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A Community of Service

2016 Provost’s Report Loyola University New Orleans

A COMMUNITY OF SERVICE 2016 PROVOST’S REPORT LOYOLA UNIVERSITY NEW ORLEANS

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on A the COMMUNITY cover: Loyola OF SERVICE student Bethany 2016 PROVOST’S Stutzman andREPORT volunteers LOYOLA Leandro UNIVERSITY Jean-Louis, Diddy NEW ORLEANS Estiverne, and Renel Cidor work with villagers in Piton, Haiti, as part of Aid for Infrastructure’s Bethany Project. Full story on page 11. Photo by Katherine Harrison.


A Message from the Provost Dear readers: Our work at Loyola University New Orleans often takes place in the context of collaborations. We know that the academic activities of our students, faculty, and staff have great potential to address problems facing the communities we are a part of. For more than a century, Loyola has nurtured a culture of community engagement with others striving to create a more just world. This report illustrates recent examples of Loyola’s community engagement. We work alongside organizations that endeavor to end homelessness or provide food to those who cannot afford it and with others that enrich the community through the visual arts, music, and theatre. Our faculty and students also create organizations that fill community needs: a ministry institute in a prison, a dental program serving rural children. Others conduct research that empowers policymakers to shape a world in which communities can thrive. All of the faculty, students, and staff in this report are dedicated to scholarship and advocacy that engages and improves the communities around us. I hope you take a moment to learn about some of their achievements. Sincerely,

Marc Manganaro, Ph.D. Provost

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Table of Contents

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Honors students crunch numbers to counter homelessness

An anti-homelessness organization uses research by Loyola undergraduates to argue the case for housing-first initiatives.

Groundbreaking reports on poverty and race empower advocates Two major reports by the Jesuit Social Research Institute give lawmakers the facts and information they need for positive reform.

A landmark study guides Mississippi River restoration

Biologist David White has spent 30 years researching wetlands in south Louisiana. Now his work is guiding officials working to save the Gulf Coast.

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Community research that changes medical practice

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Legal advice for New Orleans’ social entrepreneurs

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Each Loyola Doctor of Nursing Practice student applies research to real-world situations to transform community health.

New ventures in New Orleans aiming to create social good need legal help. Loyola law students provide it.

After-school program aims to balance educational inequality

Psychology professor Angel Parham brings her research interests to her own neighborhood to create transformative education opportunities.

Students illuminate New Orleans opera history

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Food efficiency for New Orleans’ needy

A new program looks to expand upon Loyola’s partnership with one of the country’s biggest food banks.

Inmates enrich Loyola’s community of ministries

Loyola Institute for Ministry’s adds inmates to its diverse community with a new extension program in the Louisiana State Penitentiary.

A theatre company finds refuge in residency

Loyola welcomes Southern Repertory Theatre to its campus for a two-year residency after the renowned troupe lost its performance space.

Bookshelf

Loyola faculty members published groundbreaking books on subjects ranging from video games and violence to migration law in 2016.

Loyola’s opera-related archival holdings receive a fresh interpretive treatment from music performance graduate students.

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Honors students crunch numbers to counter homelessness New research by Loyola University New Orleans honors students is helping homeless people in New Orleans get off the streets. Using surveys collected by the Harry Tompson Center, a homelessness advocacy organization, students were able to demonstrate significant savings the city of New Orleans could reap by enhancing local housing-first initiatives. The HTC is incorporating these findings for fundraising and awareness-building among community partners. The students presented their work at the national 2016 American Society of Criminology conference.

students conducted comparative analysis based on more than 200 surveys by people experiencing homelessness in New Orleans. They calculated the amount of taxpayer money spent on legal, medical, and other costs incurred by people living on the streets. Emergency room visits alone cost nearly $400,000 in six months and largely would have been avoided had the homeless population been part of a housing-first program. Overall, the students found New Orleans could save $5 million each year through housingfirst initiatives.

“I’m a stickler when it Our students comes to experiential have provided learning — I want my students to apply what impressive evidence they learn in the classroom that housing-first to real problems in the community, and I want really works. their learning to be relevant,” said Lydia Voigt, Ph.D., Joseph H. Fichter, S.J., Distinguished Professor of Social Sciences, who taught the social justice seminar from which this project emerged.

“Our students have provided impressive evidence that housing-first really works,” Voigt said. “It is a humanitarian approach that is cost-effective.”

left: Students present their findings at the national 2016 American Society of Criminology Conference. right: From left: students Nik Jablonski, Dan Parker, Marissa Friduss, and William Jennings Bryan Riley III pose outside of the Harry Tompson Center.

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Housing-first approaches help homeless people obtain housing before pairing them with social workers to address other needs — rather than vice versa. Loyola honors

A COMMUNITY OF SERVICE 2016 PROVOST’S REPORT LOYOLA UNIVERSITY NEW ORLEANS

Nik Jablonski, a music major, is one of the students who conducted the research as part of an honors social justice seminar, which engages students in community work through the lens of Ignatian values and Catholic social thought. “A big part of being a Loyola student is getting outside your comfort zone,” Jablonski said. “When I came here four years ago, I thought I’d just keep my head down and get really good at classical euphonium. I didn’t expect my first national conference presentation to be on homelessness.”


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Groundbreaking reports on poverty and race empower advocates

left: The Jesuit Social Research Institute’s two publications – the State of Working Mississippi and the JustSouth Index – aim to improve issues like poverty, racism, and migration. top right: Jeanie Donovan, JSRI policy specialist, presents the findings of the State of Working Mississippi to Democratic lawmakers at the Capitol. Photo by Elijah Baylis/ The Clarion-Ledger. bottom right: JSRI director Fred Kammer, S.J. presents the findings of the JustSouth Index at a press conference.

Pursuing its commitment to action research — research that translates directly into education and advocacy — the Jesuit Social Research Institute at Loyola University New Orleans released two landmark publications in 2016 aimed at counteracting social wrongs. The State of Working Mississippi, which tracks conditions for working people in that state, and JustSouth Index 2016, an analysis of social justice in all 50 states and Washington, D.C., both equip advocates with information they can use to work on behalf of equality and justice.

Press events in Biloxi, Miss., and New Orleans celebrated both reports’ release, helping to garner regional and national coverage that reached an audience of 84 million people. While they differ in scope and, to a degree, focus — both address JSRI’s target issues of poverty, racism, and migration — the reports present some damning, overlapping conclusions.

The connection “between race and

“One thing that links the reports together is the finding that so many working people can’t make ends meet,” Donovan said. “The cost of living is simply higher than the average wage for a great number of people.”

poverty showed up very clearly in both reports, driving home the heritage of slavery and segregation in today’s reality.

JSRI focuses on the Gulf South but compiled statistics on all 50 states and Washington, D.C., for its JustSouth Index to provide context, using metrics inspired by the United Nations and Catholic social teaching.

“We take the reports straight to legislators,” economic policy specialist Jeanie Donovan, principal investigator on both reports, said. “They’re also used in educational settings and nonprofits. People often read them to gain a broader frame of reference for the issues they’re dealing with directly.”

“It’s no great surprise, but most of the Gulf South states ended up near the bottom — Louisiana was dead last,” Fred Kammer, S.J., JSRI’s director, said. “The connection between race and poverty showed up very clearly in both reports, driving home the heritage of slavery and segregation in today’s reality.” Donovan and her colleagues will continue to publish the JustSouth Index annually, along with an interactive online counterpart that makes the information accessible to advocates nationwide.

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A landmark study guides Mississippi River restoration Scientific literature contains many studies that illustrate human effects on river ecosystems. But no such study matches a 2016 publication by Loyola University New Orleans professor of biological sciences David White, Ph.D., which unveiled a massive data set spanning three decades and tackling none other than the Mighty Mississippi. The information could prove crucial to modeling how human activity will affect the Gulf Coast in years to come.

The Mississippi River flows through New Orleans during a beautiful Louisiana sunset. According to a study completed by David White, Ph.D., with the help of Loyola students, the river’s temperature and wetland plant growth have both steadily risen over the past 30 years.

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White began The power of longmonitoring water temperature, term data sets is huge . . . sediment, and their more meaningful patterns effects on plant in nature can be revealed biomass in the Mississippi River’s by many decades’ worth Balize Delta in of work. south Louisiana in 1984. Over the next 30 years and with the help of dozens of Loyola students, White meticulously tracked these variables. He documented a river steadily warming and wetland plant growth increasing as developers introduced more agriculture and concrete structures to the river drainage.

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But what makes White’s study exceptional is its duration — its sheer length allows it to illustrate patterns in the ecosystem with a confidence shorter studies simply cannot achieve. “The power of long-term data sets is huge,” White said. “If I take any 10-year period within that 30-year period, I can’t match that statistical power because short-term weather fluctuations become longer climate patterns alongside all the natural fluxes of the ecosystem. Often, more meaningful patterns in nature can be revealed by many decades’ worth of work.” The Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority and the U.S. Geological Survey are among the organizations interested in White’s work. The CPRA’s staff, with input from wetland scientists, writes Louisiana’s 50-year Coastal Master Plan, which governs development and wetland restoration efforts. White said his observations of the unexpected increased plant growth might also facilitate an unexpected financial boon. The state of Louisiana could acquire carbon credits for the greater amounts of carbon dioxide wetland plants sequester, using his study’s findings. The study, then, could both guide and help finance efforts to protect Louisiana’s coast.


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Community research that changes medical practice Loyola University New Orleans’ Doctor of Nursing Practice program requires students to undertake a deceptively simple task: Use research that has already been conducted to address a real-world health care problem in a way that changes practice. “Too often, research results are not put into practice,” Cynthia Langford, Ph.D., associate professor of nursing, said. “Our students translate the evidence from existing research into health care practice to achieve meaningful health outcomes.” All DNP students execute scholarly projects that put demonstrated solutions to work in ways that can transform clinics and communities.

Volunteers work with villagers in Piton, Haiti, as part of Bethany Stutzman’s Aid to Infrastructure project. Photos by Katherine Harrison.

Our students “translate the evidence from existing research into health care practice to achieve meaningful health outcomes.

Jennifer Feeney used research on fluoride’s role in preventing cavities — alongside findings on parents’ anxieties about fluoride — to build a successful program for an Oregon clinic to safeguard children’s teeth. Oregon has no fluoride in its water, so Feeney had to establish systems to train clinic staff on fluoride varnish application while convincing parents of its safety and benefits.

Bethany Stutzman (pictured bottom left, holding pot) used preexisting research on roundworm infection to determine which approach would best stymie persistent infections in an isolated village in Haiti. Infections may be spread via contaminated drinking water, so Stutzman distributed specialized water filters throughout the village’s households and provided training to villagers about how to use and maintain the filters, as well how to avoid other sources of roundworm infection. A current student is investigating care methods for stroke survivors in a small Louisiana hospital – namely, why doctors don’t always use telemedicine stroke machines to improve care for patients. “You get way better care if they use the stroke machine,” Langford said. “But they don’t always use the stroke machine. So now you’ve got to figure out: Why not?” Understanding this problem will allow the student to recommend how to increase use and improve treatment. In addition to conducting this transformative work, every Loyola DNP student preparing to be a family nurse practitioner provides a minimum of 1,000 hours of direct patient care in his or her community while learning to be a health care provider. Many students select clinics in underserved areas, where they implement evidence-based solutions to significantly improve communities’ health outcomes. A COMMUNITY OF SERVICE 2016 PROVOST’S REPORT LOYOLA UNIVERSITY NEW ORLEANS

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Legal advice for New Orleans’ social entrepreneurs Socially minded business ventures aiming to improve New Orleans face a persistent problem: Tight profit margins and limited funding often mean neglecting basic upfront legal steps, which can lead to legal problems. A new partnership that pairs Loyola It was a perfect pairing. University This partnership helps New Orleans transactional law Loyola help people who are students with trying to make a difference local startups in New Orleans. participating in the Propeller Incubator program addresses this problem. It provides handson experience to Loyola students and valuable legal assistance to burgeoning New Orleans ventures.

Standing, from left: Andrew Buchler, current law student; Propellor’s Education Program Manager TraciAmanda Washington; Trey Drury; and Zachary Smith, J.D. ’16 Seated: Law students Erik Wahl, left, and Sean Williams.

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“It was a perfect pairing,” said Trey Drury, McGlinchy Stafford Distinguished Professor of Law at Loyola, who spearheaded the partnership. “Propeller does social entrepreneurship, so you have to be working on food security, educational equality,

A COMMUNITY OF SERVICE 2016 PROVOST’S REPORT LOYOLA UNIVERSITY NEW ORLEANS

health care improvement, or water rights to get accepted into its incubator program. This partnership helps Loyola help people who are trying to make a difference in New Orleans.” Propeller director Rob Lalka said it can be hard for people starting ventures to know where to place their focus. “Everyone wants a nice logo and a strong social media presence, but those often aren’t the most important things,” Lalka said. “Getting your initial operating agreements locked in, figuring out your chart of accounts — all of those business basics are really crucial, and the students were able to come in and help.” Drury and Lalka began with a pilot program in spring 2016, overseeing 12 Loyola law students working in pairs to amend a charter school’s articles of incorporation, revise contracts for a startup that leverages credit card affinity points into wetland conservation, and other ventures. Drury has now formalized the course and the partnership with Propeller — the incubator will be able to count on Loyola’s help for the foreseeable future, developing businesses that make a positive social impact on New Orleans.


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After-school program aims to balance educational inequality Loyola University New Orleans associate professor of sociology Angel Parham, Ph.D., launched the Nyansa Classical Community after-school program in her local church after hearing neighbors’ concerns over their children’s progress in school. Parham lives in a predominantly lower income and workingclass African-American neighborhood, and she has research interests in the roles race and education play in the reproduction of inequality. She designed Nyansa to provide holistic Christian classical education — which emphasizes values like truth, goodness, and beauty alongside academics — to young people who would not otherwise have access to it. The program also is designed provide continuity by staying with the same children from the age of 4 through their early 20s.

One of the “greatest things about

the program is that Dr. Parham has found people who do want to stay at Nyansa their whole time.

The Nyansa Classical Community after-school program provides holistic Christian education to young people who would not otherwise have access to it. The program uses Loyola students in service learning courses and the Social Justice Scholars program.

“One of the contributors to the reproduction of inequality is an education that is not sufficient for children to do well or to be competitive,” Parham said. “Children can go into the school system behind, and the school system is not able to help them catch up. Nyansa is a resource, in addition to the family, to make sure basic things are covered for children whose parents are really stretched.” Parham engages students from Loyola service learning courses and the university’s Social Justice Scholars program, which she directs, to act as Nyansa tutors. Loyola students become specialized in different aspects of Nyansa’s teaching protocols, offering more than the average volunteer. Many Loyola students are alongside Nyansa students as they develop. “One of the greatest things about the program is that Dr. Parham has found people who do want to stay at Nyansa their whole time,” first-year Social Justice Scholar Alex Williams said. “It’s so important to be someone in their lives for a long time — not just going there to get volunteer hours and then leaving.” As the program progresses, Parham plans to study interactions at Nyansa between Loyola students and the young people they serve in an ongoing effort to find ways to bridge divides of race and class in New Orleans.

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Students illuminate New Orleans opera history Loyola University New Orleans’ faculty and alumni have played integral roles in the storied history of opera in New Orleans. For 70 years, they have been among the most prominent directors and performers in the New Orleans Opera Association, the city’s premier operatic institution. One-time Loyola student Norman Treigle achieved great fame in global opera centers like New York while continuing to perform regularly in New Orleans with NOOA. Loyola’s current opera director, Carol Rausch, also serves as NOOA’s chorus master, music coordinator, and It’s a nice way to frame education director.

“the research process

Students explore historic musical materials in the archives of Monroe Library as part of a graduate course in the Master of Music in Performance program.

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Master of Music — from introducing in Performance students at Loyola students to the subject now have added to finding examples of another dimension: An introductory what they want to talk graduate research course pairs students about, giving it some with archivists in context, and putting it Loyola’s Monroe on display. Library to explore the archive’s music-related holdings. Students of Valerie Goertzen, Ph.D., Edward J. Kvet Distinguished Professor of Music and Fine Arts, produced a

A COMMUNITY OF SERVICE 2016 PROVOST’S REPORT LOYOLA UNIVERSITY NEW ORLEANS

display on Treigle’s tumultuous life and remarkable career in 2015. In 2016, Goertzen’s students delved into the archive’s vast newly processed NOOA collection. “Loyola already had a tight-knit relationship with NOOA,” Goertzen said. “This was a matter of expanding that into the area of historical research.” Goertzen’s students have investigated a treasure trove of opera-related materials — photos, correspondence, accounting ledgers, show programs, and other lagniappe related to Treigle and NOOA. They applied research methods as they learned them to original source materials to develop strategies for inquiry and to create the Triegle display. “It’s a nice way to frame the research process — from introducing students to the subject to finding examples of what they want to talk about, giving it some context, and putting it on display,” said Trish Nugent, Monroe Library’s Special Collections and archive coordinator, who worked with the Master of Music in Performance students along with digital initiatives librarian Elizabeth Kelly. “It’s similar to writing a paper, but then it’s up and other people can see it.” Meanwhile, a Special Collections intern, Gloria Cosenza, developed a separate display of the history of opera at Loyola and an interactive digital timeline of NOOA’s history in conjunction with Special Collections’ own exhibit on NOOA, making Loyola’s holdings more broadly available to those interested in the rich history of music in New Orleans.


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Food efficiency for New Orleans’ needy Hands-on education at Loyola University New Orleans often involves enabling our community partners to improve the lives of people in New Orleans more effectively. In the College of Business’ Operations and Process Management class, MBA students delve into the inner workings of Second Harvest, the largest food bank in the Gulf South, to offer suggestions on how to streamline its operations.

[The Second Harvest] “partnership gives our students the opportunity to apply what they learn from the textbook to actually fix something to the benefit of the local community and the region.

“Every organization requires efficient operations to produce value for their constituents, but every dollar Second Harvest has to apply to operational overhead results in fewer meals produced for those in need,” said Gerry Ormerod, Ph.D., a lecturer in management, who teaches the course. “This partnership gives our students the opportunity to apply what they learn from

Students brainstorm and execute a plan to maximize the efficiency of Second Harvest’s repacking room in New Orleans.

the textbook to actually fix something to the benefit of the local community and the region.” In a pilot program last year, Ormerod’s students focused on the repacking room of Second Harvest’s New Orleans hub, where volunteers inspect, reorganize, and prepare for distribution massive amounts of donated food. After documenting and mapping the processes involved, students made recommendations directly to Second Harvest administrators — an exercise that benefits both the food bank and the students. “When students can witness how organizations actually apply the principles that they learn in the classroom, it hammers home 10 times deeper what you’re trying to get the students to absorb,” Ormerod said. As Ormerod prepares to formalize and expand his missionbased initiative with Second Harvest, a new degree program in development at Loyola — the Food Studies Policy, Commerce, and Culture program — will use the relationship as a model to explore many facets of food in New Orleans. Program director Danny Mintz said students in the new program will engage similarly with farmers markets, urban gardens, and cooking schools to explore New Orleans’ rich culinary heritage and find ways to address its residents’ food needs.

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Inmates enrich Loyola’s community of ministries The Loyola University New Orleans Institute for Ministry engages communities across the globe via its extension program, which since the 1980s has conferred graduate degrees and certificates throughout the United States, Nigeria, Scotland, and elsewhere.

“ Our students inside

In 2016, LIM added prison have insights that six inmates at the Louisiana State our students outside Penitentiary at prison don’t have . . . Angola to its cohort of graduates, the That’s a gift to their first to complete the classmates outside of Loyola New Orleans program in prison. prison and, indeed, to LIM director Tom the whole church. Ryan, Ph.D., said although offering the program in a maximum-security facility prompted some protocol shifts — unlike most ministry students, inmates do not have Internet access, for instance — LIM’s attention to context allowed the program to accommodate the prisoners well.

In a moving graduation ceremony, six inmates at Angola became alumni of the Loyola Institute of Ministry.

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A COMMUNITY OF SERVICE 2016 PROVOST’S REPORT LOYOLA UNIVERSITY NEW ORLEANS

“What ministry looks like in prison is different from what it looks like in New Orleans — but what it looks like in New Orleans is different from what it looks like in Belize or in Nigeria or Scotland,” Ryan said. “We educate all our students — not just those in prison — to be transformative in their ministry. This requires them to be attentive to context, to institutional setting, and to themselves as ministers.” Catholic ministries around the world comprise a dizzyingly rich and diverse body of witnesses to Christ — something LIM’s diversity reflects. Ryan said the Loyola graduates in Angola join other LIM ministers as equals and can use their distinctive experiences to offer fresh perspectives on the Gospel. “Our students inside prison have insights that our students outside prison don’t have,” Ryan said. “For instance, some of the New Testament writings are by Paul, himself a prisoner. Our students at Angola are attuned to that and can enrich our understanding of the Bible. That’s a gift to their classmates outside of prison and, indeed, to the whole church.” Ryan is currently working to recruit the next class of Angola ministry students for the 36-hour program.


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A theatre company finds refuge in residency In 2012, rising rents forced Southern Repertory Theatre from its performance space in downtown New Orleans. The well-respected 30-year-old company continued to produce plays in site-specific locations while it worked to secure a permanent home. But the process proved exhausting. Their problems came to the attention of Dr. Laura Hope, associate professor and chair of Loyola

We’re supporting an “organization that really

University New Orleans’ Theatre Arts

The House That Will Not Stand, inspired by Lorca’s classic The House of Bernarda Alba, played in Loyola’s Marquette Theatre in November 2016 and was directed by Dr. Laura Hope.

and Dance Program, who was working as a dramaturge on a Southern Rep production staged in a church.

artistically enriches New Orleans while giving our students incredible opportunities to advance their understanding and practice of theatre, as well as their careers.

“I got to see on a day-to-day basis how difficult it was for the theatre company,” Hope said. “We had to take the set down twice a week for

church activities; then everything had to be put back up again. That’s really hard on a company and on the integrity of a show. No one could keep that up forever.” So Hope devised a solution: Starting in the fall of 2016, Southern Rep entered into a two-year residency on Loyola’s campus, providing the troupe a home and enmeshing Loyola with broader regional and national theatre communities. Southern Rep is the only Actors’ Equity theatre in New Orleans, and its plays often employ renowned national directors, writers, and actors — Eugene O’Neill Directing Fellow Larissa Lury oversaw Grounded, which opened at Loyola in November and explores the ethics of drone warfare. Southern Rep’s plays often confront social justice issues, aligning them with Loyola’s Jesuit mission. The residency provides Loyola theatre students chances to audition for Southern Rep plays, work backstage, take part in masterclasses by visiting theatre professionals, and attend productions for free. “This partnership is a model of community engagement,” Hope said. “We’re supporting an organization that really artistically enriches New Orleans while giving our students incredible opportunities to advance their understanding and practice of theatre, as well as their careers. Loyola and Southern Rep have a long history — lots of their staff members are alumni. This residency deepens that relationship and benefits us all.”

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Bookshelf

Women, Art and the New Deal

The Fry Pans Aren't Sufficing

Katherine H. Adams and Michael Keene

Peyton Burgess

McFarland Press The research and creative work highlighted in this report are a small representation of the expansive body of scholarly work ongoing at Loyola University New Orleans. For a complete list of publications, presentations, and performances in the 2014-2015 academic year by Loyola’s faculty, go online to loyno.edu/provosts-report

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In 1935, the U.S. Congress began employing large numbers of American artists through the Works Progress Administration. They hired writers, sculptors, painters, composers, and carvers, as well as historians and researchers. Thousands of these artists were women. This book examines the historical and social worlds they described and the collaborative depiction of womanhood they created at a pivotal moment in American history.

A COMMUNITY OF SERVICE 2016 PROVOST’S REPORT LOYOLA UNIVERSITY NEW ORLEANS

Mixed Realism: Videogames and the Violence of Fiction

Lavender Ink

Timothy Welsh

Burgess’s short stories explore both the tragic and mundane in the small moments of everyday life. With a diverse group of characters and a unique voice, Burgess takes readers through issues of identity, location, and love with stories that are both darkly funny and sometimes deeply sad.

University of Minnesota Press

What can be learned by examining video games and novels through the same lens? Welsh shows how video games, like novels, promise experiences of “immersion.” Mixed Realism offers a fresh perspective on digital games and contemporary literature, as well as a new understanding of the expanding role of virtuality in contemporary life.


Climate Change, Resilience, and Fairness: How Nonstructural Adaptation Can Protect and Empower Socially Vulnerable Communities on the Gulf Coast

Shawn Bowen, Carmen Gonzalez, Yee Huang, Nowal Jamhour Alice Kaswan Robert R. M. Verchick

Liberty and Equality in Political Economy: From Locke versus Rousseau to the Present

Valor y comunidad: Reencuentro marxista y boliviano. Una conversación con Álvaro García Linera

Nicholas Capaldi and Gordon Lloyd

Josefa Salmón

Elgar

In an age of specialization, Capaldi and Lloyd have recreated that ancient tool of learning: the conversation. Beginning with the debate between Locke and Rousseau and continuing through to Galbraith, Friedman, Hayek and Piketty, this book invites the reader to join a conversation that has now lasted over three centuries. This book does not offer definite answers but prolongs the important questions of politics and economics.

(Vice President of Bolivia) Plural Editores

An interview with Álvaro García Linera, the current vice president of Bolivia, reveals the complicated relationship between Marxism and Indian movements that has resulted in significant change in recent Bolivian politics. With a new constitution written in 2009, Bolivia has become a model for other Latin American nations and countries all over the world.

Mar Caníbal Uriel Quesada Uruk Editores

Mar Caníbal (translation: Cannibal Sea) is Uriel Quesada’s ninth book. It has been praised as “one of the best Latin American novels of 2016.”. Set in an imaginary small town on Costa Rica’s Caribbean coast, Cannibal Sea tells the story of a white family in a black community from the 1940s to the mid1970s. It is also a reflection on racism, greed, memory, aging, and homosexuality.

Climate Change, Resilience, and Fairness: How Nonstructural Adaptation Can Protect and Empower Socially Vulnerable Communities on the Gulf Coast Robert R. M. Verchick

Co-author, with Carmen Gonzalez, Alice Kaswan, Yee Huang, Shawn Bowen, and Nowal Jamhour Center for Progressive Reform

This paper examines selected case studies of nonstructural adaption strategies implemented in response to flood-related disasters in Mississippi and Louisiana; in Cedar Rapids, Iowa; and along the East Coast of the United States. It summarizes lessons learned and best practices for implementing selected strategies in vulnerable communities. The goal of this paper is to inform the policy and advocacy discussion about how best to help vulnerable communities adapt to climate change impacts.

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OFFICE OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 6363 St. Charles Avenue New Orleans, LA 70118 academicaffairs.loyno.edu

Profile for Loyola University New Orleans

Provost Report 2016  

Our work at Loyola University New Orleans often takes place in the context of collaborations. We know that the academic activities of our st...

Provost Report 2016  

Our work at Loyola University New Orleans often takes place in the context of collaborations. We know that the academic activities of our st...