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LOUISIANA LANDMARKS SOCIETY 2 0 2 0 AWA R D S F O R

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Preservation Featured on cover: The Grand Staircase of The Sazerac House 2020 Award Winner in Commercial Renovation/Rehabilitation


A B O U T LO U I S I A N A L A N D M A R KS S O C I E T Y LOUISIANA LANDMARKS SOCIETY The Louisiana Landmarks Society, the oldest citywide preservation organization in Louisiana, is a non-profit 501(C)3 that was established in 1950. With founders such as Samuel Wilson, Jr. and Martha Robinson, Landmarks Society rapidly defined itself as a leader in preservation in New Orleans by leading the charge to preserve Gallier Hall in 1950, followed by other achievements, such as preventing the demolition of the Old Carrollton Courthouse for a grocery store and helping to defeat the proposed elevated Vieux Carré Riverfront Expressway. Today the spirit of the organization’s founders lives on in our programs and day-to-day advocacy to protect the historic assets and neighborhoods that make New Orleans unique. The Louisiana Landmarks Society brings awareness to our city’s irreplaceable architectural and cultural wealth with annual programs such as the Awards for Excellence in Historic Preservation, which recognizes outstanding achievements in historic restoration, renovation and new design, and naming “The New Orleans 9 Most Endangered Sites,” which focuses attention on our most at-risk historic properties. The c. 1700 French colonial plantation-style Pitot House graces the banks of beautiful Bayou St. John as a tangible legacy of the dogged determination and ability of The Louisiana Landmarks Society to fulfill its mission. The organization rescued, moved and restored the historic building, which now serves as a museum, educational site, rental venue and headquarters for the organization. The Louisiana Landmarks Society also sponsors a variety of educational programs, including lectures, and hosts education opportunities year-round for students of all ages. Annually, a Heritage Fair, held on The Pitot House grounds, provides demonstrations and lessons about the lifestyle and crafts in the 1800s. Focusing our efforts in the New Orleans area, Landmarks’ mission is to promote historic preservation through education, advocacy and operation of The Pitot House.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES PRESIDENT, LOUISIANA LANDMARKS SOCIETY

Sally Reeves FIRST VICE PRESIDENT James Logan, IV SECOND VICE PRESIDENT Betsy Stout TREASURER Michael Duplanter ASSISTANT TREASURER Louis McFaul CORRESPONDING SECRETARY James Rolf RECORDING SECRETARY Nathan Lott 

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BOARD OF TRUSTEES Greg Arceneaux Mary Ann Barkerding William G. Barry, Jr. Michele Braden Isabelle Dissard-Cooper Rene Fransen Keith Hardie Michael Mancuso

STAFF HISTORIC HOUSE MANAGER

Jenny Dyer GRANTS ADMINISTRATOR

Karen Kern BOOKKEEPER

Janet Baker

LOUISIANA LANDMARKS SOCIETY

SPECIAL PROJECTS COORDINATOR

Cherry Fisher May LOUISIANA LANDMARKS SOCIETY & PITOT HOUSE

1440 Moss Street New Orleans, LA 70119 info@louisianalandmarks.org www.louisianalandmarks.org


P R E S I D E N T ’ S M E SSAG E / S E L E C T I O N CO M M I T T E E PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE Louisiana Landmarks Society’s 2020 Awards for Excellence in Historic Preservation is pleased to recognize and honor seventeen teams whose body of work represents the best of historic preservation projects completed in New Orleans during 2019. In a typical year we gather with the project teams to honor them at a public awards ceremony. Usually, owners of one of the awardwinning venues hosts this celebration, which attracts hundreds of community leaders in design, construction, and preservation advocacy. Plans were laid back in February and earlier this year The Sazerac House graciously offered to serve as the host. On the cover of this program, we gratefully feature an image of their stunning renovation project. We remain thankful for their generosity. 2020 has turned out to be anything but a typical year.

SELECTION COMMITTEE Fallon Aidoo Jean Boebel Endowed Professor of Historic Preservation, Planning & Urban Studies, University of New Orleans

Iñaki Alday Dean and Koch Chair in Architecture, Tulane University School of Architecture, Principal, aldayjover architecture and landscape

Bryan Block Executive Director, Vieux Carré Commission

Renee Bourgogne

This year we pivot to the digital world to ensure that these exemplary projects are given their due. In lieu of a live review of these great works from a stage at a gathering of professionals representing the design and construction community, we have produced a digital documentary that has the potential to gain an even greater audience. It is a first for our organization and although challenging, it is also inspiring. You can read more about this novel project on page four of this program and on our website: www.LouisianaLandmarks.org.

Historian, Vieux Carre’ Commission

The teams honored this year have each brought a wealth of talent and skill to their development. They reflect the kind of creativity and determination that resulted in a distinguished project that stands out for its achievement and merits public recognition. We extend special thanks to the Awards Selection Committee for their time and expertise in reviewing and selecting the winning projects for this year.

Past President, Louisiana Landmarks Society

Congratulations to all the award winners and thank you again for all you do to advance the preservation of the unique architectural landscape of our city.

Architectural Historian, Louisiana Landmarks

We hope that our digital documentary project will help build awareness, appreciation and support even more broadly across New Orleans. The Louisiana Landmarks Society is pledged to continue our role as advocates and to adapt in these challenging times. Thanks, too, for your continued support of our organization.

Eleanor Burke Deputy Director, Historic District Landmarks Commission

Eugene Cizek, FAIA, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus, Tulane School of Architecture

Michael Duplantier Nicole Hobson-Morris Executive Director, Division of Historic Preservation, Louisiana State Historic Preservation Office

Hilary Irvin Elliott Perkins Executive Director, Historic District Landmarks Commission

Sally Reeves President, Louisiana Landmarks Society, Supervising Archivist, Orleans Parish Clerk of Civil District Court

Ray Scriber Sincerely,

Louisiana Main Street Director, Louisiana  State Historic Preservation Office

Sandra L. Stokes Sally Reeves President

Former President, Louisiana Landmarks Society, Chair of Advocacy, Chair, Preservation Awards Committee

Peter M. Wolf, PhD. Author, Architectural Historian and Urban Policy Authority

2020 AWARDS FOR EXCELLENCE IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION

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A B O U T T H E AWA R D S D O C U S E R I E S LOUISIANA LANDMARKS SOCIETY:

RESPONDING TO A UNIQUE CHALLENGE IN 2020 The Louisiana Landmarks Society Awards for Excellence in Historic Preservation is a juried competition held annually in the spring. This year the awards selection committee reviewed a near record-setting number of entries and selected 17 winning teams. The list includes five institutional buildings, four residential and eight commercial projects, all making a positive impact in neighborhoods across the city. Traditionally, these prestigious awards are presented during a ceremony that features one of the winning commercial projects as the venue. In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, plans for this year’s event were shelved in early March. The organization opted instead to produce a virtual tour of the winning projects as a three-episode mini-documentary series, sponsored by GBX Group LLC. This is a first for Louisiana Landmarks Society and we hope it will garner even greater recognition for this award-winning body of work. We have also developed a self-guided driving tour and encourage viewing these projects to fully appreciate the transformation they represent. The comprehensive tour map is on page 14 of this catalogue, which also provides detailed background information for each winning project. Additionally, the catalogue is available in flip format online for easy reference during the tour. Congratulations again to all the winning teams for these exemplary projects. They set a great example for others to move forward with confidence in the value of similar opportunities. Thanks, too, to our many sponsors and patrons who worked with us to make the leap into this virtual experience. They are acknowledged on page five of this catalogue and we are grateful for their support. The documentary series, tour map and catalogue are available on our website: www.louisianalandmarks.org.

MEET OUR DOCUSERIES TEAM ROBERT BURTON, NARRATOR

With multiple corporate projects and thousands of television and radio commercials and promos to his credit, Robert Burton is a veteran voice over artist and a touring musician with Louisiana Red. His commercial work has been featured in markets from Spokane to South Florida. He Is perhaps best recognized locally as the voice of Louisiana Public Broadcasting. Robert resides in Lafayette, LA..

MARCUS CHAPA WILSON, VIDEOGRAPHER/VIDEO EDITOR

Marcus Chapa Wilson is a 2020 graduate of the digital film program at Loyola University New Orleans. He works as a freelance creative consultant with experience in videography, graphic design, web design, photography, and art direction. His previous work includes a two-year video research project at Angola Prison in collaboration with Loyola faculty, consulting and branding Louisiana Victims Outreach Program (LaVO), assistant set dressing for Netflix and Vogue, and company liaison for IMCINE at Cannes Film Festival (2018). Marcus resides in New Orleans.

DOLAN BAILEY, ANIMATOR

Dolan Bailey is a freelance animator and motion graphic designer merging her visual art with digital art to create animations. She is a 2018 graduate of Loyola University New Orleans and currently resides in New York City, where she works as the Head Animator for Ashley Longshore Art.

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CHERRY FISHER MAY, PRODUCER

Producer Cherry Fisher May is a marketing and strategic planning consultant, experienced digital and print publisher and event producer with decades of experience in every major Louisiana market and Atlanta, GA. Cherry resides in New Orleans. This is her third assignment as Special Projects Coordinator for Louisiana Landmarks Society.


SPONSORS DOCUMENTARY

MARBLE

GRANITE

LIMESTONE

Lyn Tomlinson Rene J. L. Fransen & Edward Bonin

BRICK Albert Architecture

Cypress Building Conservation

Palmisano

Choupique Holdings, LLC

Duplantier Fine Framing

Robert Remer

Concordia Architects

EskewDumezRipple

Roth Law Firm

CDW Services

Holly & Smith Architects

Voelkel McWilliams

L+M Development

PATRONS Charles Berg, AIA

Galaxie Taqueria/Patrick Finney

Keith & Supreeya Scarmuzza

Michael Bolan

Carolyn Leftwitch

Karen Snyder

Bywater Woodworks

Sally Reeves

Sandra Stokes

2020 AWARDS FOR EXCELLENCE IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION

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R E S I D E N T I A L R E N O VAT I O N / R E H A B I L I TAT I O N 1521 S. CARROLLTON AVENUE 1521 S. Carrollton Avenue New Orleans, LA Residential Renovation/Rehabilitation

HONORING

Keith & Supreeya Scarmuzza; Daniel Samuels; Ashton Avegno One of a group of four Thomas Sully-designed houses in the 1500 block of Carrollton, this 1905 residence was rescued from a fate of divided apartments, loss of fabric, inappropriate additions, and general lack of maintenance. The project began with demolition down to the studs, the replacement of a 1970s inappropriate rear addition with a new one with a double gallery more in keeping with the original style of the house, and the installation of all new systems. In the course of the renovation, owners Keith and Supreeya Scarmuzza were careful to save and restore all original hardware, doors, flooring, mantel tiles, trim and windows. Sully’s original blueprints for the house, discovered at Tulane’s Southeastern Architectural Archive, were the guidelines for the renovation. During its time of use as apartments, the home had lost the lower section of its original staircase as well as its balusters and handrails. The Sully drawings guided the reconstruction of the staircase to its original design, and the restoration of the original custom wood paneling in the foyer. According to the project narrative, “a careful effort was made to save, refurbish, and reuse all the materials possible throughout the house.” The home is located in the Carrollton National Historic District and qualified for historic rehabilitation tax credits. In making the award, the committee noted the importance of honoring noncommercial residential projects. BEFORE

DAVIS/STEWART RESIDENCE

1808-10 Dauphine Street New Orleans, LA Residential Renovation/Rehabilitation

BEFORE

HONORING

Richard Davis and Clifton Stewart; Charles A. Berg, A.I.A.; JAT Construction Located on a picturesque quadrilateral lot formed by the convergence of Dauphine and Kerlerec Streets, this classic example of a c. 1835 frame double Creole cottage has regained its prominence in the rich streetscape of the Creole Faubourg Marigny. Around the turn of the century, this downriver continuously densely populated neighborhood adjusted to accommodate a great influx of immigrant residents, often impacting the appearance of its historic dwellings. This cottage suffered unsightly shed roof construction joining the façade dormers, and additions were made at the rear. The oversized roof projection now is gone, with special attention given to salvaging the original pilastered/pedimented dormers and placing them in their proper location, thereby restoring the original façade roof line. Owned in the early twentieth-century by Anthony Vaccaro, a Sicilian “wagon peddler,” the property, according to the 1920 census, sheltered three families with a total of eleven people. In addition to the cottage, the 1908 Sanborn Insurance Map outlined a separate c. 1900 building tucked into the downriver corner. By 1937, a triangular brick filling station had replaced the corner house and remains today. The honored renovation rescued this dilapidated cottage and brought back the original use as a double with two independent two-story living units, both of which now are owneroccupied. In addition, appropriately detailed weatherboarding was installed and vintage Greek revival millwork and windows were refurbished. And, as lagniappe, the little gas station now serves as a cozy guest suite.

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R E S I D E N T I A L R E N O VAT I O N / R E H A B I L I TAT I O N 5302 DAUPHINE STREET 5302 Dauphine Street New Orleans, LA Residential Renovation/Rehabilitation

HONORING

Joshua Fegley; Guidry Cunningham LLC; Gene Guidry; Profimont, LLC; Kim Carnegie Located in Holy Cross a short distance down Egania Street from the famed steamboat houses, this shotgun house is a restoration of a c.1900 double into a single family home. After Hurricane Katrina, the house was abandoned and left to deteriorate. Victimized by the elements and vandals, the house lost most of its original historic detailing and at the time of its acquisition had been reduced to a stripped down version of its former dignified self. Aided by a single pre-storm photograph, the developers salvaged and repaired the foundation, exterior wood siding, roof, chimneys, wood flooring, front windows, door frames and transoms, and then faithfully and sensitively reproduced the windows, doors and brackets. The developers also painstakingly repurposed the original interior trim to create interesting, decorative architectural elements. The interior was restored with the goal of creating a sense of light-filed spaciousness, with refurbished fireplaces serving to provide a balance to the flow of the rooms and a reference to the historic texture. The floor plan created a master suite via a vestibule off the living room hall that includes a master bedroom, large bathroom with tub/walk-in shower combo and a large closet. The remaining two guest bedrooms share a bathroom centered on the unique diamond shaped fireplace. The generously sized lot enabled two separate parking spaces, one off Dauphine Street and a second from Egania Street in a restored garage.

BEFORE

PLUNKETT RESIDENCE 1121 First Street New Orleans, LA Residential Renovation/ Rehabilitation

BEFORE

HONORING

Laura & William Plunkett; Jahncke & Burns Architects; Robert Judice Master Craftsman An unusual award this year goes to the restoration of a single feature of a residence. It involved a careful reconstruction of the original two-story corner porch of architect James Freret’s 19th-century home on First Street. Guided by Freret’s original watercolor drawings and the expert hand of Davis J. Jahncke, Jr., the project sought to reproduce exactly the elaborate, asymmetrical entrance to the home. As designed, the house originally featured a recessed, two-story porch supported by superimposed, multi-stage colonnettes. At the lower level, an elaborate, cross-work frieze wrapped the corner, drawing support from extravagant, C-scroll brackets. Railings on both the upper and lower levels consisted of sturdy wooden balusters interrupted by prominent, fan-shaped inserts. While not apparent in the image, the projecting roof was protected by a sloping sheet metal canopy. Reproducing these intricate features was a labor of love for the Plunkett family, who have owned the home since 2009. Before the restoration, the house had completely lost the porch, its most elaborate and prominent feature. Its frame stairway had been replaced by a set of stairs in masonry, leading directly to the doorway. The house was painted a single shade of pleasant bluegreen with white trim, its projecting three-part bay the only hint of its original design. Part of the project repainted the exterior with multi-chrome highlights. In approving this award, the committee took note of the level of care and expense involved in restoring a single but defining feature of the home.

2020 AWARDS FOR EXCELLENCE IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION

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C O M M E R C I A L R E N O VAT I O N / R E H A B I L I TAT I O N BOHN MOTOR CO.

2700 S. Broad Street New Orleans, LA Commercial Renovation/Rehabilitation

HONORING

2700 Bohn Motor LLC; Gulf Coast Housing Partnership; Terrell Fabacher Architects; FH Myers Construction, The Rhodes Family This long-awaited renovation saved a vacant but fondlyremembered former automobile dealership building in the Broadmoor neighborhood. The c. 1923 Emile Weil designed Bohn Motor Company building on S. Broad Street anchored its neighborhood for decades, with both business and building being a rare local survivor from among the many pre-depression automobile dealerships. Its history and prominent site were not enough to arrest the deterioration that began with the closure of the business, a decline that continued for years as the building sat vacant. Eventually reduced to the mere shell of a building missing much of its roof, many windows, and the second story flooring, the building was named in 2008 by Louisiana Landmarks Society to the New Orleans’ Nine Most Endangered Sites. The developers arranged financing and secured an anchor tenant, but adaptive reuse first required the reconstruction of the 2nd and 3rd floor roofs, including joists and decking. The cast stone Italian Renaissance features of the façade and entrance were cleaned and repaired, and new windows were installed on the front, reproducing the 1951 window treatment. A window conservation program was employed on the rear and right side elevations, requiring removal of all glass panes and repair/restoration of the metal elements before reinstallation. Bohn Motor Company lettering was carefully removed and conserved. After being individually listed on the National Register in 2011, the building qualified for historic tax credits. The respectful reconstruction enabled this historic building to be successfully transformed into a vibrant community health facility, resulting in a boost to economic development and key services in a struggling neighborhood.

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BEFORE

LOUISIANA LANDMARKS SOCIETY

614 GRAVIER STREET

BEFORE 614 Gravier Street New Orleans, LA Commercial Renovation/Rehabilitation

HONORING

Choupique Holdings LLC; Carr, Riggs & Ingram; Cypress Building Conservation When acquired by the owners in 2013-2014, these c. 1840 red brick Greek revival style warehouse stores with granite columns sat vacant and deteriorating. Historic millwork was missing, brick needed repointing and interiors were gutted. Because of their small footprint, the buildings had escaped the attention of large-scale developers. Today the combined buildings again incorporate a bustling commercial space with coffee shop, bar and theater space on the first floor, offices on the second, and apartments on the third and fourth. The father and daughter Williams team was well-suited for the challenge. Courtney had returned to New Orleans in 2012 after receiving her Masters Degree in Historic Preservation from the University of Pennsylvania and, with fellow graduate student alumnus Michael Shoriak, had founded Cypress Building Conservation. Financing was secured in March 2017, largely dependent on the use of historic tax credits, and thus began the meticulous three-year renovation. Shoriak and Williams selfperformed the majority of the work to ensure the retention of as much historic material as possible. If not reused in the bones of the building, original fabric was incorporated into the finishes. The building’s character defining materials remain including wood floors, plastered and exposed brick walls and wood ceilings. The faded painted moniker for Edison Photograph Co., a later 19thcentury tenant, was retained; and interior architectural remnants were kept, such as the early 1900s freight elevator. The buildings have been readied for future generations while honoring the original fabric.


C O M M E R C I A L R E N O VAT I O N / R E H A B I L I TAT I O N JEWEL OF THE SOUTH 1026 St. Louis Street New Orleans, LA Commercial Renovation/Rehabilitation

HONORING

John Stubbs; Trapolin-Peer Architects; MacRostie Historic Advisors LLC; Tidewater Construction; IMC Consulting Engineers Inc. Located on the ragged edge of the French Quarter amidst a vast parking lot, this prototypical brick Creole cottage remains as the sole survivor of a c.1835 row that extended to the corner of North Rampart Street. The other three were demolished in the late 1950s by Mossy Motors, then located at 410-22 North Rampart, during the decades when this fringe area was removed from the jurisdiction of the Vieux Carré Commission. Fortuitously, over the years the historic agency regained control to protect this significant property. Today this Creole cottage has been restored and repurposed as a stylish mecca for food and drink connoisseurs, as well as for devotees of architecture, while maintaining its historic finishes and footprint. Its name — Jewel of the South — pays homage to a mid-nineteenthcentury bar on Gravier Street, where Joseph Santini first made the Brandy Crusta, the featured drink of this new twenty-first century tavern. The main entry to the restaurant takes patrons through the passageway to a lush courtyard. Its interior features an antique bar, originally from London and most recently Washington D.C., which served as the design springboard for the space. The historic stair was reworked to accommodate modern day code and create a seamless flow to the upper dining area that features a small bar, exposed wood roof rafters and original wood floors. The Jewel of the South continues the timeless tradition of welcoming public houses located in cozy spaces.

BEFORE

MAISON DE LA LUZ

546 Carondelet Street New Orleans, LA Commercial Renovation/ Rehabilitation

BEFORE

HONORING

The Domain Companies; EskewDumezRipple; Palmisano LLC; Ponchartrain Mechanical; Morphy Makofsky Inc; Spackman, Mossop & Michaels; Studio Shamishiri; AKRF Acoustical Design; Sean O-Connor Lighting; Frischertz Electric Co. The renovation of a six-story 1906 Diboll and Owen office building gives it new life as another popular Atelier Ace Hotel. The award-winning company operates hotels, restaurants, and event venues throughout the nation and overseas, specializing in the redevelopment of historic buildings and neighborhoods. One of two Ace brand hotels in New Orleans, the Maison de la Luz is just across Lafayette Street from the company’s first Ace Hotel in the city, a 2017 award winner. The interior design, led by Studio Shamshiri of Los Angeles, has resulted in a space of striking beauty, the stunning Art Nouveau lobby restored to its former glory. Designed in collaboration with EskewDumezRipple, the hotel now shines with a revitalized façade, original monumental lighting fixtures, and preserved historic windows. The project included upgrades to the building’s stormwater management system, which, according to its submission, meets the city’s resilience initiatives for stormwater. A salient feature of the lobby is its historic grand staircase and marble flooring, located near the main entrance to the hotel. Their elegant black-and-white color scheme, emphasized in the checkerboard flooring and ebony colored trim, has a stunning effect on the visitor. Maison de la Luz offers 67 guest rooms, with dining and breakfast service. Its “Bar Marilou” from the Parisian Restaurant Group, with its own address and entrance, adds additional life to the New Orleans downtown renaissance.

2020 AWARDS FOR EXCELLENCE IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION

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C O M M E R C I A L R E N O VAT I O N / R E H A B I L I TAT I O N THE SAZERAC HOUSE 101 Magazine Street New Orleans, LA Commercial Renovation/Rehabilitation

HONORING

Sazerac Company Inc.; Trapolin-Peer Architects; Ryan Gootee General Contractors; Holt Consultants, LLC; Moses Engineers

1626 ORETHA CASTLE HALEY BOULEVARD

1626 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd. New Orleans, LA. Commercial Renovation/Rehabilitation

BEFORE

HONORING

Gulf Coast Housing Partnership; Gideon Community Development Corporation; CCWIV Architecture LLC; Schrenk, Endom & Flanagan; Cobalt Construction When the owners acquired the unsightly c. 1913 building, its roof was missing, leaving interior walls and floors exposed to the elements. Steel channel beams revealed where the second story and roof had been supported. Although much of the original brick storefront fortunately was intact, only arched brick heads and sills remained at many exterior openings. Using historic tax credits, funds from the New Orleans Redevelopment Authority’s Façade Renew and Commercial Gap Loan programs, and a Louisiana Main Street Restoration Grant, the rehabilitation project included a complete transformation of this deteriorating structure – preserving, repairing and restoring the original features while installing new appropriately detailed elements. The brick parapet, cornice detail, and center ornamental medallion were gently restored. Remnants of the original granite entryways were retained with new tile material filled-in to mimic the details shown in historic photographs. The grand second story wood windows were restored or matched. The restoration of this striking brick store completes the transformational revitalization of the 1600 block of Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., reinforcing the resurgence of the Dryades Street commercial corridor. This area historically served an ethnically diverse working-class clientele including Jewish, Irish, Italian and German immigrants, as well as African-Americans during the Jim Crow era. By the 1970s, however, the vibrant street had lost its vitality, leaving this early 1900s department store abandoned and left to deteriorate. In its heyday, the honored building housed the Grand Leader department store and McCrory’s Five-and-Dime. It is now home to two thriving commercial tenants.

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This full-scale historic rehabilitation and adaptive reuse incorporates two 1860s era buildings that had been vacant and derelict for thirty years, revitalizing one of New Orleans most prominent corners at Canal and Magazine Streets. The six-story, nearly 52,000 sq. ft. Sazerac House pays homage to the storied history of America’s first mixed-spirits drink and the official cocktail of the city of New Orleans, as well as the namesake and homeplace of America’s largest spirits company. The project created a state-ofthe-art interactive cocktail museum, an active distillery, corporate headquarters and an event venue all rolled into one. Taking advantage of historic tax credit programs, the winning team renovated the historic properties from top to bottom, including stabilizing and reworking their structural systems, removal of deleterious additions, and returning the buildings to a periodappropriate visual appearance while adding critical infrastructure upgrades to reduce stormwater load on the city systems. Challenges were rife. The intensity, complexity and technological innovations required fast, creative solutions. Designers worked to create a world-class museum experience which blends historical artifacts, active alcohol production capabilities and advanced technology while maintaining the aesthetics and charm of the eras represented. Three floors of interactive exhibits include projection mapping, virtual bartender experiences, touch-screen animation and fully interactive audio and video components presenting guests with a one-of-a-kind experience. The focal point is a 46 foot-tall, threestory, glass-enclosed display wall showcasing New Orleans’ specific Sazerac projects, which serves as a backdrop for the monumental staircase that connects the exhibits. A sixth floor was added, with minimal impacts on the building’s massing and visual presence.

BEFORE


C O M M E R C I A L R E N O VAT I O N / R E H A B I L I TAT I O N TEXACO SERVICE STATION 3060 St. Claude Avenue New Orleans, LA Commercial Renovation/Rehabilitation

HONORING

Patrick Finney; Albert Architecture; The New Orleans Redevelopment Fund; Hernandez Consulting; Colectiveo; MacRostie Historic Advisers; JMT Construction; AM Creative Finishes; Matthew Holdren Design; MOSA Design+Fabrication

SEIGNOURETBRULATOUR HOUSE

BEFORE 520 Royal Street New Orleans, LA Commercial Renovation/Rehabilitation

HONORING

The Historic New Orleans Collection; Waggonner & Ball; Carr, Riggs & Ingram; Schrenk, Endom & Flanagan Engineers; TLC Engineering for Architecture; Tillotson Design Associates; Edward Dugger and Associates; Cypress Building Conservation; Bywater Woodworks The 1816 Seignouret-Brulatour House has housed wine importers, furniture makers, bohemian artists who created the iconic images of its courtyard, and the city’s first television station. After a prolonged dormancy and six years of planning, archaeology, and construction, The Historic New Orleans Collection has restored this significant Creole style landmark as a history museum, transforming its famed courtyard into the heart of its Royal Street campus. Articulated to preserve the scale of the courtyard, the new Tricentennial Wing is designed for large-scale exhibitions, while on the exterior, the windows gracefully reflect the historic courtyard space. At the Royal Street façade, the team reconstructed the historic cornice, reinforced original balconies, and removed layers of paint from granite lintels and pilasters. Workers extensively leveled, repaired and repointed the original brick and timber structure. Following discovery of early brickwork intact beneath a concrete slab, herringbone brick flooring was recreated at the welcome center and gift shop. The architects created a walkable glass cover at the courtyard to showcase past paving strata underfoot and a concealed, brick-lined well, revealing the city’s high groundwater table that fluctuates with the level of the Mississippi River. The design of the new Tricentennial Wing echoes existing materials, using a larger scale to distinguish new from old. The impact of the necessary taller ceilings and roofline on the scale of the courtyard was mitigated by wrapping the lower roof line of the existing wings across the new building and stepping the façade back above that level.

The one-story concrete block and stucco building was constructed in 1949 as a Texaco-branded service station and restored to its era. Between 1936 and 1964, over 10,000 of these stations were built based on the Moderne style prototype developed by the industrial designer Walter Dorwin Teague for Texaco. Most have been demolished, replaced or altered beyond recognition, leaving this one at 3060 St. Claude Avenue as a rare-surviving intact example in Orleans Parish. The building’s adaptive reuse as the Galaxie taqueria provides charm and furthers the revitalization of the St. Claude corridor in the Upper Ninth Ward. Modifications made in the 1970s included a mansard roof and stone veneer, concealing most of the original elements. Exploratory demolition revealed that under the exterior veneer, most of the original character defining features remained intact, including the canopy’s curving corners, horizontal fins, evidence of the horizontal banding, and the original green and white paint scheme. There were even ghosted impressions of the Texaco stars and historic signage visible about the service bays. Interior elements such as the original fixtures and tiles in the restrooms also remained. Participating in historic tax credit programs, the team carefully restored the building’s exterior including stucco repair and painting, reconstruction of the canopy and horizontal fins, the storefront in the former office, fabrication of a new overhead door to match the existing original, and custom fabrication and replacement of the missing horizontal banding, Texaco stars and historic signage. BEFORE

2020 AWARDS FOR EXCELLENCE IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION

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I N S T I T U T I O N A L R E S T O R AT I O N / R E H A B I L I TAT I O N 131 S. JEFFERSON DAVIS AVENUE

131 S. Jefferson Davis Avenue New Orleans, LA Institutional Restoration/ Rehabilitation

HONORING

CGK Realty Partners LLC; New Orleans Redevelopment Fund 2; Albert Architecture; Carr, Riggs & Ingram; Morphy, Makofsky, Inc.; Moses Engineers; Hernandez Consulting & Construction; Crescent Growth Capital LLC

ELEANOR McMAIN SECONDARY HIGH SCHOOL 5712 South Claiborne Avenue New Orleans, LA Institutional Restoration/ Rehabilitation

BEFORE

HONORING

New Orleans Public Schools; Concordia Architects; Tuna Construction; C. Spencer Smith, AIA; Carr, Riggs & Ingram; SpecsGuy Specifications Consultant The transformation of Eleanor McMain Secondary High School from a mildew-covered, faded eyesore to a colorful period landmark is a godsend to its students, faculty and the uptown neighborhood. A team at Concordia Architects led the project to address deferred maintenance associated with exterior walls and masonry, windows, stairs, ramps, planters, and doors. Self-cleaning acrylic paint was used to promote resistance to water intrusion and efflorescence. The project also made needed repairs to interior walls and restored historic frame and metal windows and doors. Built in 1931 as a high school for girls, the building reflects the popular Art Deco style of its time. Its decorative features include vertical accents, sculpture in relief, and cast stone ornament. A 1932 newspaper article described its original exterior painting as “a symphony of riotous, splashing color.” With this source in mind the present renovation has adopted a bright new color scheme that highlights the building’s Aztec revival style ornament. While planning the renovation and to qualify for tax credits, Concordia worked with Orleans Parish school officials and the State Historic Preservation Office to “preserve and restore the building’s decades-old historic characteristics.” Much of architect Edgar Christy’s original design, including lighting and planting fixtures, was preserved or recreated. Today the school complex includes the original building, auditorium, and a new gymnasium designed in a compatible style. McMain High School is once again a source of pride to its community.

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Beginning in 1905 in a simple wooden structure, the evangelistic Central Baptist Church in 1939 constructed a new auditorium adjoining its original building to accommodate its growing congregation. While the interior sanctuary was designed with minimal ornamentation, the exterior exhibited bold and exuberant flourishes in the Mayan revival style. Abandoned and vacant for over a decade, this rare local example of this modernist style has been restored and repurposed for multi-unit residential use, adding greatly to the streetscape of the Mid-City National Register Historic District. Recognizing the potential of the unusual property, the developer, New Orleans Redevelopment Fund 2, charged the architects with converting the space for multi-family occupancy while retaining the salient architectural and stylistic features. With the use of historic tax credits, the team created 20 residential units in the existing space. Removal of drop ceilings and partitions revealed the dramatic volume and features of the original sanctuary, including the baptismal font and curved steel trusses. The front became the focal point of the entry hall and common gathering space. Living units were then incorporated in the design, including an interior skybridge that connects the sanctuary’s second level with an annex building and two recessed penthouse units were added inside the roof volume of the annex. The steel trusses, wood roof decking and metal railings were restored and exposed to provide lofty twostory living spaces. Exterior historic cast stone and plaster details were repaired and restored. Parking, landscaping and rainwater retention tanks complement this development.

BEFORE


I N S T I T U T I O N A L R E S T O R AT I O N / R E H A B I L I TAT I O N THE SCHOOLHOUSE 2228 Gravier Street New Orleans, LA Institutional Restoration/ Rehabilitation

HONORING

L+M Development; Rome Office Architects; Spackman, Mossop and Michaels; Howell Consultants; Jolly Consultants; PACE Group; Fricker Historic Preservation Services; LO Specs; CDW Services; Neil Alexander

THE RENDON 800 North Rendon Street New Orleans, LA Institutional Restoration/ Rehabilitation

BEFORE

HONORING

The Rendon Partners LLC; Trapolin+Peer Architects; Macrostie Historic Advisors LLC; Ryan Gootee General Contractors; Carr, Riggs & Ingram; Robert Bouchon Consulting Engineer; IMC Consulting Engineers, Inc.; Spackman, Mossop and Michaels With the influx of families to the Bayou St. John area around the turn of the twentieth century came a demand for more neighborhood schools. In 1904, Andry and Bendernagel was commissioned to construct McDonogh Number 31. The Times Picayune called the firm’s Spanish Renaissance style brick school “one of the most modern school buildings in the city, situated in the thriving and fast-growing part of New Orleans.” In 1995 the elementary school’s name was changed to the Morris F.X. Jeff, in honor of the African-American leader. Shuttered by the Orleans Parish School Board after Hurricane Katrina, this imposing institutional building had become an abandoned eyesore. Today the converted school houses twenty-six apartments that offer modern amenities and architectural design work that highlights the historic interior components. Acquiring the property in 2017, Rendon Partners LLC enlisted the seasoned team of Trapolin-Peer Architects and Ryan Gootee General Contractors to oversee the restoration of the century-old building and to ensure maintenance of its historic fabric as required for historic tax credits. The original floor plan was reconfigured for the residential conversion, carefully retaining all demising walls between the classrooms and maintaining the wide linear character of the 2nd and 3rd floor corridors. Interior doors, transoms, and trim were maintained and restored, and original mosaic floors were replicated as necessary. A design challenge was transforming the unfinished attic into usable living space with lofted apartments and a central corridor. This historic building has been brought back into commerce.

Constructed in 1894, most likely according to the design of architect William Freret, McDonogh Number 30 served as the primary school for its Third Ward neighborhood until the late 1930s, and then several decades as city offices and a police training division. In 1953, the building reopened as a school until closing in 1976 and sitting vacant for a decade. In the late 1980s New Orleans’ first African American radio station (WYLD) purchased the school and converted it into offices and a recording studio. A vibrant confection of late Victorian eclectic architectural motifs, the imposing institutional structure remained a neighborhood landmark. Over the years, however, historic features--porch, turrets, parapets, ornamental frieze--disappeared piece-by-piece. This honored project has restored this significant building to its prominence in the streetscape while repurposing it for residential use. In undertaking this project, the dauntless team did extensive research to document the history of the building and recapture its late nineteenth-century appearance in order to correctly replicate its picturesque exterior elements. The interior schoolhouse plan, including the classrooms, central corridors and grand staircase, was retained. The classrooms were transformed into twelve, onebedroom apartments by placing an innovative “Box for Living” in the center of each space. Rather than building a new seven-story structure as allowed by zoning regulations, the developers opted to restore the architecturally and culturally significant property, while taking advantage of the benefits offered through state and federal tax credits and the Preservation Resource Center’s Façade Easement Program.

BEFORE

2020 AWARDS FOR EXCELLENCE IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION

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I N S T I T U T I O N A L R E N O VAT I O N / N E W C O N S T R U C T I O N THE CONVENT BUILDING - ST. MICHAEL SPECIAL SCHOOL 1322 Chippewa Street New Orleans, LA Institutional Restoration/Rehabilitation

HONORING

The Archdiocese of New Orleans; Holly & Smith Architects; Carr, Riggs & Ingram; Voelkel McWilliams Construction; ADG Engineering; Heaslip Engineering Religious institutions on Annunciation Square named after St. Michael have served this community for more than 150 years. These include St. Michael’s Church, c. 1869, the original St. Michael’s School, c. 1875, and St. Michael’s Special School founded in 1965 by Archbishop Philip Hannan. The school was served by the sisters from the St. Alphonsus Convent of Mercy, located in the 1850s Greek revival double townhouse at the corner of Race Street. Deteriorated and significantly altered, this historic residence was used for storage until its deterioration rendered it unsafe. This honored project restored this handsome townhouse to its mid-nineteenth century exterior appearance while reestablishing the original residential floorplan. Located behind and connected to the convent is a new strikingly simple modern student chapel.

BEFORE With financial assistance derived from using historic tax credits, the team carefully replicated the convent’s postsupported galleries and prominent cornice, reconnecting the school to the streetscape of its Lower Garden District neighborhood. On the interior, the stair hall was retained and double parlors adapted as classrooms. The Greek revival style door casings and plaster crown mouldings were carefully refurbished. Special attention was given to the design of the new chapel to ensure its dimensions and styling respected the townhouse, using modern materials to differentiate new construction from the historic. Stained glass windows from the old church were installed in the chapel, signifying its continued religious use and providing a connection to its historic origins.

TOUR MAP OF THE 2020 WINNING PROJECTS

The Louisiana Landmarks Society encourages you to take a self-guided tour of this year’s winning projects. See first hand the positive impact that the preservation of these irreplaceable landmark buildings has in our community.

1

131 S. JEFFERSON DAVIS 131 S. Jefferson Davis Pkwy.

2

614 GRAVIER 614 Gravier Street

3

1521 S. CARROLLTON 1521 S. Carrollton Avenue

4

1626 ORETHA CASTLE HALEY 1626 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd.

5

5302 DAUPHINE 5302 Dauphine Street

6

BOHN MOTOR COMPANY 2700 S. Broad Street

7

CONVENT BUILDING – ST MICHAEL 1322 Chippewa Street

8

DAVIS/STEWART RESIDENCE 1808-10 Dauphine Street

9

ELEANOR MCMAIN HIGH SCHOOL 5712 South Claiborne Avenue

10

JEWEL OF THE SOUTH 1026 St. Louis Street

11

MAISON DE LA LUZ 546 Carondelet Street

12

THE PLUNKETT RESIDENCE 1121 First Street

13

THE RENDON 800 North Rendon Street

14

THE SAZERAC HOUSE 101 Magazine Street

15

THE SCHOOLHOUSE 2228 Gravier Street

16

THE SEIGNOURET BRULATOR HOUSE 520 Royal Street

17

THE TEXACO SERVICE STATION 3060 St. Claude Avenue

Scan to view the digital map

LOUISIANA LANDMARKKS SOCITY & PITOT HOUSE

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LOUISIANA LANDMARKS SOCIETY & PITOT HOUSE 1440 Moss Street

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ORANGE Pins

Commercial GREEN Pins

Institutional BLUE Pins

Residential © OpenMapTiles © OpenStreetMap contributors

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LOUISIANA LANDMARKS SOCIETY


Revitalizing New Orleans’ Historic Buildings, Neighborhoods, and Livelihoods GBX Group does more than preserve the nation’s historic structures. Together with our investors, development partners and members of the historic preservation community, we transform neighborhoods, stimulate economic growth, and protect the cultural and historic fabric of communities.

GBX Group LLC 2101 Superior Avenue | Suite 300 Cleveland, OH 44114 216.241.6689 | gbxgroup.com


Eleanor McMain High School 5712 South Claiborne Avenue

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614 GRAVIER. COFFEE BAR BODEGA COURTYARD

A licensed commercial contractor specializing in historic material analysis and hands-on restoration. CBC’s expertise is called upon when a project requires informed restoration and maintenance interventions that do not compromise a building’s historic and material integrity.

STUDENTS OF HISTORY. CHAMPIONS OF PROGRESS. www.trapolinpeer.com

THE RIGHT ANGLE FOR HISTORIC RENOVATION (504) 858-4515 www.jatconstructionllc.com


NCARB: Louisiana and Texas 929 Elysian Fields Ave. New Orleans, LA 70117

3060 St. Claude Avenue at Clouet

Formerly The Texaco Station in Bywater – New Orleans 2020 Award Winner – Commercial Division

L+M Development New Orleans

Cel: 504-444-9857 cberg2@cox.net www.charlesberg.com


ARCHITECTURE/ENVIRONMENT

THE SAZERAC HOUSE 101 MAGAZINE STREET

504-832-1282 | www.rggc.com

wbae.com


Congratulations to the Louisiana Landmarks Society for its passionate and effective advocacy for preservation. Bob Remer, President Edgewater Historical Society And Museum, Chicago

Maison de la Luz, Excellence in Historic Preservation 2020


Business Tax Planning, Estate Planning, and Tax Credit Planning 2727 Prytania Street, Suite 14 | New Orleans, LA 70130 504.525.7792 | info@rothtaxlaw.com

Congratulations 2020

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Proud supporters of Louisiana Landmarks.

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BIG IMPACT

In Louisiana, we have a love affair with food. So, why shouldn’t we also love for communities it? At Robért’s, having the Toshopping serve our small and small project locally Stonehenge inspired prepared foods you developers, Capital invests in small want, everydayprojects items through you need historicthe rehabilitation our and the friendly, H I S T Oefficient R I C TA Xservice C R E D I Tyou expect make Sfor you M AaLshopping L D E A L F experience U N D. can actually enjoy. This proprietary fund has footprint HOW’S THAT FORa nationwide A FRESH IDEA?

and supports projects that will generate $1 million to $3 million in federal historic tax credits. We congratulate our friends and colleagues who are recognized and awarded for their tremendous preservation work in 2020.

Gabrielle Begue | gbegue@mac-ha.com | 504.655.9707 Beth Jacob | bjacob@mac-ha.com | 504.684.5796

F O R A L L O F YO U R N E E D S, N E A R A N D FA R

LAKEFRONT • MARIGNY • UPTOWN METAIRIE • BATON ROUGE

macrostiehistoric.com

Congratulations to our award winning teams. Thank you for your role in revitalizing our unique architectural legacy HISTORIC PRO NOLA As the area’s leading full-service retirement community, Lambeth House offers a fabulous independent living experience with state-of-the-art fitness center, indoor pool and spa, modern café and grill and bright, open spaces for fun and relaxation. It’s a lifestyle full of choice and possiblity, with the security of care if needed. Call 504.865.1960 today to schedule your visit.

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for future generations. HISTORIC TAX CREDIT CONSULTING

RESTORE, REBUILD, RENEW Sandra Stokes

www.historicpronola.com Advocacy Chair, Louisiana Landmarks Society Chair, 2020 Awards Committee historicpronola@gmail.com T: 504/931/9320


LOUISIANA LANDMARKS SOCIETY & PITOT HOUSE

Join Today! As a member of Louisiana Landmarks Society, you will help support our mission of promoting historic preservation through education, advocacy and operation of the Pitot House.

Learn more and become a member at: www.louisianalandmarks.org Or call 504-482-0313

HELP US PRESERVE NEW ORLEANS’ PAST FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS.

LOUISIANA LANDMARKS SOCIETY & PITOT HOUSE | 1440 MOSS STREET | NEW ORLEANS, LA 70119

Louisiana Society House 504-482-0312 INFO@LOUISIANALANDMARKS.ORG Louisiana Landmarks Landmarks Society & &|Pitot Pitot House || 1440 1440 Moss Moss Street Street || New New Orleans, Orleans, LA LA 70119 70119 504.482.0312 504.482.0312 || info@louisianalandmarks.org info@louisianalandmarks.org


LOUISIANA LANDMARKS SOCIETY & PITOT HOUSE

1440 Moss Street New Orleans, LA 70119 info@louisianalandmarks.org www.louisianalandmarks.org

Profile for louisianalandmarks

Louisiana Landmarks Historic Preservation Awards  

The Louisiana Landmarks Society Awards for Excellence in Historic Preservation is a juried competition held annually in the spring. This yea...

Louisiana Landmarks Historic Preservation Awards  

The Louisiana Landmarks Society Awards for Excellence in Historic Preservation is a juried competition held annually in the spring. This yea...

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