Page 1

GRAMMAR AND WRITING

I N

E N G L I S H

teacher edition


Introduction: Welcome to Voyages in English .

. OV-1 Program Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . OV-2 How to Use This Program . . . . . . . . . OV-16 Independent Writing Centers . . . . . . . . OV-18

PA R T

1 Grammar Teacher Preparation SECTION

1

Sentences

2

1

Sentence Sense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Making Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Practice with Capital Letters . . . . . . . . . . 4 Telling Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Asking Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Commanding Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Exclaiming Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Conjunctions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Prepositions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Sentence Challenge . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Teacher Preparation SECTION

1a–1b

29a–29b

Nouns

29

Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Proper Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Common Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . Possessive Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . The Days of the Week . . . . . . . . . . . The Months of the Year . . . . . . . . . . . Days and Months Review . . . . . . . . . . Writing Dates Using Commas . . . . . . . . . Proper Nouns and Common Nouns Review . . . . . Compound Words . . . . . . . . . . . . Nouns in a Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noun Challenge . . . . . . . . . . . . .

30 31 35 39 41 42 44 45 47 49 54 56

Contents  •  iii


Teacher Preparation SECTION

3

Verbs

59

Action Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Verbs Ending in s . . . . . . . . . . . . . Verbs Not Ending in s . . . . . . . . . . . Action Verbs Review . . . . . . . . . . . . Has and Have . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Verbs Ending in ed . . . . . . . . . . . . Eat and Ate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Give and Gave . . . . . . . . . . . . . See and Saw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Write and Wrote . . . . . . . . . . . . . Being Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Am, Is, and Are . . . . . . . . . . . . . Was and Were . . . . . . . . . . . . . Verbs That Tell What Is Happening Now . . . . . . Verbs That Tell What Will Happen . . . . . . . . Using Vivid Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . Verb Challenge . . . . . . . . . . . . .

60 61 63 65 67 69 71 72 73 74 75 76 78 80 82 84 86

Teacher Preparation SECTION

4

iv  •  Contents

59a–59b

Pronouns and Adjectives

89a–89b 89

Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 91 The Pronoun It . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Pronouns He and She . . . . . . . . . . 92 The Pronoun I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 The Pronoun Me . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 The Pronoun You . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 The Pronouns We and They . . . . . . . . . . 97 Possessive Adjectives and Pronouns . . . . . . . 98 Indefinite Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Pronouns Review . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Adjectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Color Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Number Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Size and Shape Words . . . . . . . . . . . 108


Feeling Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Sensory Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Adjectives Ending in er and est . . . . . . . . 112 A, An, and The . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 This and That . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 These and Those . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Choosing the Right Adjective . . . . . . . . . 116 Adjectives Review . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Pronoun and Adjective Challenge . . . . . . . 122

Teacher Preparation SECTION

5

Contractions

125a–125b 125

Contractions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 The Contraction Don’t . . . . . . . . . . . 128 The Contraction Didn’t . . . . . . . . . . . 129 The Contraction Doesn’t . . . . . . . . . . 130 The Contraction Couldn’t . . . . . . . . . . 131 The Contraction Isn’t . . . . . . . . . . . 132 The Contraction Aren’t . . . . . . . . . . . 133 The Contraction Hasn’t . . . . . . . . . . . 134 The Contraction Haven’t . . . . . . . . . . 135 The Contraction Can’t . . . . . . . . . . . 136 137 The Contraction Wasn’t . . . . . . . . . . The Contraction Weren’t . . . . . . . . . . 138 Contractions Review . . . . . . . . . . . 139 The Contraction I’m . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 The Contraction I’ll . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 The Contraction It’s . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 The Contractions He’s and She’s . . . . . . . . 143 The Contractions We’re and They’re . . . . . . . 144 Contractions Review . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Contraction Challenge . . . . . . . . . . . 146

Contents  •  v


Teacher Preparation SECTION

6

Word Study

7

vi  •  Contents

149

Synonyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 Synonyms Review . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Antonyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Antonyms Review . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 Word Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Context Clues . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 Prefixes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Suffixes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 Homophones . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 The Homohones Meat-Meet and Blew-Blue . . . . . 174 The Homohones No-Know and Ate-Eight . . . . . . 175 The Homohones Sale-Sail and One-Won . . . . . . 176 The Homohones Dear-Deer and Hear-Here . . . . . 177 The Homohones See-Sea and To-Two-Too . . . . . 178 Homophones Review . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Word Study Challenge . . . . . . . . . . . 180

Teacher Preparation SECTION

149a–149b

Study Skills

183a–183b 183

ABC Order . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Dictionary Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 The Cover of a Book . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Fiction and Nonfiction . . . . . . . . . . . 191 Using the Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Study Skills Challenge . . . . . . . . . . . 196


PA R T

2 Writing Teacher Preparation CHAPTER

1

Personal Narratives

Get Ready to Write: Personal Narrative . . . . . . Writer’s Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . .

Teacher Preparation CHAPTER

2 3

Get Ready to Write: Friendly Letter . . . . . . . Writer’s Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . .

CHAPTER

4

Get Ready to Write: How-to Article . . . . . . . Writer’s Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . .

CHAPTER

5

Get Ready to Write: Description . . . . . . . . Writer’s Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . .

6

236 238 242

248a–248b

Book Reports

248 Get Ready to Write: Book Report . . . . . . . . 250 Writer’s Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . 254

Teacher Preparation CHAPTER

224 226 230

236a–236b

Descriptions Teacher Preparation

212 214 218

224a–224b

How-to Articles Teacher Preparation

200 202 206

212a–212b

Friendly Letters Teacher Preparation

CHAPTER

200a–200b

260a–260b

Research Reports

260 Get Ready to Write: Research Report . . . . . . . 262 Writer’s Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . 268 Rubrics and BLMs . . . . . . . . . . . Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . Scope and Sequence . . . . . . . . . . Common Core Correlations . . . . . . . . Proofreading Marks Chart . . . . . Inside Back

T-274 T-288 T-291 T-292 T-297 Cover

Contents  •  vii


SECTION PLANNER

1

Sentences

SECTION FOCUS • Sentence Sense • Making Sentences • Practice with Capital Letters • Telling Sentences • Asking Sentences • Commanding Sentences • Exclaiming Sentences • Conjunctions • Prepositions

SUPPORT MATERIALS Writing Chapter 1 Personal Narratives Loyola Press Online Assessment System www.voyagesinenglish.com Lesson Plans www.voyagesinenglish.com

GRAMMAR FOR GROWN-UPS Strictly Sentences A sentence consists of several parts of speech organized into a pattern that expresses a complete thought. Every sentence has two basic parts: the subject, which is the explicit or implied person, place, or thing talked about; and the predicate, which is what the subject is, has, or does. A declarative (telling) sentence makes a statement and ends with a period. An interrogative (asking) sentence asks a question and ends with a question mark. An imperative (commanding) sentence gives a command and ends with a period. An exclamatory (exclaiming) sentence expresses strong emotion and ends with an exclamation point.

INDEPENDENT WRITING CENTER ACTIVITIES Writing Center Activities give students hands-on experience exploring grammar and writing concepts. Students can work independently or in small groups to practice integrating grammar and writing skills using various learning modalities. A range of Writing Center Activities appears on pages OV-18–OV-21 of the Teacher Edition.

CONNECT WITH LITERATURE

Consider using the following titles throughout the section to illustrate the grammar concept:

Harold and the Purple Crayon by Crockett Johnson If You Take a Mouse to the Movies by Laura Numeroff

For more support on the grammar concepts, go to

voyagesinenglish.com . www.voyagesinenglish.com  •  Sentences  •  1a


Section Planner COMMON ERRORS Or “Is This a Complete Sentence?” ERROR: The cat.

Some developing writers write sentence fragments rather than complete sentences. This error occurs because young writers often forget that all sentences must express a complete thought and have a subject and a predicate.

CORRECT: The cat purrs. ERROR: Raced down the street.

Explain that a sentence must name something and show an action. Remind them to make sure each sentence is a complete thought or idea.

CORRECT: I raced down the street.

DAILY MAINTENANCE 1. To begin each day, write an incorrect sentence on the board as shown (without edits).

4. Below the edited sentence, have students write the sentence again in its correct form.

2. Have students copy the sentence in their Daily Maintenance journals.

5. Call a volunteer to the board to show how he or she edited the sentence and wrote the correct one. Guide the student to make corrections as needed.

3. Ask students to consult the Proofreading Chart on the inside back cover of the student book and use the marks to edit the sentence.

DAILY EDITS Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday many

leela sailed in a

She sailed around

sometimes Leela

she sailed for

Leela saw mny

boat.

Africa

got lost.

months.

beautiful animals.

hank looks for

Hank studies

Hank found a

special plants.

plants ina lab.

silver flower

over

in a

Fog floated ovr

A bear growled

the grass.

outside

My dog hid under the couch

1b  •  Section 1

i put out a treat

window

I ran to the windo.

do you know what happened ?

Where

Ware did he find it?

i saw a dark shape.

made

he found it on a mountain.

my

It was just mi dad!

came

I mad a ham

my dog cam out to

sandwich

share my sandwich.


PART

GRAMMAR SE

1

CTION

1 Sentences Sentence Sense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Making Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Practice with Capital Letters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Telling Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Asking Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Commanding Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Exclaiming Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Conjunctions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Prepositions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Sentence Challenge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

1


Sentence Sense OBJECTIVES • To recognize complete sentences • To place end marks at the end of sentences

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP Ask students to name three kinds of animals. On the board, list responses. Point out that this is a list of things. Then ask students to name three actions an animal can do. List responses in a second column on the board. Point out that these words tell what someone or something does.

SPEAKING AND LISTENING

ASSESS Take note of which students had difficulty recognizing complete sentences. Provide those students with additional opportunities for review and practice.

RETEACH Ask students to look through newspapers or magazines and cut out one complete sentence and part of another sentence. Invite students to share their work and explain why each group of words is or is not a sentence.

Have students practice saying complete sentences by finishing sentence starters (I, The car, The slow turtle, The horse, For my birthday).

WRITING CONNECTION Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of complete sentences in writing personal narratives.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.L.1.1 CCSS.ELA.L.1.2b CCSS.ELA.SL.1.6

TEACH Guide students through the instruction on page 2. Point out that the words on the board name things and actions, but they are not complete sentences. Review the examples. SAY: The pig is not a complete sentence. Do these words name a thing or an action? (a thing) Explain that the second example is not a complete sentence either because it only tells an action— oinked. Carry out the rest of the instruction.

PRACTICE Read aloud the directions on page 2. Have students complete the page. Together go over the work and have students make corrections.

Name Sentence Sense A sentence is a group of words that tells a complete idea. The first word in a sentence always begins with a capital letter. A sentence always ends with an end mark. This is not a complete sentence.

the pig It only names something.

The pig oinked. It names something and shows an action. Underline the group of words that is a sentence. 1. We colored the picture.

the picture

APPLY

The girl 3. eat lunch

The children eat lunch. 4. jumps rope

She jumps rope. 5. The birds make a nest.

The birds 2

2  •  Section 1

oinked It only shows an action.

This is a complete sentence.

2. The girl reads a story.

Use words from both lists on the board to write complete sentences. Read aloud the sentences. SAY: These word groups make sentences because they tell complete ideas—each names something and shows an action.

This is not a complete sentence.

• Section 1

6. plays soccer

Min plays soccer. 7. The puppy wags its tail.

The puppy 8. The moon shines at night.

shines at night 9. Pedro

Pedro made a sandwich. 10. We climbed the hill.

climbed the hill


Making Sentences OBJECTIVES • To write complete sentences • To use capital letters to begin sentences

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP On separate cards, write dog, The, walks, and a period. Then display the cards for the class. Invite a volunteer to move the cards to make a complete sentence. SAY: The capitalized word will start the sentence, and a period will end it.

TEACH

PRACTICE

On page 3, read the instruction and example. SAY: A sentence tells a complete idea. A frog hopped into the pond is a complete idea. It also begins with a capital letter and ends with an end mark. A period is one type of end mark. Guide students through tracing the letters to complete the first item. Ask a volunteer to say what capital letter begins the first sentence (L). Ask another volunteer to say what word is followed by the period (cookie).

Read aloud the directions on page 3. Have students complete the page. Together go over the work and have students make corrections.

Take note of which students had difficulty writing complete sentences. Provide those students with additional opportunities for review and practice.

RETEACH

Making Sentences

Invite students to do an action and then describe what they were doing. (I run in place.) ASK: Who is doing the action? (I am) What are you doing? (running in place)

This is a sentence.

A frog hopped into the pond. Write these words in the correct order to make sentences.

Lara

cookie

the

ate

Lara ate the cookie 2.

the

takes

Derrek

WRITING CONNECTION

.

Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of complete sentences in writing personal narratives.

bus .

3.

Mom

the

drives

car

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.L.1.1j CCSS.ELA.L.1.1b CCSS.ELA.SL.1.6

. 4.

fish

Read aloud sentences or portions of sentences from classroom books. After each, ask whether you read a complete or incomplete sentence. Ask volunteers to explain their answers.

ASSESS

Name

1.

APPLY

a

Jody

caught .

5.

buzzed

around

Bees

me .

6.

I

like

red

cherries. .

Sentences • 3

www.voyagesinenglish.com  •  Sentences  •  3


Practice with Capital Letters OBJECTIVES • To write complete sentences • To use capital letters to begin sentences

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP Review that a sentence must tell a complete thought. Invite volunteers to say sentences about themselves. Write students’ sentences on the board without end marks or initial capital letters.

ASSESS

WRITING CONNECTION

Take note of which students had difficulty recognizing that sentences begin with capital letters. Provide those students with additional opportunities for review and practice.

Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of complete sentences in writing personal narratives.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS

RETEACH Cut six pictures from magazines or print them from the Internet and display them for the class. Have students write one complete sentence for each picture. Ask students to circle the capital letter in each sentence they write. Invite them to share their sentences.

CCSS.ELA.L.1.2

TEACH SAY: What comes at the beginning of a sentence? (a capital letter) Demonstrate adding capital letters to the sentences on the board. SAY: A capital letter at the beginning of a sentence shows that the sentence is starting. Model how to add end marks to the sentences on the board. SAY: A period at the end of a sentence shows that the sentence is ending.

PRACTICE Read aloud the directions on page 4. Guide students through the first item as an example. Have students complete the page. Together go over the work and have students make corrections.

APPLY

Name Practice with Capital Letters Does each sentence begin with a capital letter? Color yes or no. 1. I went to an apple farm.

yes

no

2. there were so many trees.

yes

no

3. he picked lots of apples.

yes

no

4. The apples were red.

yes

no

5. then I went home.

yes

no

6. I made an apple pie.

yes

no

7. The pie tasted good.

yes

no

8. apple pie is my favorite dessert.

yes

no

On the board, write hens, monkeys, zebras, birds in one column and eat bananas, have stripes, make nests, lay eggs in another column. Have volunteers draw a line from the words in the first column to those in the second to make a complete thought. Have students at their desks write each complete thought as a sentence with a capital letter and a period. 4

4  •  Section 1

• Section 1


Practice with Sentences OBJECTIVE • To make complete sentences

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP Have students draw a character or scene from their favorite book and write a sentence underneath telling something about it. Write these questions on the board: Does it tell a complete thought? Does it start with a capital letter? Does it have an end mark?

TEACH

APPLY

Review the words in the word bank with students. Point out which words begin with capital letters. Model completing the first sentence and crossing out the word People in the word bank.

Have students exchange their drawings and sentences from the Warm-Up with a partner. Ask students to answer the three questions on the board about the sentences they received. Tell students that if they answer no to any question, they should fix their partners’ sentences to make them correct.

PRACTICE Read aloud the directions on page 5. Have students complete the page using the word bank. Together go over the work and have students make corrections.

ASSESS Take note of which students had difficulty recognizing that sentences begin with capital letters. Provide those students with additional opportunities for review and practice.

RETEACH Cut out simple pictures from a magazine or print them from the Internet. Gather enough pictures for each student to have one. Have students write a complete sentence about what they see in the picture.

Name Practice with Sentences Use the word bank to complete each sentence.

Joel

1.

2. Mary Jane

3.

4. Pets

5. I

6.

need

Dogs

People

walk

owns

SPEAKING AND LISTENING Encourage students to ask one another about the drawings they made in the Warm-Up activity. Have students share a detail they learned about another student’s choice of book.

have many kinds of pets. a dog. are friendly animals.

WRITING CONNECTION Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of complete sentences in writing personal narratives.

food and water. my dog every day. loves his cat.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.L.1.1 CCSS.ELA.SL.1.5 CCSS.ELA.SL.1.6

Sentences • 5

www.voyagesinenglish.com  •  Sentences  •  5


Completing Sentences OBJECTIVE • To compose a complete sentence

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP Invite volunteers to say a complete sentence. Remind students that in writing, sentences begin with a capital letter and end with an end mark.

TEACH On the board, write Joe wants a hops around Maria plants flowers Ask students which word group is a sentence. Then ask volunteers to suggest ways to complete the incomplete sentences. Write their responses on the board. As you complete the first item, ask students how to end the sentence (with an end mark). As you complete the second item, ask students how to begin the sentence (with a capital letter).

PRACTICE Read aloud the directions on page 6. Have students complete the page. Together go over the work and have students make corrections.

Take note of which students had difficulty composing complete sentences. Provide those students with additional opportunities for review and practice.

On the board, write can make complete sentences. SAY: [Your name] can make complete sentences with a capital letter at the beginning and a period at the end. Ask each student to repeat the sentence using his or her own name. Repeat as a class.

RETEACH On separate note cards, write each word from column 1 on page 6. Do the same for each word group in column 2. Give each card to a different pair of students. Have each pair find the other pair with the word group that best completes their sentence. After they have found a match, have them say the complete sentence and identify the capital letter and the end mark.

WRITING CONNECTION Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of complete sentences in writing personal narratives.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.L.1.1 CCSS.ELA.SL.1.6

Name Completing Sentences Complete the sentences. Match the words in the first list to the words in the second list. 1. Zebras

make honey.

2. Fish

spin webs.

3. Bats

have stripes.

4. Giraffes

have humps on their backs.

5. Bees

live underwater.

6. Worms

have long necks.

7. Spiders

sleep upside-down.

8. Camels

crawl underground.

APPLY Have students write a complete sentence that begins with any word other than I. Have students evaluate their sentences by answering the following questions: Does it tell a complete thought? Does it start with a capital letter? Does it have an end mark? Ask volunteers to share their complete sentences after making any necessary corrections.

6

6  •  Section 1

SPEAKING AND LISTENING

ASSESS

• Section 1


Telling Sentences OBJECTIVES • To recognize a telling sentence • To use an end mark

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP Ask several students questions about their favorite colors, foods, and places. Help students answer with complete sentences. On the board, write their responses without periods. SAY: The sentences on the board are telling sentences because students are telling things about themselves.

TEACH

PRACTICE

Discuss the explanation and example on page 7. Point out that the example is a telling sentence that tells what we did. ASK: How do telling sentences begin? (with a capital letter) What is at the end of a telling sentence? (a period) Explain that telling sentences end with an end mark called a period. Point out the period in the example. Then have volunteers add periods to each sentence on the board. Model adding a period to the first sentence on the board. Remind students that an end mark shows that a sentence is ending.

Read aloud the directions on page 7. Have students complete the page. Together go over their work.

APPLY Lead the class in reciting the poem on page 7. Then call on a volunteer to say a telling sentence and to say period when he or she reaches the end of the sentence. Repeat with additional volunteers. Allow those who would prefer to do so to offer sentences in writing rather than saying them aloud.

ASSESS Take note of which students had difficulty recognizing that telling sentences end with periods. Provide those students with additional opportunities for review and practice.

Name Telling Sentences A telling sentence tells about something. A telling sentence ends with a period ( ).

RETEACH

.

Have the class stand as you read aloud the telling sentences on page 7. Tell them to sit down at the end of each sentence and say “period.”

We played a game. Put a period at the end of each telling sentence. 1. My cat can run fast •

WRITING CONNECTION

2. The bus stops at the corner

Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of complete sentences in writing personal narratives.

3. The police officer helps us 4. Our team won the game

COMMON CORE STANDARDS

5. Rosa chased the puppy

CCSS.ELA.L.1.1 CCSS.ELA.L.1.2b

6. The funny rabbit hops 7. Toby saw the lion 8. We swim in the pool 9. This is my new bike

A little black dot that you can see, Period is my name. A telling sentence ends with me. I play a telling game.

10. Tristen flew a kite

Sentences • 7

www.voyagesinenglish.com  •  Sentences  •  7


Making Telling Sentences OBJECTIVES • To recognize that a telling sentences tells about something • To use periods as end marks

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP On the board, write The bear. Point out that this is not a complete sentence. Ask students what is missing (an action). Point out that these words do not tell anything about the bear.

MEETING INDIVIDUAL NEEDS

ASSESS

EXTRA SUPPORT  Consider writing the word-bank words on labels that students can stick in place on the page rather than having them write the words.

Take note of which students had difficulty recognizing that telling sentences end with periods. Provide those students with additional opportunities for review and practice.

WRITING CONNECTION Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of complete sentences in writing personal narratives.

RETEACH Have students take turns saying the naming parts of sentences and the matching action parts to make complete telling sentences. The students saying the naming parts should start with a capital letter (Capital S School), and the students with the action part should end by saying period (is fun period).

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.L.1.1j CCSS.ELA.L.1.2

TEACH Invite volunteers to suggest words that could make The bear a complete sentence and write them on the board without end marks. Point out that these are telling sentences. Ask students what end mark should be placed at the end of each telling sentence (a period). Invite volunteers to add periods to the sentences on the board.

Name Making Telling Sentences Complete each telling sentence. Use the correct word from the word bank. Put a period at the end of each sentence.

opened

carry

plays

fixed

lie

ate

rides flew

PRACTICE Read aloud the directions on page 8. Have students complete the page. Together go over the work. Read aloud the Writer’s Corner. Allow time for writing. Encourage volunteers to share their sentences.

1. Carmen 2. Snakes 3. I

a bike in the sun my umbrella on rainy days

4. The spaceship

APPLY On the board, write is big. Ask students what is missing to make this word group a complete sentence (the naming part). Invite volunteers to name things that are big. Write their suggestions on the board. Have students make a complete telling sentence using the words is big, a word from the list, a capital letter, and an end mark.

5. Devon 6. Rudy 7. Dad 8. The monkey

baseball the door a broken toy a banana

Writer’s Corner Write a telling sentence about a bike. 8

8  •  Section 1

to the moon

• Section 1


Asking Sentences OBJECTIVES • To recognize asking sentences • To use question marks as end marks

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP Choose an object in the room and have students guess what it is by asking questions. (Is it square? Is it red?) Ask volunteers to do the same. Be sure that students form their questions as complete asking sentences. Write students’ questions on the board.

TEACH

PRACTICE

Explain that questions are a type of sentence called asking sentences. Remind students that all sentences begin with a capital letter and end with an end mark. SAY: A question mark is the end mark for an asking sentence. Draw a box around the question marks on the board. Then write a series of asking sentences without question marks, using who, what, when, where, why, and how. Have volunteers add question marks.

Read aloud the directions on page 9. Have students complete the page. Go over the work, paying attention to how students are forming the question marks. Allow for additional practice if necessary.

APPLY Lead the class in reciting the poem on page 9. Ask to what the poem is referring (question mark). Then call on a student to say an asking sentence and to say question mark at the end of the sentence. Repeat with additional volunteers. Challenge students to try to move their bodies into the shape of question marks.

ASSESS Name

Take note of which students had difficulty recognizing that asking sentences end with question marks. Provide those students with additional opportunities for review and practice.

Asking Sentences Some sentences ask a question. An asking sentence ends with a question mark (?).

Where is the library? Put a question mark at the end of each asking sentence. 1. What is the name of your teacher

RETEACH

?

Have students write their own asking sentences that begin with who, what, when, where, why, or how. Remind them to begin each sentence with a capital letter and end each with a question mark.

2. What did you say 3. Which book did you read 4. How many legs does a spider have 5. When is your birthday 6. What games do you play 7. Is your coat blue

?

?

? ?

ENGLISH-LANGUAGE LEARNERS

?

Students may need extra practice identifying asking sentences if their home language indicates a question with a punctuation mark at the beginning of a sentence.

?

8. Can you a ride a bike 9. Where do you live 10. Do you like peas

WRITING CONNECTION I am a squiggle on your page with a little dot below. At the end of each asking sentence, Will you place me just so?

Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of different sentence types in writing personal narratives.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS Sentences • 9

CCSS.ELA.L.1.2

www.voyagesinenglish.com  •  Sentences  •  9


Making Asking Sentences OBJECTIVES • To use question words in asking sentences • To use question marks in asking sentences

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP SAY: Have you ever been curious about something or wondered about something? Allow time for a number of volunteers to respond. Guide students to give their responses in the form of asking sentences. (How does the Internet work? What happens to leftover food at restaurants?)

TEACH On the board, write the list of question words on page 10 using all lowercase letters. Have the class repeat after you as you read each word aloud. SAY: These words are called question words and are often used to start questions.

PRACTICE Read aloud the directions on page 10. Have students complete the page.

APPLY Have each student draw a large question mark on a sheet of paper. Read aloud the poem “What Is Pink?” by Christina Rossetti. Ask students to hold up their question marks whenever they hear an asking sentence.

ASSESS Take note of which students had difficulty recognizing that asking sentences end with question marks. Provide those students with additional opportunities for review and practice. 10  •  Section 1

RETEACH

MEETING INDIVIDUAL NEEDS

Cut out six pictures from magazines or print them from the Internet and display them for the class. Have students write one asking sentence for each picture using a different question word.

EXTRA SUPPORT  Consider having students make a list of question words and tape it to their desks. They can refer to the list when saying or writing asking sentences.

ENGLISH-LANGUAGE LEARNERS

WRITING CONNECTION Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of different sentence types in writing personal narratives.

In a small group, ask a question of each student. Give students an opportunity to form their own questions that start with a question word.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.L.1.1

Name Making Asking Sentences An asking sentence often begins with a question word. Look at the question words in the honey pot. Write the correct question word for each sentence.

1.

makes honey?

2.

does honey taste like?

3.

is honey made?

4.

is the beehive?

5.

is the honey jar?

6.

happened to the honey?

7.

is the honey jar empty?

8.

can we eat the honey?

9.

takes care of the bees?

Who What

can we have more honey?

10. 10

• Section 1

When

Where Why How


Find the Asking Sentences OBJECTIVES • To identify asking sentences • To use question marks as end marks • To identify telling sentences • To use periods as end marks

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP On the board, write What do pandas eat? Pandas eat bamboo. Recess starts after lunch. When does recess start? Ask a volunteer to identify a telling sentence. Ask another to identify an asking sentence. Repeat with the remaining sentences.

TEACH

PRACTICE

Remind students that a telling sentence tells about something and ends with a period and that an asking sentence asks a question and ends with a question mark. Invite a volunteer to offer another clue to what signals an asking sentence (a question word). ASK: What is your favorite food? Ask a number of volunteers to offer their responses. Point out that you just used an asking sentence and their responses were telling sentences.

Read aloud the directions on page 11. Have students complete the page. Together go over the work. Read aloud the Writer’s Corner. Remind students about books they have read in class. Allow time for writing. Encourage volunteers to share their sentences.

Name Find the Asking Sentences

The children are at the zoo. 2. The seals eat fish

What do the seals eat 3. Where are the seals

The seals are in the water 4. The zookeeper has a pail of fish

Who has a pail of fish

On the board, write Who  ,  , Where  , When  , What  , Why  . Invite a volunteer to How write a complete asking sentence about your school using these words as starters and question marks as end marks. Ask other volunteers to provide answers to the questions in the form of complete telling sentences. (Who is our teacher? Mr. Ramirez is our teacher.)

ASSESS

Underline each asking sentence. Then add a question mark. Add a period to each telling sentence. 1. Where are the children?

APPLY

Take note of which students had difficulty forming asking sentences. Provide those students with additional opportunities for review and practice.

5. The children like the seals

Who likes the seals 6. Who feeds the seals

The zookeeper feeds the seals

RETEACH Working in pairs, have one student act as interviewer and one as interviewee. Instruct the interviewer to ask three questions about a fun experience the interviewee had. Invite the interviewee to answer with complete telling sentences. Then ask the students to switch roles.

7. What do the seals do

The seals bark and swim 8. The children smile and laugh

What do the children do

WRITING CONNECTION Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of different sentence types in writing personal narratives.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS

Writer’s Corner Write an asking sentence about a book.

CCSS.ELA.L.1.2b CCSS.ELA.SL.1.6

Sentences • 11

www.voyagesinenglish.com  •  Sentences  •  11


Asking and Telling Sentences OBJECTIVE • To distinguish between asking and telling sentences

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP Review that asking sentences ask questions and that telling sentences tell about something. SAY: Telling sentences are good sentences to use to answer asking sentences. On the board, write three asking sentences. Have volunteers offer answers. On the board, write students’ answers as telling sentences.

ASSESS

WRITING CONNECTION

Take note of which students had difficulty distinguishing between a telling sentence and an asking sentence. Provide additional opportunities for review and practice.

Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of different sentence types in writing personal narratives.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS

RETEACH Designate one corner of the classroom as the asking corner and another as the telling corner. Read lines from the book Green Eggs and Ham. Direct students to move to the asking side when they hear an asking sentence or move to the telling side if they hear a telling sentence.

CCSS.ELA.L.1.1

TEACH Have the class form two groups— one asking and one telling. Call on a member of the asking group to direct an asking sentence to a member of the telling group. Have the student from the telling group answer the asking sentence with a telling sentence. Then ask the same student to direct a telling sentence to a member of the asking group. The asking group then says another asking sentence. Continue until everyone has had a turn.

PRACTICE Read aloud the directions on page 12. Have students complete the page. Together go over the work.

APPLY

Name Asking and Telling Sentences Match the asking sentence in the first list to the telling sentence in the second list. 1. How many planets are

there in our solar system? 2. What is the largest

July is a hot month.

animal? 3. What animal lays eggs?

An elephant has a long trunk.

4. What has a long trunk?

There are eight planets.

5. What month is hot?

A hen lays eggs.

6. What animal has a shell?

The planet, Saturn, has rings.

7. What planet has rings?

A turtle has a shell.

On separate sentence strips, write the sentences from page 12. Mix them up. Have volunteers place asking sentences on the left side of the board and telling sentences on the right. Next have volunteers match each asking sentence to a telling sentence. 12

12  •  Section 1

The whale is the largest animal.

• Section 1


Writing Telling Sentences OBJECTIVES • To write telling sentences • To use appropriate end punctuation

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP Ask a volunteer to explain what a telling sentence is. (A telling sentence tells about something.) Ask others to give examples of telling sentences. Remind students that a telling sentence begins with a capital letter and ends with a period.

TEACH

APPLY

Have students draw pictures. After the drawings are complete, have them write a telling sentence about it. Invite volunteers to share their sentences and drawings. Consider displaying students’ work on a bulletin-board display.

Ask students to name a person or animal. On the board, write student responses. SAY: Pick one person or animal from the list and write a telling sentence about it. Have students trade their sentence with a partner and draw and color pictures that illustrate the other person’s sentence. Invite volunteers to share their sentences and drawings.

PRACTICE Read aloud the directions on page 13. Have students complete the page. Together go over the work.

ASSESS Take note of which students had difficulty writing telling sentences. Provide additional opportunities for review and practice.

RETEACH On separate note cards, write hear, look, come, play, catch, and dance. Ask a volunteer to choose a card and role-play that word for the class. Ask students to guess his or her action using telling sentences. Write the sentences on the board.

Name Writing Telling Sentences Use each word in a telling sentence. Put a period at the end of each sentence. 1.

hear

2.

look

3.

come

4.

play

5.

catch

6.

MEETING INDIVIDUAL NEEDS

We hear the music.

EXTRA SUPPORT Provide sentence frames for students who are having difficulty writing sentences as called for on page 13.

WRITING CONNECTION Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of different sentence types in writing personal narratives.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.L.1.1j CCSS.ELA.L.1.2b CCSS.ELA.SL.1.5

dance

Sentences • 13

www.voyagesinenglish.com  •  Sentences  •  13


Writing Asking Sentences OBJECTIVES • To write asking sentences • To use question marks

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP Place a common object in a bag. Have students ask questions to help guess what the object is. As students guess, write several of their asking sentences on the board. Repeat with other objects.

MEETING INDIVIDUAL NEEDS

ASSESS Take note of which students had difficulty writing asking sentences. Provide additional opportunities for review and practice.

EXTRA SUPPORT  Provide sentence frames and/or a word bank of question words as support for students who are struggling to write complete sentences.

WRITING CONNECTION

RETEACH Have students find examples of telling and asking sentences in classroom reading materials. Invite volunteers to read aloud the sentences they find and to tell what kind of sentence each is and what end mark it has.

Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of different sentence types in writing personal narratives.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.L.1.1j CCSS.ELA.L.1.2b

TEACH Use the sentences you wrote on the board to review that asking sentences begin with capital letters and end with question marks. Next, have each student silently choose an object in the classroom visible to everyone. Ask a volunteer to say, I see something that is [round, red, small, etc.]. Invite another student to pose an asking sentence that will help identify the object. Continue in this way. Consider requiring that the first two questions not begin with Is.

Name Writing Asking Sentences Use each word in an asking sentence. Put a question mark at the end of each sentence.

PRACTICE Read aloud the directions on page 14. Have students complete the page. Together go over the work.

APPLY On the board, write Question Words and the words who, what, when, where, why, how, did, do, will, would, could, and is. SAY: Asking sentences often begin with question words. Write two asking sentences, each beginning with a different question word. Remember to start with a capital letter and end with a question mark.

1.

book

2.

school

3.

crossing guard

4.

umbrella

5.

car

6.

street

14

14  •  Section 1

Where is my book?

• Section 1


Commanding Sentences OBJECTIVES • To recognize commanding sentences • To use periods as end marks

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP Invite volunteers to give a telling sentence, an asking sentence, and a commanding sentence. On the board, write student responses. (The apple smells good. What does it smell like? Take a bite.)

TEACH

PRACTICE

Use the first two examples in the Warm-Up to review that a telling sentence tells about something and that an asking sentence asks a question. Point to the third sentence. SAY: This sentence tells someone to do something. Explain that when you tell someone to do something, you are saying a commanding sentence. Go over the teaching and example on page 15. SAY: The example sentence tells someone to tie his or her shoe.

Read aloud the directions on page 15. Have students complete the page. Together go over the work.

Name Commanding Sentences Some sentences tell people what to do. These sentences are called commanding sentences. A commanding sentence ends with a period ( ).

.

Tie your shoe.

1. Come here, please •

ASSESS

RETEACH

2. Write your name on the board

Review classroom rules. SAY: Each rule is an example of a commanding sentence that ends with a period. Alternatively, have students write their own rules in the form of commanding sentences.

3. Go to the front of the bus 4. Please feed the goldfish 5. Open the door slowly

7. Eat slowly

Lead the class in reciting the poem on page 15. Then call on a student to say a commanding sentence and to say period when he or she reaches the end of the sentence. Repeat with additional volunteers. On the board, write commanding sentences, such as Pat your head, Close your eyes, and Raise your hand, without end marks. SAY: Just like telling sentences, commanding sentences end with periods. Read aloud each commanding sentence in turn and have the class perform the actions. Next, have volunteers add periods to the end of each commanding sentence on the board.

Take note of which students had difficulty recognizing commanding sentences. Provide additional opportunities for review and practice.

Put a period at the end of each commanding sentence.

6. Stop at the corner

APPLY

Commanding Sentence is my name. Giving directions is my aim. I help you know the things to do at home, at play, and in school too!

8. Walk quickly during the fire drill 9. Please close the door

WRITING CONNECTION Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of different sentence types in writing personal narratives.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.L.1.2b

10. Put the book away

Sentences • 15

www.voyagesinenglish.com  •  Sentences  •  15


Find the Commanding Sentences OBJECTIVES • To use question marks as end marks • To use periods as end marks • To recognize commanding sentences

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP On the board, write the directions for a simple recipe. Ask a volunteer to identify the type of sentences used in a recipe (commanding). SAY: Commanding sentences tell people what to do. These sentences begin with capital letters and end with periods.

TEACH Ahead of time, type and print out 30 different simple sentences. Include telling, asking, and commanding sentences. Cut each sentence into a separate strip. Label three cups telling, asking, and commanding, respectively. One at a time, invite students to take a strip of paper and read it aloud, or you read it. Have the class “vote” on what kind of sentence it is. Then have the student place the strip in the appropriate cup. Save the strips for use in the Teach activity on page 18.

RETEACH

APPLY Take one strip out of the commanding cup and one from either the telling or asking cups used in the Teach activity. Read each sentence aloud. Ask a volunteer to identify which is the commanding sentence. Repeat until all the commanding sentences have been used.

ASSESS Take note of which students had difficulty recognizing a commanding sentence. Provide those students with additional opportunities for review and practice.

Provide students with real-life examples of commanding sentences by bringing in or calling students’ attention to directions in textbooks; driving directions; classroom, family, or game rules.

WRITING CONNECTION Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of different sentence types in writing personal narratives.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.L.1.1j CCSS.ELA.L.1.2b

Name Find the Commanding Sentences Underline each commanding sentence. Then add the correct end mark to each sentence. 1. Follow the leader .

5. Hold on to your balloon

Where are we going?

The band plays a song

2. Watch your step, please

6. The man plays the drum

When does the parade start 3. How big is the elephant

Eat your ice cream quickly 4. Look at the giant drum

The balloons are colorful

PRACTICE

Stop here, please 7. The clowns make me laugh

Tell me a joke 8. Dance with me

The tuba is shiny

Read aloud the directions on page 16. Have students complete the page. Together go over the work. Read aloud the Writer’s Corner. Allow time for writing. Encourage volunteers to share their sentences.

Writer’s Corner Write a commanding sentence about a door. 16

16  •  Section 1

• Section 1


Exclaiming Sentences OBJECTIVES • To recognize exclaiming sentences • To use exclamation points as end marks

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP On the board, write It is raining without an end mark. Have a volunteer read the sentence aloud. Then have a volunteer read the sentence as though he or she were excited or surprised that it is raining.

TEACH

PRACTICE

SAY: There is a way to show excitement or surprise in writing. It’s by writing exclaiming sentences. Exclaiming sentences end with an exclamation point. Write an exclamation point at the end of the sentence on the board and say the sentence aloud with excitement. Ask students to name things that might startle them, such as a car horn, a school bell, or a dog’s bark. Guide students through the instruction on page 17.

Read aloud the directions on page 17. Have students complete the page.

APPLY Lead the class in reciting the poem on page 17. Ask volunteers to give examples of exclaiming sentences they might say when excited or surprised. Write the suggested sentences on the board without end marks. Have the student who suggested each sentence say the sentence with excitement or surprise and add the exclamation point.

ASSESS Take note of which students had difficulty recognizing exclaiming sentences. Provide those students with additional opportunities for review and practice.

Name Exclaiming Sentences Some sentences show surprise or excitement. These sentences are called exclaiming sentences. An exclaiming sentence ends with an exclamation point (!).

RETEACH

It is so hot today! Put an exclamation point at the end of each sentence. 1. Lydia caught a huge fish

!

2. Look at the giant rainbow

!

! ! !

!

My name is Exclamation Point. Now if you are very wise, you will put me at the end of each sentence of surprise.

!

3. Here comes the train 4. That is a funny bird

Invite students to find pictures in magazines or from the Internet of things that excite or surprise them. Have students glue the images to a sheet of construction paper to make a collage. Then ask students to draw a large exclamation point at the top of the collage.

WRITING CONNECTION Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of different sentence types in writing personal narratives.

5. The stars are very bright tonight

COMMON CORE STANDARDS

6. The music is too loud

CCSS.ELA.L.1.2b

7. The birthday cake is delicious 8. The water is too cold 9. I did it 10. The snow is so deep

Sentences • 17

www.voyagesinenglish.com  •  Sentences  •  17


Find the Exclaiming Sentences OBJECTIVES • To identify exclaiming sentences • To use appropriate end punctuation

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP Read aloud from the book Exclamation Mark! by Amy Krouse Rosenthal.

TEACH Ahead of time, type and print out 10 different exclaiming sentences. Add these to the ones you created for the Teach activity on page 16. Ask volunteers to choose a strip of paper, read aloud the sentence written on it, and tell whether the sentence is a telling sentence, an asking sentence, a commanding sentence, or an exclaiming sentence. Invite students to tell how they knew the answers. Write the exclaiming sentences on the board and point out that each begins with a capital letter and ends with an exclamation point.

ASSESS

WRITING CONNECTION

Note which students had difficulty distinguishing among the sentence types. Provide additional opportunities for review and practice.

Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of different sentence types in writing personal narratives.

RETEACH Have each student fold a sheet of paper in half lengthwise. On the separate resulting pages, invite them to write Type of Sentence, Begins with, Ends with, Example. Have them complete each starter with information about telling sentences. (Type of Sentence: Telling. Begins with a capital letter. Ends with a period. Example: Santo likes turtles.) Repeat this for asking, commanding, and exclaiming sentences.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.L.1.2b

Name Find the Exclaiming Sentences Underline each exclaiming sentence. Then add the correct end mark to each sentence. 1. The dolphin is in the water .

Orgo is here ! 2. How do dolphins jump

Orgo swims so fast

PRACTICE Read aloud the directions on page 18. Have students complete the page. Together go over the work. Read aloud the Writer’s Corner. Allow time for writing. Encourage volunteers to share their sentences.

3. That was a loud splash

What is she doing 4. She is a very brave trainer

Orgo does tricks for the trainer 5. Who got splashed

I am all wet 6. Orgo is a wonderful dolphin

APPLY On the board, write a sample sentence for each of the four sentence types. Ask students what all four sentence types have in common. (They begin with capital letters, tell a complete idea, end with an end mark.) Have students write four sentences of their own, one for each type.

Orgo jumps and spins 7. Hurrah for Orgo

Everyone claps for Orgo 8. I enjoyed watching Orgo

It was so much fun to see Orgo

Writer’s Corner Write an exclaiming sentence about thunder. 18

18  •  Section 1

• Section 1


Scrambled Sentences OBJECTIVE • To use periods, exclamation points, and question marks appropriately

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP Display a picture of a farm, city, or zoo scene. Have students write one of each kind of sentence about the scene. Have volunteers stand beside the picture and read their sentences. Ask the class to identify the kind of sentence the volunteer reads.

TEACH

PRACTICE

On the board, draw four columns. Write telling sentence, asking sentence, commanding sentence, exclaiming sentence at the top of each column, respectively. Have volunteers tell the definition of each kind of sentence. Ask other volunteers to suggest examples of each type of sentence. List their suggestions on the board without end marks. Ask students which end mark goes with each kind of sentence. Invite volunteers to add the correct end marks to the sentences on the board.

Read aloud the directions on page 19. Have students complete the page. Together go over the work.

APPLY On separate note cards, write the words capital letter (on 8 cards), telling sentence (2), asking sentence (2), commanding sentence (2), exclaiming sentence (2), period (4), question mark (2), and exclamation point (2). Give one card to each student. Have students work together to make “complete” sentences (capital letter card + sentence type card + end mark card).

ASSESS Note which students had difficulty unscrambling the words to make complete sentences. Provide those students with additional opportunities for review and practice.

Name Scrambled Sentences Unscramble these words to make sentences. Remember, a sentence always begins with a capital letter. A sentence ends with a period ( ), a question mark (?), or an exclamation point (! ).

.

1.

the

you

piano

can

RETEACH On individual sticky notes, write each word in the scrambled sentences from page 19. Write different end marks on additional sticky notes. Model how to unscramble the words and place the correct punctuation mark. Invite volunteers to unscramble other sentences.

play

Can you play the piano? 2.

with

come

me

WRITING CONNECTION 3.

your

4.

for

address

out

is

look

Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of different sentence types in writing personal narratives.

what

ball

the

COMMON CORE STANDARDS 5.

am

years

6.

the

scissors

six

old

with

CCSS.ELA.L.1.1j CCSS.ELA.L.1.2b

I

be

careful

Sentences • 19

www.voyagesinenglish.com  •  Sentences  •  19


Sentences to Complete OBJECTIVES • To identify different sentence types • To use appropriate end marks

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP Distribute books from the classroom library to each student or pairs of students. Invite students to read aloud sentences from the books and point out the punctuation.

TEACH On the board or on a sheet of paper taped to the floor, draw a highway with four exit ramps. On the highway, write Types of Sentences. Label the ramps Asking, Commanding, Exclaiming, and Telling. Then draw a road sign at the beginning of each ramp with the corresponding questions: Does it ask a question? Does it tell people to do something? Does it show excitement? Does it tell about something? Say a sentence and ask a volunteer to drive a toy car along the highway and to choose the correct exit ramp. Repeat with other volunteers and kinds of sentences.

PRACTICE Read aloud the directions on page 20. Have students complete the page. Together go over the work.

RETEACH

APPLY ASK: When do we use telling

sentences? (when we want to give information) When do we use asking sentences? (when we want to get information) When do we use commanding sentences? (when we need to direct someone to do something) When do we use exclaiming sentences? (when we want to show excitement or surprise)

ASSESS Note which students had difficulty completing sentences. Brainstorm with the student possible answers and present those as a word bank.

WRITING CONNECTION Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of different sentence types in writing personal narratives.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.L.1.2b

Name Sentences to Complete .

Complete each sentence. Put a period ( ), a question mark (?), or an exclamation point (!) at the end of each sentence.

1. What is your favorite

2. The boys can jump

3. That is a scary

4. Please button your

5. How do you play

6. Those flowers are so

7. Please wash your

8. Iris likes to

20

20  •  Section 1

Divide the class into four groups, one for each sentence type. Have each group write a riddle about a different type of sentence. Have each group say their riddles for the class.

• Section 1

color?


More Sentences to Complete OBJECTIVES • To identify different sentence types • To use appropriate end marks

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP On the board, draw a large flower with four petals and a big circle in the middle. Write a different sentence type on each petal. Ask students to give suggestions to fill in the petal with features, end punctuation, and examples of each type. In the circle, write Starts with a capital letter. Tells a complete idea. Ends with an end mark.

TEACH

PRACTICE

Have students work in small groups, each with a different picture cut out of a magazine or printed from the Internet. Have students write one telling sentence, one asking sentence, one commanding sentence, and one exclaiming sentence that relates to the picture. Have a volunteer from the group read their sentences to the class. If time allows, have each group trade pictures and write four sentences about the new picture.

Read aloud the directions on page 21. Have students complete the page. Together go over the work.

APPLY SAY: What sentence type would

you use to give information? (telling sentence) To get information? (asking sentence) To direct someone to do something? (commanding sentence) To show excitement or surprise? (exclaiming sentence)

ASSESS Note which students had difficulty completing sentences. Brainstorm with the student possible answers and present those as a word bank.

Name

RETEACH

More Sentences to Complete Complete each sentence. Put a period (.), a question

Divide the class into four groups, one for each sentence type. Assign a different sentence type to each group. Using a wire hanger, have each group make a mobile about the assigned sentence type. Have students cover the hanger’s opening with paper and write the sentence type and definition. The mobiles should include sample sentences written on strips of construction paper that hang down on ribbon or string from the hanger. Encourage students to be creative.

mark (?), or an exclamation point (!) at the end of each sentence.

1. My name is

2. This soup is too

3. Where is the

WRITING CONNECTION

4. Comb your

Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of different sentence types in writing personal narratives.

5. I like to

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.L.1.1j CCSS.ELA.L.1.2b

6. When do you

7. Close the

8. It is really

Sentences • 21

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The Conjunctions And, Or OBJECTIVES • To identify and use the conjunction or • To identify and use the conjunction and

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP On separate note cards, write words that go together (bike/helmet, lock/key, table/chair). On several additional cards, write the word and. Ask volunteers to select pairs of cards that go together. Have them read the pairs and say the word and in between (bike and helmet).

ASSESS

WRITING CONNECTION Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of conjunctions in sentences.

Take note of which students had difficulty using the conjunctions and and or. Provide additional opportunities for review and practice.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS

RETEACH

CCSS.ELA.L.1.1g

Have students in groups of three choose two sports or games. Help pairs write two sentences about the sports or games, one using the conjunction and and one using or. (Angel likes cards and board games.) Have each group read aloud the two sentences and the combined sentence.

TEACH Guide students through the instruction and the example sentences. Ask students to make other sentences using the conjunction and. Then guide them through the instruction with or. Ask them to make other sentences using or. ASK: What do conjunctions do? (They join together words.)

PRACTICE Read aloud the directions on page 22. Have students complete the page. As a class, go over each sentence and have students make corrections as necessary.

Name The Conjunctions And, Or A conjunction is a word that joins together words in a sentence. The words and and or are conjunctions.

I eat apples.

I eat bananas.

These two sentences can be joined into one using the word and.

I eat apples

and

bananas.

The word and joins the word apples and the word bananas.

You can choose a red cup. You can choose a purple cup. These two sentences can be joined together into one by adding the word or.

You can choose a red

or

purple cup.

The word or joins the words red and purple.

APPLY Write on the board Cats and dogs are good pets. Alma’s new pet is a gerbil or a hamster. Read aloud the first sentence. Ask students to tell what word joins together cats and dogs (and). Then read aloud the second sentence and ask what word joins together gerbil and hamster. SAY: Conjunctions join together words or groups of words. And and or are conjunctions.

Circle the correct word to complete each sentence. 1. Use a mitt (and 2. Pitchers (and

or) catchers both work hard.

3. Is your favorite sport baseball (and 4. We wear hats (and

• Section 1

or) soccer?

or) T-shirts.

5. Do you like to catch (and

22

22  •  Section 1

or) a ball to play catch.

or) pitch better?


The Conjunction But OBJECTIVE • To identify and use the conjunction but

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP Show a brief, appropriate video clip or photo of someone ice-skating. Write on the board Ice-skating is fun but hard. Read the sentence aloud. Ask volunteers to say other things they think are fun but hard.

TEACH

APPLY

SAY: The word but joins together words in a sentence. Write on the board My dog is small but strong. Some cats are shy but cuddly. Guide students through the instruction and examples on page 23.

With students working in pairs, have one student write the first half of a sentence using the word but (The grass is soft but). Have the other member of the pair complete that sentence. (The grass is soft but wet.) Have them switch which part of the sentence each writes. Ask volunteers to read the sentence aloud. On the board, write the sentences and underline the word but.

PRACTICE Read aloud the directions on page 23. Have students complete the page. Then ask volunteers to share their answers.

ASSESS Take note of which students had difficulty using the conjunction but. Provide those students with additional opportunities for review and practice.

RETEACH

Name

On the board, write What I like and What I don’t like. Have students say things they liked or did not like about books you’ve read as a class. Record the suggestions on the board. Have students write sentences using something from the What I like column and something from What I don’t like column and the word but. (Crazy Hair Day is good but silly.)

The Conjunction But A conjunction is a word that joins together words in a sentence. The word but is a conjunction.

She likes rain but not snow. He likes swimming but not running. Underline the conjunction but in each sentence. Then complete each sentence using words from the word bank.

pets

eat

deer

1. The

hurt

warm

hat

WRITING CONNECTION

tire

Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of the conjunction but.

is small but quick.

2. The bike is new but has a flat

COMMON CORE STANDARDS

.

CCSS.ELA.L.1.1g 3. Paulo got lunch but did not

it.

4. The summer was wet but

.

5. Ramona has a coat but not a

6. He fell but was not

7. Ty has a goldfish but no other

. . .

Sentences • 23

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The Prepositions To, From OBJECTIVES • To identify and use the preposition to • To identify and use the preposition from

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP Have students stand in a circle and pass around a book. SAY: [Tia] gave the book to [Luis]. [Luis] got the book from [Tia]. Continue in this way until everyone has had a turn.

ASSESS

WRITING CONNECTION

Write sentences on sentence strips that can be completed using the words to or from. (We go school in the morning. We borrow the library.) Have books students complete the strips.

Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of the prepositions to and from.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.L.1.1i

RETEACH Ask one volunteer at a time to perform commands as you say them. (Stand up and walk to the door. Walk from the door to my desk. Give a pencil to Hanna. Take a book from Ben.)

TEACH SAY: The words to and from are used in sentences to show movement and action. On the board write [Tia] gave the book to [Luis]. [Luis] got the book from [Tia]. SAY: In the sentences on the board, the word to tells us where the book is going and the word from tells us where it was. Guide students through the instruction and examples on page 24.

PRACTICE Read aloud the directions for the exercise on page 24. Have students complete the exercise. Together go over the items and have students make corrections.

APPLY Have students cut out pictures from newspapers or magazines that show people or animals coming or going and glue them to a sheet of lined writing paper. Ask them to write a sentence that uses to or from to go along with the picture they found.

Name The Prepositions To, From The words to and from are used in sentences to show movement and action.

Jorge gives the book to Elena. The word to tells where the book is going—to Elena.

Anna walks to school. The word to tells where Anna walks—to school.

Elena takes the book from Jorge. The word from tells where Elana got the book—from Jorge.

Jesse walks home from school. The word from tells where Jesse walks—from school. Complete each sentence with to or from. 1. Keisha asked five friends

her party.

2. Her friends gave presents

her.

3. People 4. Her grandparents came

far away.

5. Her uncle brought food

the party.

6. Keisha’s aunt traveled

24

24  •  Section 1

her family came.

• Section 1

New York to the party.


The Prepositions Before, After OBJECTIVES • To identify and use the preposition before • To identify and use the preposition after

DAILY MAINTENANCE Follow the directions on page 1b.

WARM-UP Ask students to name things teachers do at the beginning of the school day (unlock the door, turn on the lights, write assignments on the board, take attendance) . Then ask volunteers to make up sentences using before and after to describe the order in which each task is performed.

TEACH

PRACTICE

Write on the board Before the bell, I turn on the lights. After I take attendance, we read for 10 minutes. ASK: Which word helps you know when I turn on the lights? (before) Which word helps you know when we read? (after) Guide students through the instruction and the examples on page 25.

Read aloud the directions to the exercise on page 25. Have students complete the page. Ask students to exchange papers. Review the examples and have partners correct each other’s papers.

Perform three actions, such as pick up a marker, write on the board, sit down. ASK: What did I do before I wrote on the board? (I picked up a marker.) What did I do after I wrote on the board? (I sat down.) Invite a volunteer to pantomime or perform three actions. Ask students to make up sentences using before and after to describe what they saw.

ASSESS

Name

Take note of which students had difficulty using the prepositions before and after. Provide those students with additional opportunities for review and practice.

The Prepositions Before, After The words before and after are used in sentences to show the order of things.

We wash our hands before eating. We have silent reading time after lunch. A

RETEACH

Complete each sentence with before or after.

1. The green fish comes 2. The red fish comes

B

APPLY

Take photos of things the class does during the school day, such as math, reading, and circle time. Print out the photos and make picture cards. Ask volunteers to put the cards in the correct order. Then ask them to work in pairs to write sentences using the words before and after to describe their day. (Before lunch we do math. After lunch we read for 10 minutes.)

the purple fish. the yellow fish.

3. The yellow fish comes

the red fish.

4. The green fish comes

the blue fish.

WRITING CONNECTION Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of the prepositions before and after in sentences.

Complete each sentence with before or after. 1. I put on my socks 2. We wash the dishes

my shoes. dinner.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS 3. Put your boots on 4. Joanna ate breakfast

CCSS.ELA.L.1.1i

going out in the snow. class. Sentences • 25

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Sentence Challenge OBJECTIVES • To recognize the four types of sentences • To use the correct end mark for each type of sentence

ALTERNATIVE ASSESSMENT

ASSESS Explain the directions for each exercise. Assist students if necessary. When students have finished each exercise, review their answers. Sentence Challenge may be used as a review or as a test.

In addition to these Challenge pages and the available online assessments for this section, consider adding other forms of assessment, such as observations, performances, or portfolios to track students’ progress.

Online Assessment After you have reviewed Section 1: Sentences, administer the section assessment or create a customized test using the optional Loyola Press Online Assessment System.

Name Sentence Challenge Read each sentence. Write t for telling, a for asking, c for commanding, or e for exclaiming. 1. What day of the week is it?

2. Go to the store, Kerry.

3. Brenda is going camping.

4. Catch the football.

5. Andy will be so surprised!

6. Can elephants swim?

7. The squirrel ran up the tree.

8. Will you tell a story?

9. I saw a falling star!

10. This is a great show!

26

26  •  Section 1

• Section 1

a


Sentence Challenge WRITING CONNECTION Use pages 200–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Emphasize the use of different types of complete sentences in writing personal narratives.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.L.1.2

Name Sentence Challenge .

Read each sentence. Put a period ( ), a question mark (?), or an exclamation point (!) at the end of each sentence. 1. The noisy train went up the hill

.

2. Did the train go up the hill

3. This is such a noisy train

4. We had so much fun at the party

5. Who went to the birthday party

6. Colleen likes vanilla ice cream

7. Clean your room, please

8. Here comes the rain

9. Hold your umbrella tightly

10. Is the sun shining

Sentences • 27

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Sentence Challenge, continued Online Assessment After you have reviewed Section 1: Sentences, administer the section assessment or create a customized test using the optional Loyola Press Online Assessment System.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.L.1.1g

Name Sentence Challenge A

Underline the conjunction in each sentence. 1. Lin grows carrots and lettuce. 2. Peppers are yummy but can be spicy. 3. Squash is small but heavy. 4. Should Vin plant beans or peas? 5. Luz likes both peas and beans. 6. I like watering the garden but not picking weeds. 7. Do you like watering or picking weeds better? 8. Mark grows corn and beans. 9. Do you like corn or carrots better? 10. There are ladybugs and bees in the garden.

B

Complete each sentence using to, from, before, or after. 1. Mai put on the puppy’s leash

his walk.

2. She throws a ball

the puppy.

3. The puppy learns tricks 4. She gives a treat 5.

28

28  •  Section 1

Mai. him.

the puppy’s walk, Mai takes off his leash.

• Section 1


PART

WRITING

2

CHAPTER 1

Personal Narratives . . . . . . . . . . 200

CHAPTER 2

Friendly Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212

CHAPTER 3

How-to Articles . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224

CHAPTER 4

Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236

CHAPTER 5

Book Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248

CHAPTER 6

Research Reports . . . . . . . . . . . 260

199


CHAPTER

Personal Narratives

1

CHAPTER FOCUS

WHAT IS A PERSONAL NARRATIVE?

• What Is a Personal Narrative? • Plan a Story • Finish a Story

Personal narratives are written to share significant events in writers’ lives. At their best, personal narratives are revealing and relevant to an intended audience.

• Writer’s Workshop: Personal Narratives

A good personal narrative includes the following:

• Using I, Me, and My

■■A story about something that really happened to the writer ■■A first-person point of view ■■A beginning that engages the reader ■■A middle that tells what happens in the story ■■An ending that finishes the story ■■Time order, including temporal words ■■Correct grammar, spelling, capitalization, and punctuation

SUPPORT MATERIALS Loyola Press Online Assessment System www.voyagesinenglish.com Rubrics Student, page T-276 Teacher, page T-277 Grammar Section 1: Sentences, pages 1–28 Lesson Plans www.voyagesinenglish.com

DAILY SENTENCE STARTERS Each day, write on the board the Daily Sentence Starter. This daily exercise provides students with practice writing in the first person. Have students finish the sentences in their journals.

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

I once found a

For my last birthday, I

I saw a flower at

I got wet when

I was surprised when

I once rode in a

I laughed when I saw

I was lucky when

I was with my friends when

It scared me when

I sang a song at

I traveled to

I got mad when

A new person I met was

I was excited when

It was loud when I

I once shared my

I saw a fish when

I once dressed up as

It was hot when

200a  •  Chapter 1


Chapter Planner WRITER’S WORKSHOP TIPS

SCORING RUBRIC

Follow these ideas and tips to help you and your class get the most out of the Writer’s Workshop:

Personal Narrative

• Encourage students to keep a writing journal or picture journal to record important or interesting personal experiences. • Invite students to bring in pictures or drawings of important events. Discuss how these events might make good personal narrative topics. • Invite local officials (such as the mayor, an entertainer, or the principal) to tell the class about an event they remember from their own childhood.

Point Values 0 = not evident 1 = minimal evidence of mastery 2 = evidence of development toward mastery 3 = strong evidence of mastery 4 = outstanding evidence of mastery

Ideas

POINTS

tells about a real event

LiNK

Organization

Use the following titles to offer your students examples of well-crafted personal narratives:

has a logical sequence

Author: A True Story by Helen Lester

has a beginning

Tar Beach by Faith Ringgold

has a middle

The Relatives Came by Cynthia Rylant

has an ending

CONNECT WITH GRAMMAR

Voice is written from the writer’s point of view

Throughout the Writer’s Workshop, look for opportunities to integrate an understanding of sentence structure, conventions, and sentence variety when writing personal narratives.

Word Choice

• Discuss how using a variety of sentence types (telling, commanding, asking, and exclaiming) can make writing more interesting.

uses words appropriately uses personal pronouns

• Ask students to edit their writing to use uppercase letters to begin each sentence.

Sentence Fluency has correct sentence structure

• Have students edit their writing to add end marks in the correct places.

uses a variety of sentence types

Conventions

INDEPENDENT WRITING CENTER ACTIVITIES

grammar

Writing Center Activities give students hands-on experience exploring grammar and writing concepts. Students can work independently or in small groups to practice integrating grammar and writing skills using various learning modalities. A range of Writing Center Activities appears on pages OV-18–OV-21 of the Teacher Edition.

spelling punctuation and capitalization

Total AA full-size, reproducible Student Rubric and a Teacher Scoring Rubric can be found on pages T-276 and T-277.

www.voyagesinenglish.com  •  Personal Narratives  •  200b


CHAPTER

1

Personal Narratives

INTRODUCING THE CHAPTER Reading the Quotation Read aloud the quotation on page 200. Ask students to name some things that they think about. Tell students that writers write their thoughts with words. Talk with students about why people write. SAY: Writing is a way that people share information, ideas, and stories. Discuss ideas and stories that students might like to share with others (stories of things that have happened to them, retelling a book or movie to a friend, showing someone how to do something).

Reading the Model Direct students’ attention to the picture on page 201. Then explain that the boys in the picture are meeting for the first time. Invite volunteers to tell their own stories about meeting someone new. SAY: When you tell a story about something that happened to you, the story is a personal narrative. Emphasize that a personal narrative

CHAPTER

1

Quotation Station Writing is thinking on paper. —William Zinsser author

200

200  •  Chapter 1

is a true story about something that happened to the writer. Read aloud the model personal narrative on page 201 or invite a volunteer to do so. Point out that the model is a personal narrative because the story is true and because it happened to the writer. Explain that a personal narrative uses words like I, me, and my to show that it is a story about the writer. Call students’ attention to the words then and now

Personal Narratives


in the model. Explain that these words help the reader understand the order of events in a personal narrative. SAY: Many people share stories. We like to tell about funny and interesting things that happen to us. When we write stories, we use sentences. On the board, write a sentence and read it aloud. (Felix saw a ladybug.) Remind students that a sentence tells a complete idea.

Scavenger Hunt Ask students to find examples of personal narratives in the classroom and around the school. Point out that a personal narrative is not made up, but is a retelling of something that really happened to the writer.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.W.1.3

New at School I was new at school. I did not know anyone. Then I heard a voice say hello to me. The boy said his name was Matt. He said he was new too. Now Matt is my best friend.

Personal Narratives • 201

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What Is a Personal Narrative? OBJECTIVE • To identify the beginning, middle, and ending of a personal narrative

WARM-UP Display three separate pictures that together show a sequence in mixed-up order. Invite a volunteer to put the pictures in the correct order and explain how he or she knew which picture showed the beginning, which showed the middle, and which showed the end.

endings tell what the story meant or why it was important. Read aloud the example. Use the example to emphasize how the ending ties up the story.

PRACTICE Read aloud the exercise directions. Complete the exercise as a class. Invite volunteers to explain how they knew which story part matched which sentence.

APPLY GRAMMAR CONNECTION As you complete the exercise on page 202 as a class, take the opportunity to remind students that personal narratives are made up of sentences, which are ideas that tell complete thoughts.

the beginning, middle, and ending in several different stories. Talk with students about how in each story the beginning, middle, and ending work together and connect to one another. Cite specific examples in each story that illustrate this concept.

ASSESS Note which students had difficulty identifying the beginning, middle, and ending of a story. Provide those students with additional support.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS

Using reading materials in your classroom, ask students to identify

CCSS.ELA.W.1.3

What Is a Personal Narrative?

TEACH

We use sentences to write stories. A personal narrative is a story about you.

Ask students to recall the personal narrative that they read at the beginning of this chapter. Review what happened in that story. Point out that stories always have a beginning, a middle, and an ending. Direct students’ attention to the definition of beginning on page 202 and read it aloud. Explain that every story has a beginning. Then read aloud the example sentence. Help students understand what this story is about and how the beginning gives readers a hint about the topic. Point out the definition of middle and read it aloud. Tell students that the middle is where writers tell their stories. Explain that the middle is usually the longest part of the story. Use the example to help students understand that the middle is the most important part of the story. Explain how the middle tells more about what is told in the beginning. Guide students to understand that the ending tells how a story turns out and lets readers know that the story is over. Explain that sometimes

A good story has a beginning, a middle, and an ending.

202  •  Chapter 1

The beginning tells what the story is about.

I went to the beach today.

The middle tells what happened.

I played in the water. I made a sand castle.

The ending finishes the story.

Then the sun went down. I went home.

Draw a line to match the beginning, the middle, or the ending to each part of the story. Beginning Middle Ending

202 • Chapter 1

My mom drove me to school. The rest of the day was better. I woke up late this morning. I could not find my shoes. Then I missed the bus.


OBJECTIVES

GRAMMAR CONNECTION

• To use drawings to help plan a personal narrative • To write a short sequence of events

WARM-UP Page through a picture book with the class. Then invite volunteers to identify the beginning, middle, and ending of the story and draw a three-panel comic strip to depict the steps.

Point out that each sentence that makes up a beginning, middle, and ending of a story begins with a capital letter and ends with an end mark.

TEACH Review with students that a beginning introduces the story and grabs the attention of the reader. A middle tells what happened in the story, and an ending finishes the story. Invite students to say sentences that could be used as a beginning. Do the same with the middle and ending. Ask students

Plan a Story Think about a day you remember well. Draw pictures for the beginning, the middle, and the ending. Write a sentence for each picture.

What a day! First, I

to talk about the funniest, scariest, or most interesting thing that has happened to them during the last week. After a student has shared a story, help the class identify which part of the story is the beginning, middle, and ending. Remind students that any time they tell a story about themselves, they are telling a personal narrative.

PRACTICE
 Read aloud the exercise directions on page 203. Explain that when students write personal narratives, they should first plan what they want to write about. Explain that drawing pictures of the important parts of their story will help them keep the events in order. Point out that sometimes they will have to draw more than one picture for the middle of their stories. Ask students to draw as many pictures as they need for all the parts of their narratives. Have students complete the exercise. As students write, offer help and support. When students have finished, invite volunteers to share and explain their drawings and sentences.

APPLY Have students choose a new personal-narrative topic and draw pictures for their beginnings, middles, and endings. Encourage students to write sentences that go with each picture. Repeat this activity to offer additional practice using pictures to help plan a story.

Then I

ASSESS Note which students had difficulty planning a story using pictures. Provide those students with additional support.

It was the

day ever.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.W.1.3

Personal Narratives • 203

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What Is a Personal Narrative? OBJECTIVE • To identify the use of I, me, and my in a personal narrative

WARM-UP Recount a brief story about yourself in the first grade. As you tell the story, emphasize the use of the words I, me, and my. Invite volunteers to share stories about themselves.

GRAMMAR CONNECTION Point out that the pronoun I is used in the naming part of a sentence, and the pronoun me is used in the action part of a sentence.

PRACTICE

ASSESS

Allow time for students to color the words on page 204. Then guide them to complete the exercise. Emphasize that the words I, me, and my help us know that the story is about the writer.

Note which students had difficulty identifying the use of I, me, and my as used in personal narratives. Provide those students with additional support.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS

APPLY Invite students to practice writing sentences about themselves using I, me, and my. Challenge them to write as many sentences as they can.

CCSS.ELA.L.1.1d CCSS.ELA.SL.1.4 CCSS.ELA.W.1.3 CCSS.ELA.W.1.8

TEACH Review with students how the beginning, middle, and ending function in a personal narrative. Guide students through the instruction at the top of page 204. Point out that students use the words I, me, and my when they talk about themselves. Explain that when they write the words I, me, and my, they show that the story is about them.

I, Me, and My A personal narrative is a story about you. Use the words I, me, and my to show the story is about you.

y M I Me

Color the words about you.

Circle the words about you in this story. I had a birthday party. Everyone came. Grandma gave me a skateboard. My brother made me a cake. The cake even had my name on it. It was a great day. I had so much fun!

204 • Chapter 1

204  •  Chapter 1


OBJECTIVE

GRAMMAR CONNECTION

• To write a personal narrative using a story frame

Remind students that personal narratives can include telling, asking, commanding, and exclaiming sentences.

WARM-UP Ahead of time, encourage students to bring in pictures from their first day of school or share photos you may have. Display each picture in turn and ask volunteers to name who is in each and what each person is doing.

TEACH Review that a personal narrative has a beginning, a middle, and an ending and that writers can draw pictures to help plan their story. Personal narratives use the words I, me, and my.

Remember, you are the star of your personal narrative. Finish this story about your first day of school. Use I, me, and my. Use your own words and words from the word bank. Use capital letters and the correct end marks.

fun

I

special lunch

me

Guide students through the exercise instruction on page 205. Point out the word bank. Then allow time for students to complete the exercise. Consider having students draw pictures of their beginnings, middles, and endings before they begin to write. As students work, walk around the room to offer help and support. When students have finished, invite volunteers to share their personal narratives with the class.

APPLY Invite students to draw additional pictures about their stories. Encourage students to think of at least two other things they might include in the middle of their personal narratives. Ask students to write sentences for each picture. Then guide students to understand how they might add these details to their stories.

Finish a Story

friend

PRACTICE

ASSESS

book

my

recess

Note which students had difficulty writing a personal narrative using a story frame. Provide those students with additional support.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS

On my first day of school, I

CCSS.ELA.L.1.1d CCSS.ELA.W.1.3

My teacher

It was a day I will not forget. Personal Narratives • 205

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Writer’s Workshop OBJECTIVE • To choose a topic for a personal narrative

PREWRITING Pick a Topic Review with students that personal narratives are true stories about something that happened to the writer. Invite students to recall elements and characteristics of personal narratives (beginning, middle, ending; using I, me, and my). SAY: Let’s think of a lot of topics for personal narratives. That way we can pick the best one.

Your Turn Read aloud the Your Turn text and topic prompts. For each prompt, invite volunteers to name possible topics. Then allow time for students to write their topic ideas in their notebooks. Encourage students to pick the topic that seems the most interesting. As students write, provide support and encouragement. Help students understand which topics from their lists are appropriate for personal narratives.

ENGLISH-LANGUAGE LEARNERS Some English-language learners may feel more comfortable with their speaking ability than their writing ability. Regularly ask students to write everything they can on an open-ended topic for five minutes without regard to spelling or mechanics. Have students count the number of words they wrote each time so that they can see their progress as their writing fluency increases.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.W.1.5

TOPICS  Go over the first paragraph.

SAY: A topic is what a personal narrative is about. A topic might be I went to the circus, my walk to school this morning, or what I did last summer. These might all be good personal-narrative topics. Emphasize that before they write, students will have to pick topics. Read aloud the second paragraph. Explain that Luis is a first-grade student who is writing a personal narrative. Tell students that they will follow Luis as he writes his own personal narrative. Have students read aloud Luis’s topics. Explain that Luis wrote many different topics for his personal narrative so that he could choose the best one. Help students understand that each item on the list is a possible topic for Luis’s personal narrative because the topic is something that happened to him. Tell students that Luis circled the topic he wanted to write about. Guide students to understand that the topic for a personal narrative is a true story about something that happened to them.

Writer’s Workshop PREWRITING Pick a Topic A personal narrative is a story about you. The topic can be anything that happened to you. Luis needs to pick a topic for a personal narrative. Look at his notes.

to learned I n e h w ootball kick a f met my when I att friend M d og when my ner in ate my d

206  •  Chapter 1

Now write your own personal narrative. It should be a real story that happened to you. Jot down ideas in your notebook. Think about when • you learned something new. • you made a new friend. • something funny happened to you.

MODEL BRAINSTORMING TOPICS 

Choose your own personal-narrative topic. As you work, explain to students why you prefer some topics to others. Choose one topic and circle it.

Your Turn Write as many ideas as you can. Then circle the idea you like best. This will be your topic.

206

• Chapter 1


OBJECTIVE • To use drawings to plan and organize a personal narrative

PREWRITING Plan Your Story Invite volunteers to share the topics about which they have chosen to write. Talk with them about why their topics are appropriate for personal narratives. (The topics are things that happened to them.)

ORGANIZING IDEAS  SAY: First, we

listed possible topics. Then we chose a topic. The next thing we have to do is organize our ideas. Read aloud the first paragraph. Tell students that a good way to start planning their personal narratives is by drawing pictures. Explain that Luis has drawn pictures that show the parts of his personal narrative. Remind students that pictures help them make sure that their stories have all the important parts.

MODEL ORGANIZING IDEAS  Remind students of the topic that you chose for your personal narrative. On the board, model drawing pictures that represent the beginning, middle, and

Personal Narratives

PREWRITING

ending of your personal narrative. Include several pictures for the middle. Explain how you can use the pictures to help plan your story. SAY: Drawing pictures can help me remember what happened. Drawing pictures also helps me figure out what parts of the story are important. When I am done, I can put numbers on the pictures to show in what order the parts of my story happened. Save the pictures for the drafting stage of the writing process. Your Turn Read aloud the Your Turn text. Then allow time for students to complete their pictures. Encourage students to draw several pictures for the middle of their stories. As students work, offer help and support. Guide students to put their pictures in the order they will use when they begin to write. Help students identify which pictures are the most important to their stories.

SPEAKING AND LISTENING

Plan Your Story Now Luis must plan his personal narrative. He draws pictures to help him plan his story. He draws pictures of the beginning, the middle, and the ending of his story.

Beginning

Ask students to meet in small groups to share their completed drawings. Have them recount their narratives using their drawings as a basis for their speaking. Remind students of good listening skills, including making eye contact with the speaker and remaining quiet and still as the speaker talks. Invite students to ask the speaker respectful questions about their story.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.W.1.3 CCSS.ELA.W.1.4 CCSS.ELA.W.1.5 CCSS.ELA.W.1.8 CCSS.ELA.SL.1.5

Middle

Ending

Your Turn Think about your story. What pictures come to mind? Draw them in your notebook. Write beginning next to the beginning pictures. Write middle next to the middle pictures. Write ending next to the ending pictures.

Personal Narratives • 207

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Writer’s Workshop OBJECTIVES • To use pictures to write a first draft • To write a first draft using complete sentences

DRAFTING Ask volunteers to share the pictures they drew to help them plan and explain what part of their story each picture represents. As volunteers share, prompt them to say complete sentences about their stories. Explain that these sentences might go in their personal narratives. SAY: To help plan your personal narrative, you chose a topic and drew pictures as a way to think of what information to include in your story. Now you will write sentences about the topic you chose. Remind students that the words I, me, and my are used when writing personal narratives. Explain to students that voice is what gives writing personality and style. Help students write using their own voice in the first person as they draft their personal narratives.

Your Turn Allow time for students to complete their drafts. Invite students to use the word bank. Encourage students to use spelling patterns and letter sounds they know to write unfamiliar words. Provide students with support and encouragement as they write. Tell students to write as many sentences as they can and that they will have time to make changes or corrections later.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.L.1.2e CCSS.ELA.W.1.3 CCSS.ELA.W.1.4 CCSS.ELA.W.1.8

DRAFTING When you first write your story, you are making a draft. This is Luis’s draft.

did not I was new at school. I ard a voice know anyone. Then I he y. He said say hello to me. The bo he was new too.

first paragraph. Then direct students’ attention to Luis’s draft. Ask students to identify the words Luis used to talk about himself (I, me).

208  •  Chapter 1

EXTRA SUPPORT  To reinforce the use of writing complete sentences, write a list of naming parts on the board. Ask volunteers to suggest action parts that make a complete sentence. Then write a list of action parts and follow the same process to identify naming parts.

Writer’s Workshop

WORDS ABOUT YOU  Read aloud the

MODEL WRITING A DRAFT  Explain that Luis used his pictures to write sentences. Point out that later he will have time to make his story better. Using the pictures that you drew as part of your planning, model how to write a draft. As you work, point out sentences that are part of the beginning, middle, and ending of your narrative. Explain to students how the sentences are connected to your pictures. In your model draft, include at least one mistake that can be found using the Editing Checklist on page 209 and one mistake that can be found using the Proofreading Checklist on page 210. Save your draft to use during the Editing stage.

MEETING INDIVIDUAL NEEDS

Look at the pictures you drew to help plan your story. Make sure they are in the right order. Then write sentences to go with your pictures. Your Turn Write your draft in your notebook. Use your pictures and sentences to help you. Use the word bank if you need help. I silly

208

• Chapter 1

looked wanted

friend my

decided gave

me learned

forgot kind


OBJECTIVES

remember the important things to look for as they edit. Read aloud the Editing Checklist, pausing to clarify students’ understanding as needed.

• To edit using an Editing Checklist • To edit and revise a personal narrative

PROOFREADING MARKS  Call

EDITING AND REVISING SAY: While editing, you make sure that your writing makes sense. When you edit, you look for places where someone else might get confused, and then you make improvements. EDITING CHECKLIST  Guide students

students’ attention to the partial student model and the use of proofreading marks. SAY: When editing, we mark changes we want to make. Proofreading marks like the one shown in the example help show where we want to change things. This mark means to add something to the story. Guide students through the Proofreading Marks chart on the inside back cover of the book.

through the first paragraph. Explain that a checklist can help writers

Personal Narratives

EDITING

I don’t have an ending!

When you check your draft, you are editing. Luis uses the Editing Checklist to check his draft. Editing Checklist me? Is my story about ing? inn beg a e Do I hav ? Do I have a middle ? ing end an e hav Do I

say hello to me. T he boy. He said he was new too. Now Matt is my best friend.

Look at the mistake Luis finds. How does he fix it? Your Turn Look at your draft. Then look at the checklist. Put an X in the box if you can answer yes to the question. You might ask a friend to read your story. A friend can help you spot mistakes.

REVISING

PEER EDITING  Invite volunteers to model peer-editing behavior, using your personal narrative as a model. Help students use the checklist questions to find the mistake in your draft. Invite students to help you fix the mistake. Model language that reinforces respectful, positive interaction during peerediting conferences. Allow time for partners to edit each other’s drafts. Observe students as they edit and hold their peerediting conferences. Check that students are using respectful peerediting behavior and language. When they have finished, SAY: When someone else edits your work, check it over. That person might suggest a change that you do not agree with. You want your writing to be correct, but it is your story. You decide what to change. MODEL EDITING AND REVISING  Point out the mistake that the class found in your draft during editing. Demonstrate how to mark the correction. Explain that making this change helps make the story clearer. Then rewrite your draft on the board, incorporating your marked change into the new copy. Tell students that a new copy of the draft can help them see other things they may want to correct, add, or otherwise improve.

Your Turn Allow time for students to revise their drafts. As they work, check to see that they are making their editing changes correctly.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS

Luis revises his story. He adds changes that will make it better. Your Turn

Your Turn Allow time for students to edit their drafts. Walk around the room and check that students are giving consideration to each item on the checklist. Ask students to give reasons for making or not making changes in their work.

Copy your story. Add your changes and fix any mistakes.

CCSS.ELA.W.1.4 CCSS.ELA.W.1.5 CCSS.ELA.W.1.8 CCSS.ELA.SL.1.4

Personal Narratives • 209

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Writer’s Workshop OBJECTIVES • To edit using a Proofreading Checklist • To proofread a revised draft

PROOFREADING SAY: As we proofread, we

make sure that all the words are spelled the right way and that the sentences are correct. Proofreading is important because misspelled words and mistakes in sentences can bother the reader. Readers might not pay attention to the story because they are looking at misspelled words or other mistakes.

the error in your draft. Go over the rest of the page. Your Turn Read aloud the Your Turn text. Then allow time for students to proofread their drafts. Tell students to check for only one question at a time. Walk around the room to offer students assistance and support. Explain that students can use a print or online dictionary to check and correct misspellings. If time allows, have partners trade drafts and proofread each other’s work. Be sure that students work with different partners from those they had during editing. Remind students that another person might make suggestions for improvement that the writer may not have seen. If

PROOFREADING CHECKLIST  Read aloud the first paragraph and the Proofreading Checklist. For each checklist item, help students understand what the question means and how to check for it in their drafts. Read aloud the next paragraph and direct students’ attention to the partial student model. Ask students what change Luis made in his story and which item in the checklist alerted him to the change (an incomplete sentence. Are the sentences complete?). Guide students to explain why the sentence is incomplete. (It does not tell an action.) Ask students how Luis fixed his draft. (He added an action—said his name was Matt.) Point out the proofreading mark that Luis used to add to his draft.

210  •  Chapter 1

Teacher Tip Encourage students to refer often to the Proofreading Marks Chart on the inside back cover of the book.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS CCSS.ELA.L.1.2d CCSS.ELA.W.1.4 CCSS.ELA.W.1.5 CCSS.ELA.W.1.8

Writer’s Workshop PROOFREADING

Checklist Proofreading

s spelled Are all the word y? ctl rre co al letters? Did I use capit ht end marks? Did I use the rig es complete? Are the sentenc

When you check your words and sentences, you are proofreading. Luis uses this Proofreading Checklist to review his draft.

said his name was Matt say hello to me. The boy. He said he was new too. Now Matt is my best friend. Look at the mistake Luis finds. How does he fix it?

Your Turn Read your story again. Use the checklist to review your draft. Put an X next to the questions if you can answer yes. If you cannot answer yes, make changes to your draft. Use these proofreading marks to make your changes.

MODEL USING PROOFREADING MARKS 

SAY: We use proofreading marks to show what changes we want to make to a draft. Go over the Proofreading Marks Chart. Point out your model revised draft. Help students use the Proofreading Checklist to find the mistake in your personal narrative. Remind students that everyone makes mistakes when they write, and that by proofreading, they can tell their stories better. Demonstrate how to use proofreading marks to correct

you choose this option, walk around the classroom to be sure students are using respectful peer conferencing language. When students have finished, remind them to doublecheck their partner’s work.

Proofreading Marks Symbol

210

• Chapter 1

Meaning

Example read

add

We books.

take out

the the park

add period

She is smart

capital letter

carl jones

lowercase letter

He likes Soccer.


OBJECTIVE

MODEL WRITING A FINAL COPY 

• To publish a personal narrative

PUBLISHING SAY: Publishing means sharing your work with an audience. Explain that an audience is anyone with whom the final work is shared, including the class, the students’ parents, brothers or sisters, or friends. WAYS TO PUBLISH  Read the first

paragraph aloud. Invite a volunteer to answer the question. (Luis will publish his story by reading it to his mom.)

Model how to produce a final copy. You might write your final copy on the board, or you might use one of the publishing ideas listed in the book. As you work, explain that first you wrote the personal narrative, then you edited it, revised it, and proofread it. Explain that now you are ready to share your story with an audience. Your Turn Talk with students about how they will publish their personal narratives. Allow time for students to make their final copies. Remind students to print uppercase and lowercase letters to the best of their ability. Provide time for students to create artwork to accompany their published pieces.

RUBRICS  When students have

finished, give them copies of the Student Rubric as found on page T-276. Help students understand what each item means and how to apply it to their own writing. Then allow time for students to evaluate their work using the rubric. The Teacher Scoring Rubric on page T-277 can be used when assessing students’ understanding of the genre.

PORTFOLIOS  Have students begin

keeping a portfolio of their finished work. Distribute folders or have students use their own. Encourage students to decorate their folders. SAY: A portfolio will help you see what you are learning and how your writing improves throughout the year.

MEETING INDIVIDUAL NEEDS

Personal Narratives

PUBLISHING

SPEAKING AND LISTENING

When you share your work with others, you are publishing it. How will Luis publish his draft? Are you ready to share your work? Copy it onto a sheet of paper. Print neatly. Be sure to copy it exactly. Leave room to draw a picture. You can share your story in many ways. How will you share yours?

Mail it to a friend.

CHALLENGE  If computers are available, ask students to type the final copy of their personal narratives and add graphics.

I want to read my story to my mom!

Share on your class Web page.

During peer-editing sessions, or after a student’s published piece has been presented orally, prompt other students to ask questions to increase their understanding of or learn more about the content of the piece. Remind students to ask and answer questions in a kind, constructive, and respectful manner.

Teacher Tip Encourage students to use the available spell-check function when they type their writing on a computer.

k. lass boo Make a c

Read it to som eone special.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS

a gift. Give it as

CCSS.ELA.SL.1.1c CCSS.ELA.SL.1.3 CCSS.ELA.SL.1.5 CCSS.ELA.W.1.5 CCSS.ELA.W.1.6 CCSS.ELA.W.1.8

Your Turn Decide with your class how to share your story. Come up with new and fun ways.

Personal Narratives • 211

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Voyages in English 2018, Teacher Edition, Grade 1  

The Voyages in English Teacher Edition offers unparalleled support in an easy-to-use, step-by-step format that can be adapted for students’...

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