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CateChist PreParation

Unit 4

We Are Called Unit 4 focuses on how we express our faith in God by putting it into action.

SeSSion 16

The Protestant Reformation

In this session, young people learn about what brought about the Protestant Reformation and how its effects influence us today.

SeSSion 17

Renewal in the Church

Young people learn how to look to God to help make good decisions so that they may do their best not to be tempted by sin.

Unit Saint

The Church Reaches Out

Saint Angela Merici

SeSSion 18

In this session, young people understand how living as God’s people is a faith we live out every day in our actions and words toward others and toward God.

SeSSion 19

Faith and Reason

Young people explore the ideas that sometimes challenge our faith but can also enlighten our relationship with God.

SeSSion 20

Saint Angela Merici is known for her attentive support of girls and widows as well as for developing religious communities for women. She founded the Order of Saint Ursula to help women find new ways to serve God.

Celebrating Holy Week and Easter

In this session, young people learn the meaning of Holy Week and Easter and understand how Jesus’ sacrifice allows us to live in eternal Salvation with God.

Unit 4

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CateChist PreParation

Prayer in Unit 4

In each session of Unit 4, establish the pattern and tone for prayer. Young people pray using guided reflection and Scripture readings. They also participate in a reflection on the Exsultet. Young people also pray the Daily Examen, a form of Ignatian prayer.

Catholic Social Teaching in Unit 4 Following are the themes of Catholic Social Teaching integrated into this unit. Call to Family, Community, and Participation Participation in family and community is central to our faith and to a healthy society. Family and communities must be supported and strengthened through active participation. Care for God’s Creation We have a responsibility to care for God’s creation. We are called to make moral and ethical choices that protect the ecological balance of creation both locally and worldwide. The Dignity of Work and the Rights of Workers The Catholic Church teaches us to respect basic rights of workers: the right to productive work, to fair wages, to private property, to organize and join unions, and to pursue economic opportunity. Catholics believe that the economy is meant to serve people. Life and Dignity of the Human Person The Catholic Church teaches us that all human life is sacred and that all people must be treated with dignity. As Catholics, we strive to respect and value people over material goods. The foundation of our moral vision is our belief in the life and the dignity of the human person. Option for the Poor and Vulnerable As Catholics, we are called to follow Jesus’ example by making a specific effort to defend and promote the dignity of the poor and vulnerable and meet their immediate needs. Rights and Responsibilities The Catholic Church teaches that every person has a right to live as well as the right to things required for human decency. As Catholics, it is our responsibility to protect fundamental human rights. Solidarity Solidarity is the attitude that leads Christians to share spiritual and material goods. Solidarity unites rich and poor, weak and strong, and helps create a society that recognizes that we live in an interdependent world.

Faith in Action In Unit 4, young people are invited to show their love and care for God’s people and creations by implementing service projects, such as researching and discussing organizations that protect the right-to-life initiative. Alternative service-project ideas also appear on the last page of each session in this guide.

TogeTher as One Parish Religious Education with the Parochial School to celebrate the risen Christ, organize an event where young people of both the religious education and the parochial school participate in a living reenactment of the Stations of the Cross. Cast each young person in one role or several, depending on the number of participants. Encourage young people to be involved in behindthe-scenes aspects, such as costumes, props, script management, and publicity for the performance. invite the parish to attend the living Stations of the Cross as part of their Holy Week vigil and Easter celebrations.

Literature Opportunity Peanut Butter Friends in a Chop Suey World by Deb Brammer You might wish to have young people read this novel about Amy, who moves to Taiwan with her parents as they become missionaries. Amy experiences a range of emotions and phases as she begins her life in a new culture. She learns to make adjustments to understand her new surroundings. Solidarity

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CateChist PreParation S e S S io n 16

The Protestant Reformation 3-Minute Retreat Before you prepare the session, pause and be still. Take three deep breaths and be aware of the loving presence of God, who is with you on this journey.

Knowing and Sharing Your Faith in Session 16 Consider how Scripture and Tradition can deepen your understanding of session content.

Scripture 1 Peter 2:4 Come to him, a living stone, rejected by human beings but chosen and precious in the sight of God. . . .

Reflection At first glance, being called a “living stone” may not have great appeal. When we remember that Jesus is called “the capstone” (Ephesians 2:20), the image begins to come alive. Living stones are not static and do not suffer from erosion or the effects of nature. Living stones grow and are continually renewed and renewing. What that means for our daily life is that we cannot become indifferent to our faith or grow lax in our commitment to follow Jesus, the capstone. Last, living stones are holy. The one true God dwells in each of us and in all of us as the Church.

Questions What does being a living stone mean to me? How can I use my gifts to help build up the Church?

Psalm 138:1,3,7,8 expresses thanks to God for his presence in our lives.

Tradition As members of the human family, we have only a limited time in our earthly life. At our death we are judged by Christ and, if we have not chosen to reject the mercy of God, we will receive our eternal reward. At the end of time, the day of judgment, Christ will return to transform all of creation and establish the Kingdom of God in its fullness. At that time we will be reunited with our transformed bodies and live, as Jesus does, forever. Heaven is the state of living with God forever. Hell is the state for those who choose to reject God’s mercy and choose eternal separation from God.

Catholic Social Teaching In this session the integrated Catholic Social Teaching themes are Option for the Poor and Vulnerable and Solidarity. See page 133b for an explanation of these themes.

Window on the Catechism Concluding Prayer

Speak to God, using the words of this prayer or your own. Jesus, capstone of my life, thank you for choosing me as one of your living stones. Help me grow in my awareness of how precious I am in your sight and in my desire to be of service to others.

Our particular judgment, Heaven, Hell, Purgatory, and the Last Judgment are described in CCC 1020–1050.

General Directory for Catechesis The historical character of the mystery of Salvation is presented in GDC 107 and 108.

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caTEchIST pREpaRaTIOn

One-Hour Session Planner SeSSion 16

The Protestant Reformation

Session Theme: We find our calling from God by focusing our hearts and minds on listening to what God asks of us. Before This Session ▶▶ Bookmark your Bible to Psalm 138:1,3,7,8. Place the open Bible in your

prayer space. ▶▶ Read the Guide for this session, choose any additional If Time Allows activities

that you might have time to complete, and gather the listed materials. StepS

The prayers in this unit give young people opportunities to experience a variety of forms of prayer. Session 16 includes psalms, song prayer, and personal reflection. Follow the Prepare directions on the Catechist Guide page before sharing with young people.

ApproximAte time

Engage

10–20 minutes

Unit Saint: Saint Angela Merici The Protestant Reformation

PAgeS 133–134 PAge 135

Explore Disagreement in the Church God’s Gift of Salvation

30–40 minutes PAgeS 136–137

Prayer: god’s Invitation Where Do I Fit In?

10–15 minutes PAge 140

PAge 141

Respond What’s What?

Take IT Home

PAgeS 138–139

Reflect

10–15 minutes PAge 142

materials REQUIRED ▶▶ Image of a block of marble and a statue, such as the Pietà (page 136)

OpTIOnal ▶▶ Images of Saint Angela Merici (page 134)

▶▶ Images on display at the Vatican

▶▶ Computers with Internet access

Museum (page 137)

for research (pages 134, 137)

▶▶ Wrapped gift box (page 138)

▶▶ Session 16 BLM, T-373 (page 139)

▶▶ Bible (pages 139, 140)

▶▶ Note cards (page 141) ▶▶ Session 16 Assessment,

www.findinggod.com (page 142)

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Homework options: Working for Ecumenism

PAge 137

God’s Gift of Grace

PAge 138


EngagE

4

Unit

Unit Opener

OUTcOmES ▶▶ Identify how Saint Angela Merici put

her faith into action. ▶▶ Explain that we are called by God to

build up his kingdom.

le We A re Cal

1 Begin

d

Saint Angela Merici was born in Italy in 1474. Her parents and sister died when she was a teenager, so she lived with her uncle’s family. During this time she had a dream in which she understood that God wanted to use her to establish a community of dedicated young women. It would be many years before she understood how to do this. While at her uncle’s home, Angela became a member of the Third Order of Saint Francis. This means that she lived as a lay member of a religious community, and she dedicated her life to prayer and good works. Many women were attracted to her spirit and devotion and joined her in her good works.

Saint Angela Merici was chosen to represent Unit 4 because she answered a call from

How the Saint Relates

God and recognized a need to help others. In founding the Ursuline Sisters, Angela created a way for women to dedicate their lives in service to God without living behind monastery walls.

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Daily Examen Suggest that young people frequently pray the Daily Examen on PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ page 277 in Prayers and Practices. Guide young people through these steps, pausing after each one. • Quiet your mind and relax your body. Become aware of God’s presence around you. As you breathe in, open your heart to God. As you breathe out, share his love with the world. • Think about the past day. Review each hour. Ask yourself, “What happened? What actions were I called to take for God? Did I take them or just think about them?” • Choose one moment during the day that seemed to contain an invitation to action. Ask yourself, “Why did I respond—or not respond—to this invitation? What made me go ahead, or stop? Did I ask God to help? If not, why?” • Invite God into your heart. Quiet your own voice and listen to God’s. What is God saying to you? What is God asking of you? • Ask God to help you put your love for him into action. Thank God for giving you the gifts and talents you need to do this. Pray Amen silently when you are ready. Now come back to this room.

Read aloud the unit title. Explain that in this unit, young people will explore how God calls us to put our faith into action. Have young people silently identify someone they love. Say: Think of a kind message that you could share with this person, such as how much he or she means to you. Point out that the person the young people identified did not receive the kind message. Say: The message only exists in your mind. For the person to receive the kind message, you have to share it with him or her. Explain that there are multiple ways to do so. Say: The most powerful way to share your message is through your actions. Likewise, our faith is more than a mental activity. God calls us to live out our faith through our actions.

2 Introduce the Saint Invite a volunteer to read aloud the paragraph. Explain that the Third Order of Saint Francis is a religious community for men and women who are called to devote their lives to God but who are not called to become priests, religious brothers, or sisters. Say: Because of her strong prayer life, Merici was open to the dream that helped her discern that God was calling her to live out her faith in a new way.

How the Saint Relates

Read aloud the feature. Ask: How did Merici receive her new call from God? (through her dream) Say: God calls each of us in unique ways. It is important for us to open our minds and hearts in prayer so that we can receive this call.

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EngagE

3 Connect Invite a volunteer to read aloud the section Founding a New Religious Community. Explain that when people make a pilgrimage, they travel to a sacred place. Ask: What sacred place did Merici visit? (the Holy Land) Why did she go on a pilgrimage? (to help her better understand the will of God) Say: Imagine you are traveling in a distant country, and you go blind. How would you react? (Answers will vary.) What did the experience teach Merici? (to see with the eyes of her soul) Point out that like the dream she had, this experience of blindness helped Merici realize that God was calling her to serve his people in a special way. Explain that when we see with the eyes of our souls, we listen to God in prayer so that we can discover his will for us. Say: Like the rule that Saint Benedict wrote for the members of his community, Merici wrote her rule and Testament to give the members of her community advice on behaviors that would help them live together peacefully. Say: Saint angela Merici was a pioneer in that her community was one of the first to live among people so that the sisters could better serve people’s needs. Identify any apostolic communities in your area in which sisters live among the people.

4 Close Say: Saint angela Merici has had a profound impact on the lives of many people. Today there are Ursuline sisters all over the world who continue the work begun by Merici and her companions. Point out that having a strong prayer life empowers the members of this community to respond to God’s call faithfully. Give young people a few moments to pray silently. Encourage them to ask the Holy Spirit for the strength to remain true to what God is calling them to do.

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Founding a New Religious Community In 1516 Angela was asked by the Franciscans to go to Brescia and comfort a woman who had just lost her husband and two sons in the war. While there, she met other lay people who were doing works of charity. She joined them and soon became known for her deep love of God and care for girls and widows. To help her better understand the will of God, Angela went on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land in 1524. While on that trip, she was temporarily blinded. Angela did not regain her sight until she returned home. She later said that this experience taught her to see with the eyes of her soul. With renewed vigor, Angela continued to serve all those who needed help. Twenty-eight women joined Angela in her ministry of Christian service. On November 25, 1535, the vision that Angela had as a teenager finally became a reality. On this date, she formally founded the Order of Saint Ursula, named after a saint to whom Angela had a strong devotion. Angela was elected superior of the order by unanimous vote in 1537. She wrote a Rule and Testament for the sisters and leaders to follow. She encouraged them to treat one another as individuals and to use gentleness over force. Above: Schoolgirls and nun at an Ursuline convent and orphanage, Guyana, South America.

Because women in religious communities of the time could only live in monasteries, Angela is recognized for creating a new way for women to serve God in the Church. Saint Angela Merici, whose feast day is January 27, set an example for later communities of women religious who lived and ministered outside the cloister.

Below: Brescia, Italy

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an Ongoing mission Have small groups work PDF Signoff: Production _______ together to research the Order of Saint Ursula to discover how members of this community continue the work that Merici began. Have groups present the information they find. The Poor and Vulnerable

InclusIon

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autism Spectrum Design _______ Editorial _______ a life in pictures If you

have young people with autism-spectrum disorders, locate images of Saint Angela Merici and members of the Ursuline community, both past and present. Let young people hold and inspect each image while you explain what it shows. Lead young people to conclude that Angela Merici worked to educate young girls and that Ursuline sisters continue this mission today.


EngagE

Session

The Protestant on Reformati

16

SeSSiOn 16

OUTcOmES ▶▶ Describe how Martin Luther’s actions

led to the Protestant Reformation. ▶▶ Explain that Catholics believe

Salvation is a gift from God that is received through faith in Jesus. ▶▶ Identify the psalms as a form of

prayer that can be used in both communal and personal prayer. ▶▶ Define actual grace, free will,

indulgences, Last Judgment, particular judgment, Purgatory, and sanctifying grace.

Think about a time you disagreed with someone in a position of authority. How did you express your disagreement? How did the person respond? How was the disagreement resolved?

PR AYER

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make me mad! Write on the board the following sentences: You make me so mad! PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ and You drive me crazy! Say: When we make statements like this, we surrender control of our emotions. Point out that when we do this, we choose to reject God’s gift of free will. Say: practicing better responses can help us maintain control of our emotions. Write on the board the following sentence starter: It makes me mad when [person/group]

Read aloud the text in the box on page 135. Give young people a few moments to reflect silently on the questions or to share their responses with a partner.

2 Get Started

God, thank you for the gift of free will. May we always choose to use this gift by living faithful lives.

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1 Set the Stage

.

Have young people complete the sentence and provide a reason why the person or group might act as he, she, or they did. Provide an example such as It makes me mad when my little brother barges into my room because this means he doesn’t respect my privacy. Encourage young people to take a moment to reflect before writing their responses. Then have young people share their responses with a partner and discuss what a more Christian interpretation of the person’s or group’s behavior might be, such as My brother barges into my room because he needs help with something.

Say: Imagine that your teacher gives you a large homework assignment before a school vacation Ask: How might you respond? (Accept reasonable responses.) Discuss the potential impact that each response might have. Lead young people to realize that an angry or forceful response will increase frustration and make the situation worse. Say: How we choose to respond to a situation reflects the values we hold. When we choose to respond with gentleness, we reflect that we are Jesus’ followers. Say: In this session we are going to learn how a group of people who disagreed with the Church and its practices presented their concerns.

prayer Say: Let’s thank God for giving us the freedom to make choices. Pray aloud the prayer together. Conclude by praying the Sign of the Cross.

Go to www.findinggod.com/sessionextenders for an article on Psalm 139. You may wish to share this with the group.

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ExplORE

1 Begin Display an image of a block of marble and of a statue such as the Pietà. Ask: What must happen for a block of marble to be transformed into a statue? (Possible answer: An artist has to carve the statue out of the stone.) Point out that an outer force has to be exerted by someone in order for the sculpture to take shape. Say: In this article we’ll read how external forces exerted by members of the Church helped the Church articulate its teachings more clearly.

2 Connect Invite volunteers to read aloud the article title, the introductory paragraph, and the section Martin Luther. Explain that Martin Luther began his life as a Catholic monk. Ask: What was Luther’s original intent when he nailed his theses to the door of the Church? (to initiate a debate in order to develop Catholic thought) Draw young people’s attention to the word indulgences. Have a volunteer read aloud from the Glossary the definition of the word. Say: during Luther’s time, Church leaders sold indulgences as a way to fund the building of churches. Ask: What did Luther believe about Scripture? (that Scripture alone is the final authority for Christians) What did Luther believe about the sacraments? (Baptism and the Eucharist are the only two sacraments. Luther denied the doctrine of transubstantiation.)

our Catholic Character

Read aloud the feature. Ask: What happens when we throw a stone into a body of water? (The water ripples.) Explain that temporal punishment is akin to rippling water. Say: Our sins have an effect that ripples outward, even after the sin itself has occurred. For example, if we hurt someone in anger, that person may then treat others poorly.

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t n e m e e r g a Dis h c r u h C e h t in IN

the 16th century, Christianity was Europe’s primary religion. Christianity shaped how people lived both their public and private lives. A confluence of events, however, led to the Protestant Reformation, a movement that sought to reform the beliefs and practices of the Roman Catholic Church. Some of these reforms are still part of our tradition today.

Martin Luther Martin Luther was an Augustinian friar and Scripture scholar who lived in Germany. After he studied theology and was named a professor, Luther began questioning some of the Church’s teachings. On October 31, 1517, he posted 95 theses on the door of a church in Wittenberg, Germany. This practice was a common way for theologians to initiate debate on a topic of interest. Luther had planned to present his ideas on Salvation and the nature of the relationship between faith and works in order to develop Catholic thought.

Our Catholic Character Have you ever had a lingering feeling of shame, even after you made amends for something you did wrong? When we repent from sin, even though we receive forgiveness from God, we can continue to experience the negative effect that sin has on our relationships with others. This suffering, called temporal punishment, can be lessened through prayer and works of charity. The Church uses the word indulgence to refer to the lessening of this temporal punishment.

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Martin Luther

Printing press

Luther’s arguments resulted in controversy. Through the use of the printing press, then a relatively new invention, Luther’s ideas spread rapidly. Within a few weeks, the theses were translated from Latin into German, and approximately 250,000 copies were distributed. Luther soon found himself leading a movement that challenged many of the Church’s beliefs and practices. One of Luther’s theses challenged the practice of selling indulgences, which is a lessening of the temporal punishment due for sins that have been forgiven. Indulgences move us toward our final purification, after which we will live with God forever in Heaven. Luther felt that by marketing indulgences in a carnival-like atmosphere, Church leaders were distorting their spiritual importance. Luther also believed that Scripture alone is the final authority for Christians. In teaching this, Luther rejected the teaching authority of the Magisterium. Luther rejected the Church’s teachings on the sacraments. He believed that Baptism and the Eucharist are the only two sacraments. Luther denied the doctrine of transubstantiation by teaching that when the celebration of the Mass is over, Christ is no longer present in the bread and wine. In addition,

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Reformed Beliefs Arrange young people into small groups and assign one of PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ the following topics to each group. • indulgences • the authority of Scripture • two versus seven sacraments • transubstantiation • faith and good works Have groups research their assigned topics to discover what Luther believed and what the Church taught. Ask groups to prepare mini-lessons to present the information they find.

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ExplORE while the Church teaches that faith is necessary for Salvation, it also teaches that faith cannot be separated from good works. Luther taught that faith alone is sufficient for Salvation. Through his ultimate denial of Church teaching, Luther helped found a new branch of Christianity known as Protestantism.

Past Meets Present PAST: The Protestant Reformation had an

Other Voices Call for Reform

impact on the arts in a variety of ways. For

Other voices outside Germany joined Luther’s call for reform. John Calvin, who lived in Geneva, Switzerland, developed the concepts that came to be known as Calvinism. Calvin’s overall view was that as a result of our fallen nature, people are incapable of following God or being saved. Instead, Calvin taught that God has chosen those whom he will save through his mercy, as well as those from whom he will withhold his mercy. This doctrine, which departs from Luther’s teaching, is sometimes called “doublepredestination,” and states that some humans, called the elect, are created for Heaven, while other humans, called reprobates, are created to die unredeemed and will therefore go to Hell.

inspired by Roman Catholic teachings.

To spread his teachings, Calvin established schools, including the University of Geneva. His followers brought his message to France, the Netherlands, Germany, and Scotland. The Reformation also spread to England where the Church was challenged by King Henry VIII, who wanted to divorce his wife, Queen Catherine of Aragon. The Church forbade divorce, so Henry VIII rebelled and established the Church of England, making himself its head. As the leader of the Church of England, Henry VIII gave himself permission to divorce Catherine of Aragon. As groups continued to break away from the Roman Catholic Church, new Protestant denominations formed, including Lutheran, Anabaptist, Presbyterian, Anglican, and Puritan.

destroyed by Reformers because they were The new art that developed became more secular and focused on daily life rather than religious or scriptural themes. Artists who were interested in Catholic religious themes often had to leave their homelands to find work.

PRESENT: Today’s Church understands the importance of preserving artworks so that later generations can view and be inspired by them. Inside Vatican City,

Explore

Calvin also rejected the theology of the Real Presence. He taught, instead, that the words of consecration do not transform the bread and wine into Jesus Christ’s Body and Blood. The words simply recall what Jesus said at the Last Supper. Calvin did accept Luther’s teaching that Scripture alone is the final source of authority for Christians.

example, many medieval artworks were

the Vatican Museums house an enormous collection of religious art in 54 separate galleries. Rooms I through XIII feature treasured artworks dating from the 12th to the 16th centuries. More than four million visitors see these artworks every year.

DEF IN E indulgences

R EM EM BE R

The Protesta nt Refor mation wa s a movement tha t bega n as an effor t to refor m the beliefs and prac tices of the Roma n Catholic Church. Ins tead it resulted in a split in Ch ris tia nit y. Ma rti n Luther and Joh n Ca lvi n were two prom inent Refor mers.

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Working for Ecumenism Point out that Church leaders who are engaged in ecumenism PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ often gather to discuss similarities and differences between their respective traditions. Say: another way to work toward ecumenism is to cooperate on opportunities for prayer and service. Before the next session, have young people research whether there are any ecumenical opportunities for prayer and service in their community. During the next session, have young people share their findings. Then discuss what young people can to do support these ecumenical efforts.

Invite volunteers to read aloud the section Other Voices Call for Reform. Say: Calvin believed that some people were destined for Hell from the very moment of their creation. The Catholic Church believes that God has offered the gift of Salvation to all people. Point out that we also received the gift of free will and that we have the freedom to choose whether we are going to accept the gift of Salvation. Ask: did Calvin believe in the doctrine of transubstantiation? (No.) What did he believe instead? (that the words of consecration simply recall what Jesus said at the Last Supper) Ask: Why did King Henry vIII establish the Church of england? (He wanted to divorce his wife, which the Church did not allow.) Point out that King Henry VIII’s actions were motivated by politics. Say: King Henry and Queen Catherine were unable to have a son, or an heir to the throne. The king hoped that he would be able to have a son with another woman.

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Read aloud the feature. If possible, display images of some of the artworks that are housed at the Vatican Museums.

3 Close Point out that Martin Luther and John Calvin began a conversation that continues today. Say: The Church believes that God wants all Christians to unite as one. Leaders in many Christian denominations work together to discuss their similarities and differences in a process known as ecumenism. Give young people a moment to pray for the Church leaders who are engaged in this process. Encourage young people to pray that these leaders will be open to the prompting of the Holy Spirit.

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ExplORE

G od’s Gi ft o f S a lv a ti o n

1 Begin Display a wrapped gift box. Ask: What is the best gift someone could give you? (Accept reasonable responses.) Point out that young people most likely responded with physical items. Say: While these gifts are nice, in this article we’re going to learn about the best gift ever—the gift of Salvation that we have received from God.

ONE

of Luther’s major disagreements with Church teaching centered on Salvation. Our Catholic understanding of this gift is rooted in Scripture. In the Creation story in the Book of Genesis, Adam and Eve first lived in peace. Eventually, they gave in to temptation and disobeyed God’s will. Consequently, the human family is born into Original Sin and suffers the loss of Paradise, the pain of division, and the effects of sin. These divisions, such as murder, slavery, and poverty, are not something that God plans. They are the result of human sinfulness. When Adam and Eve turned away from God, he did not turn away from them. Instead, God promised that he would send a Savior to forgive sins and restore humans’ relationship with him. Jesus is the fulfillment of that promise. Through the Paschal Mystery—his life, Death, Resurrection, and Ascension into Heaven—Jesus Christ offers to all the gift of Salvation.

2 Connect Invite volunteers to read aloud the article title and the first section. Have young people summarize the story of Adam and Eve. Ask: What did God do after adam and eve turned away from him? (He promised that he would send a Savior to forgive sins and restore humans’ relationship with him.) Point out that God fulfilled this promise when he sent his Son, Jesus. Ask: How does Jesus offer the gift of Salvation to all people? (through his Paschal Mystery) What does the Church teach is necessary to receive God’s gift of Salvation? (faith and good works) What do our good works help us do? (share Jesus’ peace and love with others) Have young people brainstorm some good works that they can do. Draw young people’s attention to the term free will. Ask a volunteer to read aloud from the Glossary the definition of the term. Ask: How does God want us to use the gift of free will? (God wants us to use this gift to choose to have faith, profess our belief in Christ and his Church, and to do works that bear the fruit of faith.)

Sacred art

Read aloud the feature. Say: The artist’s use of color, light, and movement remind us that God’s grace is all around us, even if we cannot see it. Point out that actual grace helps us act in ways that carry out God’s plan for us and that sanctifying grace allows us to share in God’s very self.

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Adam and Eve, stained glass.

In reflecting on what human beings need to do in order to earn the gift of Salvation, Luther concluded that faith alone is a sufficient response to this gift. Luther’s opinion was in sharp contrast to the Church’s teaching that both faith and

SACRED ART

The artwork God Gives reminds us that God invites everyone to the

table and abundantly gives us everything we need. One gift that God shares with us is grace, the gift of God’s own self. We believe that grace is the Holy Spirit alive in us. There are two types of grace. Actual grace is the freely given gift of God that unites us with the life of the Trinity. This type of grace helps us make choices according to God’s will. Sanctifying

grace, sometimes called habitual grace, is the

gift of God that is given to us without our earning it. This type of grace is imparted to us through the sacraments and produces in us a permanent condition in which we are pleasing to God. This kind of grace refers to our God-given inclination and capacity for good. God Gives, Paula Wiggins.

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god’s gift of grace Have young people spend time reflecting on the Sacred Art image. PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ Point out the elements the artist used, such as color, light, and movement, to convey the presence of God’s grace. Before the next session, have young people make their own artworks that convey a sense of God’s grace. Encourage each young person to use a medium that speaks to him or her, such as drawing, music, photography, or writing. During the next session, invite young people to share their artworks.

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ExplORE DEF IN E ac tua l grace, sa nc tify ing grace, free wi ll, pa rticu lar judgment, Pu rgatory, La st Judgment

R EM EM BE R

Jesus Ch ris t is the ful fill ment of God’s prom ise of Sa lvation. We receive the gif t of Sa lvation through faith an d good works.

Was not Abraham our father justified by works when he offered his son Isaac upon the altar? You see that faith was active along with his works, and faith was completed by the works. Thus the scripture was fulfilled that says, “Abraham believed God, and it was credited to him as righteousness,” and he was called “the friend of God.” See how a person is justified by works and not by faith alone. For just as a body without spirit is dead, so also faith without works is dead. James 2:21–24,26 We receive the gift of Salvation through our faith in Jesus and by doing good works that share his peace and love with others. While God desires that all people have faith, he does not force us to believe. God has given us the gift of free will, which gives us the ability to choose whether to respond to the gift of Salvation by professing our belief in Christ and his Church and by doing works that bear the fruit of this faith.

Particular Judgment and Purgatory In the New Testament, Saint Paul rejected the idea that death is the end of everything and that once people die, their lives are over, and no part of them will ever exist again. The Catholic Church accepts Paul’s teaching that God has given each of us one body, one soul, and one life to live on earth. This one

The Church teaches us that at the time of our death, we will be judged based on how willing we were to accept God’s grace and how faithful we were to following Jesus. This is called the particular judgment. The souls of those who have lived in the grace of Christ will immediately go to Heaven. To us, living in Heaven is “to be with Christ,” which is a fulfillment of our deepest longings. At their particular judgement, those who have rejected Christ will live eternally separated from God and his love. There are many who, although saved in Christ, are not ready to enter into God’s presence in Heaven. These souls experience Purgatory, a process of purification—a kind of fine-tuning of the soul— before they enter Heaven. Because we are members of the Communion of Saints, our prayers can help the souls in Purgatory on their journey toward God.

Last Judgment At the end of time, Jesus Christ will come again in glory to bring the Kingdom of God to its fullness. At this Last Judgment, everyone will come before Christ to account for all the good he or she has done or failed to do. The just will reign with Christ, glorified in body and soul, and the whole material world will be transformed.

Explore

good works are necessary to receive the Salvation offered by God. The basis for the Church’s teaching is underscored in the New Testament Letter of Saint James.

life is our chance to live as Jesus did. How we live this life determines how we will spend all eternity.

Our Final Goal After his Crucifixion, Jesus—who is both human and divine—descended into the realm of the dead. Through his Resurrection, Christ opened Heaven’s gates for all those who died before him. Jesus taught us in Scripture that the final goal of human life is to live in Heaven with God the Father; Christ Jesus, his Son; and the Holy Spirit. In Heaven we will know God in an intimate way. Our hopes will be fulfilled, and our happiness will be realized. If, during our lives, we choose to turn away from God and live in mortal sin, we risk not being united with God in Heaven. At the same time, we believe in God’s mercy and love. We know that God allows us to ask forgiveness, do penance, and start fresh so that we can live as true followers of Christ and be with him for all eternity. Session 16 > The Protestant Reformation

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Session 16 Blm god Does not leave Us alone Ask young people if they have Design _______ Editorial _______ ever seen a baby take his or her first steps toward a parent, and if so, to describe the movements and expressions of both. Explain that God’s arms are always stretched open wide to receive us and that his face always radiates joy and excitement over us. Next, provide each young person with the Session 16 Blackline Master [T-373]. Read aloud the directions. Have young people work with a partner to find and record the Scripture passages. Then have young people complete the final item independently. PDF Signoff: Production _______

Invite volunteers to read aloud the section Particular Judgment and Purgatory. Ask: What does the Church teach will happen at the time of our death? (We will be judged based on how willing we were to accept God’s grace and how faithful we were to following Jesus.) Point out that particular judgment is the individual judgment each person receives at his or her death. Ask: Where will the souls of those who have lived in the grace of Christ go? (Heaven) Explain that we experience a glimpse of Heaven every time we choose to act in a way that builds up God’s kingdom. Say: The peace we feel when we follow God’s will prefigures the peace we will experience in Heaven. Say: The souls who go to purgatory are not yet ready for Heaven because they are still marred by the effects of temporal punishment. Point out that these effects are cleansed in Purgatory. Say: praying for the souls in purgatory lessens their temporal punishment. Give young people a moment to pray silently for the souls in Purgatory. Solidarity

Invite volunteers to read aloud the sections Last Judgment and Our Final Goal. Point out that the Last Judgment describes our journey toward God as a community, whereas particular judgment describes our journey toward God as individuals. Say: as Catholics we believe that these journeys are interconnected. Then ask: What is the final goal of human life? (to live in Heaven with God the Father)

3 Close Give young people time to reflect on their journey of faith. Encourage them to ask God for the strength to live in God’s grace so that they can receive the gift of Salvation. You may wish to play reflective music as young people pray [CD 2, Track 5].

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REflEcT

prayer Follow the steps to guide young people through the prayer on page 140.

Prayer

God’s Invitation

Young People’s Page prepare Pray the prayer in advance to become familiar with it. Select a young person to pray aloud the psalm verses. pray Invite volunteers to read aloud the page title and the paragraphs in the left column. Point out that the psalms are especially powerful because they are prayed by Jews and all the Christian traditions. You may wish to sing aloud some of the psalms that your parish frequently prays together at Mass. Give young people time to prepare themselves for prayer. Then say: Sometimes just sitting still and paying attention to the world around us can open us to an invitation from God. After giving young people time to sit still and pay attention to the world around them, say: now take a moment to thank God silently for the gift of Salvation. Then have the reader pray aloud the first verse of the psalm. Pray aloud the reflection and give young people time to reflect silently. Continue praying aloud the psalm verses and the reflections, giving young people adequate time to pray silently after each reflection. Conclude the prayer by praying together the Glory Be to the Father. Say: as we continue, let’s be mindful of all the ways that we experience God’s presence in the world around us.

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ORIGINALLY written as hymns to be sung, the psalms include songs of lamentation, sorrow, praise, and thanksgiving. The psalms also mirror God’s marvelous deeds in the history of his people. Psalm-based hymns became popular during the Reformation. Many composers, such as William Byrd, wrote hymns for people to use in worship. Today the psalms are some of the most widely used prayers of the Church, both for communal prayer and for individual reflection. For example, we pray a Responsorial Psalm at every Mass. The psalms are also at the heart of the Liturgy of the Hours, a form of public prayer in which the Church praises God and sanctifies the day.

A Psalm Prayer I thank you, Lord, with all my heart; in the presence of the angels to you I sing. Sometimes we feel overwhelmed by life. We get absorbed in ourselves and our relationships suffer. Then we remember God’s invitation to be still. We realize that we are always in God’s presence. Though I walk in the midst of dangers, you guard my life when my enemies rage. You stretch out your hand; your right hand saves me. Sometimes we have questions that don’t seem to have any answers. Why does the world seem to be full of sufferin g? Is there anything I can do to make a difference? When we accept God’s invitation to stillness, we remember that God has the answers . On the day I cried out, you answered; you strengthened my spirit. Sometimes we define ourselves by what we do rather than who we are. We lose sight of who we are deep down inside— God’s cherished one. To keep that knowledge alive, we need to accept God’s invitation to sit still with him. When we pay attention, God’s voice grows more and more familiar to us. The LORD is with me to the end. LORD, your mercy endures for ever. Never forsake the work of your hands! Psalm 138:1,3,7,8 Share with God whatever is in your heart. Then be silent and allow him to speak to you. Thank God for calling you into existence and for his great love for you.

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Song of prayer Have small groups work PDF Signoff: Production _______ together to make their own song of prayer. Encourage young people to contribute to the prayer by sharing the gifts they have received from God. For example, suggest that some young people write the verses to the songs and others set the words to music. You may wish to use young people’s songs in prayer throughout the year.

FYI

LoyolaPress.

coaching Young peopleEditorial to pray Design _______ _______ Tell young people that writing out a psalm is a good way to pray it slowly and thoughtfully. Have young people choose a psalm and copy it line by line, mentally dwelling on each phrase and image as they transcribe. Afterward, ask which words or images “spoke” to young people most loudly.

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REflEcT

E R E H W t In

1 Begin

Do I Fi

h Jesus’ ceive throug d that we re the at through l gift from Go th ta to us a ds is in n io ell rem ft While Salvat cept this gi mes Campb ac Ja to or t th no au , or tery ether Paschal Mys e option wh th ve ha we make, ation. choices we plan of Salv ate in God’s and particip

s by Ja meell b p m a C

Choose Life

Moses reminds the people of all that God has done for them. He has brought them out of Egypt, through the Red Sea, across the desert of Sinai. It has not been an easy road; there have been times of rebellion. But through Moses’s intercession, God has kept the people under his protection.

It’s Your Choice Think about an important choice you’ve made during the past week. What options did you have, and what might have been the consequence of choosing each option? Why did you choose the option you did? On the lines below, write a prayer that can help you participate in God’s plan of Salvation by making good choices.

Reflect

In Deuteronomy 30:15–20, Moses presents the Hebrew people with a choice. This is Moses’s last will and testament to the people. It is the time when the people are preparing to enter the Promised Land. Moses will not be crossing with them, so he is giving them a final instruction.

2 Connect

Now they face the future, and Moses tells them they are at a crossroads in their faith. They can choose not to follow God and be destroyed, or they can follow God and live. Moses tells them, “Choose life, then, that you and your descendants may live.” (Deuteronomy 30:19) Each day we are presented with choices that can lead us either to Salvation or to turn away from God. Each day we are called to reflect on our own history of the grace that we have been given through the sacraments and that lead us to life. Now is the time and the hour to choose life.

JAMES CAMPBELL is the author of The Stories of the Old Testament: A Catholic’s Guide.

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Ask volunteers to name a positive choice they made recently, such as helping instead of ignoring a friend in need or going to Mass instead of sleeping in. Say: every choice we make, even a simple choice, has a consequence. Explain that making a good choice isn’t always the easiest path. Have a volunteer read aloud the introductory paragraph. Say: When we are faced with a choice, it’s important to make the one that leads us to God. Let’s read about a group of people who had to make a difficult choice—one that had a huge consequence.

LoyolaPress.

good choices, Bad choices Have young people write on note cards a difficult decision that PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ they faced during the past week. Ask young people to describe the situation rather than the choice they made. Then collect the cards and shuffle them. Read aloud each card and invite young people to name possible choices that a person might make in response to the situation. Then have young people name consequences that might result from each choice.

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Remind young people of the story of Moses and the Exodus from Egypt. Invite volunteers to read aloud Choose Life. Say: Moses was a leader who listened to God and gave sound advice. He helped the Hebrew people make good choices. Who in your life helps you make good choices? (Possible responses: my parents, my priest, my teacher) Explain that with the help of these people, young people, like the Hebrew people, can remain under God’s protection. Ask: What do you think Moses meant by “Choose life, then, that you and your descendants may live”? (Possible response: Moses meant that if the Hebrews made good choices and followed God’s will, they would be with him in Heaven. He also meant that the Hebrew people would be good leaders for those who come after them and point the way to Salvation.)

3 Close Have young people complete the activity independently. Encourage young people to pray their prayer whenever they face a hard decision. Remind young people that every day, every moment, is a good time to make good choices that lead us to God, and ultimately, to our Salvation.

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RESpOnD

W h a t ’s

? t a h W

1 Begin What’s What? Have young people answer the questions with a partner or at home. Remind young people that they can use the page references to help them find the clues.

2

3

4

Review concepts from this lesson by using the clues to complete the crossword puzzle.

5

ACROSS

2 Connect

2

Say What? Ask volunteers to read aloud and define the terms. Review each term in the Glossary if necessary.

4

Luther founded a branch of Christianity . PAGE 137 known as

5

Nailing theses on the door of the local church was a way for theologians to initiate on a topic of interest. PAGE 136

6

The Church believes that faith and good are necessary for Salvation. PAGE 137

9

As a result of Adam and Eve’s choice to turn away from God, humans are born into Sin. PAGE 138

6

Martin Luther believed that alone is the final authority for Christians. PAGE 136

7

8

Respond

9

now What? Read aloud the section. Invite each young person to respond to the question independently.

3 Go in Peace

1

10

10

8

The mirror God’s marvelous deeds in the history of his people. PAGE 140

DOWN

Have young people collect their materials and return them to the appropriate places. Encourage young people to remain mindful of the Now What? challenge during the week. Say: When we perform good works, we express to God our thanks for the gift of Salvation.

1

Martin Luther taught that faith alone is . PAGE 136 sufficient for

3

John Calvin taught that the words of do not transform the bread and wine into Jesus Christ’s Body and Blood. PAGE 137

7

Angela Merici decided to name the religious , community she founded after Saint a saint to whom she had great devotion.

In response to Adam and Eve’s choice to give in to Satan’s temptation, God promised to save that he would send a humanity. PAGE 138

Say What? Know the definitions of these terms. actual grace free will indulgences Last Judgment

particular judgment Purgatory sanctifying grace

Now What? The Church teaches that faith and good works are necessary to receive the gift of Salvation promised by God. What is one work you can do for others this week?

PAGE 134

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Service: Sharing god’s Warmth Remind young people that actual grace helps us make choices PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ according to God’s will and that when we make these choices, we engage in acts of faith. For the next session, have young people bring new or gently worn blankets to donate to an organization that will distribute them to people in need. During the session form a circle around the blankets, hold hands, and ask God’s blessing on each of the people the blankets will touch. Arrange with your catechetical leader to have the blankets delivered to an appropriate organization. The Poor and Vulnerable

Session assessment Option An assessment for this session can be found at www.findinggod.com.

3-Minute Retreat Give young people an opportunity for quiet meditation at www.loyolapress.com/retreat.

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p l a n a h E a D : Get Ready for Session 17 Consult the catechist preparation pages to prepare for Session 17 and determine any materials you will need.


CateChist PreParation S e S S io n 17

Renewal in the Church 3-Minute Retreat Before you prepare the session, pause and be still. Take three deep breaths and be aware of the loving presence of God, who is with you on this journey.

Knowing and Sharing Your Faith in Session 17 Consider how Scripture and Tradition can deepen your understanding of session content.

Scripture James 5:16 Therefore, confess your sins to one another and pray for one another, that you may be healed. The fervent prayer of a righteous person is very powerful.

Reflection It is wonderful to experience the inner healing that comes after acknowledging our sins and restoring a broken relationship. The Letter of James reminds us to confess our sins and of the power of fervent prayer. The Sacrament of Reconciliation is one of the Sacraments of Healing. In Reconciliation our sins are forgiven, and we hear the worlds of absolution from the priest. The prayer of a righteous person is also a source of healing and gives us strength to avoid sin in the future.

Questions How have I experienced the healing power of prayer? For whom can I pray?

Concluding Prayer

Speak to God, using the words of this prayer or your own. Jesus, merciful healer, thank you for reaching out to me in my weakness. May my prayers for those who suffer be a source of healing for them.

Matthew 5:23–24 encourages us to offer and seek out forgiveness. Matthew 5:3–10 tells when Jesus shared the Beatitudes with us.

Tradition The Church defines sin as either mortal or venial. A sin is considered mortal when the matter—what has been done or not done—is serious or grave, done with full knowledge of the seriousness of the act, and done with a deliberate personal choice. A sin is considered venial when the matter is less serious or, even if the matter is serious, is one without full knowledge or complete consent. Mortal sins must be confessed in the Sacrament of Reconciliation. If the person is truly repentant, venial sins can be forgiven through prayer, good actions, and receiving the Eucharist.

Catholic Social Teaching In this session the integrated Catholic Social Teaching themes are Rights and Responsibilities; Care for God’s Creation; and Call to Family, Community, and Participation. See page 133b for an explanation of these themes.

Window on the Catechism The Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation is described in CCC 1420–1470.

General Directory for Catechesis Catechesis and the message of Salvation through the forgiveness of sin are described in GDC 101 and 102.

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caTEchIST pREpaRaTIOn

One-Hour Session Planner

Renewal in the Church

SeSSion 17

Session Theme: Making good, moral decisions is not always easy, but we can find support and forgiveness in God. Before This Session ▶▶ Bookmark your Bible to Matthew 5:23–24 and Numbers 6:24–26. Place the

open Bible in your prayer space. ▶▶ Read the Guide for this session, choose any additional If Time Allows activities

that you might have time to complete, and gather the listed materials. StepS

ApproximAte time

Engage Renewal in the Church

10 minutes

30–40 minutes

The Bishops Respond

Pages 144–145

Prayer: Restoring Relationships

10–15 minutes Page 148

Page 149

Respond What’s What?

Take IT Home

Pages 146–147

Reflect Where Do I Fit In?

10–15 minutes Page 150

materials REQUIRED

OpTIOnal

▶▶ Road map or GPS (page 144)

▶▶ Writing supplies (page 143)

▶▶ Copy of the Catechism of the

▶▶ Names of catechumens in

Catholic Church (page 145) ▶▶ Bible (page 148)

your parish RCIA (page 144) ▶▶ Art supplies (page 144) ▶▶ Session 17 BLM, T-374 (page 147) ▶▶ Magazines (page 149) ▶▶ Session 17 Assessment,

www.findinggod.com (page 150)

143b

Young people are invited to experience an online, Scripture-based 3-Minute Retreat at the end of the session. The prayers give young people opportunities to experience a variety of forms of prayer. Session 17 includes Scripture reading and a reflection on forgiveness. Follow the Prepare directions on the Catechist Guide page before sharing with young people.

Page 143

Explore Sin and Forgiveness

Prayer in Session 17

www.findinggod.com

Homework options: What Are They Learning?

Page 145

Session 17 BLM

Page 147


EnGaGE

Session

17

SeSSion 17

OUTcOmES ▶▶ Identify the decisions that Church

leaders made at the Council of Trent. ▶▶ State the differences between mortal,

venial, and social sin. ▶▶ Explain the meaning of the petitions

we pray in the Lord’s Prayer. ▶▶ Define catechism, personal

Think of a time you purposely broke a rule and what the consequences

Renewal in the Church

were for making that

sin, seminary, social sin, Ten Commandments, and venial sin.

choice. What role did your conscience play in helping you decide to break the rule? How did your choice affect your relationship with others and with God? How did you make amends for the impact that your choice had on others?

1 Set the Stage Read aloud the text in the box on page 143. Give young people a few moments to reflect silently on the questions or to share their responses with a partner.

2 Get Started PR AYER Jesus, thank you for the gift of forgiveness that we receive through the Sacrament of Reconciliation. Help us respond to your gift of Salvation by making good moral choices.

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lesson learned Have small groups work together to prepare and present skits about PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ a character who chooses to break a rule and the lesson that he or she learns as a result of the consequences for that choice.

Good-choice Fables Discuss with young people the characteristics of good fables. Say: Fables are short fictional stories that use characters such as plants, animals, or mythical creatures, to teach a moral lesson. Have small groups work together to write fables about characters who face a difficult decision and choose to make a good choice. Encourage young people to focus on the positive results of the decision that the character makes.

Write on the board the phrases being tardy, getting into a fistfight, and turning an assignment in a late. Then, to the side, write suspended from school. Ask: Which of these offenses deserves this consequence? (fistfight) Say: It seems just that a student should be suspended for getting into a fight. Point out that the student who receives the suspension might not feel that the consequence is fair. Say: When we’ve committed an offense, our emotions get worked up. It’s difficult for us to see the fairness of the consequences we may face. In this session we will learn about Church teachings that help us make good decisions so that we can avoid sin and its consequences.

prayer Say: Let’s thank Jesus for the forgiveness he freely offers us. Pray aloud the prayer together. Then say: Take a moment to ask God for the grace to make good moral choices. After giving young people time to pray silently, pray the Sign of the Cross.

Go to www.findinggod.com/sessionextenders for an article on the Beatitudes. You may wish to share this with the group.

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ExplORE

1 Begin Display a road map or GPS unit. Ask: Why do we use these? (to help us find our way) Say: After the Reformation, the Church needed to check its course to make sure that its teachings and practices were an authentic response to God’s Revelation. Point out that in this article, young people will read about how the Church responded to the challenges of the Reformation.

2 Connect Invite a volunteer to read aloud the article title and the introductory paragraph. Invite volunteers to share their responses to the question. (Possible answers: Feedback from others can help us identify the gifts we have received from God. Feedback from others can help us identify times when our choices have prevented us from serving others.) Ask young people to summarize what happened during the Reformation. (Reformers such as Martin Luther and John Calvin challenged the Church’s teachings and practices regarding indulgences, Scripture, the sacraments, and Salvation. As a result of the reformers’ challenges, new Christian denominations developed.) Read aloud the first paragraph of the section The Council of Trent. Point out that this was an ecumenical council. Ask a volunteer to read aloud from the Glossary the definition of the term ecumenical council. Ask: What topics do you think the bishops discussed during the Council of Trent? (the Church’s teaching about indulgences, Scripture, the sacraments, and Salvation) Say: At the time of the council, the Church was at the center of europe’s religious and political worlds. The decisions made at this council influenced the course of european history and shaped Church teaching for the next half century.

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The Bishops Respond THE

Church took seriously the challenges it faced during the Protestant Reformation. From the early 1500s to the mid-1600s, the Church listened to the feedback it was getting and renewed itself by acting upon the call to repent and reform. This period in history is often called the CounterReformation. Think about your own life. How can receiving feedback from other people help us better respond to God’s call to serve others?

The Council of Trent One of the Catholic Church’s responses to the challenges of the Protestant Reformation was to convene the Council of Trent, which was held between 1545 and 1563. During this time, Catholic bishops met to offer a collective response to the Protestant Reformation and to determine the steps necessary to renew the Catholic Church.

Saint François de Sales and Saint Jeanne de Chantal, Noël Hallé, oil on canvas.

Teaching the Faith The Catechism of the Catholic Church often helps catechumens in the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA) prepare to enter the Church. Take a moment to reflect on the Church’s teachings. Which teachings are essential to pass on to those who want to become Catholic? Write one idea on the lines below and explain why this teaching is important.

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cards for catechumens Obtain from your catechetical leader the names of the catechumens PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ in your parish RCIA program. Distribute art supplies and have young people make cards for the catechumens. Encourage young people to include notes letting the recipients know that the young people are praying for them. Arrange with your catechetical leader to have the cards delivered to the catechumens. Family and Community


ExplORE

John Calvin

med . . . the Council affir s ng the Church’s teachi n, on transubstantiatio the Real Presence, ents. and the seven sacram

Past Meets Present PAST: Martin Luther and John Calvin challenged the Church’s teachings and its practices. The Church addressed these challenges at the Council of Trent. The teachings of this council were summarized in the Catechism

In the area of Church practices, the bishops took steps to end abuses, such as the sale of indulgences. Practices around proper devotion to Mary and the saints were also defined and established. The Council affirmed the concept of an ordained priesthood and required that each diocese establish a seminary, or school for the proper formation of priests. With this widened focus on forming clergy, there soon were more Catholics preaching and teaching. Underscoring the importance of the sacraments, the bishops at the Council of Trent encouraged Catholics to receive Holy Communion at least once a week and to receive forgiveness of sins often through the Sacrament of Reconciliation. The teachings of the Council of Trent inspired the founding of new religious communities, which opened doors for devout Catholics, such as Saint Francis de Sales and Saint Jeanne (Jane) de Chantal, to serve the needs of others. As a result of the Church’s response to the Reformers, two-thirds of the Christians in Europe remained Catholic. The work and teachings of the Council of Trent formed and renewed the Church, continuing to guide it into the 20th century.

of the Council of Trent. A catechism is a collection or summary of the Church’s religious teachings. The decisions made at Trent became the foundation for Catholic teaching for the next 400 years.

PRESENT: In 1985 the Church’s bishops proposed that a new catechism be written. Their hope was that the new catechism would be a more complete, accurate, and contemporary synthesis of the Catholic faith. Pope John Paul II approved the revised edition of the Catechism of the Catholic Church in 1997. When he did so, the pope pointed out that the Catechism of the Catholic Church is a collection of the Church’s teachings on faith and morals. Through it, the pope noted, people all over the world can know what the Church teaches, celebrates, lives, and prays.

DEF IN E semi na ry, catec

hism

R EM EM BE R

Th rough the Co uncil of Trent, the Church res ponded to the concer ns that we re rai sed by the Protesta nt Refor mers by rea ffir mi ng the Church’s teach ings on Sc ripture, Trad ition, and the sacra ments.

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What are They learning? PDF Signoff: Production _______ Before the next session, ask young people to research courses that are offered in your diocesan or another regional seminary. Have young people choose one of the courses and write a paragraph about how that course can help seminarians become good priests.

Explore

In response to the claims made by Reformers, the Council affirmed the Church’s teachings on transubstantiation, the Real Presence, and the seven sacraments. The Council also affirmed that both faith and good works are necessary for Salvation. The bishops clarified the Catholic understanding of Scripture and stated that the Bible must be read within the context of the living teaching of the Church, thereby reaffirming the importance of both Scripture and the Church’s Tradition.

InclusIon

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communication Design Editorial _______ Do _______ It Your Way If young

people in your group have trouble communicating through writing, invite them to use an alternative media to complete the Teaching the Faith activity. Young people may choose to create a collage, a recording, an illustration, or a slide show about a Church teaching that they cherish. Offer to help young people create captions or brief supplementary texts as needed.

Invite volunteers to read aloud the next four paragraphs. Ask: What did the bishops at the council affirm? (the Church’s teachings on transubstantiation, the Real Presence, the seven sacraments, that faith and good works are necessary for Salvation, the Catholic understanding of Scripture, and that the Bible must be read within the context of the living teaching of the Church) Draw young people’s attention to the word seminary. Ask a young person to read aloud from the Glossary the definition of the word. Ask: What effect would the opening of seminaries have? (There soon would be more Catholics teaching and preaching.) Explain that during the time the Council of Trent took place, Catholics attended Mass but many of them did not receive the Eucharist regularly. Say: The bishops’ encouragement to receive the eucharist at least once per year is reflected in the Precepts of the Church. Say: The members of the new religious communities that were founded after the Council of Trent responded to the needs of their time. Point out how contemporary members of religious communities respond to the needs of our time, such as by running soup kitchens, hospitals, and schools.

Past meets Present

Read aloud the feature. Draw young people’s attention to the word catechism. Ask a young person to read aloud from the Glossary the definition of the word. Display a copy of the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

3 Close Give young people time to complete the Teaching the Faith Activity. Invite volunteers to share their responses.

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ExplORE

1 Begin Say: Take a moment to ask yourself, “If I didn’t have to follow any rules today, what would I do?” Ask: Do you think it would be good for us to live in a world where there weren’t any rules? Encourage young people to explain their responses. Point out that in this article, young people will read about the consequences of choosing to act in ways that are contrary to God’s rules as well as about practices that help us remain faithful to these rules.

2 Connect Invite volunteers to read aloud the article title and the first two paragraphs. Ask: Why do you think we use the Greek concept “to miss the mark” to define sin? (Possible answer: When we sin, we miss the mark by failing to live as God wants us to live.) What does the term the seal of the confessional mean? (that a priest can never reveal the sins that are confessed to him in the Sacrament of Reconciliation.) Invite volunteers to read aloud the section Types of Sin. Ask: What three conditions must be present for a sin to be considered mortal? (The action must be serious. The person must know that it is serious. The person must freely choose to commit the sin.) Point out that when a person commits a mortal sin, he or she chooses to turn away from God totally. Emphasize that the person can also choose to turn back to God and receive his forgiveness through the Sacrament of Reconciliation. Write on the board the terms mortal sin, venial sin, personal sin, and social sin. Invite volunteers to explain each type of sin. Write on the board young people’s responses. Encourage young people to use the Glossary if necessary.

our Catholic Character

Read aloud the feature. As you discuss the capital sins, explain that greed is also known as avarice or covetousness.

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Si n a nd s s e n e v i g r Fo THE

Greek word for sin means “to miss the mark.” When we sin, we hurt others by refusing to follow God’s commandments. The choice to sin, or to turn away from God, harms our relationship with God and with others. Thankfully, the Church offers a path to forgiveness through the Sacrament of Reconciliation. The priest to whom we confess our sins in this sacrament can never repeat them to anyone. This is called the “seal of the confessional” or “the sacramental seal.” How has the Sacrament of Reconciliation helped you grow in your relationship with God?

When we sin, God calls us to repent and seek forgiveness through the grace of the Holy Spirit. In addition, the Holy Spirit gives us the resolve to make better choices and strengthens us against future temptation.

Types of Sin

Sometimes a person chooses to turn away from God totally and completely by doing something that is seriously wrong. Such an action is a mortal sin. To commit a mortal sin, the action must be a serious offense, the person must know that the action is a serious offense, and the person must freely choose to commit the offense. When someone commits a mortal sin, the Holy Spirit calls the person to contrition. After committing a mortal sin, a person must celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation in order to reconcile his or her relationship The Church has identified certain sins as capital sins. These with God and with others. A person include behaviors that can lead to serious sinful actions. The who is in a state of mortal sin is not to capital sins are lust (an inordinate craving for bodily pleasure), receive Holy Communion.

Our Catholic Character

greed (the desire for material goods or money simply for the

sake of having them), envy (a desire for what others have simply because they have it and we don’t), gluttony (eating and drinking in excess), sloth (being careless about our spiritual development), pride (having a false image of ourselves that goes beyond what we deserve as God’s creation), and anger (uncontrolled feelings of hatred or wrath). The Church teaches that baptized people combat these sins through good will, humility, and trust in God.

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Sometimes people make less serious choices to turn away from God. Such a decision is a venial sin. These sins weaken our relationship with God and with others. They can also lead to mortal sins. A person who has committed a venial sin can receive Holy Communion, which forgives venial sins and strengthens us against

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Tone Talk In aPDF large, open space, have young people form two lines, facing one Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ another. Then give young people a nonsense phrase such as doodlescrood hummicruffs. One at a time, have young people walk down the aisle formed by the two lines. While the person is walking down the aisle, have the people in the two lines repeat the phrase, one at a time, using different tones of voice. Explain that the walker’s goal is to walk to the end of the aisle without smiling or laughing. After all the young people have had a chance to walk down the aisle, discuss the effects that various speakers’ tones had on the walkers and the other speakers. Explain that the “tone,” or spirit in which we commit a sin, can also have various effects. Provide an example, such as borrowing your sister’s hairbrush without asking versus stealing money from a classmate. Then invite young people to provide examples of their own.


ExplORE the temptation to sin. While the Church does not require us to do so, we are encouraged to receive forgiveness for venial sins through the Sacrament of Reconciliation. Mortal and venial sins are types of personal sin. They are the result of our personal choice to turn away from God. Social sin, another type of sin, is an accumulation of personal sins. These sins undermine human dignity, because they perpetuate cultural structures, such as racism and sexism, that allow sinful practices to continue.

The Ten Commandments

The true spirit of the Fourth Commandment teaches us to respect people in positions of authority. We are called to develop relationships with people who will help us in our journey of faith. By developing these relationships, we surround ourselves with people who will help us make good decisions and focus our minds and hearts on God’s will for us.

R EM EM BE R

W hen we sin, Go d ca lls us to repent through the grace of the Holy Spirit. The Church offers a path to forgiven es s through the Sacra ment of Re conciliation.

The Beatitudes In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus gave us the Beatitudes, which are instructions for how to live in God’s kingdom. In the Beatitudes, Jesus teaches us that disciples are called to live lives of love and humility.

Explore

The Ten Commandments are the ten rules presented by God to Moses at Mount Sinai. They sum up God’s law and teach us what is required to love God and our neighbors. The Fourth Commandment instructs us to honor our mother and our father. It is in our families that we first learn how to live moral lives. From our parents and teachers, we learn habits that help us turn toward God and away from evil. These habits include prayer, worship, and the virtues.

DEF IN E venia l sin, persona l sin, socia l sin, Ten Commandm ents

Precepts of the Church The Precepts of the Church outline the basics of what we are called to do in prayer and in living a moral life. The Church developed the Precepts to help us maintain self-discipline and foster our spiritual development. The Precepts are to attend Mass on Sundays and Holy Days of Obligation, confess serious sins at least once per year, receive Holy Communion at least once a year during the Easter season, observe the days of fast and abstinence, and provide for the needs of the Church.

READY for Confirmation The Sacrament of Confirmation, which strengthens the grace we receive in the Sacrament of Baptism, is one of the Sacraments of Initiation. As fully initiated members of the community, we have both rights and responsibilities. We have the right to rely on the Church, its teaching, and its members—the People of God—to support us on our journey of faith. We also have the responsibility to support others in their journey. We can do this by modeling a life of discipleship, by choosing to make good moral choices, by praying for others, and by practicing the Works of Mercy.

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Session 17 Blm What’s It to You? Provide each young person with the Design _______ Editorial _______ Session 17 Blackline Master [T-374]. Read aloud the directions and provide a possible translation for the first beatitude, such as If you are struggling in your spiritual life, God will help you. Have young people complete the Blackline Master before the next session. During the next session, invite volunteers to share their translations and applications. Discuss differences in translations, guiding young people to appreciate the richness of Jesus’ words. Point out that God desires to speak to each of us in terms relevant to own lives. Explain that if young people keep their eyes and ears open, they are likely to hear God’s voice not only in Scripture, but in their everyday experiences. PDF Signoff: Production _______

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Invite volunteers to read aloud the section The Ten Commandments. Have young people turn to page 264 in the back of their books. Read aloud each of the Ten Commandments. Then ask: What do the Ten Commandments teach us? (what is required to love God and our neighbors) Discuss why, as adolescents, young people sometimes find it challenging to follow the Fourth Commandment. Say: It is natural for you to want to become more independent the older you get. Point out that parents love their children just as God loves us. Say: Your parents love you and want to protect you. They also want to share with you the wisdom they have learned through their own life experiences. Invite a volunteer to read aloud the section The Beatitudes. Have young people turn to page 263 in the back of their books. Read aloud the Beatitudes. Invite a volunteer to read aloud the section Precepts of the Church. Have young people turn to page 264 in the back of their books. Read aloud the Precepts of the Church. Point out that the Precepts of the Church present the minimum we are called to do in prayer and in living a moral life. Say: We should strive to go beyond these minimum requirements.

Ready for Confirmation

Read aloud the feature. Tell young people that they don’t have to wait to be confirmed to practice these rights and responsibilities and that maturing as a follower of Christ takes a lifetime. Rights and Responsibilities

3 Close Point out that we can turn to the Ten Commandments, the Beatitudes, and the Precepts of the Church when we are tempted to sin. Say: God wants us to follow his path for us. To help us, he has given us these teachings.

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REFlEcT

Prayer

prayer Follow the steps to guide young people through the prayer on page 148.

Young People’s Page Prepare Pray the prayer in advance to become familiar with it. Select young people to serve in the roles of Leader and Reader. Have them read their parts of the prayer in advance. Point out when the Leader and Reader will need to pause for silence. Pray Invite volunteers to read aloud the paragraphs in the left column. Ask: What do we acknowledge when we pray the Lord’s Prayer? (that God’s mercy can penetrate our hearts only when we are merciful toward others and forgive those who have hurt us) Give young people a moment to prepare themselves for prayer. Then have the Leader begin the prayer. After the Leader has introduced the series of questions, read aloud the following. Pause after each one to give young people time to reflect silently.

I misuse God’s name out of frustration or anger?

Restoring Relationships Forgiveness Reflection

In the Lord’s Prayer, we pray “And

Leader: In the name of the Father, and of the Son,

Spirit. Amen.

forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us.” In this petition we acknowledge that an essential aspect of prayer is to admit that we are sinners. When we pray the Lord’s Prayer, we acknowledge that God’s mercy can penetrate our heart only when we are merciful toward others and forgive those who have hurt us. It is not always easy to forgive, but with the help of the Holy Spirit, we can open our hearts to the compassionate love of God.

and of the Holy

All:

Loving God, we come before you in praise and thanksgiving and ask for your help to see ourselves as you see us. May the Holy Spirit guide our reflection and lead us on the path of reconciliation with you and with one another. We ask this through Christ our Lord. Amen. Leader: Silently give thanks to God for all the blessing s we have received. Ask for God’s help to remember the ways we have damaged our relationships with others.

Reader: A reading from the holy Gospel accordi

ng to Matthew. Therefore, if you bring your gift to the altar, and there recall that your brother has anything against you, leave your gift there at the altar, go first and be reconci led with your brother, and then come and offer your gift. Matthew 5:23–24 The Gospel of the Lord.

All: Praise to you, Lord Jesus Christ. Leader: In light of the Word of God, let’s spend

a few minutes reflecting on our relationships. Listen to a series of questions that will be read. Silently answer them for yourself.

Leader: The L ORD bless you and keep you!

The L ORD let his face shine upon you, and be gracious to you! The L ORD look upon you kindly and give you peace! Numbers 6:24–26

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All: Amen.

▶▶ Do ▶▶ Do

I contribute to the happiness of my family by being patient and understanding?

▶▶ Do

I forgive those who have hurt me, or do I hold a grudge?

▶▶ Do

I show respect for my body and the bodies of others?

▶▶ Do

I insult others or try to make them feel inferior?

▶▶ Do

I appreciate my own good qualities, or do I always compare myself with others?

Conclude by praying together the Lord’s Prayer. Then say: As we continue, let’s reflect on how we can remain faithful to God.

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Through God’s Eyes Point out that it is impossible PDF Signoff: Production _______ to “see through God’s eyes,” but that it can be helpful to try to imagine ourselves from God’s point of view. Have young people write a description of themselves “through God’s eyes.” Have them begin their entry with these words: When I look at my beloved child [Name], I see . Remind young people that even when God notices our flaws, his love for us is overflowing.

FYI

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coaching Young peopleEditorial to pray Design _______ _______ Remind young people that spending time in prayer is the best first step we can take when we feel guilt after hurting someone. Asking God for his help and forgiveness will give us the courage we need to ask forgiveness of the other person.


REFlEcT

E R E H W t In Do I Fi

1 Begin

the Chur members of our lives. As follow our we decisions in lt en cu wh ffi at di ce nce so th We of ten fa p our conscie d to develo we are calle otsteps. fo s’ su Je llow in hear t, we fo

ch,

by Chris

L o w ne y

Decisions: Whom Do I Serve?

When I became an adult, I was lucky enough to get a job that paid a good salary, and, over the years, I had a good deal of money. I would not call myself rich, but I had more money than most people, more money than I needed to support myself. And, for sure, money can solve a lot of problems. If I need to pay a doctor or repair a leak in my house, I have the money for those things. But when you have more money than you need, you also have choices to make. Is it OK for me to buy a brand new cell phone if my old one still works? Is it OK for me to buy the fastest and most expensive car I can find if a child in Africa does not have enough money to pay tuition to go to school? As a Catholic I find that I have to make choices about money all the time. It’s natural for a human being to want to have fun and to have whatever things my neighbors have. But my faith teaches me that I’m not supposed to live only for myself and not to make myself the center of the whole world. Instead, I’m also concerned with the needs of the rest of the human family. And the way I interpret that it means that I shouldn’t try to have

CHRIS LOWNEY is the author of Heroic Leadership: Best Practices from a 450-Year-Old Company that Changed the World.

Reflect

When I was about your age, my family was not poor, but we did not have lots of money either. And I used to imagine that money could solve every problem in life. If I had lots of money, I could buy whatever toys I wanted, the biggest and best television, and so on.

too many luxurious things for myself if some of my brothers and sisters don’t even have the basic things they need in life. So every time I have extra money, I have a choice to make about how to use it.

Making Decisions Think about some of the resources you have, such as your time and your talents. On the lines below, write two or three questions you can ask yourself when you are faced with a decision about how to use your resources.

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ad-Vice? Have partners look through magazines to find ads for various goods. PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ Invite volunteers to display some of the ads and to explain how the ad insists that we buy the item being advertised. Guide young people to discuss whether Jesus would agree or disagree with the ad and why.

The Greater Good Before the activity, write on the board various items that people need, such as housing, food, and clothing. Also include luxuries such as movies and video games. Next to each item, write an approximate cost. Arrange young people into small groups and give each group varying amounts of fake money. Say: Determine how you are going to spend your money during the next week. Make sure young people notice that some groups have more money than others. After groups have planned their budgets, discuss how groups went about making their decisions. Ask the groups with the smallest amount of money to share any difficulties they experienced. Point out whether any groups donated money to groups that had less money.

Invite a volunteer to read the introductory text. Say: As you get older, your decisions will get more complex and require more thought. Invite young people to share whether they receive an allowance, and if so, how they decide what to do with it. Say: In our culture, we are often told to spend our money on ourselves. sometimes we are told to save it for a rainy day. Rarely are we told to use it for someone else’s benefit, however. Ask: Why do you think this is? (Accept reasonable responses.)

2 Connect Ask young people whether they agree with the statement “Money cannot buy happiness.” Then say: Let’s read about how the author’s opinion about this statement changed over time. Invite volunteers to read aloud the section Decisions: Whom Do I Serve? Ask: When the author was a child, what did he imagine money could do? (solve every problem in life) What did he come to realize about having more money than one needs? (that one has to make choices about how to spend it) Explain that as Catholics, we are called to care for one another’s needs. Say: While the Church does not teach that earning money is a sin, it does teach us that we have a responsibility to share our goods with others, especially with people who have less than we do. Point out that sharing our goods with others helps prevent us from turning these goods into idols. Have young people complete the activity independently. Suggest that young people turn to pages 290–293 in the back of their book for information about making good choices.

3 Close Have young people quietly ask God to help them make good decisions as they grow.

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RESpOnD

W h a t ’s

? t a h W

1 Begin What’s What? Have young people complete the activity with a partner or at home. Remind young people that they can use the page references to help them answer the questions.

1

c. have a false image of ourselves d. have uncontrolled feelings of anger

6

a. Reformation

a. Lord’s Prayer

c. Council of Transubstantiation

c. Nicene Creed

Respond

d. Beatitudes

The bishops who met between 1545 and 1563 affirmed the Church’s teachings on a variety . PAGE 145 of issues including

7

b. venial sin

b. respect people in positions of authority

c. transubstantiation

c. model a life of discipleship, making good moral choices, and praying for others

d. the catechism

3 Go in Peace

When he approved the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Pope John Paul II noted that through it, people all over the world can . PAGE 145 know what the Church a. celebrates c. repents d. reflects on The Greek word for sin means “

d. honor only our mother and our father

Say What? Know the definitions of these terms. catechism personal sin seminary

b. forgives

4

The true spirit of the Fourth Commandment . PAGE 147 teaches us to a. learn habits that help us turn toward God and away from evil

a. mortal sin

3

In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus gave us , which are instructions for how to the live in God’s kingdom. PAGE 147 b. Ten Commandments

d. Real Presence

2

. PAGE 146

b. want what we don’t have simply for the sake of having it

b. Council of Trent

now What? Read aloud the section. Invite each young person to respond to the question independently.

Have young people collect their materials and return them to the appropriate places. Encourage young people to remain mindful of the Now What? challenge during the week. Say: In addition to turning to this person when you are faced with temptation, remember to pray to the Holy spirit for strength and to practice the virtues.

One of the Church’s responses to the challenge of Protestant Reformation was . PAGE 144145 the

When we are slothful, we

a. are careless about our spiritual development

Complete each sentence by choosing the correct answer.

2 Connect say What? Ask volunteers to read aloud the terms and to use each one in a sentence. Review each term in the Glossary if necessary.

5

.”

PAGE 146

a. to refuse to follow God’s commandments b. to harm our relationship with God and with one another

social sin Ten Commandments venial sin

Now What? We can turn to others for support in living free from sin. To whom can you turn during the next week when you are faced with the temptation to turn away from God?

c. to do something we regret d. to miss the mark

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Service: Words into action Remind young people that when we sin, we miss the mark by PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ choosing not to live as God wants us to live. Say: We sin when we disrespect the gifts we have received from God, such as our natural resources. Arrange with your catechetical leader to have young people clean up trash in a local park or other natural area. God’s Creation

Session assessment Option An assessment for this session can be found at www.findinggod.com.

3-Minute Retreat Give young people an opportunity for quiet meditation at www.loyolapress.com/retreat.

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p l a n a h E a D : Get Ready for Session 18 Consult the catechist preparation pages to prepare for Session 18 and determine any materials you will need.


CateChist PreParation S e S S io n 18

The Church Reaches Out 3-Minute Retreat Before you prepare the session, pause and be still. Take three deep breaths and be aware of the loving presence of God, who is with you on this journey.

Knowing and Sharing Your Faith in Session 18 Consider how Scripture and Tradition can deepen your understanding of session content.

Scripture Ruth 1:16 But Ruth said, “Do not press me to go back and abandon you! Wherever you go I will go, wherever you lodge I will lodge. Your people shall be my people and your God, my God.”

Reflection Friendship doesn’t just happen. A friendship develops over time. Our human friendships can teach us valuable lessons about friendship with God. The Holy Spirit calls us to friendship, and how we respond is up to us. Just as human friendships require openness, patience, and effort, so does friendship with God. When we come to God with an open heart and mind, we will discover at times when our faith is tested what a faithful friend God is.

Questions What qualities of human friendship do I practice in my relationship with God? How do I show respect in my relationship with friends? In my relationship with God?

Concluding Prayer

Speak to God, using the words of this prayer or your own. Jesus, you call us friends because you have taught us all that you learned from your Father. Help me grow in friendship with you and the Father and to remain faithful to prayer.

Psalm 1:1–3 praises God’s Laws and expresses thankfulness in them for guiding us so that we may spread God’s love to others.

Tradition Every human being possesses a basic dignity that is not earned but rather is derived from being created by God and redeemed by Jesus Christ. It can never be taken away and should never be attacked in any way. Because God is the source of this human dignity, the respect we show one another is part of our reverence for God. The Fifth, Sixth, and Ninth Commandments show us in various ways how we can respect the dignity of life we have been given by God. We hold every life sacred in the Fifth Commandment, the Sixth Commandment teaches us to be faithful in our relationships with one another, and the Ninth Commandment tells us to respect the goods of others.

Catholic Social Teaching In this session the integrated Catholic Social Teaching themes are Care for God’s Creation and Life and Dignity of the Human Person. See page 133b for an explanation of these themes.

Window on the Catechism The Catechism covers the Fifth, Sixth, and Ninth Commandments in CCC 2258–2283, 2331–2400, 2514–2533.

General Directory for Catechesis Moral formation as one of the fundamental tasks of catechesis is discussed in GDC 85–87.

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caTEchIST pREpaRaTIOn

One-Hour Session Planner

The Church Reaches out

SeSSion 18

Session Theme: We cultivate our relationship with God by living his will every day. Before This Session ▶▶ Bookmark your Bible to Psalm 1:1–3. Place the open Bible in your prayer space. ▶▶ Display the Finding God poster Ignatian Spirituality. ▶▶ Read the Guide for this session, choose any additional If Time Allows activities

that you might have time to complete, and gather the listed materials. StepS

ApproximAte time

Engage The Church Reaches Out

10 minutes

30–40 minutes Pages 152–153

Caring for God’s Creation

Prayer: god’s Fingerprints

10–15 minutes Page 156

Page 157

Respond What’s What?

Take IT Home

Pages 154–155

Reflect Where Do I Fit In?

Young people are invited to experience an online, Scripture-based 3-Minute Retreat at the end of the session. The prayers give young people opportunities to experience a variety of forms of prayer. Session 18 includes an Ignatian approach to prayer, the Daily Examen. Follow the Prepare directions on the Catechist Guide page before sharing with young people.

Page 151

Explore Ignatius of Loyola

Prayer in Session 18

10–15 minutes Page 158

Homework options: God’s Presence

Page 152

Session 18 BLM

Page 155

materials REQUIRED

OpTIOnal

▶▶ Finding God poster:

▶▶ Note cards with large print (page 152)

Ignatian Spirituality (page 153) ▶▶ Information about Jesuit ministries

(page 153)

▶▶ Measuring tape for each group

(page 154) ▶▶ Session 18 BLM, T-375 (page 155) ▶▶ Scrapbook supplies (page 156) ▶▶ Session 18 Assessment,

www.findinggod.com (page 158)

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EngagE

Session

18

SeSSion 18

OUTcOmES ▶▶ Summarize the story of Saint Ignatius

of Loyola’s conversion. ▶▶ Explain how the Fifth, Sixth, and

Ninth Commandments help us care for God’s creation. ▶▶ Identify the Daily Examen as an Think about a time you experienced a wonderful surprise. What was good

The Church Reaches Out

about the experience? What feelings come to mind when you think

chastity, covet, euthanasia, moral law, and Spiritual Exercises.

experience change your life in any way? If so, how?

1 Set the Stage Read aloud the text in the box on page 151. Give young people a few moments to reflect silently on the questions or to share their responses with a partner.

2 Get Started

God, thank you for the many ways you reveal yourself to us. May we strive to find your presence in the world around us, and may our words and actions reveal your presence to others.

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▶▶ Define abortion, adultery, asceticism,

back on it? Did the

PR AYER

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meaningful coincidences AskPDF young people if they have ever experienced a coincidence, such Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ as running into a person shortly after thinking about him or her or frequently encountering a word after learning its meaning. Explain that these events may be drawing our attention to something important. If possible, provide an example from your own life of a seemingly coincidental event that had a profound effect on you. [Example: One day when I was feeling sad, I heard a song on the radio that my mother used to sing. It felt like God telling me everything would be OK.] During the next week, ask young people to record any coincidences they experience and to reflect on what the experience might be drawing them to see. During the next session, invite volunteers to share their experiences. Point out that staying alert to the wonder and mystery in our lives is a good way to stay in tune with God.

Go to www.findinggod.com/sessionextenders for an article on Ignatian spirituality. You may wish to share this with the group.

Engage young people in a discussion of the events they have experienced during the past week. Say: While you might not have realized it, God was present in those events. Point out that God may have been trying to speak to young people through some of the events they experienced. Provide an example of something you have experienced during the past week and identify what God may have been trying to say to you. Invite volunteers to identify what God may have been saying to them through their experiences. Read aloud the session title. Say: In this session we are going to learn more about how we can discover God’s presence in our everyday experiences.

prayer Say: Let’s thank God for revealing himself to us in so many different ways. Then pray aloud the prayer together. Conclude by praying the Sign of the Cross.

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ExplORE

Ignatius of Loyola

1 Begin Say: Imagine that you are asked to live in a room that is no bigger than 10 feet by 10 feet. The room does not have access to the Internet, and you cannot have a cell phone or an mP3 player. Ask: How would you spend your time? Point out that in this article, young people will read about someone who chose to live in such conditions so that he could grow in his relationship with God.

During one battle, Ignatius was seriously wounded. One of his legs was crushed, and his other leg was badly broken. Ignatius was sent home to recover. While he was at home, Ignatius read whatever he could find, which wasn’t much. One book that he read was about Jesus’ life, and another book was about the lives of the saints. During his recovery Ignatius began praying very seriously. God’s peace filled his heart and assured him that he was on the right path. This experience marked the beginning of Ignatius’s conversion.

2 Connect Invite a volunteer to read aloud the article title and the first paragraph. Ask: What contributions have you already made to the Church? (Possible answer: I have shared my gifts as a liturgical minister.) Invite volunteers to read aloud the section A Journey to Faith. Point out that early in his life, Ignatius of Loyola did little more than the minimum that was required to live out his faith. Ask: What happened during one of the battles in which Ignatius fought? (One of his legs was crushed, and his other leg was badly broken.) What happened to Ignatius during his recovery? (He had an experience of conversion. He began praying.) Draw young people’s attention to the word asceticism. Have a volunteer read aloud from the Glossary the definition of the word. Point out that Ignatius chose to live a life of asceticism so that he could grow closer to God. Ask: What did Ignatius’s experience help him realize? (that he wanted to serve others by helping them recognize the presence of God in their lives) Invite volunteers to read aloud the section The Jesuits. Ask: What did Ignatius and his friends do together? (study, preach the Gospel, offer spiritual direction) Explain that in spiritual direction, the director helps people discover God’s presence in their everyday lives.

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Saint Ignatius of Loyola, Peter Paul Rubens.

THE

years after the Council of Trent, which the Church called in response to the challenges of the Reformation, brought about renewed theological scholarship, moral betterment, and spiritual growth. Ignatius of Loyola contributed to this renewal in many ways. Like Ignatius, when we follow God’s plan for us, we can contribute to the Church in important ways.

A Journey to Faith Ignatius of Loyola was born in 1491 to a noble family living in Spain. As a young soldier, his life was full of adventure and excitement. He spent time in the palaces of dukes and princes. Ignatius of Loyola believed in God, but he didn’t pay too much attention to his faith. He did little more than attend Mass and pray his prayers. In his free time, he used his talents for his own glory and pleasure and not much else. He frequently engaged in activities that were less than admirable.

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When Ignatius was well enough to travel, he went to a Benedictine monastery in Montserrat, Spain, where he spent several days in prayer. He then went to Manresa, where he moved into a cave and lived a life of asceticism, or self-denial, in order to develop spiritual discipline. During the 10 months Ignatius lived in the cave, he gradually discovered for himself that God totally accepts, loves, and forgives each one of us. After this discovery, Ignatius finally felt ready to reenter society. He wanted to serve others by helping them recognize the presence of God in their lives.

The Jesuits After his time at Manresa, Ignatius moved to Paris and enrolled in the university there. He wanted to be able to teach in the Church. It was while he was at the University of Paris that Ignatius met the six other men who became his closest friends. Together, Ignatius and his six friends studied, preached the Gospel, and offered spiritual direction. The men soon decided to form a new religious community, the Society of Jesus. In 1540 they received the blessing of Pope Paul III. The members of the community, commonly known as Jesuits, offered their service to the pope for whatever he wanted of them. In responding to the needs of the day, some of the first Jesuits became teachers

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god’s presence Before the next session, PDF Signoff: Production _______ have young people take time to reflect on how they have experienced God’s presence in their lives during the past week. Have young people make something that represents the person or event through which they experienced God. During the next session, invite volunteers to share what they made.

InclusIon

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Vision Design Editorial _______ The_______ Big picture If you

have young people with visual impairments, write the vocabulary terms and key ideas from the session in large print on note cards. Give the cards to young people in sequence as the lesson unfolds. In addition, enlarge images from the text so that young people can explore them along with the group.

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ExplORE in schools and universities, and other Jesuits became missionaries. Eventually, Ignatius of Loyola and his followers were ordained priests and professed the evangelical counsels of poverty, chastity, and obedience. Unlike the members of most other religious communities of their time, they did not wear a religious habit.

Past Meets Present

Ignatian Spirituality

working in the Americas, Europe, China,

All religious communities have their own spirit, or charism, which directs how they preach the Gospel message. While all religious communities have much in common, their individual charisms demonstrate the diversity of the Church in its response to live out Jesus’ mission of love and service.

message of Saint Ignatius of

Part of the Spiritual Exercises is the Daily Examen, in which people are invited to reflect on their day and recognize God’s presence in their experiences. The goal of this prayer is to help people develop their relationship with Jesus Christ. The Daily Examen, the Spiritual Exercises, and Ignatian spirituality are gifts to the entire Church.

Guided by their charism, the Jesuits d strive to help people fin God in all things.

in 1556, there were close to 1,000 Jesuits and Japan. The early Jesuits carried on the Loyola in their lives and in their writings. The following are some 16th and 17th century Jesuits who had an impact around the world: Saint Francis Xavier, Blessed Peter Faber, Saint Aloysius Gonzaga, Saint Edmund Campion, Saint Isaac Jogues,

Saint Isaac Jogues

and Saint Peter Claver.

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Guided by their charism, the Jesuits strive to help people find God in all things. They do this in many ways, including offering retreats known as the Spiritual Exercises. The seeds of the Spiritual Exercises were first sown by Ignatius during his time in Manresa. The Spiritual Exercises include prayers, meditations, reflections, and directions that are led by a spiritual director. Today many people pray by using the Spiritual Exercises.

PAST: By the time Ignatius of Loyola died

PRESENT: Today approximately 19,000 Jesuits work in over 100 countries and on six continents. Jesuit priests and brothers are engaged in ministries that include evangelization, education, health care, spiritual direction, and social justice.

DEF IN E asceticism, Spiri

tua l Exercises

R EM EM BE R

Ignatius of Loyo la and his compan ion s for med the Society of Jesus to serve the need s of the Church. One of the gif ts of the Jesuit s is their sp iritua l char ism, wh ich encourag es people to fin d God in all thi ng s.

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Past meets Present

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Display the poster Ignatian Spirituality. Invite volunteers to read aloud the section Ignatian Spirituality. Ask volunteers to identify the charisms of the other religious communities young people have learned about this year. (Possible answers: Dominicans: preach the Gospel; Franciscans: care for God’s creation; Ursulines: educating people in the Christian way of life) Ask: What is the charism of the Jesuits? (to help people find God in all things) Explain that the Spiritual Exercises are often done during a 30-day silent retreat. Say: Today many people cannot participate in such a lengthy retreat. The Jesuits have adapted the spiritual exercises so that people can incorporate components of the spiritual exercises into their daily lives. Read aloud from the poster the components of Ignatian Spirituality. Ask: How can practicing the tenets of Ignatian spirituality help you find God in the world around you? (Possible answers: Ignatian spirituality can help us reflect on our daily experience so that we can find God in the midst of everyday events.)

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From the Ordinary to the Extraordinary Draw on the board a picture of an iceberg in such a way that a PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ majority of the berg appears to be below the surface of an ocean. Then explain that to find God in all things, we have to look beyond the surface, or what we experience through our senses. Say: When we experience something, there is often more going on than what we see or hear. Have partners work together to write short stories about a character who chooses to look beyond the surface of an ordinary, everyday event. Have young people write what the character learned about God’s presence in his or her ordinary event.

Read aloud the feature. If possible, share information about Jesuit ministries in your diocese.

3 Close Say: Ignatius found God in a surprising place—the few books he had in his own home. He also found God while he was recovering from serious wounds. Invite young people to ask God to open their eyes to him in surprising places, including their wounds and hurts.

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1 Begin Give young people a moment to reflect on their favorite aspect of creation. Say: Thank God for creating this gift. Invite volunteers to share the gifts for which they are thankful. Then ask: What can you do to care for this gift? (Accept reasonable responses.) God’s Creation

2 Connect Invite a volunteer to read aloud the article title and the first paragraph. Invite young people to share their responses to the question. (Possible answer: Through my awareness of God’s presence, I am reminded that we are all made in his image and likeness. This reminds me to treat people kindly.) Invite volunteers to read aloud the section The Fifth Commandment. Ask: What is the fifth Commandment? (You shall not kill.) What does this commandment reminds us? (that every person has dignity as a human being created in God’s image and likeness) Explain that recent popes have taught that other forms of punishment are preferred over capital punishment. Say: other forms of punishment are more in line with the fact that we are made in God’s image and likeness. Draw young people’s attention to the terms moral law, abortion, and euthanasia. Have a young person read aloud from the Glossary the definition of the term moral law. Then say: sometimes this term is referred to as natural law. Have volunteers read aloud from the Glossary the definitions of the words abortion and euthanasia. Say: Through its teachings on abortion, euthanasia, child labor, the sexual exploitation of human beings, and child soldiers, the Church reminds us that all human beings are made in God’s image and likeness. It is because of this that we are called to respect the life and dignity of all people.

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Caring for God’s Creation IGNATIUS

of Loyola knew that our awareness of God’s presence in the world around us awakens within us an appreciation for the sacredness of all creation. As Jesus’ followers, this awareness influences our relationships with others. How might your awareness of God’s presence in your life have an impact on your relationships with other people?

The Fifth Commandment As we grow in our ability to discover God’s presence in our lives, we grow in our desire to follow the Fifth Commandment—You shall not kill—which teaches us to respect all life. The Fifth Commandment reminds us that every person has dignity as a human being who is created in God’s image and likeness. The Fifth Commandment means more than not taking life; it also means protecting and defending life. The Fifth Commandment does not prohibit legitimate authorities from safeguarding societies against unjust aggressors. In the Catechism of the Catholic Church, however, we read that the use of nonlethal means of protecting people’s safety are preferred. Nonlethal means “are more in keeping with the concrete conditions of the common good and more in conformity with the dignity of the human person.” (CCC 2267)

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The Church teaches that some actions are objectively wrong. These actions are moral evils that violate God’s moral law. We can never choose to engage in moral evils, even if good might result. In addition, the Church has a long history of protecting life, from conception to natural death. The Church has long opposed abortion, euthanasia, the practice of child labor, sexual exploitation of human beings, and the use of children as soldiers. The Church also calls for adequate food, health care, and education for all people. Furthermore, the Church instructs us that we must do everything we can to avoid war and safeguard peace.

The Sixth and Ninth Commandments Our awareness of God’s presence in the world also influences our attitudes toward the relationships we have with one another. One way to develop positive relationships is to follow the Sixth and Ninth Commandments, which call us to remain chaste and to respect other people’s commitments. The Sixth Commandment teaches us that we should not commit adultery, which is a sin of unfaithfulness. Adultery is an attack on the dignity of marriage, which is a holy union, blessed by God and based on the faithful love between a husband and a wife. We follow the Sixth Commandment by remaining chaste. In its fullest sense, chastity

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healthy Boundaries Say:PDF Living chastely begins with setting healthy boundaries for Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ ourselves. We often know instinctively what these boundaries are. Arrange young people into groups of three and give a measuring tape to each group. Explain that group members will take turns being the Stander, the Walker, and the Measurer. Instruct the Stander and the Walker to stand about 10 feet apart. Have the Walker slowly walk toward the Stander. As soon as the Stander feels that his or her personal space is being invaded, he or she should say “Stop.” The Walker will stop, and the Measurer will measure and record the distance between the Walker’s and the Stander’s feet. After all groups have finished, discuss the results. Ask: How could you tell when personal space was being invaded? If a Walker did not stop when asked, discuss the effects. Conclude by pointing out that as both “Walkers” and “Standers” in life, God wants us to look and listen for clues that people are uncomfortable and to respect their boundaries, no matter what. Life and Dignity

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ExplORE is about having a healthy attitude toward sex and being a sexual person in a responsible way. Chastity also means that sexual relationships can only take place within the context of marriage. For a married couple, chastity means having a joyful sexual life with each other and avoiding anything that might endanger the marriage. Chastity for unmarried people means refraining from sexual activity.

The Church recognizes that some people are homosexual (sexually attracted to people of the same gender) and teaches that people with a homosexual orientation should be accepted with respect, compassion, and sensitivity. Homosexuals are invited and encouraged to participate in the life of the Church, and, like all people, they are called to recognize that engaging in sex outside of the Sacrament of Matrimony is wrong. The Ninth Commandment is “You shall not covet your neighbor’s wife.” The word covet is difficult for many people to understand. It means “to wish for enviously or to greedily want something belonging to another.” We covet when someone else has something that we want for ourselves. There is nothing wrong with wanting something. What is wrong is to want someone else’s possessions so badly that it becomes an obsession. The Ninth Commandment teaches married couples to avoid the road that might lead to adultery. In other words, the Ninth Commandments encourages us to create an environment that helps us practice virtue by selecting books, magazines, movies, music, TV shows, and Web sites that show respect and restraint. It also means dressing so that others can see that we respect ourselves and our body.

Covet is a word that you probably don’t often use. Most likely, the word detachment does not rank high in the words that you hear every day, either. But the word detachment and the idea behind it has always been part of Christian spirituality. When religious men and women take a vow of poverty, they promise to practice detachment. In this context, detachment means freedom from the possession of objects—particularly material objects—that might hinder spiritual growth. These religious men and women do so as a reminder that we are all called to live in a spirit of poverty and detachment. By practicing detachment, we overcome the temptation to covet someone else’s possessions. Detachment frees us to recognize that only God can bring us true fulfillment. Detachment is the freedom of the poor in spirit, which Jesus spoke of in the first beatitude.

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Chastity helps us recognize the boundaries that will help us live in Christian relationships with others. This virtue guides us to connect sexual activity with the lifetime commitment of a husband and a wife in marriage. It teaches us that sex is the total giving of oneself to another. That kind of giving cannot take place outside of marriage. Unmarried people who want to be chaste do not engage in sex with others. They do not dishonor their bodies through masturbation. Their respect for their own bodies and for the bodies of others is total.

Our Catholic Character

DEF IN E moral law, abor tion, eutha na sia , adulter y, chas tity , covet

R EM EM BE R

W hen we are ab le to see God in the world around us, we have a desir e to life, relation sh ips res pect , the dig nit y of others, and the good ness of ever yth ing tha t God ha s created.

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Session 18 Blm gotta have It? Explain that the average young person views Design _______ Editorial _______ 40,000 30-second commercials each year. Ask: How many days does this equal? (approximately 14) Invite young people to draw conclusions about the effects of being exposed to so many commercials. Explain that to counteract these effects, young people should take time to think critically about what they need versus what they want. Next, provide each young person with the Session 18 Blackline Master [T-375]. Read aloud the introduction and the directions. Have young people complete the activity before the next session. PDF Signoff: Production _______

Invite volunteers to read aloud the section The Sixth and Ninth Commandments. Say: The sixth Commandment is “You shall not commit adultery.” Ask: What is the ninth Commandment? (You shall not covet your neighbor’s wife.) Point out that the Ninth Commandment also means that wives should not covet their neighbor’s husband. Draw young people’s attention to the words adultery and chastity. Have a young person read aloud from the Glossary the definition of each word. Say: Just as the word killing has a broad meaning, so does the word chastity. Chastity means viewing our sexuality as a precious gift. Point out that one way to show thanks for a gift is to treat it with respect. Say: The Church teaches that sexual intercourse has two purposes: to unite a couple through their total self-giving to each other and to cooperate with God in making new life. Draw young people’s attention to the word covet. Have a young person read aloud from the Glossary the definition of the word. Say: We covet anytime we desire for ourselves someone who is in a relationship or something that belongs to another person.

our Catholic Character

Read aloud the feature. Say: one way to protect ourselves from the temptation to covet is to practice detachment. Invite volunteers to explain how detachment can prevent us from giving into the temptation to covet. (Possible answer: By practicing detachment, such as by donating items I no longer need, I am reminded that God alone is the source of true happiness.)

3 Close Give young people a moment to pray to God, asking for the strength to follow the Sixth and Ninth Commandments.

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Prayer

prayer Follow the steps to guide young people through the prayer on page 156.

Young People’s Page Prepare Pray the prayer in advance to become familiar with it. If you have been praying the Daily Examen that is part of each unit opener, you may wish to modify the introduction to the prayer to eliminate concepts with which young people are already familiar. Pray Invite volunteers to read aloud the page title and the paragraphs in the left column. Point out that when praying the Daily Examen, we reflect on God’s presence in our everyday experiences. Explain that nurturing our prayer life helps us grow in our ability to recognize this grace in our lives. Have young people turn to page 277 in the back of their books. Explain that this is another form of the Daily Examen that they can use in their daily prayer. Give young people a moment to prepare themselves for prayer. Then say: As saint Ignatius of Loyola has taught us, we can find God’s presence in the world around us. everywhere we look, we will find examples of his grace. Pray aloud the reflection, giving young people time to reflect after each paragraph and question. After praying aloud the last paragraph, say: Take a moment to rest in God’s presence. Thank him for the many ways that he has revealed to you his presence in your life. After giving young people time to reflect silently, pray together the Glory Be to the Father. Say: As we continue, let us be mindful of the fact that we are always in God’s presence.

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God’s Fingerprints One form of prayer,

Finding God in All Things

the Daily Examen, is an important part of Ignatian spirituality. In the Examen we prayerfully review our day so that we can grow in self-understanding. Being more self-aware frees us to follow God’s will for us. Praying the Daily Examen can help us become more aware of God’s action in our lives and his presence in the world around us. Here are the basic steps for praying the Daily Examen. Begin by being aware of all the blessings you have received from God through the events of the day and the people with whom you spent time. Then ask the Holy Spirit to help you know when you might have turned away from God’s presence during the day. Review your thoughts, words, and actions since the day began. Think about what brought you closer to God and what led you away from him. Ask God’s pardon for any time that you failed to love. Finally, resolve to respond more completely to the generous love of God. End with the Lord’s Prayer.

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Quiet yourself and remember that you are in God’s presence. In your mind, reflect on your day. What good things have come your way? Be specific. Remem ber the small things, like a smile, a kind word, a blue sky, or your favorite food. Remember the bigger things, too, like passing a test or scoring in a game. Share with God how grateful you are for all the blessings that you have received. Before you move deeper into prayer, pause and pray to the Holy Spirit. You may simply want to ask for the help to see whatever God wants you to see. Now return to your day and look at it with a differen t focus. Take your time. Ask yourself the following questio ns or use your own. Where have I noticed God’s presence in my

life today?

What brought me closer to God? What led me away from God?

Tell God that you are sorry for the things that kept you from recognizing his love for you. Ask forgiveness for the times you did not respond to his love. Remember that God wants to have a close relation ship with you. Ask him to help you live your life the way he wants you to. If there is any particular area in which you want God’s help, say so. Thank God for his presence in your life.

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Scrapbook Examen Remind young people that PDF Signoff: Production _______ memory is a gift and that we can use it to relive past joys and learn from past sorrows. Have young people create a page for a scrapbook that includes sketched “snapshots” of the past day. Have young people label each sketch “Gift of Joy” or “Chance to Learn.” Then have young people share and discuss their page with a partner.

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coaching Young peopleEditorial to pray Design _______ _______ Explain that it is best to set aside 10 or 15 minutes to pray the Daily Examen, but that if time runs short, young people can pray an abbreviated version. To do this, one quiets his or her mind and allows his or her memory to return to an event in the past day—whichever one springs to mind first— and then spends one or two minutes listening for God to speak about this event.


REFlEcT

E R E H W t In

1 Begin

Do I Fi

ifer Courier, pect it. Jenn we least ex en wh even amid es ce m co s presen God’s grace to find God’ Sometimes she was able w ho ns ai pl a mother, ex news. unexpected

ifer by Jenn Courier

Unexpected Blessings

One day I received a phone call from our daughter Kathryn’s teacher. She calmly explained that something seemed to be wrong. “Kathryn just isn’t getting it,” she said. She appeared to be tuning out during storytime and not following simple verbal instructions. This was unsettling news to us since, at home, Kathryn seemed very well-adjusted. There were no signs of her struggling with simple tasks. My husband and I were extremely worried. Our little girl, the youngest of our four daughters, was struggling. So, now what? I spent a lot of time praying, asking God for his guidance and grace in this challenging situation. I ended up taking Kathryn to have her hearing checked. My stomach dropped and my heart broke as I watched Kathryn struggle during the battery of tests. She was unable to hear anything at times. She stumbled and struggled to repeat back words and simple sentences at another volume level. All the while, she sat with a smile on her face completely unaware of what was going on. Four weeks later, Kathryn was fitted with a hearing aid. The doctor explained that Kathryn had developed excellent coping mechanisms such as lip reading and picking up on context clues. Now, with the hearing aid, she would begin the exciting journey of being able to hear and process all the JENNIFER COURIER is a writer, editor, wife, and mother of four girls.

sounds around her. She was thrilled to wear the new hearing aids—beautiful cotton-candy pink with sparkles all over them. These simple hearing aids have brought overwhelming blessings into my life. I loved seeing the look of awe on Kathryn’s face each time she heard a new sound. I was thrilled to see the heartwarming kindness and generous spirit of the boys and girls in Kathryn’s class and the dedication of her teachers and doctors who found a solution to help her. I am grateful that the school principal found money in a tight Catholic school budget to purchase equipment for Kathryn’s teachers to use to help her. Kathryn now “gets it.”

Reflect

One of the great blessings of my life came in the form of two sparkly, pink pieces of plastic. I was surprised— blessings are supposed to be big things, such as happiness and health, not something that fits in the palm of your hand and most people never see. But it’s true.

My Catholic faith allows me to see, feel, and accept God’s grace and presence each and every day. I’ve learned that blessings come in all shapes and sizes—even in two little pieces of plastic.

Unexpected News Recall a time you received news that you did not expect. What was your initial reaction to the news? As you think back, how might God’s grace have been present in your experience? Write your ideas on a separate sheet of paper.

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good news, Bad news Remind young people that theDesign Gospels are full of Good News. _______ Editorial _______ Have small groups work together to find Gospel stories in which someone who was experiencing a hardship received a blessing or experienced something that turned his or her bad news into good news. After giving groups time to share their examples, point out that Jesus came into this world not to rescue us from our troubles like a modern-day movie hero, but to experience them along with us and, with our help, to transform them into something new. PDF Signoff: Production _______

Ask: What are some blessings that you have received? (Possible answers: God’s grace, my family’s love) Point out that God’s grace works in interesting ways and that we can receive blessings when we least expect them. Invite a volunteer to read aloud the article title and the introductory text. Then ask what young people think the article will be about. (Possible answer: finding a blessing in bad news)

2 Connect Have volunteers take turns reading aloud the section Unexpected Blessings. Ask: What was the author’s emotional response to the bad news about her daughter’s hearing? (She was worried. Her “stomach dropped,” and her “heart broke.”) What did the author do in response to this news? (She prayed and asked for guidance and grace. She took her daughter to have her hearing checked.) Say: We have to give ourselves room to experience negative feelings when we get bad news. But at the same time, we have to take actions to convert the bad news into something good. We have to pray, and we have to seek help from human experts. Ask: What blessings came to the author and her family from the bad news? (community support, the joy of learning, gratitude for solutions) Then have young people complete the activity independently.

3 Close Invite volunteers to share their responses with the group. Say: finding the blessing in bad news isn’t about ignoring the pain or pretending everything is fine. It is about staying open to God’s mysterious ways.

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RESpOnD

W h a t ’s

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1 Begin What’s What? Have young people complete the items at home or in class with a partner. Remind young people that they can use the page references to help them answer the questions.

Review the key concepts in this session by providing a short answer to each question. 1

2 Connect 2

7

The Ninth Commandment encourages us to create an environment that helps us . PAGE 155 practice

While Ignatius of Loyola was recovering from wounds he received in battle, he read . PAGE 152 books about the lives of

Say What?

The six men whom Ignatius of Loyola met at the University of Paris joined with him in forming a new religious community known . PAGE 152 as

abortion adultery asceticism chastity

covet euthanasia moral law Spiritual Exercises

Now What?

now What? Read aloud the section. Invite each young person to respond to the question independently.

3 Go in Peace Have young people collect their materials and return them to the appropriate places. Encourage young people to remain mindful of the Now What? challenge during the week. Say: When we give thanks to God, we show our appreciation for the many ways that he has revealed himself to us through our daily experiences.

Chastity means that sexual relationships can . PAGE 155 only take place within the

Know the definitions of these terms.

Respond

say What? Ask volunteers to read aloud and define the terms. Review each term in the Glossary if necessary.

6

3

Guided by their charism, the Jesuits strive . PAGE 153 to

4

In the prayer called the , people are invited to reflect on their day and recognize God’s presence in their experiences.

Praying the Daily Examen helps us recognize God’s presence in the world around us. When during your day might you pray the Daily Examen? What can you do to give thanks to God for his ongoing Revelation in your life?

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5

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The Fifth Commandment teaches us to . PAGE 154

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Service: You Shall not Kill Explain that in 2005, the bishops of the United States launched PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ a campaign to end the death penalty, noting that this form of punishment is unfairly applied to people of certain regions, races, and economic classes. Have young people write letters to the editor, in which they express the Church’s teaching about capital punishment. Encourage young people to submit their letters to local newspapers. Life and Dignity

Session assessment Option An assessment for this session can be found at www.findinggod.com.

3-Minute Retreat Give young people an opportunity for quiet meditation at www.loyolapress.com/retreat.

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p l a n a h E a D : Get Ready for Session 19 Consult the catechist preparation pages to prepare for Session 19 and determine any materials you will need.


CateChist PreParation S e S S io n 19

Faith and Reason 3-Minute Retreat Before you prepare the session, pause and be still. Take three deep breaths and be aware of the loving presence of God, who is with you on this journey.

Knowing and Sharing Your Faith in Session 19 Consider how Scripture and Tradition can deepen your understanding of session content.

Scripture Deuteronomy 30:19–20 I call heaven and earth today to witness against you: I have set before you life and death, the blessing and the curse. Choose life, then, that you and your descendants may live, by loving the Lord, your God, obeying his voice, and holding fast to him.

Reflection On one level, choosing God may seem obvious. At a deeper level, we know that all choices are not that simple. What does choosing life really mean? The Book of Deuteronomy offers three criteria: make our decision based on the love of God; listen to the voice of God in our hearts as well as through others; hold fast to God, no matter what, in all our choices. Our choices are not only for ourselves, but for our descendants, physical and spiritual.

Questions What does choosing life mean for me right now? How do I include others in the choices I make?

Exodus 20:1–17 explains how God shared the Ten Commandments with Moses.

Tradition The Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches that there are three sources for determining the morality of a human act: the object chosen, the intention, and the circumstances of the action. If the object is an evil action, the act as a whole is wrong no matter how good the intention is. A good intention does not justify an evil action. If the object is a good action, but the intention is not good, the act as a whole is wrong. Circumstances can affect the morality of an act. Acting out of fear of harm can lessen a person’s responsibility for an act.

Catholic Social Teaching In this session the integrated Catholic Social Teaching themes are Care for God’s Creation; Call to Family, Community, and Participation; and Life and Dignity of the Human Person. See page 133b for an explanation of these themes.

Window on the Catechism Concluding Prayer

Speak to God, using the words of this prayer or your own. Life-giving God, help me recognize in the choices before me the value and importance of choosing life.

The morality of human acts is discussed in CCC 1749–1761. The Seventh, Eighth, and Tenth Commandments are discussed in CCC 2401–2425, 2464–2499, 2534–2557.

General Directory for Catechesis Moral formation as one of the fundamental tasks of catechesis is discussed in GDC 85–87.

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caTEchIST pREpaRaTIOn

One-Hour Session Planner

Faith and Reason

SeSSion 19

Session Theme: Faith is possible because we believe God is the truth, and we trust him wholeheartedly. Before This Session ▶▶ Bookmark your Bible to Exodus 20:1–17. Place the open Bible in your

prayer space. ▶▶ Read the Guide for this session, choose any additional If Time Allows activities

that you might have time to complete, and gather the listed materials. StepS

ApproximAte time

Engage

10 minutes

Faith and Reason

The Enlightenment

30–40 minutes Pages 160–161

Choosing to Do Good

Take IT Home

Pages 162–163

Reflect Prayer: a Living Work of art

10–15 minutes Page 164

Page 165

Respond What’s What?

Young people are invited to experience an online, Scripture-based 3-Minute Retreat at the end of the session. The prayers give young people opportunities to experience a variety of forms of prayer. Session 19 includes a Daily Examen, a guided reflection, and a prayer of thanks. Follow the Prepare directions on the Catechist Guide page before sharing with young people.

Page 159

Explore

Where Do I Fit In?

Prayer in Session 19

10–15 minutes Page 166

Homework options: Utilitarianism Refuted

Page 160

Gratitude Journal

Page 163

materials REQUIRED

OpTIOnal

▶▶ CD player (page 164)

▶▶ Plan for young person to “trip”

▶▶ CD 2, Track 4: “Reflecting the Holy”

(12:15) (page 164)

(page 159) ▶▶ Session 19 BLM, T-376 (page 161) ▶▶ Sheets of butcher paper (page 162) ▶▶ Various daily-reflection books,

such as My Daily Bread by Anthony Paone, S.J. (page 165) ▶▶ Session 19 Assessment,

www.findinggod.com (page 166)

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EngagE

Session

19

SeSSion 19

OUTcOmES ▶▶ Explain that faith and science are

gifts from God that complement each other.

Faith and Reason

▶▶ Identify what the Seventh, Eighth, and

Tenth Commandments call us to do. ▶▶ State that sacred art is an expression

of the infinite beauty of God in works made by human hands. ▶▶ Define Age of Enlightenment, calumny,

detraction, divine law, Fruits of the Holy Spirit, fundamentalists, and rationalists.

Think about a time you heard two conflicting accounts of the same event. What did you do to make sense of the two different stories? How did you determine which source of information was more reliable?

1 Set the Stage Read aloud the text in the box on page 159. Give young people a few moments to reflect silently on the questions or to share their responses with a partner.

PR AYER

2 Get Started

Holy Spirit, thank you for teaching us the truth. May we always turn to you, the source of all wisdom.

Share a story about a time you believed in something and later found out that what you believed was not true, such as believing that Washington, D.C., was the same as Washington the state. Invite young people to share their own stories. Point out that as we mature, the gift of reason that we have received from God helps us learn new facts. Say: Sometimes these facts may challenge our beliefs. Emphasize that the truth always draws us closer to God. Say: In this session we will learn more about the relationship between faith and reason.

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multiple perspectives In advance, choose one young person from the group and plan the PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ following scenario in secret. Place a small obstacle, such as a chair or a box, near the door. During the session, ask the designated person to open or close the door. As the young person walks to the door, have him or her pretend to trip over the object. Then ask young people to quickly write what happened in as much detail as they can. After young people have finished writing, ask volunteers to read aloud their descriptions. Discuss any differences between young people’s accounts. Guide young people to realize that our perceptions may depend on our relation to something. Explain that remembering this can help us make “truth claims” in a spirit of humility and can help us remain open to God’s truth.

Go to www.findinggod.com/sessionextenders for an article about the Works of Mercy. You may wish to share this with the group.

prayer Say: Let’s thank the Holy Spirit for guiding us toward the truth. Pray aloud the prayer together. Then say: Take a moment to pray your own prayer of thanks. After giving young people time to pray silently, conclude by praying the Sign of the Cross.

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1 Begin Ask young people how they maintain contact with friends and relatives who live at a distance. Say: we are lucky that we are able to keep in touch with our loved ones, no matter where they live. In this article we’re going to learn about a time when people began to believe that God was far away from us and how this belief affected people’s relationship with him.

The Enlightenment UNTIL

the 16th century, people believed that the earth was the center of the universe and that it was God who made everything revolve around our planet. Before long, however, scientists such as Copernicus and Galileo suggested that the earth is not the center of the universe and that the planets in our solar system revolve around the sun. Other scientists took note of the developments in astronomy. Mathematicians such as Descartes and Pascal, for example, developed their own theories about how the universe worked. What is one recent scientific discovery that has altered your understanding of the universe?

2 Connect Invite a volunteer to read aloud the article title and the first paragraph. Invite volunteers to share their response to the question. Discuss whether these discoveries have had an impact on young people’s faith. Invite volunteers to read aloud the next three paragraphs. Ask: what was the impact of these new scientific theories? (They called into question people’s beliefs about God and his relationship with creation.) Have a young person read aloud from the Glossary the definition of the term Age of Enlightenment. Ask: what did people begin to believe about God during this time? (that God was not actively involved in the world; that God created the world and then sat back as it ran itself; that God was a distant being) Have a young person read aloud from the Glossary the definition of the term divine law. Explain the potential implications for making decisions based on a morality defined as “the greatest good for the greatest number.” Say: If this was our view of morality, we could commit an injustice toward an individual or small group of people if doing so would benefit the majority of people. Ask: what are the problems with this? (Possible answer: This definition of morality rejects the belief that all human beings are made in the image and likeness of God.) Life and Dignity

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These theories of the 16th century began to explain natural phenomena in a different way than religion had done for centuries. These ideas not only changed

Faith or Science? Imagine that a friend asked you to explain the relationship between faith and science. How would you respond? What would you say to him or her about the importance of both?

Galileo

people’s understanding of the world, they also called into question people’s beliefs about God and his relationship with creation. For some, God’s ongoing role in the creation of the universe seemed diminished. This shift in worldview, which took place during the 1700s, is known as the Age of Enlightenment. During this time some people suggested that God was not actively involved in the world. Instead, they suggested that God had created the universe and then sat back as it ran itself. These people believed that God was a distant being. Some even believed that we could solve every human problem through science and mathematics. The scientific advances made during the Age of Enlightenment also had an impact on people’s understanding of morality. Some people began to move away from a belief in divine law. Instead, they defined morality as “the greatest good for the greatest number.” Philosophers also began looking for ways to encourage people to make their own way in the world and to rely less on the Church and the authority of the government.

Faith and Science Are Complementary People who believe that we can solve all of humanity’s issues by examining them scientifically and mathematically are called rationalists.

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Utilitarianism Refuted Before the next session, PDF Signoff: Production _______ have young people research the philosophical theory of utilitarianism, which suggests that moral decisions should be based on whatever produces the greatest good for the greatest number. Ask young people to write a two- to threeparagraph argument refuting this philosophy. During the next session, invite volunteers to read aloud their arguments.

InclusIon

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gifted Design Editorial gift_______ of Reason Invite_______

inquisitive young people to research the Church’s longterm response to the insights of Copernicus and Galileo. Have young people report their findings to the group. Point out that in this case, the Church was ultimately open to God’s Revelation.


ExplORE Their philosophy is called rationalism. Some people feel that there is no need for science. They believe that the Bible explains everything. People who take the Bible literally—word for word—are called fundamentalists. While Catholics do not read the Bible literally, we do believe that in matters of faith, the Bible is without error. A clue that we should not take the Bible literally can be found in the Book of Genesis, Chapters 1 and 2. Here we find two different stories about how God created the world. Rather than teaching us science or history, these stories teach us about God’s relationship with creation.

PAST: In 1789 the French Revolution deposed the king, Louis XVI. In place of the king, a government that promoted secularism was established. This new government took land from the Church, and, in a period known as the Reign of Terror, it put priests and nuns to death as enemies of the state. At that time Catholic religious communities were disbanded and forbidden. A group of Carmelite nuns in the city of Compiègne continued to pray together, however. Sixteen Carmelite sisters and one lay person accused of helping them were arrested. They were all condemned to death and beheaded in July 1794. As the women gathered

Explore

As Catholics we acknowledge that the achievements of science do not distance God from his creation. Rather, the Church teaches that both faith and science are gifts from God; they complement each other. We look to God and the Church when defining moral behavior, and we accept the ideas of the Church and divine authority as ways to guide us. Science is the study of the way things happen and where things come from. Through faith we explore the meaning of things and how we can find God in them. Science explains the laws of nature. Faith describes the intimate connection between nature and its Creator. Science helps us know why things function. Faith helps us know how all of creation reveals God’s presence to us. People of faith do not choose one or the other; we acknowledge the benefits that both have for human beings.

Past Meets Present

in prayer before their execution, they forgave their enemies. The Martyrs of Compiègne were beatified in 1906.

PRESENT: Even in recent times, priests, religious sisters, and lay ministers have been martyred as enemies of the state. Archbishop Oscar Romero, of El Salvador, was killed on March 24, 1980, while celebrating Mass. He was killed for speaking out

DEF INE Age of Enlightenment, divine law, rationalists, funda menta lists

REM EMBER As a result of the scient ific discoveries made during the Age of Enlightenment, people began to quest ion God’s role in the universe. Unlike the rationalists, the Church teaches that faith and science are complementary.

against the government’s repression of its citizens and its role in violating their basic human rights. Four American women— three religious sisters and one lay woman—

Archbishop Oscar Romero of El Salvador

were killed in El Salvador on December 2, 1980, because of the ministry that they were providing to people oppressed by the government. On November 16, 1986, six Jesuits, their housekeeper, and her daughter were murdered in El Salvador. They, too, were killed

Past meets Present

because of their criticism of the government and its abuse of human rights.

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Session 19 Blm let There Be light Have young people recall a time that they Design _______ Editorial _______ and a friend had an exciting experience that they then told to others. Point out that when telling the story, young people probably took turns giving details and describing important moments. Explain that in a similar way, we are fortunate to have two versions of the Creation story in Genesis, because each gives us important details and ideas that the other leaves out. next, provide each young person with the Session 19 Blackline Master [T-376]. Read aloud the directions. Have young people work with a partner to complete the activity. Then have young people share their conclusions with the group. PDF Signoff: Production _______

God’s Creation

Invite volunteers to read aloud the section Faith and Science Are Complementary. Draw young people’s attention to the words rationalists and fundamentalists. Have volunteers read aloud from the Glossary the definitions of each word. Ask young people to summarize the differences between rationalism and fundamentalism. (Rationalism is the belief that humanity’s issues can be solved by examining them scientifically and mathematically. Fundamentalism is the belief that the Bible is literally true.) Have young people turn to page 253 in the back of their books. Read aloud The Story of God’s Promise. Say: As Catholics we believe that the Bible is the divinely inspired word of God. our belief takes into account the fact that Scripture was written by humans who chose to use a variety of literary styles. Read aloud the directions for the Faith or Science? activity on page 160. Give young people time to write their responses. Read aloud the feature. Say: At the time of the french Revolution, a law had been passed that made ministers of the Church employees of the state. Point out that priests and nuns were killed during the Reign of Terror because they opposed this policy. Say: Like the priests and the sisters who were killed during the Reign of Terror, the Latin American martyrs were killed for choosing to remain faithful to God by challenging the policies of the government.

3 Close Give young people time to complete the Faith or Science? activity. Invite volunteers to share their responses. Conclude by giving young people a moment to thank God silently for the lives of all the martyrs who have been killed for standing up for their beliefs.

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1 Begin Arrange young people into small groups. Assign each group one of the following words: wherry, zebu, knar, factotum, and mim. Have groups find the correct definition and make up a nonsense definition. Have each group share the word and the definitions. Have young people vote on the correct definition before the real definition is revealed. Afterward, ask how young people could tell which definition was correct.

2 Connect Invite volunteers to read aloud the article title and the first two paragraphs. Have young people turn to page 266 to review the Fruits of the Holy Spirit. Invite volunteers to read aloud the section The Eighth Commandment. Ask: what is the eighth Commandment? (You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor.) why is it important to have a well-formed conscience? (Having a well-formed conscience helps us discern God’s will for us so that we can make good moral choices.) Have a volunteer read aloud from the Glossary the definition of the word calumny. Say: An example of calumny is to say that someone stole from you when he or she did not do so. Ask: why is it important to be honest? (When people experience us as honest, they experience God’s presence in our lives. They are able to trust us.)

our Catholic Character

Read aloud the feature. Ask: How can a lie damage an individual? (Possible answer: A lie can harm someone’s reputation.) Have a volunteer read aloud from the Glossary the definition of the word detraction. Ask: what can you do when you are tempted to tell a lie? (Possible answer: pray for the strength to remain truthful)

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g n s i o o h C d o o G o to D THROUGHOUT

history many people have believed that the gift of faith and our ability to reason are incompatible. There are saints, however, who have taught that faith is a journey by which we use the gift of reasoning to help us understand the mysteries of faith that have been revealed by God. Both faith and reason are gifts from God that we can use to help us form our conscience. Having a wellformed conscience helps us discern God’s will for us so that we can make good moral choices. How else can you discern God’s will for you so that you can choose to do the right thing?

Our Catholic Character According to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, a lie is the most direct offense against the truth. It does violence to an individual, destroys trust, and hinders relationships. The Eighth Commandment also forbids

detraction (revealing another person’s faults), rash judgment (assuming without really knowing a moral fault of another), and calumny. Flattery, boasting, and bragging also can be offenses against the Eighth Commandment, when they are not based on truth or are used to make fun of another person.

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We rely on our conscience to help us discover the truth. This gift from God leads us to see the morality of our acts and take responsibility for what we do. We are called to form our conscience so that it can properly guide us. We can shape our conscience by following the example set by our family, following Church teaching, and praying for the guidance of the Holy Spirit. We recognize the presence of the Holy Spirit in the Christian ways in which we act. We call these actions the Fruits of the Holy Spirit.

The Eighth Commandment One way we form our conscience is by following the Ten Commandments. The Eighth Commandment— You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor—teaches us that lies are wrong because they can harm our relationships. The lies that we call calumny are especially serious. Calumny is slander, which is a lie that hurts someone’s reputation. We are also called to refrain from sharing information about a person that might harm his or her reputation, and we are to refrain from breaking confidences that are necessary because of our profession. Whenever a person tells a lie, he or she should make an effort to repair the damage caused by the lie. The Eighth Commandment challenges us to live in truth so that people can see God reflected in our lives. When people experience us as honest, faithful, and trustworthy, they begin to experience God’s presence in our lives.

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pebble in a pond Give partners two sheets of butcher paper. Have them draw five PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ concentric circles on each sheet. Ask the partners to discuss “little white lies” they have told. next, have young people choose one of the lies they discussed and write it in one of the center circles. Have them discuss a possible negative consequence of telling the lie and then a negative consequence of that consequence, and so on, writing each effect in the next larger circle. When all the circles are filled in, have young people write the truth in the other center circle. Instruct young people to discuss and write consequences of telling the truth until all the circles are filled in. Point out that some consequences that seem “negative” at first—such as “[name] will get angry at me”—may then be followed by increasingly positive consequences. Have partners report the worst possible effect of the lie, and the best possible effect of the truth. Young people may choose not to share the lie itself with the group. Point out that both a lie and the truth have far-reaching consequences, and that by training ourselves to “look into the future,” we are training ourselves to speak the truth.


ExplORE Making Good Decisions DEF IN E

Every day we are required to make tough choices. Sometimes we have all the information we need to make the right decision, but many times we don’t. We might have partial information or even false information. And no matter the situation, we can’t always predict the outcome. When faced with difficult situations, it’s important for us to do our best to find the truth and to look to our conscience to determine the best course of action. Our conscience is our inner voice that helps us know the law of love that God has placed in our hearts. When we are faced with a difficult choice, we can look to the Holy Spirit for guidance.

The Seventh and Tenth Commandments

The Tenth Commandment teaches us that we shall not covet, or desire, our neighbor’s goods. Greed can lead people to have feelings of resentment toward others. If we let this resentment grow into anger,

SACRED ART

R EM EM BE R

We ca n use faith and rea son to help us know the truth. W hen faced with dif fic ult decision s, we ca n rely on ou r conscience to help us ma ke go od decision s.

it will sour our lives and ruin our relationships. It is not difficult to see that when we give in to greed, material objects become more important than people and relationships. The Church also forbids greed that arises from a desire for wealth and the power that often comes from having it. By discovering the truth, forming our conscience, and following the Ten Commandments, we recognize what it means to live in just relationships with others. While God wants us to enjoy the material things that are part of his creation, he also wants us to remember that other people need things and that we are called to respect their needs. When we accept who we are as God created us and thank God for the gifts he has brought into our lives, we can be happy for the gifts that God has given to others.

Explore

Many of the decisions we make in life are connected to the Seventh and Tenth Commandments. The Seventh Commandment states that we shall not steal, but it means so much more. We know that God created the world and filled it with beautiful gifts that he intended to be shared by all. For this reason the Seventh Commandment forbids taking a neighbor’s goods. It also teaches us that we should care for the goods of the earth with justice and charity so that these goods can be shared by all.

Fr uit s of the Ho ly Sp detraction, ca lum irit, ny

Life and Dignity

Jesus with Soup, Carolina Arentsen, 21st century.

To help us live out the Ten Commandments, we can practice the Corporal Works of Mercy and the Spiritual Works of Mercy. The Corporal Works of Mercy are acts by which we help others with their physical and material needs. The Spiritual Works of Mercy are the kind acts by which we help others with their emotional and spiritual needs. When we choose to practice the Works of Mercy, we build up God’s kingdom by following Jesus’ example of love and service. By doing so, we acknowledge that everyone has a right to the wonderful gifts we have received from God.

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Ask: when you have to make an important decision, what do you do? (Possible answers: Research my options. Discuss my options with others.) Invite a volunteer to read aloud the section Making Good Decisions. Say: Remember that God wants to have a part in the decisions we make too. we can cooperate with God in making good decisions when we listen to our conscience. Invite volunteers to read aloud the section The Seventh and Tenth Commandments. Ask: what is the Seventh Commandment? (You shall not steal.) Say: using more of the earth’s resources than we need is a form of stealing. This deprives others from having access to what they might need to survive.

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gratitude Journal Explain that a good way to guard against treating material goods PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ carelessly is to practice cherishing the gifts we have received from God. Encourage young people to keep a “Gratitude Journal” for the next week. Say: At the end of each day, pause to review your day. Record at least five gifts from God that brought you joy, improved your life, or made your day easier. At the end of the week, have young people share some of the items they recorded. Discuss how being consciously grateful can change our attitude toward things we often take for granted.

Say: The Tenth Commandment says “You shall not covet your neighbor’s goods.” Ask: what does the word covet mean? (“to want for ourselves something that belongs to another person”) Point out that the Church does not teach that it is a sin to have money. Say: Having wealth becomes a sin when we turn money into an idol and become greedy for more.

Sacred art

Read aloud the feature and discuss the artwork. Say: when we care for people’s needs, we follow Jesus’ example of loving service. Have young people turn to page 267 to read more about the Works of Mercy.

3 Close Have young people turn to Making Good Choices on page 290. Arrange young people in pairs and have them read aloud the section. Then have pairs come up with a situation in which a person their age would be faced with a decision. When all pairs are ready, have them take turns sharing the situation with the group. Discuss what good choices can be made in each situation. UnIT 4 • Session 19

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REflEcT

prayer Choose an approach and pray with young people. ApproAch 1

Prayer

A Living Work of Art

Guided Reflection Prepare Listen in advance to the recorded guided reflection “Reflecting the Holy” [CD 2, Track 4]. Decide if you will use the recording or lead the reflection yourself. If you choose to lead, listen again, following the script [pages T-345–T-346]. Note pauses and tone. You can then use the script or adapt it as you wish. Pray Invite volunteers to read aloud the paragraphs in the left column. Say: Being truthful means more than just being honest. It also means living with integrity. Point out that when we live with integrity, we are like an artist who, through his or her work, translates the truth and beauty of God’s Revelation into visible forms. Then play the recording or lead using the script, joining young people in reflective prayer. If you use the script, play reflective music softly in the background. Conclude by praying the Glory Be to the Father. ApproAch 2

Young People’s Page Prepare Pray the prayer in advance to become familiar with it. Pray Invite volunteers to read aloud the paragraphs in the left column. Then say: Being truthful means more than just being honest. It also means living with integrity. Point out that when we live with integrity, we are like an artist who, through his or her work, translates the truth and beauty of God’s Revelation into visible forms. Guide young people through the meditation. Conclude by praying the Glory Be to the Father.

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Through the centuries,

Christians have used sacred poetry, music, and images to deepen their experience of prayer. The psalms, for example, includes a number of hymns that were originally written as hymns to be sung during public worship. We can also turn to the beautiful paintings that decorate the Sistine Chapel in Rome or the stained-glass windows in our local churches. In our personal prayer, we can use songs or images, such as well-known paintings of Jesus, as the object of meditation. The sacred arts express the infinite beauty of God in works made by human hands. All true art gives form to the truth of reality in a language that we not only hear but can also see and touch. Inspired by truth, sacred art makes God’s glory more visible, and those of us who experience it are drawn more completely to him. As God’s greatest creation, the members of the human family are God’s greatest work of art. We are true revelations of beauty.

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Living with Integrit y

In your imagination, go to a favorite peaceful place where there are no distractio ns. Find a comfortable place to sit. Look around. Use your senses to pay attention. What do you see? What do you hear? What do you smell? What can you touch? What do you taste ? Notice that Jesus has com e to join you. He sets befo re you a large, full-length mirr or and asks you to look at your reflection. Then he asks you one question: Wha t truth do you see reflected in your life? At first you think you don ’t have a clue. But Jesus is patient and gives you lots of encouragement. He asks you questions: Do you have a joyful spirit? Do you have a positive attitude? Are you generous with your talen ts and possessions? How do you show respect for othe rs and for yourself? How do you resolve conf lict? Spend as much time as you need and feel free to ask Jesus for more clues if you need them. When you deci de on your answer, share it with him. When you are finished, Jesu s asks you to take one last look in the mirror. Can you see now that you are God ’s work of art? You are a pers on of integrity who lives the truth in a unique and pers onal way. This may be a new idea for you, and it will take time to understand it fully . Remind yourself to give it some thought wheneve r you look at yourself in the mirror. Thank Jesus for this time together.

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not Just arts & crafts Say:PDF writer dorothy L. Sayers Signoff: Production _______ has argued that human beings are most God-like when they make art and that making art is one of our highest callings. Ask whether young people agree and why. Then have young people name professions in which they are interested. Discuss how these careers involve making beauty. Conclude that creativity is not just about making art, but about using the knowledge and materials we have to make something—including God’s kingdom on earth—even better.

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coaching Young peopleEditorial to pray Design _______ _______ Remind young people that creative activities bring us closer to God and that when we are feeling confused or out of sorts, it helps to write, draw, play music, garden, collage, or dance our way into God’s presence.

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REflEcT

E R E H W t In

1 Begin

Do I Fi

ed and which is sacr of es into that vote the rest divide our liv de to we d ed an pt , m n te r, Sunday We are of te to Mass on ilein, howeve Be go e hn W Jo r: h la Coac is secu onsibilities. that which tice into sp ac re d pr an al tu ys iri other jo grate our sp our week to rtant to inte at it is impo points out th that we do. ever ything

by John

Beilein

A Spiritual Practice I Can’t Do Without

One of my biggest responsibilities as coach is to get everyone ready to play. That’s what practice is for, and we practice hard almost every day of the week during the season. But practice in the gym is only part of getting ready. Mental preparation is important too. For me, spiritual preparation is also vital. On the day of every game, I read from a book of daily reflections titled My Daily Bread by the Jesuit Anthony Paone. I’ve had this book for years. These reflections are simple and to the point, and they clear away the obstacles to my peace of mind. This spiritual reading is a big part of my game preparation. When I’m prepared, I can get my team prepared. Before every game we have a meeting that lasts about 20 minutes. Just before this meeting, I read from my book and settle my spirit. Then I can go in and talk to the players about focusing their minds on what they need to do to play the game well. I read after the game too. The reflections talk about gratitude—something that’s easy to feel if we win the game. They also talk about adversity. There’s plenty of adversity in college basketball, and you can learn more from losing than you can from winning. JOHN BEILEIN is the men’s basketball coach at the University of Michigan.

I like variety in my spiritual life. At various times, I have prayed the Rosary and practiced other devotions. I pray the Examen of Saint Ignatius Loyola. I go to Mass frequently. I change things up to keep myself fresh. But my reading from My Daily Bread is a constant. It’s a spiritual practice I can’t do without.

Reflect

I coach men’s basketball at a Big 10 university. It’s a stressful job. The competition is tough; games are close. We perform in public—on television, in big arenas— surrounded by fans who badly want us to win and who are disappointed when we don’t. For the players and coaches, the pressure is always on.

Plan Your Week For each day of the week, write one spiritual practice that you can integrate into your daily activities. Commit to completing each activity. Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

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Reflection Selection Bring a variety of daily reflection books to class, including My Daily PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ Bread by Anthony Paone, S.J., if possible. Invite young people to spend time looking through the books and reading one or more sample selections to find a tone and approach they like. Explain that there are many such books available online and elsewhere and that they are excellent daily prayer aids. Help young people find copies of books they express interest in.

Invite a volunteer to read aloud the introductory text. Explain that “integrating our spiritual practice into everything that we do” does not mean talking about God all the time or quoting Scripture passages as we walk down the street. Say: It means being nourished by our spiritual practices so that we remain connected to God as we go about our daily lives. Invite young people to name the spiritual practices that are an important part of their lives. Write on the board young people’s responses.

2 Connect Invite volunteers to read aloud the section A Spiritual Practice I Can’t Do Without. Ask what is surprising about the article? (Possible answer: We don’t think of basketball coaches as “spiritual” people; their business is athletics.) Say: Coach Beilein’s players might not know about his spiritual practice, but they definitely benefit from it. Ask: How? (Possible answers: It makes him a better leader and teacher. It enables him to keep his players focused on important lessons.) Have young people complete the activity independently. Explain that young people may write the same spiritual practice on more than one day, but encourage them to include some variety in their plan.

3 Close Encourage young people to ask their parents or other trusted adults about spiritual practices that have nourished their faith over time.

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W h a t ’s

? t a h W

1 Begin what’s what? Have young people complete the items at home or in class with a partner. Remind young people that they can use the page references to help them answer the questions.

Write the letter that best matches each description below.

c. greed

1

people who believe that we can solve humanity’s issues by examining them scientifically and mathematically PAGE 160161

2 Connect 2

gifts from God that complement each other PAGE 161

3

contain stories that teach us about God’s relationship with creation PAGE 161

now what? Read aloud the section. Invite each young person to respond to the question independently.

4

a religious truth that we can only know through God’s Revelation PAGE 162

3 Go in Peace Have young people collect their materials and return them to the appropriate places. Encourage young people to remain mindful of the Now What? challenge during the week. Say: The gifts of faith and reason help us discover God’s truth. we can rely on both of these gifts to help us discern what God is asking of us.

d. rationalists e. mystery f. faith and science g. lies

Respond

Say what? Ask volunteers to read aloud the terms and use each one in a sentence. Review each term in the Glossary if necessary.

a. conscience b. Genesis, Chapters 1 and 2

5

gift from God that leads us to see the morality of our acts PAGE 162

6

can harm our relationships PAGE 162

7

revealing another person’s faults

h. detraction i. Corporal Works of Mercy

Say What? Know the definitions of these terms. Age of Enlightenment calumny detraction divine law Fruits of the Holy Spirit fundamentalists rationalists

Now What?

PAGE 162

8

can lead people to have feelings of resentment PAGE 163

9

acts by which we help others with their physical and material needs

We can use the gifts of faith and reason to help us form our conscience. Having a well-formed conscience helps us make good decisions. How can you use the gifts of faith and reason to help you form your conscience this week?

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Service: Unplugged Sabbath Remind young people that faith and reason are complementary gifts PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ that can help us discern God’s truth. Say: Today, we are bombarded by sources of information. This overload can make it difficult to hear God. observing an “unplugged Sabbath” is one way to give people a quiet space in which to hear God’s voice. Have young people brainstorm a list of practices a family might use when observing an “unplugged Sabbath.” Have young people write a short article introducing parishioners to the idea and inviting them to adopt the practice. Arrange for the articles to appear in the parish bulletin. Family and Community

Session assessment Option An assessment for this session can be found at www.findinggod.com.

3-Minute Retreat Give young people an opportunity for quiet meditation at www.loyolapress.com/retreat.

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p l a n a h E a D : Get Ready for Session 20 Consult the catechist preparation pages to prepare for Session 20 and determine any materials you will need.


CateChist PreParation S e S S io n 2 0

Celebrating Holy Week and Easter 3-Minute Retreat Before you prepare the session, pause and be still. Take three deep breaths and be aware of the loving presence of God, who is with you on this journey.

Knowing and Sharing Your Faith in Session 20 Consider how Scripture and Tradition can deepen your understanding of session content.

Scripture Luke 21:1–2 When he looked up he saw some wealthy people putting their offerings into the treasury and he noticed a poor widow putting in two small coins.

Reflection On the surface the actions seemed the same—people making contributions to the Temple. But then we realize one gives from a surplus, another from what little she has. God alone knows the real value of our contribution, however large or small. God’s justice is expressed through compassion for the sick, the poor, the needy, the widows, and the orphans. As followers of Jesus, we honor others by sharing with them not simply from our surplus, but from the depths of who we are. We show this by honoring them and treating them in the same way God treats us.

Questions With whom can I share my time, talent, or treasure today? How willing am I to give from my need and not simply from my surplus?

Concluding Prayer

Speak to God, using the words of this prayer or your own. Compassionate God, you know the secrets of our hearts. Turn my offering, however small, into something of value for people whose needs are known to you alone.

Matthew 26:14–16,47–56, 27:3–9 describes Judas Iscariot’s betrayal of Jesus. Matthew 26:69–75 tells how Peter denies knowing Jesus.

Tradition In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus declares, “Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, / for they will be satisfied.” [Matthew 5:6] The Greek word for righteousness can also be translated as “justice.” To say God is just means that we can always count on him to show compassion and mercy to all. As Saint Vincent de Paul realized, God calls us to deal with one another in the same way by showing compassion and mercy to others in all situations and by caring for people who are in need of any kind. In this way we can be signs of hope for one another.

Catholic Social Teaching In this session the integrated Catholic Social Teaching themes are Option for the Poor and Vulnerable and Solidarity. See page 133b for an explanation of these themes.

Window on the Catechism The celebration of Easter is found in CCC 1168–1171. The virtue of hope is discussed in CCC 1813, 1817–21.

General Directory for Catechesis The importance of liturgical catechesis is discussed in GDC 71, 117, 118.

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caTEchIST pREpaRaTIOn

One-Hour Session Planner

Celebrating Holy Week and easter

SeSSion 20

Session Theme: The Church celebrates Jesus’ life, Passion, Death, and Resurrection during Holy Week and Easter so that we may be reminded of Jesus’ sacrifice for our Salvation. Before This Session ▶▶

Determine whether you will use the Unit Assessment option listed on page 174.

▶▶ Determine whether you will also discuss the Holy Week and Easter seasonal

pages in the back of the Young People’s Book. ▶▶ Bookmark your Bible to Matthew 26:14–16,47–56,69–75; 27:3–9. Place the

open Bible in your prayer space. ▶▶ Read the Guide for this session, choose any additional If Time Allows activities

Prayer in Session 20

Young people are invited to experience an online, Scripture-based 3-Minute Retreat at the end of the session. The prayers give young people opportunities to experience a variety of forms of prayer. Session 20 includes the Glory Be to the Father, a prayer of thanks, and the Exsultet. Follow the Prepare directions on the Catechist Guide page before sharing with young people.

that you might have time to complete, and gather the listed materials. StepS

ApproximAte time

Engage Celebrating Holy Week and Easter

10 minutes Page 167

Explore

30–40 minutes

A Message of Hope

Pages 168–169

Choosing Hope Over Despair

Reflect Prayer: easter Proclamation Where Do I Fit In?

10–15 minutes Page 172

Page 173

Respond What’s What?

Take IT Home

Pages 170–171

10–15 minutes Page 174

materials REQUIRED ▶▶ Hand wipes (page 167)

OpTIOnal ▶▶ Session 20 BLM, T-377 (page 169)

▶▶ Image of chiaroscuro (page 168)

▶▶ Writing supplies (page 173)

▶▶ Information on the St. Vincent de Paul

▶▶ Session 20 Assessment,

Society (page 169) ▶▶ Bible (pages 169–170) ▶▶ Map of Vatican City (page 171)

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www.findinggod.com (page 174) ▶▶ Unit 4 Assessment, T-378–T-380

(page 174)

Homework options: Session 20 BLM

Page 169

Peter, Continued

Page 171


EngagE

Session

20

g Holy n i t a r b e l e C a s te r E d n a k e e W

Vincent de Paul gave hope to others. ▶▶ Analyze Judas’s and Peter’s responses

to their betrayals of Jesus. ▶▶ State that the Exsultet is prayed during

the Easter Vigil.

important week of the liturgical year. The last three days of this week are known as the Triduum —Holy Thursday, Good Friday,

▶▶ Define Crucifixion, Exsultet, hope,

and Holy Saturday. On Holy Thursday we celebrate the Mass of the Lord’s Supper, in which we recall the Passover meal that Jesus shared with his followers on the night he was betrayed. During this Mass we give thanks for the Sacrament of the Eucharist, which Jesus instituted when he gave his Body and Blood in the form of bread and wine. We also recall that Jesus washed the disciples’ feet as an act of love. In doing this, Jesus gives us an example of how we are called to treat one another. On Good Friday, during a liturgy that begins and ends in silence, we hear the story of Jesus’ Passion, and we venerate the cross by kissing it, bowing before it, or touching it reverently. During the proclamation of the Passion, we pray as we hear about Jesus’ suffering during the hours leading up to his Crucifixion and Death on the Cross. On Holy Saturday we celebrate the Easter Vigil to commemorate the night that Jesus rose from the dead. This Mass takes place at nightfall, and it is filled with rich symbolism, including the lighting of the new fire, the lighting of the Paschal Candle, and the sprinkling with holy water. During this Mass we hear Scripture readings that remind us of God’s saving deeds, and we welcome new members into the Church.

Judaism, and Triduum.

1 Set the Stage

Recall one of the most amazing events you have experienced in your life. What impact did this event have on you? What did you to do celebrate this event? What, if anything, do you do to remember or commemorate this event?

On Easter Sunday, the highest feast of the year, we celebrate Christ’s Resurrection. We recognize that through his Death, Christ saved us from sin and destroyed the hold that death has on us. We see that his Resurrection promises new life, both in this world and in the next. Easter represents the fulfillment of our Christian faith.

PR AYER Jesus, thank you for the gift of Salvation that we receive through your Resurrection. May we live our lives with the joy of this great gift.

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Service Reflection

OUTcOmES ▶▶ Explain how the work begun by Saint

HOLY Week, which is the last week of Lent, is the most

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Emotional

Have young people PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ pair_______ It Down Editorial If you have imagine that they are young people with emotional present with Jesus and his or behavioral differences, disciples at the Last Supper. give simple, clear instructions Read aloud John 13:1–15. Invite for the Get Started activity. young people to reflect on You may also wish to assign Jesus’ words: “I have given you a specific partner to each a model to follow, so that as I young person. have done for you, you should also do.” Have young people recall times they have shown humility or hospitality. Encourage young people to conclude their reflections with a silent prayer, asking Jesus to help them follow his example of service.

Go to www.findinggod.com/sessionextenders for an article on Holy Week. You may wish to share this with the group.

Read aloud the text in the box on page 167. Give young people a few moments to reflect silently on the questions or to share their responses with a partner.

2 Get Started Distribute hand wipes and ask young people to take turns washing a neighbor’s hands. Then ask young people to share their experiences of the activity. Say: Washing another person’s hands is an act of humility for both people. Invite volunteers to read aloud the session title and the page. Draw young people’s attention to the words Triduum and Crucifixion. Say: The Triduum is comprised of the three most important days in the liturgical year. On these three days, we recall Jesus’ Passion and Death. Have young people summarize what we celebrate on each of these days. Emphasize that we remember Jesus’ act of humble service during the Mass of the Lord’s Supper on Holy Thursday when the priest washes the feet of members from the parish.

prayer Pray aloud the prayer together. Then give young people a moment to pray their own prayer of thanks to God. Conclude by praying the Sign of the Cross.

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ExplORE

1 Begin Display an image that makes use of chiaroscuro, or dramatic use of contrast between light and dark, such as Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring. Ask: Why is this image so impressive? Then say: Jesus’ Crucifixion was a profound experience of darkness. Yet God was able to turn this darkness to light through the Resurrection.

2 Connect Invite volunteers to read aloud the article title and the first paragraph. Invite volunteers to share their responses to the question. Invite volunteers to read aloud the section Saint Vincent de Paul. Have young people summarize major events in the life of Saint Vincent de Paul. Point out that many people during Vincent’s time did not receive a formal education. Then say: even from a young age, Vincent knew that God had called him to care for people in need. Ask: What did Vincent believe he could do to alleviate people’s suffering? (help them experience the joy of Christ’s love) What gifts did God give Vincent to help him respond to this call? (organizational skills, a companion to help him in ministry) What do you feel God is calling you do to? What gifts has he given you so that you can respond to this call faithfully? (Accept reasonable responses.) Point out that the Congregation of the Mission and the Daughters of Charity continue the works that Vincent and Louise began. The Poor and Vulnerable

Ready for Confirmation Read aloud the feature. Have young people turn to page 266 in the back of their books. Read aloud and summarize each Gift of the Holy Spirit. Invite young people to share how the Gifts of the Holy Spirit can help them share the hope of the Resurrection with others.

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A Message of Hope THE

Triduum ends with the celebration of Jesus’ Resurrection on Easter Sunday. This movement from death to new life, from sorrow to joy, is a reflection of our human experience. Throughout history, the Church has cared for all those in sorrow and pain so that all people can experience hope and joy in their lives. How has the Church helped you experience joy?

Saint Vincent de Paul Vincent de Paul was born in France in the 17th century. Even from a young age, he was concerned with the needs of people who were poor. He knew that by caring for people’s needs, he could alleviate their suffering and help them experience the joy of Christ’s love. Vincent’s parents made sure that he received an education, and they encouraged him to become a priest. After Vincent was ordained, he moved to Paris and began serving people who were poor or sick. Vincent wanted to serve as many people as possible, so he drew upon his organizational skills and founded the Congregation of the Mission and the Sisters of Charity. With his companion Louise de Marillac, Vincent also organized the Daughters of Charity, a lay organization that enlisted young

women to help people in need. Because Vincent and Louise were able to garner support for their ministries, they were able to provide a vast array of social services, including hospital care, soup kitchens, homes for children who had been orphaned, and homes for people who were elderly.

The Society of Saint Vincent de Paul Blessed Frederic Ozanam, who was born in France in 1813, lived at a time of great political turmoil. As a young adult, Ozanam was inspired by the charitable works performed by Saint Vincent de Paul. He believed that members of society should put the values of mercy and love into action by performing acts of charity. He gathered a small

READY for Confirmation As we prepare for Confirmation, we examine how the Holy Spirit helps us understand what God is calling us to do, with Christ as our role model. As you reflect on the Gifts of the Holy Spirit, imagine how you might share the hope of the Resurrection with people who are suffering. Try to identify some ways that you can share the message of Easter joy with others throughout the year.

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hope and Trust Take young people to a large, open space. Have two volunteers PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ demonstrate the following. Ask them to sit on the floor facing each other with their legs extended and the bottoms of their feet touching. Position a spotter behind each volunteer. next, have young people grip each other’s wrists. Explain that it is each person’s responsibility not to let go of their partner’s wrists, no matter what. After a count of three, the volunteers should pull with their hands, push with their feet, and use the tension to stand up. Once they succeed, arrange young people in groups of four and have pairs within groups take turns attempting the maneuver while the other two group members spot. When all young people have had a turn, discuss their relative feelings of security, based on the trustworthiness of their partners and spotters. Explain that trust is a synonym for the word hope. Say: One way to define hope is “trust in what cannot be seen or experienced through our senses.” Point out that even though we did not see Jesus physically rise from the dead, we still trust that it happened.


ExplORE group of university students who shared his beliefs. Originally named the Conference of Charity, Ozanam and his companions tended to the physical and spiritual needs of people who were poor, sick, and unemployed. Ozanam’s dedication to justice and social reform led many to join the Conference of Charity. Soon, more than 100 people joined the organization. Ozanam divided the Conference into smaller groups so that it could assist more people. Frederick Ozanam’s legacy, the Society of Saint Vincent de Paul, actively continues the work of Christian charity begun by Saint Vincent de Paul in France in the 17th century. The Saint Vincent de Paul Society came to the United States in 1845, first ministering to people in St. Louis, Missouri. Today over 800,000 people in 130 countries carry out the work of the Society of Saint Vincent de Paul.

Like Saint Vincent de Paul, Saint Louise de Marillac, and Blessed Frederick Ozanam, we are called to act with justice by promoting the dignity of human life and caring for the needs of the most vulnerable among us. Jesus himself gave us this mandate in the Gospels. “For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, a stranger and you welcomed me, naked and you clothed me, ill and you cared for me, in prison and you visited me.” Then the righteous will answer him and say, “Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you drink? When did we see you a stranger and welcome you, or naked and clothe you? When did we see you ill or in prison, and visit you?” And the king will say to them in reply, “Amen, I say to you, whatever you did for one of these least brothers of mine, you did for me.” Matthew 25:35–40

Saint Vincent de Paul and Blesse d Frederick Ozan am performed acts of charity for people who were suffering. We, too, are ca lle d to share a messa ge of hope with others by fol low ing Jesus’ exam ple of selfless servi ce.

During the Triduum, as we reflect on Jesus’ suffering, we acknowledge the deep suffering that is experienced by people all over the world. At the same time, we are filled with Easter joy, and we proclaim a message of hope. The Easter season offers us the opportunity to celebrate the promise of an end to suffering, fear, and death itself. We celebrate that Christ is risen and that he will come again. We pray that we will open our hearts so that Christ can work through us to help those in need.

Explore

R EM EM BE R

Jesus Points the Way

SACRED ART

In this painting, we see Saint Vincent de Paul and the Daughters of Charity helping people who are sick with the plague. This painting serves as a reminder that Jesus calls each of us to care unselfishly for the needs of others in whatever ways our gifts allow.

Saint Vincent de Paul, Antoine Ansiaux, oil on canvas, circa 1800. Session 20 > Celebrating Holy Week and Easter

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Session 20 Blm The light Shines in the Darkness Provide each young person Design _______ Editorial _______ with the Session 20 Blackline Master [T-377]. Read aloud the directions and the Scripture passages. Have young people complete the activity at home during the coming week. Encourage young people to let the texts “simmer” in their unconscious for a few days. Say: Choose a passage, contemplate the words, and allow images to arise in your mind’s eye. When an image emerges, you may wish to use it as the basis of your artwork. Encourage young people to dramatize their illustrations with dramatic dark/light contrast. During the next session, ask volunteers to share their work. PDF Signoff: Production _______

SEaSOnal SESSIOnS holy Week and Easter Work with young people through pages 235–242 to learn more about Holy Week and Easter. These special sessions can each take up to one hour to complete.

Invite volunteers to read aloud the section The Society of Saint Vincent de Paul. Ask: how did Ozanam believe members of society should operate? (by putting the values of mercy and love into action by performing acts of charity) how did he live out his belief? (by gathering a small group of people who tended to the physical and spiritual needs of people who were poor, sick, and unemployed) how do we know that other people shared Ozanam’s belief? (More than 100 people soon joined his organization.) Point out that there are St. Vincent de Paul Societies in parishes all over the world. Invite volunteers to read aloud the section Jesus Points the Way. Say: This scripture passage is not about strangers and prisoners “somewhere else.” It is about the people who are homeless, sick, and imprisoned right here in our own community. Point out that the word imprisoned does not refer only to people who are in jail. Say: People can be imprisoned in many ways. for example, people can be imprisoned by addictions or mental illnesses. Emphasize that each person we encounter, regardless of his or her circumstance, is a reflection of Christ’s presence among us. Say: When we try to relieve their suffering, we are serving Christ himself.

Sacred art

Read aloud the feature. Invite volunteers to share what they can do to continue the work begun by Vincent and Louise.

3 Close Give young people a moment to reflect silently. Invite them to ask God for the strength to live out the example of Saints Vincent and Louise. Encourage young people to find out more about what your parish does to support a local St. Vincent de Paul Society.

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ExplORE

1 Begin Have young people recall a time when they were waiting for someone or something—a parent, a ride, a phone call—and the person or thing did not come. Have volunteers describe the exact moment their expectation turned into fear. Say: ultimately, things must have turned out Ok because here you are today. This is what God wants us to remember: ultimately, everything will be Ok in ways that we can’t yet imagine.

2 Connect Invite a volunteer to read aloud the article title and the first paragraph. Draw young people’s attention to the word hope. Ask: What does the word hope mean to you? After young people share their definitions, read aloud the definition from the Glossary. Compare and contrast the Glossary definition with the definitions supplied by young people. Read aloud Matthew 26:14–16, 47–56 and 27:3–9. Then invite volunteers to read aloud the section Judas. Point out that Judas’s guilt and sorrow over his actions were so extreme that he did not believe he would ever be able to recover or be forgiven. Emphasize that God is always willing to accept us when we repent for our sins. Say: God’s love is so profound that he is capable of forgiving any sin imaginable. Point out that it is important for us to share this message of hope with others, especially when they seem to be experiencing despair.

our Catholic Character

Read aloud the feature. Say: There have been times in our Christian history when members of the Church have sinned by blaming Jews for Jesus’ Death. Emphasize that we are called to focus on the hope of the Resurrection rather than the despair of Jesus’ Crucifixion and Death.

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Choosi ng Hope O v er D espa i r The Betrayal of Jesus Christ by Judas, engraving.

THE

word despair describes the feeling of utter hopelessness. When humans are filled with despair, they might feel as if they can no longer cope with life. Thankfully, despair doesn’t have to be a permanent state. It can turn to hope, a confident expectation that everything will be OK and a trust in something that we might not be able to see or haven’t experienced. The Scripture readings that we hear proclaimed during Holy Week and Easter are filled with examples of hope and despair. In stories about two of Jesus’ Apostles, we learn a lesson about the importance of turning despair into hope and sharing that newfound hope with the world.

Judas In the Gospel of Matthew, we read that one of Jesus’ Apostles, Judas Iscariot, betrayed Jesus by arranging to have him arrested. While Jesus was praying in the garden of Gethsemane after celebrating the Last

Our Catholic Character Judas, like Jesus and all his early followers, was Jewish. Because of his betrayal and the actions of the Sanhedrin, some Christians have blamed Jews for Jesus’ Death. The Church reminds us, however, that

Judaism,

unlike other non-Christian religions, is a response to God’s Revelation. We do not believe that Jews were indiscriminately responsible for Jesus’ Passion and Death.

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Supper with his Apostles, Judas arrived with a crowd whose members were carrying swords and clubs. Judas kissed Jesus as a signal that Jesus was the one whom the chief priests sought to arrest. For his betrayal, Judas received 30 pieces of silver. It is difficult to imagine why Judas—who traveled with Jesus, heard his message, and witnessed his miracles—might betray Jesus and commit such a sin. Judas’s actions both before and after his betrayal of Jesus show us that, whatever his motivation, he obviously had lost all hope and was living in despair. In the Gospel of Matthew, we learn that after he saw Jesus being condemned to death, Judas deeply regretted what he had done. Although he felt deep sorrow over his actions, Judas did not do anything to repent of his sins or repair his broken relationship with Jesus. According to tradition, Judas returned the 30 pieces of silver to the priests and elders, admitted that he had betrayed an innocent man, and went off to hang himself. Judas’s despair clouded his thoughts and caused him to lose all hope.

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Despair into hope Have small groups discuss situations they might face that could cause PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ them to feel despair and how they could help someone in a similar situation turn that despair into hope. Then ask small groups to prepare and present skits based on the situations and actions they discussed. solidarity


ExplORE Peter Judas was not the only one of Jesus’ Apostles to feel despair over sin. In the Gospels of Matthew and Mark, we read that Peter denied knowing Jesus on three different occasions after Jesus was arrested. It appears that Peter did not want to be associated with a criminal, nor did he want to be arrested as Jesus had been. After his third denial, Peter was so ashamed that he began weeping bitterly. Peter, however, did not remain filled with despair. Despite Jesus’ Crucifixion, Peter continued to believe in God’s mercy.

PAST: Saint Peter preached in Rome during the last years of his life. It was there, during the persecutions under Emperor Nero, that he died a martyr’s death. Tradition tells us that Peter did not consider himself worthy to be crucified the same way that Jesus was. In response, he was crucified upside down. Origen, an early Christian writer, wrote “Peter was crucified at Rome with his head downward, as he himself had desired to suffer.”

PRESENT: Saint Peter’s Basilica, considered one of the largest churches in the world, is in Vatican City. The basilica stands on the traditional site where Saint Peter was crucified and buried. The tomb of Saint Peter is under the main altar. Originally founded by Constantine in 324, Saint Peter’s Basilica was rebuilt between 1506 and 1615 and includes artistic works by Bramante, Michelangelo,

A Beacon of Hope

and Bernini. Saint Peter’s is one of the holiest

Think of a situation in the world today in which people might feel despair. Then on the lines below, write how you can serve as a beacon of hope for the people in the situation.

Christian sites in the world.

Explore

The Gospel of John tells us that after the Resurrection, Peter was able to be reconciled with Jesus, who then called Peter to feed and tend Jesus’ sheep—all those who were his followers. Three times Jesus asked Peter this question, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” Three times Peter said that he did. Peter’s hope and faith in God’s mercy and Christ’s love helped him overcome despair and live out his true mission—to be the first leader of the Church.

Past Meets Present

Saint Peter’s Basilica

DEF IN E hope, Judaism

R EM EM BE R

Peter’s hope an d faith in God’s mercy he lped him overcome desp air and live out his true mi ssi on.

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Past meets Present

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peter, continued Before the next session, have young people find a passage Design _______ Editorial _______ from Acts of the Apostles in which Peter is mentioned. [Peter is referred to in chapters 3–5, 8–12, and 15.] Ask young people to summarize their passages and to write a short paragraph about how Peter’s behavior was a model of hope for the members of the early Church. During the next session, invite volunteers to share their summaries and paragraphs. PDF Signoff: Production _______

Read aloud Matthew 26:69–75. Then invite volunteers to read aloud the section Peter. Ask: What did Peter do that might have caused him to feel despair? (He denied knowing Jesus three times.) Why did he deny Jesus? (He did not want to be associated with a criminal, nor did he want to be arrested as Jesus was.) Point out that Peter’s behavior was motivated by fear. Ask: What was Peter’s initial response to his betrayal of Jesus? (He wept bitterly.) What allowed Peter to move beyond his despair? (He continued to believe in God’s mercy.) Point out that even though Peter had sinned by denying that he was one of Jesus’ closest followers, Jesus forgave him and asked him to be the Church’s first leader. Say: Jesus calls us to follow him, and he forgives us when we stray from doing so. When we celebrate the sacrament of Reconciliation, we receive his forgiveness and the strength to follow his example better in the future. Read aloud the directions to the A Beacon of Hope activity. Give young people time to complete the activity with a partner. Then invite volunteers to share their responses.

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Read aloud the feature. Ask: Why, according to tradition, was Peter crucified upside down? (He did not consider himself worthy to be crucified in the same way Jesus was.) If possible, display a map of Vatican City and point out the location of St. Peter’s Basilica.

3 Close Say: The hope of the Resurrection is present every time someone is freed from his or her despair. Have young people contemplate the idea that human despair is linked to Jesus’ suffering on the Cross and that each compassionate response to despair is linked to Christ’s Resurrection.

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REflEcT

Prayer

prayer Follow the steps to guide young people through the prayer on page 172.

Easter Proclamation

Young People’s Page Prepare Pray the prayer in advance to become familiar with it. Pray Invite volunteers to read aloud the page title and the paragraphs in the left column. Say: The image of light amid darkness is often a symbol of hope amid despair. Explain that the Service of Light at the beginning of the Easter Vigil is a reminder that the light of Christ’s Resurrection overshadows the darkness of sin and death. Point out that no matter how dark our life experiences may seem, we can always rest in the hope that we receive through Christ’s Resurrection from the dead. Explain that the Exsultet is a prayer of praise in which we give thanks for the many ways that God has shone a light of hope amid the darkness of human suffering. If possible, play a recording of the Exsultet. Give young people time to prepare themselves for prayer. Say: Take a moment to relax your bodies and rest in God’s love. Then pray aloud each paragraph from the Exsultet, pausing after each one to give young people time to reflect on the meaning of the words. After praying aloud the final verse, say: Take a moment to pray your own prayer of praise to God for the gift of his son, Jesus, who is the light amid our darkness. After giving young people time to pray, conclude by praying the Glory Be to the Father. Say: As we continue the session, keep in mind God’s message of hope. Carry it with you throughout the day.

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The Easter Proclamation that follows the lighting of the Paschal Candle at the Easter Vigil on Holy Saturday is known as the Exsultet . After sunset and in complete darkness, a fire is lit and blessed outside of or at the entrance of the church. Then the Paschal Candle is blessed and lit from this fire. As the candle is carried into the darkened church, we sing, “Christ our light. Thanks be to God!” The Exsultet, traditionally sung by a deacon, proclaims Christ’s Resurrection from the dead for our Salvation. Throughout the 50 days of Easter, the Paschal Candle stands in the sanctuary as a sign of the light of the risen Christ, “the one Morning Star who never sets, . . . who, coming back from death’s domain, has shed his peaceful light on humanity, and lives and reigns for ever and ever.” (The Exsultet)

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Exsultet Reflection

These, then, are the feasts of Passo ver, in which is slain the Lamb, the one true Lamb, whose Blood anoints the doorp osts of believers. This is the night, when once you led our forebearer s, Israel’s child ren, from slavery in Egypt and made them pass dry-shod through the Red Sea. This is the night that a pillar of fire banished the dark ness of sin. This is the night that even now, throughout the world, sets Christian believers apar t from world ly vices and from the gloom of sin, leadi ng them to grace and joining them to his holy ones . This is the night, when Christ broke the prison-bar s of death and rose victorious from the unde rworld.

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a Verse of hope Have young people write their PDF Signoff: Production _______ own verse of praise to God. Encourage young people to use the image of light to represent the hope we have received through the Resurrection.

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coaching Young peopleEditorial to pray Design _______ _______ Point out that a candle’s flame can be a powerful cue to center ourselves on God in prayer. Suggest that young people light a candle during their prayer time to help remind them of the light of God’s presence.

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REflEcT

E R E H W t In

1 Begin

Do I Fi

to maintain be difficult main ring, it can inds us to re in and suffe m pa re e r, nc ve rie we pe n, ho ehension. When we ex Our traditio man compr d. hu r Go ou in st nd yo d tru be e an ar pe at ho th r ys ou rk s in wa for God wo steadfast—

an by F r. D.J. Reim , S

Finding Jesus Where I Least Expected

As time passed, Kelly became more and more depressed. She wondered, “Is this ever going to end?” She asked me, “Why won’t God do something? Can’t God make this stop?” I felt helpless. I could have given her all kinds of theological explanations—that God, for example, is a good and loving God. That God doesn’t give us pain. Or that God can heal us, but for some mysterious reason, doesn’t always do so. But no explanation was going to help her ease the pain. And so we prayed. We prayed that God would heal her, either through her doctors or by some supernatural miracle.

God enough. And I was so impressed with Kelly—that throughout all this time, she had kept praying to God. Kelly’s miracle wasn’t just her healing. As she told me, God kept giving her the grace, the strength, and the hope to go on. “Without God,” Kelly said, “I could never have made it.” Kelly’s healing reminded me that Jesus can show up anywhere, at any time.

Reflect

Kelly suffered from migraine headaches. They were never bad enough to keep her from her daily activities, but they were a constant, never-ending threat. She saw many specialists and tried many different treatments, but nothing seemed to work.

Surprise! Take a moment to reflect on an experience that filled you with hope. Then in the box, make something—a poem, a paragraph, or a drawing—that reflects your experience.

But that prayer wasn’t answered. Kelly’s migraines continued, and her life became more and more difficult. And yet she continued to pray. She continued to believe that God knew her, loved her, and didn’t want her to suffer. Months passed. I had nearly given up hope that God would help Kelly. (And I’m supposed to be the professional “hoper”!) But there wasn’t any reason to have hope. And then, one day, Kelly called to tell me that it had been two weeks since she had her last migraine. She could see the sunshine in her life again. She felt alive! I was surprised and overjoyed. And I felt humbled that I hadn’t trusted FR. DAN REIM, S.J., is a campus minister at St. Mary Student Parish in Ann Arbor, which serves the University of Michigan.

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prayer answered? Present the following fictional scenario to young people: One PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ morning, God begins answering every prayer precisely when and how people want him to. Have young people write a short story based on this premise. Invite volunteers to read aloud their completed stories. Conclude by discussing whether these answered prayers were really prayers answered.

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Invite a volunteer to read aloud the introductory text. Explain that to be steadfast is to be faithful and patient. Ask: Does the world around us encourage us to be patient or impatient? Why? (Possible answer: impatient; We are constantly told to do or buy something immediately and that problems should be solved instantly.) Say: sometimes we can’t solve problems instantly, though. We just have to wait. Today’s article tells the story of a faith-filled person who waited with God.

2 Connect Have volunteers read aloud the section Finding Jesus Where I Least Expected. Ask: Where did the author find Jesus? (Possible answers: in Kelly’s healing; in Kelly’s faith; in Kelly’s story) What elements does this story contain that you least expected? (Possible answers: It was Kelly who ended up helping Father Reim, instead of the other way around. Kelly actually got well, even when her case seemed hopeless.) Invite young people to share stories about people they know who remained steadfast in their faith through a difficult ordeal. Then say: When we are inspired to stay faithful by stories like these, we have Jesus to thank. he is in our suffering, in our healing, in the support we give one another, and in the stories we tell one another. Have young people complete the activity independently, then invite volunteers to share their reflection.

3 Close Point out that everyone feels helpless at times—even priests. Encourage young people to pray for patience and guidance during times of helplessness.

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RESpOnD

W h a t ’s

? t a h W

1 Begin What’s What? Have young people complete the items at home or in class with a partner. Remind young people that they can use the page references to help them answer the questions.

Complete each sentence with the correct word or phrase.

say What? Ask volunteers to read aloud and define the terms. Review each term in the Glossary if necessary.

Respond

2 Connect

1

The Exsultet is the Easter Proclamation that . PAGE 172 follows the lighting of the

2

On Holy Saturday, we celebrate the to commemorate the night that Jesus rose from the dead. PAGE 167

3

8

is the founder of the Society of Saint Vincent de Paul. PAGE 168169

On we recognize that through his Death, Christ saved us from sin and destroyed the hold that death has on us. PAGE 167

Say What? Know the definitions of these terms. Crucifixion Exsultet hope Judaism Triduum

Now What?

now What? Read aloud the section. Invite each young person to write a prayer independently.

3 Go in Peace

4

Despite his feelings of despair, Peter . PAGE 171 continued to believe in

5

Saint Vincent de Paul founded two religious and the Sisters of Charity. orders, the

Name a time this week when it will be important for you to be a source of hope to yourself or to others. When the time comes, remember to ask the Holy Spirit for guidance.

PAGE 168

Have young people collect their materials and return them to the appropriate places. Encourage young people to remain mindful of the Now What? challenge during the week. Say: We can always rely on the holy spirit to give us the strength to share the light of Christ’s hope with others. 174

6

We celebrate the Mass of the Lord’s Supper . PAGE 167 on

7

In exchange for betraying Jesus, received 30 pieces of silver. PAGE 170

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Service: Be the light Remind young people that we can share the light of hope with others PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ through our actions. Arrange with your catechetical leader to have young people organize a campaign to collect donations for a ministry sponsored by a local St. Vincent de Paul Society. The Poor and Vulnerable

Session assessment Option An assessment for this session can be found at www.findinggod.com.

Unit assessment Option If you wish, photocopy the Unit Assessment on pages T-378–T-380. Administer the assessment during the session or send it home.

3-Minute Retreat Give young people an opportunity for quiet meditation at www.loyolapress.com/retreat.

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p l a n a h E a D : Get Ready for Session 21 Consult the catechist preparation pages to prepare for Session 21 and determine any materials you will need.


acT

Faith in

ACT I O N

Unit

4 faITh In acTIOn Complete one of the suggested Faith in Action projects as a class, or organize young people into two groups, having each group complete a different project. Note that directions continue on the next page.

As Christians we respond to Christ’s call to share the Gospel message of hope by treating one another with compassion and by performing acts of charity and service. By performing these works, we put our faith into practice, and we follow Jesus’ example in our own words and actions. In this unit we explored the theme of being called by Christ to share his love with others. Through the sacraments, Scripture, and the Church’s teachings, we receive the strength we need to respond to this call. In order to help us respond to this call faithfully, we work with the Holy Spirit to develop our conscience, our inner voice that helps us make good decisions.

“The Church service of charity any more than she can neglect the Sacraments and the Word.” —Pope Benedict XVI

Drive for the Basics

Act

cannot neglect the

Purpose Understand the importance of the common good; put this teaching into action by identifying needs in your community, organizing a drive to collect goods, and distributing them to people in need.

Background Housing, food, education, health care, and employment are just some of the basic rights of every human being. In the Acts of the Apostles, Luke tells us that meeting people’s basic needs was one of the main responsibilities of the early Church. Luke writes, “There was no needy person among them, for those who owned property or houses would sell them, bring the proceeds of the sale, and put them at the feet of the apostles, and they were distributed to each according to need.” (Acts of the Apostles 4:34–35)

Steps 1. Read Acts of the Apostles 6:1–7. In this passage, Luke tells us about two different but related tasks in the early Church: preaching the Good News of Jesus Christ and caring for the needs of the members of the community. How would you retell this story by using your community’s circumstances? 2. Talk with local community leaders to find out about some of the pressing needs of the people in your community. 3. Organize a food drive or other drive to collect goods that will help meet the needs of people in your community. Be creative in designing your drive. Find ways to get as many people as possible involved so that people can say about your community, “There was no person in need among them.”

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Serving Others Arrange with your catechetical leader to have young people prepare PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ and serve a meal at a local soup kitchen or shelter for people who are homeless. Afterward, engage young people in a discussion about how they can continue to share their gifts and provide for people in need. Solidarity

m aT E R I a l S: Get Ready for Faith in Action For these projects, you will need computers with Internet access, a guest speaker from Make-A-Wish or a similar organization, the prayer service planning guide, prayer service planning tips, and writing supplies. Also see the project steps.

1 Prepare Discuss the project ideas with young people and involve them in the decision-making process to determine a project. Discuss the project they choose in terms of faith and being a “person for others.” Ask: What do you hope to learn from this project? What interests you about it? What concerns do you have about it? Whom will you serve, and how will your service be beneficial to them and to you? Are you prepared to recognize the humanity in those you encounter? how does this project help you put your faith into action? What theme or themes of Catholic social Teaching will you be experiencing in the project?

2 Implement Have young people follow the directions to complete Drive for the Basics on page 175 or Grant a Wish on page 176. Be sure young people do research before taking action. For Drive for the Basics, have young people research statistics regarding the number of people living in poverty in your area as well as the work done by organizations attempting to respond to people’s basic needs. For Grant a Wish, invite a guest speaker from Make-A-Wish or a similar organization to speak about the organization and its mission. Be sure young people are supervised during their project as appropriate. Consider asking for parent volunteers to be Faith in Action facilitators for this and the next unit. UnIT 4 • Faith in Action

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acT Grant a Wish Purpose

3 Close

Learn how even a small act of kindness can bring hope to a person and mean the world to him or her. Find out what someone’s wish is, or the wishes of a group of people, and come up with creative ways to make their wishes come true.

Bring closure to the project by leading young people in completing one or both of the following:

Background All his life, Christopher Greicius dreamed of becoming a police officer. But after developing a life-threatening illness, realizing his dream seemed far away. In 1980, a group of people worked together with Chris’s mom to make his dream come true. With the assistance of the Arizona Department of Public Safety, Chris was able to fly in a police helicopter, wear the motorcycle wings of an Arizona Highway patrol officer, and become the first honorary state trooper in Arizona. Chris died that same year at the age of seven but not before inspiring people around him. The people who worked so hard to make his dream come true decided that they could do the same for others. This was the beginning of the Make-A-Wish Foundation. Since then, more than 144,000 wishes have been granted.

Act

Prayer service Download and print out the prayer service planning guide and prayer service planning tips at www.findinggod.com. Have young people plan and implement a prayer service that expresses both gratitude to God for the opportunity to serve and hope for the people whom they served.

Asher McGarrah, 5, holding his tree house drawing. The Make-A-Wish Foundation built the tree house in his backyard.

“Every person has a . . . duty to work for

Steps 1. Read the Native American story about Jumping Mouse. A wonderful version of the story is The Story of Jumping Mouse, illustrated by John Steptoe. What can we learn from Jumping Mouse about giving? 2. Design your own Grant-A-Wish service project that will give you the opportunity to give to others. Identify a person or group of people who have a wish that seems like an impossibility to them. Work together to grant the wish.

the advancement of the common good and the well-being of all . . .” —United States Conference of Catholic Bishops

Pass It On Have young people make a storyboard to share their experiences of the project. Encourage young people to include ways that others can engage in a similar work of justice. Arrange with your catechetical leader to have the storyboard placed in the church entrance.

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living faith: The Smallest of Wishes Brainstorm with young people ways we might grant wishes every PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ day on a smaller scale. What are our friends’, families’, and neighbors’ needs? Could we visit someone who is ill, make a special effort to listen well, or share a special meal? Make a list and challenge young people to grant one small wish each day. Rights and Responsibilities

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CateChist PreParation

Unit 5

We Are Sent Unit 5 focuses on how the Church calls us to live out our faith in our daily lives.

SeSSion 21

Truth Revealed by God

In this session, young people learn how the Church responded to cultural changes in society.

SeSSion 22

Acting on Behalf of Justice

Young people will explore how the Church calls us to live out our faith in our daily lives.

SeSSion 23

Called by God

In this session, young people explore how they can respond to God’s call to live holy lives in service of others.

SeSSion 24

People for Others

Young people learn that being a person for others is acting as Jesus would, with sincere care and kindness toward those in need.

SeSSion 25

Unit Saint

Blessed Pope John XXIII Blessed Pope John XXIII changed the way the papacy interacted with followers of Christ, which guided us in strengthening our relationship with God.

Celebrating Pentecost

In this session, young people learn about Pentecost, a time when we celebrate the arrival of the Holy Spirit.

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CateChist PreParation

Prayer in Unit 5

In each session of Unit 5, establish the pattern and tone for prayer. Young people pray prayers of petition and thanksgiving and participate in meditations and guided reflections. Young people also pray the Daily Examen, a form of Ignatian prayer.

Catholic Social Teaching in Unit 5 Following are the themes of Catholic Social Teaching integrated into this unit. Call to Family, Community, and Participation Participation in family and community is central to our faith and to a healthy society. Families and communities must be supported and strengthened through active participation. Care for God’s Creation We have a responsibility to care for God’s creation. We are called to make moral and ethical choices that protect the ecological balance of creation both locally and worldwide. The Dignity of Work and the Rights of Workers The Catholic Church teaches us to respect basic rights of workers: the right to productive work, to fair wages, to private property, to organize and join unions, and to pursue economic opportunity. Catholics believe that the economy is meant to serve people. Life and Dignity of the Human Person The Catholic Church teaches us that all human life is sacred and that all people must be treated with dignity. As Catholics, we strive to respect and value people over material goods. The foundation of our moral vision is our belief in the life and the dignity of the human person. Option for the Poor and Vulnerable As Catholics, we are called to follow Jesus’ example by making a specific effort to defend and promote the dignity of the poor and vulnerable and meet their immediate needs. Rights and Responsibilities The Catholic Church teaches that every person has a right to live as well as the right to things required for human decency. As Catholics, it is our responsibility to protect fundamental human rights. Solidarity Solidarity is the attitude that leads Christians to share spiritual and material goods. Solidarity unites rich and poor, weak and strong, and helps create a society that recognizes that we live in an interdependent world.

Faith in Action In Unit 5, young people are invited to demonstrate their advocacy for rights for those who are disenfranchised. Young people are invited to develop and implement the following service projects: creating and distributing a justiceawareness publication and learning the basics of another language so that they can cross cultural and language barriers in their community. Alternative service-project ideas also appear on the last page of each session in this guide.

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TogeTher as One Parish Religious Education with the Parochial School End the year by inviting each school and RE family to design a page for the parish scrapbook. Provide each family with a sheet or two of scrapbook paper and allow them to decorate the sheets with personal thoughts or memories of their time in the program. Encourage families to contribute a written reflection that describes their favorite “faith moment” of the year. Collect the reflections and assemble them into a book to be displayed in the church before and after Mass.

Literature Opportunity Anything but Typical by Nora Raleigh Baskin You might wish to have young people read this novel about Jason, a budding writer who is also autistic. He finds an online friend in Rebecca, who shares his love for writing. Jason is afraid to meet Rebecca in person at an upcoming convention because he does not want her to treat him differently because of his autism. Young people will see how understanding another person’s perspective can broaden our own. Life and Dignity


CateChist PreParation S e S S io n 21

Truth Revealed By God 3-Minute Retreat Before you prepare the session, pause and be still. Take three deep breaths and be aware of the loving presence of God, who is with you on this journey.

Knowing and Sharing Your Faith in Session 21 Consider how Scripture and Tradition can deepen your understanding of session content.

Scripture James 3:7–9 For every kind of beast and bird, of reptile and sea creature, can be tamed and has been tamed by the human species, but no human being can tame the tongue. . . . With it we bless the Lord and Father, and with it we curse human beings who are made in the likeness of God.

Matthew 9:16–17 uses an image to communicate to us that Jesus is present and to remind us to enjoy the fullness of creation.

Tradition

Who has not immediately regretted a slip of the tongue that became the source of unintended damage? We have often been told that we should think before we speak. The tongue can be a dangerous weapon or a source of praise. In our personal relationships and in our media outlets, we are called never to forget the fundamental truth that we are made in the image and likeness of God and called to respect everything he has made. We serve the Kingdom of God when we speak the truth in love.

From the time we are very young, we are taught to “tell the truth.” When we speak the truth, we encounter Jesus who referred to himself as “the way and the truth and the life.” [John 14:6] We are called to live in truth in both deeds and words, respecting the reputation of others, avoiding deception, and making reparations for times we have been untruthful. We are also called to support the use of the media in evangelization. The use of the Internet, especially the Vatican Web site and that of the bishops at the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops allows the Church to promote authentic Catholic teaching in the world.

Questions

Catholic Social Teaching

Do I use my tongue more often to bless the Lord or to curse human beings made in the image and likeness of God? How can I best respect everything God has made?

In this session the integrated Catholic Social Teaching themes are Life and Dignity of the Human Person and Call to Family, Community, and Participation. See page 177b for an explanation of these themes.

Reflection

Window on the Catechism Concluding Prayer

Speak to God, using the words of this prayer or your own. Jesus, brother, open my eyes to see the likeness of God in each person I meet. Teach me to speak the truth in love.

The moral issues around slander [or calumny] and detraction are discussed in the CCC 2477, 2479, 2507.

General Directory for Catechesis Moral formation as one of the fundamental tasks of catechesis is discussed in GDC 85–87.

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caTEchIST pREpaRaTIOn

One-Hour Session Planner

Truth Revealed by God

SeSSion 21

Session Theme: In response to the modernist movement, the Church developed new ways to reach followers. Before This Session ▶▶ Bookmark your Bible to Matthew 9:16–17. Place the open Bible in your

prayer space. ▶▶ Read the Guide for this session, choose any additional If Time Allows activities

that you might have time to complete, and gather the listed materials. StepS

Prayer in Session 21

The prayers give young people opportunities to experience a variety of forms of prayer. Session 21 includes an extended guided reflection, a special approach to prayer. Follow the Prepare directions on the Catechist Guide page before sharing with young people.

ApproximAte time

Engage Unit Saint: Blessed Pope John XXIII Truth Revealed by God

10–20 minutes Pages 177–178

Page 179

Explore Responding to Modernism Witnesses to Truth

30–40 minutes Pages 180–181

Reflect Prayer: Instruments of Peace Where Do I Fit In?

10–15 minutes Page 184

Page 185

Respond What’s What?

Take IT Home

Pages 182–183

Homework options: A Personal God

Page 180

Tech Talk

Page 183

10–15 minutes Page 186

materials REQUIRED

OpTIOnal

▶▶ Boxes with religious and secular items

▶▶ Computers with Internet access for

(page 177)

research (page 178)

▶▶ Bible (page 182)

▶▶ Note cards (page 179)

▶▶ Computer to display Web sites

▶▶ Session 21 BLM, T-381 (page 181)

(page 183) ▶▶ CD player (page 184) ▶▶ CD 1, Track 2: “Together in God”

(13:43) (page 184)

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▶▶ Bible (page 182) ▶▶ Session 21 Assessment,

www.findinggod.com (page 186)


EngagE

5

Unit

Unit Opener

OUTcOmES ▶▶ Identify the contributions Blessed

Pope John XXIII made to the Church. ▶▶ State that John XXIII lived a life

of devout prayer that helped him recognize the voice of God in his life.

t We A re Sen

1 Begin

Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli was ordained in 1904. During World War II, he was drafted by the Italian army to serve as a chaplain. After the war, he served the Church in a number of ways. He was the papal ambassador to Turkey and Greece, and he was the bishop of Bulgaria in southeast Europe. On October 28, 1958, Cardinal Roncalli was elected pope and took the name John XXIII. Many of the popes prior to John XXIII had chosen to eat their meals alone so that they could spend more time in prayerful silence. John XXIII, however, hired a cook and started inviting people to join him for dinner. The meals he shared with others helped him remain close to the people he served as pope. Blessed Pope John X XIII was chosen to represent this unit because of his open-

How the Saint Relates

hearted willingness to serve God however he was called to do so. His deep prayer life and profound spirituality contributed to his ability to serve God’s people throughout his life.

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Before the session, prepare boxes with both secular and religious items, such as baseball cards, cereal bars, rosaries, and prayer cards. During the session, arrange young people into small groups and give a box to each group. Have young people organize the items in the boxes into logical categories. Invite volunteers to explain what categories they used. Write on the board the words secular and sacred. Ask young people to define the words. (not overtly or specifically religious; dedicated or set apart for the worship of God) Then read aloud the unit title. Say: The sessions in this unit will teach us that there is no distinction between sacred and secular. Explain that young people will explore how the Church calls us to live out our faith in our daily lives.

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Daily Examen Suggest that young people frequently pray the Daily Examen on PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ page 277 in Prayers and Practices. Have young people close their eyes. Then guide them through these steps. • Still your mind and quiet your body. For a moment or two, just breathe. Feel the air pass into you and out of you. • Rewind your mind to yesterday at this time and then move forward hour by hour. Ask yourself, “Where did I go, and what did I do? Did I stay conscious of God’s presence, or did I forget about God?” • Choose one moment when you forgot about God or when your actions did not reflect God. Ask yourself, “How would this ‘everyday moment’ have been different if I had seen God in the situation? What might God have been trying to say or do through me?” • Be open to God’s voice now. What is God saying to you in this moment? What might God be nudging you to do today? • Ask God to help you carry him into your everyday life. Thank God for giving you the gift of himself. • Pray Amen silently when you are ready. Now come back to this room.

2 Introduce the Saint Invite a volunteer to read aloud the paragraph. Ask: What tradition did John XXIII change after he became pope? (He hired a cook and began inviting people over for dinner.) What did the meals he shared with others help him do? (remain close to the people he served as pope) Why is it important for the pope to remain close to the people he serves? (Possible answer: so that he can better respond to their needs)

How the Saint Relates

Read aloud the feature. Ask: What did John XXIII’s spirituality enable him to do? (serve God’s people) Encourage young people to develop their own spirituality by praying often. UNIT 5

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3 Connect Invite volunteers to read aloud the first two paragraphs. Ask: What else did John XXIII do after he was elected pope to help him remain close to the people he served? (He visited people in prisons and children in hospitals.) Point out that during the time John XXIII was pope, people often worked long hours for little pay. Say: By standing up for social justice and the rights of workers, pope John XXIII reminded people that we all have inherent dignity as human beings because we are made in the image and likeness of god. Remind young people that an encyclical is a letter written by the pope that is meant for the whole Church. Work and Workers

Invite a volunteer to read aloud the section Prayer and Reflection. Say: pope John XXIII’s strong prayer life helped him hear god’s voice in his life. Remind young people that an active prayer life helps us hear God’s voice in our own lives so that we can better respond to his call. Point out that keeping a journal is one form of prayer. Invite a volunteer to read aloud the section Calling a Council. Say: at the Second Vatican Council, Church leaders worked together to discern how god’s Spirit was calling the Church to respond to changes in society. Explain that the council demonstrated the Church’s ability to find a balance between remaining faithful to Tradition while also remaining open to God’s ongoing Revelation.

4 Close Say: pope John XXIII spent time nurturing his prayer life. This gave him the strength and passion to respond to the needs of the people of god. Point out that when we nurture our own prayer life, we receive the strength and passion to live out our vocation.

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Elected Pope After the 1958 death of Pope Pius XII, who had served as pope for almost 20 years, Cardinal Roncalli was elected pope, at which time he took the name John XXIII. Because of his age—he was 76—many assumed that he would serve out a short and uneventful papacy. Immediately, however, his actions demonstrated that he would be an active leader who truly cared about his flock. As the Bishop of Rome, John XXIII decided to make pastoral visits to Catholics within the diocese, including to prisoners and children in hospitals.

Pope John XXIII was a spokesperson for so cial justice, the rights of the working class, peop le who were poor, and the un ity of Christians.

Pope John XXIII was a spokesperson for social justice, the rights of the working class, people who were poor, and the unity of Christians. He wrote two encyclicals related to Catholic Social Teaching. In Pacem in Terris (Peace on Earth), he emphasized the need for universal peace and the right to life for all humans. In addition, he wrote Mater et Magistra (Mother and Teacher), an encyclical that explained the need for society to promote human dignity.

Prayer and Reflection Blessed Pope John XXIII lived a life of devout prayer and profound spirituality. As a young man, he began keeping a journal of spiritual reflections, which are included in the book Journal of a Soul. In this book, Pope John XXIII shares his thoughts and spiritual development from adolescence until late in life. His loving, trusting relationship with God is apparent through words such as these: “I will not forget that I am never alone, even when I am by myself. . . .”

Calling a Council Pope John XXIII’s most significant contribution to the Church was calling the Second Vatican Council, a gathering of the world’s bishops. This council eventually approved significant reforms to the Church and its practices, including allowing priests to celebrate Mass in people’s native language rather than in Latin only. Pope John XXIII died before the work of the council was completed, but Pope Paul VI, his successor, resumed the council and brought it to its close. While most feast days are celebrated on the anniversary of a person’s death, the feast day of Blessed Pope John XXIII is celebrated on October 11, the anniversary of the opening of the Second Vatican Council.

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papal Themes Point out that a “theme” often emerges during a man’s time as pope. PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ Say: The importance of social justice was a theme that emerged during pope John XXIII’s time as pope. Have young people research the writings and accomplishments of various popes from the 19th and 20th centuries. Ask young people to identify any themes they find. Then invite young people to imagine that they have been elected pope. Have them decide what they would most like to accomplish while holding the office and why. After young people write a few sentences describing the theme of their papacy, invite them to share their ideas.


EngagE

Session

21

SeSSiOn 21

OUTcOmES ▶▶ Identify the First Vatican Council

as the Church’s response to the modernist movement. ▶▶ Explain how we can use modern

technology to spread the Gospel message. ▶▶ State that traditional prayers give us

Think about a time

Truth Revealed by God

someone challenged one of your deeply held beliefs, perhaps by questioning your religious beliefs or family customs. How

Syllabus of Errors.

challenge? Did you talk with the person? Did you ignore him or her? Did you begin to question your

1 Set the Stage Read aloud the text in the box on page 179. Give young people a few moments to reflect silently on the questions or to share their responses with a partner.

2 Get Started

PR AYER Holy Spirit, thank you for guiding our Church leaders. Help them always remain faithful to the Revelation that we receive from God.

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did you respond to the

own beliefs?

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a pleasant Tone Remind young people that receiving criticism from others can PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ sometimes be painful. Say: This is a safe place. let’s remember to respect one another’s dignity during this activity. Have young people write two mild criticisms of themselves, such as “Sometimes I lose my temper with my siblings.” Then have young people exchange cards with a partner. Have partners take turns reading aloud the criticisms, first in a gentle voice and then in a critical voice. After both partners have read aloud the criticisms, have them discuss positive words that could be used to express each criticism. Conclude the activity with a group discussion about tone. Point out that when the tone of a criticism is unkind, it is more difficult to remain objective. Say: It is important for us to remember our tone when we interact with others. We are called to treat others with dignity and respect at all times. Life and Dignity

Ask young people to think of a time someone, such as a teacher or a coach, offered them constructive criticism. Invite willing volunteers to share their stories. Ask: How did you feel afterward? (Possible answer: slightly embarrassed, grateful) Say: It can be difficult to receive criticism from others, even when the comments are meant to be helpful. Our instinct may be to ignore the comments or to defend ourselves. Point out that if we remain open to the comments, we can use the feedback to improve ourselves. Say: In this session we’re going to read how the Church responded to criticism it faced during the modernist movement.

prayer Give young people a moment to prepare themselves for prayer. Then say: let’s thank god for all those who help us recognize the truth. Pray aloud the prayer together. Conclude by praying together the Sign of the Cross.

Go to www.findinggod.com/sessionextenders for a 3-Minute Retreat. You may wish to share this with the group.

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Responding to Modernism

1 Begin Have young people recall a time they made an important decision. Say: Think about the process you used to make your decision. reflect on the questions you asked yourself. After giving young people time to reflect silently, ask: did you rely more on your emotions or your ability to reason? Why? (Accept reasonable responses.) Point out that when we make decisions, it’s important to consider our thoughts and emotions. Say: god is able to speak to us through both of these. each one can be a source of god’s revelation.

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modernist movement describes the period during the late 19th and early 20th centuries when many people began to think that human progress was the result of science and reason alone. One aspect of this movement involved the notion that we can use logical, scientific means to understand the world thoroughly and that we can understand and control the world through rational thought. These ideas led some philosophers to suggest that a person could discover truth through scientific inquiry and reasoned thought only, rather than by using faith and reason as equally valid means of discovering the truth as revealed by God.

2 Connect Invite volunteers to read aloud the article title and the first five paragraphs. Ask: What did some people begin to believe during the modernist movement? (that we can use logical, scientific means to understand the world thoroughly and that we can understand and control the world through rational thought) Point out that the Syllabus of Errors was a helpful reference. Say: When people had questions about Church teachings, they turned to the Syllabus of Errors. This resource helped answer people’s questions by providing statements made by the popes over time. Ask: What resources can you turn to when you have questions about Church teachings? (Possible answers: priests, catechists, teachers, Scripture) Invite a volunteer to define the word pantheism in his or her own words. Say: as Catholics we believe that god created the universe, not that god is the same being as the universe. Point out that the Church had misgivings about modernist thought because Church leaders feared that it would lead people to reject God’s role in his creation.

THE

Pope Pius IX

DEF IN E

s, Sylla bu s of Er ror

pa ntheism,

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s tel l us that Church teach ing l God who na rso pe a is God un iverse the ate cre to e chos ca nnot be th fai ; ng thi no out of son; the rea by d pe as gr ful ly God never by led ea rev truth findings of contrad ict s the d lea rn ing are an th fai n; rea so y. tar en lem comp

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In response to false claims that had been made by some people who believed in the modernist movement, Pope Pius IX issued the Syllabus of Errors on December 8, 1864. This document addressed modernist claims by citing 80 statements made by earlier popes. Each statement included references to Church documents so that readers could look to the Syllabus when they wanted to know more about the Church’s teachings on various topics. The final version of the Syllabus addressed claims that related to rationalism, pantheism —a belief that rejects a personal God and views God and the universe as being identical—socialism, communism, the rights of the Church, the relationship between the Church and civil society, Christian ethics, and marriage. While Catholics generally accepted the Syllabus, many outside the Church viewed the document as the Church’s wholehearted rejection of modern culture, which was not the case. Some countries even forbade the Syllabus of Errors from being published within their borders.

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a personal god Explain that our belief in a personal God means that we believe God PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ created the world and continues to have a role in his creation. Say: We do not believe that god created the universe then sat back to watch history unfold. Point out that an important component in our belief in a personal God is that we are called to develop our relationship with God through prayer and the sacraments. Before the next session, have young people reflect on their relationship with God. Ask them to make something, such as a song, poem, or drawing, that symbolizes their relationship with God. During the next session, have young people share what they made.


ExplORE While the Syllabus of Errors offered important clarifications about some of the dangers presented in modernist thought, it also reflected some of the Church’s own misgivings and fears about advances in science. In other words, over time, Church leaders realized that the teachings presented in the document needed refining.

issued several important statements that clearly defined papal infallibility. The definition began with a reminder that the pope—the successor to Saint Peter—has been promised the gift of the Holy Spirit, which gives him the sacred ability to preserve and interpret Revelation as first taught by the Apostles. In addition, the council produced and received papal approval for the Constitution on the Catholic Faith, a document that responded to claims presented by modernist thinkers. This document reminds us that

The First Vatican Council The Church continued to respond to the modernist movement by clarifying some of its teachings during the First Vatican Council, which Pope Pius IX opened on December 8, 1869. Before this meeting of Church leaders began, Pius IX organized various committees to draft statements to be discussed. Initially, these drafts addressed issues such as Church teaching and practice, the relationship between the Roman Catholic Church and Oriental Churches, and the relationship between Church and state.

God is a personal God who freely has chosen to create the universe ex nihilo (out of nothing). faith cannot be fully grasped by reason. the truth revealed by God never contradicts the findings of reason. faith and learning are complementary rather than contradictory.

In addition to the draft documents, bishops sent additional discussion suggestions, which included requests for revisions of the Liturgy of the Hours and the Code of Canon Law, clarification on Church teaching of the bodily Assumption of Mary into Heaven at the end of her earthly life, requests to name Saint Joseph the universal patron of the Church, and clarification on Church teaching regarding papal infallibility.

Explore

The First Vatican Council was the first ecumenical council in over 300 years, and it proved to be a productive way to deal with the issues of the day. The next ecumenical council, the Second Vatican Council, was held less than 100 years later—showing that the Church would continue to respond productively as times changed.

As the council met, the attendees began an intense debate about the doctrine of papal infallibility. The topic became so important that the council

Our Catholic Character Questions regarding the teaching around papal infallibility first emerged during the Middle Ages. The First Vatican Council affirmed some of the earlier thinking regarding this doctrine. In regard to faith and morals, for a teaching to be infallible, the teaching must be made by the pope and be held to be true by the universal Church. Since 1870, only one teaching has been designated an official infallible teaching. In 1950, Pope Pius XII’s definition of the dogma of the Assumption of Mary was universally held to be infallible. Previously (1854), Pope Pius IX declared the doctrine of the Immaculate Conception of Mary to be infallible.

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Session 21 Blm Science Book? Provide PDF Signoff: Production _______ each young person with the Session 21 Blackline Master [T-381]. Read aloud the directions. Have young people work with a partner to complete the first two sections. Then have young people complete the final item independently. Invite volunteers to share their responses.

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mary’s assumption Design _______ The_______ dogma ofEditorial the Assumption

of Mary, declared in 1950, states that “The Immaculate Mother of God . . . having completed the course of her earthly life, was assumed body and soul into heavenly glory.” According to Church teaching, Mary’s Assumption is different from Christ’s Ascension: Mary was “taken up” by God, whereas Jesus rose into Heaven of his own accord.

Invite volunteers to read aloud the section The First Vatican Council. Say: during the Council of Trent, the Church responded to issues raised during the reformation. likewise, during the first Vatican Council, the Church responded to issues that were being raised during the modernist movement. Point out that the term Oriental Churches refers to Eastern Catholic Churches—those in Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Northern Africa, and India. Explain that the Eastern Catholic Churches are branches of the Catholic Church that have their own liturgical rites. Remind young people that the Liturgy of the Hours is the universal prayer of the Church. Say: The liturgy of the Hours is comprised of Scripture readings, hymns, and writings by the Church fathers. Explain that the Code of Canon Law is the Church’s collection of laws. Say: The doctrine of infallibility helps us trust in god’s guidance of the Church. Point out that at the First Vatican Council, the Church Fathers reaffirmed the Church’s belief that both faith and reason are gifts from God. Say: We can use both faith and reason to help us discover god’s truth. The danger comes when we rely on one more than the other.

our Catholic Character

Read aloud the feature. Point out that in order for a pope to decree something as infallible, the teaching must already be accepted as true by the majority of the faithful and confirmed true by the entire Magisterium.

3 Close Say: The Church teaches that reason must be used along with faith to discern god’s truth. This requires both patience and humility. Have young people quietly ask God for the wisdom and perseverance to seek his truth.

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1 Begin Write on the board the following sentences: ▶▶ How

are you doing today?

▶▶ What ▶▶ You ▶▶ I

are you doing?

make me laugh.

had a great time at your party.

Have partners come up with slang phrases that they might use to express the same ideas. Remind young people to use respectful language. Invite volunteers to share their phrases. Then say: There are many ways to express a message. you probably wouldn’t use slang with an unfamiliar adult or with your school principal. To communicate effectively, we have to consider our audience and speak their language.

2 Connect Invite a volunteer to read aloud the article title and the first paragraph. Ask: What are the main ideas of modernist thought? (We can use logical, scientific means to understand the world thoroughly and that we can understand and control the world through rational thought.) Invite volunteers to read aloud the section Reach Out to Others. Ask: What is the goal of reaching out to people through forms of communication that are familiar to them? (to get to the heart of people’s daily lives) What does the word evangelization mean? (the process of sharing the Good News) How can you engage in this process? (Possible answer: treat others with kindness)

Past meets Present

Read aloud the feature. Ask: What is the goal of the paulists? (to spread the truth about the Church and its teachings) Point out that there are several forms of media, including television, newspapers, magazines, and the Internet by which people spread the Gospel message.

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s e s s e t n Wi h t u r T to

Saint Matthew

THROUGH

the Syllabus of Errors and the First Vatican Council, the Church began to respond to the major issues of the day while remaining true to its teachings. In doing so, the Church witnessed to a way of life rooted in the truth of the Gospel and courageously countered certain aspects of mainstream culture.

Reach Out to Others Jesus shows us the importance of reaching out to people through familiar forms of communication and in a way that gets to the heart of people’s daily lives. Jesus knew how to tell stories and speak about the Kingdom of God in a way that everyone could understand. “No one patches an old cloak with a piece of unshrunken cloth, for its fullness pulls away from the cloak and the tear gets worse. People do not put new wine into old wineskins. Otherwise the skins burst, the wine spills out, and the skins are ruined. Rather, they pour new wine into fresh wineskins, and both are preserved.” Matthew 9:16–17

Past Meets Present PAST: Isaac Hecker (1819 – 1888), who lived in New York, saw that many people were not adeq uately receiving the Church’s teach ings. In Isaac Hecker t response, he beca me a pries for men, called and founded a religious order Paul the Apostle. the Missionary Society of Saint are commonly The mem bers of this community is to spread goal their and sts, Pauli as know n

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its teach ings. the truth about the Church and , Father Hecker After found ing the community the Catholic bega n a mont hly maga zine, truth about the the learn le peop help World , to s of the day. Church’s response to the issue

PRE SEN T: Like Father Hecker, conte

mporary

us forms of Catholic evangelists use vario are over 26 technology. For example, there hund reds of Catholic million Catholic Web sites, count less podcasts, maga zines and newspapers, which are used of —all apps le and even mobi ation on Church to provide news and inform r and faith. teach ings and to foster praye

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Have small groups read PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Special TasksEditorial If you _______ have Matthew 9:14–17 to situate young people with attention the wineskin passage in its larger differences, you may wish context. Then have young people to give them special tasks discuss the following questions: during the session, such • What message was Jesus as writing on the board communicating through his the sentences used in the use of imagery? (Possible Begin activity. answer: There is no need to fast when Jesus is among us. Enjoy his presence and the fullness of creation.) • If Jesus were teaching in your hometown today, what images might he use to express this idea? (Possible answer: People do not bake a cake and then let it sit there; they enjoy the cake.)

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ExplORE

Saint Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits, also believed in the importance of meeting people where they are. A quote attributed to him instructs those in the ministry of evangelization—the process of sharing the Good News—to reach out to others by entering through their door. In other words, evangelization is most effective when we work with people where they are and address the questions, concerns, and longings that they carry in their heart. In addition, Saint Ignatius desired to help people find God in all things. Today the Church recognizes that modern technology, when used appropriately, can be used to help people discover God’s presence in their lives.

DEF IN E evangelization

R EM EM BE R

The Church tea ches that technology— wh en used wi sely— ca n be used to spread the Gospel messa ge to others.

Modern Evangelization

Use Technology Wisely While the Church does not condemn the tools of modern society, it does call us to make good moral choices when using them. The Church points out

that media and technology in themselves are not evil or harmful. Rather, the Church condemns the use of media for unwholesome purposes, such as creating and accessing pornography, plagiarizing, or spreading gossip or hurtful remarks about others. Furthermore, the Church warns against overuse of media and technology. Just as gluttony refers to eating too much food, we can also consume too much media. Sometimes we may rely too much on the Internet, television, and movies, or we may use them in unhealthy ways, such as to seek excessive pleasure or to avoid pain. When we are faced with the temptation to make bad choices regarding the use of technology, we can change our habits by limiting the amount of time we spend online or by watching less or better quality TV. We also can choose to access only wholesome Web sites, videos, and music. When we practice good habits, we grow in virtue, and we cooperate with the Holy Spirit in building up God’s kingdom.

Explore

Today, the Church continues to provide examples of how to live as disciples while still accepting aspects of modern society. For example, the Church reaches out to people in ways that are familiar to them, such as social media, television, and magazines, to teach others about Christ and his message. Pope Benedict XVI, for example, was the first prelate to use a tablet computer to send a tweet. In his message, Pope Benedict praised Jesus and announced the launch of a Vatican news and information site. Similarly, entire television and radio stations are devoted to presenting Catholic teachings, and many parishes use the Internet to share information about opportunities for faith formation, worship, and service.

READY for Confirmation As you prepare to celebrate the Sacrament of Confirmation, you will learn about the Gifts of the Holy Spirit. One of these gifts is fortitude, the gift that strengthens us to do the will of God in all things. As you use media and technology, you can pray to the Holy Spirit to strengthen your fortitude so that you can make good choices.

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Tech Talk Before the next session, have young people research media resources PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ for Catholic teens and young adults. Have young people choose a resource they especially liked and write a short review. Explain that the review should include • the function or purpose of the resource; • features of the resource; • why the resource is helpful; and • how the resource could be improved. During the next session, have young people share their reviews. Afterward, compile a list of the resources and photocopy it for the whole group.

Invite a volunteer to read aloud the section Modern Evangelization. Explain that social media are Webbased technologies that people use to communicate with one another, often in real time. Ask: How can you use social media to spread the good news? (Possible answer: I can tweet links to articles in my diocesan newspaper.) If possible, display the Vatican and your diocesan and parish Web sites, and explain some of the resources that are available there. Invite young people to share any other faith-based Web sites and television or radio stations of which they are aware. Invite a volunteer to read aloud the section Use Technology Wisely. Explain that the Church wants us to remember that technology is best used in moderation. Say: It’s great that we can use technology to connect with friends and family members all over the world. It’s important to remember, however, that interacting with people face-to-face is good for us too. Point out that thoughtlessly drifting toward a screen or a gadget during downtime can eventually become an unhealthy habit that is difficult to break. Ask: What other activities can you engage in when you are bored? (Possible answers: spend time with friends, spend time outside)

Ready for Confirmation

Read aloud the feature. Ask: What does the gift of fortitude do? (It strengthens us to do the will of God in all things.) Say: The Holy Spirit will always give you the strength to remain faithful to god.

3 Close Give young people a moment to pray to God for the strength to be evangelists in all that they do. Conclude by saying: When we share god’s Word with others, we help people grow in their relationship with him.

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prayer Choose an approach and pray with young people.

Prayer

Instruments of Peace

approach 1

Guided Reflection prepare Listen in advance to the recorded guided reflection “Together in God” [CD 1, Track 2]. Decide if you will use the recording or lead the reflection yourself. If you choose to lead, listen to the recording a second time, following the script [pages T-347–T-348] and noting pauses and tone. You can then use the script or adapt it as you wish. pray During the session, have volunteers read aloud the first two paragraphs. Discuss prayers that young people have taken to heart. Say: We can use these prayers any time we want. They are especially helpful when we have difficulty praying words of our own. Then play the recording or lead using the script, joining young people in reflective prayer. If you use the script, play reflective music softly in the background. Conclude by praying the Glory Be to the Father. approach 2

Young People’s Page prepare Pray the prayer in advance to become familiar with it. pray Discuss prayers young people have taken to heart. Suggest that the Peace Prayer is a good one to carry with us because it provides comfort and direction in trying times. Then invite young people to prepare to pray. Say: Sit quietly and invite Jesus into your heart. Share with him your desire for peace. ask Jesus to show you how you can be a peacemaker in the world today. When you’re ready, pray the prayer. Allow young people time to pray silently. Conclude by praying together the Glory Be to the Father.

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Prayer

is the raising of our hearts and minds to God. Traditional prayers give us rich and powerful words to use to talk with God. They are prayers to take to heart over the course of our lives. When we pray these prayers, we are connected to those who have gone before us in faith. We are part of the community who has prayed the same prayers throughout history. Traditional prayers can be prayed alone, and they also help us pray with others. The Peace Prayer, usually associated with Saint Francis of Assisi, is one traditional prayer. Blessed Pope John Paul II prayed it before representatives of the Christian churches and the world religions when he met with them to pray for peace in 1986.

Peace Prayer

Lord, make me an instr ume nt of your peace: where there is hatred, let me sow love; where there is injur y, pard on; where there is dou bt, faith ; where there is despair, hope; where there is dark ness , light; where there is sadness, joy. O divine Master, grant that I may not so muc h seek to be consoled as to cons ole, to be understood as to und ersta nd, to be loved as to love. For it is in giving that we receive, it is in pardoning that we are pardoned, it is in dying that we are born to eter nal life. Amen.

After praying the Peace Prayer, take a moment to reflect silently on how you can be a peacemaker through your words and actions. You may wish to use these questions to help you. How can I be a peacema ker within myself? How can I make peace at home? How can I make peace at school? How can I make peace in the world?

Conclude by praying to the Holy Spirit for the strength to share Jesus’ peace and love with ever yone in your life.

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Explain that in 1986 and 2002, peopleEditorial to pray PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ _______ Pope John Paul II invited Remind young people representatives from the that there are a number of world’s major religions to meet resources, such as the Prayers in Assisi, Italy, to pray for world and Practices section in their peace. Write on the board the books, that have traditional following idea, which the pope prayers they can pray when stressed during these meetings: they have difficulty thinking In the one God, we find the of their own words to pray. perfect union of justice and mercy on which all peace is based. Have young people discuss with a partner what they think this idea means and to come up with an example of “the perfect union of justice and mercy” from everyday life. (Possible answer: If a friend treats me rudely, I will forgive the friend but will also explain that I was hurt by his or her actions.) Have pairs share their ideas with the group. Point out that efforts toward peace begin in our daily lives.


REflEcT

E R E H W t In

1 Begin

Do I Fi

hes, embers, coac as family m nt for us trust, such rta we po e im os th so It’s al to turn to what to do. It’s natural we don’t aren’t sure even when rs, when we es guidance id ov and teache pr he es d. Sometim to turn to Go in prayer. turn to him

orothy by Sr. D O.P. Ederer,

What Does God Want Me to Do?

The time came when the women in our community come together to reflect on our lives and consider where God may be calling us to serve. One morning I jokingly said to the other sisters, “Well, I will go where God wants me to, but he will have to call me.” Seconds later, the phone rang, and laughingly I said, “I might as well answer it. It’s probably God.” I picked up the phone, and the priest who was head of campus ministry at Western Michigan University was on the line wanting to speak to me. He asked if I would be interested in coming to work with him as a campus minister. I was stunned and made all kinds of objections. All he said was, “I know you will love working with our students here. They need someone like you. You will do just fine.” He was right. For 13 years we made Jesus real to the 3,000 students from different faiths on the Western Michigan campus.

Reflect

My first assignment as a member of the Grand Rapids Dominicans was teaching eighth grade. I loved this work, and I was good at it. I taught for a very happy and rewarding 13 years. Then, I had the premonition that my life was about to turn in a different direction. But I didn’t know what this might mean.

team in a ministry that went all over the world. For nine wonderful years, we brought Jesus to people throughout the United States and other countries. God will speak. All we have to do is listen. None of us knows what God has planned for us, but if we keep our hearts and minds open to his call and eagerly follow, it is thrilling what can happen! We will never be disappointed.

God Guides Take a moment to think about the following questions. Then on a separate sheet of paper, write an answer to each. What is one good decision I’ve made this school year? When I made the decision, how did I know what God was asking me to do? During the next week, focus on your words and actions. Think about how God may be guiding you as you go through your everyday life.

I had a dream of someday making Jesus real for people in a travelling ministry, but this wasn’t anything more than a dream. Then I read a book, called Joshua, and I met the author, Father Joseph Girzone. Soon another phone call came—from Father Girzone, asking me to work with his SR. DOROTHY EDERER, O.P., is a Grand Rapids Dominican, campus minister, and author of two books, Colors of the Spirit and The Golfer’s Prayer Book. Session 21 > Truth Revealed by God

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Dear god, I’m confused Have young people choose an issue or decision they are struggling PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ with in their own lives. Then have them write a letter to God in which they ask for his guidance. Encourage young people to read the letter prayerfully once a day for a week and to consciously look and listen for God’s response. At the end of the week, ask young people to describe the guidance they received.

Invite a volunteer to read aloud the introductory text. Have young people share stories about times when God reached out to them in surprising or unusual ways. Point out that God, in his love, sometimes reaches out to us in creative ways that make us more fully aware of his presence.

2 Connect Invite volunteers to read aloud the section What Does God Want Me to Do? Ask: How were the events in Sister dorothy’s life the work of god? (Accept reasonable responses.) What exactly did she ask for? (She asked God to tell her where to go and what to do.) Where did god send her? (to the very places she wanted to go) Point out if we are willing to trust and follow God, he will never lead us to a place of misery or drudgery. Say: god will lead us to a place that fills us with joy and makes good use of the gifts he has given us. Have young people recall times they followed the guidance of the Holy Spirit. Then have young people complete the activity independently.

3 Close Have partners discuss the effects of the good decision they wrote about in the activity. Remind young people that a good decision always brings peace of mind, even if it requires us to make a sacrifice or do challenging work.

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RESpOnD

W h a t ’s

? t a h W

1 Begin What’s What? Have young people answer the questions at home or in class with a partner. Remind young people that they can use the page references to help them answer the questions.

Say What? Ask volunteers to read aloud and define the terms. Review each term in the Glossary if necessary.

1

What contributed to Pope John XXIII’s ability to serve God’s people throughout his life? PAGE 177

6

2

PAGE 183

7

In regard to the tools of modern society, what does the Church call us to do?

What did Pope John XXIII write about in Pacem in Terris and Mater et Magistra? PAGE 178

8

What is one definition of the word prayer? PAGE 184

now What? Read aloud the section. Invite each young person to respond to the question independently.

3

4

What was Pope John XXIII’s most significant contribution to the Church? PAGE 178

How did the Syllabus of Errors address modernist claims? PAGE 180

3 Go in Peace Have young people collect their materials and return them to the appropriate places. Encourage young people to remain mindful of the Now What? challenge during the week. Say: using technology wisely is one way to build up the kingdom of god. Remind young people that when they are tempted to use technology in unwholesome ways, they can pray to the Holy Spirit for the gift of fortitude.

What did Saint Ignatius of Loyola believe was an effective way to evangelize others?

PAGE 183

Respond

2 Connect

Review the concepts in this session by providing a short answer to each question.

Say What? Know the definitions of these terms. evangelization pantheism Syllabus of Errors

Now What?

5

What are four teachings that were included in the Constitution on the Catholic Faith?

The Church calls us to use technology for the good of ourselves and others, without overusing it. What is one change that you can make in your technology use this week?

PAGE 181

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Service: Translate the love Remind young people that the goal of evangelization is to share PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ the Good News with others. Point out that it is helpful to do so by connecting with people where they are at in their own lives. Have young people work together to develop a “Work for Peace” media campaign that uses a variety of social media. Arrange with your catechetical leader to include components of the campaign in your parish’s communications strategy. Family and Community

Session assessment Option An assessment for this session can be found at www.findinggod.com.

3-Minute Retreat Give young people an opportunity for quiet meditation at www.loyolapress.com/retreat.

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p l a n a h E a D : Get Ready for Session 22 Consult the catechist preparation pages to prepare for Session 22 and determine any materials you will need.


CateChist PreParation S e S S io n 2 2

Acting on Behalf of Justice 3-Minute Retreat Before you prepare the session, pause and be still. Take three deep breaths and be aware of the loving presence of God, who is with you on this journey.

Knowing and Sharing Your Faith in Session 22 Consider how Scripture and Tradition can deepen your understanding of session content.

Scripture James 2:14–17 What good is it, my brothers, if someone says he has faith but does not have works? Can that faith save him? If a brother or sister has nothing to wear and has no food for the day, and one of you says to them, “Go in peace, keep warm, and eat well,” but you do not give them the necessities of the body, what good is it? So also faith of itself, if it does not have works, is dead.

Reflection The Letter of James presents in strong terms the relationship between faith and social justice. Words of comfort alone are not sufficient; there also has to be action on behalf of those in need. James words’ call on all Christians to reflect on the social concerns of their time and to take concrete steps to address the needs of their community. They also call for discernment and prayer to the Holy Spirit to direct our contributions to specific needs based on how these speak to our hearts.

Questions What social concerns speak to your heart and can help direct your contributions? What needs of the world do you bring to God in prayer?

Concluding Prayer

Speak to God, using the words of this prayer or your own. Jesus, you care for all, help me recognize the ways in which I may share in ministering to those in need.

Matthew 5:3–12 contain the Beatitudes, the words Jesus shared with the people in the Sermon on the Mount.

Tradition In the fourth century, Saint John Chrysostom wrote: “Not to enable the poor to share in our goods is to steal from them and to deprive them of life.” In solidarity we unite ourselves with our neighbor in his or her need. Solidarity with all people calls us to pay special attention to the relief, defense, and liberation of those who are poor. To do so we look to the inspiration and the spirit of the Beatitudes, the poverty of Jesus, and his concern for the poor.

Catholic Social Teaching In this session the integrated Catholic Social Teaching themes are Life and Dignity of the Human Person; Solidarity; The Dignity of Work and the Rights of Workers; Rights and Responsibilities; and Call to Family, Community, and Participation. See page 177b for an explanation of these themes.

Window on the Catechism The relationship between the Eucharist and concern for the poor is discussed in CCC 1397. Catholic teaching in social justice is found in CCC 1928–1942, 2425–2426.

General Directory for Catechesis Moral formation as one of the fundamental tasks of catechesis is discussed in GDC 85–87.

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caTEchIST pREpaRaTIOn

One-Hour Session Planner SeSSion 22

Acting on Behalf of Justice

Session Theme: We build up the Kingdom of God by working to end injustices and by answering God’s call to serve. Before This Session ▶▶ Bookmark your Bible to Matthew 5:3–12. Place the open Bible in your

prayer space. ▶▶ Display the Finding God poster Catholic Social Teaching. ▶▶ Read the Guide for this session, choose any additional If Time Allows activities

that you might have time to complete, and gather the listed materials. StepS

ApproximAte time

Engage Page 187

Explore Catholic Social Teaching

Young people are invited to experience an online, Scripture-based 3-Minute Retreat at the end of the session. The prayers give young people opportunities to experience a variety of forms of prayer. Session 22 includes prayers of thanks and a litany for justice. Follow the Prepare directions on the Catechist Guide page before sharing with young people.

10 minutes

Acting on Behalf of Justice

The Industrial Revolution

Prayer in Session 22

30–40 minutes Pages 188–189

Take IT Home

Pages 190–191

Homework options:

Reflect Prayer: Looking Beyond Myself Where Do I Fit In?

10–15 minutes Page 192

Page 193

Respond What’s What?

Session 22 BLM

Page 188

CST Media Campaign

Page 191

10–15 minutes Page 194

materials REQUIRED

OpTIOnal

▶▶ Bowl of popcorn, serving spoon,

▶▶ Session 22 BLM, T-382 (page 188)

bowls (page 190) ▶▶ Finding God poster: Catholic

Social Teaching (page 190) ▶▶ Copy of the Catechism of the

Catholic Church (page 145)

▶▶ Average and minimum hourly wage

for your area (page 188) ▶▶ Member of the parish social concerns

committee (page 189) ▶▶ Newspapers and magazines

(pages 190, 193) ▶▶ Session 22 Assessment,

www.findinggod.com (page 194)

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EngagE

Session

22

Acting on Behalf of Justice

SeSSion 22

OUTcOmES ▶▶ Identify the social issues Pope Leo XIII

addressed in Rerum Novarum. ▶▶ Explain what Catholic Social Teachings

instruct us to do. ▶▶ State that action on behalf of justice

is one way to encounter God in our present lives. ▶▶ Define encyclical, Industrial Revolution,

Think about a time you

living wage, participation, and subsidiarity.

witnessed an injustice. Maybe someone was making fun of an unpopular classmate, or maybe someone was discriminated against because of his or her race. How did you respond? Did you take action or ignore the situation? What was the

1 Set the Stage Read aloud the text in the box on page 187. Give young people a few moments to reflect silently on the questions or to share their responses with a partner.

result of your response?

2 Get Started PR AYER God, thank you for giving us a body of teachings that helps us make good decisions. May we practice the social teachings of the Church by working to end violence and oppression.

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a Ready Response Point out that young people will likely witness or experience injustice PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ throughout their lives. Encourage young people to think about how they can respond to the injustices they might witness. Say: If we think about our responses ahead of time, we are more likely to respond in a Christlike manner. Have young people choose one of the current events that was discussed during the Get Started activity. Then have young people reflect on the following questions in light of whichever event they chose. • How might Jesus have responded to this injustice? • What can I do to follow Jesus’ example? • What can I do to prevent injustices like this from happening in the future? Invite volunteers to share their responses to the questions. Solidarity

Go to www.findinggod.com/sessionextenders for an article on Catholic Social Teaching. You may wish to share this with the group.

Ask: What is justice? (the virtue that guides us to give to God and others what is due them) Discuss current events that demonstrate an issue of injustice. Invite young people to summarize the events. Ask: How have the people in these events turned away from God? How have others been affected? What might be some of the long-term effects of the injustices that are present in these situations? How can these situations be resolved justly? Remind young people that through the Sacraments of Initiation, we have been welcomed into the Church, a community called by God to build up his kingdom. Say: One way to build up the Kingdom of God is to work to end injustices. In this session we are going to learn how we are called to work for justice in the world today.

prayer Say: Let’s thank God for the guidance of the Church. Pray aloud the prayer together. Conclude by praying the Sign of the Cross.

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ExplORE

1 Begin Ask: What is fairness? (Possible answer: respecting the rights of others) Then propose the following situations and have partners discuss the fairness of each one. ▶▶ Last

year’s eighth-grade class went on a class trip to an amusement park, and the class misbehaved. This year’s eighth-grade class does not get to go on a class trip.

▶▶ You

are watching your favorite movie, and your mother tells you to turn the volume down. When your grandmother has the volume turned up, no one says anything.

After giving partners time to discuss, invite young people to share their ideas with the group.

The Industrial Revolution THROUGH

the end of the 18th century, many families made their income by growing and selling crops and livestock. Farmwork was timeconsuming and difficult. Advances in technology, however, made farming more efficient and easier. Pope Leo XIII For example, the invention of the cotton gin helped workers clean up to 50 times more cotton than they could by hand. A mechanical replacement for the horse-drawn reaper allowed farmers to cut up to 12 acres of wheat a day rather than just two or three. At the same time, the textile industry developed new machines and work processes that greatly increased production. These rapid changes resulted in new social struggles that the Church tried to address. To meet the demand for these new technologies, people opened factories to increase production. As a result, the economy began to rely more on manufacturing than on farming. This rapid change in technology regarding how goods were produced is known as the Industrial Revolution. With the Industrial Revolution came the need for a large workforce. The demand for factory-produced products was so high that factory owners hired men, women, and children to work. In the mid-19th century, for example, over 20 percent of the urban workforce was made up of children under the age of 10. Cities soon became overcrowded

SACRED ART

2 Connect Invite volunteers to read aloud the article title and the first four paragraphs. Have a young person read aloud from the Glossary the definition of the term Industrial Revolution. Ask: What injustices did workers face after the Industrial Revolution? (Children were required to work. People worked long hours for little pay. Working conditions were dangerous.) What could factory owners have done to create more just working conditions? (Possible answers: not hire children, pay fair wages)

Sacred art

Read aloud the feature. Say: The government establishes a minimum wage that organizations must pay their workers. Explain that a living wage is the amount of income that is necessary to live a life of dignity. Point out that a living wage can vary from the minimum wage, based on issues such as cost of living. Say: God wants our basic physical needs to be met, and he wants us to experience peace and joy. Life and Dignity

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During the Industrial Revolution, people worked long hours and received low wages. Like the people in this painting, they often relied on the charity of others. To address the injustice, Pope Leo XIII called for a living wage in his encyclical, or letter, Rerum Novarum (On the Condition of Labor). In this document, he defined a living wage as enough to support a person in reasonable comfort. The Church’s insistence on a fair income has been a tenet of its social teaching ever since.

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Session 22 Blm Budget Basics In advance, find out the average and minimum hourly PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ wages for workers in your area. Distribute the Session 22 Blackline Master [T-382] and have young people write the wage information in the appropriate places. During the next week, have young people conduct research to find the average monthly costs for the expenses listed on the Blackline Master. Then ask young people to make a budget for someone who earns the minimum wage. Have young people answer the questions at the bottom of the Blackline Master on a separate sheet of paper. During the next session, ask young people to share their responses to the questions and any realizations or insights about the importance of a living wage that they learned as a result of completing the activity. Work and Workers


ExplORE with workers, most of whom worked long hours and earned very little. Entire families needed to work in order to earn enough money to survive. In addition, working conditions were dangerous, both in the factories as well as in the coal mines that produced the fuel that powered the factories.

Church Reflection and Action As the Industrial Revolution progressed, Church leaders recognized the need to improve the deplorable conditions that many people in society were experiencing. Catholics began to reflect on the effects of poverty and the need to work for systematic change rather than relying solely on individual acts of charity. At the same time, people proceeded with optimism and hope for the future. Before long, Pope Leo XIII led the Church to take a stand and work to meet the needs of all people.

PAST: Rerum Novarum (On

of Labor) was the first

the Condition encyclica l in whic h

a pope discussed econ omic issues. This encyclica l paved the way for futu re popes to shape Catholic Soci al Teac hing. In 1931 Pope Pius XI issued Qua dragesimo Anno (After Fort y Year s) in whic h he add ressed the need for a social orde r based on justice and subsidiar ity, the belief that issues are often best hand led at the lowest level of authority.

PRE

SEN T: In 2009, Pope Benedict XVI presented Caritas in Veri tate (Cha rity in Trut h), in whic h he disc usses Catholic Social Teac hing. In this encyclica l, the pope tells us, “Ch arity is love received and given.” He explains , “Love is revealed and made pres ent by Chr ist (Joh n 13:1) and ‘pou red into our hear ts through the Holy Spir it.’ (Rom ans 5:5) As the objects of God’s love , men and women become subjects of char ity, they are called to make them selves instr uments of grace, so as to pour forth God ’s char ity and to weave networks of char ity.”

Explore

The Industrial Revolution happened so quickly that most cities were unprepared for the rapid increase in population. Many farmers and their families moved into cities to take factory jobs. Living conditions were poor. Often, entire families lived in one-room apartments that were part of poorly built tenement houses. Clean water and good plumbing were rare, which led to the spread of illness and disease. Soot from burning coal filled the air. Eventually, in response to these conditions, governments passed laws regarding working conditions. These laws, however, were difficult to enforce.

Past Meets Present

Rerum Novarum To offer the Church’s response to the destitution that some people were experiencing as a result of the Industrial Revolution, Pope Leo XIII wrote Rerum Novarum (On the Condition of Labor). In this letter, Pope Leo XIII applied Catholic teaching to the rights of humans to work, make fair wages, own property, and establish professional labor associations. The pope explained the Church’s belief that socialism and class struggle were not appropriate ways to develop society. This encyclical also challenged Catholics to work to correct the injustices brought on by the Industrial Revolution and to engage in reform of the new social order. This encyclical is often recognized as the first official document that presents the Church’s Catholic Social Teaching.

DEFI NE Industrial Revolution, living wage, encyclical, subsidia rity

REME MBER As a result of the conditions laborers faced during the Industrial Revolution, Pope Leo XII wrote Rerum Novarum, which is recogni zed as the first of many documents that present Catholic Social Teaching. Session 22 > Acting on Behalf of Justice

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Social concerns committee Invite a member of the parish social concerns committee to present PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ to young people an overview of the committee’s work. Encourage the speaker to emphasize ways that young people can become involved in the committee’s work. After the presentation, discuss with young people how the committee’s work is bringing an end to injustice. Family and Community

Invite a volunteer to read aloud the section Church Reflection and Action. Ask: What did reflection on the effect of poverty lead people to realize? (the need to work for systematic change rather than relying on individual acts of charity) Draw on the board two footprints. Label one Acts of Charity and the other Systematic Change. Ask: What acts of charity can people perform for others? (Possible answer: the Corporal Works of Mercy) Under the appropriate footprint, write young people’s responses. Then say: Working for systematic change involves efforts to change unjust social structures and attitudes such as racism and sexism. Ask: What can we do to engage in systematic change? (Possible answer: contact our legislators) Write on the board under the appropriate footprint young people’s responses. Explain that the Church teaches that both acts of charity and acts that bring about systematic change are necessary to build up God’s kingdom. Invite volunteers to read aloud the section Rerum Novarum. Explain that Rerum Novarum is an encyclical that the pope wrote to the Church in order to respond to the social injustices of the day. Ask: If the current pope were to write a letter addressing contemporary social injustices, what might he write about? (Accept reasonable responses.)

Past meets Present

Read aloud the feature. To explain the concept of subsidiarity, say: If someone were to misbehave during our session, I would try to deal with the issue first before calling the police.

3 Close Give young people a moment to pray silently to ask God for the strength to remain faithful to the teachings of the Church.

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ExplORE

1 Begin Bring to the session a large bowl of popcorn, a serving spoon, and a bowl for each young person. Say: Imagine that this popcorn is the only food you get to eat tomorrow. Then distribute spoonfuls of popcorn, randomly giving some young people one spoonful and other young people four or five spoonfuls. Ask young people who received only one spoonful to share how they felt when they saw other people receiving multiple spoonfuls. Say: Now imagine that the popcorn represents the world’s wealth. many people today have more than they need while others do not have enough to survive. Let’s read more about the Church’s teachings on social justice.

Catholic Social Teaching SINCE the time of the Industrial Revolution, the Church has taught that taking action to create a more just world is a central aspect of discipleship. Catholic Social Teaching is a rich treasure of wisdom about how we can build a just society and live holy lives amid the challenges of the modern world. These teachings identify ways in which the Good News of Jesus can be proclaimed in word and action. In a nutshell, the Catholic Social Teachings instruct us to respect everyone, since all life is sacred. contribute to family and society by promoting the well-being of all. protect the basic human rights of every person. help meet the needs of those who are poor and sick.

2 Connect Display the Finding God poster Catholic Social Teachings. Invite volunteers to read aloud the article title and the text in the left column. Have volunteers summarize in their own words what each of the social teachings call us to do. Invite volunteers to read aloud the section Justice, Love, and Peace. Ask: When does justice exist? (when we follow the guidance of the Holy Spirit and treat one another in the same way that God treats us) Have young people turn to page 263 in the back of their books to review the Beatitudes. Ask: How do the Beatitudes help us live just lives? (Possible answer: They give us directions for how we can act in ways that build up God’s kingdom.) Draw young people’s attention to the word participation. Say: The word participation reminds us that we are called to work actively for justice in the world. Emphasize that as members of the Church, we cannot passively ignore the injustices that surround us. Say: We are all called to use our gifts to respond to the needs of others. Have young people share the gifts they can use to respond to the needs of others.

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work hard and make sure that others have the opportunity to do the same. be a peacemaker and recognize that we all depend on one another. care for creation and respect plants and animals.

Every pope since Leo XIII has written at least one encyclical about social justice. The issues that the popes have addressed include loving people who are poor, feeding the hungry, sheltering the homeless, abolishing racism, and ending war. Bishops and theologians have also spoken out against injustice and have written about the importance of peace.

190

Justice, Love, and Peace Catholic Social Teaching is rooted in the ideas of justice and love. Justice exists when we follow the guidance of the Holy Spirit and treat one another in the same way that God treats us. The Holy Spirit also calls us to love and care for the well-being of each member of the human family, just as Jesus did. We do this by practicing the Beatitudes, in which Jesus taught us the importance of being peacemakers and loving our enemies. In addition, the Church wants us to work for peace in our world. In his encyclical, Evangelium Vitae (The Gospel of Life), Pope John Paul II pointed out that human life is sacred because it is a gift from God. We also believe that since Jesus has a unique relationship with every human being, we are able to see the face of Christ in every human face. This respect for human life requires that society respect, defend, and promote the dignity of the human person, beginning at the moment of conception and continuing through every moment and in every condition of each person’s life. We demonstrate our belief in the sacredness of human life when we freely choose to respond to the call of justice, peace, and love. Finally, as members of a universal Church, we are called to participation in the life of the community. Through participation in the communities to which we belong, we work to build a just and peaceful society.

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good news, Bad news Arrange young people into PDF Signoff: Production _______ pairs and assign a Catholic Social Teaching to each pair. Have young people discuss what behaviors might provide evidence that people are putting the teachings into practice. Then have pairs look through newspapers and magazines to find examples of people living out the teachings they have been assigned. Invite volunteers to share their findings with the group. Point out that there are many ways to put the Catholic Social Teachings into practice. Rights and Responsibilities

InclusIon

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chronic health conditions Design _______ Editorial _______ colored Stones If you have young people with chronic health conditions that prevent them from eating popcorn, modify the Begin activity by using small colored stones or glass beads. Have young people imagine that the stones or beads are jewels they can use to buy food for lunch the next day.


ExplORE Solidarity

DEF IN E

Jesus identified with all people and even spent time with those whom society considered to be outcasts. As Jesus’ followers we are called by the Holy Spirit to live in solidarity with others. This means that we are called to live as one human family—whatever our differences may be. As Pope John Paul II pointed out, to live in solidarity with others is to commit oneself to the common good of every person.

pa rticipation

The resources of creation are destined for the whole human race. When we follow God’s commandments, we do not selfishly hoard or exploit the natural resources of the world. God calls us to share the gift of creation equally so that all people benefit. When we recognize our solidarity with others, we become more capable of working with our brothers and sisters to care for and renew the earth.

Explore

Pope John Paul II wrote about the connection between charity and solidarity in his encyclical, Sollicitudo Rei Socialis (On Social Concern). This connection, which is fundamental to Catholic Social Teaching, is a distinguishing mark of Christ’s disciples. In his encyclical the pope reminds us that through solidarity and charity, we recognize Christ in our neighbor. He points out that our neighbors are not only human beings, who have their own rights as humans, but that they also are the living image of God the Father. Each person is saved through Jesus Christ’s Paschal Mystery and placed under the protection of the Holy Spirit.

R EM EM BE R

We are ca lled by God to prac tice the Ch urch’s Catholic Socia l Teachings , wh ich help us bu ild a jus t socie ty and live in solidar ity with others.

There are many ways to demonstrate solidarity with others. One way is to take a stand against discrimination. We can do this by standing up for people who are teased, or bullied for being too smart, too dumb, too white, too brown, or too nice. We can also make sure that no one is excluded. Another way to live in solidarity with others is to care for the earth. By caring for the environment, we show God’s love to the people who will come after us.

Our Catholic Character Death is an important part of the gift and mystery of life. But in modern industrial societies, which tend to measure the value of life by the riches amassed, death can be seen as an unbearable defeat. When we separate death from life, we run the risk of denying death entirely or believing that

God’s Creation

we can choose death on our own terms to end suffering. Since God is the source of our life, every life is sacred. We must do what we can to lessen suffering, but we are not required to prolong life when death is imminent.

our Catholic Character

We know this because our faith in the Resurrection gives new meaning to our life and death.

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cST media campaign Before the next session, have young people review the Catholic Social PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ Teachings on pages 190–191 and 298–300. Have young people choose one of the teachings and make a poster, commercial, or radio spot that provides information about what the teaching means. Encourage young people to include information about how we can put the teachings into practice in our daily lives. During the next session, invite volunteers to share their work. Arrange with your catechetical leader to have young people’s work displayed around the parish. Solidarity

Invite volunteers to read aloud the section Solidarity. Say: As Catholics we believe that we are all children of God. Point out that since God is our Father, we are all brothers and sisters in faith. Say: As members of the human family, we are called to care for one another. Ask young people to name groups that might face discrimination. Write on the board young people’s suggestions. Then have small groups work to develop ways to show solidarity with the groups listed on the board. After giving groups time to work, invite volunteers to share their ideas. (Possible answer: We can show solidarity with people of different races by standing up for them if other people call them names.) Then ask: What can we do to show care for God’s creation? (Possible answers: use garbage bins rather than littering, recycle, reduce what we use)

Read aloud the feature. Point out that our modern society attempts to hide death in many ways, such as through the language we use to talk about death and by having wakes in funeral homes or at churches rather than in people’s homes as was once the custom. Say: As human beings, we know that death is simply a part of life. As Catholics we have faith in the Resurrection. We trust that God will raise us from the dead at the end of time. Point out that the Church’s teachings on life and death remind us that life is a gift from God and that we are called to respect this gift.

3 Close Have young people turn to pages 298–300 in the back of their books to read more about the Catholic Social Teachings. Ask pairs to identify how they can put each teaching into practice in their own lives.

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REflEcT

prayer Follow the steps to guide young people through the prayer on page 192.

Young People’s Page Prepare Pray the prayer in advance to become familiar with it. Select young people to serve in the roles of Reader 1, Reader 2, and Reader 3. Have young people review the prayer before praying aloud. Pray Invite volunteers to read aloud the page title and the introductory paragraphs. Ask: What is the basis for justice? (compassionate love) Why are we called to recognize the injustices that surround us? (Possible answer: so that we can do something about them, thereby sharing God’s love with people who need it) Then draw on the board a circle that is made of two arrows. Where one arrow ends and the other begins, write Action. Where the other arrow ends, write the word Reflection. Say: An important part of our faith is the notion that our relationship with God compels us to action on behalf of others. At the same time, our good actions encourage us to grow in our relationship with God through prayer and reflection. Both of these activities are vital. Give young people a few moments to prepare themselves for prayer. Say: Remember that when we pray, we lift our minds and our hearts to God. Take a moment to rest in God’s presence. Then pray the prayer. After praying aloud the closing prayer, say: Remember that working to end injustice requires both prayer and action. As we continue the session, let’s think of ways that we can act on behalf of justice.

Prayer

Looking Beyond Myself The world is in need of more love, peace, and justice. Catholic Social Teachings call us to look at our own lives and our behavior as well as to recognize the injustices that exist all around us. These teachings call us to reach out in compassionate love, which is the basis for justice. For Christians, our inner spiritual life goes hand in hand with our active life in the world. Whenever we nurture our love for God in prayer, we are better able to meet the needs of others and to reach out with love and compassion. In contrast, by acting in solidarity to bring love, make peace, and heal injustice, we can actually enrich our prayer life. Through action, we encounter God in our present lives. In this way, our prayer can gives us the strength and desire to live in ways that transform the world into a better place for all of God’s children.

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ce

on or a group of people who is suffering the effects of an inju stice, such as poor living cond ition s, random acts of violence, false accu sations of crime, or discrimi natio n.

Reader 2: In you r imagina tion surround this person or group with care and compassion. Pray a silent prayer for them. (Pause.) Reader 3:

Now let us pray together a litany for those who suffer from inju stice. If you wou ld like, pray aloud the inte ntion for which you just prayed silently. After each person prays aloud, we will pray together, “Be mercifu l, O Lord.”

CL OS IN G PR AY ER

All: God of mercy,

touch with compassion the lives of those who suffer unjustly. Help us to be your instr ume nts of care and heal ing for othe rs. We ask this in the name of Jesus, your Son and our brot her. Amen.

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prayer and action plan Remind young people that PDF Signoff: Production _______ our faith calls us to work for justice. Ask young people to brainstorm various justice activities they can complete. Write on the board young people’s suggestions. Then have young people make a calendar for the next week. Say: Be sure to include your routine activities and don’t forget to include time for prayer. Ask young people to include time each day for them to complete an activity that will help them build up God’s kingdom. Rights and Responsibilities

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Litany to Heal Injusti

Reader 1: Thin k of a pers

FYI

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coaching Young peopleEditorial to pray Design _______ _______ Remind young people that prayer can take the form of images as well as words. Suggest that in private prayer, young people simply hold someone’s face in mind and imagine it radiating the peace and joy of God.

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REflEcT

E R E H W t In

1 Begin

Do I Fi

al cial and mor ld Catholic so respond to and to upho le to d ab lle er ln ca e vu and we ar that God sist the poor As Catholics as fts gi to ue ed iq id un e are gu ing with the teachings. W e, each work of human lif . m the dignity do ng ki s to serve hi has given us

ira by Palmay Pe r e a H

How Do I Respond to the Needs Around Me?

I have a distant cousin who is deaf. When I was a child, my mother found out he had no place to live, so she invited him to live with us in our already-crowded house. He lived with us for years. I am now 70, and my mother’s example of generosity still moves me and motivates me. Recently, our parish got a request to visit a family in need. My husband and I are volunteers with the St. Vincent de Paul Society, so we made the visit one cold January day. It was a family in crisis—three children and a single mother. The mother had moved to our town because she had been diagnosed with lymphoma the day before Christmas, and she needed urgent cancer treatment. They also had very little money. We arranged for the family to receive help. Our parish provided financial assistance with the rent and utilities. The woman needed a course of chemotherapy at the hospital, but she had no way to get there, was very anxious, and spoke only Spanish. I was able to take her to the hospital. I interpreted for her and stayed with her for

every treatment over seven months. The woman calls me her “Angelita.” And now she has been declared to be free of lymphoma. It is a gift and a privilege to participate in the healing of another person. Why did I do it? My mother’s example still shows me the way—the way of Jesus.

Reflect

“For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, a stranger and you welcomed me, naked and you clothed me, ill and you cared for me, in prison and you visited me. . . . Amen, I say to you, whatever you did for one of these least brothers of mine, you did for me.” Matthew 25:35-36,40

Needs Chart On a separate sheet of paper, make a three-column chart with the following headings: At Home, At School, and In My Community. Under each heading, list at least three areas in which you see a need for care, love, or healing. Then reflect by asking yourself, “How might I bring care, love, or healing in each situation?” Take time in prayer to ask the Holy Spirit to show you how to respond to each need. Notice what happens as you work to meet the needs you listed.

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The World’s needs Have young people look through newspapers and magazines for PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ stories about people who are in need. Write on the board a list of needs that young people find. Arrange young people into small groups and have each group select one of the needs listed on the board. Ask groups to work together to develop plans to address the needs. After giving groups time to work, have the groups share their plans. Encourage young people to do what they can to put their plans into action. Solidarity

The Poor and Vulnerable

2 Connect

PALMIRA PEREA HAY lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with her husband, Steve. Together they engage in ministries such as taking Holy Communion to people in the hospital and visiting people in prison.

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Invite a volunteer to read aloud the introductory text. Ask: Who are the people who are poor and vulnerable? (Possible answer: They are those who have few material resources, but also those who lack companionship, direction, hope, spiritual sustenance, and so on.) Say: People who are poor and vulnerable are all around us. As Catholics, we are called to see them and to respond to their needs.

Invite volunteers to read aloud the section How Do I Respond to the Needs Around Me? Say: The power of love is strong and its effects are ongoing. Ask: Whom did the author’s mother help? How? (Possible answers: the author, by setting an example of generosity; the woman with lymphoma, by raising a daughter who would in turn help people in need; the author’s cousin, by taking him in) Why does the author say that it is “a gift and a privilege” to help someone in need? (Possible answer: because it takes you outside yourself, into the heart of another person) Have young people complete the activity independently. Suggest that they take a few moments to “see” the poor and vulnerable in their communities before they begin writing.

3 Close Encourage young people to choose one of the responses they wrote in the activity chart and resolve to carry it out during the next week.

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RESpOnD

W h a t ’s

? t a h W

1 Begin What’s What? Have young people complete the crossword puzzle individually or with a partner. Remind young people that the page references can help them find the answers to the clues.

say What? Ask volunteers to read aloud and define the terms. Review each term in the Glossary if necessary. Now What? Read aloud the section. Invite each young person to complete the activity independently.

5

8

9

7

Whenever we nurture our love for God in prayer, we are better able to meet the needs of others and to reach out with . PAGE 192

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One way to demonstrate our with others is to take a stand against discrimination. PAGE 191

9

As a result of the Industrial Revolution, world economies began to rely more on than on farming. PAGE 188

10

3 Go in Peace Have young people collect their materials and return them to the appropriate places. Encourage young people to remain mindful of the Now What? challenge during the week. Say: When we put the Catholic social Teachings into practice, we follow Jesus’ example by sharing God’s love with others.

Our faith in the gives new meaning to our life and death. PAGE 191

10

4

In encyclicals on social justice, popes have addressed issues such as loving people who are poor, feeding the hungry, sheltering the homeless, abolishing racism, and ending . PAGE 190

6

Pope Leo XIII’s titled On the Condition of Labor was the first to apply Catholic teaching to the rights of humans to work and earn fair wages. PAGE 189

In the mid-19th century, over 20 percent of the urban workforce was made up of . PAGE 188

DOWN 1

Blessed Pope John Paul II pointed out that life is sacred because it is a gift from God. PAGE 190

2

Catholic Social Teaching is rooted in the . PAGE 190 notion of justice and

3

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7

ACROSS 5

3

4

Review the concepts from this session by completing the crossword.

Respond

2 Connect

1 2

Catholic Social Teaching tells us how we society and live holy can build a lives amid the challenges of the modern world. PAGE 190

Say What Know the definitions of these terms. encyclical Industrial Revolution living wage

participation subsidiarity

Now What? Catholic Social Teaching calls us to stand in solidarity with human beings all over the world. On a separate sheet of paper, write what you can do during the next week to practice solidarity with others.

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Service: campus cleanup Remind young people that caring for God’s creation is one way PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ to build up God’s kingdom. Arrange with your catechetical leader to have young people work together to pick up litter around the parish grounds. God’s Creation

Session assessment Option An assessment for this session can be found at www.findinggod.com.

3-Minute Retreat Give young people an opportunity for quiet meditation at www.loyolapress.com/retreat.

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p l a n a h E a D : Get Ready for Session 23 Consult the catechist preparation pages to prepare for Session 23 and determine any materials you will need.


CateChist PreParation S e S S io n 2 3

Called by God 3-Minute Retreat Before you prepare the session, pause and be still. Take three deep breaths and be aware of the loving presence of God, who is with you on this journey.

Knowing and Sharing Your Faith in Session 23 Consider how Scripture and Tradition can deepen your understanding of session content.

Scripture Ephesians 5:19–20 [Address] one another [in] psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and playing to the Lord in your hearts, giving thanks always and for everything in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ to God the Father.

Reflection By virtue of our Baptism, we are initiated into a community in which we have a twofold responsibility. First, we are responsible for ourselves and our spiritual growth. Letting “the word of Christ dwell in you richly” implies a disposition of the heart that is open to being led by the Spirit. It implies a willingness to renew ourselves in the faith so we may grow in relationship with Christ and others. Second, we are responsible for one another. This means we participate in the renewal of the Church, teaching and admonishing one another, so we may build up the community and serve the Kingdom of God.

Questions In what ways do I take responsibility for my own spiritual growth? In what ways do I take responsibility for the renewal of my faith community?

Concluding Prayer

Speak to God, using the words of this prayer or your own. Gracious God, thank you for the gift of faith and the grace of being called to new life in Christ. Help me use my gifts to lead others to you.

1 Peter 2:4–5 tells us to model our lives on Jesus Christ. 1 Corinthians 12:4–11 explains how we each have unique gifts and talents that help us answer God’s call to holiness.

Tradition During the Second Vatican Council, the Church articulated a clear and positive vision of the unique role of the laity, which is to “seek the Kingdom of God by engaging in temporal affairs and ordering them according to the plan of God.” [Dogmatic Constitution on the Church, 31] The role of the laity is shaped by a secular challenge, meaning the lay faithful fulfill their vocation primarily in the world where they are called to “see in their daily activities as an occasion to join themselves to God, fulfill his will, serve other people and to lead them to communion with God in Christ.” [On the Vocation and the Mission of the Lay Faithful, 17]

Catholic Social Teaching In this session the integrated Catholic Social Teaching themes are Solidarity; Option for the Poor and Vulnerable; and Call to Family, Community, and Participation. See page 177b for an explanation of these themes.

Window on the Catechism The renewal of Catholic life that came about in the Second Vatican Council is discussed in CCC 9 and 10.

General Directory for Catechesis The renewal of catechesis that came about from the Second Vatican Council is discussed in GDC 1–7.

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caTEchIST pREpaRaTIOn

One-Hour Session Planner SeSSion 23

Called by God

Session Theme: We respond to God’s call to holiness by serving others and spreading God’s grace. Before This Session ▶▶ Bookmark your Bible to Matthew 9:35–38. Place the open Bible in your

prayer space. ▶▶ Read the Guide for this session, choose any additional If Time Allows activities

that you might have time to complete, and gather the listed materials. StepS

ApproximAte time

Engage Called by God

10 minutes Page 195

Explore The Second Vatican Council Called to Holiness

30–40 minutes

Reflect Where Do I Fit In?

Take IT Home 10–15 minutes

Page 200

Page 201

Respond What’s What?

10–15 minutes Page 202

materials REQUIRED

OpTIOnal

▶▶ Cups of two sizes, bowl, water,

▶▶ Research materials (page 196)

computer (page 195) ▶▶ Web clip of the opening of the Second

Vatican Council (page 197) ▶▶ Bible (pages 198–199)

195b

Young people are invited to experience an online, Scripture-based 3-Minute Retreat at the end of the session. The prayers give young people opportunities to experience a variety of forms of prayer. Session 23 includes a prayer of thanks, intercessions for others, and the Glory Be to the Father. Follow the Prepare directions on the Catechist Guide page before sharing with young people.

Pages 196–197

Pages 198–199

Prayer: abundant Harvest

Prayer in Session 23

www.findinggod.com

▶▶ Session 23 BLM, T-383 (page 199) ▶▶ Art supplies (page 201) ▶▶ Session 23 Assessment,

www.findinggod.com (page 202)

Homework options: Real Presence

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Session 23 BLM

Page 199


EngagE

Session

23

d o G y b d e Call

SeSSion 23

OUTcOmES ▶▶ Identify the issues addressed during

the Second Vatican Council. ▶▶ Explain that human beings have

received unique gifts that allow us to respond to God’s call to holiness. ▶▶ State that when we pray prayers of

intercession, we ask something on behalf of another person. ▶▶ Define laity and synod.

1 Set the Stage Think about a time you were invited to serve others without receiving anything in return. What was the situation, and how did you respond? What did you learn from the experience?

Read aloud the text in the box on page 195. Give young people a few moments to reflect silently on the questions or to share their responses with a partner.

2 Get Started PR AYER God, give us the strength to respond to your invitation to serve others. May we remain faithful to your call to share Christ’s love with others.

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christian Economics 101 Familiarize young people with the economic concept of supply and PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ demand. Then say: As Jesus’ followers, we believe that there is an infinite supply of Christ’s love. He has so much love that it’s free, regardless of demand. Point out that as members of the Church, we are called to find where the need for Christ’s love is the greatest. Have small groups brainstorm areas in the world that are in need of Christ’s love. Then have groups brainstorm ways young people can share their surplus time and talent with the people in those situations to help share Christ’s love. After giving groups time to work, invite volunteers to share their ideas. The Poor and Vulnerable

Before the session, set a cup inside a bowl and fill a larger cup with water. During the session, sit at a computer and say: I’m having trouble changing one of my passwords. Ask: Can someone help me? After people offer to help, say: Thank you for offering to share your gifts with me. Then pour the water into the cup that is inside the bowl until the water overflows. Ask: Why did the water overflow? (As more water filled the cup, the excess was forced over the edge.) Say: The law of love works in a similar way. Whenever we use our gifts to help others, we share God’s love. Point out that when we continue to serve others, we respond to God’s call of holiness and we help God’s grace overflow into the lives of other people. Say: In this session we will learn more about how we can respond to the call of holiness.

prayer

Go to www.findinggod.com/sessionextenders for an article on the call to holiness. You may wish to share this with the group.

Say: Let’s ask the Holy Spirit to continue to help us “overflow.” As a group, pray aloud the prayer. Conclude by praying the Sign of the Cross.

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ExplORE

The Second Vatican Council

1 Begin Share a story about a time you had to adjust to change, such as moving to a new city or beginning a new job. Then invite young people to share their own stories. Ask: What helped you adjust to the change you encountered? (Possible answer: the support of family and friends) How can you support people who are experiencing change in their own lives? (Possible answers: treat them with kindness, offer words of welcome and support) Say: In this article we are going to read about how during the middle of the last century, the Church responded to cultural changes that were happening.

Pope John XXIII

IN

the mid-20th century, Pope John XXIII called an ecumenical council to address new issues in the Church and society that arose from changes brought about by the Industrial Revolution, war, and the rise of fascism and communism. The decisions that were made at the Second Vatican Council continue to shape how we practice our faith today. Recall the last time you went to Mass. The fact that the prayers and Scripture readings were in a language other than Latin and that there were lay ministers are just two of the changes that came about as the result of decisions made during the Second Vatican Council.

Providing Direction for the Future Inspired by the Holy Spirit, Pope John XXIII responded to the challenges of the 20th century by calling the bishops of the world to come together for the Second Vatican Council. Pope John XXIII hinted that he would convene a

SACRED ART

2 Connect Invite a volunteer to read aloud the article title and the first paragraph. Say: fascism is an ideology that values the nation above the individual. Communism is a philosophy in which goods are held in common. Ask: What events changed the world during the 1900s? (Possible answers: the Industrial Revolution, world wars, the atomic bomb, advances in technology) Ask: Why do some people like old shoes? (Possible answer: They are comfortable.) Why is it necessary to get new shoes? (Possible answer: The old ones don’t fit.) Say: Pope John XXIII realized that the Church needed to try new approaches to connect with the modern world. To many, the old ways were more comfortable. But the pope knew that for the Church to continue serving people, change was necessary.

Sacred art

Read aloud the feature. Explain that the pope is the figure in white and that all the men in red hats are cardinals. Ask: Why do you think the painter chose to place the cross in a prominent position? (Possible answer: to remind Church leaders that they are responsible for leading the Church founded by Christ)

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Extraordinary Synod, Franklin McMahon, 1985.

This artwork depicts a meeting convened by Pope John Paul II during which bishops from all over the world met to reaffirm the message of the Second Vatican Council. Meeting such as these, called by the pope to discuss matters of doctrine and pastoral care, are called synods. The pope also has the authority to call for an Ecumenical Council, a gathering of all the world’s bishops. During a council, Church leaders exercise their role as members of the Magisterium. One of the main differences between a synod and an Ecumenical Council is that with the pope’s approval, the decisions of an Ecumenical Council are official teachings of the Church. During a synod, however, the members offer suggestions to the pope, which may or may not become official teachings at a later time.

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Voices of the Vatican Say:PDF In addition to ecumenical councils and synods, the pope and Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ heads of Vatican offices may issue various statements, such as encyclicals, apostolic exhortations, and apostolic letters. Arrange young people into three groups and assign one type of document to each group. Instruct groups to conduct research and to prepare a brief presentation of their assigned document type. After each group has presented, discuss the differences among the three types of documents. Explain that an encyclical is a letter written by the pope to a particular group of bishops; sometimes this group includes all the bishops. Point out that an apostolic exhortation is a letter written by the pope in which he encourages a particular group to undertake a particular activity. State that an apostolic letter is issued by the pope or on behalf of the pope and that these letters sometimes address issues of Church governance.


ExplORE council in 1959, shortly after he was elected pope. It took more than two years, however, for Church leaders to prepare for this grand event.

Our Catholic Character During the Second Vatican Council, Church

Around 2,450 bishops, as well as theologians, members of religious orders, and lay people attended this council, which lasted from 1962–1965. Unlike many previous Ecumenical Councils, the goal of the bishops during the Second Vatican Council was not to respond to people who were teaching heresy. Rather, Church leaders explored how Church teaching could be made clearer. One of the outcomes of the council was the invitation to all Catholics to recognize their call to holiness so that they could be effective evangelizers in the world.

leaders clearly stated that the Eucharist is the

Renewal

of Holy Communion. Choirs often sang for the

The Church continues to renew itself in response to the signs of the times. In 2011, Catholics in the United States began using a new edition of the Roman Missal. Previously called the Sacramentary, the Roman Missal is the book that contains all the prayers that are prayed at Mass. The most current edition of the Roman Missal is a closer translation of the Latin original.

us enter more fully into the sacrament, the Council made changes in the way we celebrate the Eucharist. For centuries the Mass was prayed in Latin, with the priest facing an altar built into the wall of the sanctuary, with his back to the assembly. Holy Communion was received only under the form of bread. There were no lay lectors or extraordinary ministers people rather than with the people. In many parishes, congregations used English missals while following along with Latin prayers. Think about Mass in your parish today. How is it different from what is described here? The more participatory nature of today’s Mass can be attributed to the vision, understanding, and

Explore

During the Second Vatican Council, the bishops approved 16 documents that responded to major issues of the modern day. Some of the Church teachings that were emphasized in the council documents include the role of the laity as the People of God and the need for a renewed understanding of the Church and its mission in the modern era. One document, for example, reminds us that each baptized person should recognize his or her call from God to live a life of holiness. The document on the role of the Church in the modern world points out that all members of the Church are called to support goodness and correct evils in the world. The document on the liturgy called for further renewal in the Mass and allowed for priests to celebrate Mass in the language of the people rather than in Latin, as was the custom. In the document on divine Revelation, the council clarified the Church’s teaching on Scripture and Tradition and called for Catholics to read the Bible more frequently and with greater devotion. In the document on religious freedom, the Church reaffirmed its commitment to support and work for everyone’s right to religious freedom.

high point of our lives as Catholics. To help

work of the bishops at the Second Vatican Council.

DEF IN E sy nod, laity

R EM EM BE R

Pope Joh n XX III ca lled the bishops togeth er for the Second Vatican Council , du ring wh ich the Church’s lea ders res ponded to major socia l and rel igiou s issues of the da y.

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Real presence Point out that the Mass calls for our full participation. Ask: How can PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ we participate fully? (Possible answers: sing, think about the words we pray) Explain that the Mass is the source and summit of our lives as Catholics. Say: The mass is the summit of our lives because it is our highest prayer of praise to God for the gift of Jesus in the eucharist. The mass is the source of our lives because it provides all that we need. Explain that the Mass is also a model for how we are to live—in thanksgiving for all that God has given to us. Before the next session, encourage young people to practice awareness of the world around them. Say: We often fail to notice what is really going on around us. for example, when I am a passenger in a car and traveling a route I often drive, I notice many things I don’t see when I’m driving. Have young people write what they notice as they practice a sense of awareness over the next week. During the next session, ask young people to share what they discovered. Then discuss the difference between seeing and observing. Explain that God wants us to observe and participate in life rather than merely watch it pass us by.

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Invite volunteers to read aloud the section Providing Direction for the Future. Ask: If you asked your family to choose a restaurant for dinner, would everyone agree? (probably not) Remind young people that bishops are responsible for the spiritual needs of the people in their dioceses. Point out that people living in different parts of the world can have drastically different needs. Say: one of the challenges the bishops faced during the council was addressing the needs of the people they served. Then explain that a word Pope John XXIII often used when referring to the council is aggiornamento, a Latin word that means “to bring up to date.” Say: This spirit of the word aggiornamento set the tone for the rest of the council. If possible, show a Web clip of the council opening. Invite a volunteer to read aloud the section Renewal. If possible, display copies of the documents promulgated during the Second Vatican Council. Read aloud the titles of the documents to help young people understand the breadth of issues discussed by Church leaders. Explain that the laity, or lay people, are baptized individuals who participate in the mission of Christ but who are not ordained clergy.

our Catholic Character

Read aloud the feature. Ask: Why did the changes that were approved during the Second Vatican Council help people enter into the celebration of the mass? (Possible answers: People were able to pray more actively. People were able to participate in the Mass in their own language.)

3 Close Say: The mass is a gift. Let’s thank Christ for entrusting us with this gift. Invite a volunteer to pray aloud a brief prayer thanking Jesus for the gift of the Mass.

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ExplORE

Ca l led to H ol i n e s s

1 Begin Write on the board a T-chart with the headings Sacraments of Initiation and Gifts Received. Ask volunteers to name the sacraments. Then work together to list the gifts, or graces, that we receive through each of the sacraments. If necessary, suggest that young people turn to pages 284–285 in the back of their books for information about the sacraments.

2 Connect Write on the board the word holy. Say: The word holy comes from an old english word meaning “happy, well, and whole.” Let’s see what Vatican II had to say about holiness. Invite volunteers to read aloud the article title and the first section. Ask: Why are we called to live holy lives? (We are made in God’s image.) Point out that the Sacrament of Baptism welcomes us into the Christian community. Then say: The Sacrament of Confirmation strengthens and perfects the grace that we receive through our Baptism. even though many of us have not yet been confirmed, we can always pray to the Holy Spirit for the strength to live as God wants us to. Explain that the Eucharist nourishes our spirits so that we have the strength and desire to live out our vocation of love and service. Say: Through the eucharist, Christ has given us a model of how to live. We are called to share ourselves with others. Have partners work together to list the gifts they have received from God and identify ways that they can use these gifts to “be saints” in the world today. After giving partners time to work, invite volunteers to share their responses. Discuss how the strength that we have received through the Sacraments of Initiation give us the grace to use our gifts to serve others.

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the document titled Dogmatic Constitution on the Church, the Second Vatican Council emphasized that all Christians are called to holiness—that we are all called to be saints. The bishops at the council sought to remind us that we are called to live holy lives because we are made in God’s image. Through the council’s teachings, we learn that each person’s unique vocation offers its own way to achieve holiness. Through the Sacraments of Initiation, we receive the grace we need to respond to this call to holiness. Filled with this grace, we respond to the call to holiness by sharing Christ’s love with others through our words and actions—in places and circumstances where it’s needed most, whether in our homes, our schools, our communities, or in the world at large. Scripture clearly tells us that we are to model our lives after Christ as a way to seek holiness. For example, the author of First Peter calls God’s people “living stones” who are to model their lives on Jesus Christ, the cornerstone. Come to him, a living stone, rejected by human beings but chosen and precious in the sight of God, and, like living stones, let yourselves be built into a spiritual house to be a holy priesthood to offer spiritual sacrifices acceptable to God through Jesus Christ. 1 Peter 2:4–5

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The Catechism of the Catholic Church reinforces the call to holiness by telling us, “All Christians in any state are called to the fullness of Christian life and to the perfection of charity. All are called to holiness.” (CCC 2013) The Catechism goes on to explain that we should wholeheartedly devote ourselves to the glory of God and to the service of our neighbors. It’s not always easy to choose to build up God’s kingdom, to serve others, or to preach the Good News. Through our devotion to the glory of God, we are sometimes called to offer spiritual sacrifices. We know that we are living stones who, united in Christ, can live lives of holiness to help others in many ways, including helping them grow in their relationship with Jesus and his Church.

Many Gifts In addition to the grace that we receive through the Sacraments of Initiation, each of us has received unique gifts and talents that enable us to respond to God’s call of holiness. Paul explained this in his First Letter to the Corinthians. There are different kinds of spiritual gifts but the same Spirit; there are different forms of service, but the same Lord; there are different workings but the same God who produces all of them in everyone. To each individual the manifestation of the Spirit is given for some benefit. To one is given through the Spirit the expression of wisdom; to another the expression of knowledge

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light amid the Darkness Remind young people that as Jesus’ followers, we are called to share PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ his light with others. Point out that sometimes living as a disciple involves taking a risk by being a source of light amid places of darkness. Have small groups work together to identify experiences of darkness that people in the world might face. Then ask groups to identify how they can share Christ’s light with those who might be experiencing such darkness. If groups have trouble getting started, provide examples such as People who live in poverty experience darkness. We can share Christ’s light by donating to a food pantry or working in a soup kitchen. After giving groups time to work, invite volunteers to share their responses. Solidarity


ExplORE according to the same Spirit; to another faith by the same Spirit; to another gifts of healing by the one Spirit; to another mighty deeds; to another prophecy; to another discernment of spirits; to another varieties of tongues; to another interpretation of tongues. But one and the same Spirit produces all of these, distributing them individually to each person as he wishes.

All Christians, whether married, single, religious, or ordained, cooperate in the building up of the Body of Christ.

1 Corinthians 12:4–11 All Christians, whether married, single, religious, or ordained, cooperate in the building up of the Body of Christ. In the Church there is a diversity of ministries and a unity of mission—to make Christ present in the world today. Regardless of the gifts that we have been given or the ways we have been called to serve, we are all equal before God, who made us in

Pope John Paul II wrote about the universal call to holiness in his 1988 Apostolic Exhortation Christifideles Laici (On the Vocation and the Mission of the Lay Faithful in the Church and in the World). Everyone in the Church, precisely because they are members, receive and thereby share in the common vocation to holiness. . . . [On] equal par with all other members of the Church, the lay faithful are called to holiness . . . The call to holiness is rooted in Baptism and proposed anew in the other Sacraments, principally in the Eucharist. Since Christians are reclothed in Christ Jesus and refreshed by his Spirit, they are “holy.” They therefore have the ability to manifest this holiness and the responsibility to bear witness to it in all that they do.

Explore

R EM EM BE R

God ha s ca lled each of us to a life of holines s. We res pond to thi s ca ll by bu ild ing up God’s kingdom. We rec eive the grace and stren gth to live holy lives through the sacra ments, es pecia lly the Eu char ist. Th is grace gives us the strength to prac tice the gif ts we have received from Go d.

his image and likeness. By remembering this, we are reminded that we are all one human family with God as our Father.

READY for Confirmation As one who is preparing for Confirmation, it is important to understand the four Marks of the Church, which tell us that the Church is one, holy, catholic, and apostolic. When we say the Church is one, we mean that the Church is unified in the Holy Spirit and that the fullness of Christ’s body subsists in the Catholic Church. In the Holy Spirit, her members are united in Christ. When we say the Church is holy, we mean that she is consecrated to the service and worship of God. When we say the Church is catholic, or universal, we mean that she possesses the fullness of Christ’s presence and the means of Salvation sent on a mission to the whole human family. When we say the Church is apostolic, we mean that the sole Church of Christ subsists in the Catholic Church and is governed by the successor of Peter and her bishops.

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Ideas to share LoyolaPress.

Session 23 Blm

The Church is:

choices, choices PDF Signoff: Production _______ Provide each young person with the Session 23 Blackline Master [T-383]. Read aloud the directions. Before the next session, have young people complete the Blackline Master. During the next session, invite volunteers to share their responses.

• one:_______ unified inEditorial the Holy Spirit; Design _______

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the fullness of Christ’s body subsists in the Catholic Church

• holy: consecrated to the service and worship of God • catholic: possesses the fullness of Christ’s presence and the means of Salvation sent on a mission to the whole human family • apostolic: the sole Church of Christ subsists in the Catholic Church and is governed by the successor of Peter and her bishops

Before the session, write on the board a chart with the following headings: Expression of Wisdom, Expression of Knowledge, Faith, Gifts of Healing, Mighty Deeds, Prophecy, Discernment of Spirits, Varieties of Tongues, Interpretation of Tongues. During the session, invite volunteers to read aloud the section Many Gifts. Invite volunteers to name vocations in which people can practice each gift listed on the board. Write on the board young people’s responses. (Possible answers: Expression of Wisdom: counselors; Expression of Knowledge: teachers; Faith: parish ministers, priests, sisters; Gifts of Healing: doctors and nurses; Mighty Deeds: advocates for peace; Prophecy: spiritual directors, advocates for peace and justice; Discernment of Spirits: counselors, priests; Varieties of Tongues and Interpretation of Tongues: translators, teachers) Have young people identify ways that they currently work to build up the Kingdom of God. Write on the board young people’s suggestions. Say: Look at the ways we are already living lives of holiness. Through the work that we do, we help build up the Church, and we model the Church in action.

Ready for Confirmation

Read aloud the feature. Have young people turn to pages 94–95 to review the Marks of the Church. Discuss the Ideas to Share with the group.

3 Close Give young people a moment to think about someone in their lives who has responded to God’s call to holiness faithfully. Say: Ask yourself what you can do to follow that person’s example. Then ask yourself how you can be an example for others. After giving young people time to reflect, pray together the Glory Be to the Father.

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REflEcT

prayer Follow the steps to guide young people through the prayer on page 200.

Young People’s Page Prepare Pray the prayer in advance to become familiar with it. Select young people to serve in the roles of Reader 1 and Reader 2 and give them time to familiarize themselves with their parts of the prayer. Remind young people to read slowly, clearly, and reverently. Open the Bible to the Scripture passage that will be read aloud during the prayer. Pray Invite volunteers to read aloud the page title and the introductory paragraphs. Say: many people who are not Catholic believe that we worship mary and the saints. Point out that Catholics believe that God alone is worthy of our worship. Say: We do not worship mary and the saints, but we do pray to them, asking them to intercede on our behalf. Point out that prayers such as the Lord’s Prayer and the Hail Mary include intercessions. Give young people a moment to prepare themselves for prayer. Say: Intercession is an important form of prayer. It reminds us that we are all interconnected as members of God’s family, the Church. Pray aloud the prayer together. After praying, say: Take a moment to pray your own prayers of intercession silently. After giving young people time to pray, conclude by praying the Hail Mary. Encourage young people to take time to pray prayers of intercession whenever they notice that someone needs God’s help. Say: As we continue our session, let’s be mindful of the prayers of intercession we’ve prayed. Let’s think about ways we can help all those who need to be reminded of God’s love. Solidarity

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Prayer

Abundant Harvest Interceding for Othe

The word intercession means “to ask something on behalf of another.” A prayer of intercession is a form of prayer that leads us to pray as Jesus did. Throughout his life on earth, Jesus interceded with the Father on behalf of all people. The Holy Spirit inspires us to pray in this way so that our hearts are turned outward and focused on the needs of the people around us. When we intercede for others, we are asking for God’s mercy on their behalf.

All: In the Name of the Fath

Amen.

rs

er, and of the Son, and of

the Holy Spirit.

Leader: Reflect silently as I read aloud from the holy Gospel according to Mat thew. [Read aloud Mat thew 9:35–38.] The Gospel of the Lord. All: Praise to you, Lord Jesu

s Christ.

Reader 1: Silently reflect

on the passage. Ask your self: How might God be calling me to help with the harvest at this time in my life? Let us ask God to send laborers to spread the Good News.

Rea

der 2: God of mercy, you sent your Son to teach, prea ch, and heal. Grant that people ever ywh ere may follow his example and work to serve the Kingdom of God. Let us pray to the Lord. All: Lord, hear our prayer. Reader 1: Faithful God, we pray that all people hear your call to serve and respond generously. Let us pray to the Lord.

All: Lord, hear our prayer. Rea

der 2: God of love, we pray for ourselves, asking you to reveal to each of us how we can live in service. Grant us the grac e to be open to your invitation to join Jesu s in his ministry. Let us pray to the Lord. All: Lord, hear our prayer. Reader 1: Let’s pause to add our own petitions silen tly. (Pause.) Mindful of all our prayers, those spok en and those in our hear ts, let us pray. Reader 2: May Jesus guid e our steps and enlighten our hear ts. May the Holy Spirit be with us, show ing us how to spread the Good News at home, at school, in our commun ities, and in our world. All: Amen.

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Intercessions at mass Work with your catechetical PDF Signoff: Production _______ leader to have young people write the Prayer of the Faithful for an upcoming Sunday Mass. Before writing the intercessions, read aloud the Scripture passages for the Mass and reflect on any messages or themes that emerge from the readings. Explain that during the Prayer of the Faithful, it is customary to pray for the needs of the Church, for public authorities and the Salvation of the whole world, for those in need, and for the local community.

FYI

LoyolaPress.

coaching Young peopleEditorial to pray Design _______ _______ Remind young people that they can pray a prayer of intercession anytime, anywhere—even for a stranger on the street who looks worried or pained. Explain that establishing this habit will keep their hearts open and responsive to others’ needs.

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REflEcT

E R E H W t In

1 Begin

Do I Fi

again that it er and over ve heard ov ha us e the world of t ak n, mos nerally m kindergarte ke hers, and ge Since before might not ta rns, help ot tu we ke so ta d e, an at to shar ctively, we know th most instin is important ics al ol is th th Ca ow As rtant. e. We kn ncept is impo a better plac co is th y k about wh answer. time to thin rist for the to Jesus Ch we can look

or y by Gregne Pierce Aug usti

Why Am I Being Sent?

I grew up in New York City. I got sent to Chicago. My wife and I have three children. I run a small business that produces good products and provides excellent service to our customers. I vote in every election, and I am involved in a variety of community organizations and social justice efforts. This work is how I try to make the world a better place. As a husband, father, businessman, and citizen, I carry out my part of Jesus’ mission to proclaim that the reign of God has already begun—that it is within each and every one of us. Many people think that only priests, nuns, brothers, and deacons have vocations. Actually, every baptized Christian has a calling from God. This call is to build up what Jesus called “the kingdom of God, on earth as it is in heaven.” This was Jesus’ vision for how the world should be—a very different way for human beings to relate to one another and to our world, because it is based on love, not hatred, power, money, or ambition.

Reflect

At the end of his time on earth, Jesus gathered his disciples together and told them to go out into the entire world to preach, baptize, and build the Kingdom of God. They were sent.

son, “Please go out and mow the lawn.” But the boy complained, “I did it last time. It’s my brother’s turn. My friends are coming over right now. I won’t do it.” But when his friends arrived, the boy told them to come back in an hour, and he went out and mowed his father’s lawn. Jesus asks us, “Which son did the will of the father?” The correct answer is “the one who mowed the lawn.”

2 Connect

So, mow the lawn. Find the work God has for you, and do it.

Witness to Love Write on the lines two or three sentences to describe a time when you witnessed someone making a decision based on love rather than hatred—even when hatred may have seem justified. Then write a final sentence to describe one positive outcome of this person’s decision.

Jesus told a story about two sons. If told today, the story might go something like this. The father said to the first son, “Please go out and mow the lawn.” The boy said he would, but his friends showed up and so he went off with them instead. The man then said to his second GREGORY AUGUSTINE PIERCE is a husband, father, publisher, writer, speaker, community organizer, baseball coach, and Cubs and Bulls fan.

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InclusIon ~ pg 201 ~

chronic health conditions PDF Signoff: Production _______ pray with Us If you have a young person with a chronic illness, you may wish to record the prayer session with a video camera and send it to him or her, along with an invitation to pray with the group when they feel they need a boost of spiritual strength. In the recording, include personal greetings from young people assuring their classmate that he or she is being prayed for. Solidarity

Session 23 > Renewal in the Church

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The Kingdom of god, on _______ Earth Editorial _______ Design

Have a volunteer read aloud the introductory text. Then ask: Why is it important to share, take turns, and help others? (Possible answers: because God wants us to; because that is how we make God’s love present to the world; because loving works better than hating) Say: Today’s article reminds us that when we love each other, we are doing the most important work ever: we are building the kingdom of God.

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Have young people draw a picture that illustrates the incident they described in the activity. Explain that the image may be realistic or symbolic and that it can include speech balloons to clarify what is happening. When the illustrations are completed, have young people work together to create a bulletin-board display titled The Kingdom of God on Earth. Encourage them to supplement the display with images from magazines or the Internet that depict people doing God’s work.

Have volunteers take turns reading aloud Why Am I Being Sent? Say: Sometimes we imagine the kingdom of God as “over there” or “up there.” But the author reminds us that the kingdom of God is inside us and in our relationships with others when we choose to do his will. Ask: In the story about the two sons, what was the second brother’s first response to his father’s request? (He complained and refused to do it.) What happened next? (He decided to do the work.) Say: We may complain sometimes, too, and turn away from God. But this doesn’t make us unfit to serve him. God will always rejoice when we turn back to him. Have young people complete the activity independently. Then invite volunteers to share what they wrote.

3 Close Say: every time you have to make a tough decision, you are being sent to do God’s work. Encourage young people to think of their next tough decision as a mission to build up the Kingdom of God.

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RESpOnD

W h a t ’s

? t a h W

1 Begin What’s What? Have young people complete the items individually or with a partner. Remind young people that they can use the page references to help them find the responses to the questions. Invite volunteers to share their responses.

Say What? Ask volunteers to read aloud the terms and to use each one in a sentence. Review each term in the Glossary if necessary.

1

2

3

9

during an

Throughout his life on earth, Jesus with the Father on behalf of all people. PAGE 200

Say What? Know the definitions of these terms.

Pope John XXIII was inspired by the

laity synod

when he called the bishops of the world to gather for the Second Vatican Council. PAGE 197

Now What?

A teaching emphasized in the council documents included the role of the as the People of God.

3 Go in Peace Have young people collect their materials and return them to the appropriate places. Encourage young people to remain mindful of the Now What? challenge during the week. Say: God has given each of us different gifts that, when used together, can respond to all of the world’s needs.

because Jesus, its is founder, is holy. PAGE 199

PAGE 197

now What? Read aloud the section. Invite each young person to respond to the question independently.

One mark of the Church is that the Church

Church leaders exercise their role as members of the ecumenical council. PAGE 196

Respond

2 Connect

Complete each sentence with the correct word or phrase.

8

4

The document on allowed priests to celebrate Mass in the language of the people. PAGE 197

5

We receive the that we need to live lives of holiness. PAGE 198

6

The Catechism tells us that we should wholeheartedly devote ourselves to the

You have unique gifts and talents that enable you to respond to God’s call to holiness. Think about the needs of your family and friends. What is one gift that you will use this week to bring Christ’s peace and love to others?

and to the service of our neighbors. PAGE 198

7

There are different kinds of spiritual but the same Spirit. PAGE 198

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Service: Thank a Role model Remind young people that the Church is filled with many people PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ whose example we can follow in our quest to live holy lives. Select someone in the parish for whom you can express thanks for his or her example. Then have young people make a spiritual bouquet for that person by making paper flowers on which they write thank-you notes. Collect the paper flowers, place them in a vase, and deliver to the bouquet to the intended recipient. Family and Community

Session assessment Option An assessment for this session can be found at www.findinggod.com.

3-Minute Retreat Give young people an opportunity for quiet meditation at www.loyolapress.com/retreat.

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p l a n a h E a D : Get Ready for Session 24 Consult the catechist preparation pages to prepare for Session 24 and determine any materials you will need.


CateChist PreParation S e S S io n 2 4

People for Others 3-Minute Retreat Before you prepare the session, pause and be still. Take three deep breaths and be aware of the loving presence of God, who is with you on this journey.

Knowing and Sharing Your Faith in Session 24 Consider how Scripture and Tradition can deepen your understanding of session content.

Scripture John 15:12 “This is my commandment: love one another as I love you.”

Reflection We can love others because we have first been loved by God. It’s one thing to know that in our heads. It is quite another thing to be convinced in our hearts. The key is to make time in our busy lives to stop and allow God to love us, to actually experience God’s love for us personally. Loving others will flow naturally from our deep belief in God’s personal love for us.

Questions How can I allow myself to experience God’s love today? How can I open myself to see the heart of God in the hearts of others?

Luke 4:18–19 assures us that Jesus has come to respond to our needs. Matthew 25:34–40 teaches us that when we care for others’ needs, we serve Jesus.

Tradition Probably the most predominant image in the preaching of Jesus in the Gospel of Matthew is the Kingdom of Heaven. It is the qualities of the kingdom we see outlined in Matthew 25:34–40. When God rules, the poor are vindicated, the oppressed are liberated, and justice and peace are experienced by all. God’s rule is seen in the ministry of Blessed Teresa of Calcutta. When we feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, clothe the naked, and welcome the immigrant, we are helping make the Kingdom of Heaven visible on earth.

Catholic Social Teaching Concluding Prayer

Speak to God, using the words of this prayer or your own. Loving and gracious God, thank you for the love that you have poured out on us in giving us your Son, Jesus. Help me deepen my awareness of your love and share it with those I meet.

In this session the integrated Catholic Social Teaching themes are Solidarity; Rights and Responsibilities; Option for the Poor and Vulnerable; and Call to Family, Community, and Participation. See page 177b for an explanation of these themes.

Window on the Catechism The Works of Mercy are discussed in CCC 1458, 1473, 1815, 1879, 1853, 2044, 2447.

General Directory for Catechesis Moral formation as one of the fundamental tasks of catechesis is discussed in GDC 85–87.

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caTEchIST pREpaRaTIOn

One-Hour Session Planner

People for others

SeSSion 24

Prayer in Session 24

Session Theme: We respond to God’s call using our unique talents.

Young people are invited to experience an online, Scripture-based 3-Minute Retreat at the end of the session. The prayers give young people opportunities to experience a variety of forms of prayer. Session 24 includes the Act of Faith and a reflection on the Beatitudes. Follow the Prepare directions on the Catechist Guide page before sharing with young people.

Before This Session ▶▶ Bookmark your Bible to Luke 4:18–19 and Matthew 25:34–40. Place the open

Bible in your prayer space. ▶▶ Read the Guide for this session, choose any additional If Time Allows activities

that you might have time to complete, and gather the listed materials. StepS

ApproximAte time

Engage People for Others

10 minutes Page 203

Explore Hearing the Cry of the Poor Works of Mercy

30–40 minutes Pages 204–205

Reflect Prayer: Make Peace Where Do I Fit In?

10–15 minutes Page 208 Page 209

Respond What’s What?

Take IT Home

Pages 206–207

10–15 minutes

Homework options: Saintly Art

Page 205

Session 24 BLM

Page 206

Page 210

materials REQUIRED

OpTIOnal

▶▶ Bible (page 204)

▶▶ Session 24 BLM, T-384 (page 206)

▶▶ Images of various people

▶▶ Computer with Internet access

(in jail, lonely, unhappy) (page 204) ▶▶ Large bowl of an aromatic treat

(page 206) ▶▶ Newspapers and magazines

(page 207)

203b

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(page 207) ▶▶ Arrange for a parish staff member

to visit (page 209) ▶▶ Session 24 Assessment,

www.findinggod.com (page 210)


EngagE

Session

24

People for Others

SeSSion 24

OUTcOmES ▶▶ Explain how following the example of

Blessed Teresa of Calcutta can help us live holy lives. ▶▶ Identify the Corporal and Spiritual

Works of Mercy. ▶▶ State that being a peacemaker helps

us respond to the needs of others. ▶▶ Define beatified, contemplative,

and superior. Think about a time you were invited to share a special gift or talent. Perhaps you were asked to show a small child how to play a game or to perform at a family party. What were you invited to do? Why do you think you were asked? How did you respond? In what way did your service help build up the Kingdom of God?

Jesus, thank you for inviting us to spread your message of peace and love with others. May we always be willing to go wherever your Spirit leads us.

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Read aloud the text in the box on page 203. Give young people a few moments to reflect silently on the questions or to share their responses with a partner.

2 Get Started

PR AYER

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1 Set the Stage

LoyolaPress.

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here I am, lord Say:PDF It can be difficult to say that we are talented in a certain area Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ because doing so may seem boastful. The difference lies in our intention. Do we desire admiration or are we helping others and serving God? Have young people spend a few minutes writing down the talents and gifts they have received from God. Then have young people write about something they would love to do but aren’t sure they can. When all young people have finished, remind them that they are in the presence of trusted friends. Next, ask young people to stand up in turn and share first their known talents and then their not-so-sure dreams with the group. After each revelation, invite group members to offer encouraging comments and suggestions about turning the talent or dream into a form of service.

Ask young people to list their ringtones. Discuss why they chose their ringtones. Ask: Why do we like to be notified when someone calls or texts us? (Possible answer: so that we don’t miss anything) Say: Some scientists think people are becoming addicted to the “ping” of a text message or an e-mail. The sound gives them a small boost that says “You’re important.” God doesn’t have a cell phone. Ask: How does God “call” us? (Possible answers: through our conscience, our experiences, prayer, the Church, others) Say: Answering these calls from God can give us a much bigger boost than we receive through a text message or an e-mail. More importantly, it gives a boost to others and to the Kingdom of God. In this session we’re going to read about ways we can respond to God’s call.

prayer Pray aloud the prayer together. Then conclude by praying together the Sign of the Cross.

Go to www.findinggod.com/sessionextenders for an article on mercy and justice. You may wish to share this with the group.

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ExplORE

1 Begin In advance, locate images of a person in jail, a person alone at a party, and a person looking in the mirror unhappily. Begin by asking: What does it mean to be poor? (to have very little money) Say: right. now, let’s broaden the definition. What are some of our basic needs? (food, rest, shelter) Challenge young people to identify more abstract needs such as love, freedom, self-respect, and community. Then show each image in turn, asking: What basic need does this person lack? After discussing the images, say: Poverty comes in many forms. As Christians, we are called to see it and respond to it.

2 Connect Invite volunteers to read aloud the introductory paragraphs. Point out that Church leaders call on us to care for people in need. Write on the board the word marginalized and underline margin. Ask: What is a margin? (the area just outside a border) What does it mean to be “marginalized”? (to be an outsider) Say: Let’s read about someone who devoted her entire life to the marginalized. Have volunteers read aloud the section Blessed Teresa of Calcutta. Explain that as a result of British colonization, English is one of India’s official languages. Ask: What do you find most remarkable about Blessed Teresa of Calcutta’s life story? (Accept reasonable responses.)

our Catholic Character

Read aloud the feature. Invite people to share examples of contemporary people or organizations that care for people in need. Encourage young people to name ways that they can support this work. Say: When we serve the needs of others, we follow the example of all those in the Communion of Saints. Rights and Responsibilities

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Hearing the Cry of the Poor THROUGHOUT

Scripture we read about God’s concern for people who are poor. In Exodus we learn that God freed the Chosen People from slavery. In Deuteronomy, creditors are called upon to cancel debts after seven years so that no one in the community would be in need. The psalms assure us that the Lord hears the cry of the poor. And in the Gospel of Luke, we read the words that Jesus spoke when he began his public ministry—words first spoken by the prophet Isaiah. “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to bring glad tidings to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim liberty to captives and recovery of sight to the blind, to let the oppressed go free, and to proclaim a year acceptable to the Lord.”

Christians have always worked together to care for others in need. For example, in the Acts of the Apostles, we learn that the early Christians collected alms for widows, orphans, and others who were poor. Today, Church leaders call us to do the same—to stand up for and provide for the needs of those who are poor and marginalized.

Blessed Teresa of Calcutta

Blessed Teresa of Calcutta (1910–1997) wholeheartedly responded to the call to care for others. Teresa of Calcutta was born in what is now Macedonia. Her parents, who were of Albanian descent, named her Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu. By the time she was 12, Agnes knew that God was calling her to become a religious sister. At the age of 18, she Saints throughout history have heard God’s call to serve people who joined the Sisters of Loreto and traveled were poor and sick. In the fourth century, a Roman soldier named to a convent in Ireland where she learned Martin of Tours gave his cloak to a man who was shivering in the English so that she could teach in India. Shorty after beginning her career at Saint cold. Later that night Martin dreamed that he saw Jesus dressed Theresa’s School in India, Agnes made her in the cloak he had given to the man. This dream had a profound first vows and took the name Teresa—the impact on Martin, who converted to Christianity and later was Spanish spelling of the name Thèrésa—in chosen to be a bishop. In addition, Saint Frances of Rome, who lived honor of Thèrése of Lisieux, the patron in the 15th century, founded a community of women who dedicated saint of missionaries. Sister Teresa was themselves to caring for people who were poor. eventually named headmistress, or principal, of the school. Luke 4:18–19

Our Catholic Character

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The Spirit of the lord

InclusIon

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Visual

Read aloud the Scripture PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ EditorialIf_______ people in poverty you passage on page 204. have young people with Point out that the phrases visual impairments, modify “bring glad tidings to the poor,” the Begin activity by sharing “proclaim liberty to captives,” stories about people who are “recovery of sight to the blind,” experiencing various forms and “let the oppressed go free,” of poverty. are both metaphorical and literal. Ask young people to provide examples of the phrases’ metaphorical meanings. (Possible answers: people who are poor because they are lonely, people who are captives to unhealthy addictions, people who are blinded by racism or sexism, people who are oppressed because of their religious beliefs) Then have small groups identify ways they can share the Good News with people who may be victims of these situations. Solidarity


ExplORE A Call Within a Call

DEF IN E

In 1946 Sister Teresa was traveling by train to her annual retreat when she received what she termed “a call within a call.” She had an experience which led her to believe that Jesus wanted her to begin caring for people living in the slums of Calcutta, one of India’s largest cities. After receiving basic medical training, Sister Teresa began caring for people in need. Other women soon joined her. In 1950 she received permission from the pope to found a new religious community, the Missionaries of Charity. Sister Teresa frequently is called Mother Teresa because she was the longtime superior,or leader, of the community.

By the time Mother Teresa died in 1997, there were around 4,500 sisters staffing 610 missions in 123 countries all over the world. The work of the community, which continues today, includes caring for people who are sick and dying and who are living with HIV/AIDS. In 1979 Mother Teresa received the Noble Peace Prize, and in 2003 she was beatified by Pope John Paul II and given the name Blessed Teresa of Calcutta.

SACRED ART

R EM EM BE R

Th roughout his tor y, Ch ris tia ns have worked tog ether to ca re for people in need . Blessed Teres a of Ca lcutta is an example of someone who rem ained faithf ul to God’s ca ll to ca re for others, even though sh e ex perienced moments of doub t.

Faith and Doubt During her life, Mother Teresa remained faithful to prayer even though she experienced periods of doubt. Always honest about her faith journey and relationship with God, Mother Teresa provides a good example for us—she chose to remain faithful to what God had called her to do despite times of uncertainty. She followed God’s will for her by caring for the poorest of the poor and those who had been rejected by society.

Explore

One of the new religious community’s first works was to open a home for the dying, a place for people to receive free medical care and die with dignity. The next major initiatives were to open a home for people with Hansen’s disease and a house for children who were homeless or orphaned. As news spread, many others wanted to join the community, including men who wanted to become religious brothers and women who wanted to live a more contemplative, or prayerful, life. This growth allowed the Missionaries of Charity to begin working in other parts of the world.

superior, conte mplat ive, beati fied

Sister of Charity, Saint Louise de Marillac, ca. 1630.

Saint Louise de Marillac, who worked with Saint Vincent de Paul in Paris, France, also responded to God’s call to help others. In addition to providing charity, Vincent de Paul and Louise worked for long-term change. One way they did this was by founding the Congregation of the Mission and the Daughters of Charity, two religious communities that continue to care for people in need.

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Invite volunteers to read aloud the section A Call Within a Call. Ask: What surprises you most about Teresa’s call? (Possible answer: It was so specific.) Based on what you know, how would you describe her? (Possible answer: intuitive, decisive, high energy, action-oriented) Say: There is a difference between being impulsive and being decisive. Point out that an impulsive person acts on a whim, but a decisive person acts from knowledge. Say: In Teresa’s case, the knowledge she used to make her decisions came from God. Point out that the religious community founded by Blessed Teresa has received recognition for its work to care for people in need. Say: one of the greatest tributes to Blessed Teresa is that she is on the path to sainthood. The Church recognizes that she has lived a life worthy of emulation. Invite a volunteer to read aloud the section Faith and Doubt. Point out that many people of faith have experienced times of doubt and uncertainty. Say: Doubt is a sign that a person takes his or her faith seriously. It is a sign of active engagement.

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Saintly art Before the next session, have young people select a saint whose story PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ inspires them. If young people have difficulty selecting someone, encourage them to review the unit openers in their books. Say: Make an artwork that expresses qualities, characteristics, or behaviors of the saint that provide examples worth following. Encourage young people to make artworks that show their saints in action rather than just making portraits. During the next session, invite volunteers to share their artworks and to explain why the saints they chose are good examples of Christian living.

Read aloud the feature. Explain that before the founding of the Daughters of Charity, women in religious communities led private, or “cloistered,” lives. Say: The Daughters of Charity lived and worked among the people of the community. Invite young people to identify qualities of Saint Louise suggested by this artwork.

3 Close Say: God calls all of us to care for those in need. We can do this in many different ways. Invite young people to ask God silently how they might do so. Point out that God often speaks to us at times we least expect it. Say: remember to take time to listen to God in prayer every day.

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ExplORE

Works of Merc y

1 Begin Place a large bowl of an inviting treat before the group—the more aromatic the better. Then say: Let’s pray together the Act of Faith. When young people respond with uncertainty, say: You don’t seem focused. Ask: Is something distracting you? When young people indicate the treat, ask: Why is the treat more compelling than the praying the Act of Faith? (Possible answer: because the treat smells good) Say: The Church understands that the needs of the body are very strong and must be fulfilled before the needs of the spirit can be addressed. After everyone has a helping of the treat, we’ll learn more about helping people in body and spirit. Distribute portions of the snack to young people.

CHURCH

teachings always leads us to Christ. In Scripture, Jesus teaches us that when we care for the needs of others, we serve him as well. Then the king will say to those on his right, ‘Come, you who are blessed by my Father. Inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world. For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, a stranger and you welcomed me, naked and you clothed me, ill and you cared for me, in prison and you visited me.’ Then the righteous will answer him and say, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you drink? When did we see you a stranger and welcome you, or naked and clothe you? When did we see you ill or in prison, and visit you?’ And the king will say to them in reply, ‘Amen, I say to you, whatever you did for one of these least brothers of mine, you did for me.’ Matthew 25:34–40

2 Connect Invite a volunteer to read aloud the article title, the introductory paragraph, and the Scripture passage. Say: Parables use stories and images to illustrate larger messages. They can be understood literally and metaphorically. Write on the board the words hungry, thirsty, and poor. Ask: Where in Matthew are these words used metaphorically? Say: Hint: It happened on a “mount.” (in the Beatitudes) Say: In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus says, “Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for justice” and “Blessed are the poor in spirit.” He wants his listeners to realize that hunger, thirst, and poverty can apply to the spirit as well as to the body. Reread the Scripture passage on page 206. Encourage young people to explain how each condition might be interpreted metaphorically.

our Catholic Character

Read aloud the feature. Have young people turn to page 274 in the back of their books. Pray together the Prayer for Generosity. Say: This is a great prayer to take to heart.

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Our Catholic Character Saint Ignatius of Loyola believed that God’s loving generosity is revealed through the creation of the world and in Jesus, his Son. He believed that God’s generosity challenges us to be generous toward others so that we can mirror God’s love to those around us. In this spirit, Ignatius of Loyola gave the Church his Prayer for Generosity, a prayer in which we ask God to help us humbly and generously serve the needs of others.

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Session 24 Blm Works at Work Provide each young person with the Session 24 PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ Blackline Master [T-384]. Then assign each young person one of the Corporal Works of Mercy. Ask young people to spend time before the next session researching local organizations that live out their assigned Works of Mercy. Have young people choose one and complete the BLM by using information about the organizations they select. During the next session, invite young people to share what they discovered. Then collect the BLMs and have two volunteers work together to photocopy and collate the pages, add a cover, and create booklets, one for each young person. Distribute the booklets and encourage young people to share them with their families and choose an organization to serve as volunteers. Family and Community


ExplORE Spiritual Works of Mercy The Church also guides us to perform Spiritual Works of Mercy, which are ways by which we can care for people’s emotional and spiritual needs. Instruct We can share our faith with others. We can share our knowledge by tutoring or teaching a skill.

Advise We can refuse to participate in gossip, discrimination, or unjust behavior and call others to stop or avoid such behavior.

Corporal Works of Mercy The Church has given us the Corporal Works of Mercy as a way to help us respond to the call to serve the needs of others. The Corporal Works of Mercy are kind acts by which we can care for our neighbors’ physical and material needs. donating to a food pantry or volunteering at a soup kitchen.

Shelter the Homeless We can volunteer at a shelter or support organizations that serve people who are homeless. Clothe the Naked Ways to clothe the naked include donating clothing or baby supplies to organizations that help individuals or families in need. Visit the Sick and Imprisoned We can reach out to the lonely. We can visit nursing homes, and we can send cards to people who are sick. We can support prison ministries and agencies that fight injustice.

Give Alms to the Poor We can give alms to organizations that serve people who are poor. We can share our time and talents.

Comfort We can listen, offer sympathy to those who have experienced a hardship, or be present to those who are struggling or in pain.

Forgive We can receive the grace to forgive others through celebrating the Sacrament of Reconciliation. We can forgive by choosing not to hold grudges. We can be kind even to those who aren’t kind to us. We can find ways to make peace with those who have hurt us.

Bear Wrongs with Patience We can turn away from seeking revenge when someone hurts us, by praying for those who have wronged us, and by giving people the benefit of the doubt.

Explore

Feed the Hungry Ways to feed the hungry include

Console We can assure those in doubt or despair of the loving presence of God.

RE ME MBER

ways by The Works of Mercy are the needs which we can care for ctice of others. When we pra d to these Works, we res pon the most God’s call to care for vul nerable among us.

Bury the Dead We can attend wakes and funerals, provide food baskets to hospice care centers, and send sympathy cards.

READY for Confirmation Confirmation, like all the sacraments, is not about what you are doing but what God is doing through you. Know that the Holy Spirit that descended upon the Apostles at Pentecost is the same Spirit that you receive when you are anointed with Chrism at Confirmation. The Gifts of the Holy Spirit that you receive give you the strength to share in God’s work of caring for the needs of others. These gifts also empower you to practice the Works of Mercy and in doing so build up the Kingdom of God.

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Teach Thyself Point out that the first Spiritual Work of Mercy is to instruct and explain PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ that the first step in performing any of the Works of Mercy is to instruct ourselves about the needs of others. Have young people visit the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Web site devoted to combating poverty at http://old.usccb.org/cchd/povertyusa. Ask young people to complete the poverty quiz. When young people have completed the quiz, discuss their results. Ask which poverty fact most surprised them. Then ask what young people think it means that so many people live in poverty in one of the world’s wealthiest nations.

Invite volunteers to read aloud the section Corporal Works of Mercy. Remind people that while the Corporal Works of Mercy refer to people’s physical needs, they can also refer to other needs that people have. Say: We can visit people imprisoned by loneliness, for example, by spending time with people who live in nursing homes. Ask young people to name ways that they can put each Corporal Work of Mercy into practice. Have volunteers read aloud the section Spiritual Works of Mercy. Have young people name ways that they can put each Spiritual Work of Mercy into practice. Say: When we put the Works of Mercy into practice, we build up the Kingdom of God by sharing Jesus’ peace and love with people who need it. Arrange young people into small groups and have groups find examples from newspapers and magazines of different ways that people live out the Works of Mercy. After giving groups time to work, ask volunteers to share the examples that they found. Conclude by sharing the ministries in your parish that carry out the Works of Mercy. Emphasize ways that young people can get involved in this work.

Ready for Confirmation

Read aloud the feature. Have young people tell about times they found the courage or strength to care for someone else when it would have been easier not to. Suggest that whenever they receive a thank-you for an act of kindness, they mentally “pass it on” to the Holy Spirit for giving them the strength to act.

3 Close Have young people silently ask God to continue helping them practice the Corporal and Spiritual Works of Mercy in their daily lives.

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REflEcT

Prayer

prayer Follow the steps to guide young people through the prayer on page 208.

Young People’s Page Prepare Pray the prayer in advance to become familiar with it. Select young people to pray aloud the Family, Community, and World sections of the reflection. Have the volunteers review their parts of the prayer ahead of time. Pray Invite volunteers to read aloud the page title and the introductory paragraphs. Ask: Which saint is known for being a peacemaker? (Saint Francis of Assisi) Remind young people that another prayer they can take to heart is the Peace Prayer attributed to Saint Francis. Then say: For Jesus’ followers, the Beatitudes are a way of life. They call us to look at the world from a perspective that the rest of the world doesn’t always share. one of the Beatitudes describes the reward for those who work for peace. Today we’re going to reflect on this Beatitude. Have young people prepare to pray by quieting themselves and finding a comfortable position. Then say: Let’s listen to the reflections and spend a few moments of silence after each one to consider our own personal call to be peacemakers. Pause for a moment and then indicate for the first reader to begin. After each paragraph, allow time for reflection before reading the Beatitude. Have young people conclude the prayer by exchanging the Sign of Peace. Say: As we continue our session, let’s reflect on ways we can share Jesus’ peace with others.

Make Peace Beatitude Reflection

Family We don’t get to choose our families. Our parents, brothers, sisters, and othe r relatives are all given to us. We journey together through good times and bad, thro ugh the ups and downs of life. Nob ody’s family is perfect, and the peace we desire is not alwa ys present. Each of us, how ever, in our own way, is called to work for peace at hom e. How can you be a peacemaker in your family? Blessed are the peacem akers, for they will be calle d child ren of God.

One

way to respond to the needs of others is by being a peacemaker. We make peace in the world by speaking out against violence and by living a virtuous life. In the Sermon on the Mount in Matthew’s Gospel, Jesus teaches that conversion of heart, from anger and hatred to true love of one’s neighbor, is essential for Christian living. We are to love our enemies and pray for our persecutors, which the works of Mercy encourage us to do. Another Scripture passage reminds us to reconcile with our brother or sister before bringing our gift to the altar. Acts of conversion and reconciliation form the basis of fruitful prayer. Through prayerful forgiveness from the depth of a pure heart that seeks the kingdom before all else, we learn to pray as the children of God.

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Community Peacemakers learn to love their enemies as Jesus taught us. It’s easy to pret end you don’t have enem ies, but there are likely people who m you don’t like and try to avoid. Your enemy might be a class mate who, even without saying a word, reminds you that you’re not part of the “in” group. Or the enemy might be som eone you tease because he or she look s or talks or dresses differently than you do. Wha t gesture of peace can you offer toda y? Blessed are the peacem akers, for they will be calle d child ren of God. World Peace doesn’t happ en by itself. Peace begins with people who are committ ed to work for justice, not just for themselves but for ever yone . When you choose to buy clothing from companies that treat workers fairly, you help create peace. When you volunteer to assist others in need, you help create peace. When you take time to learn abou t people from another country or religious tradition and reac h out in friendship, you are helping create peace. How will you work for justice to create peac e? End by exchanging a sign of peace.

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Reflection to action Invite volunteers to share PDF Signoff: Production _______ peacemaking suggestions that came to mind during the reflection. Ask young people to name obstacles that might get in the way of that peacemaking effort. Then have young people work together to come up with strategies for overcoming the obstacles. Say: Sometimes being a peacemaker can be challenging, but we can always rely on members of the Church to help us respond to the call to discipleship. Rights and Responsibilities

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coaching Young peopleEditorial to pray Design _______ _______ Explain that stress is a state of inner conflict, which is why people say “I am [or am not] at peace with my decision.” Suggest that when young people feel stress, they ask God to help them make peace. They should begin by clearly identifying the two warring desires or demands within. Next, they should ask God how to reconcile these two “enemies” and listen for his response.


REflEcT

E R E H W t In

1 Begin

Do I Fi

ce a year: n at least on e this questio t of us hear at at least on os th m y , el od lik s ho child up?” It’ Throughout swer is OK en you grow an st wh ne be ho to is u want in ow.” And th “What do yo will lead us er “I don’t kn st that God ve the answ , we can tru ld time we’ll gi fo un es use as our liv to give beca rection. the right di

m es by F r. Ja S.J. Mar tin,

Discovering Who You’re Meant to Be Reflect

We know what Jesus was like as an adult. But what was he like as a boy? He must have had the same experiences that all kids have. He ate the meals that his family made for him. He had to learn how to read. Saint Joseph taught him how to saw wood and hammer a nail the right way. Like all of us, he got sick from time to time. He got sad when things didn’t turn out the way he hoped. And he was happy when he was with his friends in Nazareth and could play with them. (Maybe he was especially happy when the school day ended!)

(and well-paid!). Finally, I realized that God wanted me to be a priest. That’s what I really wanted. The signs were there all along. But it took me awhile to understand them. Have you ever thought about the person whom you want to be? Think about it. God showed Jesus. He showed me. He’ll show you too.

Jesus must have gradually discovered who he was. He listened to what was in his heart. When he saw people who were poor, he wanted to free them from poverty. When he saw people who were sick, he wanted to heal them. When he saw people who were lonely, he wanted to help them find friends. He started to act on these desires and do the things God the Father wanted him to do. He told people how much God loved them and how they should love others. He healed the sick, and he helped lonely people feel part of the community again. All this took time. It was awhile before Jesus discovered who he was meant to be.

2 Connect

Vocation Reflection On a separate sheet of paper, make a list of all the talents and skills that you feel you possess—nothing is too insignificant. Reflect on your list. Ask yourself the following questions as you reflect.

What am I supposed to be? That’s the big question growing up. When I was a boy, I wanted to be an architect. That seemed cool and creative and fun. Then I studied business in college and worked for a big company. That job choice seemed solid and respectable

What kinds of vocations or careers might suit a person with these talents and skills? When I grow up, how might I be able to use these talents and skills to help my family, my community, or the world? If not for a vocation or career, why do I think God may have given me these skills and talents?

FR. JAMES MARTIN, S.J., is a Jesuit priest and best-selling author of several books, including My Life with the Saints. Session 24 > People for Others

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Read aloud the introductory text. Ask: How have you grown in awareness of the plan that God has for you? (Possible answers: through my life experiences, by listening to my conscience) Say: God has a plan for each of us, and the more we listen to him, the more faithful we will be at following that plan. Ask: When do you think Jesus figured out that he was God’s Son? (Answers will vary.) Say: The author of today’s article has some ideas about this question. Let’s read to see what they are.

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Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign Arrange for a parish staff member to visit the class and share his or her PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ own story of vocational discernment. Ahead of time, invite the speaker to organize his or her talk around the signs that he or she recognized, or now recognizes, as nudges from God. Ask the speaker to describe obstacles that threatened to prevent him or her from following God’s call. After the presentation, include time for young people to ask questions of the speaker.

Invite volunteers to read aloud the section Discovering Who You’re Meant to Be. Discuss with young people the idea that Jesus gradually discovered who he was. Have young people imagine the Father’s joy as he watched the truth dawn on his beloved Son. Say: God rejoices as we discover who we are too. Ask: What kinds of actions brought Jesus closer to the truth about himself? (listening to his heart; helping people who were poor, sick, and lonely; sharing God’s message with others) Say: When we do these things, we get closer and closer to finding out who we are too. Give young people time to complete the activity independently. Afterward, invite volunteers to share their responses.

3 Close Write on the board this sentence starter: When I grow up, I want to be . Have young people complete it with a descriptive phrase rather than the name of a job or a profession. Encourage young people to offer phrases that would make God smile.

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W h a t ’s

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1 Begin What’s What? Have young people complete the activity individually or with a partner. Remind young people that they can use the page references to help them answer the questions.

Review the concepts from this session by matching the descriptions on the right with the Works of Mercy listed on the left.

Say What? Ask volunteers to read aloud the terms and to use each one in a sentence. Review the terms in the Glossary if necessary.

Respond

2 Connect

Feed the Hungry PAGE 207

a. Assure those in doubt or despair of the loving presence of God.

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Shelter the Homeless PAGE 207

b. Share our faith with others.

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Clothe the Naked PAGE 207

c. Volunteer at a shelter.

Visit the Sick and Imprisoned

d. Offer sympathy to those who have experienced a hardship.

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PAGE 207

now What? Read aloud the section. Invite each young person to respond to the question independently.

3 Go in Peace Have young people collect their materials and return them to the appropriate places. Encourage young people to remain mindful of the Now What? challenge during the week. Say: The Church has given us many tools to help us respond to the needs of people who are suffering and vulnerable. We can rely on God’s grace and the strength of the Holy Spirit to practice the Works of Mercy.

1

Give Alms to the Poor PAGE 207

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Bury the Dead PAGE 207

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Instruct PAGE 207

g. Donate to a food pantry or volunteer at a soup kitchen.

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Advise PAGE 207

h. Refuse to participate in unjust behavior and call on others to do the same.

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Console PAGE 207

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Comfort PAGE 207

f. Attend wakes and funerals.

i. Pray for those who have wronged us. j. Donate baby clothing and supplies. k. Choose not to hold grudges.

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Forgive PAGE 207

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Bear Wrongs with Patience PAGE 207

l. Give alms to organizations that serve people who are poor.

Say What?

Now What?

Know the definitions of these terms.

God calls us to respond to the needs of people who are suffering and vulnerable. What can you do this week to respond to this call? Write your ideas on a separate sheet of paper.

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e. Visit nursing homes; send cards to people who are sick.

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Service: When I Was hungry Remind young people that one way to care for people in need is to PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ practice the Corporal Works of Mercy. Assist young people in choosing a local shelter for people who are homeless. Contact the organization to ascertain its daily food needs, then have young people supply a portion of a meal for the shelter’s residents. For example, young people might make sandwiches, cookies, or fruit salad. If possible, arrange for young people to prepare the food together in the school or parish kitchen. Then arrange for young people to deliver the food to the shelter and help serve the residents. The Poor and Vulnerable

Session assessment Option An assessment for this session can be found at www.findinggod.com.

3-Minute Retreat Give young people an opportunity for quiet meditation at www.loyolapress.com/retreat.

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p l a n a h E a D : Get Ready for Session 25 Consult the catechist preparation pages to prepare for Session 25 and determine any materials you will need.


CateChist PreParation S e S S io n 2 5

Celebrating Pentecost 3-Minute Retreat Before you prepare the session, pause and be still. Take three deep breaths and be aware of the loving presence of God, who is with you on this journey.

Knowing and Sharing Your Faith in Session 25 Consider how Scripture and Tradition can deepen your understanding of session content.

Scripture Acts of the Apostles 2:42 They devoted themselves to the teaching of the apostles and to the communal life, to the breaking of the bread and to the prayers.

Matthew 10:26–33 reminds us that we should not be afraid. It tells us to share Christ’s message that God helps and comforts those in need.

Tradition

After they experienced the descent of the Holy Spirit on Pentecost, the early Christians understood the need to practice their “new” way of life. They understood that it was necessary to listen and to learn, to break bread and to pray. We are called to live as disciples in the same way as the early Christians. We continue to devote ourselves to the teaching of the Apostles and their successors. The breaking of the bread is the summit of our Christian life. Our prayer life keeps us connected to God, the source of life.

The Ascension of Jesus represents the entrance of Jesus’ humanity into divine glory. Ten days later, as Luke describes it, Jesus Christ poured out the Holy Spirit on the disciples, resulting in the birth of the Church. The mission of the Spirit is inseparable from the mission of Jesus who is the visible image of the invisible God. The mission of Jesus Christ and the Holy Spirit is brought to completion in the Church, which the Spirit builds up, animates, and sanctifies. The Spirit reveals Christ to us, unites us to him, and brings us to life in him.

Questions

Catholic Social Teaching

Reflection

How have I experienced the Holy Spirit in my life? In what ways does my discipleship resemble that of the early Christians?

Concluding Prayer

Speak to God, using the words of this prayer or your own. Faithful God, thank you for the gift of the Holy Spirit who calls me to follow your Son. Grant me the grace to live and love as the disciples who have gone before me.

In this session the integrated Catholic Social Teaching themes are Option for the Poor and Vulnerable and Call to Family, Community, and Participation. See page 177b for an explanation of these themes.

Window on the Catechism Pentecost and the action of the Holy Spirit in the Church are described in CCC 731–747.

General Directory for Catechesis The transmission of Revelation by the Church through the work of the Holy Spirit is described in GDC 42–45.

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caTEchIST pREpaRaTIOn

One-Hour Session Planner SeSSion 25

Celebrating Pentecost Prayer in Session 25

Session Theme: Pentecost reminds us that as members of the Church, we support one another in fulfilling the Church’s mission.

Young people are invited to experience an online, Scripture-based 3-Minute Retreat at the end of the session. The prayers give young people opportunities to experience a variety of forms of prayer. Session 25 includes a prayer of thanks and reflection on Pentecost. Follow the Prepare directions on the Catechist Guide page before sharing with young people.

Before This Session ▶▶

Determine whether you will use the Unit Assessment option listed on page 218.

▶▶ Determine whether you will also discuss the Pentecost seasonal pages in the

back of the Young People’s Book. ▶▶ Bookmark your Bible to Isaiah 61:1–2. Place the open Bible in your

prayer space. ▶▶ Read the Guide for this session, choose any additional If Time Allows activities

that you might have time to complete, and gather the listed materials. StepS

ApproximAte time

Engage Celebrating Pentecost

10 minutes Page 211

Explore

30–40 minutes

Proclaiming Christ Anew

Pages 212–213

The New Evangelization

Pages 214–215

Reflect Prayer: Come, Holy spirit, Come! Where Do I Fit In?

10–15 minutes Page 216

Page 217

Respond What’s What?

Take IT Home

10–15 minutes Page 218

Homework options: Saintly Examples

Page 212

Know Thy Audience

Page 214

materials REQUIRED

OpTIOnal

▶▶ Bible (pages 211, 213)

▶▶ Information about any regional or

▶▶ Plant seeds, paper cups, soil (page 212) ▶▶ Theme song and past attendees of

World Youth Day (page 213)

diocesan gatherings for adolescents (page 213) ▶▶ Session 25 BLM, T-385 (page 215) ▶▶ Writing supplies (page 216) ▶▶ Containers with tight-fitting lids

(page 217) ▶▶ Invite parish priest (page 217) ▶▶ Session 25 Assessment,

www.findinggod.com (page 218) ▶▶ Unit 5 Assessment, T-386–T-388

(page 218)

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EngagE

Session

25

g Celebratin Pentecost

Blessed Pope John Paul II. ▶▶ Explain the major concepts that are

part of the New Evangelization. ▶▶ State that a sequence is a piece of

liturgical poetry that expands on and explains the meaning of the liturgical celebration.

believers who share in God’s infinite wisdom through Jesus’ teachings and the guidance of the Holy Spirit. Each year, on the Feast of Pentecost, 50 days after Easter, we celebrate the birth of the Church. The Pentecost event, which we remember each year on Pentecost Sunday, occurred nine days after Jesus’ Ascension into Heaven. On this day, Mary and the Apostles were gathered together in one room. Here is what Scripture tells us happened next:

Acts of the Apostles 2:2–4

▶▶ Define Fruits of the Holy Spirit and

Jubilee Year.

Just like the Apostles, you can share the Good News of Jesus Christ with the world.

The Holy Spirit came down upon the Apostles and made it possible for them to share God’s Word with people of many different languages. Through the Apostles, with Peter as their leader, the Good News of Salvation quickly spread.

What part of Christ’s life

On Pentecost Sunday we celebrate the work of the Holy Spirit in the past and in the present—in the lives of those who came before us, in our own lives, and in the lives of others. We go forth as people filled with grace, guided by the Holy Spirit to serve the Kingdom of God.

message of love? Healing?

and message speaks most profoundly to you? The Forgiveness? Salvation?

Read aloud the text in the box on page 211. Give young people a few moments to reflect silently on the questions or to share their responses with a partner.

2 Get Started

PR AYER Holy Spirit, help us share the Good News of Jesus Christ in our own unique ways. Empower us to develop our gifts and talents for the service of God’s kingdom.

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1 Set the Stage

Why is this message so important to you?

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OUTcOmES ▶▶ Identify major events in the life of

AS the Church, we are the People of God, a community of

And suddenly there came from the sky a noise like a strong driving wind, and it filled the entire house in which they were. Then there appeared to them tongues as of fire, which parted and came to rest on each one of them. And they were filled with the holy Spirit and began to speak in different tongues, as the Spirit enabled them to proclaim.”

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pentecost news Reports Have small groups work together to prepare and present news reports PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ about Pentecost. Encourage young people to select different roles, such as eyewitnesses, Apostles, bystanders, reporters, and news anchors. Remind young people to answer the questions who, what, when, where, and why in their news reports.

Invite young people to share experiences of working with a group to complete a task. Ask: What helped you work together to accomplish your task? (Possible answer: We had a common goal.) Say: As members of the Church, we rely on the Holy Spirit to bond us together. As members of the Church, we support one another in fulfilling the Church’s mission. Invite volunteers to read aloud the section Celebrating Pentecost. Ask: What does the Church celebrate on the Feast of Pentecost? (the birthday of the Church) Say: On this feast day, we give thanks to God for sending us the Holy Spirit. Ask: What does the Holy Spirit help us do? (Possible answer: remain faithful to God; gain the strength to serve others) Say: In this session we’re going to learn about the Feast of Pentecost.

prayer Pray aloud the prayer. Conclude by praying the Sign of the Cross. Go to www.findinggod.com/sessionextenders for an article on symbols of the Holy Spirit. You may wish to share this with the group.

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ExplORE

1 Begin Distribute plant seeds, paper cups, and soil. Have young people plant the seeds, then ask: What do these seeds need to become plants? (sunlight, water, care) Say: Through our words and actions, we cooperate with God in planting the seeds of his love in the hearts of the people with whom we interact. The Holy Spirit helps nurture these seeds. As disciples, we help others grow in their relationship with God. Encourage young people to take their seeds home and nurture them.

2 Connect Invite volunteers to read aloud the article title and the first two paragraphs. Ask: What contemporary circumstances prevent people from being open to hearing Christ’s message? (Possible answer: a culture rooted in materialism) Invite volunteers to read aloud the section Blessed Pope John Paul II. Point out that through his attendance at the Second Vatican Council, Pope John Paul II had a solid understanding of the issues that the modern Church faced. Say: Pope John Paul II was known for his extensive travel schedule. He went all over the world to connect with Catholics from various countries and cultures. By doing so, he reminded us that the pope is both the Bishop of Rome and the shepherd of the People of God all over the world. Ask: For what else was he known? (as a peacemaker and as someone who lived a life of openness and charity)

our Catholic Character Read aloud the feature. Explain that for a miracle to be “scientifically proven” means that medical and scientific experts must verify that the act is not explainable by science. Remind young people that we can always turn to the members of the Communion of Saints for examples of Christian living.

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Proclaiming w e n A t s i r h C IN

many ways, the circumstances that the members of the Church encounter today are similar to those faced by the Apostles at Pentecost. We are called to proclaim the message of Christ to a world that may not readily accept it. With Christ’s strength, we can go forward with conviction and compassion. We can look for guidance from the Holy Spirit and from other Spirit-led people in our Church whose lives are an example for us.

Blessed Pope John Paul II Karol Wojtyla was born on May 18, 1920, near Krakow, Poland. As a young boy, he enjoyed skiing and swimming. During college he was interested in theater and poetry. When his school was closed by Nazi troops, Wojtyla began studying at a secret seminary run by the archbishop of Krakow. Wojtyla was ordained in 1946. Father Wojtyla was soon

Our Catholic Character The Church follows a process to beatify and canonize a person who has lived a life of heroic virtue. During the process, two miracles must be proven to be attributed to the intercession of the person—miracles that are instant, able to be proven scientifically, complete, and permanent. Upon canonization, the person is recognized as a saint. As part of the process, experts research the person’s life and gather testimonials. In the case of Pope John Paul II, four volumes of information were gathered, and 100 witnesses were interviewed.

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Pope John Paul II

recognized as a leading thinker and participated in the Second Vatican Council. Wojtyla was named a bishop, then an archbishop, and, eventually, a cardinal. For 456 years, from 1522–1978, all the popes had been Italian. In 1978, the cardinals of the Church gathered in Rome and selected Cardinal Wojtyla of Poland to be pope. Wojtyla took the name John Paul II and became the 264th pope. Pope John Paul II was known as a peacemaker and as someone who lived a life of openness and charity. Pope John Paul II spoke out against war, violence, and capital punishment. He was a defender of the dignity of human life and an advocate for human rights. While pope, he was instrumental in bringing about the fall of communism in Eastern Europe. Often recognized as the pilgrim pope because of his travels to more than 100 countries, Pope John Paul II attracted huge crowds wherever he went. On April 2, 2005, Pope John Paul II passed away. From the evening of April 2 until his funeral on April 8, more than three million people came to Rome to pay homage to him in Saint Peter’s Basilica.

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Saintly Examples

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attention

Before the next session, have PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ EditorialIf_______ planting partners you young people research the life work with young people who of someone who has recently have attention differences, been named a saint. You invite them to help you may wish to provide a list of distribute the materials that people who have recently been are part of the Begin activity. canonized. Ask young people to write a two-paragraph biography about the person, including information about how he or she served God, the miracles that have been attributed to the person, and how young people can follow the new saint’s example of discipleship. During the next session, invite young people to share their reports.


ExplORE World Youth Day In 1984, Pope John Paul II announced that 1985 would be a Jubilee Year for the Catholic Church. The term jubilee has been used in the Church since the 1300s to refer to a holy year, a year in which the pope calls people to witness to their faith in specific ways. Aware of the rising number of youth in the Church, Pope John Paul II invited young people from around the world to travel to Rome and gather in Saint Peter’s Square for Palm Sunday. More than 300,000 young people responded. After attending this first unofficial World Youth Day, the pope invited the youth to return home to live in virtue and share their renewed faith.

The events at each International World Youth Day take their inspiration from a theme derived from Scripture. For example, in 1993, the theme was “I came that they might have life and have it more abundantly.” (John 10:10) During each celebration, it’s common to see flags from the world’s nations along with singing, dancing, praying, worshiping, and the honoring of both the cultural diversity and the religious unity of the young People of God. Here is an excerpt from Pope John Paul’s message to the participants of the 1993 World Youth Day: At this stage of history, the liberating message of the Gospel of life has been put into your hands. And the mission of proclaiming it to the ends of the earth is now passing to your generation. . . . The Church needs your energies, your enthusiasm, your youthful ideals, in order to make the Gospel of life penetrate the fabric of society, transforming people’s hearts and the structures of society in order to create a civilization of true justice and love. Now more than ever, in a world that is often without light and without the courage of noble ideals, people need the fresh, vital spirituality of the Gospel.

PAST: The orig ins of the desi gnat ion of a year as a Jubi lee Year come from the Old Testament book of Levi ticus. According to Jewish law duri ng bibl ical times, ever y 50th year, farm land was to rem ain unplanted, mor tgage debts were to be settled, and slaves were to be free d. The Catholic Chu rch adapted this trad ition in the 1300 s. PRE

SEN T: In 2009 Pope Benedict XVI officially opened a Jubi lee Year for Priests. This Jubi lee coincided with the 150t h anniversary of the deat h of Saint John Vian ney. The Holy Father called for a year of prayer and renewal that invit ed Catholics to pray for priests, encourage entr y into the vocations, and deepen thei r love and devotion for the Euch arist and all the sacr aments.

Explore

On December 20, 1985, the Holy Father announced the institution of World Youth Day as a regular event. The first official World Youth Day was held in 1986. From that year forward, International World Youth Day has been held every two to three years, in locations such as the Philippines, Spain, Poland, and the United States.

Past Meets Present

DE FI NE Jubilee Yea r

RE ME MBER

st of Each yea r, on the Fea te the Pentecost, we celebra birt h of the Chu rch. l II was Blessed Pope Joh n Pau showed a Chu rch leader who ssage us how to sha re the me ion and of Chr ist with convict compas sion.

World Youth Day is one of the many blessings that Blessed Pope John Paul II gave to the People of God.

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host a Rally Obtain from your catechetical leader information about any PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ regional or diocesan gatherings for adolescents. After reviewing the information with young people, work with your catechetical leader to have young people organize and sponsor a mini youth rally for children in your catechetical program. The rally might include activities such as presentations, games, songs, and service projects. Family and Community

SEaSOnal SESSIOn pentecost Work with young people through pages 243–246 to learn more about Pentecost. This special session can take up to one hour to complete.

Invite volunteers to read aloud the section World Youth Day. Draw young people’s attention to the term Jubilee Year. Point out that the celebratory nature of Jubilee Years is rooted in Scripture. Read aloud Isaiah 61:1–2. Then say: The last Jubilee Year was in 2000. Explain that the Church marked this occasion in various ways, such as through prayer and service. Say: To remind us that social justice is an important component of our lives as Catholics, the Church also participated in an initiative asking governments to forgive the debts of developing nations. Share with young people information about the upcoming World Youth Day. If possible, play the theme song for the event and invite attendees from recent World Youth Days to share their stories about their experiences. Say: Pope John Paul II had a great respect for young people. He believed that your joy and enthusiasm reflects the creative joy of God. Draw young people’s attention to the first line of the pope’s message from 1993. Ask: How does it make you feel to hear the pope say that “the liberating message of the Gospel of life” is in your hands? (Answers will vary.)

Past meets Present

Read aloud the feature. Say: Saint John Vianney was a remarkable priest. People came from all over the world to seek his counsel. It is said that he heard confessions for 16 hours a day but never lost patience.

3 Close Give young people a moment to call to mind the spirit-led people in their lives who model Christian discipleship. Say: Take a moment to pray a prayer of thanks to God for the example these people provide us. After giving young people time to pray, say: I encourage you to thank these people for living such faith-filled lives.

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ExplORE

1 Begin Write on the board a three-column chart with the headings Whisper, Speaking Voice, and Scream. Discuss situations in which each voice is appropriate. Write on the board young people’s suggestions. Then say: Sometimes a whisper is more effective than using a loud voice. Ask: Why? (Possible answer: People have to pay more attention to hear someone whisper.) Point out that the Church calls us to use various voices in the work of evangelization. Say: let’s find out more by reading the article.

2 Connect Invite volunteers to read aloud the section The New Evangelization. Ask: Why might people be indifferent about their faith? (Possible answer: They are more interested in worldly concerns.) Ask: What does the term new Evangelization describe? (our call to serve as evangelists, both to those who have not yet heard the Gospel as well as to traditionally Christian countries that need to hear the Gospel anew) Invite volunteers to explain the principles of the New Evangelization using their own words. (Possible answer: Sharing Jesus’ love with others is at the heart of the new Evangelization. Even as young people, we are responsible for serving the Church as evangelists. We don’t have to travel to foreign lands to be evangelists. The goal of the new Evangelization is to share with others the heart of the Gospel message. The new Evangelization is not a one-time event; it is a lifelong process of helping others grow in their relationship with God.)

Sacred art

Read aloud the feature. Ask: Why are doves and tongues of flame good symbols for the Holy Spirit? (Possible answer: Doves are symbols of peace, and the Holy Spirit fills us with the warmth and light of God’s love.)

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The New Evangelization POPE John Paul II realized that one of the greatest problems facing the Church is that some people are indifferent about faith—they don’t care to hear about Jesus and his message of Salvation. The pope taught that Catholics can respond to this indifference by showing how living as a Christian gives meaning to life. Pope John Paul II used the term New Evangelization to describe our call to serve as evangelists, both to those who have not yet heard the Gospel, as well as to traditional Christian countries who need to hear the Gospel anew. In his teaching, the pope presented these principles for the New Evangelization.

The New Evangelization is Christ-centered, founded on Jesus Christ and his Gospel. the responsibility of all the People of God, not only those in religious vocations. for all places on earth, not just for foreign missions. for individuals as well as entire cultures. the teaching of the Gospel, of catechesis, and of the moral and social teachings of the Church. a way of spirituality that calls us to know Christ and to make him known to all people.

SACRED ART

The Coming of the Holy Spirit is an oil painting that shows the descent of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost. The waves overhead represent the rush of wind that accompanied the flames. The dove represents the Holy Spirit. It is important to note that the Apostles themselves form a heart—a common symbol that represents the love that Jesus has for all of us and the love that the Apostles had for Jesus. The joined arms of the two Apostles in the center also form a heart shape. The faceless apostles of many shades reminds us that the Holy Spirit has come to and remains with all of us. The Coming of the Holy Spirit, Soichi Watanabe, 1996.

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Know Thy audience After the session, have young people call to mind someone they know PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ who is indifferent to his or her faith. Ask young people to brainstorm how they might cast the message of Jesus’ love in language that is related to that person’s interests. For example, if the person they think of loves to ski, the message might be expressed as “Come to the Kingdom of God, where the snow is pure and the lift tickets are free.” Encourage young people to be as creative as they can. During the next session, invite volunteers to share their messages.


ExplORE Bearing Fruit

Pontifical Council for Promoting New Evangelization

Explore

Pope Benedict XVI, the successor of Pope John Paul II, has reminded Catholics of the need to have a clear understanding of our faith. Only in this way can we prepare ourselves to be a sign of Jesus’ love to the world. On September 21, 2010, Pope Benedict XVI wrote an apostolic letter that officially established an office of the Roman Curia called the Pontifical Council for Promoting New Evangelization. This office seeks to turn words into action—to help Catholics around the world be regenerated by the power of the Holy Spirit so that they can give witness to the saving grace and truth that is Jesus Christ. One of the specific responsibilities of this office is to study and promote the use of modern technology in the work of evangelization.

Turn to page 266. Read the section Fruits of the Holy Spirit. Then take a moment to as yourself, “Which Fruit of the Holy Spirit is most present in my life today? What evidence of this fruit do I see?” Write your answers on the lines.

The Gifts and Fruits of the Holy Spirit Like the Holy Spirit descending upon the Apostles at Pentecost, the Holy Spirit has always inspired people to help serve the Church. This same Holy Spirit is at the center of our lives, ready to help us serve others in the same way. To help us, the Holy Spirit sustains us with gifts that make it possible for us to do what God asks of us. These Gifts of the Holy Spirit are wisdom, understanding, counsel, piety, fortitude, knowledge, and fear of the Lord. The Fruits of Holy Spirit are signs that show us that the Holy Spirit is active in our life. The more receptive we are to the Holy Spirit in our life, the more we will experience the fruits of God’s presence. The Fruits of the Holy Spirit are love, patience, faithfulness, joy, kindness, gentleness, peace, generosity, and self-control.

DEF IN E Fr uit s of the Ho

ly Spirit

R EM EM BE R

We are ca lled to be regenerated by the power of the Holy Spiri t and to give witness to the sa ving grace and truth that is Jes us Ch ris t. The Holy Spirit is at the center of ou r lives, ready to help us.

READY for Confirmation The introduction to the Rite of Confirmation tells us that through the Sacrament of Confirmation, we are enriched with a special strength of the Holy Spirit and bound even more closely to the Church. As confirmed Catholics, we are called to spread and defend the faith through our words and actions. Session 25 > Celebrating Pentecost

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Session 25 Blm Danger ahead Provide each Design young _______ person with the Session 25 Editorial _______ Blackline Master [T-385]. Read aloud the introduction and the passage from Matthew. Then have young people complete the activity with a partner. Afterward, invite pairs to share their ideas with the group. Have young people name the Gift of the Spirit that would best enable them to face each danger they identify. Finally, read aloud Matthew 10:26–33. Emphasize that no matter what danger touches us in this life, we are safe in ways we can’t begin to comprehend. PDF Signoff: Production _______

Invite volunteers to read aloud the section Pontifical Council for Promoting New Evangelization. Explain that the Roman Curia is comprised of the Church’s central administrative offices. Say: The Curia includes offices that are responsible for various aspects of the life of the Church, such as teaching and the sacraments. Point out that by establishing an office responsible for the New Evangelization, the pope demonstrated the importance of this ministry. Say: By creating a new office, he established a budget and a staff who are responsible for this work. Remind young people that as members of the Church, we are all responsible for the work of evangelization. Invite volunteers to read aloud the section The Gifts and Fruits of the Holy Spirit. Say: The Gifts of the Holy Spirit are seven unique graces we receive that help us live out our lives of faith. Point out that we receive the Gifts of the Holy Spirit through Baptism and that these gifts are strengthened in Confirmation. Say: The Fruits of the Holy Spirit are behaviors that we exhibit when we choose to follow God’s path for us. Have young people turn to page 266 in the back of their books for more information about the Gifts and Fruits of the Holy Spirit.

Ready for Confirmation

Read aloud the feature. Say: We can always pray to the Holy Spirit for the strength to follow God, even before we have been confirmed. Emphasize that we receive the grace of the Holy Spirit through Baptism.

3 Close Give young people time to pray silently for the strength to share the Good News with others through their words and actions.

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prayer Follow the steps to guide young people through the prayer on page 216.

Young People’s Page Prepare Pray the prayer in advance to become familiar with it. Select someone to serve in the role of Leader and give him or her time to review the prayer. Pray Invite volunteers to read aloud the page title and the introductory paragraphs. Ask: What do we celebrate during the easter season? (Christ’s Resurrection from the dead) What do we celebrate on the Feast of Pentecost? (the descent of the Holy Spirit) Say: The four sequences that we use today are for the feasts of easter, Pentecost, Corpus Christi, and Our lady of Sorrows. Point out that the sequences help us celebrate important events in God’s plan of Salvation. Say: While Pentecost was a one-time event, God wants us to remember that the Holy Spirit is always with us. We are reminded of that every time we pray the Sequence for Pentecost. Suggest that young people can pray this prayer throughout the liturgical year. Give young people a moment to prepare themselves for prayer. Then pray aloud the prayer together. After the Leader prays the last part of the prayer, give young people time to pray silently. Say: Conclude your prayer by praying the Sign of the Cross. Say: As we continue our session, let’s remember that we can always turn to the Holy Spirit for the strength to live as God wants us to live.

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Prayer

Come, Holy Spirit, Come! At Mass on Easter and Pentecost, a prayer called a sequence is read or sung before the Gospel Acclamation. A sequence is a piece of liturgical poetry that expands on and explains the meaning of the celebration. Though many sequences were added to the liturgy in the Middle Ages, only four remain today. When we hear a sequence proclaimed as part of prayer, we are invited to reflect on a specific mystery of faith. The sequence for Pentecost encourages us to meditate on the gift of Salvation we have received through Christ’s Resurrection and the outpouring of the Holy Spirit.

Sequence for Pentecos t Prayer and Reflection

All: Come, Holy Spir it, com Leader: Why do you need All: O most blessed Light

e!

the Holy Spirit today?

divine, Shine with in these hear ts of your s, And our inmost being fill!

Lea

der: How can you tell whe n a person is filled with the Holy Spirit? How can others tell when the light of the Holy Spirit is shining within you? All: Where you are not, man

has naught, Noth ing good in deed or thought, Noth ing free from taint of ill. Leader: Do you know som eone who seems empty inside or feels as if he or she has noth ing? Pray that this person might be guided by the Holy Spirit.

All: Heal our wou nds, our

strength renew; On our dryness pou r your dew; Wash the stain s of guilt away: Bend the stubborn hear t and will; Melt the frozen, war m the chill; Guide the steps that go astray.

Leader: What is one goo d choice you made today? Where have you felt temptation to sin? Pray to the Holy Spir it to guide your steps toward Jesus.

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another Verse Invite young people to write PDF Signoff: Production _______ another verse of the Sequence for Pentecost. Before they begin writing, encourage young people to reflect on everything they have learned about the Holy Spirit. Say: Call to mind the times in your life when you were aware of the presence of the Holy Spirit. After giving young people time to work, invite volunteers to share their verses.

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coaching Young peopleEditorial to pray Design _______ _______ Remind young people that prayer won’t make them perfect, but it will help them address their imperfections and learn from them. Whenever young people feel guilty, frustrated, or weary, suggest that they pause to offer the imperfection to God and ask that he help mend it.


REflEcT

E R E H W t In

1 Begin

Do I Fi

. the Church e birthday of ost marks th ing where we ild that Pentec bu ve e lie th be of ly, we mes of ten think Traditional eologian Ja church, we worship. Th ar the word e we can th whom we When we he er wi wh ity ch un ur m ch the com is a domestic go to pray or at our family minds us th e. Campbell re ac gr d God’s love an experience

Ask young people to describe memories of good times they have experienced with their families. Say: All of these are experiences of Church, even though we might not immediately think so. Invite a volunteer to read aloud the introductory text and the article title.

s by Ja meell b p m a C

What Does It Mean to Be Church?

My younger sister is a member of the Little Sisters of the Poor, whose mission is to care for the elderly. For 25 years she has done this in Colombia, South America. Her particular responsibility is to make sure that there is food on the table every day. For many people, the food my sister provides is all the food they will eat that day. It’s difficult work. Every morning my sister receives Jesus in the Eucharist so that she can have the strength to feed his people. Once, while on a family visit, my brother asked my sister if she wanted to discuss new ideas about Jesus and the Church. My sister wasn’t much interested. She told my brother that he should come and live with her community for awhile if he wanted to know what Jesus meant in her life. There he would see that Jesus is present in the Church in all the ways the sisters cared for the needs of people who are poor.

Reflect

We live in the presence of God every moment of our lives. I have experienced God with special closeness in my own family.

I think of my family as a small “domestic church.” It’s where my wife and I have had the honor of watching our daughters grow in wisdom and grace. It’s where we see God every day. All of us can celebrate God’s presence in the domestic church of our families. We are all fed in the Eucharist so that in one another we can continue to see the face of God.

Church Take a moment to reflect on your experience of the Church. Then, in the box, draw an image that expresses what the Church means to you.

Family and Community

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2 Connect Invite volunteers to read aloud the section What Does It Mean to Be Church? Ask: In what ways does the author experience God in his family? (through the ministry and example of his sister’s work; through his marriage; through being a parent)

My wife, Barbara, and I experienced the presence of God most joyfully when we were together at the birth of our two daughters. Our second daughter was unexpectedly born at home. When we knew everything would be OK, Barbara and I were so filled with joy that we spontaneously sang a song popular in the Church’s liturgy at the time. We sang, “God is love, and he who abides in love, abides in God and God in him.” JAMES CAMPBELL is the author of Stories of the Old Testament: A Catholic’s Guide.

Family and Community

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family font Ahead of time, ask young people to bring a container with a tightPDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ fitting lid to class. Invite a priest to visit your class to bless one or more pitchers of water and to pour the holy water into young people’s containers. Invite young people to take the water home and, with their family members, choose a special vessel to hold the water. Have young people place the water near the door of their home and to use it to bless themselves as they enter and exit as a reminder of God’s presence in the domestic church of their family.

Say: We may not have siblings who work as missionaries, but in a way, all our family members are missionaries. They were placed in our lives to give us special messages about God’s love. Invite young people to tell how they see and hear God in their family members. Say: The word church can refer to any community in which we experience joy and belonging. Then have young people complete the activity independently. Invite volunteers to share their completed images with the group.

3 Close Encourage young people to keep in mind the idea of family as domestic church in the coming week. Remind young people that God is present in our family communities, even during periods of conflict and disagreement.

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RESpOnD

W h a t ’s

? t a h W

1 Begin What’s What? Read aloud the directions. Then have young people complete the exercise at home or in class with a partner. Remind young people that they can use the page references to help them find the answers to the questions.

Say What? Ask volunteers to read aloud and define the terms. Review each term in the Glossary if necessary.

8

The Fruits of the Holy Spirit are that show us that the Holy Spirit is active in our life. PAGE 215

We are the People of God, a community of believers who share in God’s infinite wisdom through Jesus’ teachings and the

Say What?

.

PAGE 211

2

birth of the Church. PAGE 211

3

Know the definitions of these terms. Fruits of the Holy Spirit Jubilee Year

Now What?

Each year, on the Feast of , we celebrate the

What can you do this week to spread God’s message to family, friends, or classmates?

Pope John Paul II was a defender of the dignity of human life and an advocate for . PAGE 212

4

now What? Read aloud the section. Invite each young person to complete the activity independently.

Pope John Paul II spoke out against war, .

violence, and PAGE 212

5

3 Go in Peace Have young people collect their materials and return them to the appropriate places. Encourage young people to remain mindful of the Now What? challenge in the days to come. Say: Remember that we are called to be evangelists in all that we do. Often we are more effective at sharing God’s love with others through our actions than with our words.

The Gifts of the make it possible for us to do what God asks of us. PAGE 215

Write the word or phrase that best completes each sentence.

guidance of the

Respond

2 Connect

1

7

On December 20, 1985, the Holy Father announced the institution of . PAGE 213

6

The describes our call to serve as evangelists to those who have not heard the Gospel as well as those who need to hear the Gospel anew. PAGE 214

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Service: Works of mercy Remind young people that one way to evangelize is to practice the PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ Works of Mercy. Arrange with your catechetical leader to have young people coordinate a food and clothing drive for a local organization that serves people in need. After the drive, have young people prepare the donations for delivery to the selected organization. The Poor and Vulnerable

Session assessment Option An assessment for this session can be found at www.findinggod.com.

Unit assessment Option If you wish, photocopy the Unit Assessment on pages T-386–T-388. Administer the assessment during the session or send it home.

3-Minute Retreat Give young people an opportunity for quiet meditation at www.loyolapress.com/retreat.

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acT

Faith in

ACT I O N

Unit

5 faITh In acTIOn Complete one of the suggested Faith in Action projects as a class, or organize young people into two groups, having each group complete a different project. Note that directions continue on the next page.

Our experience of God’s grace compels us to go out into the world to share his love with others. We receive the call to participate in this mission through the sacraments, Scripture, and our own personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Through our participation in this mission, we take action to create a more just and peaceful world. In his own life, Jesus preached not only with words but also with his actions—the way he lived his life. We believe that taking action to create a more just world is an essential component of proclaiming the Gospel.

“For the Catholic commitment to build peace and justice is not secondary but essential.” —Pope John Paul II

Outreach Magazine

Act

faithful, the

In this unit we explored the theme of being sent out into the world to share God’s love with others. Since its beginnings the Church has called us to participate in its mission to proclaim the Good News by working for justice. We respond to this call by honoring all life and by respecting others.

Purpose Learn about the role of communication media in building a just world; create a publication in which young people can voice their opinions about issues of justice and peace and inspire one another to put their beliefs into action.

Background Truthful communication can be an effective tool in stopping disrespectful, violent, and other unjust behaviors. Open and honest communication has the power to inspire people to act on behalf of justice for the good of all of God’s creation.

Steps 1. As a group, start a free magazine or blog that gives young people a voice about justice-and-peace issues such as violence, hunger, sexism, and racism. 2. Enlist the help of your community. Others in your school or parish may be interested in serving as guest writers or in providing graphic or Web design services. If you choose to produce a print publication, volunteers may be willing to donate access to resources such as publishing software, printers, paper, and copiers. 3. Distribute your magazine to local community centers, schools, parishes, restaurants, and coffee shops. Make sure that you ask before you leave the magazines.

Unit 5 > Faith in Action

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planning Your magazine Consider including the following in your magazine: PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ • Interviews with young people from around the country about specific issues • Stories or poems written by young people or articles that can be legitimately reproduced • Original photographs or illustrations • A calendar of justice and peace events • A listing of local justice and peace organizations • A regular column on global-justice issues

m aT E R I a l S: Get Ready for Faith in Action For these projects, you will need computers with Internet access, a guest speaker from a local English-language learner program, the prayer service planning guide, and prayer service planning tips. Also see the project steps.

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1 Prepare Discuss the project ideas with young people and involve them in the decision-making process to determine a project. Discuss the project they choose in terms of faith and being a “person for others.” Ask: What do you hope to learn from this project? What interests you about it? What concerns do you have about it? Whom will you serve, and how will your service be beneficial to them and to you? Are you prepared to recognize the humanity in those you encounter? How does this project help you put your faith into action? What theme or themes of Catholic Social Teaching will you be experiencing in the project?

2 Implement Have young people follow the directions to complete Outreach Magazine on page 219 or Learn a New Language on page 220. For Outreach Magazine, have young people research a social justice issue that is affecting your community. Encourage young people to find out what the Church teaches about the issue. For Learn a New Language, ask young people to research what languages are spoken in your community. If possible, have a guest presenter from an English-language learner program speak about the services their program offers. Be sure young people are supervised during their project as appropriate. Consider asking for parent volunteers to be Faith in Action facilitators for this unit. UnIT 5 • Faith in Action

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acT Learn a New Language (Aprender una Nueva Idioma)

3 Close

Purpose Learn a new language and deepen your appreciation for people of different cultures and backgrounds.

Bring closure to the project by leading young people in completing one or both of the following:

Pass It On Arrange with your catechetical leader to have young people meet with younger children to share their experiences of the project and to inspire them to become involved in the work for peace and justice. As a next step, you may wish to have young people work with the children to plan a simple service project that they can complete together.

Knowing a second or even a third language can help us increase our awareness and appreciation for people of different cultures and backgrounds. For example, learning sign language may expose us to the culture of people who are deaf. Learning Spanish or Chinese—the first and second most spoken languages after English in the United States— may give us a better sense of the people in our community.

Steps

Act

Prayer Service Download and print out the prayer service planning guide and prayer service planning tips at www.findinggod.com. Have young people plan and implement a prayer service that expresses both gratitude to God for the opportunity to serve and hope for the people whom they served.

Background

1. Learn about the different languages of the people in your community. The Modern Language Association (MLA) has an online resource on the most spoken languages in the United States. The United States Census Bureau also has a lot of information arranged according to states and regions. Contact local organizations for people who are deaf to learn how many people in your community use sign language. 2. On the basis of the statistics that you’ve learned, choose a language that would help you better relate to people in your community. 3. Working together, design a program for yourselves that will accomplish the following goals: learn basic vocabulary of the new language, connect with people who are fluent in the language, study the particular culture(s) associated with the language, and practice, practice, practice!

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“A single act of kindness throws out roots in all directions.” —Amelia Earhart legendary aviator

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living faith: Sharing language Discuss with young people the many ways in which being PDF Signoff: Production _______ Design _______ Editorial _______ multilingual benefits us and unlocks doors for us. Challenge young people to volunteer as language tutors, either within the school or in a community program. Solidarity

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Grade

8

Praying the Daily Examen A good way to develop the habit of finding God in all things is to pray the Examen, a daily habit practiced and encouraged by Saint Ignatius of Loyola. In this prayer, you look back over your day to recognize how God is actively involved in your life. Take some time to follow these simple steps: 1. Find a quiet place. Remember that you are in the holy presence of God. 2. Give thanks. Name one moment from your day for which you are grateful. 3. Review the day. In your imagination, retrace the steps of your day—what you did, whom you encountered, thoughts and feelings you experienced. 4. Talk with God. Tell God the things you feel good about and those you regret. 5. Look toward the day to come. Ask God to help you be your best self as you look forward to tomorrow.

When the Examen is practiced over time, patterns of activity or thought will emerge. Pay attention to these patterns because they can help you detect God’s presence in your life and live more fully in his presence.

Visit www.findinggod.com for a wealth of resources to enhance your sessions.

Parish Edition Grade 8

ISBN-13: 978-0-8294-3674-7 ISBN-10: -0-8294-3674-X 3441 N. Ashland Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60657 (800) 621-1008 www.loyolapress.com

Finding God 2013 Grade 8 Parish Catechist Guide | PART 3  

These easy-to-use guides provide support and tools for catechists and teachers of every experience level and include complete catechetical b...

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