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VoyaGe Academic Guide: 2019-20, Volume 2

Working together to empower, challenge, and Inspire

Lowndes High School 1606 Norman Dr Valdosta, GA 31601 229.245.2260


L Labor Day Holiday Fall Break Thanksgiving Holiday Early Release Day/End of Semester Christmas Holiday Student Holidays/Professional Learning for Teachers Students Return to School Martin Luther King Holiday Winter Break Student Holiday/Professional Learning for Teachers Spring Break Early Release/Last Day of School Memorial Day Holiday Post-planning

September 2

October 11 and 14

November 25-29

December 20

December 23- January 3

January 6-7

January 8

January 20

February 17

February 18

April 6-10

May 22

May 25

May 26-28

Teacher Inservice

First and Last Day of School Early Release Day

First Day of School

August 7

Holiday

Pre-planning

August 1-2 and August 5-6

OWNDES COUNTY SCHOOLS 2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

October ‘19

1 8 15 22 29

6 13 20 27

6 13 20 27

5 12 19 26

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

1 8 15 22 29

7 14 21 28

5 12 19 26

2 9 16 23 30

4 11 18 25

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

3 10 17 24

5 12 19 26

3 4 5 6 10 11 12 13 17 18 19 20 24 31 25 26 27

7 14 21 28

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

S M

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

7 14 21 28

5 12 19 26

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24

4 11 18 25

June ‘20

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

S

7 14 21 28

T W Th F S

S M T W Th F

1 8 15 22 29

7 14 21 28

Th F S

March ‘20

4 11 18 25

S M T W

1 1 2 3 8 8 9 10 15 15 16 17 22 22 23 24 29 29 30 31 Th F S

6 13 20 27

May ‘20

4 11 18 25

3 10 17 24

December ‘19

2 9 16 23 30

T W Th F S

2 1 2 3 9 8 9 10 16 15 16 17 23 22 23 24 30 29 30 31 T W Th F S

S M T W

2 9 16 23

5 12 19 26

3 10 17 24 31

Th F S

February ‘20

4 11 18 25 S M

3 10 17 24

2 9 16 23 30 1 8 15 22 29

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 28

6 13 20 27

November ‘19

5 12 19 26

M

September ‘19 S

T W Th F S

August ‘19

M

S M T W

4 11 18 25

S

Full 180 Instructional Year Calendar. First Draft 90 Days First Semester, 90 Second Semester. 10 Inservice

1 8 15 22 29

W Th F S

3 10 17 24 31

Th F S

April ‘20

7 14 21 28 S M T

5 12 19 26

3 10 17 24 31

January ‘20

7 14 21 28

2 9 16 23 30

S M T W

6 13 20 27

1 8 15 22 29

S M T W Th F S

7 14 21 28

S M T W Th F S

July ‘19

Amended & Approved by Lowndes Board of Education - 3/11/19

2019-2020

Working Together For Excellence Every Day


TOP 10 THINGS

that make Lowndes High School Meritorious 1. Access to advanced technological resources is conducive to enhanced, enjoyable, relevant and rigorous learning. 2. Our administration encourages teachers to plant seeds of knowledge into students. These seeds germinate into maturity, metaphorically speaking, as students continually strive for excellence. 3. Vigilant and asmund (derived from an Old Norse Vikings term) minded School Resource Officers work diligently to assure our safety, security and protection. 4. The highly respected, selfless custodial staff, among the hardest working employees at our school, ensures an aesthetically pleasing, clean environment in which to learn. 5. Interaction with other students improves morale, helping students to enter their classes more refreshed and prepared for instruction. 6. The policy of inclusion makes LHS particularly inviting to students of all persuasions. 7. The conscientious discernment of our school’s staff makes Lowndes HS meritorious, capitalizing on our strength through the diversity of our faculty and student body. 8. A multitude of extracurricular activities provides various avenues for healthy competition, enjoyment, and teamwork while making lifelong memories and friendships. 9. LHS has an incomparably diverse athletic program, which has earned our community the distinction of Title Town, USA. 10. Teachers collaborate and are continually learning the most current facets of their trade, honing their skills for the sole purpose of improving their ability to lead students toward realizing their full potential in life. Submitted by the Cadets of AFJROTC


Social Media Accounts WHO WE ARE STAR PROGRAM AND TEACHER OF THE YEAR........................................................................................................................................8 STUDENT RECOGNITIONS......................................................................................................................................................................9 LOCAL SCHOLARSHIPS........................................................................................................................................................................10 A LETTER FROM THE PRINCIPAL.........................................................................................................................................................11

WHAT WE BELIEVE VISION/MISSION/VALUES/PRINCIPLES..............................................................................................................................................13 ADMINISTRATIVE TEAM......................................................................................................................................................................14 THE THREE W’S..................................................................................................................................................................................15

ACADEMICS AT LHS INSTRUCTIONAL INFORMATION...........................................................................................................................................................17 GRADING PROCEDURES.......................................................................................................................................................................18

GRADUATION GRADE POINT AVERAGE/HONORS FOR 2020, 2021 COHORTS.............................................................................................................20 GRADE POINT AVERAGE/HONORS FOR 2022 COHORT AND BEYOND....................................................................................................21 ACADEMIC PROGRAMS.......................................................................................................................................................................22 FOREIGN EXCHANGE STUDENTS..........................................................................................................................................................26 HIGH SCHOOL ASSESSMENT REQUIREMENTS......................................................................................................................................27 GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS.............................................................................................................................................................28 FOR 2020 COHORT.........................................................................................................................................................................29 FOR 2021, 2022, and 2023 COHORTS...........................................................................................................................................30

ACADEMICS ENGLISH.............................................................................................................................................................................................31 MATH.................................................................................................................................................................................................32 SCIENCE.............................................................................................................................................................................................34 SOCIAL STUDIES.................................................................................................................................................................................36 FOREIGN LANGUAGE...........................................................................................................................................................................38 PHYSICAL EDUCATION........................................................................................................................................................................39 FINE ARTS..........................................................................................................................................................................................40

CAREER, TECHNICAL, AND AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION (CTAE) CAREER CLUSTERS.............................................................................................................................................................................45 LOWNDES HIGH SCHOOL CTAE PATHWAYS..........................................................................................................................................46 AGRICULTURE/FFA.............................................................................................................................................................................48 ARCHITECTURE AND CONSTRUCTION/SKILLS USA..............................................................................................................................55 ART, AV/TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATIONS/SKILLS USA..............................................................................................................56 BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION/FBLA......................................................................................................................58


EDUCATION AND TRAINING/FEA.........................................................................................................................................................60 FINANCE/FBLA...................................................................................................................................................................................61 GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION/AFJROTC.....................................................................................................................63 HEALTHCARE SCIENCE/HOSA.............................................................................................................................................................64 Hospitality and Tourism/FCCLA....................................................................................................................................................66 Information Technology/FBLA.....................................................................................................................................................68 Marketing/FBLA..............................................................................................................................................................................69 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math/TSA.....................................................................................................................70 Transportation, Distribution, and logistics/Skill USA...........................................................................................................72

Testing Required Testing.............................................................................................................................................................................74 current school year Testing Dates............................................................................................................................................75

Planning Your Next Move Counselor’s Office.........................................................................................................................................................................78 Preparing for Life Beyond High School.......................................................................................................................................79 Georgia Scholarship and Grant Programs................................................................................................................................82 GPA Calculations............................................................................................................................................................................83 HOPE Grant Eligibility....................................................................................................................................................................84

Beyond The Classroom Letter from the 2019 Valedictorian...........................................................................................................................................87 Life after High School...................................................................................................................................................................87 LHS Athletics..................................................................................................................................................................................89 Work-Based Learning....................................................................................................................................................................91

Things Students Need to Know Behavior Expectations..................................................................................................................................................................93 Attendance Policy..........................................................................................................................................................................95 Automobiles and student Parking...............................................................................................................................................96 Bring Your Own Technology..........................................................................................................................................................97 Bullying Policy...............................................................................................................................................................................99 Cafeteria Information................................................................................................................................................................ 100 Do the Right Thing....................................................................................................................................................................... 101 Dress and Grooming.................................................................................................................................................................... 102 LCBOE Equity Compliance............................................................................................................................................................ 103 Homecoming and Prom................................................................................................................................................................ 104 Student Information................................................................................................................................................................... 105 Important Contacts.................................................................................................................................................................... 109 LHS Clubs & Extra Curricular Activities................................................................................................................................. 110 Bell Schedule.............................................................................................................................................................................. 113


WE ARE

ALL IN THIS TOGETHER!

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Who We Are


STAR Program and TOTY Joyce Qiaosi Liu was named the 2019 State PAGE STAR Student at a gala celebration held in Atlanta in April. Earlier in the year, Joyce was selected as the 2019 Lowndes County STAR Student after receiving a perfect score of 1600 on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). Joyce went on to compete at the region level and was selected as 2019 Region 10 STAR Student. At the state-level Joyce competed against 15 other region finalists, six of whom had also scored a 1600 on their SAT. At the state competition, Joyce competed in several interviews and wowed the judges in an onstage interview during the banquet in front of over 700 honorees and guests. Way to go, Joyce! The Student Teacher Achievement Recognition (STAR) award is given to the graduating senior at each Georgia high school who has achieved the highest score on SAT (administered for college admission), while meeting other program requirements, including being among the Top 10% of the graduating class. The award is sponsored at the state level by the Professional Association of Georgia Educators (PAGE) Foundation and sponsored locally by the Azalea City Civics Club. Joyce received cash prizes for being selected as the Region 10 STAR winner and the State STAR Student winner.

Georgia Star Teacher: Mrs. Becky Martin

Georgia Star Student: Joyce Qiaosi Liu

Joyce selected Mrs. Becky Martin as her STAR Teacher. Mrs. Martin has been in education for 25 years and has taught math at LHS for the past 21 years. Mrs. Martin holds a Bachelor’s degree in Mathematics from the University of Florida, and a Master’s Degree in Education from Troy University. Mrs. Martin, Joyce’s AP Calculus teacher, was selected as STAR Teacher because of her excellence in education and her dedication to her students.

Teacher of the Year - Mr. Lt. Col. Peter Dominicis

The TOTY is recognized for his/her outstanding work as an educator and represents Lowndes High School for the next year as our “Teacher of the Year!” The 2019 Teacher of the Year is Mr. Lt. Col. Peter Dominicis. Recent Teachers of the Year for Lowndes High School include:

2019: Lt. Col. Dominicis 2018: Julie Hoff 2017: Brittany Williams 2016: Angela Swilley 2015: Dr. Treva Gear Back to Table of Contents

2014: Christina DiTomasso 2013: John Newton 2012: Major Norene Olson 2011: Cindy Osborne 2010: Carmen Ruddle 2019-20 LHS Advisement Guide

2009: Andrea Bridges 2008: Krista Pearson 2007: Pam Guice 2006: Sherry Bennett 2005: Krista Pearson Page <8>


Student Recognitions Students are recognized throughout the year for their outstanding achievements at LHS. Departmental Awards are given to students for outstanding performance in each department. Students in all grade levels are eligible and will be recognized during Honors Night and Freshman Academy Honors Night. The Top Ten awards are presented to the ten students with the highest cumulative GPA in the Senior Class. The students’ cumulative averages at the end of spring semester are used in this calculation. The National Honor Society is a service organization that recognizes academic achievement and fosters service to others. New members are inducted at the end of the year based on grades throughout the year. Seniors are given stoles to wear at Commencement. The STAR Student is the senior with the highest SAT score during a single test administration. Eligible students must also meet GPA requirements and rank in the top 10 percent of the class. The STAR Student is recognized by the Azalea City Civic Club and the PAGE Foundation. Seniors meeting all the requisite GPA and academic requirements are presented an Academic Honor Stole/Cord at Honors Night. See Honor Graduate Cohort Requirements for details. The Valedictorian and Salutatorian of the Senior Class are the students with the highest GPAs (LHS GPA weighted scale). They are offered a variety of recognitions, including the opportunity to speak at Commencement. See the Valedictorian and Salutatorian Requirements for details. The National BETA Club is an educational youth organization that promotes the ideals of academic achievement, character, service, and leadership. New members are inducted each year based on academic requirements. The Student of the Month/Year award recognizes a student for his/her outstanding character. This award is given to students who treat others with utmost care, compassion, friendliness, and respect. LHS teachers will nominate and vote on each recipient monthly. From the monthly winners, a Student of the Year will be selected and recognized at Honors Night. Perfect Attendance: each semester students with perfect attendance are recognized by the Attendance Focus Team. The Mr. & Miss CTAE Student of the Year recognizes two students who best represent LHS in the area of CTAE and

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CTSO involvement and achievement. Each student will receive a scholarship and recognition at various events. Winners are announced in February during National CTAE Month. Mr. & Miss LHS recognizes two students who best represent LHS in academic excellence, extracurricular activities, community service, and school spirit. Each student will represent LHS at various school and system events. The Viking Pride Wall highlights achievements of students and staff. Displays include STAR Student, National Merit Scholars, students scoring at the Distinguished level on End of Course Tests, students scoring a 5 on AP Exams, national club officers, national competition winners, etc. Senior Superlatives are students selected by the LHS faculty for their achievements in academic, athletic, leadership, vocational, fine arts, and extracurricular endeavors. Students are recognized during Honors Night. The AP Scholar award recognizes members of the Senior Class who have demonstrated exemplary college-level achievement on AP Exams. AP Scholar Awards are presented during Honors Night. AP High Five awards are presented each summer to students scoring a perfect score (5) on College Board Advanced Placement Exams. Numerous scholarships are provided by local organizations, individuals, and trusts within Lowndes County. These scholarships are made available to graduating seniors and are selected by scholarship committees, individual schools, and organizations. Most local scholarships require students submit an essay and meet specific criteria. Students are encouraged to frequently check the Scholarship Wall located in the Guidance Department as well as student email for scholarship updates.

Additional Honor Cords and Medallions • • • • • • • •

Air Force JROTC Governor’s Honors CTAE Pathway Completer FCCLA FFA National Art Honor Society National French Honor Society National Spanish Honor Society

• • • • • • • •

Thespian Honor Society Tri-M Music Honor Society Academic Pathway Completer Fine Arts Pathway Completer Community Service GMC Dual Enrollment VSU Dual Enrollment WGaTC Dual Enrollment


Local Scholarship Program All scholarships listed below were given during the 2018-19 school year. Availability of these for subsequent years are based on funding from the individual organizations and donors. The LHS guidance department posts all scholarship applications on the LHS Guidance website. Students should visit this site regularly throughout their junior and senior years to become familiar with available scholarships. Because our community realizes that educated citizens are productive citizens, many of the scholarships awarded at Honors Night come from local individuals, businesses, and civic organizations from inside and outside our school system. Please note the donors who create scholarships, collect funds and wade through numerous applications and essays to honor Lowndes High School students. Their dedication to our studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; future is greatly appreciated.

Local Scholarships Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Scholarship Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Scholarship Amelia Davis Johnson Legacy Scholarship Colton Shaw Scholarship Delta Kappa Gamma Society Scholarship Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Scholarship ERCO Worldwide Math and Science Scholarship Frances P. Eidson Honorary Scholarship Georgia Cooperative Council Annual Scholarship and James Hollis Tillman Scholarship Heart of a Viking Memorial Scholarship

James D. Eunice Legacy Scholarship Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Scholarship Michael Clark Memorial Scholarship R. Wayne Bubba Alexander Scholarship Sullivan Scholars ValdostaSold/Copeland Realty Future Leaders of America Scholarship Viking Touchdown Club Scholarship Virginia Prince Memorial Scholarship, Valdosta Elkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lodge Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Scholarship

Lowndes Educational Improvement Foundation (LEIF) Bret Reddick Scholarship Burton and Collins Scholarship Carlton Jones Memorial Scholarship Clemons Memorial Scholarship Dr. Steve and Linda Smith Scholarship Harley Langdale Jr. Foundation Scholarship James and Katrina Hargrett Scholarship

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John and Joyce Feazell Scholarship Langdale Legal Scholarship Make Your Mark Epley Scholarship Mary Anderson Memorial Scholarship Milhouse Family Scholarship Valdosta Insurance Services Scholarship Wayne and Elaine Ricks Scholarship

2019-20 LHS Advisement Guide

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A Letter from the Principal Dear Lowndes High School Parents and Community, As principal of Lowndes High School, it is my pleasure to share with you what I believe makes our school such an amazing place. We promote high standards and expectations for our students regarding academic and extracurricular excellence. Our teachers, counselors, administrators, and staff welcome the opportunity to teach, challenge, and inspire students. We want every student’s high school experience to be one that is memorable and productive. At LHS, we are dedicated to continuous learning and supporting student success. Our faculty participates in robust professional learning and meets regularly in Professional Learning Communities to develop research-based instructional plans, discuss teaching strategies for engaged learning, and analyze student performance. Our guidance counselors meet with students and parents to discuss academic programming including Advanced Placement® courses and post-secondary options available through Georgia’s Dual Enrollment program. We work with students to identify career pathway courses designed for real-world employment readiness. We strongly believe in student participation in extracurricular activities to create a positive high school experience. LHS offers something for everyone. Our Georgia Bridgemen marching band is approximately 450 members strong. We have 21 competitive sports programs for student athletes. Academic extracurricular activities include Mock Trial, Mu Alpha Theta math club, Science Olympiad, SAGA school newspaper, Model UN, Literary, Spanish Honor Society, National Art Honor Society, just to name a few. Our Career, Technical, and Agricultural Education student organizations include FFA, FBLA, FCCLA, HOSA, TSA, Skills USA, and AFJROTC- StellarXplorers. We also offer a variety of clubs to support student interests such as drama, flying, archery, fishing, anime, guitar, Y-club, BETA, Anchor, and chess. We welcome the opportunity for parents and community members to become involved at LHS. Parents are always encouraged to visit our school and to be a part of student success by: • Attending Fall and Spring Open House and other parent involvement events • • • •

Checking student attendance and progress in Infinite Campus Supporting school-wide community service projects Joining a booster club or the Lowndes Education Improvement Foundation (LEIF) Maintaining open communication with teachers, administrators, and counselors

I am honored to serve as the Principal of Lowndes High School and to be part of this community. If I can be of assistance, please feel free to contact me at leannemccall@lowndes.k12.ga.us or (229) 245-2260. We are ONE LOWNDES! Sincerely,

LeAnne McCall Principal Lowndes High School

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2019-20 LHS Advisement Guide

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What We Believe


Vision/Mission/Values/Principles

Our Vision

A learning community striving for excellence every day.

Our Mission

Working together to empower, challenge, and inspire - One Lowndes! Values: • • • • • •

A Safe and Orderly School Environment A Focus on Students Empowering Leadership and Teamwork Research-Based and Data-Driven Decision Making Effective and Efficient Operations Stakeholders Satisfaction and Support

Guiding Principles:

• The safety, education, and welfare of our students are our priorities, and this must be reflected in our actions and our facilities. • A safe, supportive environment nurtures teaching and learning. • Excellent teachers are the foundation of quality instruction. All educators are accountable for the quality of work provided to students, and they must be committed to the continuous improvement of that work. • All educators and staff must be continuous learners. They must be disciplined people, with disciplined thought and disciplined action. • The purpose of the school is to ensure that each student develops the capacity to think, reason, and use one’s mind well. Each student must develop those understandings, skills, and habits of the mind which make it possible to participate fully in the life of a diverse society operating in the context of an information-based global economy. • The focus of all schools’ activities must be on providing students with quality work which engages them in meaningful learning. • Every student can surpass their current level of learning. Students learn in different ways and at different rates; therefore, instruction should make every attempt to match learning styles and levels. • All resources (time, people, space, information, budget, and technology) must be used effectively, efficiently, and continuously evaluated to improve the quality of education provided for our students. • A home/school/community partnership with open communication is essential in providing each student the support needed to be successful. • Each parent is a partner with the school system in providing a quality education to his/her child. Parent, student, and community input into every aspect of what we do as a school system is absolutely essential to everyone’s success. Back to Table of Contents

2019-20 LHS Advisement Guide

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Administrative Team

Tonya Brown

Dan Chappuis

LeAnne McCall Principal

Jared Dickey

Stacy Dickey

Janet Hendley

Casey Page

Krista Pearson

Danny Redshaw

Cloise Williams

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2019-20 LHS Advisement Guide

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The Three W’s What you know…What you can do…What kind of person you are becoming So what do the three W’s have to do with you at LHS? Together they frame what you should be doing every day.  Learning, doing, becoming.  Make no mistake; all three are of great importance to the future you.  When you finish your high school days, don’t look back and think of them as a spectator events for you; make sure you’re in the game, developing into a successful adult. To think about the three W’s of the 21st Century, let’s first look back at the “Three R’s,” which actually are attributed to the 18th Century.  It was in the late 1700s, not long after the establishment of the United States of America, that Sir William Curtis, a member of Parliament from the City of London, made a toast at a Board of Education dinner and has been credited with the phrase, “Reading, wRiting, and aRithmetic” to describe the three cornerstone skills of education.  Since Sir Curtis’ recitation of renown, the “Three R’s” have popped up over and over again for a number of causes (Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, for example), both in and out of the world of education. The skills of reading, writing, and mathematics continue to be important for the scholarship of any student.  If a young LHS student sought to improve in classwork, he or she could never be wrong in immersing himself or herself in the improvement of these three fundamentals.

IN THE WORLD IN WHICH YOU ARE GOING TO LIVE, IT’S PROBABLY NOT GOING TO BE ENOUGH, HOWEVER.

1. WHAT

YOU KNOW,

2. WHAT

YOU CAN DO

which is in part the “Three ‘R’s,” continues to be an important part of academic, vocational, and social progress. Although information is plentiful in your wired world, knowledge is still an important part of your success story.  It doesn’t end there, though.

is of great interest to the world that awaits you. It’s a question you should ask yourself frequently.  Many people like to make “bucket lists” of things they’d like to do in a lifetime.  As a high school student, you should be making your “survival list” of things you need to be able to do to be successful as an adult.  The things you do in and out of class should contribute to your ability to do things.  Some abilities will come your way through extracurricular activities: things you do with your family, with a civic organization, or with your community.  The ability to do things will be important to future friends, your potential spouse, a possible employer, higher education, and most importantly, yourself.

3. WHAT KIND OF PERSON

YOU ARE BECOMING

is arguably the most important thing you are doing each day, both in and out of school. Are you becoming someone who is contributing to the greater good?  Are you becoming a person of integrity?  Are you becoming more patient?  More hard-working?  We don’t actually have a class for this.  In truth, ALL of your classes are in this.  Everything you do contributes to the building of…you.  Seek to be a person of value.  “Of value” to yourself, your family, your friends, your community, and the world.  You’ll be amazed at what you’ve built little by little – sometimes without noticing – over the course of your high school years. Back to Table of Contents

2019-20 LHS Advisement Guide

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Academics at LHS


INSTRUCTIONAL INFORMATION LHS SCHEDULE Lowndes High School operates on a 4 x 4 block schedule. Students take four courses each semester (eighteen weeks), earning one Carnegie unit for each course. Each class meets for ninety-minutes. After completing the fall semester (August-December), students begin spring semester and take four additional courses (January-May). The greatest benefit of a block schedule is that students have the opportunity to earn as many as 32 Carnegie units over a four-year period. Students also have more opportunities to take elective courses (academic, Advanced Placement, Dual Enrollment, technology, fine arts, Air Force Junior ROTC, and physical education) as part of their chosen course of study. Students planning to enter research universities, regional universities, and state universities and colleges within the University System of Georgia are encouraged to take additional academic elective courses. The block schedule also helps those students who fall behind academically by giving them more opportunities to get “back on track” without going to summer school or taking overlapping courses.

INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMING AND PLACEMENT Lowndes High School offers a comprehensive program of study with a common set of requirements for all students. At the beginning of the high school career, students should establish appropriate goals and plan carefully to meet requirements of their chosen program of study. All students entering the secondary program are urged to confer with their subject matter teacher, counselor, and parents before selecting courses. The counselor and subject matter teacher are in a position to answer questions and give sound advice. It is important for the student to select a course of study that he/she is willing to pursue with enthusiasm, interest and effort. Students in high school progress toward graduation on a course-by-course basis. Students take courses based upon academic performance, academic needs, graduation requirements, and previous credits earned. Students entering Lowndes High School are assigned a graduation year. The graduation requirements in effect at the time of entrance apply for the student’s entire high school career unless amended by the Board of Education. A tentative program of study is planned by the student, the counselor, and parents to serve as a guide in the selection of courses during the entire secondary school program. This program of study should be flexible and allow for a change in direction if the student has a change of interest. State and system requirements must be included in program planning. The Lowndes High Advisement Guide is a resource for selecting, planning, and completing the courses that lead to high school graduation. The guide will be used throughout the student’s high school enrollment.

NINTH GRADE ACADEMY Lowndes High freshmen will enter the Ninth Grade Academy. Most academic classes are taught in the ninth grade area; however, electives are taught in other areas of the building. The academy concept allows for closer supervision and the opportunity for ninth graders to establish a relationship with a small group of ninth grade teachers. Parent involvement is a key component of the ninth grade academy. Parents are invited to a rising freshman parent night conducted at each middle school in the spring of the 8th grade year as well as a freshman orientation IGNITE at Lowndes High School in the fall of the 9th grade year.

PARENT CONFERENCES Continued communication between the home and school is vital to a successful secondary experience. Although parents are encouraged to contact teachers directly to discuss their child’s progress, certain issues may warrant a conference. Parents should contact the child’s guidance counselor to schedule a conference at any time during the semester. Parent/ teacher conferences are scheduled through the guidance office (245-2260). Conferences are scheduled between 7:45 a.m. – 8:15 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

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2019-20 LHS Advisement Guide

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GRADING PROCEDURES INFINITE CAMPUS Infinite Campus is an online tool that provides parents and guardians with access to their child’s grades and attendance information. Infinite Campus is available anywhere the user has an Internet-connected device. Parents may register online for Infinite Campus by first obtaining a username and password from the Lowndes High School registrars at 2452260.

GRADES

Grades are updated each Monday by 4pm.

Grades are cumulative.

There is a requirement of a grade of 70 or above to receive credit for a course.

A final exam or a Georgia Milestones End of Course Assessment is required for each course. Final exams/EOC count 20% of the semester average. All students are required to complete final exams in accordance with the final exam schedule. No exams are given early. In extenuating circumstances, students must receive written permission from the principal to make up exams.

PROGRESS REPORTS AND REPORT CARDS Parents and students have the responsibility of monitoring progress during the year using Infinite Campus. The website to access the portal is https://campus.lowndes.k12.ga.us/campus/portal/lowndes.jsp. Printed progress reports are issued to students through homeroom at 9 weeks. A final grade and Carnegie unit credit earned are given to the student at the end of each semester. Transcripts and additional grade reports are available to parents upon request.

STUDENT SCHEDULES Since the schedule of classes for the entire school year is built upon students’ requests, it is important for students and parents to be accurate and specific in course selection. Students receive course verification forms as part of the registration progress. Careful attention to individual student requests during registration will allow the best opportunity to accommodate the requests. The administration reserves the right to adjust schedules in order to balance class sizes and teacher loads.

TRANSFER CREDIT FOR WORK IN OTHER SCHOOLS In accordance with the Southern Association of Schools Standards, Lowndes High School will validate competency before awarding Lowndes High School credit for work completed at a home school or private school that is not accredited by the Southern Association of College and Schools, one of the SACS equivalents, the Georgia Accrediting Commission, or one of the accrediting agencies that is a member of the Georgia Private School Accreditation Council. Specifically, Lowndes High School accepts at face value credit transferred from the New England, Middle States, Southern, North Central, Northwest, and Western Associations, as well as the Georgia Accrediting Commission. Students entering Lowndes High School from private schools not accredited by one of the above associations may be required to validate competency through testing or through scholarship performance in specified courses. Students entering from a home school may be required to earn credit through testing. Students wishing to transfer credit for a Georgia Milestones End of Course (EOC) assessments course ( Algebra 1, Geometry, Physical Science, Biology, Ninth Grade Literature and Composition, American Literature and Composition, U. S. History, and Economics) must take the appropriate EOC assessment before credit will be posted.

Home School Students entering Lowndes High School from accredited home schooling programs will follow procedures and receive all units of credit according to the guidelines established by the Lowndes County Board of Education.

Transfer of Grades from Lowndes Alternative Program Grades must reflect the student’s current grades and include at least one skill/concept/topic grade per week utilizing Infinite Campus grade book.

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2019-20 LHS Advisement Guide

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Credit for High School Courses Taken in Middle School Students who earn credit for high school courses while in middle school receive credit toward their high school graduation requirements. Courses taken for high school credit at the middle school will be calculated in the Lowndes High grade point average but do not count toward the grade point average for the HOPE Scholarship program.

PROMOTION REQUIREMENTS The following units must be earned for class/grade placement. Class placement is made at the beginning of each academic year based on the number of units earned at that time and is not altered during the year. Grade / Status

Minimum Units Required for Promotion

Tenth grade – Sophomore Eleventh grade – Junior Twelfth grade – Senior

6 units 13 units 20 units

28 units for Graduation

**Students must meet Georgia High School Association (GHSA) requirements to participate in many extracurricular activities. Eligibility requirements differ from promotion requirements and should be discussed with the activity coach or sponsor. See the GHSA Requirements Addendum for more information.

GRADING SCALE Numeric grades are issued according to the scale listed below. Passing grades are 70 and above. A cumulative numeric average is computed at the end of every semester

A = 90 and Above

B = 80-89

C = 70-79

F = Below 70

HONOR ROLL Lowndes High recognizes superior student effort and achievement. We release, to the press, the names of those students who make the honor roll at the end of each semester. To make the Principals Honor Roll, a student must achieve an overall average of 90.000 or greater for the grading period. The calculation is to the third decimal place and not rounded up.

EXEMPTIONS

A student who meets the following criteria is eligible to exempt the final exam for a course:

The student is a junior or senior.

The student has an average of at least 90.

The student has three (3) or fewer absences.

The student has three (3) or fewer tardies.

Note: The student is required to take statemandated Georgia Milestones End of Course Assessments.

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GRADUATION HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA

28 Carnegie Units The document awarded to students certifying that they have satisfied attendance requirements, unit requirements, and the state assessment requirements as referenced in State Board of Education Rule 160-3-1-.07 Testing Programs –Student Assessment.

LIFE SKILLS PREPARATORY DIPLOMA

The document awarded to students with disabilities assigned to a special education program who have not met the State Board of Education Assessment Requirements referenced in Rule 160-3-1-.07 Testing Programs – Student Assessment or who have not completed all of the requirements for a high school diploma but who have nevertheless completed their Individualized Education Programs (IEP).

SIXTH SEMESTER GRADUATION

Students who have completed all graduation requirements at the end of six semesters are eligible to apply for graduation. The diploma will be conferred at the spring graduation ceremony. After graduation, the graduate will not be eligible to participate in any school or extra-curricular activities. The applicant will submit all required documentation, along with the application, to his or her guidance counselor no later than May 1st prior to the start of the anticipated year of graduation. Please see your guidance counselor for more information.

SEVENTH SEMESTER GRADUATION

Students who have completed all graduation requirements at the end of seven semesters are eligible to apply for graduation. The diploma will be conferred at the spring graduation ceremony. However, an accurate transcript, which is necessary for post-secondary pursuits, will be provided to the seventh semester graduate as soon as possible. Seventh semester graduates will no longer be enrolled at Lowndes High School and will not be eligible to participate in school or extracurricular activities. Please see your guidance counselor for more information.

GRADE POINT AVERAGE/HONORS FOR 2020 & 2021 COHORTS Determination of Honor Graduates For recognition as an honor graduate, a senior must achieve a weighted cumulative GPA of 90.000 or greater for all courses taken during the entire high school career. The calculation is to the third decimal place and not rounded up. The calculation of the honor graduate GPA is by the school’s student information system.

Determination of Grade Point Average

For the purpose of determining class rank, students taking courses at Lowndes High School designated as Honors (previously denoted as Pre-Advanced Placement (PreAP)) and/or Advanced Placement (AP) receive merit points calculated into the total weighted GPA. These points, although not reflected in individual course grades, automatically are assigned by the school’s student information system at a rate of 5 points per unit for Honors/PreAP classes and 10 points for AP classes. Students taking courses at Lowndes High School denoted Honors, Pre-Advanced Placement (PreAP) or Advanced Placement (AP) can earn additional merit points toward their cumulative GPA. Teachers add points to the final average at the end of the semester at a rate of two points (2) per unit for Honors/PreAP and five points (5) per unit for AP courses, not to exceed a maximum grade of 100. However, there shall be no merit points added to grades below 70 or for credits earned online or at other sites, including grades earned at post-secondary institutions.

Dual Enrollment/Transfer


Determination of Valedictorian and Salutatorian The titles of salutatorian and valedictorian recognition are awarded to the students who achieve the highest GPAs in their senior class. The following conditions apply:

•The candidates have to be enrolled students at Lowndes High School by the 10th day of the senior term. •Determination is on the cumulative GPA for all high school courses through the second semester of the senior year. •For the rank of valedictorian or salutatorian, a tie between two students occurs if and only if the cumulative GPA is equal when rounded to the thousandths place. •In case of a tie for salutatorian, there will be two salutatorians. •In case of a tie for the valedictorian, co-valedictorians reign with no salutatorians, and a committee appointed by the principal determines the recipients of Governor’s Scholarship awards.

GRADE POINT AVERAGE/HONORS FOR 2022 COHORT AND BEYOND Determination of Honor Graduates

For recognition as an honor graduate, a senior must have not failed a course and achieve a weighted cumulative GPA of 90.000 or greater for all courses that receive high school credit. The calculation is to the third decimal place and not rounded up. The calculation of the honor graduate GPA is by the school’s student information system. Determination of Honor Graduates with Distinction for the Class of 2022 For recognition as an honor graduate with distinction, a senior must have not failed a course and achieve a weighted cumulative GPA of 95.000 or greater for all courses that receive high school credit. The calculation is to the third decimal place and not rounded up. In addition, the student must successfully complete a minimum of two Advanced Placement or AP Equivalent Dual Enrollment courses. The calculation of the honor graduate GPA is by the school’s student information system. Determination of Grade Point Average For the purpose of determining class rank, students taking courses at Lowndes High School designated as Honors, Advanced Placement, or an AP equivalent Dual Enrollment courses receive merit points calculated into the total weighted GPA. Students who successfully complete courses at a four year university that are equivalent to an Advanced Placement Course, as determined by the LHS Advanced Placement Advisement Committee, will receive the additional Class Rank Points. These points, although not reflected in individual course grades, are automatically assigned by the school’s student information system. Teachers are not to assign grades that exceed a maximum of 100.

Determination of Valedictorian and Salutatorian The titles of salutatorian and valedictorian recognition are awarded to the students who achieve the highest GPAs in their senior class. The following conditions apply: • The candidates must be enrolled students at Lowndes High School by the 10th day of the senior year. • Determination is on the cumulative GPA that includes all courses that receive high school credit. • The candidate must be an honor graduate with distinction. • For the rank of valedictorian or salutatorian, a tie between two students occurs when and/or if the cumulative GPA is equal when rounded to the thousandths place. • In case of a tie for salutatorian, there will be two salutatorians. • In case of a tie for the valedictorian, co-valedictorians reign with no salutatorians, and a committee appointed by the principal determines the recipients of Governor’s Scholarship awards

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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS ADVANCED PLACEMENT Lowndes High School currently offers numerous Advanced Placement (AP) courses. Compared with regular high school courses, AP courses are more demanding, often requiring additional time and work. AP courses should be considered commensurate with college-level work.

Placement Criteria: The following criteria will be considered when advising candidates for the Advanced Placement (AP) program. However, Lowndes High School follows the protocol established by the CollegeBoard® which encourages students who are academically promising to consider enrollment in the program.

Students identified as eligible for gifted services

Academically promising students recommended by subject area teachers

Students identified by the AP Potential formula as possible candidates for the AP program

Students who present themselves for enrollment and understand the rigor and requirements of the program

The CollegeBoard® Advanced Placement program provides high school students with the opportunity to receive advanced placement and/or credit in college through successful completion of an Advanced Placement exam. All students enrolled in AP courses are encouraged to take the AP exam. CollegeBoard® does require a fee for AP exams. Please refer to the CollegeBoard® website for the cost of exams. Students not enrolled in AP classes may register for the AP exams. Students should check with specific colleges for their policies regarding enrollment in AP courses and credits for AP exams. Lowndes High School also offers honors courses for students desiring a more rigorous program of study. Honors courses are designed to prepare students for AP courses.

PATHWAY COMPLETION Students have the opportunity to complete pathways within their program of study by earning credit in specified courses. Students may be pathway completers in the educational areas of: Career /Technical and Agricultural Education, Advanced Academics, Fine Arts, and World Languages. Advanced Academic Pathways: Students may earn an Advanced Academic Pathway in any of the following content areas: English, mathematics, science or social studies. To complete an Advanced Academic Pathway a student must successfully complete 4 required courses in the academic area, one of which must be an Advanced Placement or Dual Enrollment course. Additionally, students must earn credits in two sequential courses in the same world language. Fine Arts Pathway: Students complete a Fine Arts Pathway when they have completed three courses in either dace, music, theatre, or visual arts World Language Pathway: Students complete a World Language Pathway when they have completed three courses in the same World Language. CTAE Pathway: Students complete a CTAE Pathway when they complete a series of three or four specific courses in CTAE-approved pathway. *A total of three (3) units of credit shall be required from the following areas: CTAE and/or Foreign Language and/or Fine Arts to be a pathway completer. Students are encouraged to select courses in a focused area of interest.

Dual Enrollment Georgia’s Dual Enrollment allows students in 9th – 12th grade to earn college credit while working on their high school diploma. Tuition, mandatory fees and required textbooks are paid through Dual Enrollment. The goal of Dual Enrollment is to increase college access and completion, and prepare students to enter the workforce with the skills needed for success. To participate in Dual Enrollment, students must complete an application, meet the admissions requirements at the postsecondary institution, and make satisfactory academic progress. Applications must be received by the student’s counselor by April 15 for Fall or Summer participation and November 1 for Spring participation.


Lowndes High School

Advanced Placement​ Program 2019-2020 ®​

Current AP Courses

Biology

Microeconomics

Calculus

Physics

Chemistry

Spanish Language

Computer Science Principles

Statistics

Environmental Science

Studio Art: 2-D Design

English Language

Studio Art: Drawing

English Literature

US Government

Human Geography

US History

Macroeconomics

World History

Students Scoring 3 or Higher on AP Exams 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Total AP Students

371

378

392

375

384

346

330

342

Number of Exams

594

583

644

628

649

565

570

567

AP Students with Scores of 3+

190

205

220

213

195

193

213

227

% of Total AP Students with Scores 3+

51.2

54.2

56.1

56.8

50.8

55.8

64.5

66.4

​Dual Enrollment for 2018-2019​ Fall 2016

Spring 2017

Fall 2017

Spring 2018

Fall 2018

Spring 2019

Wiregrass Georgia Technical College

55

100

120

107

98

94

Valdosta State University

47

54

103

141

78

81

Georgia Military College

52

80

59

66

99

108

2

4

280

287

Other Post-Secondary Institutions TOTAL

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Lowndes High School

A ​ ccomplishments for Advanced Placement and Dual Enrollment L​owndes High School is named a ​2019 Advanced Placement (AP) Honors School​ by the Georgia

Department of Education in three categories. ● AP Humanities School​ for testing students in at least one ELA course, two social science courses, one fine arts course, and one world language course ● AP Stem School​ for testing students in at least two math courses and two science courses ● AP Stem Achievement School​ for testing students in at least two math courses and two science courses ​and​ at least 40% of exam scores on these exams earning scores of 3 or higher To celebrate students who excel on AP exams, LHS teachers and administrators visited the families of 50 students. These students earned a total of 73 top scores of 5 on AP exams. In the Class of 2019, 32 graduates were named LHS AP Scholars for taking 8 or more AP courses. Thirteen students from the Class of 2019 graduated with a high school diploma and an associate’s degree from college.

Advanced Placement and Dual Enrollment Notes ✔ Teachers and counselors encourage students to take rigorous courses from the varied programs that are available. ✔ Valdosta State University and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University are teaching Dual Enrollment courses on the LHS campus. ✔ Wiregrass Georgia Technical College is currently offering courses in construction, healthcare sciences, and public safety at Lowndes High School. ✔ Students have the opportunity to enroll in AP courses not offered at LHS through Georgia Virtual Schools. ✔ Students are participating in Dual Enrollment at post-secondary institutions outside of our community which include Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, and Brewton Parker College. ✔ As the number of students participating in Dual Enrollment with Wiregrass Technical College, Valdosta State University, and Georgia Military College continues to increase, enrollment in Advanced Placement courses has remained consistent. ✔ Parent Night to provide information on Advanced Placement and Dual Enrollment will be held January 16, 2020.​ Back to Table of Contents

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Lowndes High School

Dual Enrollment/Advanced Placement Equivalents Class of 2022 and Beyond Students who successfully complete courses at a four year university that are equivalent to an Advanced Placement Course, as determined by the LHS Advanced Placement Advisement Committee, will receive additional Class Rank Points. These points, although not reflected in individual course grades, are automatically assigned by the school’s student information system. The following courses are considered to be Dual Enrollment/ Advanced Placement equivalents; however, the status of a course is subject to change. Advanced Placement Course

Valdosta State University Course

AP Studio Art Drawing

ART 1010

AP Studio Art 2D Design

ART 1020

AP Studio Art 3D Design

ART 1030

AP Biology

BIO 1010 and BIO 1020L

AP Chemistry

CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L

AP Physics

PHYS 1111K

AP Calculus

MATH 2261

AP Statistics

MATH 2620

AP US Government and Politics

POLS 1101

AP World History

HIST 1101

AP US History

HIST 2111 or HIST 2112

AP Microeconomics

ECON 2106

AP Macroeconomics

ECON 2105

AP Human Geography

GEOG 1101

AP Psychology

PSYC 1101

AP English Lit or AP English Lang

ENGL 1102

AP Spanish Language

SPAN 2001

AP Computer Science

CS 1301

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SPECIAL EDUCATION Special education services are provided based on Georgia Department of Education rules and regulations. Services are based on the identified needs of individual students.

LOWNDES LEARNING CENTER (LLC) Lowndes Learning Center is an alternative education program offered on the LHS campus. The LLC serves students who are academically at-risk or have specific scheduling needs. Students in the LLC utilize a computer assisted instructional program.

LOWNDES ALTERNATIVE PROGRAM The Lowndes Alternative Program located on the campus of the Parker-Mathis Learning Center is an extension of Lowndes High School. The alternative program is a special placement option for students who are identified as chronically disruptive or have committed an offense which requires placement into the alternative program (Refer to the Lowndes County Schools Student & Parent Handbook). The program serves students in grades fourth through twelve and follows the state-mandated curriculum. Not all courses that are offered at LHS are available at the alternative school.

VIRTUAL LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES The Lowndes County School System recognizes the importance of our students becoming independent, life-long learners, and one aspect of this goal is allowing students to work through classes in an online environment. Recognizing that our students are technological learners with a growing need for flexibility, and that the business community, colleges, and universities seek graduates whose high level digital skills match their ongoing professional and learning needs, the school system offers Georgia Virtual School classes as an option for disciplined, self-motivated students who desire this technological platform for learning. The rigor of the Georgia Virtual School courses mirrors the high level of expectation and quality that students are held to within the Lowndes County School System. Interested parents or students should see a guidance counselor for more information.

FOREIGN EXCHANGE STUDENTS A foreign exchange student is a student who requests authorization for enrollment at Lowndes High School, through a foreign exchange agency approved by the State Department of United States Government or the Council of Standards for International Educational Travel. Students eligible for the foreign exchange program must be enrolled in high school in their home country but may not have completed the final year of high school as organized in their home country. The age of the foreign exchange student must be at least 15 but not exceed 18 years on September 1 of the school year that the student is to be enrolled in the system. Students should be screened for demonstrated maturity and to make certain that they have sufficient knowledge of English.  It is the responsibility of the exchange program to verify this provision. The exchange program must assume full responsibility for the student.  This includes solving any housing or personal concerns the student may have.  Exchange students must have complete insurance coverage. Foreign exchange students must be enrolled as full-time students and their records must be in order for admission no later than June 15 prior to the school year of enrollment. The following records must be submitted with the application:

a. a completed foreign exchange application,

b. an official transcript of school records with a translation signed by the translator,

c. an English proficiency statement signed by the agency representative,

d. medical or immunization forms,

e. a copy of the passport, and

f. a copy of the approved visa for the student.

A high school diploma will not be issued through this program. Upon satisfactory completion of course requirements, course credit will be issued to exchange students and may be transferred to their home school upon request by the student. Exchange students will have courses, grades, credit, etc., recorded as other students. This is necessary for extra-curricular eligibility purposes and to maintain an academic record for participating students.

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HIGH SCHOOL ASSESSMENT REQUIREMENTS

Georgia Milestones End of Course Assessments are administered for the following courses: GSE Algebra 1, GSE Geometry, Physical Science, Biology, U. S. History, Economics, Ninth Grade Literature and Composition, and American Literature and Composition. Students take the EOC assessment during the semester in which they are enrolled in the course.

The EOC assessment will count 20% to the course grade.

Any student, regardless of grade-level, enrolled in an EOC course must take the appropriate EOC assessment in order to receive credit for that course.

Students who are absent during the EOC testing window must take the test during the mid-month testing window. Students failing to retest will not receive credit for the course.

Students enrolled in online courses which they receive graduation credit for one of the EOC courses must take the corresponding EOC assessment.

EOC results are posted on report cards and included in the final course grade.

EOC assessments are required for certain Dual Enrollment courses.

Earning Units of High School Course Credit by Testing-Out A student may demonstrate subject area competency by testing-out of any course that has an associated Georgia Milestones End of Course (EOC) Assessments during the June test administration. Students must meet several requirements to be eligible to participate in the testing-out option. A unit of credit is awarded to those students who reach the performance level of Distinguished on an EOC prior to taking the specific EOC course. Additionally, a fee of $50.00 per test is established by the Georgia Department of Education and must be paid prior to the administration of the test. Please contact your guidance counselor for more information and to schedule an appointment to participate.

Earning Units of High School Course Credit by Native Language Assessment The Georgia Department of Education provides an opportunity for an exemption from the high school graduation requirements for two units of foreign language for students whose native language is not English. To demonstrate proficiency, students must take a two-level native language assessment given by the foreign language department at

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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 4 credits of English · 9th Grade Literature & Composition · 10th Grade Literature & Composition · American Literature · 4th English Core Credit 4 credits of Math · Algebra 1 · Geometry · Algebra 2 · 4th Math Core Credit 4 credits of Science · Physical Science or Physics · Biology · Chemistry · 4th Science Credit 4 credits of Social Studies · American Government · World History · US History · Economics 1 credit of Personal Fitness/Health · Health/Personal Fitness 3 credits of CTAE, Fine Arts, or World Language · 3 credits of high school electives that are defined at CTAE, Fine Arts, or

World Language courses

4 elective credits · 4 credits of high school electives or beyond required core

4 years of high school 4 units of credit each semester 2 semesters per school year Back to Table of Contents

32 units of credit possible


Graduation Requirements for Class of 2020 ENGLISH - 4 Units

SOCIAL STUDIES - 4 Units

9th Grade Literature & Composition (EOC) 10th Grade Literature & Composition

American Government AP US Government

American Literature and Composition (EOC) AP English Language (Elective)

World History World Area Studies and AP World History

Advanced Composition British Literature AP English Literature

US History (EOC) US World Affairs and AP US History (EOC)

MATHEMATICS - 4 Units Foundations of Algebra Accel. Algebra 1/ Geom. A (EOC) Algebra 1 (EOC) Algebra 1 Support/Year Long (EOC)

Economics (EOC) AP Macroeconomics (elective) AP Microeconomics (EOC) AP Macroeconomics and AP Microeconomics (EOC)

CTAE &/or FINE ARTS &/or FOR. LANG. - 3 Units* 1

Accelerated Geometry B/Algebra II (EOC Geometry (EOC)) Geometry Support/Year Long (EOC)

2

Pre Calculus Algebra II Algebra II Support/Year Long

Students planning to enter or transfer into a University System of Georgia institution mus take two units of the same foreign language

3

Pre Calculus Statistical Reasoning College Readiness Mathematics AP Statistics AP Calculus

ELECTIVES - 8 units 1 2 3

SCIENCE - 4 Units

4

Physical Science (EOC) or Physics

5

Biology I (EOC)

6

Chemistry, Env. Science, Earth Systems

7

Astronomy, Biology II, Botany, Chemistry, Chemistry II, Environmental Science, Earth Systems Human Anatomy, Zoology, AP Biology, AP Chemistry, AP Environmental Science, AP Physics, approved CTAE courses.

8

HEALTH and PHYSICAL EDUCATION 1 unit Health/Personal Fitness

SELECTED PATHWAY(S):

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Graduation Requirements for the Class of 2021, 2022 & 2023 ENGLISH - 4 Units

SOCIAL STUDIES - 4 Units

9th Grade Literature & Composition (EOC) 10th Grade Literature & Composition

American Government /Civics AP US Government

American Literature and Composition (EOC) AP English Language

World History World Area Studies and AP World History

Advanced Composition British Literature AP English Literature

US History (EOC US World Affairs and AP US History (EOC)

MATHEMATICS - 4 Units

Economics (EOC) AP Macroeconomics (elective) AP Microeconomics (EOC) AP Macroeconomics and AP Microeconomics (EOC)

Foundations of Algebra

CTAE &/or FINE ARTS &/or FOR. LANG. - 3 Units*

GSE Algebra 1 Support/Year Long (EOC) GSE Algebra 1 (EOC) GSE Geometry Support/Year Long (EOC) GSE Geometry (EOC)

1

Algebra II Algebra II Support/Year Long

3

2 * Students planning to enter or transfer into a University System of Georgia institution must take two units of the same foreign languag

Pre Calculus Statistical Reasoning College Readiness Mathematics AP Statistics AP Calculus

ELECTIVES - 8 units 1

SCIENCE - 4 Units

2

Physical Science (EOC) or Physics

3

Biology I (EOC)

4

Chemistry, Env. Science, Earth Systems

5

Astronomy, Biology II, Botany, Chemistry, Chemistry II, Environmental Science, Earth Systems Human Anatomy, Zoology, AP Biology, AP Chemistry, AP Environmental Science, AP Physics, approved CTAE courses.

6 7 8

HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION - 1 unit Health/Personal Fitness

SELECTED PATHWAY(S):

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ACADEMICS ENGLISH All students must complete (4) units of English.

Courses in English: Ninth Grade LiteratureComposition: This course integrates writing, grammar and usage, literature, speaking, listening, and critical thinking skills. Presents the writing process: planning, drafting, revising, editing, and proofing; the study of form in personal narratives, descriptions, and expository papers with emphasis on persuasive writing. Emphasizes oral and written responses to literature, distinguising characteristics of various gengres, literary elements, and vocabulary study.

Tenth Grade Literature/Composition: This course develops descriptive, personal narrative, expository, and persuasive writing skills and includes grammar,mechanics, and usage. Introduces a variety of authors and selections from world literature, poetry, short stories, novels,drama, and classical mythology. Engages students in the research process. Stresses vocabulary development and requires written literary analysis through discussion of elements of literature. Prerequisite: Ninth Grade Literature/Composition

American Literature/Composition: This course offers opportunities to improve reading, writing, speaking/listening, and critical thinking skills through the study of American literature. Includes a variety of literary genres and writers in a chronological or thematic pattern. Refines research skills. Integrates grammar, mechanics, and usage into the writing process. Prerequisite: Tenth Grade Literature/Composition

British Literature/Composition: This course offers opportunities to improve reading, writing, speaking/listening, and critical thinking skills through the study of literary selections from British/English writers organized chronologically or thematically. Refines research skills. Integrates grammar, mechanics, and u sage into the writing process. Prerequisite: American Literature/Composition

Advanced Composition: This course offers opportunities to improve reading, writing, speaking/listening, and critical thinking skills through the study of literary selections from British/English writers organized chronologically or thematically. Refines research skills. It integrates grammar, mechanics, and usage into the writing process. Prerequisite: American Literature/Composition

Advanced Placement Literature/Composition: This course conforms to the CollegeBoardÂŽ recommendations for the AP Literature and Composition Examination and covers the study and practice of writing and the study of literature. It stresses modes of discourse, assumptions underlying rhetorical strategies, connotation, metaphor, irony, syntax, and tone. Emphasizes writing critical analyses of literature and includes essays in exposition and argument, poetry, drama, prose fiction, and expository literature. Prerequisite: American Literature/Composition

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English Academic Electives: Electives: (May not be used to satisfy core academic requirements for English)

Advanced Placement Language/Composition: This course is an academic elective and conforms to the CollegeBoardÂŽ recommendations for the AP Language Composition Examination. The course emphasizes critical thinking, reading, and writing through the study and discussion of expository, analytical, and argumentative essays. It also stresses the connection between reading and writing mature prose. Students choosing this course must also take American Literature/Composition. Prerequisite: Honors American Literature/Composition

Journalism: This course explores journalistic writing through analysis of newspapers, yearbooks, literary magazines, and broadcast journalism publications. It covers news gathering, ethics, copy writing, editing, and revising as well as publication of the school newspaper or school yearbook.

Literature and History of the Old and New Testament: The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the contents of the Old and New Testaments, the history recorded in both, the literary style and structure, the customs and cultures of the peoples and societies recorded, and the influence of the Old and New Testaments upon law, history, government, literature, art, music, customs, morals, values, and culture. Students enrolled in this course choose to participate in an academic, non-devotional study of the Bible and will receive credit for the class as an academic elective. It is understood that the student who enrolls in this course has done so because of a genuine interest in the Bible as literature and demonstrates the maturity to analyze biblical writings and tolerate a variety of interpretations and opinions.

Mythology: This course introduces the importance of myths and tales of classical mythology, focusing on a comparative study of plot, characters, themes, and figurative devices. The course emphasizes the following: critical and analytical skills, vocabulary development, a study of the influences of Greek, Roman, and Norse word origins on the English language, and composition. The study of the relationship between people and their societies is a major emphasis, along with the impact of mythology on the literary world. Writing exploration through media literacy and viewing will be a focus in this course.

Creative Speaking and Writing: This course focuses on developing public speaking skills. The student will identify effective methods to arrange ideas and information in written form and then convert the written form into an effective oral delivery. The course focuses on critical thinking, organizing ideas, researching counter viewpoints, and communicating appropriately for different audiences and purposes. The student will analyze professional speeches to enhance his or her knowledge of solid speech writing. The student will read informational and persuasive text and incorporate the ideas within these genres into the speeches created. The student will speak in a manner that guides the listener to understand important ideas and participate in student-to-teacher, student-to-student, and group verbal interactions.

MATHEMATICS All students must complete (4) units of mathematics.

Courses in Mathematics: GSE Foundations of Algebra: Provides many opportunities to revisit and expand the understanding of foundational algebra concepts, will employ diagnostic means to offer focused interventions, and will incorporate varied instructional strategies to prepare students for required high school mathematics courses. The course will emphasize both algebra and numeracy in a variety of contexts including number sense, proportional reasoning, quantitative reasoning with functions, and solving equations and inequalities. (Student enrollment criteria must be met to be enrolled.)

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GSE Algebra I: The fundamental purpose of Algebra I is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. The critical areas, organized into units, deepen and extend understanding of functions by comparing and contrasting linear, quadratic, and exponential phenomena.

GSE Geometry: Geometry is the second course in a sequence of three high school courses designed to ensure career and college readiness. The course represents a discrete study of geometry with correlated statistics applications. (Prerequisite: Successful GSE Algebra)

Algebra II: Advanced Algebra/Algebra II is the third course in a sequence of three high school courses designed to ensure career and college readiness. It is in Advanced Algebra that students pull together and apply the accumulation of learning that they have from their previous courses, with content grouped into six critical areas, organized into units. They apply methods from probability and statistics to draw inferences and conclusions from data. Students expand their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. They expand their study of right triangle trigonometry to model periodic phenomena. And, finally, students bring together all of their experience with functions and geometry to create models and solve contextual problems. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of Analytic Geometry/GSE Geometry)

Pre-Calculus: Pre-Calculus focuses on standards to prepare students for a more intense study of mathematics. The critical areas organized in seven units delve deeper into content from previous courses. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. (Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra or Algebra II or Accelerated Analytic Geometry B/ Advanced Algebra or Accelerated GSE Geometry B/Algebra II)

Statistical Reasoning: This is a fourth mathematics course option for students who have that provides additional experiences in statistics to strengthen their understanding of the statistical method of inquiry and statistical simulations. Students will formulate statistical questions to be answered using data, will design and implement a plan to collect the appropriate data, will select appropriate graphical and numerical methods for data analysis, and will interpret their results to make connections with the initial question. (Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra or Algebra II or Accelerated Analytic Geometry B/ Advanced Algebra or Accelerated GSE Geometry B/Algebra II)

Mathematics of Finance: This course concentrates on the mathematics necessary to understand and make informed decisions related to personal finance. (Prerequisite: Algebra II)

College Readiness Mathematics: College Readiness Mathematics is a fourth course option for students who have completed Algebra I or Coordinate Algebra, Geometry or Analytic Geometry, and Algebra II or Advanced Algebra, but are still struggling with high school mathematics standards essential for success in first year post-secondary mathematics courses required for non-STEM majors. The course has been approved by the University System of Georgia as a fourth mathematics course beyond Algebra II or Advanced Algebra for non-STEM majors, so the course will meet the needs of college-bound seniors who will not pursue STEM fields. (Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra or Algebra II)

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Advanced Placement Statistics: This course follows the CollegeBoard® syllabus for the Advanced Placement Statistics Examination. The four major themes are exploratory analysis, planning a study, probability, and statistical inference. (Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra or Algebra II or Accelerated Analytic Geometry B/ Advanced Algebra or Accelerated GSE Geometry B/Algebra II)

Advanced Placement Calculus AB: This course follows the CollegeBoard® syllabus for the Advanced Placement Calculus AB examination. The topics include properties of functions and graphs, limits and continuity, differential and integral calculus. (Prerequisite: PreCalculus or Accelerated PreCalculus)

SCIENCE All students must complete four (4) units of science. Students must take one unit of Physical Science or Physics; one unit of Biology; one unit of either Chemistry, Earth Systems, Environmental Science, or an AP/IB science course; and one additional science unit. The fourth science unit requirement is met by taking identified courses from the academic sciences or elective areas as designated in the List of State Funded Courses and K-8 Subjects Rule (IDA2). The fourth unit of science may be used to meet both the science and elective requirements. The student’s postsecondary plans should be discussed before fourth science courses are selected. NOTE: Students have flexibility in meeting the fourth science requirements for high school graduation; however, not all fourth science courses meet the Board of Regents admissions requirements for science. Students should consult their college for details about admissions. It is important that the student’s postsecondary plans be discussed before a fourth science course is selected to assure that the student will meet necessary admission requirements to the postsecondary institution of choice. Courses can be selected from academic science courses or from approved career technology courses that meet science standards listed within the CTAE section of this catalog. Students focused on completion of a career pathway may use the approved courses to meet both the pathway AND the fourth science requirement. In some cases, courses selected for the fourth science unit may be used to meet both the science and elective requirements. Courses can be used to meet both science and elective requirements but they DO NOT earn two credits.

Courses in Science: Physical Science: This course promotes science process skills through study of selected chemistry and physics topics. Domains covered are atomic and nuclear theory and the periodic table; chemical reactions and the properties of matter; energy, force and motion; waves, electricity, and magnetism.

Physics: This course covers basic mechanics (linear motion, Newton’s laws, static forces, circular and angular motion, conservation of momentum and energy, applications of basic mechanics), kinetic theory (phases of matter, information retrieval), thermodynamics (characteristics, conservation), wave mechanics, particle physics, and reference, research skills, lab safety, and process skills. (Prerequisite: Chemistry)

Biology I: This course introduces science process skills through the study of five domains. These domains cover cells, organisms, genetics, evolution, and ecology.

Chemistry I:

This course introduces chemistry; covers science process skills, units of chemistry, atoms and collections of atoms, periodicity and bonding, compounds and reactions, characteristics of states of matter, acid/base chemistry, chemical dynamics and equilibrium, reference, research skills, and lab safety. (Prerequisite: Biology I)

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Earth Systems Science: This course develops the explanations of phenomena fundamental to the sciences of geology and physical geography, including the early history of the Earth, plate tectonics, landform evolution, the Earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s geologic record, weather and climate, and the history of life on Earth. (Prerequisite: Physical Science and Biology I)

Environmental Science: The concepts in this course focus on the links between living things, their surrounds, and the total environment of the planet. The intent of the course is to help individuals become informed, get involved, and care for oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s self and the environment. (Prerequisite: Physical Science and Biology I)

Anatomy: Anatomy is an academic rigorous elective designed for those students planning to pursue a career in a medical or health related field. This course may meet the fourth science requirement. ( Prerequisite: Biology I)

Astronomy: This course introduces astronomy; covers science process skills, laboratory safety, measurements and motions, celestial clock, the moon, solar system, stars, the sun, Milky Way, and other galaxies, cosmology, reference, and research skills. This course may meet the fourth science requirement. (Prerequisite: Biology)

Zoology: Zoology covers science process skills and laboratory safety, porifera, cnidaria, platyhelminthes, nematode, rotifera, annedlida, bryozoa, mollusca, arthropods, echinodermata, hemichordata, chordata, agnatha, chondrichthyes, osteichthyes, amphibia, reptilian, aves, and mammalia. This course may meet the fourth science requirement. (Prerequisite: Physical Science and Biology I)

Botany Honors: Botany introduces science process skills and laboratory safety, the study of botany, plant cells, the plant cell and its environment, photosynthesis and respiration, classification, viruses, Monera, bacteria, blue green algae, fungi, photosynthetic protista, algae, bryophytes, vascular plants, reproduction in flowering plants, identification of flower plants, roots, stems and leaves of flowering plants; plant water relationships, growth regulators in plants, environmental factors, and economics botany. This course is paired with Advanced Placement Biology. (Prerequisite: Physical Science, Biology, and/or Chemistry. Teacher recommendation is suggested for this course.)

Advanced Placement Biology: The AP Biology is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year of college. The AP Biology course is designed to be taken by students after successful completion of a first course in high school biology and one in high school chemistry as well. It aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology. The general areas of study include molecules and cells, heredity and evolution, and organisms and populations. This course conforms to the CollegeBoardÂŽ topics for the Advanced Placement Environmental Science examination. (Designed for students pursuing a more rigorous program of study.)

(Prerequisite: Botany)

Chemistry II:

This course enhances level-one skills; emphasizes qualitative and quantitative analysis and organic chemistry. Chemistry II is paired with AP Chemistry as a year-long option for students.

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Advanced Placement Chemistry: AP Chemistry covers atomic theory and structure, chemical bonding, nuclear chemistry, gases, liquids, solids, solutions, types of reactions, stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetics, and thermodynamics. This course conforms to the CollegeBoard® topics for the Advanced Placement Environmental Science examination. (Designed for students pursuing a more rigorous program of study.) (Prerequisite: Chemistry II)

Advanced Placement Environmental Science: AP Environmental Science is designed to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. This course conforms to the CollegeBoard® topics for the Advanced Placement Environmental Science examination. (Designed for students pursuing a more rigorous program of study.) (Prerequisite: Physical Science, Biology, and Chemistry)

Advanced Placement Physics: AP Physics develops the students’ abilities to: read, understand, and interpret physical information — verbal, mathematical, and graphical; describe and explain the sequence of steps in the analysis of a particular physical phenomenon or problem; use basic mathematical reasoning — arithmetic, algebraic, geometric, trigonometric, or calculus, where appropriate; perform experiments and interpret the results of observations, including making an assessment of experimental uncertainties. This course conforms to the CollegeBoard® topics for the Advanced Placement Environmental Science examination. (Designed for students pursuing a more rigorous program of study.) (Prerequisite: Physics I Pre AP or teacher recommendation)

SOCIAL STUDIES All students must complete four (4) units of social studies (American Government/Civics, World History, U. S. History, and Economics).

Courses in Social Studies: American Government/Civics: This course focuses on the basic concepts and principles of the American political system. It covers the structure and function of the American system of government, the roles and responsibilities of citizens to participate in the political process, and the relationship of the individual to the law and legal system. American Government/Civics is taken in the ninth grade.

World History: This course emphasizes the political, cultural, economic, and social development and growth of civilizations. It covers the development of change beginning with ancient civilizations, the emergence of nations through trade/communications, intellectual development, scientific/technological development, emergence of nation states, nations in conflict and the emerging interdependence of nations in the twentieth century. World History is taken in the tenth grade.

U. S. History: This course investigates the United States, its people, institutions and heritage. It emphasizes political, cultural and social issues, the role of the United States as a world leader and the issues confronting the United States today. U. S. History is taken in the eleventh grade.

Economics: This course focuses on the American economic system; covers fundamental economic concepts, comparative economic system, microeconomics, macroeconomics and international economic interdependence. It stresses the ability to analyze critically and to make decisions concerning public issues. Economics is taken in the twelfth grade.

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World Area Studies: This course examines a region of the world, focusing on an investigation of the geographic, historic, cultural, economic and political development of the region. This course involves such topics as population, urbanization, environment and food supply. This course is paired with AP World History as a year-long option for students.

U. S. and World Affairs: This course focuses on global interrelationships, analyzing strategic geographic, political, economic and social issues that influence the United States’ relationships with other countries in an interdependent world. This course is paired with AP US History as a year-long option for students.

Advanced Placement American Government: The course includes United States history from the time of the earliest settlements to the present. It targets political and social aspects of history, but also includes diplomatic, economic and intellectual history. The course will involve extensive readings, independent study and frequent written analysis to prepare students for the AP examination. This course conforms to the CollegeBoard® topics for the AP American Government examination. This course is designed for students pursuing a more rigorous program of study.

Advanced Placement United States History: AP United States History covers discovery and settlement, colonial society, the American Revolution, Constitution and the New Republic, Age of Jefferson, Nationalism, Sectionalism, Territorial Expansion, Civil War, Reconstruction, Industrialization, Progressive Era, World War I, Depression, New Deal, World War II, The Cold War, through modern times. This course conforms to the CollegeBoard® topics for the AP US History examination. This course is designed for students pursuing a more rigorous program of study. (Prerequisite: U.S. and World Affairs)

Advanced Placement World History: AP World History covers intellectual and cultural history, political and diplomatic history and social and economic history. This course conforms to the CollegeBoard® topics for the AP World History examination. This course is designed for students pursuing a more rigorous program of study.

(Prerequisite: World Area Studies)

Advanced Placement Macroeconomics: This course conforms to CollegeBoard® topics for the Advanced Placement Macroeconomics Examination. The topics include basic economic concepts, measurement of economic performance, national income and price determination and international economics and growth. This course is an academic elective designed for students pursuing a more rigorous program of study.

Advanced Placement Microeconomics: This course conforms to CollegeBoard® topics for the Advanced Placement Microeconomics Examination. The topics include basic economic concepts, the nature and functions of product markets, factor markets and efficiency, equity and the role of government. This course is designed for students pursuing a more rigorous program of study. The End of Course Test for Economics is give at the end of this course.

Social Studies Academic Electives: Electives: (May not be used to satisfy core academic requirements for Social Studies)

The Individual and the Law: This course analyzes the foundations and functions of the American legal system. Examines types of laws, the individual’s relationship to the law and major court decisions

Sociology: This course investigates principles of sociology, the individual in groups, social institutions, social control, and the use of research methods to examine social problems.

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Advanced Placement Human Geography: The purpose of the AP course in Human Geography is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. This course conforms to the CollegeBoard® topics for the AP Human Geography examination. (Designed for students pursuing a more rigorous program of study.)

Advanced Placement Psychology: The purpose of the AP course in Psychology is to introduce the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Included is a consideration of the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. Students also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. This course conforms to the CollegeBoard® topics for the AP Psychology examination. (Designed for students pursuing a more rigorous program of study.)

Advanced Placement European History: This course conforms to CollegeBoard® topics for the Advanced Placement European History Examination and covers intellectual and cultural history, political and diplomatic history and social and economic history. (Designed for students pursuing a more rigorous program of study.)

FOREIGN LANGUAGE All students are encouraged to earn two units of credit in the same foreign language. Students planning to enter or transfer into a University System of Georgia institution must take two units of the same foreign language. Foreign language courses must be taken in sequence. Students whose native language is not English may be considered to have met the foreign language expectation by exercising the credit in lieu of enrollment option if they are proficient in their native language.

Courses in Foreign Language: Spanish I: Spanish I is a beginning foreign language course covering skills that enable the students to understand, read, write and speak the target language in a culturally acceptable manner. Students will function in the language in context and will demonstrate an understanding of Hispanic culture, geography, history and their influence on the Spanish language.

Spanish II: Spanish II is a beginning foreign language course covering skills that enable students to understand, read, write, and speak the target language in a culturally acceptable manner. Students will function in the language using the grammar, pronunciation, and vocabulary in context and will demonstrate an understanding of Hispanic culture, geography and history and their influence on the Spanish language.

(Prerequisite: Spanish I)

Spanish III: Spanish III is an intermediate foreign language course covering skills that will further enable students to understand, read, write, and speak the target language in a culturally acceptable manner. Students will function in the language using the grammar, pronunciation, and vocabulary in context and will demonstrate an understanding of Hispanic culture, geography and history and their influence on the Spanish language. (Prerequisite: Spanish II)

Spanish IV: Spanish IV is an intermediate foreign language course covering skills that will further enable students to understand, read, write, and speak the target language in a culturally acceptable manner. Students will function in the language using the grammar, pronunciation, and vocabulary in context and will demonstrate an understanding of Hispanic culture, geography and history and their influence on the Spanish language. (Prerequisite: Spanish III)

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Spanish V: Spanish V is an advanced foreign language course covering skills that will further enable students to understand, read, write, and speak the target language in a culturally acceptable manner. Students will function in the language using the grammar, pronunciation, and vocabulary in context and will demonstrate an understanding of Hispanic culture, geography and history and their influence on the Spanish language. (Prerequisite: Spanish IV)

Advanced Placement Spanish Language: Advanced Placement Spanish Language is intended for students who wish to develop proficiency and integrate their language skills, using authentic materials and sources. Students who enroll should already have a basic knowledge of the language and cultures of Spanish-speaking peoples and should have attained a reasonable proficiency in using the language. This course conforms to the CollegeBoardÂŽ topics for the AP Spanish Language examination. (Prerequisite: Spanish V)

French I: French I is a beginning foreign language course covering skills that enable the students to understand, read, write and speak the target language in a culturally acceptable manner. Students will function in the language in context and will demonstrate an understanding of French culture, geography, history and their influence on the French language.

French II: French II is a beginning foreign language course covering skills that enable students to understand, read, write, and speak the target language in a culturally acceptable manner. Students will function in the language using the grammar, pronunciation, and vocabulary in context and will demonstrate an understanding of French culture, geography and history and their influence on the French language. (Prerequisite: French I)

French III: French III is an intermediate foreign language course covering skills that will further enable students to understand, read, write, and speak the target language in a culturally acceptable manner. Students will function in the language using the grammar, pronunciation, and vocabulary in context and will demonstrate an understanding of French culture, geography and history and their influence on the French language. (Prerequisite: French II)

French IV: French IV is an intermediate foreign language course covering skills that will further enable students to understand, read, write, and speak the target language in a culturally acceptable manner. Students will function in the language using the grammar, pronunciation, and vocabulary in context and will demonstrate an understanding of French culture, geography and history and their influence on the French language. (Prerequisite: French III)

PHYSICAL EDUCATION ALL students must earn 1 unit of Health/Personal Fitness for graduation. Three (3) units of credit in JROTC (Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps) may be used to satisfy the health/personal fitness requirement.

Courses in Physical Education: Health/Personal Fitness: Health explores the mental, physical and social aspects of life and how each contributes to total health and well-being. Personal Fitness is designed for students to assess their own personal fitness level and needs, learn about the role activity plays in their lives and plan a personal fitness program.

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Introductory Team Sports/Intermediate Team Sports/Advanced Team Sports Includes basketball, flag football, volleyball soccer, and softball

Introductory Lifetime Sports/Intermediate Lifetime Sports/Advanced Lifetime Sports Includes badminton, tennis, wrestling, table tennis, golf, track and field, and horseshoes

Rhythmics and Dance/Intermediate Rhythmics and Dance/Advanced Rhythmics and Dance Includes modern dance, ballet, and country western, aerobic, creative, choreography

Body Sculpting, Advanced Body Sculpting Provides methods to redefine body shape through specific exercise

Physical Conditioning/Advanced Physical Conditioning Provides to participate in a variety of activities to enhance flexibility, muscular strength an opportunities d endurance, cardiovascular endurance and body composition.

Exercise and Weight Control/Advanced Exercise and Weight Control Provides safe, effective and physiologically sound ways to manage weight and alter metabolism and body composition

Weight Training/Advanced Weight Training Introduces weight training, strength development, and proper lifting techniques

Principles of Athletic Training/Sports Medicine Introduces techniques to prevent recognize, evaluate, manage, treat and rehabilitate athletic injuries

Driver Education/Study Skills Prepares students for on the road driving and the State of Georgia driver exam. Students must have a driving permit to participate in the course. First-Aid includes basic first aid and safety techniques.

FINE ARTS Drama: Theatre Arts/Fundaments I, II, III, IV Introduction to pantomime, simple acting, theater and film figures, drama terms and theater history. Techniques of oral interpretation are studied in II. Levels III and IV focus on production and performance.

Theatre Arts/Acting I,II, III, IV Introduces advanced acting process. Includes recitals, one act and full length plays.

Theatre Arts/Advanced Drama I, II III, IV Builds on concepts from Theatre Arts/Acting. Includes vocal techniques, creating a character, improvisation. (Eleventh and Twelfth graders by permission)

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Visual Arts: Visual Arts/Comprehensive Introduction to a variety of art media including: pencil, colored pencil, marker, tempera and acrylic paint, oil pastels, chalk, ink, mixed media sculpture, and clay.

Visual Arts/Drawing Students explore a variety of drawing media including pencil, charcoal, chalk and oil pastels, colored pencils, and ink. Different drawing techniques will be explored through various subject matters.

Visual Arts Painting Students will study and explore a variety of painting media including tempera, watercolor, watercolor pencils, and acrylics. The concept and use of color will be explored as well as different painting techniques.

Visual Arts/Ceramics/Pottery Students learn about basic ceramic hand building techniques: pinch, coil, and slab. Students will also learn forming, texturing, and glazing of clay.

Visual Arts/Printmaking Students learn a variety of printmaking methods. These methods include: monoprints, rubber stamps, stencils, block printing, collagraph print (and other forms of relief printing), etching, lithography and screen printing.

Advanced Placement Studio Art The AP Studio Art portfolios are designed for students who are seriously interested in the practical experience of art. AP Studio Art is not based on a written exam; instead, students submit portfolios for evaluation at the end of the school year. The AP Studio Art Program consists of three portfolios â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2-D Design, 3-D Design, and Drawing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; corresponding to the most common college foundation courses.

Advanced Placement Drawing Portfolio The Drawing Portfolio is designated to address a very broad interpretation of drawing issues and media. Light and shade, line quality, rendering of form, composition, surface manipulation, and illusion of depth are drawing issues that can be addressed through a variety of means, which could include painting, printmaking, mixed media, etc. Abstract and observational works may demonstrate drawing competence. College or university credit is issued at the discretion of the institution.

Advanced Placement 2-D Design Portfolio This portfolio is intended to address two-dimensional (2-D) design issues. Design involves purposeful decision making about how to use the elements and principles of art in an integrative way. For this portfolio, students are asked to demonstrate mastery of 2-D design through any two-dimensional medium or process, including but not limited to, graphic design, digital imaging, photography, collage, fabric design, weaving, illustration, painting, and printmaking. Students who successfully complete the course can request credit from the college or university of their choice. College or university credit is issued at the discretion of the institution.

Band: Beginning Band I, II, III, IV Provides opportunities to develop performance skills on a wind or percussion instrument. Emphasizes performance and production; may include analysis, historical and cultural influences, improvisation and appreciation of music. Organizes objectives for self-paced progress through all four levels. Stresses individual progress and group experiences.

Intermediate Band I, II, III, IV Provides opportunities for intermediate-level performers to increase performance skills and precision on a wind or percussion instrument. Includes performance and production, analysis and theoretical studies, historical and cultural contributions and influences, creative aspects of music and appreciation of music. Stresses individual progress and learning and group experiences; strengthens reading skills.

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Advanced Band I,II,III, IV Provides opportunities for advanced-level performers to increase, develop and refine performance skills and precision on a wind or percussion instrument. Covers performance and production, analysis and theoretical studies, historical and cultural contributions and influences, creative aspects of music and appreciation of music at advanced levels of understanding. Organizes objectives for self-paced progress through all four levels. Stresses individual progress and learning strategies and ensemble experiences.

Beginning Jazz I,II,III, IV Offers opportunities to develop performance skills and knowledge on instruments or voice in a jazz idiom. Includes performance and production, analysis and theoretical studies, historical and cultural contributions and influences. Emphasizes improvisation and composition; stresses individual progress and group experiences. Emphasizes jazz as an indigenous American art form.

Intermediate Jazz I,II,III, IV Offers opportunities for intermediate-level performers to increase performance skills and knowledge on instruments or voice in a jazz idiom. Covers performance and production, analysis and theoretical studies, historical and cultural contributions and influences, creative aspects of music (especially improvisation and composition) and appreciation of music. Organizes objectives for self-paced progress through all four levels. Stresses individual progress and group experiences. Emphasizes jazz as an indigenous American art form and a major component of our cultural heritage.

Advanced Jazz I,II,III, IV Offers opportunities for advanced-level performers to increase performance skills and knowledge on instruments or voice in a jazz idiom. Covers performance and production, analysis and theoretical studies, historical and cultural contributions and influences, creative aspects of music (especially improvisation and composition) and appreciation of music. Organizes objectives for self-paced progress through all four levels. Stresses individual progress and group experiences. Emphasizes jazz as an indigenous American art form and a major component of our cultural heritage.

Chorus: Beginning Mixed Chorus I, II, III, IV Provides opportunities to develop amateur performance skills and knowledge in mixed (male and female) choral singing. Covers production and performance, analysis and theoretical studies, historical and cultural contributions and influences, creative aspects of music, and appreciation of music. Organizes objectives for self-paced progress through various levels. Stresses individual progress and group experiences.

Intermediate Mixed Chorus I, II, III, IV Provides opportunities to develop intermediate performance skills and knowledge in mixed (male and female) choral singing. Builds on the Beginning Mixed Chorus concepts listed above.

Advanced Mixed Chorus I, II, III, IV Provides opportunities to develop advanced-level performance skills and knowledge in mixed (male and female) choral singing. Builds on the Beginning & Intermediate Mixed Chorus concepts listed above. Participation in All-State Chorus, Select Chorus, “Southern Sensations” Show Choir and Tri-M Music Honor Society are strongly encouraged

Men’s Chorus Provides opportunities to develop advanced-level performance skills and knowledge in male choral singing. Builds on the Beginning & Intermediate Mixed Chorus concepts listed above. Participation in All-State Chorus, Select Chorus, “Southern Sensations” Show Choir and Tri-M Music Honor Society are strongly encouraged.

Women’s Chorus Provides opportunities to develop advanced-level performance skills and knowledge in female choral singing. Builds on the Beginning & Intermediate Mixed Chorus concepts listed above. Participation in All-State Chorus, Select Chorus, 1.51 “Southern Sensations” Show Choir and Tri-M Music Honor Society are strongly encouraged.

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Fine Arts Band, Chorus, Drama, and Visual Arts Here at LHS, we pride ourselves on the quality and the quantity of our fine arts offerings. From instrumental to vocal music, from stage work to painting, there is a passion inside all of humanity that must be nurtured. If you choose to delve into one of these arts, you will not be disappointed. CHORUS The Lowndes High Chorus is a part of the diversified offerings available to students of the Fine Arts department. It offers all students an opportunity to participate in music activities. Our chorus participates at various school and community functions throughout the year. Our students have performed at and won numerous awards including Region Literary competition. Chorus Director: Jennifer McQuade

DRAMA

LHS Off-Broadway consists of the audition-based Acting Company, Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced Acting Classes, a Tech Theatre program, a Drama Club and Thespian Troupe. We have been recently honored as a Gold Honor Thespian Troupe - which is the highest distinction awarded by the Georgia Thespians. The mission of LHS Off-Broadway is to develop student excellence in theatre arts, to share student talents with our school and community, and to help students further their theatre studies beyond high school if they so desire. The LHS Off-Broadway Acting Company performs a full season of shows. For the 2018-2019 Season, we will produce Enchanted April, The Elephant Man, Halls of Horror, A Tuna Christmas, Disney’s Little Mermaid, Shakespeare’s Hamlet, and Senior Showcase. We participate in the following competitions: •The Ray Horne (SETC) Festival at the Georgia Theatre Conference •Region One Act Play (GHSA) •Region Literary Competition (GHSA) •Georgia Thespian Individual Events (IEs) at the Georgia Thespian Conference •Spring Shakespeare Festival at Camden County High School Additionally, our students have competed and won honors at the: •Georgia National Association for Teachers of Singing Auditions •Southeastern Region National Association for Teachers of Singing Auditions Students routinely audition and are hired for roles in independent films and local professional productions, including Peachstate Summer Theatre. Students also audition for in-state and out-of-state college theatre programs, including: The New York Film Academy, Julliard, New York University, AMDA, Brigham Young University, LaGrange College, Kennesaw State University, Valdosta State University, Georgia Southern University, Wesleyan College, Reinhardt College, Shorter College, Full Sail University, Young Harris, Piedmont College, The University of Georgia, Florida State University, and the University of Florida. Many students have received substantial scholarships to attend these university theatre programs. Drama Director: Sheri Dorsett

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BAND The Lowndes High Georgia Bridgemen is the largest and most recognized student organization on campus. With over 450 members, when the Bridgemen take the field it is an experience you will not forget. The band performs at all football games and competes in marching band competitions all over the southeast. The Bridgemen have also participated in many nationally televised parades including the Rose Parade in Pasadena, CA, the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York, NY, the McDonald’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Chicago, IL, and the Thanksgiving Day Parade in Philadelphia, PA. The band program is also composed of the Concert, Symphonic and Wind Ensemble, which participates yearly in the Georgia Bandmaster’s Association Concert Band Festival. Other performing groups within our band program are the Percussion Ensemble,Viking Steel, and our nationally recognized Winter Guard programs.

Band Directors: Jon Bowman, Dr. Jeff Grant, and MIchael Thomas

HONORS AND AWARDS: • Numerous Best in Class and Grand Championships for the Georgia Bridgemen • Superior Ratings at Concert Band Festivals • Viking Steel invited to perform at the 2019 Georgia Music Educators State Conference • Lowndes Open Winter Guard earning three top-ten finishes at WGI World Championships

VISUAL ARTS

The Visual Arts program at LHS offers a wide variety of classes that engage students by encouraging creativity, collaboration, and an appreciation for the arts. Studio assignments are designed to introduce students to a variety of media. Research, design, fabrication, exhibition, and analysis are all essential components of the curriculum. Student work is continuously displayed around campus. Art students are encouraged to enter various art competitions throughout the year. Art Instructors: Sherry Bennett and Daisy Taylor HONORS AND AWARDS: • Art Awards 2018 • Valdosta State University Regional High School Show • Honorable Mention- Alyssa Davis and Jayliyah Brantley • GAEA sponsored NAHS state conference push pin exhibit • Congressional Art Competition • Selected for inclusion in the annual Advanced Placement Studio Art Exhibit- Sarah Karagoz

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CAREER, TECHNICAL, AND AGRICUlTURAL EDUCATION (CTAE) Career Clusters: Preparing Georgia’s Students for College and Career Readiness

Georgia has implemented the 17 Cluster model using the National Career Clusters/Pathways utilized by most of the United States. Georgia’s Career Clusters allow students to choose an area of interest in high school from the 17 clusters listed below. Students take classes tailored to their cluster, which helps them navigate their way to greater success – no matter what they choose to do after high school graduation. Each cluster will include multiple career pathways. The aim of the program is to show students the relevance of what they’re learning in the classroom, whether they want to attend a two-year college, a four-year university or go straight into the world of work. Georgia’s initiative is based on the National Career Cluster Model.

​Georgia College and Career Clusters/Pathways •

Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources Cluster

Hospitality and Tourism Cluster

Architecture and Construction Cluster

Human Services Cluster

Arts, AV/Technology, and Communications Cluster

Information Technology Cluster

Business, Management, and Administration Cluster

Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Cluster

Education and Training Cluster

Manufacturing Cluster

Energy Cluster

Marketing Cluster

Finance Cluster

Government and Public Administration Cluster

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Cluster

Health Science Cluster

Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics Cluster

Lowndes High School is proud to offer all students the opportunity to pursue educational and career goals through Career Clusters/Pathways. Georgia’s Career Clusters/Pathways provide a structure for organizing and delivering quality CTAE programs. Career pathways are state-approved career enhancement programs comprised of coherent, articulated sequences of rigorous academic and career related courses usually commencing in the ninth grade and leading to an associate degree, an industry-recognized certificate or licensure, and/or a baccalaureate degree and beyond. CTAE provides all Georgia students with the opportunity to select at least three sequenced electives in a career pathway, along with the recommended academic course work. Selection of a pathway is based on self-awareness and the investigation of occupations plus related educational levels aligned with each pathway.

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Lowndes High CTAE Pathways Lowndes High CTAE Pathways

48 Pathways (Excluding ROTC) 86 Total CTAE Classes + (8 ROTC Courses)

AGRICULTURE, FOOD, & NATURAL RESOURCES

AGRICULTURE, FOOD, & NATURAL RESOURCES

ARCHITECTURE AND CONSTRUCTION

Horticulture & Forestry Science Basic Agricultural Science Forest Science General Horticulture & Plant Science Horticulture & Animal Systems Basic Agricultural Science General Horticulture & Plant Science Animal Science & Biotechnology Forest & Animal Science Systems Basic Agricultural Science Forest Science Animal Science & Biotechnology Agriscience Systems Basic Agricultural Science Animal Science & Biotechnology Plant Science & Biotechnology Agricultural Mechanics Systems Basic Agricultural Science Agricultural Mechanics Technology I Agricultural Mechanics Technology II Ag Mechanics & Electrical Systems Basic Agricultural Science Agricultural Mechanics Technology I Ag. Electricity & Electric Controls Ag. Mechanics & Metal Fabrication

Forest Mechanical Systems Basic Agricultural Science Agricultural Mechanics Technology I Forest Science Ag Leadership in Forestry Basic Agricultural Science Forest Science Agribusiness Mgmt. & Leadership Forestry/Natural Resources Management Basic Agricultural Science Forest Science Natural Resources Management Forest Management Systems Basic Agricultural Science Forest Science Forestry Science II Plant and Landscape Systems Basic Agricultural Science General Horticulture & Plant Science Nursery & Landscape Horticulture / Mechanical Systems Basic Agricultural Science General Horticulture & Plant Science Agricultural Mechanics Technology I Plant Mechanical Systems

Architectural Drawing & Design Introduction to Drafting and Design Architectural Drawing and Design I Architectural Drawing and Design II Structural Detailing (additional elective) Civil Engineering (additional elective) Carpentry Industry Fundamentals & Occ Safety Introduction to Construction Carpentry I Electrical Industry Fundamentals & Occ Safety Introduction to Construction Electrical I Masonry Industry Fundamentals & Occ Safety Introduction to Construction Masonry I Plumbing Industry Fundamentals & Occ Safety Introduction to Construction Plumbing I

Basic Agricultural Science Agricultural Mechanics Technology I Agricultural Metal Fabrication Food Animal Systems Basic Agricultural Science Animal Science and Biotechnology Ag. Animal Production & Management Animal / Mechanical Systems Basic Agricultural Science Agricultural Mechanics Technology I

Basic Agricultural Science Agricultural Mechanics Technology I Plant Science & Biotechnology Ag Leadership in Plant Science Basic Agricultural Science Plant Science & Biotechnology Agribusiness Mgmt. & Leadership Ag Leadership in Horticulture Basic Agricultural Science General Horticulture & Plant Science

Entrepreneurship Introduction to Business & Technology Legal Environment of Business Entrepreneurship Business & Technology Introduction to Business & Technology Business & Technology Business Communications

Ag. Animal Production & Management

Agribusiness Mgmt. & Leadership

Ag Leadership in Animal Production Basic Agricultural Science Animal Science Tech./ Biotechnology Agribusiness Mgmt. & Leadership

Forestry / Wildlife Systems Basic Agricultural Science Forest Science Wildlife Management

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BUSINESS, MANAGEMENT & ADMINISTRATION

EDUCATION AND TRAINING Teaching as A Profession Examining the Teaching Profession Contemporary Issues in Education Teaching as a Profession Practicum

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ARTS, AV/TECHNOLOGY ANDCOMMUNICATIONS Audio/Video Technology and Film Audio Video Technology and Film I Audio Video Technology and Film II Audio Video Technology and Film III Graphics Communications Introduction to Graphics and Design Graphic Design and Production Advanced Graphic Output Processes Graphics Design Introduction to Graphics and Design Graphic Design and Production Advanced Graphic Design

FINANCE Advanced Accounting Introduction To Business & Technology Principles of Accounting I Principles of Accounting II Business Accounting Introduction To Business & Technology Financial Literacy Principles of Accounting I

MARKETING

Marketing and Management Marketing Principles Marketing and Entrepreneurship Marketing Management

HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM Culinary Arts Introduction to Culinary Arts Culinary Arts I Culinary Arts II

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Web & Digital Design Introduction to Digital Technology Digital Design Web Design

HEALTH SCIENCE Therapeutic Services/Patient Care Introduction to Healthcare Science Essentials of Healthcare Patient Care Fundamentals Therapeutic Services/Sports Med Introduction to Healthcare Science Essentials of Healthcare Sports Medicine Health Information Management Introduction to Healthcare Science Essentials of Healthcare Health Information Mgt/Medical Office Therapeutic Services /Allied Health Introduction to Healthcare Science Essentials of Healthcare Allied Health and Medicine

HUMAN SERVICE-FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE

Nutrition & Food Science Food, Nutrition & Wellness Food for Life Food Science Interiors, Fashion and Textiles Foundations of Interior Design Fundamentals of Fashion Textile Science

Auto Maintenance & Light Repair Basic Maintenance and Light Repair Maintenance and Light Repair 2 Maintenance and Light Repair 3 Auto Service Technology Automobile Service Technology 4 Automobile Service Technology 5 Automobile Service Technology 6 Master Auto Service Technology Master Auto Service Technology 7 Master Auto Service Technology 8 Auto Service Technology Internship

Air Force Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFJROTC) JROTC AF Leadership 100 JROTC AF Leadership 200 JROTC AF Leadership 300 JROTC AF Leadership 400 JROTC AF Survival JROTC AF Space Exploration JROTC AF Flight Science JROTC AF Aviation History

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, & MATH Engineering & Technology Foundations of Engineering & Technology Engineering Concepts Engineering Applications Engineering Drafting & Design Introduction to Drafting and Design Survey of Engineering Graphics 3D Modeling and Analysis Technical Manufacturing (additional elective)

Programming Introduction to Digital Technology Computer Science Principles Programming, Games, Apps, & Society

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TRANSPORTATION, DISTRIBUTION & LOGISTICS

John Newton CTAE Director Lowndes County Schools

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Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources

Course 1 – Basic Agriculture Science

This course is designed as the foundational course for all Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Pathways. The course introduces the major areas of scientific agricultural production and research; presents problem solving lessons and introductory skills and knowledge in agricultural science and agri-related technologies. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities. This course is the prerequisite for all AFNR pathways and is intended for students in grades 8-10.

Agriculture Mechanics Systems Course 1 – Basic Agriculture Science Course 2 – Agricultural Mechanics Technology I

This laboratory course is designed to provide students with introductory level experiences in selected major areas of agricultural mechanics technology which may include wood working, agricultural structures, electrical wiring, electric arc welding, oxy/fuel cutting and welding processes, and power equipment operation and maintenance. Learning activities include information, skill development and problem solving. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through FFA supervised agricultural experiences, leadership programs and activities.

Course 3 – Agricultural Mechanics Technology I The goal of this laboratory course is designed to offer students intermediate level experiences in selected major areas of agricultural mechanics technology which may include small engine maintenance and repair, metal fabrication, concrete construction, building construction, plumbing, electrical wiring, maintenance of agricultural machinery, equipment and tractors and soil and water conservation. Learning activities include information, skill development and problem solving.

Food Animal Systems Course 1 – Basic Agriculture Science Course 2 – Animal Science Technology / Biotechnology This course is designed to introduce students to the scientific principles that underlie the breeding and husbandry of agricultural animals, and the production, processing, and distribution of agricultural animal products. This course introduces scientific principles applied to the animal industry; covers reproduction, production technology, processing, and distribution of agricultural animal products. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

Course 3 – Agricultural Animal Production and Management The goal of this course is to provide all students instruction in establishing and managing agricultural animal enterprises; includes instruction in selecting, breeding, feeding, caring for and marketing beef and dairy cattle, horses, swine, sheep, and poultry. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

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Forest Mechanical Systems Course 1 – Basic Agriculture Science Course 2 – Forest Science This course provides entry-level skills for employment in the forest industry and for further study. The course covers establishing forests by natural and artificial means, maintaining and surveying forests, identifying and protecting trees, practicing silviculture, measuring trees and land, mapping, preparing for timber sales and harvest, employing multipleuse resource management, keeping records, and figuring taxes. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities

Course 3 – Agricultural Mechanics Technology I This laboratory course is designed to provide students with introductory level experiences in selected major areas of agricultural mechanics technology which may include wood working, agricultural structures, electrical wiring, electric arc welding, oxy/fuel cutting and welding processes, and power equipment operation and maintenance. Learning activities include information, skill development and problem solving. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through FFA supervised agricultural experiences, leadership programs and activities.

Plant & Landscape Systems Course 1 – Basic Agriculture Science Course 2 – General Horticulture and Plant Science This course is designed as an introduction for the Horticulture-Plant Science Pathway Program of Study. The course introduces the major concepts of plant and horticulture science. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

Course 3 – Nursery and Landscape This course is designed to provide students with the basic skills and knowledge utilized by the green industry in nursery production and management and landscape design and management. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

Horticulture Mechanical Systems Course 1 – Basic Agriculture Science Course 2 – General Horticulture and Plant Science

This course is designed as an introduction for the Horticulture-Plant Science Pathway Program of Study. The course introduces the major concepts of plant and horticulture science. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities

Course 3 – Agricultural Mechanics Technology I This laboratory course is designed to provide students with introductory level experiences in selected major areas of agricultural mechanics technology which may include wood working, agricultural structures, electrical wiring, electric arc welding, oxy/fuel cutting and welding processes, and power equipment operation and maintenance. Learning activities include information, skill development and problem solving. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through FFA supervised agricultural experiences, leadership programs and activities.

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Plant Mechanical Systems Course 1 – Basic Agriculture Science Course 2 – Agricultural Mechanics Technology I This laboratory course is designed to provide students with introductory level experiences in selected major areas of agricultural mechanics technology which may include wood working, agricultural structures, electrical wiring, electric arc welding, oxy/fuel cutting and welding processes, and power equipment operation and maintenance. Learning activities include information, skill development and problem solving. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through FFA supervised agricultural experiences, leadership programs and activities.

Course 3 – Plant Science and Biotechnology Plant science is a basic component of the agriscience pathway. This course introduces students to the scientific theories, principles, and practices involved in the production and management of plants for food, feed, fiber, conservation and ornamental use. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities

Ag Leadership in Horticulture Course 1 – Basic Agriculture Science Course 2 – General Horticulture and Plant Science This course is designed as an introduction for the Horticulture-Plant Science Pathway Program of Study. The course introduces the major concepts of plant and horticulture science. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

Course 3 – Agribusiness Management and Leadership The Agribusiness Management and Leadership course provides a foundation for students interested in pursuing a degree in agribusiness through post-secondary study or to enter the Agribusiness industry upon graduation from high school. The student will demonstrate competence in the application of principles and practices of agribusiness management and leadership. The course will help students build a strong knowledge base of the agribusiness industry as they study agribusiness types, business management, financial analysis, communications, agricultural law, leadership and teamwork, ethics, and agricultural economics. Mastery of these standards through project-based learning and leadership development activities in the FFA and supervised agricultural experience program will help prepare students for postsecondary study or entry into agribusiness.

Ag Leadership in Animal Prod. Course 1 – Basic Agriculture Science Course 2 – Animal Science Technology / Biotechnology This course is designed to introduce students to the scientific principles that underlie the breeding and husbandry of agricultural animals, and the production, processing, and distribution of agricultural animal products. This course introduces scientific principles applied to the animal industry; covers reproduction, production technology, processing, and distribution of agricultural animal products. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

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Course 3 – Agribusiness Management and Leadership The Agribusiness Management and Leadership course provides a foundation for students interested in pursuing a degree in agribusiness through post-secondary study or to enter the Agribusiness industry upon graduation from high school. The student will demonstrate competence in the application of principles and practices of agribusiness management and leadership. The course will help students build a strong knowledge base of the agribusiness industry as they study agribusiness types, business management, financial analysis, communications, agricultural law, leadership and teamwork, ethics, and agricultural economics. Mastery of these standards through project-based learning and leadership development activities in the FFA and supervised agricultural experience program will help prepare students for postsecondary study or entry into agribusiness.

Plant & Landscape System Course 1 – Basic Agriculture Science Course 2 – General Horticulture and Plant Science This course is designed as an introduction for the Horticulture-Plant Science Pathway Program of Study. The course introduces the major concepts of plant and horticulture science. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities

Course 3 – Nursery and Landscape This course is designed to provide students with the basic skills and knowledge utilized by the green industry in nursery production and management and landscape design and management. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

Horticulture & Animal Systems Course 1 – Basic Agriculture Science Course 2 – General Horticulture and Plant Science This course is designed as an introduction for the Horticulture-Plant Science Pathway Program of Study. The course introduces the major concepts of plant and horticulture science. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

Course 3 – Animal Science Technology / Biotechnology This course is designed to introduce students to the scientific principles that underlie the breeding and husbandry of agricultural animals, and the production, processing, and distribution of agricultural animal products. This course introduces scientific principles applied to the animal industry; covers reproduction, production technology, processing, and distribution of agricultural animal products. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

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Forestry & Animal Science Course 1 – Basic Agriculture Science Course 2 – Forest Science This course provides entry-level skills for employment in the forest industry and for further study. The course covers establishing forests by natural and artificial means, maintaining and surveying forests, identifying and protecting trees, practicing silviculture, measuring trees and land, mapping, preparing for timber sales and harvest, employing multipleuse resource management, keeping records, and figuring taxes. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

Course 3 – Animal Science Technology / Biotechnology This course is designed to introduce students to the scientific principles that underlie the breeding and husbandry of agricultural animals, and the production, processing, and distribution of agricultural animal products. This course introduces scientific principles applied to the animal industry; covers reproduction, production technology, processing, and distribution of agricultural animal products. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

Forestry/Natural Resources Course 1 – Basic Agriculture Science Course 2 – Forest Science (see description above)

Course 3 – Natural Resources Management This course introduces conservation management and maintenance of natural resources and good stewardship of air, soil, water, land, fish, and wildlife resources for economic, recreation, and health purposes. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

Ag Leadership in Forestry Course 1 – Basic Agriculture Science Course 2 – Forest Science (see description above)

Course 3 – Agribusiness Management and Leadership The Agribusiness Management and Leadership course provides a foundation for students interested in pursuing a degree in agribusiness through post-secondary study or to enter the Agribusiness industry upon graduation from high school. The student will demonstrate competence in the application of principles and practices of agribusiness management and leadership. The course will help students build a strong knowledge base of the agribusiness industry as they study agribusiness types, business management, financial analysis, communications, agricultural law, leadership and teamwork, ethics, and agricultural economics. Mastery of these standards through project-based learning and leadership development activities in the FFA and supervised agricultural experience program will help prepare students for postsecondary study or entry into agribusiness.

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Forestry Management Systems Course 1 – Basic Agriculture Science Course 2 – Forest Science This course provides entry-level skills for employment in the forest industry and for further study. The course covers establishing forests by natural and artificial means, maintaining and surveying forests, identifying and protecting trees, practicing silviculture, measuring trees and land, mapping, preparing for timber sales and harvest, employing multipleuse resource management, keeping records, and figuring taxes. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

Course 3 – Forestry Science II This laboratory course provides students with entry-level skills for employment in the forest industry; including instruction in establishment of the forest by natural and artificial means, forest maintenance and surveillance, tree identification, protection, silviculture, tree and land measurement, mapping, preparation for timber sales and harvest, multiple use resource management, record keeping, and taxation.

Agriculture Mechanics/ Metal Course 1 – Basic Agriculture Science Course 2 – Agricultural Mechanics Technology I This laboratory course is designed to provide students with introductory level experiences in selected major areas of agricultural mechanics technology which may include wood working, agricultural structures, electrical wiring, electric arc welding, oxy/fuel cutting and welding processes, and power equipment operation and maintenance. Learning activities include information, skill development and problem solving. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through FFA supervised agricultural experiences, leadership programs and activities.

Course 3 – Agricultural Metals Fabrication This course is designed to provide students with a more in-depth study of agricultural metal fabrication. Students interested in agricultural mechanics will have the opportunity to explore the many career possibilities in the field of agricultural metal fabrication. Additionally, hands-on-laboratory activities enhance the classroom learning experience and provide students with the skills needed to participate in Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs and FFA Career Development Events.

Forestry/Wildlife Systems Course 1 – Basic Agriculture Science Course 2 – Forest Science This course provides entry-level skills for employment in the forest industry and for further study. The course covers establishing forests by natural and artificial means, maintaining and surveying forests, identifying and protecting trees, practicing silviculture, measuring trees and land, mapping, preparing for timber sales and harvest, employing multipleuse resource management, keeping records, and figuring taxes. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

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Course 3 – Wildlife Management This course introduces students to the principles of wildlife management and conservation and to opportunities for further education and careers in the field of wildlife biology. The course includes instruction in the history of wildlife management, ecological concepts, habitat assessment, habitat management techniques for wildlife, population dynamics, predator-prey relationships, wildlife species biology and identification, human-wildlife conflict resolution, the role of hunting in conservation, game and fish laws and regulations, hunters safety, and the application of scientific principles to managing wildlife habitat and populations. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

Ag Mechanics and Electrical Course 1 – Basic Agriculture Science Course 2 –

Agricultural Mechanics Technology I

This laboratory course is designed to provide students with introductory level experiences in selected major areas of agricultural mechanics technology which may include wood working, agricultural structures, electrical wiring, electric arc welding, oxy/fuel cutting and welding processes, and power equipment operation and maintenance. Learning activities include information, skill development and problem solving. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through FFA supervised agricultural experiences, leadership programs and activities.

Course 3 –

Agricultural Electricity & Electrical Controls

This laboratory course is designed to provide students with introductory level experiences in selected major areas of agricultural mechanics technology associated with the design and installation of electric motor and non-motor load electrical circuits designed for use in agricultural structures, and agricultural industry applications. Topics covered include electrical terms and theory, branch and feeder circuit design and installation, service entrance equipment selection and installation, electric motors and motor controllers, switching devices including thermostats, proximity sensors, float switches, clock timers, relays, and similar devices. Learning activities include information, skill development and problem solving. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.

Career and Technical Student Organization The FFA is an integral component of the agricultural education program. It is the student development and leadership application piece for agricultural education. The FFA offers a variety of experiential learning opportunities through competitive proficiency awards and career development events. Competitions focus on leadership and public speaking; communications, agriscience and biotechnology, as well as production agriculture. Agricultural education teachers and FFA advisors stress problem solving and decision making; and uses a learning by doing method. By applying a science based curriculum learned in a classroom to real life projects, teamwork, and competition; FFA members develop into successful, productive citizens. The strength of the FFA and agricultural education lies in the dedication of the teachers; whose philosophy is, “We don’t just teach agriculture, we teach students!”

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Architecture and Construction Architectural Design

Course 1 – Introduction to Drafting and Design Introduction to Drafting and Design is the foundational course for the Architectural Drafting and Design pathway. Emphasis is placed on safety, geometric construction, fundamentals of computer-aided drafting, and multi-view drawings. Students learn drafting techniques through the study of geometric construction at which time they are introduced to computer-aided drafting and design.

Course 2 – Architectural Drawing and Design I Architectural Drawing and Design I is the second course in the Architectural Drawing and Design pathway and introduces students to the basic terminology, concepts, and principles of architectural design. Emphasis is placed on house designs, floor plans, roof designs, elevations (interior and exterior), schedules, and foundations. The standards are aligned with the drafting and design standards in Georgia’s technical colleges, thus helping students qualify for advanced placement to continue their education at the postsecondary level. Students who successfully complete this and other drafting courses should be prepared to take the End of Pathway Assessment. Competencies for the co-curricular student organization, SkillsUSA, are integral components of both the core employability skills standards and the technical skills standards. The prerequisite for the course is Introduction to Drafting and Design.

Course 3 – Architectural Drawing and Design II Architectural Drawing and Design II is the third course in the Architectural Drawing and Design pathway and builds on the skills developed in Architectural Drawing and Design I. Emphasis is placed on the design process, site plans, electrical plans, plumbing plans, sections and details, project presentations, and a course portfolio. The standards are aligned with the drafting and design standards in Georgia’s technical colleges, thus helping students qualify for advanced placement should they continue their education at the postsecondary level. Students who successfully complete this and other drafting courses should be prepared to take an End of Pathway Assessment. Competencies for the co-curricular student organization, SkillsUSA, are integral components of both the core employability skills standards and the technical skills standards. The prerequisite for this course is Introduction to Drafting and Design and Architectural Drawing and Design I.

Career and Technical Student Organization Georgia SkillsUSA members participate in local, state, and national activities provided through trade and industrial, technical, and health occupations courses and programs. The mission of SkillsUSA is to develop leadership skills and workplace competencies that students will need to succeed in a constantly changing global workplace. The organization provides many opportunities for leadership development and skills training. Competition in over 70 leadership, health occupations, occupationally related, and trade, industrial, and technical contests is offered at the region and state levels, culminating with the SkillsUSA Championships.

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Art, AV/Technology and Communications Audio/Video Technology Course 1 – Audio & Video Technology & Film I This course will serve as the foundational course in the Audio & Video Technology & Film pathway. The course prepares students for employment or entry into a postsecondary education program in the audio and video technology career field. Topics covered may include, but are not limited to: terminology, safety, basic equipment, script writing, production teams, production and programming, lighting, recording and editing, studio production, and professional ethics. Skills USA and Technology Student Association (TSA) are examples of, but not limited to, appropriate organizations for providing leadership training and/or for reinforcing specific career and technical skills and may be considered an integral part of the instructional program. All material covered in Audio & Video Technology & Film I will be utilized in subsequent courses. The pre-requisite for this course is advisor approval.

Course 2 – Audio Video Technology and Film II This one credit course is the second in a series of three that prepares students for a career in Audio Video Technology and Film production and/or to transfer to a postsecondary program for further study. Topics include Planning, Writing, Directing and Editing a Production; Field Equipment Functions; Operational Set-Up and Maintenance; Advanced Editing Operations; Studio Productions; Performance; Audio/Video Control Systems; Production Graphics; Career Opportunities; and Professional Ethics. Skills USA and Technology Student Association (TSA) are examples of, but not limited to, appropriate organizations for providing leadership training and/or for reinforcing specific career and technical skills and may be considered an integral part of the instructional program.

Course 3 – Audio Video Technology and Film III This one-credit transition course is designed to facilitate student-led projects under the guidance of the instructor. Students work cooperatively and independently in all phases of production. Skills USA and Technology Student Association (TSA) are examples of, but not limited to, appropriate organizations for providing leadership training and/or for reinforcing specific career and technical skills and may be considered an integral part of the instructional program.

Graphic Design Course 1 – Introduction to Graphic Design This course is designed as the foundational course for both the Graphics Production and Graphics Design pathways. The Graphics and Design course provides students with the processes involved in the technologies of printing, publishing, packaging, electronic imaging, and their allied industries. In addition, the Graphics and Design course offers a range of cognitive skills, aesthetics, and crafts that includes typography, visual arts, and page layout. Pre-requisite for this course is adviser approval.

Course 2 – Graphic Design and Production As the second course in the Graphics Communication and Graphics Design Pathways, this course builds on knowledge and skills learned in the Introduction to Graphics and Design course and focuses on procedures commonly used in the graphic communication and design industries. Students will gain more experience in creative problem solving and the practical implementation of those solutions across multiple areas of graphic design and graphic communications. The prerequisite for this course is Introduction to Graphics and Design.

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Course 3 – Advanced Graphic Design Students will continue to explore in an increasingly independent manner, the principles of design and layout procedures relating to the field of graphic design. Content will cover electronic systems and software programs used in graphic design, page composition, image conversion, and digital printing. Knowledge and skills in digital design and imaging will be enhanced through experiences that simulate the graphic design industry and school-based and work-based learning opportunities. This is the final course in the Graphic Design pathway.

Graphic Communication Course 1 – Introduction to Graphic Design This course is designed as the foundational course for both the Graphics Production and Graphics Design pathways. The Graphics and Design course provides students with the processes involved in the technologies of printing, publishing, packaging, electronic imaging, and their allied industries. In addition, the Graphics and Design course offers a range of cognitive skills, aesthetics, and crafts that includes typography, visual arts, and page layout. Pre-requisite for this course is adviser approval.

Course 2 – Graphic Design and Production As the second course in the Graphics Communication and Graphics Design Pathways, this course builds on knowledge and skills learned in the Introduction to Graphics and Design course and focuses on procedures commonly used in the graphic communication and design industries. Students will gain more experience in creative problem solving and the practical implementation of those solutions across multiple areas of graphic design and graphic communications. The prerequisite for this course is Introduction to Graphics and Design.

Course 3 – Advanced Graphic Output Processes As the third course in the Graphics Communication Pathway, students will gain more advanced levels of experience to complete the output processes of various projects in an increasingly independent manner. Students also learn to manage the output and completion process as a whole including customer relations management, printing, finishing, and binding. Students will continue to accumulate work samples that will constitute their personal portfolio. Upon successful completion of the course, students are prepared to move into employment or a post-secondary educational environment where self-motivation and a high level of skill are expected. This is the final course in the Graphic Communication Pathway. The prerequisite for this course is Graphic Design and Production.

Career and Technical Student Organization Georgia Technology Student Association (GA TSA) is committed to providing students with opportunities to excel and advance as part of their instruction in technology education. Georgia TSA promotes technology education as a means of preparing students for a dynamic world, inviting them to become critical thinkers, problem solvers, and technologically literate leaders. The mission of GA TSA is to prepare its members to be successful leaders and responsible citizens in a technological society through co-curricular activities with the technology education program, thereby developing communication, leadership, and competitive skills.

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Business, Management and Administration Business and Technology Course 1 – Introduction to Business & Technology Introduction to Business & Technology is the foundational course for Business and Technology, Entrepreneurship, and Human Resources Management pathways. The course is designed for high school students as a gateway to the career pathways above, and provides an overview of business and technology skills required for today’s business environment. Knowledge of business principles, the impact of financial decisions, and technology proficiencies demanded by business combine to establish the elements of this course. Emphasis is placed on developing proficient fundamental computer skills required for all career pathways. Students will learn essentials for working in a business environment, managing a business, and owning a business. The intention of this course is to prepare students to be successful both personally and professionally in an information-based society.

Course 2 – Business and Technology Business and Technology is designed to prepare students with the knowledge and skills to be an asset to the collaborative, global, and innovative business world of today and tomorrow. Mastery use of spreadsheets and the ability to apply leadership skills to make informed business decisions will be a highlight of this course for students. Publishing industry appropriate documents to model effective communication and leadership will be demonstrated through project based learning. Students will use spreadsheet and database software to manage data while analyzing, organizing and sharing data through visually appealing presentation.

Course 3 – Business Communications As one of the most important skills for employers, students will explore the value of communication in their personal and professional life. The digital presence and impact of written and visual communication in a technological society will be addressed. Students will create, edit, and publish professional appearing business documents with clear and concise communication. Creative design, persuasive personal and professional communications will be applied through research, evaluation, validation, written, and oral communication. Leadership development and teamwork skills will be stressed as students work independently and collaboratively. Presentation skills will be developed and modeled for students master presentation software in this course.

Entrepreneurship Course 1 – Introduction to Business & Technology Introduction to Business & Technology is the foundational course for Business and Technology, Entrepreneurship, and Human Resources Management pathways. The course is designed for high school students as a gateway to the career pathways above, and provides an overview of business and technology skills required for today’s business environment. Knowledge of business principles, the impact of financial decisions, and technology proficiencies demanded by business combine to establish the elements of this course. Emphasis is placed on developing proficient fundamental computer skills required for all career pathways. Students will learn essentials for working in a business environment, managing a business, and owning a business. The intention of this course is to prepare students to be successful both personally and professionally in an information-based society.

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Course 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Legal Environment of Business Legal Environment of Business addresses statutes and regulations affecting businesses, families, and individuals. All students will benefit with the knowledge of business law as they will eventually assume roles as citizens, workers, and consumers in their communities and in society at large. Students will get an overview of business law while concentrating on the legal aspects of business ownership and management. Legal issues addressed include court procedures, contracts, torts, consumer law, employment law, environmental law, international law, ethics, and the role of the government in business. Students will not only understand the concepts, but will also apply their knowledge to situations and defend their actions, decisions, and choices.

Course 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Entrepreneurship Entrepreneurship focuses on recognizing a business opportunity, starting a business, operating and maintaining a business. Students will be exposed to the development of critical thinking, problem solving, and innovation in this course as they will either be the business owner or individuals working in a competitive job market in the future. Integration of accounting, finance, marketing, business management, legal and economic environments will be developed throughout projects in this course. Working to develop a business plan that includes structuring the organization, financing the organization, and managing information, operations, marketing, and human resources will be a focus in the course. Engaging students in the creation and management of a business and the challenges of being a small business owner will be fulfilled in this course.

Career and Technical Student Organization Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) is a student organization for all middle and high school students participating in business programs. As an integral part of the business instructional program, FBLA provides opportunities for students to develop vocational and career-supportive competencies. Participation in FBLA activities promotes civic and personal responsibility; helps students develop business leadership skills and establish career goals; and prepares them for useful citizenship and productive careers.

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Education and Training Teaching as a Profession Course 1 – Examining the Teaching Profession The Examining the Teaching Profession is the foundational course under the Teaching as a Profession pathway and prepares students for future positions in the field of education. Teaching as a Profession students study, apply, and practice the use of current technologies, effective teaching and learning strategies, the creation of an effective learning environment, the creation of instructional opportunities for diverse learners and students with special needs, and plan instruction based on knowledge of subject matter, students, community, and curriculum performance standards.

Course 2 – Contemporary Issues in Education This course engages the candidate in observations, interactions, and analyses of critical and contemporary educational issues. The candidate will investigate issues influencing the social and political contexts of educational settings in Georgia and the United States and actively examines the teaching profession from multiple vantage points both within and outside of the school. Against this backdrop, the candidate will reflect on and interpret the meaning of education and schooling in a diverse culture and examine the moral and ethical responsibilities of teaching in a democracy. (Mastery of standards through project based learning, technical skills practice, and leadership development activities of the career and technical student organization Future Educators of America (FEA) will provide students with a competitive edge for either entry into the education global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice to continue their education and training).

Course 3 – Teaching as a Profession Practicum The practicum offers a candidate in the Teaching as a Profession career pathway a field experience under the direct supervision of a certified teacher (mentor teacher). The practicum stresses observing, analyzing and classifying activities of the mentor teacher and comparing personal traits with those of successful teachers. The candidate intern will develop a portfolio of their skills, plan and teach a lesson or lessons, understand and practice confidentiality as it pertains to the teaching profession, meet the needs of students with special needs, maintain the safety of the students, practice professionalism, and demonstrate ethical behavior. Georgia Future Educators Association (FEA) is a professional organization that supports students who are interested in education-related careers. Through affiliation with local chapters that are registered with the international FEA office, prospective educators have access to scholarship opportunities, as well as age appropriate materials and activities, including a national conference, that help them gain a realistic understanding of the role of the teacher. As the only national pre-collegiate program for prospective teachers, the Future Educators Association helps students develop the strong leadership traits that are found in high-quality educators.

Career and Technical Student Organization Georgia Future Educators Association (FEA) is a professional organization that supports students who are interested in education-related careers. Through affiliation with local chapters that are registered with the international FEA office, prospective educators have access to scholarship opportunities, as well as age appropriate materials and activities, including a national conference, that help them gain a realistic understanding of the role of the teacher. As the only national pre-collegiate program for prospective teachers, the Future Educators Association helps students develop the strong leadership traits that are found in high-quality educators.

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Finance Business Accounting Course 1 – Introduction to Business & Technology Introduction to Business & Technology is the foundational course for Business and Technology, Entrepreneurship, and Human Resources Management pathways. The course is designed for high school students as a gateway to the career pathways above, and provides an overview of business and technology skills required for today’s business environment. Knowledge of business principles, the impact of financial decisions, and technology proficiencies demanded by business combine to establish the elements of this course. Emphasis is placed on developing proficient fundamental computer skills required for all career pathways. Students will learn essentials for working in a business environment, managing a business, and owning a business. The intention of this course is to prepare students to be successful both personally and professionally in an information-based society.

Course 2 – Financial Literacy Step into this course specifically designed for high school students to understand the importance of the financial world, including planning and managing money wisely. Areas of study taught through application in personal finance include sources of income, budgeting, banking, consumer credit, credit laws and rights, personal bankruptcy, insurance, spending, taxes, investment strategies, savings accounts, mutual funds and the stock market, buying a vehicle, and living independently. Based on the hands-on skills and knowledge applied in this course, students will develop financial goals, and create realistic and measurable objectives to be MONEY SMART! Through project-based learning activities and tasks, students will apply mathematical concepts in realistic scenarios and will actively engage by applying the mathematics necessary to make informed decisions related to personal finance. Financial Literacy places great emphasis on problem solving, reasoning, representing, connecting and communicating financial data.

Course 3 – Principles of Accounting I Principles of Accounting I is a skill-level course that is of value to all students pursuing a strong background in business, marketing, and management. Using financial information, students will learn how to make decisions about planning, organizing, and allocating resources using accounting procedures. Performing accounting activities for sole proprietorships and corporations following Generally-Accepted Accounting Procedures are included in the course. Students analyze business transactions and financial statements, perform payroll, and evaluate the effects of transactions on the economic health of a business.

Advanced Accounting Course 1 – Introduction to Business & Technology Introduction to Business & Technology is the foundational course for Business and Technology, Entrepreneurship, and Human Resources Management pathways. The course is designed for high school students as a gateway to the career pathways above, and provides an overview of business and technology skills required for today’s business environment. Knowledge of business principles, the impact of financial decisions, and technology proficiencies demanded by business combine to establish the elements of this course. Emphasis is placed on developing proficient fundamental computer skills required for all career pathways. Students will learn essentials for working in a business environment, managing a business, and owning a business. The intention of this course is to prepare students to be successful both personally and professionally in an information-based society.

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Course 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Principles of Accounting 1 Principles of Accounting 1 is a skill-level course that is of value to all students pursuing a strong background in business, marketing, and management. Using financial information, students will learn how to make decisions about planning, organizing, and allocating resources using accounting procedures. Performing accounting activities for sole proprietorships and corporations following Generally-Accepted Accounting Procedures are included in the course. Students analyze business transactions and financial statements, perform payroll, and evaluate the effects of transactions on the economic health of a business.

Course 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Principles of Accounting II Building on the foundation knowledge acquired in Principles of Accounting I, students will extend their skills and knowledge in accounting. By performing accounting activities for various business entities following Generally-Accepted Accounting Procedures, students will apply their skills and knowledge in applicable format. Uncollectible accounts, plant assets, inventory, notes payable and receivable, prepaid and accrued expenses, and unearned and accrued revenues are analyzed and related adjustments are calculated. Students will apply managerial accounting techniques.

Career and Technical Student Organization Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) is a student organization for all middle and high school students participating in business programs. As an integral part of the business instructional program, FBLA provides opportunities for students to develop vocational and career-supportive competencies. Participation in FBLA activities promotes civic and personal responsibility; helps students develop business leadership skills and establish career goals; and prepares them for useful citizenship and productive careers.

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Government and Public Administration Air Force JROTC The AFJROTC curriculum is divided into two parts, Aerospace Science and Leadership Education.

Aerospace Science Survival – This course teaches students what to do to maintain life in a survival situation—whether that situation is natural or manmade. Space Exploration – This course guides students through an all new world of satellites, orbits, space environments and travel to other planets. Cultural Studies – This course introduces students to world cultures through the study of world affairs, regional studies, and cultural awareness. Science of Flight – This course focuses on how airplanes fly, how weather conditions affect flight, flight and the human body, and flight navigation.

Leadership Development Leadership 100 – This course contains sections on cadet and Air Force organizational structure; uniform wear; customs, courtesies, and other military traditions; health and wellness; fitness; individual self-control; and citizenship. Leadership 200 – This course stresses communication, increased awareness of self and others, improved leadership, and developing personal integrity while emphasizing leadership. Leadership 300 – This course is designed to equip students with essential life skills, focusing on educational and career paths. Leadership 400 – This course discusses principles and techniques of management, decisions involving conflict management, personal coping mechanisms, skills, roles, and delegation. The mission of AFJROTC is to “Develop citizens of character dedicated to serving their nation and community.” AFJROTC is not an USAF accessions program and cadets are never under any obligation to join the military. AFJROTC is a Title 10 US Code mandated citizenship training program that is designed to educate and train high school cadets in citizenship, promote community service, instill personal responsibility, character, and self-discipline. The program achieves this through classroom education in air and space fundamentals and hands on learning opportunities in a number of fun and challenging extra-curricular activities.

Career and Technical Student Organization The mission of AFJROTC is to “Develop citizens of character dedicated to serving their nation and community.” AFJROTC is not an USAF accessions program and cadets are never under any obligation to join the military. AFJROTC is a Title 10 US Code mandated citizenship training program that is designed to educate and train high school cadets in citizenship, promote community service, instill personal responsibility, character, and self-discipline. The program achieves this through classroom education in air and space fundamentals and hands on learning opportunities in a number of fun and challenging extra-curricular activities.

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Healthcare Science

Therapeutic Services/Allied Health Course 1 – Introduction to Healthcare Science Introduction to Healthcare Science is the foundational course for all Health Science pathways and is a prerequisite for all other Healthcare Science pathway courses. This course will enable students to receive initial exposure to the many Healthcare Science careers as well as employability, communication, and technology skills necessary in the healthcare industry. The concepts of human growth and development, interaction with patients and family members, health, wellness, and preventative care are evaluated, as well as the legal, ethical responsibilities of today’s healthcare provider. This course will provide students with a competitive edge to be the better candidate for the healthcare global marketplace.

Course 2 – Essentials of Healthcare Anatomy and Physiology is a vital part of most healthcare post-secondary education programs. The Essentials of Healthcare is a medical-focused anatomy course addressing the physiology of each body system, along with the investigation of common diseases, disorders and emerging diseases. The prevention of disease and the diagnosis and treatment that might be utilized are addressed, along with medical terminology related to each system. This course provides an opportunity to demonstrate technical skills that enforce the goal of helping students make connections between medical procedures and the pathophysiology of diseases and disorders. The pre-requisite for this course is Introduction to Healthcare.

Course 3 – Allied Health and Medicine This course is designed to offer students (preferably upper classmen - juniors or seniors) the opportunity to become effective and efficient multi-skilled healthcare providers as they develop a working knowledge of various allied health opportunities. Students focusing on a career path in the healthcare field may apply classroom/lab knowledge and skills in the clinical setting as they participate in direct or simulated client care. The curriculum allows instructors to provide options for classroom/student growth opportunities in area(s) of interest to the student. These options may be determined by community need, available resources, and/or student interest, etc. Instructors may select which classroom content standards 1-14 best meet his/her individual classroom needs in addition to the required clinical/capstone project to equal total class time available for the course.

Therapeutic Services/Sports Medicine Course 1 – Introduction to Healthcare Science Introduction to Healthcare Science is the foundational course for all Health Science pathways and is a prerequisite for all other Healthcare Science pathway courses. This course will enable students to receive initial exposure to the many Healthcare Science careers as well as employability, communication, and technology skills necessary in the healthcare industry. The concepts of human growth and development, interaction with patients and family members, health, wellness, and preventative care are evaluated, as well as the legal, ethical responsibilities of today’s healthcare provider. Fundamental healthcare skills development is initiated including microbiology, basic life support and first aid. This course will provide students with a competitive edge to be the better candidate for either entry into the healthcare global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice to continue their education and training. The prerequisite for this course is advisor approval.

Course 2 – Essentials of Healthcare Anatomy and Physiology is a vital part of most healthcare post-secondary education programs. The Essentials of Healthcare is a medical-focused anatomy course addressing the physiology of each body system, along with the investigation of common diseases, disorders and emerging diseases. The prevention of disease and the diagnosis and treatment that might be utilized are addressed, along with medical terminology related to each system. This course provides an opportunity to demonstrate technical skills that enforce the goal of helping students make connections

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between medical procedures and the pathophysiology of diseases and disorders. The pre-requisite for this course is Introduction to Healthcare.

Course 3 – Sports Medicine Sports Medicine is the third course in the Therapeutic Services/Sports Medicine Career Pathway. The course is appropriate for students who wish to pursue a career in healthcare with a focus on the musculoskeletal system, injury assessment, injury prevention, or rehabilitation including careers in Sports Medicine and Rehabilitative Services. This course will enable students to receive initial exposure to therapeutic services skills and attitudes applicable to the healthcare industry. The concepts of anatomy and physiology, assessment, preventative and rehabilitative care are introduced. Fundamental healthcare skills development is initiated, including medical terminology, kinesiology, patient assessment, record keeping, and basic life support. The prerequisites for this couse are Introduction to Healthcare and Essentials of Healthcare.

Therapeutic Services/Patient Care Course 1 – Introduction to Healthcare Science Introduction to Healthcare Science is the foundational course for all Health Science pathways and is a prerequisite for all other Healthcare Science pathway courses. This course will enable students to receive initial exposure to the many Healthcare Science careers as well as employability, communication, and technology skills necessary in the healthcare industry. The concepts of human growth and development, interaction with patients and family members, health, wellness, and preventative care are evaluated, as well as the legal, ethical responsibilities of today’s healthcare provider. Fundamental healthcare skills development is initiated including microbiology, basic life support and first aid. This course will provide students with a competitive edge to be the better candidate for either entry into the healthcare global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice to continue their education and training. The prerequisite for this course is advisor approval.

Course 2 – Essentials of Healthcare Anatomy and Physiology is a vital part of most healthcare post-secondary education programs. The Essentials of Healthcare is a medical-focused anatomy course addressing the physiology of each body system, along with the investigation of common diseases, disorders and emerging diseases. The prevention of disease and the diagnosis and treatment that might be utilized are addressed, along with medical terminology related to each system. This course provides an opportunity to demonstrate technical skills that enforce the goal of helping students make connections between medical procedures and the pathophysiology of diseases and disorders. The pre-requisite for this course is Introduction to Healthcare.

Course 3 – Patient Care Fundamentals This course is designed to provide students interested in the careers that involve patient care with entry level skills most commonly associated with the career Nursing Assistant. The students are required to meet both national and intrastate professional guidelines as designated by applicable regulatory agencies and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA). Upon completion of this course and its prerequisites, this course meets the Certified Nurse Assistant curriculum content as specified by the Georgia Medical Care Foundation. Students meeting all academic, attendance, and age requirements may sit for the Georgia Registry’s Examination. Successful completion of the Georgia Registry Examination allows students to seek employment in the state of Georgia as a Certified Nurse Assistant.

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Hospitality and Tourism Culinary Arts

Course 1 – Introduction to Culinary Arts Introduction to Culinary Arts is the foundational course designed to introduce students to fundamental food preparation terms, concepts, and methods in Culinary Arts where laboratory practice will parallel class work. Fundamental techniques, skills, and terminology are covered and mastered with an emphasis on basic kitchen and dining room safety, sanitation, equipment maintenance and operation procedures. The course also provides an overview of the professionalism in the culinary industry and career opportunities leading into a career pathway to Culinary Arts. Mastery of standards through project-based learning, technical skills practice, and leadership development activities of Family, Career and Community Leaders of America, (FCCLA) will provide students with a competitive edge for either entry into the education global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice to continue their education and training.

Course 2 – Culinary Arts I As the second course in the Culinary Arts Career Pathway, the prerequisite for this course is Introduction to Culinary Arts. Culinary Arts I is designed to create a complete foundation and understanding of Culinary Arts leading to postsecondary education or a food-service career. This fundamentals course begins to involve in-depth knowledge and hands-on skill mastery of culinary arts.

Course 3 – Culinary Arts II As the third course in the Culinary Arts Pathway, the prerequisite for this course is Culinary Arts I. Culinary Arts II is an advanced and rigorous in-depth course designed for the student who is continuing in the Culinary Arts Pathway and wishes to continue their education at the postsecondary level or enter the food-service industry as a proficient and well-rounded individual. Strong importance is given to refining hands-on production of the classic fundamentals in the commercial kitchen

Human Services Nutrition & Food Science

Course 1 – Food, Nutrition and Wellness

Food, Nutrition and Wellness is the foundational course in the nutrition and food science pathway. The focus of the course is centered on healthy food and lifestyle choices. Students will investigate the interrelationship of food, nutrition and wellness to promote good health. Mastery of standards through project-based learning, technical skills practice, and leadership development activities of Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) will provide students with a competitive edge for either entry into the education global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice to continue their education and training. Pre-requisite for this course is advisor approval.

Course 2 – Food for Life

Food for Life is an advanced course in food and nutrition that addresses the variation in nutritional needs at specific stages of the human life cycle: lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood including elderly. The most common nutritional concerns, their relationship to food choices and health status and strategies to enhance well-being at each stage of the lifecycle are emphasized. This course provides knowledge for real life and offers students a pathway into dietetics, consumer foods, and nutrition science careers with additional education at the post-secondary level.

Course 3 – Food Science

Food science integrates many branches of science and relies on the application of the rapid advances in technology to expand and improve the food supply. Students will evaluate the effects of processing, preparation, and storage on the quality, safety, wholesomeness, and nutritive value of foods. Building on information learned in Nutrition and Wellness and Chemistry, this course illustrates scientific principles in an applied context, exposing students to the wonders of the scientific world. Careers will be explored.

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Interior Design Course 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Foundations of Interior Design This course introduces the student to the basic fundamentals of design and the interior design profession. The skills taught throughout the course will allow the student to investigate and explore the various careers within the aspects of interior design. Students will gain knowledge of the history of interior furnishings. Basic mathematics, English language arts and science skills will be incorporated throughout the curriculum. Individual work, teamwork and presentation skills will also be incorporated into the curriculum. Upon completion of the interior design curriculum, students will have acquired the basic skills that will allow them to make a well educated move to the post secondary level.

Course 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Interior Design Furnishings, Materials The materials and components course is related to interior design and construction and introduces the student to a wide array of building fixtures, furnishings, and equipment used in the industry. Students will learn to read scaled floor plans, estimate quantity, and understand specifications for residential and commercial products. Knowledge of current industry standards, correct product applications, and product resource development are important elements in this course. Students will research career options including educational requirements, salary expectations, and job demands. Projects will involve individual work, team work, verbal presentations, and application of computer technology.

Course 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Textile Science The textile science course introduces students to the fascinating world of fabrics, fibers, dyes and fabric construction. Textiles for apparel, interior furnishings, and industrial applications are investigated. Testing methods, labeling laws, trends, applications, and color forecasting are all included. Various career paths will be researched to determine educational levels, salary expectations, and growing industry demand. Projects will involve individual work, team work, verbal presentations, fabric swatches, and computer applications. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) is a national student organization that helps young men and women become leaders and address important personal, family, work, and social issues through family and consumer sciences education. Through cooperative and competitive programs, FCCLA members develop skills for life including character development, creative and critical thinking, interpersonal communication, practical knowledge, and career preparation. Participation in national programs and co-curricular chapter activities enables FCCLA members to learn cooperation, take responsibility, develop leadership, and give service.

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Information Technology Web and Digital Design

Course 1 – Introduction to Digital Technology Introduction to Digital Technology is the foundational course for Web & Digital Communications, Programming, Advanced Programming, Information Support & Services, and Network Systems pathways. This course is designed for high school students to understand, communicate, and adapt to a digital world as it impacts their personal life, society, and the business world. Exposure to foundational knowledge in hardware, software, programming, web design, IT support, and networks are all taught in a computer lab with hands-on activities and project focused tasks. Students will not only understand the concepts, but apply their knowledge to situations and defend their actions/decisions/choices through the knowledge and skills acquired in this course. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry.

Course 2 – Digital Design Using web design as the platform for product design and presentation, students will create and learn digital media applications using elements of text, graphics, animation, sound, video and digital imaging for various format. The digital media and interactive media projects developed and published showcase the student skills and ability. Emphasis will be placed on effective use of tools for interactive multimedia production including storyboarding, visual development, project management, digital citizenship, and web processes. Students will create and design web sites that incorporate digital media elements to enhance content of web site.

Course 3 – Web Design Taking this course will equip students with the ability to plan, design, and create a web site. Students will move past learning how to write code and progress to designing a professional looking web site using graphical authoring tools that contains multimedia elements. Working individually and in teams, students will learn to work with web page layout and graphical elements to create a professional looking web site.

Programming Course 1 – Introduction to Digital Technology Introduction to Digital Technology is the foundational course for Web & Digital Communications, Programming, Advanced Programming, Information Support & Services, and Network Systems pathways. This course is designed for high school students to understand, communicate, and adapt to a digital world as it impacts their personal life, society, and the business world. Exposure to foundational knowledge in hardware, software, programming, web design, IT support, and networks are all taught in a computer lab with hands-on activities and project focused tasks. Students will not only understand the concepts, but apply their knowledge to situations and defend their actions/decisions/choices through the knowledge and skills acquired in this course. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry.

Course 2 – Computer Science Principles Engage your creativity, demonstrate and build your problem solving ability all while connecting the relevance of computer science to the society! Computer Science (CS) Principles is an intellectually rich and engaging course that is focused on building a solid understanding and foundation in computer science. This course emphasizes the content, practices, thinking and skills central to the discipline of computer science. Through both its content and pedagogy, this course aims to appeal to a broad audience. The focus of this course will fall into these computational thinking practices: connecting computing, developing computational artifacts, abstracting, analyzing problems and artifacts, communicating, and collaborating.

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Course 3 – Programming, Games, Apps, and Society The course is designed for high school students to strategize, design, and develop games and mobile and desktop applications that can be produced in the real world. Students will learn about life-cycles of project development and use models to develop applications. Attention will be placed on how user interfaces affect the usability and effectiveness of a game or an application. Programming constructs will be employed which will allow students’ applications to interact with “real world,” stimuli. The course exposes students to privacy, legality, and security considerations with regards to the software industry.

Marketing

Marketing and Management Course 1 – Marketing Principles Marketing Principles is the foundational course for the Marketing and Management, Fashion Merchandising and Buying, and Marketing Communications and Promotion Pathways. Marketing Principles addresses all the ways in which marketing satisfies consumer and business needs and wants for products and services. Students develop a basic understanding of Employability, Foundational and Business Administration skills, Economics, Entrepreneurship, Financial Analysis, Human Resources Management, Information Management, Marketing, Operations, Professional Development, Strategic Management, and Global Marketing strategies. Instructional projects with real businesses, workbased learning activities including School-Based Enterprises, and DECA application experiences should be incorporated in this course. Pre-requisite for this course is advisor approval.

Course 2 – Marketing and Entrepreneurship Marketing and Entrepreneurship is the second course in the Marketing and Management Career Pathway. Marketing and Entrepreneurship begins an in-depth and detailed study of marketing while also focusing on management with specific emphasis on small business ownership. This course builds on the theories learned in Marketing Principles by providing practical application scenarios which test these theories. In addition, Marketing and Entrepreneurship focuses on the role of the supervisor and examines the qualities needed to be successful.

Course 3 – Marketing Management Marketing Management is the third course in the Marketing and Management pathway. Students assume a managerial perspective by applying economic principles in marketing, analyzing operation’s needs, examining channel management and financial alternatives, managing marketing information, pricing products and services, developing product/service planning strategies, promoting products and services, purchasing, and professional sales. This course also includes global marketing where students analyze marketing strategies employed in the United States versus those employed in other countries.

Career and Technical Student Organization Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) is a student organization for all middle and high school students participating in business programs. As an integral part of the business instructional program, FBLA provides opportunities for students to develop vocational and career-supportive competencies. Participation in FBLA activities promotes civic and personal responsibility; helps students develop business leadership skills and establish career goals; and prepares them for useful citizenship and productive careers.

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Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Engineering & Technology Course 1 – Foundations of Engineering and Technology The Foundations of Engineering and Technology is the introductory course for the Engineering and Technology Education pathways. This STEM driven course provides the students with an overview of engineering and technology including the different methods used in the engineering design process developing fundamental technology and engineering literacy. Students will demonstrate the skills and knowledge they have learned through various project based activities while using an engineering design process to successfully master the “E” in STEM. The pre-requisite for this course is advisor approval.

Course 2 – Engineering Concepts Engineering Concepts is the second course in the Engineering and Technology Pathway. Students will learn to design technical solutions to engineering problems using a whole systems approach to engineering design. Students will demonstrate the application of mathematical tools, teamwork, and communications skills in solving various design challenges, while maintaining a safe work environment. The prerequisite for this course is Foundations of Engineering and Technology.

Course 3 – Engineering Applications Engineering Applications is the third course in the Engineering and Technology Pathway. Students will apply their knowledge of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) to develop solutions to technological problems. Solutions will be developed using a combination of engineering software and prototype production processes. Students will use market research, cost benefit analysis, and an understanding of the design cycle to create and present design, marketing, and business plans for their solutions. A capstone project will allow students to demonstrate their depth of knowledge of the engineering design process and prepare them for future opportunities in the field of engineering. The prerequisite for this course is Engineering Concepts.

Career and Technical Student Organization Georgia Technology Student Association (GA TSA) is committed to providing students with opportunities to excel and advance as part of their instruction in technology education. Georgia TSA promotes technology education as a means of preparing students for a dynamic world, inviting them to become critical thinkers, problem solvers, and technologically literate leaders. The mission of GA TSA is to prepare its members to be successful leaders and responsible citizens in a technological society through co-curricular activities with the technology education program, thereby developing communication, leadership, and competitive skills.

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Engineering Drafting & Design Course 1 – Introduction to Drafting and Design Introduction to Drafting and Design is the foundational course for the Architectural Drafting and Design pathway. Emphasis is placed on safety, geometric construction, fundamentals of computer-aided drafting, and multi-view drawings. Students learn drafting techniques through the study of geometric construction at which time they are introduced to computer-aided drafting and design. The standards are aligned with the national standards of the American Design Drafting Association (ADDA).

Course 2 – Survey of Engineering Graphics Survey of Engineering Graphics is the second course in the Engineering Drafting and Design Career Pathway. The course is designed to build student skills and knowledge in the field of engineering graphics/technical drafting. The course focus includes employability skills, career opportunities, applied math, working drawings that include sectional, auxiliary, detail and pictorial views, and pattern developments. In addition, elements in applied mathematics are integrated throughout the course. The prerequisite for this course is Introduction to Drafting & Design.

Course 3 – 3D Modeling and Analysis Three-Dimensional (3D) Modeling and Analysis is a one-credit course that completes the pathway in Engineering Drafting and Design. Reverse engineering strategies are recommended for third level working drawings. Computer-aided design (CAD) is recommended for use extensively with each standard in the course. Focus is on employability strategies, career studies, applied math, fasteners, working drawings, and assembly drawings. The final culmination is a presentation project that contains information mastered throughout the three courses. The prerequisite for this course is Survey of Engineering Drafting & Design.

Career and Technical Student Organization Georgia SkillsUSA members participate in local, state, and national activities provided through trade and industrial, technical, and health occupations courses and programs. The mission of SkillsUSA is to develop leadership skills and workplace competencies that students will need to succeed in a constantly changing global workplace. The organization provides many opportunities for leadership development and skills training. Competition in over 70 leadership, health occupations, occupationally related, and trade, industrial, and technical contests is offered at the region and state levels, culminating with the SkillsUSA Championships.

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Transportation, Distribution and Logistics Automotive Maintenance Course 1 – Automobile Maintenance and Light Repair This course is designed as the foundational course for the Automobile Maintenance and Light Repair pathway. Students in this course will learn the basic skills needed to gain employment as a maintenance and light repair technician. Students will be exposed to courses in automotive preventative maintenance and servicing and replacing brakes, and steering and suspension components. In addition, student will learn how to do general electrical system diagnosis, learn electrical theory, perform basic tests and determine necessary action. In addition, students will learn how to evacuate and recharge air-conditioning systems using the proper refrigerant. The hours completed in this course are aligned with ASE/NATEF standards and are a base for the entry-level technician. The pre-requisite for this course is advisor approval.

Course 2 – Maintenance and Light Repair II Students will learn the basic skills needed to gain employment as a maintenance and light repair technician and will expose students to automotive preventative maintenance and servicing, as well as replacing brakes, and steering and suspension components. Students will also learn general electrical system diagnosis, electrical theory, basic test requirements, and determining necessary action. In addition, students will learn how to evacuate and recharge airconditioning systems using the proper refrigerant. Standards for this course are aligned with ASE/NATEF standards and are an excellent foundation for the entry-level technician. The prerequisite for this course is Basic Maintenance and Light Repair.

Course 3 – Maintenance and Light Repair III Students will learn the basic skills needed to gain employment as a maintenance and light repair technician and will expose student to automotive preventative maintenance and servicing, replacing brakes, as well as steering and suspension components. Students will learn about general electrical system diagnosis, electrical theory, basic tests that are required, and determine the necessary action. In addition, students will learn how to evacuate and recharge airconditioning systems using the proper refrigerant. The standards in this course are aligned with ASE/NATEF standards and are an excellent foundation for the entry-level technician. The prerequisite for this course is Maintenance and Light Repair 2.

Automotive Service Technology Course 1 – Automobile Service Technology IV Students in this major will learn the basic skills needed to gain employment as a maintenance and light repair technician. This career major will expose the student to courses in automotive preventative maintenance and servicing and replacing brakes, and steering and suspension components. They will also learn how to do general electrical system diagnosis, learn electrical theory, perform basic tests and then determine necessary action. In addition, they will learn how to evacuate and recharge air-conditioning systems using the proper refrigerant. The hours completed in this major are aligned with ASE/NATEF standards and are an excellent foundation for the entry-level technician. The pre-requisite for this course is Maintenance and Light Repair III.

Course 2 – Automobile Service Technology V Students in this course will learn the basic skills needed to gain employment as a maintenance and light repair technician and will expose students to courses in automotive preventative maintenance, servicing and replacing brakes, and steering and suspension components. The students will also learn how to do general electrical system diagnosis, learn about

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electrical theory, and perform basic tests to determine necessary action. In addition, students will learn how to evacuate and recharge air-conditioning systems using the proper refrigerant. The hours completed in this course are aligned with ASE/NATEF standards and are an excellent foundation for an entry-level technician. The pre-requisite for this course is Automobile Service Technology IV.

Course 3 – Automobile Service Technology VI Students in this course will learn the basic skills needed to gain employment as a maintenance and light repair technician and will expose students to automotive preventative maintenance, servicing and replacing brakes, and steering and suspension components. The students will also learn how to do general electrical system diagnosis, learn electrical theory, perform basic tests and determine necessary action. In addition, students will learn how to evacuate and recharge airconditioning systems using the proper refrigerant. The hours completed in this course are aligned with ASE/NATEF standards and are an excellent foundation for an entry-level technician. The pre-requisite for this course is Automobile Service Technology V.

Master Automotive Service Course 1 – Automobile Service Technology VII Students in this course will learn the basic skills needed to gain employment as a maintenance and light repair technician. This course will expose students to automotive preventative maintenance and servicing and replacing brakes. In addition, students will learn about steering and suspension components and general electrical system diagnosis, as well as learning electrical theory, performing basic tests, and determining necessary action. Students will learn how to evacuate and recharge air-conditioning systems using the proper refrigerant. The course standards are aligned with ASE/NATEF standards and are an excellent foundation for an entry-level technician. The pre-requisite for this course is Automobile Service Technology VI.

Course 2 – Automobile Service Technology VIII Students will learn the basic skills needed to gain employment as a maintenance and light repair technician. This course will expose the student to automotive preventative maintenance and servicing and replacing brakes, and steering and suspension components. Students will also learn electrical theory, learn general electrical system diagnosis, and perform basic tests to determine necessary action. In addition, students will learn how to evacuate and recharge air-conditioning systems using the proper refrigerant. The course standards are aligned with ASE/NATEF standards and are an excellent foundation for the entry-level technician. The prerequisite for this course is Master Automobile Service Technology VII

Course 3 – Automobile Service Technology IX The Automobile Service Technology Internship is an elective course for all Automobile Service Technology pathways. Students have the opportunity to practice finished work and develop problem solving skills. Students practice adaptability to job equipment and technology and exhibit progressive productivity and acceptable job performance. Mastery of these standards through project-based learning and leadership development activities of the Career and Technical Student Organizations will help prepare students with a competitive edge for the Automobile Service marketplace. The prerequisite for Internship is the successful completion of the Maintenance and Light Repair pathway.

Career and Technical Student Organization Georgia SkillsUSA members participate in local, state, and national activities provided through trade and industrial, technical, and health occupations courses and programs. The mission of SkillsUSA is to develop leadership skills and workplace competencies that students will need to succeed in a constantly changing global workplace. The organization provides many opportunities for leadership development and skills training. Competition in over 70 leadership, health occupations, occupationally related, and trade, industrial, and technical contests is offered at the region and state levels, culminating with the SkillsUSA Championships.

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Required Testing STATE ASSESSMENTS GEORGIA MILESTONES END OF COURSE (EOC) The Georgia Milestones Assessment System (GMAS) is a summative assessment program in the content areas of English/language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. Students in high school will take an end-of-course assessment for each of the eight courses designated by the State Board of Education. End-of-course grades will account for 20% of the students’ final average in the eight designated courses. Language Arts •Ninth Grade Literature & Composition •American Literature & Composition Mathematics •Algebra I •Geometry

Science •Physical Science •Biology Social Studies •United States History •Economics/Business/Free Enterprise

END OF PATHWAY ASSESSMENTS (EOPA)

GEORGIA ALTERNATIVE ASSESSMENT (GAA)

Georgia students who complete a designated career pathway can take the EOPA to measure the level of technical skills attained. The state’s technical skill attainment inventory will be comprised of several measurement components: national industry certifications, national occupational assessments, and state licensures and state developed assessments.

The Georgia Alternate Assessment (GAA) is an assessment for students with significant cognitive disabilities in grades 3- 8 and grade 11. The students are assessed using standards in English/language arts, math, science and social studies that are aligned to the Georgia curriculum. 

ACCESS for EL: ACCESS for ELLs 2.0 is administered, annually, to all English learners in Georgia. ACCESS for ELLs 2.0 is a standards-based, criterion referenced English language proficiency test designed to measure English learners’ social and academic proficiency in English. It assesses social and instructional English as well as the language associated with language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies within the school context across the four language domains. ACCESS for ELLs 2.0 meets the federal requirements that mandates require states to evaluate EL students in grades K through 12 on their progress in learning to speak English. ACCESS for ELLs 2.0 is used to determine the English language proficiency levels and progress of ELs in the domains of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. ACCESS for ELLs 2.0 serves five main purposes. These include: •

determining the English language proficiency level of students;

providing districts with information that will help them evaluate the effectiveness of their ESOL programs;

providing information that enhances instruction and learning in programs for English language learners;

assessing annual English language proficiency gains using a standards-based assessment instrument;

providing data for meeting federal and state requirements with respect to student assessment.

NATIONAL ASSESSMENTS

ACCUPLACER

ASVAB The ASVAB is an aptitude test that measures developed abilities and helps predict future academic and occupational success in the military. It is administered annually to more than one million military applicants, high school, and post-secondary students.

®

The CollegeBoard ’s Accuplacer is an untimed, multiple-choice, computerized test that assists some colleges with evaluating students’ reading, writing, and mathematics skills and guides placement into appropriate courses at the college level.

PRELIMINARY SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE TEST/ National Merit Scholarship Qualifying (PSAT) The Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test is a practice instrument for students planning to take the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT). The PSAT is designed to help students identify academic strengths and weaknesses. The PSAT is administered free of charge to Georgia sophomores in October of each year. Other students may pay the associated fee to take the exam. SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE TEST (SAT) The Scholastic Aptitude Test is designed to measure skills developed over many years of education that are related to academic performance in college. SAT scores are intended primarily to help forecast the college academic performance students. The SAT is given on the LHS campus and at Valdosta State University. Students are encouraged to take the SAT in spring of their junior year and fall of their senior year. For more information, visit: https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat

ACT The ACT assesses high school students’ general educational development and their ability to complete college-level work and is universally accepted for college admission. The multiplechoice tests cover four skill areas: English, mathematics, reading, and science. Students are encouraged to take the ACT in the spring of their junior year and fall of their senior year. For more information visit: https://www.act.org/

ADVANCED PLACEMENT EXAMS (AP) The CollegeBoard Advanced Placement program gives high school students the opportunity to receive advanced placement and/or credit in college through successful completion of an Advanced Placement exam. All students enrolled in AP courses are encouraged to take the AP exam. CollegeBoard® does require a fee for AP exams. Please refer to the CollegeBoard® website for the cost for exams. Students not enrolled in AP classes may register for the AP exams. A passing score on an AP exam may allow students to exempt college courses with credit. Students should check with specific colleges for policies regarding AP enrollment and credit for AP exams. AP exams are administered in May with scores reported in July.

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Current School Year Testing Dates

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Current School Year Testing Dates

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Planning Your

Next Move


Counselors’ Office Today’s school counselors are vital members of the Career,Technical and Agricultural Education team.They help all students in the areas of academic achievement; social/emotional development and career development, ensuring today’s students become the productive, well-adjusted adults of tomorrow. Gone are the days of “guidance counselors” sitting in their offices and only handing out college applications or dealing with the “problem kids.” Today’s professional school counselors guide their students through three parallel paths that lead to one destination: success. Rather than providing a service just to students who need them, school counselors manage comprehensive programs for every student. (gadoe.org, 2017) Lowndes High School provides extensive guidance and counseling services. The delivery of these services requires the cooperative efforts of principals, counselors, and teachers. These professionals all have distinct, but interactive roles that are essential to the success of the program. Students may come directly to the guidance office if there is a crisis situation that arises. For appointments, students may come to the Guidance Office before school and during all four lunches. The information shared in conversations between students and their school counselor is confidential. The only exceptions to confidentiality are circumstances in which disclosure is required to prevent clear and imminent danger to the student or others or when legal requirements demand that confidential information be revealed. In these cases, confidentiality must be broken in order to best assist the student. Need to see your counselor? Based on your last name, you can easily identify your counselor. If your last name falls in this part of the alphabet A - Ci Cj - Grax Gray - Lewis Lf - Perk Perl - Sto Stp - Z Alternative Program

Your counselor is Freda Newson Leigh Walker Dr. Dana Hutchinson Terri Meyers Leb Upchurch Erica Cooper Dr. Angie Thomas

School Counselors

Freda Newson

Leigh Walker

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Dr. Dana Hutchinson

Terri Meyers

Leb Upchurch

Erica Cooper

Dr. Angie Thomas


Preparing for Life Beyond High School As you make decisions about your options in high school, it is really more about deciding where you want to end up and then working backwards to determine the steps to get you there. Please use the following information as guides so that you are aware of the requirements for certain paths and recommendations for how to get there. Please note that admission to college is evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Achieving these standards does not guarantee admission to any particular college/university, however; the guidance that is listed here is based on the best information provided by the colleges as of spring 2019. These recommendations are based on our work with colleges and universities and through the information they release to us and are subject to change by the college/university. It is possible that you could meet the requirements some other route, however, these suggestions offer our best advice and guidance to help you arrive at the destination that you seek.

If your path takes you: University of Georgia Georgia Tech Competitive out-of-state colleges Ivy League Colleges

Then you need to focus on these things while at LHS: Incoming freshman to UGA and Georgia Tech accepted in 2018 averaged taking 5 or more AP courses • 96% of incoming freshman at Georgia Tech accepted for the year had taken and passed AP Calculus Maintain strong grades: • Average GPA Admitted is a 4.0 • Most students take more academic classes than the minimum required Strong performance on standardized testing: • Average SAT for Georgia Tech is 1400-1520 • Average SAT for UGA was 1490 • Average ACT for Georgia Tech/UGA was 33 • • • •

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Provide evidence of leadership, creativity, and service to others Evidence of strong intellectual pursuits and creative endeavors Participation in school activities, public service Evidence of intergrity and personal maturity

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Preparing for Life Beyond High School If your path takes you through:

Then you need to focus on these things while at LHS:

Valdosta State Univesity Georgia Southern Kennesaw Albany State

Take challenging coursework, including AP/Honor courses • Rigourous coursework in high school allows for an easier transition to college Maintain strong grades: • Average GPA Admitted for the fall 2018 was 3.0 Strong performance on standardized testing: • Average ACT / SAT for VSU is 19 / 980 • Average ACT / SAT for Ga. Southern 20 / 1030

If your path takes you through:

Then you need to focus on these things while at LHS:

Georgia Military College ABAC

Take challenging coursework. Maintain strong grades: • Maintain respectable grades • Minimum GPA Admitted for admission is 2.2

If your path takes you through:

Then you need to focus on these things while at LHS:

Wiregrass or Military

Take challenging coursework. Complete pathway coursework at LHS related to area of interest

LHS AFJROTC

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• Job shadow someone in your field of interest • Paticipate in Work-Based learning or Youth Apprenticeship • Participate in Dual Enrollment Take the ASVAB or other Career Apptitude test to identify potential careers

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Knowledge is not Power... Until it is APPLIED! *SIGN UP! Guidance Remind: Text @vikeguide to 81010 or download the mobile app and join our class@vikeguide for all things Senior Year. *CREATE Your GAFUTURES Account! ASAP! This account will help you all 4 years in High School with HOPE GPA, COURSES OF RIGOR NEEDED FOR HOPE, college, career interests’, general scholarship information and much more. GO TO www.gafutures.org NOW! *Take the SAT or ACT or BOTH at least by end of Jr. Year! · ACT: For test dates, practice tests and to register visit: www.actstudent.org · SAT: For test dates, practice tests and to register visit: www.collegeboard.org · Federal Student Aid: For HOPE and other loan information visit: www.fafsa.ed.gov · Federal Student Aid: The Pin Website www.pin.ed.gov NOT SURE, WHAT YOU WANT TO DO AFTER HIGH SCHOOL? For a full breakdown of your interests and abilities visit: 1. www.youscience.com/ga/activate 2. Create your account using your LHS email address 3. Password will be Viking1! 4. You will need to know your GTID#...see your counselor 5. Graduation Year 6. Click the box that says you agree with the terms and services 7. Sign In….and learn all about yourself! THIS PROGRAM IS AMAZING! Back to Table of Contents

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Georgia Scholarship & Grant Programs All information about HOPE/Zell requirements can be found at GAfutures.org. Any information below is subject to change. Please check website for details. HOPE and Zell Miller Scholarship Programs Frequently Asked Questions (current high school graduates) What is the HOPE Scholarship and what are the academic eligibility requirements? The HOPE Scholarship is a merit-based scholarship that provides assistance towards the cost of tuition at eligible public and private Georgia postsecondary institutions. A student must graduate from an eligible high school with a minimum 3.0 HOPE GPA (as calculated by GSFC) and meet specific rigor course requirements. What is the Zell Miller Scholarship and what are the academic eligibility requirements? The Zell Miller Scholarship is a merit-based scholarship that provides full tuition at a public postsecondary institution and tuition assistance at an eligible private postsecondary institution. A student must graduate from an eligible high school as valedictorian or salutatorian (meeting the requirements of the HOPE Scholarship) or graduate with a minimum 3.7 Zell Miller GPA (as calculated by GSFC) along with a minimum combined score of 1200 on the math and reading portions of the SAT or a minimum composite score of 26 on the ACT (single national administration of either test) and meet specific rigor course requirements. What are rigor course requirements? Students graduating from an eligible high school must meet rigorous course requirements (in addition to other requirements) in order to be eligible for the HOPE and Zell Miller Scholarships. Discuss course options with your high school counselor if you are not sure whether a course meets the rigor requirement. Currently, a student must earn four rigor course credits. How do I apply for the HOPE or Zell Miller Scholarship? A student may apply for the scholarships by completing the GSFAPPS (one time completion) or FAFSA (completed each academic year). Check with the postsecondary institution’s financial aid office for scholarship eligibility after submitting an application. Additional documentation may be required by the postsecondary institution. How is my GPA calculated for scholarship purposes? GSFC calculates the GPA based solely on core course data (English, math, social studies, science, and foreign language only) transmitted from the high school, by June 30, for graduating seniors. GSFC cannot change or alter that data in any way. Any grade discrepancies or errors must be corrected by the high school and then resubmitted to GSFC. Contact your high school counselor if you have questions regarding courses and/or grades. How do I view my HOPE/Zell Miller GPA? You may view your HOPE/Zell Miller GPA calculation by logging into your account at www.GAfutures.org. Are dual credit enrollment hours included in the eligibility determination for the HOPE or Zell Miller Scholarship? High school credit will be given for degree-level core courses taken as a dual credit enrollment student and is included in determining a student’s high school HOPE GPA. The dual credit enrollment coursework cannot be used to gain HOPE Scholarship eligibility while in high school or to determine HOPE Scholarship eligibility for non-HOPE scholars. Source: www.gafutures.org

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GPA Calculations HOPE GPA Calculations – Uses 4.0 GPA Scale This GPA is found on the gafutures.org website and is calculated by the Georgia Student Finance Commission (GSFC). This is the official GPA used for the HOPE/Zell Miller Scholarship. Students must create an account. Their name, birthday, and social security number must be entered correctly for this calculation to be available for the students to view. Please pay close attention to the number of rigor classes to take in order to fulfill HOPE requirements. Students need to check their HOPE transcript each semester. This will enable the students to see what classes count each year. NCAA GPA Calculations – Uses 4.0 GPA Scale This GPA is calculated by the NCAA. You may use CoreCourse GPA software available through the athletic department to see what your GPA is to see if you are eligible to participate in NCAA athletics after high school. Individual College/University GPA Calculations – Uses 4.0 GPA Scale Individual colleges and universities look at the students’ transcripts and make their own decisions about whether they want to admit them to their school. They have a number of different ways they do this, and it varies from school to school. Most of them use the same format as the Georgia Student Finance Commission. Students must contact individual colleges/universities to see if they meet their requirements. In short, your grades matter! EVERY DAY COUNTS because every day you are building your year-end score that builds your GPA which is a portal to your future. Do your best in your classes, make sure you get off to a great start, and never slow down!

For example, notice how 1 or 2 points in 1 or 2 classes can make a huge difference in GPA English – 89 (3.0) Math – 79 (2.0) Science – 78 (2.0) History – 85 (3.0) Foreign Language - 82 (3.0)

English – 90 (4.0) Math – 81 (3.0) Science – 78 (2.0) History – 85 (3.0) Foreign Language - 82 (3.0)

GPA = 2.60

GPA = 3.0

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HOPE Grant Eligibility Georgia’s HOPE Grant (a separate program from the HOPE Scholarship) is available to Georgia residents who are working towards a certificate or diploma (continuing education programs are not eligible) at an eligible college or university in Georgia.

Eligibility for the HOPE Grant

Basic Eligibility All HOPE programs require students to meet basic requirements. An eligible student must 1. Meet HOPE’s U.S. citizenship or eligible non-citizen requirements; 2. Be a legal resident of Georgia; 3. Meet enrollment requirements; 4. Be in compliance with Selective Service registration requirements; 5. Meet academic achievement standards; 6. Be in good standing on all student loans or other financial aid programs; 7. Be in compliance with the Georgia Drug-Free Postsecondary Education Act of 1990; 8. Not have exceeded the maximum award limits for any HOPE program. Program Eligibility Full-time enrollment is not required and students are not required to graduate from high school with a specific GPA, however, they are required to have a postsecondary cumulative 2.0 GPA, at certain checkpoints, in order to maintain eligibility. A student that received a high school diploma (through an approved Alternative Graduation Option) by earning a technical college diploma or two technical college certificates, in one career pathway identified by the Technical College System of Georgia (TCSG), may be eligible for the HOPE Grant, up to 30 degree hours. The student must be enrolled in an associate degree program at a TCSG institution in order to receive the HOPE Grant. After payment for 30 semester hours, the student is no longer eligible for HOPE Grant while enrolled in a degree level program. The student must then meet the HOPE Scholarship eligibility requirements at the 30 semester hour checkpoint. Source: www.gafutures.org

How GPA Works When you say, “What is my GPA?” you have to be more specific. More than one calculation is made from the list of final

grades you have earned in classes in which you have earned credit. The document that lists all of these courses and grades is called your transcript. The transcript also includes test scores and contact information about you and is used as the official communication between the school and other agencies (colleges, the military, scholarship programs, etc.) upon your request. Internal LHS GPA – Uses 100 point scale This GPA is found on your high school transcript. It is updated at the end of each semester. Students and parents have access to this at any point through Infinite Campus (Parent Portal) under the reports tab. At the end of each semester, a school calculation is made for class rank, which is significant when you are a senior and colleges want to see how you compare to other students in your class at your school. At LHS, we have a weighted class rank/ GPA. You earn additional points in each AP, Honors, and selected Dual Enrollment classes that you pass which goes into the calculation. Our school’s weighted GPA includes your grades for every class you took that counted for high school credit. For more specific questions, see your counselor. Two types of internal LHS GPA’s 1. Weighted GPA —What is it used for? –Valedictorian/Salutatorian –Honor and Merit Graduates –Class Rank –Some scholarships request weighted GPA 2. Unweighted GPA —What is it used for? –Some scholarships request unweighted GPA

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Your account in GAFutures is the place to check your HOPE eligibility! Only Academic classes and the elective classes below will count toward your HOPE GPA. Your HOPE GPA is not the GPA listed on your transcript! To estimate your HOPE GPA, take every HOPE eligible course and translate your grade to the 4.0 scale. Remove 2 points from your final grade in a PreAP/Honors course and 5 points from an AP course.

Total number of 4.0’s = ____ x 4 = ____ Total number of 3.0’s = ____ x 3 = ____ Total number of 2.0’s = ____ x 2 = ____ Add these together

(sum) = ____

Sum _____ Divided by Total courses______ = _____ (Your HOPE GPA)

A (90-100): 4.0

You MUST have a 3.0 Academic GPA AND

B (80-89): 3.0

4 Rigor Courses Req’d (List yours below):

C (70-79): 2.0

1. ________________________________

F (0-69): 0

2. ________________________________

Add back 0.5 points for any AP course (up to 4.0)

3. ________________________________

Elective Courses which count for HOPE:

4. ________________________________

Computer Science Principles Programming, Games, Apps, Soc.

Courses that count for HOPE Rigor:

AP Computer Science

Any AP course

Essentials of Healthcare

Any Dual Enrollment Academic Course

Sports Medicine (Healthcare only)

Any Foreign Language Course II and above

Food for Life

Algebra II/Advanced Algebra

Food Science

Pre-Calculus

Forest Science

Statistical Reasoning

Gen Horticulture

College Readiness Math

Natural Resources

Human Anatomy

Animal Science

Chemistry I

Plant Science

Chemistry II

Forensic Sci and Crim. Invest.

Physics

The Georgia Student Finance Commission (GSFC) is the final authority on determining HOPE eligibility

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Beyond the Classroom


2019 Valedictorian Dear LHS Students, As a recent alumna of Lowndes High School, I’m grateful for this opportunity to share with you some advice and wisdom I gained over the past four years. First, let’s get this straight. Learning to navigate high school will be an adventure! Trying to balance schoolwork, extracurriculars, volunteering, friends, family, maybe a job, and then somehow finding time to sleep often seems like an impossible challenge. I hear you; I’ve been through the same thing. But the beauty of going to a school with 3,000 students is that you’re never alone in your struggle. Speaking of the student body, popularity may seem like everything now, but once you graduate, no one will remember what clothes you wore or what car you drove or even if you drove at all. Instead of trying to impress everyone, be who YOU want to be because you’re stuck with yourself for a lifetime. Find people who will lift you up and support your aspirations. One of the best ways to do this is to get involved in clubs and organizations. Don’t be afraid to try out for a sports team, audition for a part in the play, or run for office in your favorite club. In addition to meeting new people, you never know what interests or talents of yours you might discover. Of course, the education aspect of school is just as important.Try your best academically. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes and ask questions when you’re confused. It’s part of the learning process.Take classes you’re interested in to plan for whatever it is you want to do with your life. Set aside time to study without distractions. Although reading a chemistry textbook on the weekend may not seem tempting, it’ll pay off when you’re applying to college, I promise. High school can feel intimidating, so be kind to everyone. Say hi to people in the hallway, and sit with new students at lunch. Help out underclassmen if they’re lost.You know you would have appreciated the advice when you were at that age. Also, befriend your teachers.They truly care about you, and if you let them, they can make a meaningful impact in your life. I certainly know a few who did for me. Finally, have fun, dude! You’re at that perfect age: old enough that adults trust you to be relatively independent, but young enough that you don’t have to worry about paying rent. Doing your best in school doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy the ride. Go to Waffle House at 3 am with your friends because let’s be honest, it’s a Waffle Home. Dance at homecoming like no one’s watching because chances are, no one is. Enjoy these years because before you know it, you’ll be walking across the stage at graduation. Wishing you all the best of luck on your high school journey, Joyce Liu,Valedictorian Class of 2019

Life After High School Celebrating the successes of LHS Graduates Dear Students, If you have ever heard the expression “Gone in 60 seconds” then you will completely understand the value of time in high school. At Lowndes High School, you are introduced to many new faces, new situations, new emotions, as well as new challenges and opportunities. How you perceive each and every day that you walk on campus matters in an immense amount. How you choose to treat people, how you choose to judge situations, even how you choose to represent yourself.Your times at Lowndes will be remembered forever, from laughing with your classmates in the hallway, to failing your first test, to being the loudest one on the field in front of millions of people underneath the Friday night lights.To me, LHS has produced legends. It has produced some of the most critical thinkers, some of the most athletic and unforeseen individuals, as well as some of the hardest working human beings that will ever walk this earth. After Lowndes High School, you get to determine what you get to do with that.You get to determine who you want to be for the rest of your life.You get to understand the difference between meeting the finish line, and bursting through and beyond the finish line. For me, I use it as a catalyst to understand that I need to go way beyond the finish line in order to be successful. A lot of people do not realize that, they just get by and feel that they have accomplished everything they need to accomplish after high school is over. I am here to tell you and let it be known that you have not even scratched the surface.While this incredible place will get you ready for many challenges, many opportunities, and many outcomes... you have to be the one to determine what to do with all of those. Do you lay down the baton and say you have finished your race? Or do you squeeze the baton even harder and keep moving forward, as we say in football during conditioning... Pick them up and put them down, keep moving. Do not try to quit whether it looks hard or not, you will be made into an even better individual than you thought you could be.You will become a better father, a better husband, a better provider, a better friend, a better son, daughter, niece, and nephew. Life after Lowndes high school can only be described in one word... Pride. How much pride do you have in yourself? How much pride do you have in the person you can become? How much pride do you have in the way you want to live one day? Only you can determine that answer. Only you can determine what you are worth. My name is Tre’ Jackson, and I know my worth! Tre’ Jackson Class of 2014


Life After High School Celebrating the successes of LHS Graduates Fellow Vikings, I want to take this opportunity to share with you the limited knowledge I have acquired over the past few years. Take my advice for what it’s worth and use it to improve the future for yourself and others. After graduating from LHS in 2014, I obtained a dual degree in mechanical and aerospace engineering from the University of Florida. My academic career provided me with the freedom to follow my dreams. I had the opportunity to help design the hyperloop, military airplanes, and the James Webb Space Telescope, which will look back to the origins of our Universe. I am now starting my career with ExxonMobil as a mechanical engineer. None of this would have been possible without humility, determination, and a strong commitment to learning. Enough about me, Let’s talk about you.Your time at LHS will arguably be the most important years of your pre-professional career. The habits you establish now will build the foundation for the rest of your life. With that being said, I have one philosophy that I try to follow, and that is to constantly find ways to improve myself and to never become stagnant. It doesn’t matter what you do but never become complacent, and always find ways to keep learning. Get involved in your class cabinet, as this is where you will build friendships that last a lifetime. Join clubs that even slightly interest you, because this is where you will find your passions that you never knew existed. Spend your summer getting internship experience instead of staying home, because there are so many companies looking to hire young talent. Most importantly find the time to challenge yourself academically and create habits that will aid you through the rest of your professional career.Your teachers in high school genuinely care for you. So now, more than ever, is the time to act with humility, discover your motivation, challenge yourself, and make mistakes, because your teachers are there to guide you back if you fall astray.You can always achieve more than you think you can, as success is simply a state of mind. Challenge yourself to take more AP classes. Challenge yourself to read your textbook. Challenge yourself to do more. It’s taking these extra steps every day that make the difference between being average and being extraordinary. The habits and mindsets that you develop now will make your collegiate and professional careers much more pleasant. The most influential professor I had while at UF, Anil Rao, always ended his semesters with eye opening quotes from famous astronomers. These quotes would tie together everything taught that semester. I would like to share this tradition with you by leaving you with a quote from Neil deGrasse Tyson, that I believe portrays the essence of how I am encouraging you to proceed forward during your time at LHS and beyond. I wish you the best of luck and remember to always keep challenging yourself! “We live on this speck called Earth - think about what you might do, today or tomorrow - and make the most of it.” Tanner Jones Class of 2014

Dear students, High school is not only an experience, it is a journey. In the four years I spent at Lowndes High School, I changed in every way imaginable. It was a time when I escaped the awkward phase of being a teenager and prepared to be independent, living on my own. At Lowndes High, I began to discover talents and passions that would guide my decisions for the rest of my life. The experiences I had at LHS with great teachers and a variety of extracurricular activities allowed me to find out what I truly was interested in. The diversity of Lowndes High School allowed me to meet and develop friendships with people of all backgrounds. As great as this time is, high school also comes with its heartbreaks. Losing friends to illness and accidents, tough decisions and stressful preparation for the future did create hardship in those four years- and they left me changed, but that was part of growing up. Despite the dark side, high school left me with memories that I will never forget. Whether you were in the stands, or on the field, Friday night football games were the best and will always have a soft spot in my heart. The amazing LHS marching band is second to none. Plowboy Dance, Homecoming and Prom were also special memories- and are something all students should look forward to. Enjoy all the new friends and all the amazing memories you will make over the next four years! In a blink of an eye, you will be a graduated senior heading off to college looking back thinking where did the time go? Make sure to soak up every moment because you can’t get it back. Do your best, study hard and have fun! Carly Thomas, Class of 1991 LHS 2019 Distinguished Alumnus

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LHS Athletics The 2018-2019 school year brought about some great accomplishments for LHS Athletics!

Boys’ Athletics Baseball Region Champions 1st Round State Basketball Region Runner-Up 1st Round State Cross Country Region Champions 4th Place Area & State Qualifier

Girls’ Athletics Basketball 1st Round State Competition Cheerleading Area Champions State Qualifier Cross Country Area & State Qualifier

Football Region Runner-Up State Semi-finals

Golf Individual State Qualifier Soccer 1st Round State

Golf Region & Area Champions State Team Qualifier

Softball Region Champions Elite Eight

Soccer Region Champs 1st round State

Swimming State Qualifiers

Tennis Region Runner Up 1st Round State Track Region Champions State Qualifiers Wrestling Area & State Qualifiers Back to Table of Contents

Tennis 1st Round State Track Region Champions State Qualifiers Volleyball Regions Runner Up


Listed below is important information regarding the Lowndes High Athletics program. Please see your coach for more detailed information. INSURANCE The Athletic Department pays for an athletic insurance policy to help cover your student athlete. The policy acts as a secondary insurance plan to the primary insurance you carry on your student athlete. It is not a 24/7 policy and only covers your child during supervised athletic events and practices. It carries a $250.00 deductible that will be the parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; responsibility. PHYSICALS The GHSA requires that all student athletes have a pre-participation physical exam prior to competing in high school athletics. Physicals are good for one calendar year from the date of exam. The Lowndes High Athletic Training program offers physicals at the school at various times throughout the school year. These physicals are free of charge. If you choose to use your primary care physician, the physical must be on the required GHSA pre-participation physical form which can be found on our website or the GHSA website. ELIGIBILITY Students who participate in GHSA sponsored athletics and activities must be certified as eligible, and must remain so throughout the course of the season, by the Georgia High School Association prior to participating in pre-season practice or tryouts. Students must meet all State and Local requirements. These requirements include but are not limited to age, semesters in high school, academic grades, transfer rules, and place of residence. PARTICIPATION A student athlete who is participating in a sport must complete/finish the season for that sport before participating in another sport. The student is not allowed to quit one sport in-season to participate in another unless there is mutual consent between the coaches of the two sports and approval by the Athletic Director. ATTENDANCE No student will be permitted to practice or participate in athletic activities on a school day if they have not been in attendance for at least half of the school day unless approved to practice or play by the Athletic Director. OSS/ALT SCHOOL/YDC/EXPULSION Students assigned to an alternative school or out-of-school suspension for disciplinary reasons, adjudicated to YDC, or placed under expulsion, lose their eligibility. Students may not attend any functions, events, or activities on any Lowndes County BOE property (with the exception of alternative school attendance) until they have been cleared to return as a student at Lowndes High School. Suspension is considered to have ended when the student is physically readmitted to the classroom. Back to Table of Contents

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Work-Based Learning Lowndes High Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Work-Based Learning (WBL) program is designed to equip students, 16 years or older, with the necessary employability skills to be productive the work environment. Students entering the program must complete an application process and be selected for admission by the WBL coordinator. The application can be found online, located on the WBL website (https://sites.google.com/lowndes.k12. ga.us/lhs-wbl). Students must maintain employment throughout the entirety of their time in the WBL program. The WBL coordinator is available to help students find employment that relates to his/her CTAE pathway. Please, see Mr. Van Nus in office S-520 for more information.

Did you know that the average WBL student makes over $2,700 a semester. That is over $5,400 for the school year! Back to Table of Contents

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Things Students

Need to Know


Behavior Expectations Below are expectations regarding student behavior at Lowndes High School. It is the desire of Lowndes High School that all students have every possible opportunity to take advantage of the instructional programs that will allow them access to the best possible education. Any distractions from a favorable teaching and learning environment lessen these opportunities. Students are expected to adhere to standards of behavior that will facilitate a positive learning environment for themselves and other students and to respect each other, employees, and school property. They are also expected to comply with the student behavior policies adopted by the Lowndes County Board of Education. The expectations listed below are not intended to be all-inclusive, and a student committing an act of misconduct not covered by the LCS Student Code of Conduct will be subject to the discretionary authority of the principal. CLASSROOM ASSERTIVE DISCIPLINE PLAN Each teacher is to follow the LHS Classroom Assertive Discipline Plan. Parent contact via phone conversation is a vital part of the LHS Classroom Assertive Discipline Plan and utilized extensively. The teacher will document on the Classroom Assertive Discipline Plan for the first three offenses. The fourth and subsequent offenses will be document on an Immediate Office Referral. The LHS Classroom Assertive Discipline Plan is as follows: Step 1—First Offense (Teacher/student conference) Step 2—Second Offense (Teacher contact parent via telephone conversation and documents in Infinite Campus Contact Log Step 3—Third Offense (Teacher assigned detention) Step 4—Fourth and subsequent offenses: immediate office referral ATTENDANCE School attendance is an important factor for student success. Our expectation is for students to be present and on time each day. Attendance in the LCS Student Handbook is defined as: repeated or excessive unexcused absences or tardies; including failure to report to class, skipping class, leaving school without authorization, out of assigned area, or failure to comply with disciplinary sanctions. Tardies: 1st offense:Teacher recorded warning with student initials 2nd offense: Parent contact by teacher 3rd offense:Teacher assigned detention in classroom 4th offense: Administrator assigned isolation 5th -7th offense: ISS as assigned by administrator 8th offense: OSS as assigned by administrator, possible referral to Lowndes Alternative Program

Skipping: 1st offense- 3rd offense : ISS as assigned by administrator 4th -5th offense: OSS as assigned by administrator 6th offense: 5 days OSS as assigned by administrator, possible referral to Lowndes Alternative Program

VERBAL ALTERCATIONS/DISTURBANCES Lowndes County Schools promote a safe and orderly learning environment. Students who are involved in verbal altercations, horseplay, and/or creating disturbances will be disciplined based on the severity and totality of their actions. Consequences for these behaviors may result in up to ten (10) days suspension. BULLYING Bullying behavior is not acceptable at Lowndes High School. To meet the standard of “bullying,” student behaviors must meet the following criteria: An established pattern of behavior, which may include written, verbal, physical acts, or through a computer, computer system, computer network, or other electronic technology occurring on school property, on school vehicles, at designated school bus stops, or at school related functions that is so severe, persistent, or pervasive so as to have the effect of substantially interfering with a student’s education, threatening the educational environment, or causing substantial physical harm or visibly bodily harm. Includes but is not limited to a pattern of unwanted teasing, threats, name-calling, intimidation, harassment, humiliation, hazing, physical attacks, extortion, social exclusion, coercion, spreading of rumors or falsehoods, gossip, stalking, or using any type of electronic means to harass or intimidate. 1st offense: 3 days OSS, referral to counselor, parental contact 2nd offense: up to 5 Days OSS as assigned by administrator, parental contact, and possible referral to Lowndes Alternative Program CELL PHONES Realizing the role cell phones have come to play in everyday life, cell phone possession by a student on campus is acceptable. Students are allowed to utilize cell phones before and after school, during class changes, and during lunch. Cell phones are also permitted at the discretion of the classroom teacher for instructional purposes. However, if the teacher has not given students permission to have cell phones visible or in use during class, students may be disciplined under the Assertive Discipline Plan or Student Incivility depending upon the circumstances of the offense. Earbuds worn in both ears, headphones, & wireless devices are not permitted.

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DRESS CODE For a full description of the Dress Code Policy, please refer to the Lowndes County Schools Student Handbook. Violation of school dress code will be disciplined as follows: If the violation can be corrected: First Offense: Warning and Parent Contact Second Offense: Referral for one block of isolation and Parent Contact Third Offense: One day of ISS and Parent Contact Fourth and Subsequent Offenses: Assigned additional ISS/OSS EARBUDS/HEADPHONES/WIRELESS DEVICES Students are allowed to utilize earbuds to listen to devices; however, for student safety, only one earbud should be used. This will enable students to hear announcements and directions. Large headphones that cover the ears are not permitted at Lowndes High School and will be disciplined according to the Dress Code expectation above. FIGHTING Students are encouraged to make a report to a teacher, counselor, or administrator if they are in conflict with another student so that conflict resolution may be implemented. Fighting is mutual participation involving physical violence where there is intent to harm and no one main offender. This does not include verbal confrontations, tussles, or other minor confrontations. Up to 10 OSS as assigned by administrator, parental contact, referral to Law Enforcement and, possible referral to Lowndes Alternative Program STUDENT INCIVILITY Lowndes High School promotes a positive, safe, and orderly learning environment for all students. Failure to comply with reasonable directions of a Lowndes County Schools employee is not acceptable behavior. This can include cursing, talking back, “sassing,” intentionally arguing in a demanding or disruptive manner, refusal to follow the directions of a staff member or otherwise showing disrespect for any persons present at school or school related functions. This includes verbal, non-violent confrontation, willful disobedience, and disrespectful behavior. Student Incivility also includes insubordination or disrespect to other students; includes but is not limited to harassing, intimidating with words or actions, verbally abusing others, use of vulgar or inappropriate language, verbal non-violent confrontation, and misrepresentation of the truth. Repeated discipline of Student Incivility may constitute Bullying behavior. Minor Infractions: 1st:Teacher recorded warning & correction 2nd:Teacher parent contact 3rd:Teacher assigned detention and parent contact 4th and Subsequent: referral to administrator

PARKING AND TRAFFIC VIOLATIONS Parking at Lowndes High School is available to students. All vehicles on campus must have a valid decal that is visibly hung from the rear view mirror. A new decal must be purchased each school year that you are a student at LHS and drive on campus. Students participating in Dual Enrollment must purchase a valid decal to park on campus. Students must have a valid driver’s license to obtain a permit and drive on campus. Students will be fined and parking permits may be revoked for the following violations: • • • • •

Driving too fast for conditions, reckless driving, and improper parking Parking in teachers’ or honors’ parking spaces Parking without a decal Behaving in any manner that could cause accident or injury Loaning, sharing, or giving permits to other students

First Offense: $25 fine and/or possible permanent loss of parking privileges Second Offense: $30 fine and/or possible permanent loss of parking privileges Third Offense: $35 fine and/or possible permanent loss of parking privileges

Please refer to the Lowndes County Schools Student Handbook for additional information regarding student discipline. Back to Table of Contents

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Attendance Policy Student Absences: Compulsory school attendance is required of all children between the ages of six and sixteen residing within the State of Georgia. The responsibility for ensuring the regular attendance of a school age child lies with the parent, guardian, or other person with whom the child resides (O.C.G.A.20-2-690.1). In an effort to improve student attendance, Lowndes County Schools has established procedures to address student absences from school. Through the combined efforts of the building level principal, classroom teachers, parents/guardians, school system social workers, local law enforcement officials and the Southern Judicial Circuit, the goal to improve student attendance will be achieved. It is not the desire of Lowndes County Schools that students attend school when ill; however, there is a direct relationship between school attendance and academic performance. Therefore, every reasonable attempt should be made for students to attend school to help ensure their academic success. Lawful Absence from Class/School As permitted under Georgia state law and Georgia State Board of Education policies, a student’s absence, tardy or early checkout may be excused for the following reasons: 1. Personal illness or when attendance in school would endanger a student’s health or the health of others; 2. Serious illness or death of an immediate family member; 3. Mandated absence by order of governmental agencies, including pre-induction physical examinations for service in the armed forces; 4. Observing religious holidays, necessitating absence from school; 5. Conditions that render attendance impossible or hazardous to one’s health or safety; 6. Registering to vote or voting, for a period not to exceed one day; and 7. Reuniting of families between military deployments, not to exceed five days. NOTE: For school attendance purposes, students shall be counted present when they are in attendance at least one-half of the instructional day or serving as pages of the Georgia General Assembly. Absences Requiring Medical Documentation In the event that a student’s personal illness or attendance at school endangers a student’s health or the health of others, the school may require the student to present appropriate medical documentation upon return to school for the purpose of validating that the absence is an excused absence. • In the event that a student has 10 or more absences for health reasons, the school requires a physician’s excuse in order to consider the absence as an excused absence. Parents are encouraged to be proactive in communicating with their child’s school when there is an unusual attendance pattern expected. The following procedures will be utilized in addressing an accumulation of unexcused and/or excused student absences and/ or tardies/early checkouts: • System approved letters are mailed that include the Georgia Compulsory Attendance Law (O.C.G.A. 20-2-690.1). Instructions are included in each letter. Upon the generation of each letter, the principal and attendance officer will be notified. • Absences do not accumulate beyond the current school year. • School days missed as a result of out of school suspensions will not count as unexcused absences for the purpose of determining truancy. NOTE: LCS complies with the Lowndes County Juvenile Court Protocol Agreement for Truancy in Schools. A referral to the Truancy Intervention Program (TIP), juvenile court, state court, magistrate court, and/or the Department of Family and Children Services (DFCS) may be made in lieu of the outlined procedures. Tardies (see Tardy referral form) When the tardy bell rings, students are to be in the classroom. Students arriving on campus after 8:30 am must secure admit slip from the student office in order to be admitted to class. Tardy Consequences: First Offense:...........................................................................Verbal Warning/Automated School Call for every offense/infraction Second Offense:..................................................................................Parental Contact by teacher and document in IC contact log Third Offense:................................................................................................................................After-school detention with teacher Fourth Offense:................................................................................................................................. Administration Assigned Isolation Fifth Offense: ................................................................................................................................. Administration Assigned ISS (1 day)

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Automobiles and Student Parking STUDENT PARKING AND TRAFFIC RULES & REGULATIONS All vehicles on campus must have a visible parking permit displayed from the rearview mirror. A new permit must be purchased each school year that you intend to park on campus. Students must show a valid driver’s license and proof of insurance in order to obtain a parking permit. Parking decals can be purchased in the old student office next to the main office during lunch for $25. After March 1st permit prices will be $15. There is a $10 replacement fee for lost or stolen permits. Parking and Driving Rules and Procedures:

1. 2. 3. 4.

All vehicles parked on campus must have a visible parking permit. Students are expected to abide by all Georgia traffic laws. Students should not use handheld electronic devices while driving on campus. Driving too fast, reckless driving, or behaving in any manner that could cause accidents, injury, or damage to property will be enforced. 5. Students must park legally in a marked parking space. 6. Students may only park in the student parking lot. Faculty parking areas are off-limits. 7. Marked numbered spaces are reserved for specific “Senior Honors” parking. 8. Students may not loan or share decals. You must use the decal that is assigned to you. 9. Students are not allowed to have flags, banners, and/or signs attached to their vehicles while on campus. 10.Students are not allowed to access their vehicle and/or enter the student parking lot during the instructional day unless approved by administration or a Lowndes Co SRO. 11.Students arriving late during the instructional day or dismissed early may not loiter in the parking lot. 12.Students arriving late during the instructional day or dismissed early must speak with the security guard at the front gate and show proper documentation and identification. 13.Students may not leave campus without permission during the school day. 14.Students may not bring outside food into the building without permission. 15.All vehicles parked on the campus of LHS are subject to being searched by school staff and possibly law enforcement. 16.It is at the administration’s discretion to enforce other rules and procedures not specifically listed. 17.Vehicles may be towed away at the owner’s expense and Law Enforcement may be notified when necessary.

All rules apply to ALL LHS students regardless of the amount of time they are on campus. Students may be fined, have their permit revoked, and face other disciplinary actions for violating parking and driving rules 1​st​ Offense: $25 fine and/or permit revocation and/or other disciplinary action 2​nd​ Offense: $30 fine and/or permit revocation and/or other disciplinary action 3​rd​ Offense: $35 fine and/or permit revocation and/or other disciplinary action

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Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT) LOWNDES COUNTY SCHOOLS ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY (STUDENTS) Technology is an integral part of the learning experiences in the Lowndes County Schools. Students will use these resources to acquire knowledge, to seek, evaluate, and create information, and to communicate and collaborate with others.The use of the system’s computers and network is a privilege that requires each student to act responsibly.The student shall be accountable for any violations of this Acceptable Use Policy, as they would be for any other classroom disciplinary incident. A student and his/her parents shall be responsible for damages resulting from a violation of this policy and shall be liable for costs incurred for service or repair. Students have no expectation of privacy in their use of and storage on the Lowndes County School System network or on any online storage solution provided by the school system. Any access from a school computer, including internet browsing and use of electronic mail, is subject to monitoring and may be visible through routine maintenance. Monitoring and maintenance may lead to the discovery that the user is violating this use policy and implementing regulation, other Lowndes County School System’s policies, or the law. Such violations will be reported and appropriate action taken.   With the permission of the school administration and classroom teacher, the student may use a personal computing device at school for instructional purposes and connect to the wireless network. Use of this personal device will be governed by this Acceptable Use Policy.  Upon reasonable suspicion that the student has violated this AUP or the Student Code of Conduct, the device may be confiscated by a staff member and examined by an administrator in accordance with local board policy and state and federal law. Bullying - The Lowndes County Schools System has adopted policies prohibiting bullying. Students should not use personal or school-owned technology resources to threaten, harass, or intimidate others. Prohibited behaviors include, but are not limited to:  •Cyberstalking or engaging in conduct to communicate, or to cause to be communicated, words, images, or language by or through the use of electronic mail or electronic communication, directed or about a specific purpose, causing substantial emotional distress to the victim. •Cyberbullying or the willful, hostile, and repeated harassment and intimidation of a person through the use of digital technologies, including, but not limited to, email, blogs, social networking websites, chat rooms, texts, and instant messaging •The use of cameras or camera phones to take embarrassing photographs or videos of students or school employees and posting them online •Sending abusive or threatening text messages or instant messages •Using websites to circulate gossip and rumors to other students Bullying and its consequences are described in the Student Code of Conduct (JCDA) and LCBOE Bullying policy (JCDAG). Notice on Web Filtering Lowndes County Schools will take measures to filter and monitor resources and information accessed  through its information and data systems. Although a conscious effort will be made by professionals to deter the access to materials that are inappropriate for the educational setting, no safeguard is foolproof.  The user is responsible for not seeking or initiating access to inappropriate material. Expectations The student SHALL: • Login to the Lowndes County Schools network using his or her assigned username and password (when a username and password have been provided to the student). • Refrain from sharing personally-identifying information, such as address or phone number, when posting on any wiki, blog, or other web-based tool provided or authorized by Lowndes County Schools, and students in grades K-5 shall not post their last names in such posts. • Give credit for information and images found through internet research when used in a class project or paper. • Create original images or use public domain or Creative Commons licensed images in class projects. • Notify the teacher or media specialist if he or she inadvertently browses to an inappropriate site on the internet. • Use a school-system provided email account only for instructional purposes and as directed by his or her teacher (if

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provided with an e-mail account by the school system). • Ensure that any computing devices or storage media they bring in from outside the school are virus free and do not contain any unauthorized or inappropriate files. The student SHALL NOT: • Use the school system’s computer hardware, network, or Internet link in a manner that is inconsistent with a teacher’s directions and generally-accepted network etiquette • Seek or initiate access to inappropriate material on the internet, including (but not limited to) abusive, obscene, sexually-oriented material, or hate speech • Use the school computers or network for illegal activity, such as copying or downloading copyrighted software, music, or images, or for violation of copyright laws • Purposely bring on premises or infect any school computer or network with a virus, Trojan, or program designed to damage, alter, destroy or provide access to unauthorized data or information • Gain access or attempt to access unauthorized or restricted network resources or the data and documents of another person, nor will the student alter or delete the data belonging to others or to the school system • Use or attempt to use the password or account of another person or use a computer while logged on under another user’s account • Use the computer of a teacher, administrator, or other staff member without permission or supervision • Use the school’s computers or network while access privileges have been suspended. • Alter or attempt to alter the configuration of a computer, network electronics, the operating system, or any of the software. • Vandalize, disconnect or disassemble any network or computer component. • Utilize the computers and network to retrieve information or run software applications not assigned by their teacher or inconsistent with school policy • Provide another student with user account information or passwords • Bring on premises any computer, disk or storage device that contains a software application or utility that could be used to alter the configuration of the operating system or network equipment, scan or probe the network, or provide access to unauthorized areas or data. • Download, access via e-mail or file sharing, or install any software or programs not specifically authorized by Technology Department personnel. • Bypass or attempt to circumvent network security, virus protection, network filtering, or policies (VPN). Violations Violations of any of the provisions of this use and implementation policy will result in restricting or discontinuing a user’s use of the Lowndes County Schools System’s technology and may result in other disciplinary and/or legal action. For students, disciplinary action will be tailored to meet the specific violation. If the violation also involves a violation of other Lowndes County Board of Education policies or implementing regulations, including policy JCDA – Code of Student Conduct, the violation will be handled in accordance with the discipline measures recommended by that other policy or regulation.  The Lowndes County School System will fully cooperate with local, state, and federal officials in any investigation concerning or relating to any illegal activities conducted through the district’s technology, as permitted or in compliance with federal and state laws. ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATION DEVICES Realizing the role of cell phones and electronic devices have come to play in everyday life, possession of these devices by a student on campus is acceptable within the guidelines set forth by Lowndes County Schools.  A student may possess a cell phone, tablet, or other electronic devices on school property or during school activities as long as the device is out of sight and turned off. Wearable electronic devices (e.g., smart watches, Fitbits, etc.)  are allowed to be worn but must not chime during the school day. The student is prohibited from using the device during the instructional day unless specifically directed by the teacher for instructional purposes. During testing events, students and staff must adhere to the protocols outlined by the testing agency and/or the test examiner. Lowndes County Schools is not responsible for the theft, loss, or damage to electronic devices brought onto its property or during field trips.

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Bullying Policy Lowndes County School Bullying Policy

The Lowndes County Board of Education believes that all students can learn better in a safe school environment. Behavior that infringes on the safety of students will not be tolerated. Bullying, as the term is defined in Georgia law, of a student by another student is strictly prohibited. Such prohibition shall be included in the Student Code of Conduct for all schools within the school system. Bullying is defined as a pattern of behavior that is a(n): 1. willful attempt or threat to inflict injury on another person, when accompanied by an apparent present ability to do so; 2. intentional display of force such as would give the victim reason to fear or expect immediate bodily harm; or 3. intentional written, verbal, or physical act, which a reasonable person would perceive as being intended to threaten, harass, or intimidate, that: a. causes another person substantial physical harm within the meaning of Code Section 16-5-23.1 or visible bodily harm as such term is defined in Code Section 16-5-23.1; b. has the effect of substantially interfering with a student’s education; c. is so severe, persistent, or pervasive that it creates an intimidating or threatening educational environment; or d. has the effect of substantially disrupting the orderly operation of the school. The term applies to acts which occur on school property, on school vehicles, at designated school bus stops, or at school related functions or activities or by use of data or software that is accessed through a computer, computer system, computer network, or other electronic technology of a local school system. The term also applies to acts of cyberbullying which occur through the use of electronic communication, whether or not electronic act originated on school property or with school equipment, if the electronic communication (1) is directed specifically at students or school personnel, (2) is maliciously intended for the purpose of threatening the safety of those specified or substantially disrupting the orderly operation of the school, and (3) creates a reasonable fear of harm to the students’ or school personnel’s person or property or has a high likelihood of succeeding in that purpose.  Electronic communication includes, but is not limited to, any transfer of signs, signals, writings, images, sounds, data or intelligence of any nature transmitted in whole or in part by a wire, radio, electromagnetic, photo electronic or photo optical system. Any teacher or other school employee who, in the exercise of his or her personal judgment and discretion, believes he or she has reliable information that would lead a reasonable person to suspect that someone is a target of bullying is encouraged to immediately report it to appropriate school administrator. Any report of retaliation for reporting bullying will also be investigated and addressed as called for in this policy and in accordance with school procedures. Acts of bullying shall be punished by a range of consequences through the progressive discipline process, as stated in the Code of Conduct. However, upon a finding by the disciplinary hearing officer, panel or tribunal that a student in grades 6-12 has committed the offense of bullying for the third time in a school year, the student may be assigned to an alternative school. Upon a finding by a school administrator that a student has committed an act of bullying or is a victim of bullying, the administrator or designee shall notify the parent, guardian, or other person having control or charge of the student.

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CAFETERIA INFORMATION General Information: It is our privilege to provide low cost nutritious breakfast and lunch meals to all students and staff at Lowndes High School (LHS). All meals adhere to the USDA dietary guidelines and requirements. These regulations prohibit the sale of non-nutritional foods and carbonated beverages during meal times at LHS. Outside restaurant foods are not allowed to be brought on campus by students, parents, or others. Breakfast or lunches sent with students when they come to school in the morning in lunch boxes, pails, or plain bags are allowed. Meal Accounts, Payments and Prepayment on-Line: Students must memorize and use their five digit number that follows 692 of the student number assigned to them. School nutrition uses this as their meal account PIN number. Payment for meals is due before the meal is eaten. Students are allowed to charge only one meal until their account is paid in full. Students may pay at time of purchase or use one of the prepayment options. The first option is to pay weekly or monthly with cash or check using the envelope provided by the school. Checks should be made to LHS Nutrition Program with the student’s name and PIN number on the check and envelope. Families with more than one student at LHS should send separately for each student. The second option is to pay online through My School Bucks (http://myschoolbucks.com). You must use the student’s full school ID number in this format: (692 _ _ _ _ _). Master Card, Visa, and Discover debit/credit cards are accepted. A convenience fee of .50 cents is applied each time you make an online payment. Any money deposited may take up to 12 hours to post to the account. Free or Reduced Price Meals: Students may qualify for free school meals if they receive food stamps (SNAP or TANF). Families may also qualify for free or reduced price meals based on family income. Family applications, rather than individual applications, are used. One application is needed per family. Applications are available at LHS as well as the Lowndes County Schools website. Please make sure that your application reaches the nutrition manager at LHS. List High School and Adult/Visitor Meal Prices Below (Lunch): • Non-Educator................................................................................................................................ $3.75 • Educator Adults............................................................................................................................ $3.25 • High School Students................................................................................................................... $2.25 • Second Student Lunch (USDA Requires Adult Price)............................................................ $3.75 • Reduced Price Lunch.................................................................................................................... $0.40 List High School and Adult/Visitor Meal Prices Below (Breakfast): • Adult and Guest............................................................................................................................ $2.00 • High School Student..................................................................................................................... $2.00 • Reduced Price Breakfast.............................................................................................................. $0.30

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Do The Right Thing Assemblies

Assemblies are provided for transmitting information to the student body and for programs of interest and enjoyment. Students are expected to exhibit appropriate behavior during assemblies.

Display of Signs

The appropriate administrator must approve all posters, signs, announcements, etc., before being posted in the school. All approved signs must be posted on the bulletin board. No signs are to be taped to the walls.

Fines and Fees

Students are responsible for any debts incurred while enrolled at LHS. These include but are not limited to monies owed to the office, library, cafeteria, athletic department, graduation supplies, lost/damaged books, school board in the case of damage assessments, fundraisers, club dues, or any settlements. Failure to settle financial obligations may result in one or more of the following actions: 1. Withholding of an additional textbook or library book until restitution is made. 2. Withholding of all grade cards, class schedules, diplomas, or certificates until restitution is made. 3. Denying privileges of participating in clubs, field trips, parking privileges, etc.

Off-Limit Areas

During the lunch period, students should report to the cafeteria or to the media center. During school hours, all parking lots are off limits to students unless approved by an administrator. Consequences for violation of these guidelines will be at the discretion of the administration.

Outward Displays of Affection

An outward display of affection through physical contact is inappropriate at school. Violation will result in disciplinary warning and parent notification.

Passes

Students who leave the classroom during classroom time must have a pass. Teachers will provide hall passes on lanyards for students going to the restroom, office, guidance, etc. For students going to the media center or school nurse, students should have a written pass from the teacher with the designated time, date, and destination. There should be no movement in the hallways during the first 10 minutes or the last 10 minutes of class.

See Something, Say Something!

If students are aware of problems, conflicts, or safety concerns, they are encouraged to inform an adult in the building. Counselors, teachers, and administrators are here to assist and want to know how we can help. Information is kept confidential. Our goal is safety for all!

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Dress Code In order to maintain an appropriate climate for learning, the following dress code has been established for Lowndes County Schools. On a case-by-case basis, administrators or designee may ban items that disrupt the learning environment. Teachers may refer any student whose appearance causes distractions to the learning environment to an administrator for corrective or disciplinary action. General Guidelines Clothing, hairstyle and color, jewelry, tattoos, including temporary tattoos, body carvings, face paintings, piercings, or hand-carried items may not distract from the normal learning environment. Clothing articles, jewelry, bags, and other items brought onto school must not create a safety or health hazard. Jewelry, clothing, or any article that can be used as a weapon may not be brought onto Lowndes County School property. All students must maintain appropriate hygiene standards. Clothing articles designed to cover the body may not be constructed of see-through materials such as mesh, net, sheer, clear plastic, or 'cut-out' materials unless worn over an acceptable garment. Belts, buttons, zippers, suspenders, snaps or other similar items will be fastened appropriately. Holes or rips in clothing above the knee must not expose the body. Hair curlers, picks, and combs will not be worn in the hair. Head coverings (e.g. hats, caps, scarves, sweatbands, or hoods affixed to other articles of clothing)and sunglasses will not be worn on campus during the school day. All items worn or carried will not include any written or pictorial messages that promote the use of alcohol, tobacco, illegal drugs, or any other illegal product/activity and must not contain any derogatory racial, religious, sexual, ethnic implications or any obscene language. Bandanas are not permitted on Lowndes County School Property. Bottoms These items must not be overly tight, extremely loose, or extend past the sole of the shoe. Pants, shorts, and skirts must be worn at the natural waist. These items must be an appropriate size at the waist. The outer garment must cover the buttocks entirely. Shorts and skirts must be no shorter than 3 inches above the knee cap when the student is standing straight up. Any open pleats, vents, or slits must also be no more than three inches above the knee. Tights and similar items may only be worn under pants, skirts, shorts, dresses, and jumpers that meet the dress code requirement. Leggings Loose-fitting shirts that cover the entire buttocks may be worn with leggings. Leggings may also be worn under pants, skirts, shorts, dresses, and jumpers that meet the dress code requirement of Lowndes County Schools. Tops These items must be of the appropriate length not to expose the midriff area and back area during the course of normal daily activities (walking, standing, sitting and raising arms). Tank tops, spaghetti straps, tube tops, halter tops and strapless tops are not allowed. These items must not excessively expose breast/chest areas or undergarments. The necklines should be no lower than two inches below the top of the sternum (breastbone), with no part of the breast/chest area visible. Discretionary intervention by school administration may be used in determining the appropriateness of attire. *Please refer to the Lowndes County Schools Student Handbook to view the Student Dress Code in its entirety. Shoes . â&#x20AC;˘ Must be worn at all times. â&#x20AC;˘ Cleats, taps, spurs, or other unnecessary objects will not be affixed to shoes. â&#x20AC;˘ All shoes must be fastened.

Consequences: If the violation can be corrected: First Offense: Warning and Parent Contact Second Offense: Referral for one block of isolation and Parent Contact Third Offense: One day of ISS and Parent Contact Fourth and Subsequent Offenses: Assigned additional ISS/OSS If the violation cannot be corrected, the student will be held in isolation.

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LCBOE Equity Compliance EQUAL EDUCATION OPPORTUNITY NON-DISCRIMINATION NOTICE The Lowndes County Schools (LCS) does not discriminate on the basis of sex, age, race, disability, religion, or national origin in its programs or activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the nondiscrimination policies: Assistant Superintendent Rodney Green 1592 Norman Drive Valdosta, Ga. 31601 229. 245.2250 State law prohibits discrimination based on gender in athletic programs of local school systems (Equity in Sports Act, O.C.G.A. 20-2-315). Students are hereby notified that LCS does not discriminate based on gender in its athletic programs. For inquiries or complaints concerning sports equity, contact Owen Prince, sports equity coordinator, at 229.245.2250. Complaint Procedure:  Federal Programs Complaint Procedure (Title I-A, Title I-C, Title II, Title III, Title VI, Title IX and Title X (McKinney Vento Act) Any individuation, organization or agency may file a complaint with the Lowndes County Schools (LCS) if they believe and allege that LCS is violating a federal statute or regulation regarding ESSA.  The complaint must allege a violation that occurred not more than one (1) year prior to the date the complaint is received unless a longer period is reasonable because the violation is considered to be systemic or ongoing. A written complaint should be addressed to: Lowndes County Board Of Education, Attn. Federal Projects Director, 1592 Norman Drive,Valdosta, Georgia 31601.

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Homecoming & Prom All dances sponsored by LHS are for LHS students and their guests. The administration has set the following guidelines for dances. Homecoming Dance • Actively enrolled students are allowed to purchase tickets. • Students and their guests may be asked to present an ID in order to enter the dance. • Participants must be 9th – 12th graders and cannot be over the age of 20. • Administrators reserve the right to deny entry to anyone, with no refunds. • Students assigned to the Lowndes Alternative Program for disciplinary purposes cannot attend as a guest.

Prom Eligibility & Requirements

It is the desire of LHS administration, faculty and staff to have the Junior / Senior Prom be an activity dedicated to those who have earned enough credit to be a Junior or Senior. Appropriate attire is required for the Prom. No caps, sunglasses, flip flops, etc., are allowed. Juniors and Seniors must meet the following academic requirements for Prom eligibility. 1. To be considered a senior for the Prom, you must begin the current school year school year with 20 units of credit. 2. To be considered a junior for the Prom, you must begin the current school year school year with 13 units of credit. 3. Any student who is assigned to Lowndes Alternative Program for disciplinary reasons is not eligible. 4. If a student is suspended from school the day prior to the Prom, they lose Prom eligibility with no reimbursement for any pre-paid activities. 5. All elements of the Student Handbook apply for the Prom. 6. To purchase tickets for the Prom and to enter the Prom each student must have a valid picture ID. 7. The Prom committee will handle ticket sales and decorations. 8. To participate in the Prom as a guest, a student must be in at least the 9th grade. 9. No individual over the age of 20 will be allowed to the Prom. 10. LHS students who choose to bring a non-student as their date must register their date with the Principal and approval must be given prior to the purchase of Prom tickets. 11. The Administration has the right to deny access to any Prom activities for any non-students. 12. Former students assigned to the Lowndes Alternative Program for disciplinary reasons will not be allowed to return as Prom guests.

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Student Information Academic Indifference

It is the expectation of the administration and faculty that all students perform in school to the best of their ability in all areas. Students who do not meet a teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s academic expectations in the classroom may be referred to the appropriate assistant principal. The teacher must have previously made contact with the parent/guardian and must have met with the student and his/her counselor to address academic performance. Action will be taken by the administration based on the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s failure to meet teacher expectations.

College Visitation

Students are allowed three visitation days for the admissions to their post secondary option, such as colleges, universities, technical colleges, or military. Prior approval is needed for these visitations. While visiting, the students must have the college representative complete the required form. This form can be found in the LHS Guidance office of on the LHS Guidance web page. Once the form is complete, the student must submit it to the LHS attendance clerk. Students are responsible for all assignments missed when on a college visitation.

Emergency Evacuation

In accordance with state and local school board policy, it is necessary to conduct emergency evacuations and severe weather drills at various times throughout the school year. Emergency evacuation routes are prominently posted in each classroom. Each teacher will advise all students of the evacuation route to be taken for that particular classroom during emergency evacuation. Teachers will also advise all students of the procedures to be taken by that particular classroom in the event of severe weather. During either the emergency evacuation or the severe weather alert, it is important that each student listens carefully and follows the instructorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s directions.

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act

An educational agency or institution shall give full rights under the Act to either parent, unless the agency or institution has been provided with evidence that there is a court order, state statute, or legally binding document relating to such matters as divorce, separation, or custody that specifically revokes these rights. Athletic students who do not wish for their coaches to have access to their grades on the student information system must present a written/signed statement to that effect from their parent/guardian to the Guidance office secretary.

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Hospital/Homebound Services

Hospital/homebound services are provided for students who qualify for this program as outlined by the Board of Education. However, there are some courses at the High School that may not be continued while on the hospital/homebound program. If you are seeking Hospital/Homebound Services, parents must contact the counselor for paperwork that a physician must complete. A parent conference is required prior to receiving services. Unless prior arrangements are made with the HHB teacher, physician, parent, principal, and teachers, all work must be submitted in accordance with the procedure outlined in this handbook (Grading Policy). Hospital/homebound students are not eligible for any school event or activity. Students enrolled in Dual Enrollment courses must contact the post secondary institution to see if provisions can be made for illness. The classes taken through Dual Enrollment do not participate in hospital/homebound services.

Internet Use, Network Use, and Web Publication

Technology resources including school network access and Internet access are used in Lowndes County Schools as part of instructional activities. Lowndes County Schools take every measure to protect students while using these resources as required and outlined by the Children’s Internet Protection Act [Pub. L. No. 106-554 and 47 USC 254(h)]. A technology protection measure is in place to protect students while using these resources by blocking or filtering inappropriate websites at all schools. Students will be permitted to use these resources and will be expected to adhere to the Lowndes County Schools’ Internet Acceptable Use Policy (Board Policy Descriptor Code: IFBG). Parents and students may access this policy by visiting the Lowndes County Schools online board policy manual. The Acceptable Use Policy outlines best practices for school computer/technology use with specific emphasis on the following restricted activities: • • • • • • • • • •

Using obscene language Sending or displaying offensive messages or pictures Giving personal information, such as complete name, phone number, address or identifiable photo, without permission from teacher and parent or guardian Harassing, insulting or attacking others Damaging or modifying computers, computer systems, computer networks, or any school technology equipment Violating copyright laws Using others’ passwords Trespassing in others’ folder, work or files Intentionally wasting limited resources Employing the network for commercial purposes, financial gain, or any methods deemed unlawful or unethical.

Violations may result in a loss of access as well as other disciplinary or legal action (Board policy and procedures on student rights and responsibilities). In addition, Lowndes County Schools is committed to maintaining system and school websites that highlight the achievements of the faculty, staff, and students of all Lowndes County Schools by displaying photographs, videos, audio files, and/or student creations with possible student full name recognition. Students may also be asked to create accounts for educational websites.

NCAA Eligibility Requirements

College-bound student athletes may access information about academic requirements to attend practice, receive scholarships, or compete in Division I or Division II athletics by visiting http://www.ncaa.org/student-athletes.

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School Safety Zone

It shall be unlawful for any person to carry or possess or have under such person’s control while within a school safety zone (all property in, on, or within 1,000 feet of any real property owned by or leased to any public or private elementary school, secondary school, or school board and used for elementary or secondary education) or at a school building, school function, or school property or on a bus or other transportation furnished by the school, any weapon or explosive compound. Any person who violates this subsection shall be guilty of a felony and upon conviction thereof, be punished by a fine of not more than $10,000, by imprisonment for not less than two or more than 10 years, or both. Reference O.C.G.A. 16-11127.1. This paragraph excludes any instruments used for classroom work authorized by the teacher and principal.

School Social Worker

The school social worker is a resource to parents, students, faculty, and staff when social, emotional and/or family problems interfere with a student’s ability to succeed in school. The school social worker can help students and their families with a wide range of problems such as disabilities, alcohol/chemical concerns, violence, serious illness, unacceptable behavior, or excessive absences. He/she can help identify concerns, consider solutions, and find resources. The school social worker welcomes students and parents who have concerns he/she might be able to help with. If the needs of the whole student are unmet, academic areas may suffer.

Search and Seizure

In January 1985, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that school officials have the right to search students under their jurisdiction where there are “reasonable grounds for suspecting that the search will reveal evidence that the student has violated or is violating the law or rules of the school” and the search is conducted in a reasonable manner. (New Jersey v. T.L.O., 469 U.S. 325, 105, S. CT. 733, 744; 1985i)

Selective Service

All male students must register for selective service at age 18. You may register online at www.sss.gov or in the Guidance Office. Failure to register in a timely fashion will result in the revocation of the HOPE scholarship and render the FAFSA application null and void.

Sexual Harassment

Sexual Harassment is a form of discrimination prohibited by the Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and local Board Policy GAE. Lowndes High School is committed to maintaining a learning environment that is free from sexual harassment, where all employees and students can work and study together harmoniously. The school district will act to investigate all complaints, formal or informal, verbal or written, and to discipline any student or employee who sexually harasses another student or employee of the school district.

Stolen/Lost Items

LHS is not responsible for securing personal valuables. Students should not have and do not need the following: large amounts of money, electronic devices, expensive jewelry, and other valuable items on campus. It is the responsibility of the student to secure their personal valuables while on campus. LHS is not responsible for personal items stolen at LHS. A report can be filed by the School Resource Officer for stolen items. The LHS Administration may or may not investigate stolen items, dependent upon the circumstances.

Student Activities

Any activity that is school-sponsored or competitive or involves students as representatives of the school is considered a school activity. Students must have permission from their parents before they are permitted to go on any field trips sponsored by the school. The administration reserves the right to deny a student participation in any such activity. Students who are suspended from school, assigned to alternative school, or whose parent signs a wavier cannot participate or attend school activities.

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Student Grievance

The LCBOE acknowledges the rights of students and has established a policy for which students can file a grievance. The student should follow the steps below: 1. Try to settle the issue first with the teacher. 2. If relief is not granted, then appeal should be taken to the counselor. 3. If the problem is not resolved, then an appeal can be made to the Assistant Principal. 4. If the problem is not resolved, then an appeal can be made to the Principal. 5. Appeals beyond the Principal’s office should be made to the Assistant Superintendent.

Student ID’s

Student ID’s will be issued to all students. If lost, a replacement ID will cost $5.00.

Teenage and Adult Driver Responsibility Act

Governor Nathan Deal signed SB 100 into law on April 16, 2015. SB 100 makes significant changes to the Teenage and Adult Driver Responsibility Act (TAADRA) by eliminating the requirement for schools to submit noncompliance data for students with excessive unexcused absences and certain discipline infractions. Effective July 1, 2015, schools must certify that a student is enrolled in and not under expulsion from a public or private school to be eligible for a driver’s license or learner’s permit using the Certificate of Enrollment form. The Certificate of Enrollment form is posted on the GaDOE website. Students can request a certificate of enrollment from the main office. The first request is at no cost. All requests after the first request are $5.00. Allow 5 school days to process the certificate. An Alcohol and Drug Awareness Program (ADAP) certificate is to verify that a student has passed the requirement to allow him or her to have a Georgia Driver’s License. This ADAP certificate is needed for the driver’s license only; therefore, a student must have passed this course and be 16 years of age to receive an ADAP certificate. Students can request their ADAP certificate at the main office.

Telephones

In the case of an emergency, students should report to the student office to ask for permission to use a phone. Students may ask a teacher for permission to use a cell phone if a student has to contact a parent in the case of an emergency.

Visitors

All visitors must sign in at the main office, park in the designated area for visitors (specifically designed for allowing visitors an easy exit at the end of the day), and enter through the Main Lobby. Please note that teachers are instructing students and are not available for visitors during the school day.

The LHS policies and procedures cited here were up-to-date at the printing deadline. Changes to certain policies may come into effect during the current school year school year as the Lowndes County Board of Education updates policies. LHS defers to the most recent revision stated in LCS board policies.

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Important Contacts 504/SST/IEP

Guidance Office

Hospital/Homebound

Guidance Office

Academic Help

Your Individual Teacher

Band

Band Director

Accident Report

Main Office

College Information Guidance Office

ADAP Card

Main Office

Check-in/Check-out Student Office

Advanced Placement

Guidance Counselor

Lost and Found

Student Office

Advice about schedule/Personal

Guidance Office

Medical Attention

School Nurse (Student Office)

Athletics

Athletic Office

Parking Permits

Main Office

Attendance

Main Office

Report Cards and Registrar Transcript Requests

Audio Visual Aids

Media Center

Work-Based Learning

Work-Based Learning Coordinator

Buses

Assistant Principals

Scholarships

Guidance Office

Certificate of Enrollment

Main Office

Student IDs

Student Office

Dual Enrollment:

Guidance Office

CTAE Director

Technology

Media Center

Career Technical Agricultural Education Tardy Slips

Grievances and/or Student Issues

Guidance Office

Withdrawal from School

Guidance Office

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Lowndes High School Clubs and Extracurricular Activities Athletics, Clubs and Extracurricular Activities

Sponsor/Coach

Room #

Description of Club or Extracurricular Activity

Academic Quiz Bowl

Todd Clements

E726

Students compete against students from other schools in the academic areas at the local and district levels.

AFJROTC Academic Bowl

Lt. Col. Dominicis, MSgt Hunter, MSgt Harbach

CO Annex Port.

Competition focuses on college preparatory curriculum including math, science, language, social studies, arts and mythology, competing in on-line competitions.

AFJROTC Aerospace Club

Lt. Col. Dominicis, MSgt Hunter, MSgt Harbach

CO Annex Port.

Explores different aspects of Aerospace Science, including learning to fly on desktop flight simulators, build aircraft models, build and launch rockets, and fly remote contolled aircraft and quadcopter unmanned air systems.

AFJROTC Cyber Patriot

Lt. Col. Dominicis, MSgt Hunter, MSgt Harbach

CO Annex Port.

The National Youth Cyber Defense competition, where students learn about defending and hardening networks and operating systems against threats. Students compete in multiple rounds of competitions at the state and national level.

AFJROTC Drill Team

Lt. Col. Dominicis, MSgt Hunter, MSgt Harbach

CO Annex Port.

Students will learn precision drill, teamwork, self-discipline and leadership, and participate in multiple competitions and community service events.

AFJROTC Kitty Hawk Honor Society

Lt. Col. Dominicis, MSgt Hunter, MSgt Harbach

CO Annex Port.

The Air Force Junior ROTC Honor Society for students with outstanding academic and leadership records. Cadets are selected and invited to join this prestigious organization based on merit.

AFJROTC Marksmanship Team

Lt. Col. Dominicis, MSgt Hunter, MSgt Harbach

CO Annex Port.

Athletics - The Air Riflery team is open to AFJROTC cadets that participates in three position marksmanship competitions according to the Civilian Marksmanship Program, NRA and Junior Olympic rules.

AFJROTC StellarXplorers

Lt. Col. Dominicis, MSgt Hunter, MSgt Harbach

CO Annex Port.

The National High School Space competition, where students learn about satellite orbits and orbital mechanics, satellite and rocket design, and the space launch business. Students compete in multiple rounds of competition against teams from around the world.

American Sign Language Club

Taylor Patterson, Kim Smith

E7001

Open to students with no prior ASL experience to students with ASL fluency. The mission of ASL Club is to promote the exchange of ASL with an acknowledgement and respect for Deaf culture.

Anchor Club

April Harrell

E706

A service project club with a national focus on brain-related disorders. The members work with Speical Olympics and other special education organizations.

Anime Club

Katrina Mayweather

J133

A group that seeks to explore and discuss various anime/manga from other countries. Students will discuss their interest in these oriental creations with their peers and seek to broaden their understandings of cultures that are foreign to most.

Archery Club

Chase Ellinburg

E724

The mission is to expose any student willing to participate in international target style archers, along with building self-esteem through accomplishment, teamwork and developing individual skill are key factors.

Athletic Trainers - Students

Philip Pieplow

H806

The athletic training students learn from supervised observations under the certified athletic trainer. Students learn how to provide the appropriate assistance for specific sports teams while under supervision.

Band -- Georgia Bridgemen Marching Band

Jon Bowman

Band Room

A socially competitive musical group that focuses on organization, team work, collaboration and good sportsmanship.

Band -- Indoor Percussion

Dr. Jeff Grant

Band Room

A socially competitive musical group that focuses on organization, team work, collaboration and good sportsmanship.

Band -- Viking Steel (Steel Drum Band)

Dr. Jeff Grant

Band Room

A socially competitive musical group that focuses on organization, team work, collaboration and good sportsmanship.

Band -- Jazz Band

Jon Bowman

Band Room

A socially competitive musical group that focuses on organization, team work, collaboration and good sportsmanship.

Band -- Winter Guard - Varsity and JV

Jon Bowman

Band Room

A socially competitive group made of band members that focuses on organization, team work, collaboration and good sportmanship.

Bank Board Organization

Erica Cooper

Guidance

Interested students must apply in spring of junior year in order to serve during senior year. Qualifying candidates will be chosen through an application & interview process and must be interested in the business/finance field after graduation.

Baseball Varsity, JV and 9th grade

Varsity - Ryan Page (Head Coach)

Gym

Athletic activity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

Basketball (Boys) Varsity and JV

Varsity - Reshon Benjamin (Head Coach)

Gym

Athletic activity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

Varsity - Antonia Tookes (Head Coach)

Gym

Athletic activity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

Bat Girls

Arabi Hall

New Office in Cafe.

Social group that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy culture and character-building through good sportsmanship.

BETA

Dena Rogers, Jennifer Copeland

E725

Organized to promote the ideals of character, service and leadership among students, to reward meritorious achievement, and to encourage and assist students in continuing thier education after high school. Membership is by invitation only.

Book Club

Amanda Glass-Bortle, Anastasia Croft

E701

A great way to extend your circle and get to know new people! In this club, one can read and discuss books, play games, do themed activities or even dress up as your favorite character.

Cheerleading - Competition - Varsity

Melissa Trolinger (Head Coach)

C306

Athleticactivity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

Basketball (Girls) Varsity and JV

Cheerleading - JV Football & Basketball

Jill Hatton (Head Coach), Arabi Hall

E705

Athletic activity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

Cheerleading - Varsity Basketball

Ashlei Collins (Head Coach), Candace Robinson

E742

Athletic avtivity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

Cheerleading - Varsity Football

Jill Hatton (Head), Arabi Hall

E705

Athletic activity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

Chess Club

Pam Guice

E731

An activity of instruction used to guide and promote individual and team decision-making strategies and to support its educational program through community outreach and local partnerships.

G509

Students learn, understand, and appreciate the basic elements of vocal techniques, communicate the structural elements of melody, harmony, rhythm, & form, and learn to appreciate the performance practices of a variety of musical styles/eras.

Chorus

Dr. Jennifer McQuade

Chorus - Tri-M Music Honor Society

Dr. Jennifer McQuade

G509

Tri-M Music Honor Society membership provides recognition and motivation for the finest music students at LHS through service and community outreach and leadership opportunities. Tri-M is part of the largest arts education association in the world, The National Association for Music Education.

Civics Club

Bonnie Williams, Taylor Patterson, Alex Boone

E724

Civics Club promotes patriotism, leadership, political and civic activism for the betterment of our school, community, and country. It strives for civil bipartisan political discourse.

Class Cabinet of 2020

Jill Hatton, Melonie Niehanke, Lisa Eckwahl

E705

A student-led club to promote school government & Viking Spirit among Seniors.

Class Cabinet of 2021

Charlotte Davis, Jodi Scruggs, Nikki Vannoy

J221

A student-led club to promote school government & Viking Spirit among Juniors.

Class Cabinet of 2022

Andrea Inman, Andrea Bridges, Aprile Steel

S506

A student-led club to promote school government & Viking Spirit among Sophomores.

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Athletics, Clubs and Extracurricular Activities

Sponsor/Coach

Room #

Description of Club or Extracurricular Activity

Class Cabinet of 2023

Bonnie Williams, Leslie Whiddon

E724

A student-led club to promote school government & Viking Spirit among Freshman.

Cross Country (Boys)

Martha Mazurkiewicz

C309

Athletic activity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

Cross Country (Girls)

Martha Mazurkiewicz

C309

Athletic activity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

DECA

Gwen Belue

E720

DECA enhances the preparation for college and careers by providing co-curricular programs that integrate into classroom instruction, applying learning in the context of business, connecting to business and the community and promoting competition.

Drama Club - LHS Off-Broadway

Sheri Dorsett

Students learn about acting, memorization techniques, play analysis, set design, costumes, roles and director expectations. Joining drama club is a way to gain hands-on L1028 (cafeteria) theatrical experience.

FBLA (Future Business Leaders of America)

Gwen Belue

E720

FBLA-PBL is the premier student business association. Our mission is to bring business and education together in a positive working relationship through innovative leadership and career development programs.

FCCLA (Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America)

Kimberly Boswell

Cafe. Port.

Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) is a dynamic and effective national student organization that helps young men and women become leaders and address important personal, family, work and societal issues through Family and Consumer Sciences Education.

FCA (Fellowship of Christian Athletes)

Angela Swilley

J141

FCA presents students with the challenges and adventures of receiving Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior through fellowship of the church. The organization provides opportunity for Christian fellowship among students and student-athletes.

FFA (formerly known as "Future Farmers of America")

Quinton Hadsock, James Corbett, Anglia Webb-Crosby

S508

A national organization dedicated to making a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth, and career success through agricultural education.

S505

Future Educators Association(FEA) members are Teaching As A Profession (TAAP) pathway students who want to pursue a degree in education. FGE's misson is to identify, recruit, prepare and retain the next generation of Georgia educators.

FGE (Future Georgia Educators)

Andrea Bridges

Fishing Club

Chris Smith

D401

The fishing club is a social and community service club that helps students to focus, learn patience and become knowledgeable of the many different species of fish, along with the skills associated with the art/hobby/profession of fishing. Promoting a clean environment is an important aspect of this organization.

Football - Varsity, JV and 9th grade

Varsity - Randy McPherson (Head Coach)

Field House

Athletic activity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

French Club

Naureen Smith

C303

A social organization open to any current or former French-as-a-Foreign Language student, where we celebrate the French language and culture through fellowship, food, games, etc.

Golf (Boys)

Tommy Watson (Head Coach)

Gym

Athletic activity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

Golf (Girls)

Tommy Watson (Head Coach)

Gym

Athletic activity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

GSA

Wendi Baird

J205

A social, student-led club, which provides a place for students to meet, talk about issues, and support one another on many topics.

Gymnastics

Brittany Gillespie

E739

Athletic activity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

Hugin, the creative magazine

Amanda Wilson

E730

The Hugin is Lowndes High's literary magazine. We accept any approved student submissions of art, photography, short stories, poems, etc.

Interact Club

Leigh Ann Haworth

L1001.1

Service club: The purpose of Interact is to provide the opportunity for young people to work together in a world fellowship dedicated to service and international understanding. The goals of Interact are: To recognize and develop constructive leadership and personal integrity.

International Thespian Society

Sheri Dorsett

L1028 (cafe)

An honorary organization for theatre students in secondary schools across America and abroad. The mission of ITS is to honor student achievement in the theatre arts.

KEY Club

Bill Henderson, Joe Stubbs

J222

A high school organization sponsored by Kiwanis International, assistingwith carrying out its mission to serve the children of the world. Members perform acts of service in their communities, such as cleaning up parks, collecting clothing and organizing food drives.

Cafe. Portable

HOSA is an international student organization recognized by the U.S. Department of Education and the Health Science Education (HSE) Division of CTAE. HOSA's two-fold mission is to promote career opportunities in the health care industry and to enhance the delivery of quality health care to all people.

LHS Health/Occupational Science Association (HOSA)

Ashley Harris and Brooks Johnson

LHS Recycling

David Swanson

D403

A service organization that establishes and reinforces environmentally sound practices for life-learning experiences of continuing great behavioral contributions as adults through the removal of materials from the waste stream, then putting them to new uses.

Literary

Caitlin Mozzo

E740

A competitive academic activity that focuses on the skills and talents of writing with high artistic qualities and exploring the richness of language and culture.

Lowndes Youth Leadership League

Freda Newson

Guidance

The purpose is to assist students in developing an internal sense of community awareness, knowledge of teen issues, the development of leadership skills and provide an opportunity for students to network with each other and with other adult leaders for the betterment of their community.

Mat Girls

Jennifer Graybeal

J107

Social group that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy culture and character-building through good sportsmanship.

Math Team

Christina DiTomasso, Daniel Drummond

D405

A competitive academic activity that focuses on the concepts, skills and knowledge of concrete and abstract mathematics through problem-solving and logical reasoning. Mock Trial is a nationally recognized, competitive program that was created to help students acquire a working knowledge of our judicial system, develop analytical abilities and communication skills, and gain an understanding of their obligations and responsibilities as participating members of our society.

Mock Trial

Sandra James

J106

Model United Nations/Club

Patricia Dinkins

J129

Students learn about the UN-- its committees and processes.

Model United Nations/Competitive Team

Patricia Dinkins

J129

Students roleplay delegates from various countries and serve on mock committees at conferences.

Mu Alpha Theta Math Honor Society

Christina DiTomasso, Daniel Drummond

D405

An organization dedicated to promoting scholarship in mathematics to High School & Junior College students.

MUNIN Yearbook

Todd Clements

E726

Academic/Social Club that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration, for the purpose of creating a publication that reflects the events and lives of students, staff, and community involved with the school throughout the year.

National Art Honor Society

Sherry Bennett, Daisy Daniel

S514

An organization for student artists who are dedicated to the arts in our school community.

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2019-20 LHS Advisement Guide

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Athletics, Clubs and Extracurricular Activities

Sponsor/Coach

National English Honor Society(NEHS): Lambda Epsilon Sigma Lori Bennett

Room #

Description of Club or Extracurricular Activity

E723

NEHS recognizes students who take Honors level English classes and maintains a 3.5 GPA. The focus is on service to others, therefore students are required to complete several Community Service Projects throughout the year. Students interested in joining must submit an application for approval and have two English teacher recommendations.

Paws & Claws Club

Melonie Niehanke

D422

This club encourages activities for developing leadership, friendliness and unity among animal lovers. Paws and Claws educates students and the community on the many problems animals are facing.

Poetry Out Loud

Pattie Reitz

E733

Poetry Out Loud is a national poetry memorization/recitation competition open to all students. www.poetryoutloud.org

Media Center

The mission of Positive Action Group is to productively impact our school, home, and community through service, advocacy, and quality social interactions. Students will be equipped with knowledge, skills, and experiences that will enable them to lead affirmative social change in their school and beyond.

Positive Action Group (Crimson Creed)

Treva Gear, Erika Downing

Principal's Advisory Committee

LeAnne McCall

Admin. Office

The purpose of the Principal Advisory Committee is to bring parents, school employees, students and community members together to create a better understanding of and mutual respect for each other's perspectives and share ideas for increasing student achievement and performance.

SAGA Newspaper

Amanda Wilson

E730

The publishing of the school newspaper using student reports on school events, sports, school news and student opinions.

Science Bowl

Joshua Selph

J137

The goal is for students to compete as a team in a science quiz competition with other schools in the state.

Science Club

Jenny McLendon

J226

Aims to foster student interest in science by participating in experiments during club meetings and listen to guest speakers on real life science applications. Students also participate in community service projects.

Skills USA

Marilu Cantrell, Marc McLain

S512

Students learn about personal, workplace, and technical skills (grounded in academics) and compete using these skills at regional, state, and national conferences. SkillsUSA is open to any student.

Soccer (Boys) - Varsity

TBA

TBA

Athletic activity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

Soccer (Girls) - Varsity

Jake Chitty (Head Coach) PMLC

Gym

Athletic activity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

Softball - Varsity

Stewart Thomas (Head Coach)

J110

Athletic activity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

SPAGE (Student Professional Assoc. of GA Educators)

Andrea Bridges

S506

Teaching As A Profession students are members of the student PAGE association which provides educators with professional learning that enhances competence, confidence and leadership skills, leading to higher achievement for students, while providing legislative and legal support.

Spanish Honor Society

Brittany Williams

C307

To become a member, students must have a 90 or above in Spanish 1, 2, and 3 and take Spanish 4.

Student Council & Class Cabinets

Brittany Williams, Rebecca Elmore, Caitlyn Mozzo

C307

Student Council and Class Cabinets are the student government bodies at Lowndes High School. Students exercise leadership skills and participate in service opportunities through these clubs, and are also responsible for organizing important school events such as school dances, Powderpuff football game, and more.

Swimming - Varsity

Kim Cliett

Gym

Athletic activity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

Tennis (Boys) Varsity and JV

Heath Phelps (Head Coach), Levi Hibbard

J204

Athletic activity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

Tennis (Girls) Varsity and JV

Heath Phelps (Head Coach), Levi Hibbard

J204

Athletic activity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

Track (Boys) Varsity

Terry Quinn (Head Coach)

Gym

Athletic activity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

Track (Girls) - Varsity

Joseph Robinson (Head Coach)

E738

Athletic activity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

TRI-M Music Honor Society

Jennifer McQuade

G509

A middle/high school organization designed to recognize students for their academic and musical achievements and to provide leadership and service opportunities to young musicians.

TSA (Technology Student Association)

Greg Terry, Matt North

S504

Lowndes Technology Student Association (TSA) prepares members to be successful leaders in a technological society through co-curricular activities such as communication, robotics, leadership, teamwork and competitive events.

Viking Ambassadors

Leigh Walker, Brooks Johnson

Mega Portable

Ambassadors are nominated by a teacher and must be a rising 10th, 11th, or 12th grade student. Duties and responsibilities include: participation in Chick-fil-A Leadership Academy, Shop with a Viking, assisting with school sponsored events as assigned, assisting with Clothes Closet, and assisting with tours for new students and families.

VNN News Broadcast

Greg Terry

P3

The Viking News Network (VNN) is a student produced, monthly broadcast that covers student interest pieces and local/school events.

Volleyball - Varsity and JV

Laine Craven (Head Coach)

Gym

Athletic activity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

E704

Athletic activity that focuses on organization, team work and collaboration to promote healthy competition and character-building through good sportsmanship.

Wrestling - Varsity

Spencer Graybeal (Head Coach)

Writing Fair

Chase Ellinburg

E724

The Writing Fair is open to any LHS student. Students will be asked to submit original writings such as poems, essays or narratives. All submissions will be read and judged by LHS staff before moving to next level of competition.

Y Club

Aprile Steel, Donna Tomlinson

J127

Purpose: To create, maintain and extend, throughout the home, school, and community, high standards of Christian character (See state webpage). Eligibility: Open to anyone with an interest in government, politics, or civic engagement.

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2019-20 LHS Advisement Guide

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LHS REGULAR BELL & LUNCH SCHEDULE 2019-20 BELL SCHEDULE 7:55-8:15 8:15-9:46 9:46-9:52 9:52-11:23 11:23-11:29 11:29-1:23 1:23-1:29 1:29-3:00 3:10-3:40 3:10-4:15

LUNCH SCHEDULE Students may enter the building 1​st​ Block Class Change 2​nd​ Block Class Change 3​rd​ Block (Lunch) Class Change 4​th​ Block Detention (M, W, Th) PL (Tuesday)

​ 1:23-11:53 1​st​ Lunch 1 PE, FA-Math & Sci, Driver’s Ed 11:53-12:23 2​nd​ Lunch C, D, S, T, Portables 12:23-12:53 3​rd​ Lunch LLC, Old E 12:53-1:23 4​th​ Lunch F, J, Band, ROTC, FA-ELA & SS

LHS VIP BELL & LUNCH SCHEDULE 2019-20 BELL SCHEDULE 7:55-8:15 8:15-9:32 9:32-9:38 9:38-10:08 10:08-10:15 10:15-11:32 11:32-11:39 11:39-1:32 1:32-1:38 1:38-3:00 3:10-3:40 3:10-4:15

Back to Table of Contents

LUNCH SCHEDULE Students may enter the building 1​st​ Block Class Change VIP Class Change 2​nd​ Block Class Change 3​rd​ Block (Lunch) Class Change 4​th​ Block Detention (M, W, Th) PL (Tuesday)

11:32-12:02 1​st​ Lunch PE, FA-Math & Sci, Driver’s Ed 12:02-12:32 2​nd​ Lunch C, D, S, T, Portables 12:32—1:02 3​rd​ Lunch LLC, Old E 1:02-1:32 4​th​ Lunch F, J, Band, ROTC, FA-ELA & SS

2019-20 LHS Advisement Guide

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Profile for lowndeshighschool

2019-20 Advisement Guide - Lowndes High School  

This document is the Advisement Guide for all Lowndes High School Students for the 2019-20 School Year.

2019-20 Advisement Guide - Lowndes High School  

This document is the Advisement Guide for all Lowndes High School Students for the 2019-20 School Year.

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