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ALICE: A STUDY OF FINANCIAL HARDSHIP IN LOUISIANA

2018 REPORT

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed. ®

The United Way ALICE Project is a collaboration of United Ways in Connecticut, Florida, Hawai‘i, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Texas, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin.


REGIONAL MAP OF LOUISIANA United Way ALICE Project Participants United Way of Northwest Louisiana www.unitedwaynwla.org 820 Jordan Street, Suite 370 Shreveport, LA 71101

United Way of Northeast Louisiana www.unitedwaynela.org 1201 Hudson Lane Monroe, LA 71201

United Way of Central Louisiana www.uwcl.org 1101 4th Street, Suite 202 Alexandria, LA 71301

St. Landry – Evangeline United Way www.uwsle.org 5367 I-49 S. Service Road Opelousas, LA 70570

Capital Area United Way www.cauw.org 700 Laurel Street Baton Rouge, LA 70802

United Way of Southeast Louisiana www.unitedwaysela.org 2515 Canal Street New Orleans, LA 70119

United Way of Southwest Louisiana www.unitedwayswla.org 815 Ryan Street Lake Charles, LA 70601

United Way of Acadiana

www.unitedwayofacadiana.org 215 E. Pinhook Road Lafayette, LA 70501

United Way of Iberia, Inc.

www.unitedwayofiberia.org 1101 East Admiral Doyle, Suite 207 New Iberia, LA 70560

Represents parish location of regional United Way office.

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Learn more here: www.launitedway.org/ALICE

St. John United Way

www.stjohnunitedway.org 408 Belle Terre Boulevard LaPlace, LA 70068

United Way of St. Charles www.uwaysc.org 13207 River Road Luling, LA 70070


LETTER TO THE COMMUNITY Dear Louisianans, From her home in Arnaudville, Amanda sometimes feels invisible. Even though she gets her kids ready for school every morning and she goes to work at least five days a week at a job she’s had for nearly a decade, she lives in a constant state of robbing Peter to pay Paul. She does her best to put food on the table for her children, keep the lights on, make sure there’s a non-leaky roof over her family’s heads — and she prays that her car doesn’t break down. Amanda is not alone. She is ALICE. Like many throughout Louisiana, no matter how hard she works, she still cannot afford to make ends meet. ALICE lives in every town and every parish in our state — working as child care providers, aides for the elderly, cashiers, mechanics, and waiters and waitresses. They are our friends, family, and people we rely on every day. Until the arrival of the United Way ALICE Project in Louisiana, ALICE was an invisible group with serious struggles and with little public attention. To provide a better understanding of ALICE, United Ways throughout Louisiana share this update, which advances the data on ALICE in Louisiana by one year, since our last report was released in 2017. This United Way ALICE Report for Louisiana reveals that 29 percent, or nearly 500,000, of Louisiana households are ALICE and another 19 percent live in poverty. Together, 48 percent of all Louisiana households cannot afford basic expenses — housing, child care, food, transportation, health care, cell phone access, and taxes. One of our goals in releasing this Report is to provide real data to help families like Amanda’s feel less invisible and to find better ways to improve their lives by informing policy makers, coalitions, organizations, employers, and the general public. This United Way ALICE Report for Louisiana is made possible by generous corporate support from the Entergy Corporation. As our sponsor and as a National ALICE Advisory Council member, Entergy supports ALICE research in our state and around the nation. The Louisiana Association of United Ways is also grateful for the partnership of Louisiana United Ways and the countless governmental, nonprofit, and business partners who work to find ways to help ALICE. The United Way ALICE Report with parish-level information is available online at www.launitedway.org. If you would like to contact us about ALICE, please email us at ALICE@launitedway.org. Join us in the fight for families like Amanda’s who feel invisible in their struggle to feed their children and hopeless when it comes to achieving financial stability. When Louisiana’s ALICE households can improve their financial status so they are not struggling to make ends meet, we are all stronger and more prosperous. Sincerely,

Sarah H. Berthelot President and CEO, Louisiana Association of United Ways sarah@launitedway.org @sarahberthelot #ALICELA #meetALICE Cover caption: Joycelyn Mackey, who works at Russell’s Grocery in Arnaudville, assists Amanda and her two youngest children, sons Jace and Jayden, as the family buys groceries.

ALICE Project Participants Capital Area United Way George H. Bell President/CEO www.cauw.org St. John United Way Artis Williams Executive Director www.stjohnunitedway.org St. Landry – Evangeline United Way Ginger LeCompte Executive Director www.uwsle.org United Way of Acadiana Margaret H. Trahan President/CEO www.unitedwayofacadiana.org United Way of Central Louisiana David Britt President www.uwcl.org United Way of Iberia Corleen Rouly Executive Director www.unitedwayofiberia.org United Way of Northeast Louisiana Janet S. Durden President www.unitedwaynela.org United Way of Northwest Louisiana Bruce Willson, Jr. President & CEO www.unitedwaynwla.org United Way of Southeast Louisiana Michael Williamson President/CEO www.unitedwaysela.org United Way of Southwest Louisiana Denise Durel President/CEO www.unitedwayswla.org United Way of St. Charles John Dias Executive Director www.uwaysc.org

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NATIONAL ALICE ADVISORY COUNCIL The United Way ALICE Project is partially funded and supported by the National ALICE Advisory Council, a body of corporate and national organizations convened to elevate ALICE’s voice to a national level. The Council is a forum for sharing experiences, developing best practices, and building innovative impact strategies to stabilize ALICE households and our broader economy. Current members include:

Aetna Foundation  Alliant Energy  AT&T  Atlantic Health System  Deloitte  Entergy Johnson & Johnson  KeyBank  Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation  OneMain Financial RWJBarnabas Health  Thrivent Financial Foundation  Union Bank & Trust  UPS  U.S. Venture Dear Louisianans: At Entergy, our focus on ALICE is rooted in the economic reality of the communities we serve — we know ALICE well. ALICE families matter deeply to our business, as they should for all businesses, because when ALICE suffers, we all suffer. Poverty has a destabilizing impact on the economy of our communities, from mom-and-pop businesses to Fortune 500 corporations. Our team at Entergy is as concerned about keeping power flowing for customers who are struggling financially as we are for those who are without power because of a storm or other issue. What that means is a commitment to attack the root causes of poverty, which we took on as a corporate cause with the formation of the low-income customer service initiative. Entergy has developed four practical ways companies can get involved and be a part of the solution: 1. Recognize that ALICE is in our workforce. Offering competitive wages and benefits is a given for companies like Entergy that seek to be an employer of choice. Even so, from time to time, employees may find themselves in a position where they need help. 2. Business can help through investments in workforce development to equip ALICE with skills to land a living-wage job. Entergy created a five-year, $5-million initiative to provide workforce training to help equip unemployed and underemployed adults for high-demand, high-wage jobs. 3. Businesses and corporations can partner with organizations and causes that have established track records for success in lifting up ALICE. For Entergy, this has meant galvanizing efforts around the Earned Income Tax Credit, the nation’s most effective federal poverty alleviation program. 4. Businesses and corporations can help ALICE by supporting sound public policy at the local, state, and federal levels. Equipping ALICE families with the tools to succeed is both practical and possible. ALICE represents our collective reality. What we do to help ALICE represents our collective future. We are pleased to work with Louisiana United Ways and appreciate that partnership as we work together to build stronger financial stability for hardworking families throughout our state. Sincerely,

D. Patricia Riddlebarger Vice President Corporate Social Responsibility, Entergy Corporation

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THE ALICE RESEARCH TEAM The United Way ALICE Project provides high-quality, research-based information to foster a better understanding of who is struggling in our communities. To produce the United Way ALICE Report for Louisiana, a team of researchers collaborated with a Research Advisory Committee, composed of 24 representatives from across Louisiana, who advised and contributed to the report. This collaborative model, practiced in each state, ensures each report presents unbiased data that is replicable, easily updated on a regular basis, and sensitive to local context. Working closely with United Ways, the United Way ALICE Project seeks to equip communities with information to create innovative solutions.

Lead Researcher Stephanie Hoopes, Ph.D., is the lead researcher and director of the United Way ALICE Project. Dr. Hoopes began this effort with a pilot study of a more accurate way to measure financial hardship in Morris County, New Jersey in 2009. Since then, she has overseen its expansion into a broad-based, state-by-state research initiative now spanning 18 states across the country. Her research on the ALICE population has garnered both state and national media attention. Before joining United Way full time in 2015, Dr. Hoopes taught at Rutgers University and Columbia University. Dr. Hoopes has a doctorate from the London School of Economics, a master’s degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a bachelor’s degree from Wellesley College. Dr. Hoopes is on the board of directors of the McGraw-Hill Federal Credit Union, and she received a resolution from the New Jersey General Assembly for her work on ALICE in 2016.

Research Support Team Andrew Abrahamson

Madeline Leonard

Dan Treglia, Ph.D.

ALICE Research Advisory Committee for Louisiana Melanie Bronfin, J.D. Louisiana Policy Institute for Children

Lamar M. Gardere The Data Center

Lisanne F. Brown, Ph.D., M.P.H. Louisiana Public Health Institute

Jerry W. Jones, Jr. St. John The Baptist Parish Economic Development

Tristi Charpentier Huey and Angelina Wilson Foundation

Sandra McQuain England Economic and Industrial Development District

Pearson Cross, Ph.D. University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Jan Moller Louisiana Budget Project

Jerome Cox, Ph.D. Milestones Counseling Services, LLC

Susan East Nelson, J.D. Louisiana Partnership for Children and Families

Steven J. Dick, Ph.D. University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Communications Department Robert Eisenstadt, Ph.D. University of Louisiana at Monroe Barry Erwin Council for a Better Louisiana

Brigitte T. Nieland Louisiana Association for Business and Industry Davy Norris, Ph.D. Louisiana Tech University Patty Riddlebarger Entergy Corporation

Bill Rodier St. Landry Parish Economic Development Randall E. Roach, J.D. Former Mayor of Lake Charles Alex Posorske Ride New Orleans Bently B. Senegal, C.P.A., C.G.M.A. Our Lady of Lourdes Regional Medical Center Adrienne C. Slack Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta John Warner Smith Education’s Next Horizon Monty Sullivan, Ed.D. Louisiana Community and Technical College System Adren O. Wilson, Ph.D. Deputy Chief of Staff Louisiana Office of the Governor

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THE UNITED WAY ALICE PROJECT The United Way ALICE Project provides a framework, language, and tools to measure and understand the struggles of a population called ALICE — an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed. ALICE is the growing number of households in our communities that do not earn enough to afford basic necessities. This research initiative partners with state United Way organizations to present data that can stimulate meaningful discussion, attract new partners, and ultimately inform strategies for positive change. Based on the overwhelming success of this research in identifying and articulating the needs of this vulnerable population, the United Way ALICE Project has grown from a pilot in Morris County, New Jersey in 2009, to the entire state of New Jersey in 2012, and now to the national level with 18 states participating. Louisiana United Ways are proud to join the more than 540 United Ways in these states that are working to better understand ALICE’s struggles. Organizations across the country are also using this data to address the challenges and needs of their employees, customers, and communities. The result is that ALICE is rapidly becoming part of the common vernacular, appearing in the media and in public forums discussing financial hardship in communities nationwide. Together, United Ways, government agencies, nonprofits, and corporations have the opportunity to evaluate current initiatives and discover innovative approaches that give ALICE a voice, and create changes that improve life for ALICE and the wider community. To access reports from all states, visit UnitedWayALICE.org

States With United Way ALICE Reports

Oregon

North Dakota

Montana

Washington

Minnesota

Wisconsin

South Dakota

Idaho

Wyoming

Michigan

Iowa

Nebraska Nevada

New Hampshire Vermont Maine

Illinois Indiana Utah

Colorado

California

Kansas

Missouri

Oklahoma Arizona

Arkansas

Ohio

Tennessee

Georgia

Alabama Louisiana Alaska

Hawai‘i

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Pennsylvania

West Virginia Virginia Kentucky

New Mexico Texas

New York

Mississippi

North Carolina

South Carolina Florida

Massachusetts

Rhode Island Connecticut New Jersey Delaware Maryland District of Columbia


TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 1 ALICE BY THE NUMBERS���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������6

ALICE IN THE WORKFORCE�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������17 EMERGING TRENDS ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������22 NEXT STEPS��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������30

INDEX OF FIGURES Figure 1. Household Income, Louisiana, 2010 to 2016����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������6 Figure 2. Household Income by Age of Head of Household, Louisiana, 2010 to 2016��������������������������������������������7 Figure 3. Households Below ALICE Threshold (BAT), by Age and Race/Ethnicity, Louisiana, 2010 to 2016��������9 Figure 4. Single or Cohabiting (Under 65) Households, No Children, by Income, Louisiana, 2010 to 2016������� 10 Figure 5. Families With Children by Income, Louisiana, 2010 to 2016�������������������������������������������������������������������11 Figure 6. Percent of Households Below the ALICE Threshold by Parish, Louisiana, 2010 and 2016�������������������12 Figure 7. Percent of Households Below the ALICE Threshold by New Orleans Neighborhood, 2016������������������� 13 Figure 8. Household Survival Budget, Louisiana Average, 2016 ���������������������������������������������������������������������������15 Figure 9. Household Survival Budget, Family of Four, Louisiana Parishes, 2016 ������������������������������������������������ 16 Figure 10. Number of Jobs by Hourly Wage, Louisiana, 2016��������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 18 Figure 11. Top 20 Occupations by Employment and Wage, Louisiana, 2016���������������������������������������������������������� 19

ALICE IN LOUISIANA

THE HOUSEHOLD SURVIVAL BUDGET������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 15

Figure 12. Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size, With Average Annual Wages, Louisiana, 2016���������������� 20 Figure 13. Percent Employment by Firm Size, Louisiana, 2016������������������������������������������������������������������������������21 Figure 14. Population Projection, Louisiana, 2010 to 2040���������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 22 Figure 15. Population Inflows and Outflows, Louisiana, 2016��������������������������������������������������������������������������������23 Figure 16. Job Projections, Louisiana, 2016 to 2026����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������26

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY In Louisiana, 828,255 households — 48 percent — could not afford basic needs such as housing, child care, food, transportation, health care, and technology in 2016. This update of the United Way ALICE Report for Louisiana provides the most comprehensive look at the population called ALICE — an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed. ALICE households have incomes above the Federal Poverty Level (FPL), but struggle to afford basic household necessities. The Report describes the cost of basic needs for each parish in Louisiana, as well as the number of households earning below this amount — the ALICE Threshold — and focuses on how households have fared since the Great Recession ended in 2010. Despite overall improvement in employment and gains in median income, the economic recovery in Louisiana has been uneven. Many ALICE households continue to face challenges from low wages, reduced work hours, depleted savings, and increasing costs. For the many households that earned just above the ALICE Threshold in the past, the increases in the cost of living have pushed them below the Threshold and into financial hardship. The total number of Louisiana households that cannot afford basic needs increased 21 percent from 2010 to 2016. This Report focuses on trends in Louisiana that led to more families becoming unable to make ends meet. Key findings include: • Households continue to struggle: Of Louisiana’s 1,729,126 households, 19 percent lived in poverty in 2016 and another 29 percent were ALICE. Combined, 48 percent (828,255 households) had income below the ALICE Threshold, up from 41 percent in 2010. • Basic cost of living still on the rise: The cost of basic household expenses increased steadily in Louisiana to $53,988 for a family of four (two adults with one infant and one preschooler) and $19,548 for a single adult in 2016. These bare-minimum budgets are significantly higher than the 2016 FPL of $24,300 for a family of four and $11,880 for a single adult. The cost of the family Household Survival Budget increased by 33 percent from 2010 to 2016. • Changes in the workforce: Although unemployment rates are falling, ALICE workers are still struggling. Low-wage jobs dominate the employment landscape in Louisiana, with 66 percent of all jobs paying less than $20 per hour. At the same time, an increase in contract jobs and on-demand jobs is leading to less financial stability. Gaps in wages are growing wider and vary depending on the size and location of employers as well as the gender, education, and race/ethnicity of workers.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

• Emerging trends: Several trends could impact the economic landscape for ALICE families: • The Changing American Household — Baby boomers are aging, millennials are making different lifestyle and work choices than previous generations, and patterns of domestic and foreign migration are shifting. These trends are changing both household composition and demands for goods and services. • Market Instability — A globally connected economy means that economic disruptions and natural disasters in one part of the world will increasingly have an impact on ALICE workers in the U.S., contributing to employment instability, shifting supply and demand, and a disruption in traditional modes of operation.

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• Health Inequality — As health costs rise, there will be increasing disparities in health according to income. Expensive medical advances that are out of reach of lower-income households will only further this divide. The United Way ALICE Report for Louisiana offers an enhanced set of tools for stakeholders to measure the real challenges ALICE households face in trying to make ends meet. This information is presented to enable communities to move beyond stereotypes of “the poor” and an outdated FPL, and instead use data to inform programmatic and policy solutions for ALICE and communities, now and for the future.

RESEARCH FRAMEWORK GLOSSARY ALICE is an acronym that stands for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed, comprising households with income above the Federal Poverty Level but below the basic cost of living. A household consists of all the people who occupy a housing unit but does not include those living in group quarters such as a dorm, nursing home, or prison. The Household Survival Budget calculates the actual costs of basic necessities — housing, child care, food, transportation, health care, technology (a smartphone), and taxes — in Louisiana, adjusted for different parishes and household types. The ALICE Threshold is the average income that a household needs to afford the basic necessities defined by the Household Survival Budget for each parish in Louisiana. Households earning below the ALICE Threshold include both ALICE and poverty-level households.

WHAT’S NEW Every two years, the United Way ALICE Project engages a national Research Advisory Committee of external experts to scrutinize the ALICE methodology and sources. This rigorous process results in enhancements that ensure the best local data is presented. While these changes impact specific calculations, the overall trends have remained the same. For this Report, the following changes have been incorporated:

The source for state taxes has been updated: To provide greater consistency across states and reduce the complexity of calculations while maintaining accuracy, the Report uses the Tax Foundation’s individual income tax rates and deductions for Louisiana instead of state-level tax sources. Louisiana’s Individual Income Tax Forms and Instructions are used to confirm state tax deductions and exemptions, such as the Personal Tax Credit. This change resulted in slight changes in tax amounts; budgets have been recalculated for 2010, 2012, and 2014. To ensure consistency in change-over-time comparisons, the data for previous years — 2010, 2012, and 2014 — has been recalculated and is presented in this Report. For example, the old Report stated that 723,077 households (42 percent) had income below the ALICE Threshold in 2014, the new Report presents that 732,634 households (43 percent) had income below the ALICE Threshold in 2014.

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UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

The inclusion of technology: Technology has become a regular part of life, and smartphones in particular are an expectation for employment. The Household Survival Budget now includes the cost of a smartphone plan for each adult.


Change over time: The 2015 United Way ALICE Report measured change before and after the Great Recession, in 2007 and 2010. This Report focuses on the recovery, measuring change from the baseline of 2010, followed by the even years since — 2012, 2014, and 2016. Additional geographic data available: More ALICE data is available at the local level at UnitedWayALICE.org including by: subcounty, place, zip code, Public Use Microdata Area, and congressional district.

METHODOLOGY NOTES This Report remains focused on the parish level because state averages can mask significant differences between parishes. For example, the percentage of households below the ALICE Threshold ranges from 27 percent in Cameron Parish to 75 percent in East Carroll Parish. The Report examines issues surrounding ALICE households from different angles to draw the clearest picture with the range of data available. Sources include the American Community Survey, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Bureau of Labor Statistics at the U.S. Department of Labor, the Internal Revenue Service, the Tax Foundation, and the Louisiana Department of Education. State, parish, and municipal data is used to provide different lenses on ALICE households. The data are estimates; some are geographic averages, others are one- or five-year averages depending on population size. Due to different rounding conventions in different data sources, total percentages may vary by +/-1 percent from 100 percent for a group. Typically, we present rounded numbers to make the ALICE data as clear as possible to a general audience. The United Way ALICE Reports follow the U.S. Census classifications for the largest non-White populations: Black, Asian, Hispanic, and American Indian/Alaska Native, as well as people identifying as two or more races. Because people of any race, including Whites, can also be of Hispanic ethnicity, the ALICE data looks at White, Black, Asian, and American Indian/Alaska Native categories “alone” (i.e., not also Hispanic), as well as at Hispanic populations. In Louisiana, ALICE data is only available for White, Black, Hispanic, and Asian populations; the American Community Survey does not provide income data on other race/ethnicity categories because they have small samples, so ALICE statistics are not available. Less than 1 percent of households in Louisiana identify themselves as American Indian/Alaskan Native, another 2 percent identify as “Some Other Race,” and 2 percent also identify as being of “Two or More Races” (American Community Survey, 2016).

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

For a more detailed description of the methodology and sources, see the Methodology Overview on our website, UnitedWayALICE.org/methodology. For a breakdown of the data by parish and municipality, see the Parish Pages and Data File at UnitedWayALICE.org/Louisiana (under “Downloads”).

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AT-A-GLANCE: LOUISIANA 2016 Point-in-Time Data Population: 4,681,666 | Number of Parishes: 64 | Number of Households: 1,729,126

How many households are struggling?

How much does ALICE earn? In Louisiana, 66 percent of jobs pay less than $20 per hour, with more than two-thirds of those jobs paying less than $15 per hour. Another 29 percent of jobs pay from $20 to $40 per hour. Only 4 percent of jobs pay from $40 to $60 per hour.

What does it cost to afford the basic necessities?

52%

ALICE

29%

Above ALICE Threshold

Number of Jobs (in thousands)

ALICE, an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed, comprises households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level but less than the basic cost of living for the state (the ALICE Threshold). Of Louisiana’s 1,729,126 households, 334,779 earn below the Federal Poverty Level (19 percent) and another 493,476 (29 percent) are ALICE.

Poverty

19%

1,400 1,200 1,000

66% $15-$20

800 600 400

29%

$10-$15

$30-$40

Less $20-$30 200 Than $10 0

4%

Less Than $20-$40 $40-$60 $20

0.3%

0.3%

$60-$80 Above $80

Despite a low rate of inflation nationwide — 9 percent from 2010 to 2016 — the bare-minimum Household Survival Budget increased by 16 percent for a single adult and 33 percent for a family. Affording only a very modest living, this budget is still significantly more than the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four.

Household Survival Budget, Louisiana Average, 2016 SINGLE ADULT

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

Housing

$517

$715

$-

$996

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$148

$409

Taxes

$227

$392

$1,629

$4,499

$19,548

$53,988

$9.77

$26.99

Child Care

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage* *Full-time wage required to support this budget

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UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Monthly Costs


Louisiana Parishes, 2016

AT-A-GLANCE: LOUISIANA

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Louisiana Parishes, 2016

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PARISH

TOTAL HOUSEHOLDS

% ALICE & POVERTY

Acadia

22,655

47%

Allen

7,881

Ascension

TOTAL HOUSEHOLDS

% ALICE & POVERTY

Madison

4,080

66%

57%

Morehouse

10,273

59%

40,663

34%

Natchitoches

14,393

59%

Assumption

8,676

43%

Orleans

154,355

53%

Avoyelles

15,016

53%

Ouachita

54,349

58%

Beauregard

13,106

43%

Plaquemines

8,644

48%

Bienville

5,738

48%

Pointe Coupee

8,802

46%

Bossier

47,458

46%

Rapides

47,745

47%

Caddo

96,532

53%

Red River

3,491

49%

Calcasieu

77,029

46%

Richland

7,581

51%

Caldwell

3,635

60%

Sabine

8,984

50%

Cameron

2,653

27%

St. Bernard

14,732

52%

Catahoula

3,731

54%

St. Charles

18,586

37%

Claiborne

5,828

61%

St. Helena

4,033

57%

Concordia

7,579

58%

St. James

7,952

36%

De Soto

10,259

46%

15,363

45%

East Baton Rouge

St. John the Baptist

163,764

47%

St. Landry

30,302

57%

East Carroll

2,557

75%

St. Martin

19,268

49%

East Feliciana

6,822

48%

St. Mary

20,164

50%

Evangeline

11,871

55%

St. Tammany

92,205

36%

Franklin

7,520

54%

Tangipahoa

47,756

48%

Grant

7,286

52%

Tensas

1,941

66%

Iberia

26,240

50%

Terrebonne

40,102

48%

Iberville

11,162

47%

Union

8,194

55%

Jackson

6,052

48%

Vermilion

21,743

44%

Jefferson

170,710

46%

Vernon

17,789

51%

Jefferson Davis

11,554

50%

Washington

17,487

58%

Lafayette

89,130

44%

Webster

15,806

56%

Lafourche

37,199

45%

West Baton Rouge

9,253

41%

LaSalle

5,320

52%

West Carroll

4,185

49%

Lincoln

17,144

56%

West Feliciana

3,879

49%

Livingston

47,479

40%

Winn

5,440

57%

PARISH

Sources: Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey, 2016. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey and the ALICE Threshold, 2016. Wages: Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2016b. Budget: Consumer Reports, 2017; U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 2016; U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2016; Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2016a; Internal Revenue Service, 2016; Tax Foundation, 2016, 2017, and Louisiana Department of Education, 2017.


ALICE BY THE NUMBERS In Louisiana, ALICE households exist in all age groups, across all races and ethnicities, in single and two-parent families, and with or without children. They exist in all parts of the state, from urban New Orleans to the suburbs of Baton Rouge to rural communities in Lincoln and Beauregard parishes. This section drills down to reveal demographic differences of ALICE and poverty-level households by age, race and ethnicity, and household type over time. It also reports on important local variations that are often masked by state averages. Overall population changes: In Louisiana, the total number of households increased by 3 percent between 2010 and 2016 to 1,729,126. But the number of ALICE and poverty-level households increased even more, from 683,897 in 2010 to 828,255 in 2016, a 21 percent increase (Figure 1). • Poverty: The number of households in poverty — defined in 2016 as those earning at or below $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four — grew from 295,562 in 2010 to 334,779 in 2016, a 13 percent increase. The proportion of all households that were in poverty grew from 18 percent to 19 percent during that period. • ALICE: The number of ALICE households increased from 388,335 in 2010 to 493,476 in 2016, a 27 percent increase. The proportion of all ALICE households rose from 23 percent to 29 percent during that period.

Figure 1. Household Income, Louisiana, 2010 to 2016 2,000,000 1,800,000

1,719,709

1,722,841

59%

59%

57%

23%

22%

24%

18%

19%

19%

19%

2010

2012

2014

2016

1,685,303

1,729,126

1,600,000

1,200,000

52%

1,000,000 800,000 600,000 400,000 200,000 0

29%

0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Source: American Community Survey, 2010-2016, and the ALICE Threshold, 2010-2016; for additional data and ALICE Methodology, see UnitedWayALICE.org

HOUSEHOLDS BY AGE Two major population bubbles are changing communities across Louisiana: The baby boomers (born between 1946 and 1964) are the largest generation, and as they age, their needs and preferences change. The second largest group is the millennials (adults born between 1981 and 1996, according to the Pew Research Center), who are making different lifestyle and work choices than previous generations. Between the two population bubbles is the smaller Generation X, made up of adults born between 1964 and 1980. To analyze general trends,

6

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Households

1,400,000


the ALICE data is presented by household in more precise Census age breaks: under-25, 25–44, 45–64, and 65 and older. Millennials are covered by the youngest two brackets and baby boomers by the oldest two (Colby & Ortman, 2014; Dimock, 2018).

Aging Population

The increase in the number of ALICE households in Louisiana is driven by older households. The number of senior households (65 years and older) increased 18 percent, from 353,704 in 2010 to 417,182 in 2016 (Figure 2). Yet the number of senior households with income below the ALICE Threshold grew at an even faster rate of 21 percent, so that by 2016, 49 percent of senior households had income below the ALICE Threshold. The next oldest age group, households headed by 45- to 64-year-olds, decreased slightly between 2010 and 2016 (by 1 percent), yet the number of these households with income below the ALICE Threshold grew by 21 percent, a surprising drop in wealth for those in their prime earning years (American Community Survey, 2010, 2016).

Younger Households

Even though the total population of millennials is growing, the number of households headed by them is decreasing. The youngest segment of the millennials, households headed by those under 25 years old, fell by 20 percent, from 87,435 households in 2010 to 70,391 in 2016, and the number with income below the ALICE Threshold fell by 5 percent. The older and larger segment of millennials, households headed by 25- to 44-year-olds, increased by 1 percent overall, and the number with income below the ALICE Threshold increased by 27 percent. Unlike previous generations of young Americans, many millennials cannot afford to live on their own. Instead, they are more likely to live with their parents or with roommates. And for the first time in more than a century, they are less likely to be living with a romantic partner. These patterns vary among some millennials from immigrant families. Overall, people under the age of 25 who are the head of their household (i.e., don’t live with parents, older relatives, or roommates/partners) are far less likely to be able to afford basic necessities, with 79 percent of them living below the ALICE Threshold (American Community Survey, 2010, 2016; Cilluffo & Cohn, 2017; Gurrentz, 2018; W. H. Frey, 2018).

Figure 2. Household Income by Age of Head of Household, Louisiana, 2010 to 2016

DECREASED

20%

HOUSEHOLDS Under 25 Years 70,391

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

25-44 Years 575,993

1%

7

INCREASED

DECREASED

5% 1%

45-64 Years 665,560

HOUSEHOLDS

INCREASED

Under 25 Years 55,972 25-44 Years 269,447

27%

45-64 Years 297,292

21%

Over 65 Years 417,182

18%

Over 65 Years 205,544

21%

TOTAL 1,729,126

3%

TOTAL 828,255

21%

HOUSEHOLDS Source: American Community Survey, 2010–2016 and the ALICE Threshold, 2010–2016

HOUSEHOLDS BELOW ALICE THRESHOLD


HOUSEHOLDS BY RACE AND ETHNICITY Changes in statewide demographic and income numbers are driven by changes in White (non-Hispanic) households because they make up the largest racial group in Louisiana, but these trends often mask important changes in other racial/ethnic groups. For example, in Louisiana, the number of Hispanic and Asian households grew faster than the number of White and Black households from 2010 to 2016. Hispanic households increased by 25 percent to 65,019 households, and Asian households increased by 15 percent to 23,886 households. In comparison, the number of White households remained flat, at 1,087,569 households, and Black households increased by 4 percent to 519,827 households (see the note on race/ethnicity in the Data & Methodology Box on p. 3). A breakdown by race/ethnicity and age shows other important trends: Most racial/ethnic groups had a decrease in young households: The number of White under-25-yearold households fell by 25 percent from 2010 to 2016. Because White households make up the largest group of under-25-year-old households, this drop caused a decrease in the overall number of young households in Louisiana. Further adding to this decrease in young households, Black and Hispanic under-25-year-old households also saw a decrease during this time period (16 percent and 15 percent, respectively). Households headed by 25- to 44-year-olds also decreased for White and Black households (both a 1 percent decrease), but for this age group, both Hispanic and Asian households increased (by 25 percent and 6 percent, respectively). Senior households of all race and ethnic groups are increasing: White senior households (65+) are driving the overall growth in the senior population, increasing by 16 percent from 2010 to 2016, but other senior groups are experiencing significant growth as well: Asian senior households increased by 69 percent, Hispanic senior households by 36 percent, and Black senior households by 26 percent. Households headed by 45- to 64-yearolds followed a similar trend for Hispanic, Asian, and Black households (up 29 percent, 16 percent, and 3 percent, respectively). White households in this age group, however, saw a slight decrease of 1 percent.

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UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

The number of households below the ALICE Threshold increased in most groups (Figure 3): The number of households below the ALICE Threshold increased in all age and racial/ethnic groups from 2010 to 2016, with the exception of young (under-25) White, Black, and Hispanic households. The largest increases in households below the ALICE Threshold for Asian and Black households were among seniors (65+), with Asian senior households increasing by 171 percent and Black senior households by 31 percent. The greatest growth in households below the ALICE Threshold for Hispanic and White households, on the other hand, were within the 25- to 44-year-old age group, with increases of 77 percent and 25 percent respectively. White, Black, and Hispanic under-25-year-old households — the only groups that saw a decrease in ALICE households — also experienced a decrease in total households.


Figure 3. Households Below ALICE Threshold (BAT), by Age and Race/Ethnicity, Louisiana, 2010 to 2016

DECREASED

HOUSEHOLDS BAT

5%

Under 25 Years 26,570

INCREASED

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

HOUSEHOLDS BAT

9%

Under 25 Years 22,847

INCREASED

25-44 Years 108,893

25%

25-44 Years 127,418

19%

45-64 Years 147,428

19%

45-64 Years 133,271

20%

Over 65 Years 128,665

13%

Over 65 Years 66,582

31%

Total Below ALICE Threshold 411,556

17%

Total Below ALICE Threshold 350,118

19%

WHITE HOUSEHOLDS BAT

DECREASED

HOUSEHOLDS BAT

5%

Under 25 Years 2,931

INCREASED

BLACK HOUSEHOLDS BAT

DECREASED

HOUSEHOLDS BAT

INCREASED

Under 25 Years 1,001

12%

25-44 Years 18,418

77%

25-44 Years 4,495

38%

45-64 Years 8,933

64%

45-64 Years 3,336

54%

Over 65 Years 1,513

171%

Total Below ALICE Threshold 10,345

50%

Over 65 Years % ipsum 4,240 Lorem 32 Total Below ALICE Threshold 34,522

56%

HISPANIC HOUSEHOLDS BAT Source: American Community Survey, 2010–2016 and the ALICE Threshold, 2010–2016

9

DECREASED

ASIAN HOUSEHOLDS BAT


HOUSEHOLDS BY FAMILY TYPE There are longstanding preconceptions about what types of families tend to be low-income — for example, homes headed by single mothers. Yet ALICE and poverty-level families exist in all configurations. There have been such dramatic changes in the living arrangements of Americans that it is important to re-evaluate these old stereotypes. After decades of declining marriage rates across the country, along with rising levels of divorce, remarriage, and cohabitation, the household made up of a married couple with two children is no longer typical. Since the 1970s, American households have become smaller for a number of reasons: Fewer households have children, there are fewer married-couple households, and more people are living alone, especially at older ages. People are living in a wider variety of arrangements, including singles living alone or with roommates, and grown children living with parents. The share of American adults who have never been married is at a historic high (Waggoner, 2016). In Louisiana in 2016, there were 834,429 households composed of single or cohabiting adults under the age of 65 with no children under 18 years old. They make up the largest group in Louisiana, accounting for 48 percent of all households and they have the largest number and percentage of households below the ALICE Threshold. In 2016, 409,235 of these households, 49 percent, had income below the ALICE Threshold (Figure 4), increasing from 39 percent in 2010.

Figure 4. Single or Cohabiting (Under 65) Households, No Children, by Income, Louisiana, 2010 to 2016 Single or Cohabiting (no children under 18), Louisiana, 2010 -2016

900,000

836,477

853,498

852,711

834,429

61%

59%

57%

51%

25%

25%

26%

14%

16%

17%

17%

2010

2012

2014

2016

800,000 700,000

500,000 400,000 300,000 200,000 100,000 0

Poverty

ALICE

32%

Above ALICE Threshold

Source: American Community Survey, 2010-2016, and the ALICE Threshold, 2010-2016

Families With Children Families with children are also changing, with mothers doing more paid work outside the home as the cost of living continues to rise. Nationally in 2015, 42 percent of mothers were sole or primary breadwinners, bringing in 50 percent or more of family earnings, and another 22 percent were co-breadwinners, earning 25 percent to 49 percent of earnings in 2015. Gender roles are changing as well, with fathers doing more housework and child care. Over the last 30 years, the number of stay-at-home fathers has doubled to 2.2 million, and the amount of

10

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Households

600,000


housework fathers report doing has also doubled, to an average of nine hours a week (Cohn & Caumont, 2016; Glynn, 2016; Livingston, 2014; Parker & Livingston, 2017). The composition of families is changing as well. Nationally, there are increasing numbers of other types of families, including those with several cohabiting generations and those with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) parents. More than a quarter of married LGBT couples are now raising children, and the number of same-sex marriages more than doubled nationally from 2012 to 2015. During that time, the Supreme Court ruled in 2013 that the federal government must recognize state-sanctioned same-sex marriages, and then in 2015, it ruled that all states must allow same-sex marriages. Households with combined children from parents’ prior relationships are also on the rise. Almost one in six children under the age of 18 now lives in a family with parents and their children from previous relationships (Cohn & Caumont, 2016; Gates & Brown, 2015; Pew Research Center, 2015). Louisiana families saw the following changes to their composition and financial status from 2010 to 2016: • Below ALICE Threshold: Of all Louisiana families with children, there were 212,980 or 45 percent with income below the ALICE Threshold in 2016. Of these families, 28 percent were in married-parent families, 61 percent in single-female-headed families, and 11 percent in single-male-headed families. • Married-parent families: The number of married-parent families with children fell by 6 percent from 2010 to 2016, while the number below the ALICE Threshold increased greatly, by 38 percent (Figure 5). • Single-female-headed families: The number of single-female-headed families with children decreased by 3 percent, while the number below the ALICE Threshold increased 7 percent. • Single-male-headed families: This smallest group by family type increased by 10 percent; the number with income below the ALICE Threshold increased at an even greater rate of 21 percent.

Figure 5. Families With Children by Income, Louisiana, 2010 to 2016

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

DECREASED

HOUSEHOLDS

DECREASED

HOUSEHOLDS

INCREASED

6%

Married-Couple 281,853

Married-Couple 59,370

38%

3%

Single Female-Headed 154,176

Single Female-Headed 130,924

7%

Single Male-Headed 22,686

21%

TOTAL 477,525

TOTAL 212,980

16%

FAMILIES

FAMILIES BELOW ALICE THRESHOLD

Single Male-Headed 41,496

4%

11

INCREASED

10%

Source: American Community Survey, 2010-2016, and the ALICE Threshold, 2010-2016


ALICE BY PARISH Contrary to stereotypes that suggest financial hardship only exists in inner cities, ALICE households live in urban, suburban, and rural areas and in every parish in Louisiana. Though the cost of living and wages differ across the state, the number of households with income below the ALICE Threshold increased across most parishes from 2010 to 2016. But there is enormous variation among parishes: The percentage of households below the ALICE Threshold ranges from 27 percent in Cameron Parish to 75 percent in East Carroll Parish (Figure 6).

Figure 6. Percent of Households Below the ALICE Threshold by Parish, Louisiana, 2010 and 2016 2010

2016

Baton Rouge

Baton Rouge

New Orleans

27%

Percent Below ALICE Threshold

New Orleans

75%

Source: American Community Survey, 2010, 2016, and the ALICE Threshold, 2010, 2016. Details on each parishes’ household income and ALICE demographics, as well as further breakdown by municipality, are listed in the ALICE Parish Pages and Data File at UnitedWayALICE.org/Louisiana

There is financial hardship in all New Orleans neighborhoods, yet levels of hardship vary greatly across the city (Figure 7). Households with income below the ALICE Threshold range from 8 percent in Lakewood to 90 percent or more in Fischer Development, Iberville Development, and B.W. Cooper. With significant migration occurring in the wake of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, many New Orleans neighborhoods have changed character and composition. New investment in the city is leading to improvements in many areas, but 44 out of 71 neighborhoods still have a majority of families with income below the ALICE households. There are many low-income neighborhoods that are predominantly Black, and residents face many of the same barriers to financial stability that they have for decades (LaBorde, 2016; Housing Authority of New Orleans, 2017).

12

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

ALICE IN NEW ORLEANS


Figure 7. Percent of Households Below the ALICE Threshold by New Orleans Neighborhood, 2016

32

68 38 34

33

70 51 54

46 52 50 26 35 11 57 13 25 12 36 47 59 17 14 55 21 4 58 20 40 28 44 63 41 15 27 64 22 8 29 37 42 3 1 9 65 7 72 43 10 6 2 39 5 49 60 30 66 19 71 31 61 23 45 62 24 16

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

69

13

18 56

53 67

Percent Below ALICE Threshold 8% 48

96%


Key to Map: New Orleans Neighborhoods

Percent Total ALICE Households Below Threshold

Percent Total ALICE Households Below Threshold

1

Algiers Point

1,471

34%

37

Leonidas

3,032

58%

2

Audubon

4,893

26%

38

Little Woods

13,783

68%

39

Lower Garden District

3,781

36%

40

Lower Ninth Ward

1,455

77%

41

Marigny

1,914

44%

3

B.W. Cooper

272

96%

4

Bayou St. John

1,943

56%

5

Behrman

2,886

66%

6

Black Pearl

844

45%

7

Broadmoor

2,659

50%

42

2,503

35%

8

Bywater

1,869

51%

Marlyville/ Fontainebleau

43

McDonogh

1,058

69%

9

Central Business District

1,709

36%

44

Mid-City

5,689

61%

10

Central City

6,401

76%

45

Milan

2,444

53%

11

City Park

1,405

44%

46

Milneburg

1,640

58%

12

Desire Dev & Neighborhood

922

83%

47

Navarre

1,217

30%

13

Dillard

2,103

64%

48

New Aurora/ English Turn

2,111

47%

14

Dixon

663

83%

49

Old Aurora

6,730

41%

15

East Carrollton

1,815

44%

50

Pines Village

1,251

79%

16

East Riverside

1,330

42%

51

Plum Orchard

1,612

73%

17

Fairgrounds

2,672

52%

18

Filmore

2,004

36%

19

Fischer Development

382

90%

20

Florida Area

606

82%

21

Florida Development

N/A

N/A

22

French Quarter

2,159

32%

23

Freret

753

55%

24

Garden District

1,047

23%

25

Gentilly Terrace

3,865

51%

26

Gentilly Woods

973

59%

27

Gert Town

1,149

84%

28

Hollygrove

2,116

72%

29

Holy Cross

1,258

66%

30

Iberville Development

131

91%

31

Irish Channel

1,782

41%

32

Lake Catherine

331

33

Lake Terrace & Oaks

34

52

Pontchartrain Park

602

59%

53

Read Blvd East

2,915

40%

54

Read Blvd West

1,803

65%

55

Seventh Ward

4,932

76%

56

St. Anthony

1,770

59%

57

St. Bernard Area

1,008

79%

58

St. Claude

3,000

72%

59

St. Roch

2,784

73%

60

St. Thomas Development

1,088

79%

61

Tall Timbers/ Brechtel

5,660

60%

62

Touro

1,272

29%

63

Treme’/Lafitte

2,186

74%

64

Tulane/Gravier

1,357

80%

65

U.S. Naval Support Area

794

57%

66

Uptown

2,981

29%

31%

67

Viavant/Venetian Isles

296

88%

823

26%

68

Village de l’est

2,724

61%

Lakeshore/Lake Vista

1,477

14%

69

West End

1,934

24%

70

West Lake Forest

1,708

70%

35

Lakeview

3,075

24%

71

West Riverside

2,477

37%

36

Lakewood

658

8%

72

Whitney

887

67%

Source: American Community Survey, 2010, 2016, and the ALICE Threshold, 2010, 2016

14

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Key to Map: New Orleans Neighborhoods


THE HOUSEHOLD SURVIVAL BUDGET The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum cost to live and work in the modern economy. In Louisiana, the average Household Survival Budget was $53,988 for a four-person family and $19,548 for a single adult in 2016 (Figure 8). The hourly wage necessary to support a family budget is $26.99 for one parent working 40 hours per week for 50 weeks per year (or $13.50 per hour each, if two parents work), and $9.77 per hour full-time for a single adult. These costs continue to increase faster than the rate of inflation.

Figure 8. Household Survival Budget, Louisiana Average, 2016 Household Survival Budget, Louisiana Average, 2016

Percent Change 2010-2016

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT

Monthly Costs Housing

$517

$715

0%

8%

$-

$996

N/A

35%

Food

$164

$542

1%

10%

Transportation

$322

$644

7%

7%

Health Care

$196

$726

94%

79%

Technology*

$55

$75

N/A

N/A

Miscellaneous

$148

$409

16%

33%

Taxes

$227

$392

19%

120%

$1,629

$4,499

16%

33%

$19,548

$53,988

16%

33%

$9.77

$26.99

16%

33%

Child Care

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage**

* Cost of a smartphone plan for each adult, new to budget in 2016 ** Wage working full-time required to support this budget

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 2016; U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2016; Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2016a; Internal Revenue Service, 2016; Tax Foundation, 2016, 2017; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2017. For the Methodology Overview and additional data, see our website: UnitedWayALICE.org

The cost of household basics in the Household Survival Budget — housing, child care, food, transportation, health care, technology, and taxes — increased by 16 percent for a single adult and 33 percent for a family of four from 2010 to 2016. At the same time, median earnings only increased by 14 percent in Louisiana and 11 percent nationwide, putting greater strain on households. It is important to note that the national rate of inflation — which covers many budget items that change at varying rates — was 9 percent during this time period, significantly lower than the increase in Louisiana’s Household Survival Budget. The rise in the Household Survival Budget in Louisiana between 2010 and 2016 for a family of four was driven primarily by a 33 percent increase in the cost of child care. Budgets for households of all ages were impacted by an 87 percent increase in health care costs. Increases in health care costs are due to the addition of the Affordable Care Act insurance requirements, as well as rising out-of-pocket health care costs. Louisiana expanded Medicaid coverage in July 2016, which greatly increased the percentage of low-income Louisiana

15


residents with insurance and reduced costly out-of-pocket expenses for these households. However, because the Medicaid eligibility cutoff is 138 percent of the Federal Poverty Level ($33,534 for a family of four), many ALICE families do not qualify. Since the Household Survival Budget only includes the bare minimum for each item, the lowest-cost option in 2016 was not even the least expensive Bronze Marketplace plan, which carries premiums and deductibles, but rather the penalty families were required to pay for not having health insurance. While seniors have Medicare for health insurance, they have out-of-pocket expenses, which include services and items not covered by Medicare such as vision and dental care (for more details on health care costs, see the Methodology Overview at UnitedWayALICE.org). In addition, the 2016 budget now includes the cost of a basic smartphone plan for each adult (technology), which is a necessity of modern-day life. The big increase in taxes can largely be explained by the increase in all other budget items. As the cost of these items increased, the earnings needed to cover the expenses increased, and higher earnings resulted in a larger tax bill. Changes in tax rates were minimal from 2010 to 2016; both federal and Louisiana tax rates were flat on avereage, though tax brackets shifted (American Community Survey, 2010, 2016; Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2018a). The cost of the Household Survival Budget varies across the state, with the highest-cost parishes located around Baton Rouge and New Orleans (Figure 9).

Figure 9. Household Survival Budget, Family of Four, Louisiana Parishes, 2016

$50,532

Annual Budget

$60,732

Baton Rouge

New Orleans

16

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Source: American Community Survey, 2010-2016, and the ALICE Threshold, 2010-2016


ALICE IN THE WORKFORCE Overall, Louisiana’s economy did not grow from 2010 to 2016. After a strong economy throughout the 2000s, state real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) varied between $221 billion and $202 billion since 2010 (adjusted for inflation in 2009 dollars), ending with a GDP of around $206 billion in 2016. The state’s economy has been bumpy due to ups and downs in the state’s oil and natural gas industries as well as periodic regional flooding, which hurts local businesses. In addition, some regions had very strong economic growth, while others saw their economy decline. Of Louisiana’s eight metropolitan areas, two — Lake Charles and Alexandra — were among the fastest-growing economies in the U.S. by 2016, and two — Lafayette and Houma-Thibodaux — were among the most rapidly shrinking economies (U.S. Department of Commerce, 2017; U.S. Energy Information Administration, 2016). Natural disasters, particularly floods and hurricanes, have a significant impact on Louisiana workers and businesses. In 2016, the state experienced two devastating floods: In the spring of 2016, severe flooding in northern Louisiana caused $2.3 billion in damage, and in August, flooding in the southern parts of the state caused $10.3 billion in damage. The August floods were so extensive that an estimated 20 percent of all Louisiana businesses were impacted, translating to a disruption of 14 percent of the workforce and just over $300 million in lost labor productivity (Terrell, 2016; Upton, 2017; U.S. Geological Survey, 2016). In terms of industry, manufacturing and natural gas production increased in both output and employment, while the oil industry suffered. Low prices for oil also negatively impacted related businesses, for example, those that build oil rig components and those that transport oil and supplies to and from offshore rigs. At the same time, new investments in industry demonstrated a trend toward a diversifying state economy. Major initiatives included a $3 billion chemical plant investment in Lake Charles, a $20 million investment in general informatics in Baton Rouge, and statewide support of small firms through programs like STEP from the U.S. Small Business Administration. The Medicaid expansion in 2016 — representing a 97.5 percent federal contribution for state fiscal year 2017 — expanded and sustained the health care sector, which in turn positively impacted other sectors of the Louisiana economy (Evans, 2018; Louisiana Economic Development, 2016; Richardson, Llorens, & Heidelberg, 2018). Despite challenges with the state’s GDP and the impacts from natural disasters, unemployment rates have shown improvement. In 2016, the unemployment rate was 7 percent, down from 10 percent in 2010. However, even with improvements in employment and productivity in some sectors, many workers in the state still don’t earn enough to cover a basic household budget. For a range of reasons — including low wages, lack of fulltime work, and a reduced share of profits going to workers — ALICE households are still struggling (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2018b).

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

LOW-WAGE JOBS Low-wage jobs continue to dominate the Louisiana economy, making it more challenging for workers to find jobs with wages that can support even a basic household budget. With a total of 1.9 million full- and part-time jobs in Louisiana recorded by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) in 2016, the job market has shown improvement since 2010. But 66 percent of all jobs pay less than $20 per hour, with more than two-thirds of those jobs paying less than $15 per hour (Figure 10), and with job gains the greatest in occupations that paid around $8.70 per hour (Figure 11). A full-time job that pays $15 per hour grosses $30,000 per year, which is just over half of the Household Survival Budget for a family of four in Louisiana (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2010, 2016).

17


Figure 10. Number of Jobs by Hourly Wage, Louisiana, 2016 1,400 66%

Number of Jobs (in thousands)

1,200 $15-$20 1,000

800

600

$10-$15

29% $30-$40

400

200

Less Than $10

$20-$30

4%

0 Less Than $20

$20-$40

$40-$60

0.3%

0.3%

$60-$80

Above $80

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics Wage Survey – All Industries Combined, 2016

Many ALICE workers are employed in the service sector, but they also work in occupations that build and repair our infrastructure and in jobs that educate and care for the workforce. Together, these workers were aptly described as “maintainers” by technology scholars Lee Vinsel and Andrew Russel in 2016. With much credit for economic growth given to “innovators” — disruptors and inventors — it is important to recognize that the majority of jobs are focused on ensuring a strong and functioning infrastructure and a healthy and educated workforce. These maintainer jobs are not only vital to a smoothly running economy but are the foundation for successful innovation. Yet despite how essential these workers are to the economy, improvements in employment and productivity still have not enabled many of them to earn enough to afford a basic household budget (Frey & Osborne, 2013; Vinsel & Russell, 2016).

The most common occupation in Louisiana, cashiers, pays a wage that is well below what is needed to make ends meet. The more than 71,000 retail salespeople make an average of $8.87 per hour, or $17,740 if working full time year-round. These jobs fall short of meeting the family Household Survival Budget by more than $35,000 per year. Even if both parents worked full time at this wage, they would fall short of the Household Survival Budget by $18,508 per year.

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UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

The top 20 occupations employing the most people in Louisiana are predominantly maintainer jobs, which are more likely to pay low wages and be part-time, seasonal or on-demand jobs that do not provide a steady full-time salary. In 2016, only two of the top 20 occupations in the state — registered nurses and general and operations managers — paid enough to support the Household Survival Budget for a family, a minimum of $26.99 per hour (Figure 11).


Figure 11. Top 20 Occupations by Employment and Wage, Louisiana, 2016 2016

Percent Change 2010-2016

NUMBER OF JOBS

MEDIAN HOURLY WAGE

NUMBER OF JOBS

MEDIAN HOURLY WAGE

Cashiers

71,140

$8.87

11%

6%

Retail Salespersons

61,120

$10.35

3%

11%

Laborers and Movers, Hand

45,230

$11.85

17%

12%

Registered Nurses

44,780

$29.24

10%

4%

Office Clerks

39,220

$11.39

18%

15%

OCCUPATION

Waiters and Waitresses

38,810

$8.62

20%

3%

Personal Care Aides

33,410

$8.79

101%

5%

Secretaries and Administrative Assistants

33,340

$14.12

-11%

11%

Food Preparation Workers

33,090

$8.71

9%

6%

General and Operations Managers

29,920

$42.06

-5%

7%

Food Preparation, Including Fast Food

29,030

$8.72

59%

6%

Janitors and Cleaners

28,240

$9.52

1%

4%

Maintenance and Repair Workers

26,770

$16.01

-2%

3%

Stock Clerks and Order Fillers

23,680

$10.29

10%

11%

Elementary School Teachers

23,510

$24.05

-4%

4%

Sales Representatives

22,980

$24.26

9%

0%

Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers

22,610

$18.71

0%

13%

First-Line Supervisor of Retail Sales Worker

21,600

$16.43

4%

6%

Customer Service Representatives

21,510

$13.65

-2%

6%

Nursing Assistants

21,450

$9.98

-10%

8%

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics Wage Survey — All Industries Combined, 2010 and 2016

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

SMALL BUSINESSES One of the key determinants of ALICE workers’ wages, benefits, and job stability is the size of their employer. Generally, large companies have greater resources to offer career-growth opportunities, continuous employment, and better benefits. Small businesses, defined by the BLS as firms with fewer than 500 employees, have been an important engine for growth in the U.S. and Louisiana economies, driving job creation, innovation, and wealth, and have traditionally grown to become medium or large employers. However, small businesses are more vulnerable to changes in demand, price of materials, and transportation costs, as well as to cyberattacks and natural disasters. As a result, their employees face more instability, reduced wages, and a greater risk of job loss. These past two decades have been particularly tough for small businesses, with entrepreneurial growth in the U.S. and Louisiana largely down from the levels experienced in the 1980s and 1990s (Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, 2017; Haltiwanger, Jarmin, Kulick, & Miranda, 2017).

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Despite these struggles, in Louisiana, small businesses employed just over half of the private sector workforce in 2016 (Figure 12). The very smallest firms — those with fewer than 20 people — accounted for the largest share of small-business employment. Yet because small firms experience the greatest employee turnover of any size firm, workers in small firms move in and out of employment more often, which can lead to periods of no wages (U.S. Census Bureau, 2016).


Figure 12. Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size, With Average Annual Wages, Louisiana, 2016 1,000,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

900,000 800,000

$46,248

500+ 250-499

Number of Jobs

700,000 600,000

50-249

$40,128

20-49 0-19

500,000 400,000

$35,496

$48,180

300,000 200,000

$33,336

100,000 0 Small Firms

Large Firms

Source: U.S. Census Bureau; Quarterly Workforce Indicators, 2016

The wages of employees in the smallest firms are lower than wages in larger firms (Figure 12). While average wages have been increasing at the same rate or faster than the 9 percent national rate of inflation regardless of firm size, wages have not kept pace with the 33 percent increase in the cost of the family Household Survival Budget. From 2010 to 2016, workers in firms with fewer than 20 employees saw their wages rise by 11 percent to an average of $33,336 (if full time year-round). Wages of workers in companies with 20 to 49 employees grew by 9 percent to $35,496 and wages of those in companies with 50 to 250 employees also increased by 9 percent to $40,128. Employees in the largest firms started with higher wages and also saw an increase in their wages: Those working in firms with 250 to 499 employees saw their wages increase by 10 percent to $46,248, and wages of those working in firms with 500 or more employees increased by 16 percent to $48,180.

Wages vary widely by location, with areas dominated by small companies having lower wages and less job stability. Figure 13 shows the percentage of firms in each parish that are the smallest (fewer than 20) and the largest (500 or more), with lighter areas representing a lower percentage of firms and the darker areas representing a higher percentage. Rural parishes, such as Tensas and Sabine, have a higher concentration of employment in small firms, while companies with 500 or more employees are more concentrated in urban areas around New Orleans and Baton Rouge. Despite a small population, Cameron Parish has a notable concentration of large firms, mostly due to the relatively high percentage of companies in the oil, gas, and mining sector. Cameron Parish has experienced dramatic shifts in population because of natural disasters like

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UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Another measure reveals that new-hire wages are lower than wages of workers in stable employment (working more than one quarter). Since job instability is often a threat to an ALICE household’s stability, it’s important to note the difference between new wages and stable wages. For all firm sizes, new-hire wages were at least 31 percent lower than stable wages, and as much as 41 percent less for those in firms with 20 to 49 employees.


Hurricane Rita — another fact that should be considered when making change-over-time comparisons. Large companies in rural areas are often retail chains, which tend to have lower wages, explaining the lower median wage for firms with more than 500 employees in rural areas compared to firms with 250 to 499 employees in those areas (U.S. Census Bureau, 2016).

Figure 13. Percent Employment by Firm Size, Louisiana, 2016 Fewer Than 20 Employees

500 or More Employees

Baton Rouge

Baton Rouge

New Orleans

New Orleans

Percent Employment 6%

86%

Source: U.S. Census; Quarterly Workforce Indicators, 2016

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

GIG ECONOMY As the economy approached full employment (defined as less than 5 percent unemployment) in many areas of Louisiana and across the country in 2016, ALICE workers were less likely to be unemployed. But their income still lagged behind the cost of living in most areas. In some cases, the problem is just low wages. But workers are also having difficulty finding full-time, continuous employment. During the past decade there has been a shift away from traditional full-time, full-benefit jobs. In 2016, 15 to 33 percent of the national workforce worked as a consultant or contingent worker, temp, freelancer, or contractor (often referred to as the gig economy). According to a National Bureau of Economic Research report, as much as 94 percent of U.S. net employment growth in the last decade has come from alternative or contingent labor.

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As a result, more workers are experiencing gaps in employment and less regular schedules and they are forgoing retirement plans, health insurance, and worker safety protections. Many gig-economy workers struggle to afford ongoing monthly expenses and often do not qualify for loans or other financial products that require regular income. The growth of “nonemployer” businesses (typically self-employed individuals with very small businesses) was especially pronounced in New Orleans, which ranked as one of five metropolitan areas in the U.S. that saw a 37 percent or higher two-year growth of nonemployer businesses from 2012 to 2014 (Abraham, Haltiwanger, Sandusky, & Spletzer, 2016; Fehr, 2017; Eden & Gaggl, 2015; Freelancers Union & Elance-oDesk, 2016; Hathaway & Muro, 2016; Katz & Krueger, 2016; U.S. Government Accountability Office, 2015; Wald, 2014; West, 2015).


EMERGING TRENDS While ALICE households differ in their composition, challenges, and level of need, three broad trends will impact the conditions they face and their opportunities to change their financial status in the next decade: the changing American household, increasing market instability, and growing inequality of health. These trends will also have significant implications for local communities and the state as a whole.

THE CHANGING AMERICAN HOUSEHOLD Decades of shifting demographic trends have created changes in demand for housing, health care, transportation, and community services. These changes have implications for which households become ALICE households and where they live and work.

Growing Populations: Millennials, Baby Boomers, and Immigrants Generational shifts: Both millennials and baby boomers are powerful demographic forces in the U.S. and in Louisiana. Millennials have different lifestyle preferences than past generations, including choosing to live in urban areas, and delaying both marriage and having children. The large boomer cohort encompasses a group that is working longer, involved in a wide array of activities, and is generally healthier than previous generations. Louisiana’s elderly population is projected to grow from 557,857 (12 percent of the total population) in 2010 to 886,983 (17 percent) by 2040, a 59 percent increase (Figure 14). In contrast, demographers predict that the rest of the population will increase in numbers, but their percentage of the overall population will actually decline. For example, the number of 0- to 19-year-olds will grow from 1,254,237 (28 percent) in 2010 to 1,375,641 (26 percent) by 2040, and 20- to 64-year-olds will grow from 2,721,278 (60 percent) in 2010 to 2,988,836 (57 percent) by 2040 (Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, 2016).

Figure 14. Population Projection, Louisiana, 2010 to 2040 6,000,000

Population

4,000,000

12%

3,000,000

15%

17%

17%

60%

58%

57%

57%

28%

27%

26%

26%

2010

2020

2030

2040

2,000,000

1,000,000

0

Age Group Source: Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, 2016

Under-20

20-64

65+

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UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

5,000,000


Migration and immigration: Louisiana has seen an influx of people migrating from other states, largely Mississippi, Texas, and other Southern states (though some are returning Louisiana residents who left after Hurricane Katrina), as well as immigrating from abroad. Though people moved both in and out of the state, more people across almost all age groups moved into Louisiana than left in 2016: Net migration was positive in all age groups except for households headed by people in their 40s and people over 65. The largest inflows and outflows were among children under 18. There was also a strong positive inflow of young working-age people in their 20s and 30s but there was also a notable outflow of people in their 40s along with a smaller net outflow of seniors (Figure 15). For all groups there was a significant number of foreign-born immigrants moving into the state. Foreign-born immigrants contributed greatly to population growth in Louisiana. Without immigration, Louisiana population change would be negative overall in 2016 (Aisch, Gebeloff, & Quealy, 2014; American Community Survey, 2016).

Figure 15. Population Inflows and Outflows, Louisiana, 2016 25,000 20,000 15,000

Population

10,000 5,000 0

1,974

1,878

2,333

2,140

2,379

(197)

(1,356)

(5,000) (10,000) (15,000) (20,000) (25,000)

Under-18

18-24

25-30

30s

40s

50-64

65+

Age Group Outflow

Inflow - Domestic

Inflow - Foreign

Net Migration

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Source: American Community Survey, 2016

An ethnically diverse workforce: International migration plays an increasing role in Louisiana’s racial and ethnic composition as well as its changing workforce. The immigration inflow has increased over time, with the total number of immigrants increasing from 11,959 in 2010 to 15,970 in 2016, a 34 percent increase. The largest number of immigrants are people in their 30s, followed by those under age 18 and those in their mid20s. Seniors (65+) make up the smallest group of immigrants by age (American Community Survey, 2010, 2016).

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Because of this steady flow of immigrants, the foreign-born population made up 4 percent of Louisiana’s total population in 2016, up from 3 percent in 2000. By 2016, 42 percent had become citizens, 23 percent were legal permanent residents, and 35 percent were undocumented. Current immigrants in Louisiana come from Latin America (55 percent) followed by Asia (31 percent), but they also hail from Africa, Europe, and the Middle East (American Community Survey, 2016; Migration Policy Institute, 2014, 2016).


• Impact on the labor force: In 2015, Louisiana’s immigrant workers comprised 5 percent of the labor force, with a total of 117,672 workers. Nationally, the portion of the labor force that is foreign-born has risen over the last 20 years from about 11 percent to just over 16 percent. Because the number of immigrants and their children are increasing faster than the domestic population, they will make up a significant portion of the future workforce (American Immigration Council, 2017; National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, 2017). • Immigrants work in all sectors: In Louisiana, immigrants work primarily in the sectors of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting (13 percent immigrant share); construction (10 percent); other services — except public administration (9 percent); accommodation and food services (7 percent); and wholesale trade (6 percent) (American Immigration Council, 2017). • Immigrants vary widely in education: Among adults age 25 and older, 28 percent of Louisiana’s foreign-born population has less than a high school education, compared with 16 percent of the state’s native population. However, a much higher percentage of the foreign-born population has a graduate or professional degree (13 percent) compared to the native-born population (7 percent) (American Community Survey, 2016).

Implications of Demographic Trends Changing infrastructure needs: There will be greater pressure on the state’s infrastructure, especially the housing market with demand for smaller, affordable rental units. Different groups prioritize different amenities for these units: Many young millennials prefer housing near compact, mixed-use, walkable centers with shopping, restaurants, and public transportation; seniors generally want housing that is accessible to family, health care, and other services; and many immigrants want locations close to schools, jobs, and public transportation. These trends are increasing the demand for smaller, low-cost housing units and public transportation in Louisiana. Rental vacancy has decreased in the state, from 13 percent in 2010 to 11 percent in 2016, although rates regularly fluctuate year-to-year. Median gross rent in Louisiana has steadily increased from $712 in 2010 to $800 in 2016, a 12 percent increase (U.S. Census Bureau, 2016, 2017). Increased need for caregiving: The aging population will increase the demand for geriatric health services, including caregiving, assisted living facilities, nursing homes, and home health care. The challenges of ensuring seniors getting the care they need include a shortage of paid and unpaid caregivers, lack of training among caregivers, and the financial and emotional burden of caregiving on family members.

• Health aides are ALICE: With the increased demand for caregivers, there is a growing need for more paid direct care workers (home health aides, personal care aides, and nursing assistants), who are themselves likely to be ALICE. Personal care aides, one of the fastest-growing jobs in Louisiana, are paid an average of $8.79 per hour and require reliable transportation, which can consume a significant portion of the worker’s wage. These jobs do not require extensive training and are not well regulated, yet they involve substantial responsibility for the health of vulnerable clients. Together, these factors may lead to poor-quality caregiving and the risk of physical, mental, and financial abuse and neglect — an issue that is on the rise in Louisiana and across the country (MetLife Mature Market Institute, 2011; U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, 2015). • Caregiving takes a toll: In Louisiana, there are currently more than 660,000 family caregivers, whose unpaid care is valued at an estimated $6.47 billion. While families of all income levels may choose to care for family members themselves, many ALICE caregivers are forced into the role because they cannot afford to hire outside care. Nationwide, half of caregivers reported household income of less than $50,000

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UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

• The caregiver-support ratio: With the number of seniors increasing and the number of potential caregivers (aged 45 to 64) decreasing, there will be fewer people available to care for each senior. The ratio of working-age people to older seniors (80+) was 7 to 1 in 2010 nationally, and is projected to fall to 4 to 1 by 2030, and then to 3 to 1 in 2050 (AARP Public Policy Institute, 2015; Redfoot, Feinberg, & Houser, 2013).


per year and said they had no choice in taking on caregiving responsibilities. Caregiving also adds direct costs to a household budget and can reduce income due to hours away from work or the loss of a job. And the responsibility of making medical decisions in addition to the amount of care required can mean further mental and physical strain for caregivers. Louisiana ranked 35th in the nation for support of family caregivers (AARP, 2017; AARP Public Policy Institute, 2015; Dixon, 2017; MetLife Mature Market Institute, 2011; Rainville, Skufca, & Mehegan, 2016; Ramchand, et al., 2014).

MARKET INSTABILITY In a complex, integrated global economy, ALICE workers will experience even greater fluctuations in employment and changes in job requirements. Economic disruptions and natural disasters in one part of the world will increasingly have an impact on ALICE workers in the U.S., contributing to employment instability, shifting supply and demand, and disruption in traditional modes of operation. ALICE households, with few resources to weather these fluctuations, will suffer the most.

Shifting Risk to Workers As businesses seek new ways to improve productivity and reduce costs, they have increasingly shifted to a contingent workforce that enables them to scale up or down as needed. Yet, workers bear the brunt of this strategy by experiencing unexpected gains or losses in work hours, which makes it difficult for ALICE households to pay bills regularly, make short-term family plans (e.g., child care), or make long-term financial plans such as qualifying for a mortgage. In addition, shorter working hours make it uneconomic for those who have to travel long distances to jobs. These arrangements also reduce the responsibility of employers to provide benefits, such as health insurance and retirement plans. This increases costs to ALICE households and makes them more vulnerable if they have a health crisis or have to retire early. In some cases, employer or government benefits (including paid and unpaid time off, health insurance, unemployment insurance, public assistance, and work supports) are tied to number of hours worked, and unpredictable scheduling means workers could at times fall short of eligibility. For example, low-wage workers are two and a half times more likely to be out of work than other workers, but they are only half as likely to receive unemployment insurance (Garfield, Damico, Stephens, & Rouhani, 2015; U.S. Government Accountability Office, 2007; Watson, Frohlich, & Johnston, 2014).

Changing Job Market

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Louisiana’s economic landscape is changing. Despite media attention on innovation, the workforce in Louisiana is projected to be largely low-paying jobs requiring few educational credentials. From 2018 to 2025, 82 percent of the fastest-growing jobs in Louisiana will pay less than $20 per hour, and 76 percent will not require more than a high school diploma (Figure 16) (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2016b; Projections Management Partnership, 2016). Many of these jobs are also at the greatest risk of being replaced by technology. In Louisiana, almost threefourths (73 percent) of jobs in the top-20 fastest-growing occupations could be replaced by technology in the next two decades. In addition to automating existing jobs, technology is creating new on-demand jobs and services, with the most attention going to gig economy jobs such as TaskRabbit work, Uber and Lyft driving, and Airbnb rentals (Frey & Osborne, 2013).

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It is easy to identify jobs that are likely to disappear due to automation, but it is more difficult to predict the many new jobs that will be created to build and repair the newly mechanized parts of this infrastructure. Workers filling these maintainer roles will be required to develop new sets of skills. In the face of rapidly increasing computing power, an ability to work with data and alongside machines will be necessary. The pace of change may be faster than anticipated. By one estimate, 50 percent of subject knowledge acquired during the first year of a four-year technical degree will be outdated by the time students graduate.


Types of jobs that are predicted to emerge in the next 20 to 30 years include augmented reality architects, alternative currency bankers, waste-data managers, 3-D printing engineers, privacy managers, wind-turbine repair techs, nano-medics, drone dispatchers, robotic-earthworm drivers, body-part and limb makers, memory augmentation therapists, mass-energy-storage developers, and self-driving car mechanics. Louisiana has also made key investments to building a competitive software and IT sector, including, for example, the creation of the Digital Transformation Center (created by DXC technology), located in New Orleans. This project, which began in 2016, will bring 2,000 jobs to the area over the next five years (T. Frey, 2011; Kaiser Family Foundation, 2016; Louisiana Economic Development, 2017; Mejia, 2017; OECD, 2016; World Economic Forum, 2016).

2016 Employment

Annual New Growth

Hourly Wage

Education or Training

Likelihood of Being Replaced by Tech

Cashiers

70,710

13,610

$8.87

None

97%

Retail Salespersons

62,050

9,780

$10.35

None

92%

Laborers and Movers, Hand

45,620

6,900

$11.85

None

85%

Registered Nurses

44,620

3,010

$29.24

Bachelor’s degree

1% 96%

Occupation

Office Clerks

39,220

4,530

$11.39

High school diploma or equivalent

Waiters and Waitresses

38,310

7,990

$8.62

None

94%

Personal Care Aides

35,010

6,640

$8.79

High school diploma or equivalent

39%

Secretaries and Administrative Assistants

33,370

3,240

$14.12

High school diploma or equivalent

96%

Food Preparation Workers

32,940

6,200

$8.71

None

87%

General and Operations Managers

29,690

2,840

$42.06

Bachelor’s degree

16%

Janitors and Cleaners

28,760

4,240

$9.52

None

66%

Food Prep, Including Fast Food

28,730

6,370

$8.72

None

92% 28%

First-Line Supervisors of Retail Sales Workers

27,570

3,230

$16.43

High school diploma or equivalent

Maintenance and Repair Workers

26,980

3,010

$16.01

High school diploma or equivalent

64%

Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers

25,000

2,970

$18.71

Postsecondary nondegree award

79%

Sales Representatives

23,580

2,670

$24.26

High school diploma or equivalent

85%

Nursing Assistants

23,510

2,990

$9.98

Postsecondary nondegree award

6%

Stock Clerks and Order Fillers

23,430

3,350

$10.29

High school diploma or equivalent

64%

Elementary School Teachers

22,540

1,800

$24.05

Bachelor’s degree

0%

Bookkeeping and Auditing Clerks

21,710

2,400

$16.90

Some college, no degree

98%

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2017; Projections Management Partnership, 2016

Increasing Exposure to Environmental Hazards The impact of natural and man-made disasters is often felt more by ALICE workers and low-income communities. More affordable homes are often located in vulnerable areas and are more likely to be older and less suited to withstand severe weather compared to more expensive homes. People with lower incomes are also less financially resilient and are less likely to be able to be able to re-locate to safer areas (Fothergill & Peek, 2004).

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UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Figure 16. Job Projections, Louisiana, 2016 to 2026


In Louisiana, floods and hurricanes — the most common natural disasters in the state — threaten the homes and jobs of ALICE families. In addition to the damage done to businesses by the August 2016 floods, an estimated 109,000 housing units were flooded. East Baton Rouge and Livingston parishes were hardest hit, with 41,000 and 38,000 units flooded, respectively (Terrell, 2016). Households with their own resources (like flood insurance) to put toward disaster recovery can often bounce back quicker than households that rely on government assistance following a natural disaster. There is evidence that people with lower incomes face substantial barriers in obtaining aid following disasters. Barriers include difficulty getting to disaster assistance centers (because of transportation and child care issues) and a lack of knowledge and comfort with governmental procedures. Even with assistance, many families are still not able to recover fully, especially in terms of lost and lower wages. In the area impacted by Hurricane Katrina, for example, research by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that government assistance did not fully compensate evacuees for lower earnings following the disaster (Fothergill & Peek, 2004; Groen & Polivka, 2008). Maintainer jobs commonly held by ALICE workers — those that build and repair infrastructure and support the workforce — are also key to recovery following natural disasters. Communities rely on ALICE workers to rebuild and recover. When ALICE can’t work during these periods of recovery because of relocation, injury, or caregiving responsibilities (due to closed schools or senior centers), community resilience is negatively impacted overall, and ALICE households suffer lost wages. Low-income families are also more likely to suffer from stress related to lack of housing and other resources, and experience a greater prevalence of mental and physical health issues, such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (SAMHSA, 2017).

Lacking Assets What makes market instability especially difficult for ALICE households is their lack of financial resilience. Without adequate assets, families have little to no savings and few opportunities to improve their situation. When families can invest in education, new technology, a small business, or their own home, they can improve their circumstances socially and economically. They can also finance a secure retirement. These are opportunities for creating financial security that are often unavailable to ALICE, increasing the vulnerability of hard-working people.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

More than three-quarters of U.S. workers live paycheck to paycheck at least some of the time, and nearly as many are in debt. They do not have savings or access to credit that might sustain them through a low period of income or an unexpected disaster. In 2015, 54 percent of Louisiana residents did not have money set aside to cover expenses for three months to protect them against an emergency such as illness or the loss of a job. The wealth divide disproportionately affects households of color, which have fewer assets than White households. Nationally (state data is not available), the median wealth of White households was eight times the median wealth of Black households in 2010 and grew to 13 times in 2013 (the most recent data available) (CareerBuilder, 2017; FINRA Investor Education Foundation, 2016; Kochhar & Cilluffo, 2017; McKernan, Ratcliffe, & Shanks, 2011; Prosperity Now, 2018).

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While data on wealth is minimal, there is data on three of the most common assets in Louisiana — vehicles, homes, and investments — which can provide insight into resources families have for emergencies and to accumulate wealth. Most Louisiana households (92 percent) have at least one vehicle. Although cars are a necessity for work in Louisiana and offer other benefits beyond their cash value, they are not an effective means of accumulating wealth. The second most common asset is a home, which has traditionally provided financial stability and the primary means for low-income families to accumulate wealth. In 2016, 65 percent of Louisiana households owned a home and about half of those had a mortgage. Renting a home has become less affordable in Louisiana as the cost of rentals has continued to rise, while demand for low-cost and multifamily housing has outpaced the supply. Louisiana renters devote a high percentage of their household income to rent — the seventh highest percentage in the nation — with 167,000 households, or 27 percent of renters, paying more than half of their income on rent (American Community Survey, 2016; Make Room, 2016).


The most effective resource to weather an emergency is an income-producing investment, which can range from a savings account to a 401(k) retirement plan to a rental property. In 2016, 16 percent of households in Louisiana had interest and dividends or rental income, below the national average of 21 percent, but up by 2 percent since 2010. Only 17 percent of Louisiana households had retirement income (American Community Survey, 2014, 2016; CareerBuilder, 2017; McKernan, et al., 2011). When families do not have savings or access to traditional financial services, they are often forced to use alternative lending products with high interest rates and face greater risks of predatory lending practices and default. In some cases, the consequence of not taking out these loans are worse than the financial risk of taking them. However, when caught in a cycle of lending and borrowing, they can spiral into a debt trap with long-term financial consequences (Mayer & Jencks, 1989; McKernan, Ratcliffe, & Vinopal, 2011; McKernan, et al., 2009; Mills & Amick, 2011).

THE WEALTH-HEALTH GAP There has long been a real and significant divide in health outcomes by socioeconomic status, largely because of differences in living conditions, but also because of disparities in access to quality health care. Nationally, it is well documented that people in lower-income groups do not live as long as those in higher-income groups. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine projects that, of people born in 1960, those in the lowest-income quintile have a shorter life expectancy than those in the highest-income quintile: 13 years shorter for men (76 years compared to 89 years) and 14 years shorter for women (78 years compared to 92 years) (Chetty, Stepner, Abraham, et al., 2016; Komlos & Kelly, 2016; National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, 2015). Data at the state level is more limited, but the Louisiana Department of Health’s Annual Health Report Card shows a strong correlation between low income and poor health, especially for having diabetes, obesity, stroke, asthma, COPD, arthritis, and depressive disorders. The July 2016 Medicaid expansion extended health insurance to more than 430,000 low-income Louisianans, which has the potential to close the wealth-health gap. Yet many families still have difficulty accessing health care because of a shortage of providers in rural areas and a shortage of providers who accept Medicaid throughout the state (Louisiana Department of Health, 2017; Louisiana Department of Health, 2018). The wealth-health divide will also be exacerbated by advances in technology and medical care, such as personalized medicine, biotechnology, and genetic engineering. These expensive technologies will be more available to those who can afford them (Harari, 2014; Komlos & Kelly, 2016; Regalado, 2015).

Institutionalized racism and ongoing discrimination also factor into disproportionate exposure to adverse health conditions, as people of color have typically had less mobility and choice around where they live and in job opportunities. A 30-year analysis of 319 commercial hazardous waste treatment and storage sites in the U.S. found a consistent pattern of placing hazardous waste facilities in low-income neighborhoods, which are often disproportionately populated by Black and Hispanic families. A variety of large studies have also revealed an association between low socioeconomic status and greater harm from air pollution. A comprehensive review from Harvard University researchers revealed that Black, Asian, Hispanic, and Medicaid-eligible individuals of any race/ethnicity had a higher likelihood of death from any pollution-related cause compared to the rest of the population, with Black people almost three times as likely to die from exposure to air pollutants than other groups (Di, Wang, Zanobetti, & Wang, 2017; Mohai & Saha, 2015).

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Where people live can also widen the wealth-health gap. Those with the fewest resources live in areas with unhealthy living conditions, such as contaminated water and polluted air, because these homes are less expensive. The impact of pollution, toxic exposure, and disease compounds over time (Chetty, Stepner, Abraham, et al., 2016; DataHaven, 2015).


THE DENTAL HEALTH DIVIDE Nowhere are wealth-health disparities starker than in the divide in dental care. Higher-income Americans have dental insurance (most often separate from health insurance) and access to care that provides resistance to tooth decay and breakage, and promotes jaw comfort, clear speech, and easier maintenance — all of which lead to better overall health. The wealthiest families spend thousands of dollars on supplemental dental care to achieve whiter, straighter, and stronger smiles, which lead to more social and job opportunities. Those with the lowest incomes rarely have dental insurance and Medicaid’s dental coverage varies from state to state, so these families often forgo preventative care. They are far more likely to suffer from tooth decay and gum infection, which can increase the risk of cancer and cardiovascular diseases and can affect speech, nutrition, sleeping, learning, and overall quality of life. In addition, crooked or yellow teeth can stigmatize people in social settings and reduce job prospects, as they are associated with low educational achievement and social mobility. According to a 2015 American Dental Association survey, 31 percent of low-income Louisiana respondents reported that the appearance of their mouth and teeth affected their ability to interview for a job. Following Medicaid expansion in 2016, Healthy Louisiana added dental coverage through five health plans. Each plan provides some limited dental benefits for adults over 21 (such as dentures and partials), as well as more comprehensive care for Medicaid recipients 0 to 21 years of age. Although the plans differ, they all include two oral exams a year, periodic x-rays, fillings and crowns, and extractions. In addition, the Louisiana Seals Smiles Program provides dental screenings, education on oral hygiene, and sealants for elementary school students in certain districts with high numbers of students that qualify for free and reduced lunch or districts in rural areas or those without fluoridated water. Interventions like these have improved oral health outcomes for low-income children significantly over the last decade. A 2015 report by the American Dental Association’s Health Policy Institute found that from 2005 to 2013, the dental utilization gap between privately insured children and those enrolled in Medicaid narrowed by nearly 100 percent in Louisiana. This decrease in the gap is much larger than the national average decrease of 53 percent and represents the fifth largest decrease reported for all U.S. states. Louisiana’s gap was approximately 4 percent in 2013, which was smaller than the 16 percent average gap nationally and is the sixth smallest gap in coverage among all U.S. states.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Dental care for adults is limited because many dental services require a co-pay, which may make them unaffordable for many ALICE families. If the services are not covered by Medicaid, there are even more charges. Louisiana Medicaid only covers three dental services for seniors (oral exams, routine cleaning, and dentures). Just 55 percent of Louisiana seniors report visiting the dentist in the past year, and 45 percent have severe tooth loss. Unable to afford expensive root canals and crowns, many adults simply have their teeth pulled. As a result, nearly 1 in 5 Americans older than 65 do not have a single real tooth. Dental coverage does not guarantee access to treatment. There are 117 Dental Care Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSAs), in both rural areas and urban areas, meaning that only 54 percent of the need for care is met. An estimated 232 practitioners are needed in the state to remove this HPSA designation. Louisiana’s number of practicing dentists per 100,000 individuals (48.2) ranks just 42nd nationally. This statistic is worse in some regions. While metropolitan parishes in Louisiana average 60 dentists per 100,000 individuals, non-metropolitan parishes have just 30 dentists per 100,000 individuals. In order to further improve dental outcomes in Louisiana, the impact of resource inequities must be addressed in both rural and urban areas.

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Sources: Barnett & Berchick, 2017; Center for Health Care Strategies, 2018; Frakt, 2018; Health Policy Institute, 2015; Hinton & Paradise, 2016; Jordan & Sullivan, 2017; Kaiser Family Foundation, 2016, 2017; Louisiana Dental Association, 2016; Louisiana Department of Health, 2018; Oral Health America, 2018; Otto, 2017; Paradise, 2017; United Health Foundation, 2017; Vujicic & Nasseh, 2015


NEXT STEPS There is a basic belief in America that if you work hard, you can support yourself and your family. Yet the data presented in this Report shows that for nearly 830,000 households in Louisiana, this is not the case. Working households are still struggling due to the mismatch between the basic cost of living and the wages of many jobs across the state, which are exacerbated by systemic inequalities in opportunity and wealth. By making these inequalities clear, the ALICE data challenges persistent assumptions and stereotypes about people who can’t afford to pay their bills or are forced to visit a food bank — that they are primarily people of color, live only in cities, are unemployed, or are struggling as the result of some moral failing. The data on ALICE households shows that hardship in Louisiana exists across boundaries of race/ethnicity, age, and geography. With projected demographic changes and persistent barriers to stability, many ALICE and poverty-level families will continue to face hardship. In particular: • At least 54 percent of Louisiana residents do not have money set aside to cover expenses for three months in case of an emergency such as illness or the loss of a job (FINRA Investor Education Foundation, 2016). • The majority of residents under age 25 are unable to afford to live on their own, and for both economic and cultural reasons are delaying getting married, having children, or moving for new job opportunities. • More seniors are aging without saving for retirement. • There are fewer workers to meet the growing demand for senior caregiving. • Income and wealth disparities persist by race/ethnicity, sex, gender identity, and sexual orientation.

OVERCOMING THE OBSTACLES: IDEAS BEING DEBATED, CONSIDERED, AND PILOTED

Widening Skills Gap

1

Going forward, most jobs, and especially higher-paying jobs, will require digital skills. Nationally, since 2004, the share of occupations that require high levels of digital skills has more than doubled, from 10 to 22 percent (Liu, 2017). For ALICE to maintain employment over time, workers will need accessible, high-quality technology training throughout their lifetime. Public K–12 schools can incorporate digital skills into all aspects of the curriculum for students, higher education can offer more focused programs, and companies can invest in training for their employees.

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Economic change will continue, and these changes will both provide opportunity and inflict costs. Yet the distribution of opportunity and cost is not usually even or equitable. To have a positive impact on ALICE families, communities need to consider a range of system changes that would help ALICE weather downturns in the short term and become more financially secure in the long term. Policymakers, academics, and advocates have proposed a range of broad ideas that could be adapted on a local, statewide, or national front. The following are four of the biggest obstacles to financial stability for ALICE families, and a sample of ideas and pilot programs being debated and considered across the country.


Lack of Stable and Viable Employment

2

For ALICE, finding well-paying jobs with security and financial stability is becoming harder as lowwage and gig-economy jobs continue to dominate the landscape. Earning a wage that is high enough to support a family has been a challenge. In addition, fluctuating income — through unpredictable schedules and on-demand work — has become one of the biggest problems ALICE workers face. At the same time, employers are also trying to navigate a changing business environment, remain competitive, and offer comprehensive benefit packages. The following are several possible solutions that address these challenges that ALICE workers and businesses face: • Fewer barriers to employment: ALICE’s barriers can include lack of job skills, family care responsibilities, physical and mental health problems (including substance abuse), limited English proficiency, and lack of reliable transportation. There are several evidence-based solutions, such as work programs that provide direct connections to employment, including apprenticeships; an individualized approach to address a wide range of challenges, from soft skills to housing to access to affordable child care; and the development of career pathways over time through work and education. Successful outcomes require employers, government agencies, and nonprofits to weave together larger webs of connected programs and resources (Tessler, 2013; U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, 2012; Van Horn, Edwards, & Greene, n.d.; Yellen, 2017). • Portable benefits: Benefits such as health insurance, retirement plans like a 401(k), or paid leave, could move with the worker from job to job, and across multiple jobs at once. These can be delivered in multiple forms — through programs that are not connected to work or the employer at all, or through programs that involve employers but establish benefits that can be provided across employers. Some examples of this approach already exist in the construction industry and business associations. Legislators in New York and Washington are considering benefit management systems that would allow employers to pay into workers’ benefit funds (Foster, Nelson, & Reder, 2016; Guillot, 2017; Maxim & Muro, 2018; Quinton, 2017; Small Business Majority, 2017a; Strom & Schmitt, 2016).

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

• Small business support: Because of the less stable nature of many small businesses, their employees would benefit from measures that helped them weather fluctuations in their schedule and long-term employment, which include establishing portable benefits as mentioned above. In addition, small business entrepreneurs and their employees need more support to help them overcome common barriers, such as limited resources to invest in skill development; student debt, which limits an owner’s ability to invest in their businesses; and lack of access to affordable child care, which increases absenteeism and decreases their productivity (Beelsley, 2016; Small Business Majority, 2016, 2017b). • Lifetime employment: Considering examples from other countries can expand thinking on this topic. For example, guaranteed employment is an innovative policy that has been utilized in Germany and Japan. Companies guarantee employment for large numbers of workers. To avoid layoffs, the practice allows for transfers and defined reductions in hours and wages in lean times (Noorderhaven, Koen, &Sorge, 2015).

Lack of Savings and Assets

3 31

Without enough money for even current expenses, ALICE families find it nearly impossible to save for emergencies or invest in future goals like education or retirement. A lack of savings is one of the biggest problems facing low-income families. Programs and infrastructure are needed to help them weather emergencies and periods of low income. Here are two approaches for policy makers to consider:


• Access to credit: For those with low incomes, saving for emergencies is nearly impossible. Access to credit at low rates has proven to be effective to help ALICE workers and employers — especially small businesses — weather an emergency. However, ALICE families still need to have enough income to repay the loan, or they risk greater long-term financial crises (Collins & Gjertson, 2013; Mayer & Jencks, 1989). • Private and public financial instruments: These range from new types of financial products to a guaranteed income or allowance. Employers could make wages more immediately available (rather than wait two weeks until payday), and banks could do the same for deposited funds. Financial institutions and the government could offer insurance or credit, as well as tax credits and savings incentives, to protect workers against dips in income. Going even further, for centuries economists, theologians, and policy makers have proposed a minimum guaranteed income for all families, though proposals run the gamut of approaches. The idea has received more bipartisan attention recently as more workers face periods of low-wages or unemployment (Murray, 2016; Schiller, 2017; Shaefer & Edin, 2013; Van Parijs & Vanderborght, 2017).

Systemic Bias

4

Bias against marginalized groups persists in the workplace, the housing market, education, health care, and the law, despite positive shifts in public opinion and attitudes regarding differences in race and ethnicity, age, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, and disability. Racial bias is among the most persistent, despite research confirming that the gaps in education, income, and wealth that now exist along racial lines in the U.S. have little to do with individual behaviors. Instead, these gaps reflect systemic policies and institutional practices that create different opportunities for people of different races and ethnicities. Discriminatory practices have been embedded in our social structures and legal system, especially in terms of housing policies, immigration practices, voting rights, school funding, and health care programs. To make a difference for ALICE households, changes need to be made within institutions that impede equity in the legal system, health care, housing, education, and jobs (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 2015; Cramer, 2012; Goldrick-Rab, Kelchen, & Houle, 2014; Shapiro, Meschede, & Osoro, 2013; The Sentencing Project, 2018).

Ultimately, if ALICE households can become financially stable, Louisiana’s economy will be stronger and its communities more vibrant — improving life not just for ALICE, but for everyone. The data detailed in this Report can be a jumping-off point to create new and better ideas that can help working families move toward this goal. There is no one solution: A range of strategies will be needed to ensure that working people and their families aren’t left behind.

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For solutions to be effective, they must be as comprehensive and as interconnected as the problems are. Siloed solutions do not work. Because conditions vary across communities and states, the solutions to the challenges that ALICE and poverty-level households face will vary as well. Stakeholders — family, friends, nonprofits, businesses, policy makers, academics, and the government — will need to work together with innovation and vision, and be willing to change the structure of the local and national economy and even the fabric of their communities.


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ALICE IN ACADIA PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 62,372 • Number of Households: 22,655 Median Household Income: $39,837 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 9.1% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 25% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 22% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220011

25,000

22,508

22,788

22,655

54%

55%

53%

25%

24%

25%

20%

21%

21%

22%

2010

2012

2014

2016

21,911

Households

20,000

15,000

57%

10,000 23% 5,000

0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220012

12,000

10,181 10,000

8,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

7,369

52%

6,000

5,105

60%

41%

4,000 30% 15%

2,000

25%

18% 0

Single or Cohabiting Poverty

33% 26%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, Acadia Parish

Acadia Parish, 2016 Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Church Point

1,785

62%

Crowley

4,978

60%

Egan

281

75%

Estherwood

313

45%

Iota

687

46%

Mermentau

268

59%

Morse

325

42%

Rayne

2,926

52%

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$415

$582

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$135

$383

Taxes

$198

$325

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,485

$4,215

$17,820

$50,580

$8.91

$25.29

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220013

8,000

Number of Jobs

7,000

6,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$33,132

500+

$30,876

250-499

5,000 4,000

50-249 20-49

$30,336

0-19

3,000 2,000

$27,468

$39,492

1,000

0

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

9,000


ALICE IN ALLEN PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 25,619 • Number of Households: 7,881 Median Household Income: $41,801 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 9.3% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 40% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 17% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220031

9,000

8,216

8,205

8,108

52%

51%

49%

43%

29%

32%

34%

40%

19%

17%

17%

17%

2010

2012

2014

2016

8,000

7,881

7,000

Households

6,000 5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000

0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220032

4,000

3,674

3,500 3,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

41%

2,500

2,267 1,940

2,000 1,500

53%

34%

26%

50%

43%

1,000 500 0

16%

21%

16%

Single or Cohabiting

Families With Children

65 and Over

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Allen Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Elizabeth

169

67%

Kinder

934

67%

Oakdale

2,050

64%

Oberlin

574

63%

Reeves

103

52%

Town

Household Survival Budget, Allen Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$477

$579

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$143

$383

Taxes

$215

$324

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,572

$4,211

$18,864

$50,532

$9.43

$25.27

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220033

Number of Jobs

1,600 1,400

$19,476

1,200

$24,516

1,000

$24,372

Firm Size by Number of Employees 500+

250-499 $38,052

800

20-49 0-19

600 400

50-249

$26,640

200

0

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

1,800


ALICE IN ASCENSION PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 121,587 • Number of Households: 40,663 Median Household Income: $76,581 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 5.8% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 22% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 12% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220051

45,000 40,000

39,794

41,433

40,663

70%

66%

36,927

35,000

Households

30,000 25,000

69%

70%

20,000 15,000 10,000

18%

18%

19%

22%

13%

12%

11%

12%

2010

2012

2014

2016

5,000

0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220052

20,000

18,306

18,000 15,517

16,000 14,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

12,000

73%

10,000

71% 7,127

8,000 6,000

4,000

49% 17%

15%

10%

14%

Single or Cohabiting

Families With Children

2,000 0

Poverty

ALICE

40% 11% 65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Ascension Parish, 2016 Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Donaldsonville

2,532

62%

Gonzales

3,966

44%

135

86%

9,823

24%

653

51%

Lemannville Prairieville Sorrento

Household Survival Budget, Ascension Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$594

$842

$–

$1,125

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$158

$444

Taxes

$249

$483

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,738

$4,881

$20,856

$58,572

$10.43

$29.29

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220053

25,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

20,000

15,000

10,000

5,000

0

500+

250-499

$45,720

$36,492

50-249 $62,208

20-49 0-19

$32,748

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

$61,416


ALICE IN ASSUMPTION PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 22,973 • Number of Households: 8,676 Median Household Income: $47,822 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 8.2% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 24% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 19% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220071

10,000 9,000

8,857

8,726

8,676

60%

61%

57%

22%

23%

15%

18%

16%

19%

2010

2012

2014

2016

8,454

8,000

Households

7,000 6,000

64%

5,000

4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0

21%

Poverty

ALICE

24%

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220072

4,500

4,142

4,000

3,500 3,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

66%

2,500

2,290

2,244

2,000

1,000 500 0

42%

56%

1,500 19% 15% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

17%

39%

27%

19%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Assumption Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Bayou L’Ourse

593

50%

Belle Rose

710

61%

Labadieville

763

34%

Napoleonville

246

60%

Paincourtville

300

24%

1,096

27%

235

51%

Town

Pierre Part

Household Survival Budget, Assumption Parish

Supreme

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$447

$596

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$139

$385

Taxes

$207

$330

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,530

$4,236

$18,360

$50,832

$9.18

$25.42

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220073

2,500 $38,232

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$39,120

500+

1,500

250-499 50-249

$46,836

20-49

1,000

500

0-19

$31,524 $56,604

0

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

2,000


ALICE IN AVOYELLES PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 41,252 • Number of Households: 15,016 Median Household Income: $34,985 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 8.5% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 30% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 23% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220091

18,000 16,000

15,712

15,277

15,107

15,016

51%

48%

47%

27%

29%

30%

21%

22%

23%

23%

2010

2012

2014

2016

14,000

Households

12,000 10,000

59%

8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000

0

20%

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220092

8,000 7,000

6,933

6,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

5,000

46%

3,000 2,000 1,000 0

4,147

3,936

4,000

43%

50% 36%

18% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

18%

32%

32%

25%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, Avoyelles Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT

Avoyelles Parish, 2016 Town Bordelonville

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

302

49%

1,502

61%

Center Point

104

70%

Cottonport

654

70%

Evergreen

144

75%

Fifth Ward

312

49%

Hessmer

377

63%

Mansura

697

68%

2,080

66%

Moreauville

412

66%

Simmesport

607

74%

Bunkie

Marksville

Monthly Costs Housing

$363

$579

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$128

$383

Taxes

$184

$324

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,412

$4,211

$16,944

$50,532

$8.47

$25.27

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220093

5,000

$17,484

4,000

$28,872

Firm Size by Number of Employees 500+

250-499 50-249

3,000

20-49

$27,300

0-19

2,000 1,000 0

$27,852

Small Firms

$30,912

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

6,000


ALICE IN BEAUREGARD PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 36,435 • Number of Households: 13,106 Median Household Income: $46,599 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 7.0% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 25% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 18% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220111

14,000

12,877

13,040

13,095

13,106

63%

63%

59%

57%

20%

24%

25%

14%

17%

17%

18%

2010

2012

2014

2016

12,000

Households

10,000 8,000 6,000

4,000

23%

2,000 0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220112

7,000 6,000

5,915

5,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

4,000

3,968

53%

3,223

3,000 2,000

60% 59% 32% 16%

1,000 0

25%

15%

24%

Single or Cohabiting

Families With Children

Poverty

ALICE

16% 65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Beauregard Parish, 2016 Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

DeRidder

3,756

48%

Longville

163

54%

Merryville

440

71%

Oretta

156

20%

Singer

179

26%

Household Survival Budget, Beauregard Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$477

$579

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$143

$383

Taxes

$215

$324

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,572

$4,211

$18,864

$50,532

$9.43

$25.27

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220113

4,500 $43,584

Firm Size by Number of Employees

Number of Jobs

3,500

3,000

$30,060

500+

250-499

2,500 2,000

20-49 0-19

1,500 1,000

50-249

$33,516 $53,784 $27,648

500

0

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

4,000


ALICE IN BIENVILLE PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 13,924 • Number of Households: 5,738 Median Household Income: $35,722 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 10.0% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 22% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 26% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220131

7,000 6,000

5,689

5,888

5,672

5,738

Households

5,000 4,000

49%

53%

51%

52%

22%

22%

3,000

2,000 1,000 0

26%

19%

25%

28%

27%

26%

2010

2012

2014

2016

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220132

3,000 2,557 2,500

2,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

1,737

56% 1,444

1,500

45% 51%

1,000 26%

45%

18% 0

Single or Cohabiting Poverty

32%

4%

500

23%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Bienville Parish, 2016 Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Arcadia

1,105

65%

Gibsland

413

67%

Lucky

113

63%

Ringgold

539

73%

Saline

133

47%

Household Survival Budget, Bienville Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$477

$579

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$143

$383

Taxes

$215

$324

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,572

$4,211

$18,864

$50,532

$9.43

$25.27

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220133

2,500

Firm Size by Number of Employees 500+

1,500

250-499 $62,028

1,000

$37,740

50-249 $31,008

20-49 0-19

$31,656 500

$33,120 0

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

2,000


ALICE IN BOSSIER PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 126,057 • Number of Households: 47,458 Median Household Income: $48,163 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 5.5% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 28% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 18% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220151

50,000 45,000

45,087

47,072

46,685

47,458

40,000

Households

35,000 30,000

63%

66%

70%

54%

25,000

20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0

28% 23%

20%

19%

14%

11%

14%

18%

2010

2012

2014

2016

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220152

30,000

25,000

20,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

24,465

49% 14,171

15,000

10,000

52%

5,000

14%

20% 0

8,822

65%

31%

Single or Cohabiting Poverty

41%

21% Families With Children ALICE

7% 65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Bossier Parish, 2016 Town Benton

% ALICE & Poverty

691

56%

Bossier City

24,904

46%

Eastwood

1,684

36%

Haughton

1,379

43%

351

63%

2,588

39%

Plain Dealing Red Chute

Household Survival Budget, Bossier Parish

Total HH

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$580

$819

$–

$1,125

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$156

$441

Taxes

$244

$475

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,717

$4,847

$20,604

$58,164

$10.30

$29.08

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220153

20,000

Number of Jobs

16,000 14,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$26,628

$36,612

500+

12,000

250-499

10,000 8,000

$29,376

$34,620

50-249 20-49 0-19

6,000 4,000

2,000 0

$28,992

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

18,000


ALICE IN CADDO PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 248,851 • Number of Households: 96,532 Median Household Income: $37,104 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 6.9% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 29% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 24% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220171

120,000

100,000

98,886

96,648

94,854

59%

52%

Households

80,000 55%

96,532

47%

60,000

40,000

25%

29%

28%

23%

17%

18%

23%

24%

2010

2012

2014

2016

20,000

0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220172

60,000

50,000

40,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

47,672

43%

30,000

20,000

36%

58%

45% 15%

10,000 21% 0

25,645

23,215

Single or Cohabiting Poverty

27%

40%

15%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, Caddo Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT

Caddo Parish, 2016 Town Belcher

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

118

53%

Blanchard

1,173

28%

Greenwood

1,407

42%

Hosston

124

44%

Ida

100

39%

Lakeview

517

60%

Mooringsport

325

56%

Oil City

400

79%

Shreveport

75,509

56%

Vivian

1,418

64%

Monthly Costs Housing

$580

$819

$–

$1,125

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$156

$441

Taxes

$244

$475

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,717

$4,847

$20,604

$58,164

$10.30

$29.08

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220173

Number of Jobs

50,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$30,816

40,000

500+

$40,380

250-499 50-249

30,000 20,000 10,000 0

$37,500

$40,860

20-49 0-19

$35,148

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

60,000


ALICE IN CALCASIEU PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 200,601 • Number of Households: 77,029 Median Household Income: $45,962 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 7.1% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 26% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 20% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220191

90,000 80,000

77,029

73,459

74,708

73,873

59%

62%

57%

23%

21%

25%

18%

17%

18%

20%

2010

2012

2014

2016

70,000

Households

60,000 50,000

54%

40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000

0

Poverty

ALICE

26%

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220192

40,000

37,046

35,000 30,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

25,000

53%

22,602

20,000

17,381 58%

15,000 10,000 5,000 0

49%

30% 14%

35%

17%

28%

Single or Cohabiting

Families With Children

Poverty

ALICE

16% 65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, Calcasieu Parish

Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Carlyss

1,854

40%

DeQuincy

1,146

48%

Gillis

218

65%

Hayes

303

32%

Iowa

1,238

52%

Lake Charles

30,546

51%

Moss Bluff

4,398

32%

271

67%

Sulphur

7,975

40%

Vinton

1,331

54%

Westlake

1,906

48%

Starks

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT

Calcasieu Parish, 2016

Monthly Costs Housing

$470

$762

$–

$1,125

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$142

$433

Taxes

$213

$454

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,562

$4,761

$18,744

$57,132

$9.37

$28.57

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220193

45,000 40,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$48,408

30,000 25,000 20,000

15,000

500+ $41,184

250-499 $47,028

$36,456

50-249 20-49 0-19

10,000 5,000

0

$31,116

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

35,000


ALICE IN CALDWELL PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 9,997 • Number of Households: 3,635 Median Household Income: $29,832 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 10.9% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 31% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 29% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220211

4,500 4,000

3,961

3,851

3,651

3,635

3,500

Households

3,000 2,500

55%

62%

58%

40%

2,000 31%

1,500 1,000 500

0

22%

20%

16%

22%

22%

23%

29%

2010

2012

2014

2016

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220212

2,000

1,800

1,731

1,600 1,400

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

42%

1,200

1,075

1,000 800 600

829 36%

52%

400 200 0

30%

45%

1% 47%

22% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

25%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Caldwell Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Banks Springs

533

73%

Clarks

193

74%

Columbia

199

59%

Grayson

183

65%

Town

Household Survival Budget, Caldwell Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$477

$579

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$143

$383

Taxes

$215

$324

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,572

$4,211

$18,864

$50,532

$9.43

$25.27

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220213

1,400

$33,996

Firm Size by Number of Employees

Number of Jobs

1,200 1,000

500+

$27,060

250-499 50-249

800 600

20-49

$16,788

0-19

400 200

0

$25,860 $48,912 Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

1,600


ALICE IN CAMERON PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 6,739 • Number of Households: 2,653 Median Household Income: $65,679 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 3.5% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 17% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 10% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220231

3,000

2,663

2,577

2,482

2,500

2,653

Households

2,000 71% 1,500

73%

74%

73%

17%

17%

17%

1,000

500

0

18% 11%

10%

9%

10%

2010

2012

2014

2016

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220232

1,400 1,200

1,153

1,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

822 800

678

75%

600 76%

69%

400 200 0

16%

12%

23%

9%

12%

Single or Cohabiting

Families With Children

Poverty

ALICE

8% 65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Cameron Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Cameron

102

50%

Hackberry

481

33%

Town

Household Survival Budget, Cameron Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$470

$762

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$142

$407

Taxes

$213

$388

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,562

$4,482

$18,744

$53,784

$9.37

$26.89

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220233

9,000 8,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

6,000

500+

250-499

5,000

50-249

4,000

$70,740

3,000

0-19

$62,076

2,000

$52,368

1,000

0

20-49

$33,204

$37,776 Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

7,000


ALICE IN CATAHOULA PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 10,145 • Number of Households: 3,731 Median Household Income: $34,736 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 7.3% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 32% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 22% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220251

4,000

3,794

3,753

58%

58%

19%

20%

23% 2010

3,786

3,731

49%

46%

28%

32%

22%

23%

22%

2012

2014

2016

3,500

Households

3,000 2,500 2,000

1,500 1,000 500 0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220252

2,000

1,809

1,800 1,600 1,400

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

46%

1,200

1,006

916

1,000

36%

800 600

57%

36%

400 200 0

42%

12% 18% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

31%

22%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Catahoula Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Harrisonburg

120

63%

Jonesville

783

69%

Sicily Island

194

70%

Wallace Ridge

166

46%

Town

Household Survival Budget, Catahoula Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$477

$579

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$143

$383

Taxes

$215

$324

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,572

$4,211

$18,864

$50,532

$9.43

$25.27

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220253

1,400

Firm Size by Number of Employees

1,000

$31,788

500+

250-499

800 600

50-249 20-49

$40,092

0-19

400 200

$24,312 $30,456

0

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

1,200


ALICE IN CLAIBORNE PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 16,452 • Number of Households: 5,828 Median Household Income: $28,927 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 14.4% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 31% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 30% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220271

7,000 6,000

5,890

5,677

5,635

Households

5,000 44%

45%

51%

4,000 3,000

2,000 1,000 0

5,828

39%

31%

30%

24%

30%

26%

25%

25%

2010

2012

2014

Poverty

ALICE

30%

2016

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220272

3,000 2,656 2,500

2,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

37% 1,798 1,374

1,500 36%

45%

34%

1,000

15% 500

0

27%

36%

51% 19%

Single or Cohabiting Poverty

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Claiborne Parish, 2016 Town Athens

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

124

55%

Haynesville

1,076

66%

Homer

1,234

74%

Household Survival Budget, Claiborne Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$456

$579

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$140

$383

Taxes

$209

$324

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,542

$4,211

$18,504

$50,532

$9.25

$25.27

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220273

1,800

$33,576

Firm Size by Number of Employees

Number of Jobs

1,600 1,400

1,200

500+

$35,568

250-499 50-249

1,000 800

20-49 0-19

$38,748

600 400

200 0

$33,348

Small Firms

$46,308 Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

2,000


ALICE IN CONCORDIA PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 20,288 • Number of Households: 7,579 Median Household Income: $28,405 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 9.7% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 26% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 32% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220291

9,000 8,000

7,803

7,940

7,767

7,579

50%

52%

48%

42%

7,000

Households

6,000 5,000 4,000 3,000

18%

22%

22%

26%

2,000 1,000

0

32%

2010

26%

30%

32%

2012

2014

2016

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220292

4,000 3,500 3,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

3,500

41%

2,500

2,117

1,962

2,000 1,500

42%

35%

1,000 500 0

44%

8% 30% 50%

24% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

26% Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, Concordia Parish

Concordia Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Clayton

229

80%

Ferriday

1,256

67%

Minorca

735

53%

Monterey

175

53%

Ridgecrest

283

66%

Spokane

150

20%

1,655

52%

Town

Vidalia

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$430

$579

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$137

$383

Taxes

$202

$324

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,506

$4,211

$18,072

$50,532

$9.04

$25.27

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220293

Number of Jobs

3,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$19,164

2,500

500+

$38,448

250-499

2,000 1,500

50-249 20-49

$43,728

0-19

1,000 500 0

$25,704

$28,572

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

3,500


ALICE IN DE SOTO PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 27,047 • Number of Households: 10,259 Median Household Income: $42,368 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 9.8% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 23% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 23% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220311

12,000 10,120

10,254

10,172

10,259

55%

55%

57%

54%

25%

22%

20%

23%

20%

23%

23%

23%

2010

2012

2014

2016

10,000

Households

8,000

6,000

4,000

2,000

0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220312

5,000

4,500

4,474

4,000 3,500

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

3,000

53%

2,935

2,850

53%

55%

2,500 2,000 1,500

29%

13%

1,000 500 0

18% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

25%

34%

20%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

De Soto Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Keachi

123

35%

Logansport

633

53%

1,878

62%

South Mansfield

142

85%

Stonewall

786

34%

Town

Mansfield

Household Survival Budget, De Soto Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$580

$819

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$156

$415

Taxes

$244

$408

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,717

$4,567

$20,604

$54,804

$10.30

$27.40

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220313

2,500

$64,812

2,000

$45,900

Firm Size by Number of Employees 500+

250-499 50-249

1,500

20-49

$29,424

1,000 500 0

$57,816

0-19

$27,192

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

3,000


ALICE IN EAST BATON ROUGE PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 447,037 • Number of Households: 163,764 Median Household Income: $50,508 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 6.6% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 28% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 19% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220331

180,000

165,646

167,731

62%

63%

22%

19%

16% 2010

170,572

163,764

160,000 140,000

Households

120,000

59%

53%

24%

28%

18%

17%

19%

2012

2014

2016

100,000 80,000 60,000 40,000 20,000

0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220332

100,000

90,000

86,683

80,000 70,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

60,000

51%

50,000

40,654

36,427

40,000 30,000

57%

31%

57%

20,000 10,000 0

17% 18% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

33%

26%

10%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, East Baton Rouge Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$594

$842

$–

$1,125

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$158

$444

Taxes

$249

$483

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,738

$4,881

$20,856

$58,572

$10.43

$29.29

East Baton Rouge Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Baker

5,078

56%

Baton Rouge

81,939

57%

Brownfields

1,970

50%

Central

10,201

31%

Gardere

4,006

61%

Inniswold

2,658

32%

Merrydale

3,189

57%

Monticello

1,849

33%

Oak Hills Place

3,495

27%

Old Jefferson

2,938

29%

Shenandoah

7,593

23%

Village St. George

2,621

30%

Westminster

1,254

18%

Zachary

5,368

31%

Town

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220333

140,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

100,000 80,000

$47,112

500+

$50,244

60,000 40,000 20,000 0

250-499

$42,132

50-249 20-49 0-19

$40,668

$36,972 Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

120,000


ALICE IN EAST CARROLL PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 7,419 • Number of Households: 2,557 Median Household Income: $22,093 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 11.5% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 28% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 47% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220351

3,000

2,500

Households

2,000

2,426

2,592

32% 37%

0

25%

38%

28% 27%

27%

36%

35%

2010

2012

1,000

500

2,557

2,371

1,500

Poverty

40%

2014

ALICE

28%

47%

2016

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220352

1,200

1,130

1,000

21% 757

800

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

600

670 41%

6%

47%

18%

400

200

0

17% 76%

38%

36%

Single or Cohabiting Poverty

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

East Carroll Parish, 2016 Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Lake Providence

1,798

80%

Household Survival Budget, East Carroll Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$443

$579

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$139

$383

Taxes

$206

$324

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,525

$4,211

$18,300

$50,532

$9.15

$25.27

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220353

1,200 $19,104

Firm Size by Number of Employees

800

$24,528

500+

250-499 600

50-249

$18,444

20-49 0-19

400 200

$22,704 $35,640

0

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

1,000


ALICE IN EAST FELICIANA PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 19,756 • Number of Households: 6,822 Median Household Income: $48,997 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 6.1% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 32% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 16% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220371

8,000 7,000

6,746

6,901

6,909

6,822

52%

60%

55%

52%

27%

32%

Households

6,000 5,000 4,000

3,000 2,000 1,000 0

27%

23%

21%

17%

18%

16%

2010

2012

2014

2016

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220372

3,500

3,160

3,000 2,500

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

55%

1,973

2,000

1,689

1,500

50% 49%

1,000

30%

0

35%

30%

500 15%

21%

15%

Single or Cohabiting

Families With Children

65 and Over

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

East Feliciana Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Clinton

678

63%

Jackson

438

58%

Norwood

148

60%

Slaughter

488

35%

Wilson

206

66%

Town

Household Survival Budget, East Feliciana Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$594

$842

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$158

$418

Taxes

$249

$416

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,738

$4,601

$20,856

$55,212

$10.43

$27.61

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220373

2,500 $64,248

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$34,776

500+

1,500

250-499 50-249

1,000

500

0

20-49

$25,692

0-19

$29,088

$55,620 Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

2,000


ALICE IN EVANGELINE PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 33,765 • Number of Households: 11,871 Median Household Income: $30,724 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 11.2% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 30% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 25% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220391

14,000 12,000

11,934

12,172

12,053

11,871

53%

50%

45%

45%

28%

30%

26%

27%

25%

2012

2014

2016

Households

10,000 8,000 6,000

4,000 2,000 0

27%

20% 2010

24%

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220392

6,000 5,123 5,000

4,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

41%

3,714 3,034

3,000

2,000

48% 48%

37% 18%

33%

1,000 34%

22% 0

Single or Cohabiting Poverty

19%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, Evangeline Parish

Evangeline Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Basile

525

62%

Chataignier

126

68%

Mamou

943

63%

Pine Prairie

310

52%

Reddell

328

44%

Turkey Creek

129

53%

3,086

76%

Town

Ville Platte

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$357

$579

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$128

$383

Taxes

$182

$324

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,404

$4,211

$16,848

$50,532

$8.42

$25.27

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220393

3,500

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$34,704

Number of Jobs

3,000 2,500

500+

$23,544

250-499 50-249

2,000 1,500

1,000

20-49

$23,832

$41,700

0-19

$27,312

500

0

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

4,000


ALICE IN FRANKLIN PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 20,464 • Number of Households: 7,520 Median Household Income: $32,440 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 10.1% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 27% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 27% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220411

9,000 8,000

7,969

7,692

7,748

48%

46%

46%

25%

27%

27%

25%

27%

27%

27%

2010

2012

2014

2016

7,520

7,000

Households

6,000

57%

5,000 4,000 3,000

18%

2,000 1,000

0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220412

3,500

3,267

3,000 2,500

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

40%

2,327 1,926

2,000

1,500

54%

46%

37%

1,000 500 0

10% 44%

23% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

27% 19%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Franklin Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Baskin

104

59%

Gilbert

187

65%

1,836

69%

339

68%

Town

Winnsboro Wisner

Household Survival Budget, Franklin Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$430

$579

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$137

$383

Taxes

$202

$324

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,506

$4,211

$18,072

$50,532

$9.04

$25.27

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220413

2,500 $26,484

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$21,936

500+

1,500

250-499 50-249

$30,972

20-49

1,000

500

0

0-19

$23,208

Small Firms

$27,828

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

2,000


ALICE IN GRANT PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 22,372 • Number of Households: 7,286 Median Household Income: $40,389 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 8.4% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 31% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 21% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220431

8,000

7,426

7,199

7,204

7,286

50%

49%

48%

31%

31%

31%

17%

19%

20%

21%

2010

2012

2014

2016

7,000

Households

6,000 5,000

55%

4,000

3,000 2,000 1,000 0

28%

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220432

4,000

3,610

3,500 3,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

44%

2,500 1,996

2,000 1,500

1,680 50%

38%

52%

1,000 500 0

18% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

20%

30%

28%

20%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, Grant Parish

Grant Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Colfax

608

70%

Dry Prong

191

46%

Georgetown

117

49%

Montgomery

297

44%

Pollock

171

58%

Prospect

179

17%

Rock Hill

119

49%

Town

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$553

$726

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$153

$403

Taxes

$236

$375

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,679

$4,429

$20,148

$53,148

$10.07

$26.57

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220433

2,000 1,800

Firm Size by Number of Employees

1,400

$35,016

500+

1,200

250-499 50-249

1,000 800

$33,168

600

$20,928

20-49 0-19

400

200 0

$26,316 $46,224 Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

1,600


ALICE IN IBERIA PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 73,273 • Number of Households: 26,240 Median Household Income: $41,424 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 10.6% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 26% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 24% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220451

30,000 26,130

26,359

25,855

60%

62%

62%

19%

19%

22%

21%

19%

16%

2010

2012

2014

26,240

25,000

Households

20,000

50%

15,000

10,000

26%

5,000

0

Poverty

ALICE

24% 2016

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220452

14,000 12,000

11,915

10,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

47%

7,981

8,000

6,344 6,000 4,000

50% 57%

38%

9%

2,000

41%

26%

Families With Children

65 and Over

15% 0

Single or Cohabiting Poverty

17%

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Iberia Parish, 2016 Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Jeanerette

2,041

65%

Loreauville

269

44%

Lydia

252

43%

11,560

51%

New Iberia

Household Survival Budget, Iberia Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$525

$708

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$149

$400

Taxes

$228

$369

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,639

$4,402

$19,668

$52,824

$9.83

$26.41

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220453

14,000

Number of Jobs

12,000 10,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$55,860

500+

$43,056

250-499 50-249

8,000 6,000

0

0-19

$51,264

4,000 2,000

20-49

$35,916

$32,412

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

16,000


ALICE IN IBERVILLE PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 33,159 • Number of Households: 11,162 Median Household Income: $46,480 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 7.2% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 29% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 18% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220471

12,000

11,101

11,257

11,162

56%

56%

53%

23%

24%

29%

19%

21%

20%

18%

2010

2012

2014

2016

10,951

10,000

Households

8,000

61%

6,000

4,000 20% 2,000

0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220472

6,000

5,365

5,000

4,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

57%

2,949

2,848

3,000

48%

53%

2,000 31%

17%

1,000

0

35%

12%

30%

Single or Cohabiting

Families With Children

Poverty

ALICE

17% 65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, Iberville Parish

Iberville Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Bayou Goula

272

49%

Crescent

233

28%

Grosse Tete

291

54%

Maringouin

315

62%

Plaquemine

2,647

44%

Rosedale

376

50%

St. Gabriel

1,432

54%

806

67%

Town

White Castle

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$459

$635

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$141

$390

Taxes

$210

$343

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,547

$4,293

$18,564

$51,516

$9.28

$25.76

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220473

9,000 8,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

6,000 5,000 4,000

500+

250-499

$34,896

50-249 $44,568

$81,024

0-19

3,000 2,000 1,000

0

20-49

$30,912

$37,884 Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

7,000


ALICE IN JACKSON PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 15,999 • Number of Households: 6,052 Median Household Income: $38,310 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 5.6% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 23% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 25% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220491

7,000 6,000

6,166

6,052

50%

52%

26%

23%

20%

24%

25%

2012

2014

2016

5,967

6,076

58%

58%

25%

22%

17% 2010

Households

5,000 4,000 3,000

2,000 1,000 0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220492

3,000

2,500

2,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

2,444

1,943 46%

1,665

1,500 64%

43%

1,000

32%

14%

500

0

Single or Cohabiting Poverty

22%

43%

22%

14% Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Jackson Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Chatham

276

75%

East Hodge

138

64%

Hodge

169

47%

1,475

75%

150

62%

Town

Jonesboro North Hodge

Household Survival Budget, Jackson Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$430

$579

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$137

$383

Taxes

$202

$324

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,506

$4,211

$18,072

$50,532

$9.04

$25.27

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220493

1,400

$24,624

1,200

$22,380

1,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees 500+

250-499

$28,704

50-249

800

20-49

600

400

$45,444

0-19

$26,040

200

0

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

1,600


ALICE IN JEFFERSON PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 436,523 • Number of Households: 170,710 Median Household Income: $49,678 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 5.7% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 32% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 14% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220511

180,000

170,710

166,696

166,492

169,033

58%

57%

57%

27%

28%

28%

32%

15%

15%

15%

14%

2010

2012

2014

2016

160,000 140,000

Households

120,000

54%

100,000 80,000 60,000 40,000 20,000

0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220512

90,000

81,047

80,000

70,000 60,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

54%

50,000

45,840

43,823

40,000

20,000

34% 24%

10,000 0

54%

53%

30,000

36%

12%

23%

Single or Cohabiting

Families With Children

Poverty

ALICE

10% 65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Avondale

1,729

59%

Barataria

430

52%

Bridge City

2,411

66%

Elmwood

2,785

36%

Estelle

5,290

43%

342

55%

Gretna

6,856

58%

Harahan

3,962

37%

Harvey

7,870

61%

614

42%

Jefferson

5,104

51%

Kenner

24,208

43%

Lafitte

321

59%

Marrero

11,810

57%

Metairie

60,296

42%

Jean Lafitte

Monthly Costs Housing

Town

Grand Isle

Household Survival Budget, Jefferson Parish SINGLE ADULT

Jefferson Parish, 2016

$669

$963

$–

$1,125

Food

$164

$542

River Ridge

5,855

35%

Transportation

$322

$644

Terrytown

8,617

56%

Health Care

$196

$726

Timberlane

3,329

44%

Waggaman

3,465

58%

Technology

$55

$75

Westwego

3,482

63%

Woodmere

3,604

43%

Child Care

Miscellaneous

$168

$460

Taxes

$274

$526

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,848

$5,061

$22,176

$60,732

$11.09

$30.37

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220513

100,000 $58,296

Firm Size by Number of Employees

Number of Jobs

80,000 70,000

$42,336

500+

60,000 50,000 40,000

250-499 $39,720

$45,384

50-249 20-49 0-19

30,000 20,000

$36,984

10,000 0

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

90,000


ALICE IN JEFFERSON DAVIS PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 31,399 • Number of Households: 11,554 Median Household Income: $39,202 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 8.5% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 29% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 21% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220531

14,000 12,000

11,950

11,816

11,553

11,554

61%

57%

54%

50%

20%

24%

29%

23%

22%

21%

2012

2014

2016

Households

10,000 8,000 6,000

4,000 25% 2,000 0

14% 2010 Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220532

6,000

5,000

4,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

4,923

3,598

51%

3,033

3,000 56%

2,000

31%

19%

1,000

18% 0

44%

Single or Cohabiting Poverty

35%

25%

21%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, Jefferson Davis Parish

Jefferson Davis Parish, 2016 Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Elton

543

61%

Fenton

149

71%

Jennings

3,736

58%

Lacassine

127

33%

Lake Arthur

981

58%

Roanoke

209

53%

1,177

60%

Welsh

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$477

$579

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$143

$383

Taxes

$215

$324

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,572

$4,211

$18,864

$50,532

$9.43

$25.27

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220533

6,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0

500+

250-499

$36,876

50-249 20-49

$27,600

$27,444

Small Firms

0-19

$36,384 Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

$48,612


ALICE IN LAFAYETTE PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 241,398 • Number of Households: 89,130 Median Household Income: $49,969 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 4.9% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 27% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 17% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220551

100,000 90,000

84,447

88,097

88,611

63%

67%

89,130

80,000

Households

70,000 60,000 50,000

68%

56%

40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0

15%

27%

20%

20%

17%

17%

13%

17%

2010

2012

2014

2016

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220552

50,000

45,000

44,747

40,000 35,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

30,000

53%

27,426

25,000 20,000 15,000

31%

49%

10,000 5,000 0

16,957

64%

14%

38%

16%

22%

Single or Cohabiting

Families With Children

Poverty

ALICE

13% 65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, Lafayette Parish

Lafayette Parish, 2016 Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Broussard

3,785

31%

Carencro

3,179

54%

635

59%

Lafayette

50,473

47%

Milton

1,106

15%

Ossun

615

48%

Scott

3,493

47%

Youngsville

3,734

15%

Duson

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$605

$877

$–

$1,125

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$159

$448

Taxes

$252

$495

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,753

$4,932

$21,036

$59,184

$10.52

$29.59

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220553

70,000

Number of Jobs

60,000 50,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$46,656

500+

$40,848

250-499 50-249

40,000 30,000

20-49

$35,664 $46,428

0-19

20,000 10,000

0

$36,240

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

80,000


ALICE IN LAFOURCHE PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 98,305 • Number of Households: 37,199 Median Household Income: $51,772 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 5.9% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 29% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 16% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220571

40,000

35,691

35,392

62%

63%

25%

25%

13%

12%

2010

2012

37,199

34,564

35,000

Households

30,000 25,000

54%

55%

20,000

15,000 10,000 5,000 0

Poverty

ALICE

27%

29%

19%

16%

2014

2016

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220572

20,000

18,000

17,435

16,000 14,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

12,000

57%

10,712 9,052

10,000 8,000 6,000

4,000 2,000 0

62%

43%

17%

43%

28%

15%

21%

Single or Cohabiting

Families With Children

Poverty

ALICE

14% 65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, Lafourche Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT $639

$857

$–

$1,125

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$164

$446

Taxes

$264

$488

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Bayou Blue

4,285

42%

517

15%

Chackbay

1,812

37%

Choctaw

304

48%

Cut Off

2,165

41%

Galliano

2,859

45%

Golden Meadow

717

41%

Kraemer

357

52%

Lafourche Crossing

775

29%

2,749

44%

Lockport

905

50%

Lockport Heights

502

36%

Mathews

833

38%

Raceland

3,947

56%

Thibodaux

5,509

58%

Bayou Country Club

Larose

Monthly Costs Housing

Lafourche Parish, 2016

$1,804

$4,903

$21,648

$58,836

$10.82

$29.42

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220573

16,000 $65,664

Firm Size by Number of Employees

Number of Jobs

12,000 10,000

$48,936

500+

250-499 50-249

8,000 6,000

$36,600

$58,272

20-49 0-19

4,000 2,000

0

$30,540

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

14,000


ALICE IN LASALLE PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 14,927 • Number of Households: 5,320 Median Household Income: $35,339 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 5.2% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 28% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 24% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220591

7,000 6,000

5,718

5,715

5,245

5,320

Households

5,000 4,000

60%

67%

60%

48%

3,000

2,000 1,000 0

26%

20%

14%

13%

2010

2012

Poverty

21%

ALICE

28%

19%

24%

2014

2016

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220592

3,000

2,500

2,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

2,409

42% 1,500

1,500

1,000

47%

57%

31%

12%

500 27% 0

1,411

Single or Cohabiting Poverty

41%

31%

12%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

LaSalle Parish, 2016 Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Jena

1,375

65%

Midway

510

90%

Olla

506

51%

Tullos

165

60%

Urania

210

52%

Household Survival Budget, LaSalle Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$430

$579

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$137

$383

Taxes

$202

$324

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,506

$4,211

$18,072

$50,532

$9.04

$25.27

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220593

2,000

Number of Jobs

1,600 1,400

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$41,676 $24,972

500+

1,200 1,000 800

250-499 50-249 0-19

600 400

20-49

$35,784

$36,000 $26,640

200 0

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

1,800


ALICE IN LINCOLN PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 47,480 • Number of Households: 17,144 Median Household Income: $34,527 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 10.4% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 25% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 31% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220611

20,000 18,000 16,000

15,876

16,886

Households

14,000 12,000

54%

54%

17,060

17,144

48%

44%

10,000

8,000 6,000

21%

22%

19%

25%

4,000 2,000 0

25%

27%

30%

31%

2010

2012

2014

2016

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220612

10,000

9,000

8,734

8,000 7,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

39%

6,000 4,823

5,000 4,000

25%

3,587

47%

3,000

2,000 1,000 0

54%

18%

36%

33%

35%

13% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, Lincoln Parish

Lincoln Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Choudrant

433

38%

Dubach

378

64%

Grambling

1,667

70%

Ruston

7,806

65%

Simsboro

410

53%

Vienna

197

35%

Town

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$558

$683

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$153

$397

Taxes

$237

$360

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,685

$4,365

$20,220

$52,380

$10.11

$26.19

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220613

10,000 $52,992

Firm Size by Number of Employees

Number of Jobs

8,000 7,000

$33,624

500+

6,000 5,000 4,000

250-499 50-249 0-19 $36,756

3,000 2,000

1,000 0

20-49

$28,416

$27,648

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

9,000


ALICE IN LIVINGSTON PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 140,138 • Number of Households: 47,479 Median Household Income: $56,534 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 5.2% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 27% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 13% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220631

60,000

50,000

44,849

48,943

47,228

47,479

Households

40,000

30,000

65%

62%

72%

60%

20,000

10,000

0

24% 11% 2010

22%

17%

27%

16%

11%

13%

2012

2014

2016

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220632

25,000 20,985 20,000 16,159

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

15,000

60%

10,335

64%

10,000

54%

5,000

0

33%

15%

Single or Cohabiting Poverty

34%

21%

7%

12%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, Livingston Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT

Livingston Parish, 2016 Town Albany

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

525

54%

3,884

46%

French Settlement

486

43%

Killian

497

45%

Livingston

664

45%

Port Vincent

358

36%

Springfield

172

62%

Walker

2,428

45%

Watson

434

43%

Denham Springs

Monthly Costs Housing

$594

$842

$–

$1,125

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$158

$444

Taxes

$249

$483

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,738

$4,881

$20,856

$58,572

$10.43

$29.29

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220633

14,000

10,000

$40,932

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$32,808

500+

250-499

8,000

50-249

$28,668

20-49

6,000

0-19

$37,884

4,000 2,000 0

$29,184

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

12,000


ALICE IN MADISON PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 11,803 • Number of Households: 4,080 Median Household Income: $25,404 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 14.1% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 28% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 38% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220651

4,500 4,000

4,050

4,035

4,080

38%

36%

34%

29%

28%

32%

33%

36%

38%

2010

2012

2014

2016

3,973

3,500

Households

3,000

40%

2,500 2,000

28%

28%

1,500 1,000 500

0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220652

2,500 2,051 2,000

29%

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

1,500 1,035 1,000

994

42%

34%

42%

2%

500

0

29%

64%

29%

29% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Madison Parish, 2016 Town Richmond Tallulah

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

162

44%

2,727

70%

Household Survival Budget, Madison Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$430

$579

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$137

$383

Taxes

$202

$324

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,506

$4,211

$18,072

$50,532

$9.04

$25.27

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220653

1,800

Number of Jobs

1,600

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$13,944

1,400

1,200

500+

$25,788

250-499 50-249

1,000 800 600 400

200 0

20-49 0-19

$23,340

$22,008

$31,716 Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

2,000


ALICE IN MOREHOUSE PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 26,739 • Number of Households: 10,273 Median Household Income: $30,279 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 8.1% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 31% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 28% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220671

12,000 10,559

10,383

10,273

46%

42%

41%

26%

30%

31%

24%

28%

28%

28%

2010

2012

2014

2016

10,141 10,000

Households

8,000

48%

6,000

4,000

28%

2,000

0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220672

6,000

5,000

4,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

4,885

38% 3,006

3,000

2,000

2,382 44%

40%

42% 12%

1,000

46%

22% 0

Single or Cohabiting Poverty

33% 23%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Morehouse Parish, 2016 Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Bastrop

4,061

74%

Collinston

150

74%

Mer Rouge

161

56%

Household Survival Budget, Morehouse Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$451

$579

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$140

$383

Taxes

$208

$324

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,536

$4,211

$18,432

$50,532

$9.22

$25.27

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220673

4,500 $38,112

Firm Size by Number of Employees

Number of Jobs

3,500

3,000

$28,116

500+

250-499

2,500 2,000

1,500

50-249 20-49

$29,436

0-19

1,000 500

0

$26,100

$28,212

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

4,000


ALICE IN NATCHITOCHES PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 39,258 • Number of Households: 14,393 Median Household Income: $30,697 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 12.1% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 28% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 31% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220691

16,000

15,101

15,013

14,598

14,393

52%

46%

41%

22%

26%

28%

26%

28%

31%

2010

2012

2014

2016

14,000

Households

12,000

47%

10,000 8,000

6,000

25%

28%

4,000 2,000 0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220692

8,000

7,322

7,000 6,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

35%

5,000 4,000

3,811 3,260

33%

3,000

50%

46% 2,000 1,000 0

16%

32%

29%

38% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

21%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Natchitoches Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Campti

350

80%

Clarence

140

64%

Goldonna

146

45%

Natchez

180

70%

6,454

69%

Point Place

208

41%

Provencal

227

60%

Vienna Bend

454

53%

Town

Natchitoches

Household Survival Budget, Natchitoches Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$488

$651

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$144

$392

Taxes

$218

$349

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,587

$4,317

$19,044

$51,804

$9.52

$25.90

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220693

6,000 5,000

$34,788

Firm Size by Number of Employees 500+

250-499 3,000

0

20-49

$38,484

2,000 1,000

50-249

$25,332

0-19

$27,084

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

$26,136 4,000


ALICE IN ORLEANS PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 391,495 • Number of Households: 154,355 Median Household Income: $38,681 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 8.2% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 29% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 24% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220711

180,000 160,000

142,093

152,788

151,735

154,355

140,000

Households

120,000 100,000

54%

50%

57%

47%

80,000 60,000 40,000 20,000

0

22%

22%

16%

29%

24%

28%

27%

24%

2010

2012

2014

2016

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220712

100,000

90,000

89,757

80,000 70,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

46%

60,000

50,000 40,000 30,000

31%

20,000 10,000 0

23% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

31,579

33,019

50%

46%

20%

34%

30%

20%

Families With Children

65 and Over

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Orleans Parish, 2016 Town New Orleans

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

154,355

53%

Household Survival Budget, Orleans Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$669

$963

$–

$1,125

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$168

$460

Taxes

$274

$526

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,848

$5,061

$22,176

$60,732

$11.09

$30.37

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220713

90,000

Number of Jobs

80,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$46,596

70,000

60,000

500+

$39,276

250-499 50-249

50,000 40,000 30,000

$50,052 $35,592

20-49 0-19

20,000

10,000 0

$35,808

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

100,000


ALICE IN OUACHITA PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 156,983 • Number of Households: 54,349 Median Household Income: $37,275 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 7.1% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 33% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 25% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220731

70,000 60,000

57,072

58,133

57,766

57%

55%

54%

21%

22%

22%

22%

23%

24%

25%

2010

2012

2014

2016

54,349

Households

50,000 40,000

42%

30,000

20,000 10,000 0

Poverty

ALICE

33%

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220732

25,000

20,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

23,404

34%

16,797 14,148

15,000 45% 10,000

52%

43% 20%

5,000

0

32% 23%

35%

Single or Cohabiting

Families With Children

16%

Poverty

ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Bawcomville

1,189

74%

Brownsville

1,572

75%

191

41%

Claiborne

4,388

41%

Lakeshore

734

46%

17,717

65%

Richwood

530

77%

Sterlington

768

54%

Swartz

1,820

44%

West Monroe

5,295

63%

Calhoun

Monroe

Household Survival Budget, Ouachita Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT

Ouachita Parish, 2016

Monthly Costs Housing

$561

$737

$–

$1,125

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$154

$429

Taxes

$238

$445

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,690

$4,723

$20,280

$56,676

$10.14

$28.34

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220733

40,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$31,092

Number of Jobs

30,000 25,000

500+

$34,404

250-499 50-249

20,000 15,000

20-49

$29,112

$43,140

0-19

10,000 5,000

0

$30,084

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

35,000


ALICE IN PLAQUEMINES PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 23,584 • Number of Households: 8,644 Median Household Income: $50,251 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 3.9% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 30% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 18% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220751

10,000 9,000

8,823

8,772

62%

67%

63%

28%

19%

8,315

8,644

8,000

Households

7,000 6,000

52%

5,000

4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0

10% 2010

21%

30%

14%

16%

18%

2012

2014

2016

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220752

4,000

3,745

3,500

3,013 3,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

2,500

57% 54%

2,000

1,886 37%

1,500 1,000

31%

27%

12%

19%

500 0

Single or Cohabiting Poverty

33% 30%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, Plaquemines Parish

Plaquemines Parish, 2016 Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Belle Chasse

5,019

39%

Boothville

341

68%

Buras

463

48%

Empire

402

73%

Port Sulphur

578

71%

Triumph

113

64%

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$669

$963

$–

$1,125

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$168

$460

Taxes

$274

$526

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,848

$5,061

$22,176

$60,732

$11.09

$30.37

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220753

7,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$58,032

Number of Jobs

6,000 5,000

500+

$47,988

250-499 50-249

4,000 3,000

20-49

2,000 1,000

0

0-19

$47,520 $79,992

$35,856

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

8,000


ALICE IN POINTE COUPEE PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 22,366 • Number of Households: 8,802 Median Household Income: $44,275 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 8.8% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 27% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 19% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220771

10,000 9,000

8,634

9,121

8,888

8,802

8,000

Households

7,000 6,000

54%

57%

61%

61%

31%

24%

23%

12%

15%

16%

19%

2010

2012

2014

2016

5,000

4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0

Poverty

ALICE

27%

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220772

4,500 4,000

3,867

3,500 3,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

2,500

2,833 57% 2,102

44%

2,000

1,500 1,000 500 0

58% 27%

34% 20%

16% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

22%

22% Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Pointe Coupee Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Fordoche

369

37%

Livonia

672

34%

Morganza

326

46%

1,798

51%

468

47%

Town

New Roads Ventress

Household Survival Budget, Pointe Coupee Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$594

$842

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$158

$418

Taxes

$249

$416

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,738

$4,601

$20,856

$55,212

$10.43

$27.61

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220773

3,500

2,500

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$42,456

500+

$40,944

250-499

2,000 1,500

50-249 20-49

$34,380

0-19

1,000 500 0

$27,936

Small Firms

$28,476

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

3,000


ALICE IN RAPIDES PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 132,424 • Number of Households: 47,745 Median Household Income: $42,582 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 6.4% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 28% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 19% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220791

60,000

50,000

49,299

46,738

47,745

59%

53%

53%

20%

27%

28%

18%

21%

20%

19%

2010

2012

2014

2016

47,126

Households

40,000

30,000

60%

20,000

10,000

0

22%

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220792

25,000

20,638 20,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

15,000

14,484

54%

12,623 50%

10,000

5,000

55%

31%

24%

15% 0

Single or Cohabiting Poverty

26%

26%

19%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, Rapides Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT

Rapides Parish, 2016 Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Alexandria

17,837

55%

Ball

1,443

37%

Boyce

514

68%

Cheneyville

211

73%

Deville

702

40%

Forest Hill

282

70%

Glenmora

457

65%

Lecompte

389

65%

5,123

52%

504

38%

Pineville Woodworth

Monthly Costs Housing

$553

$726

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$153

$403

Taxes

$236

$375

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,679

$4,429

$20,148

$53,148

$10.07

$26.57

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220793

Number of Jobs

25,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$31,992

20,000

500+

$31,392

250-499 50-249

15,000 $34,908 10,000 5,000 0

20-49

$39,120

0-19

$35,292

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

30,000


ALICE IN RED RIVER PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 8,757 • Number of Households: 3,491 Median Household Income: $36,831 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 8.0% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 25% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 24% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220811

4,000 3,500

3,203

3,225

51%

57%

28%

21%

21% 2010

3,382

3,491

Households

3,000 2,500

52%

51%

2,000

1,500 1,000 500 0

24%

25%

22%

24%

24%

2012

2014

2016

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220812

1,600

1,493

1,400

1,121

1,200

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

1,000

53%

877

41%

800 61%

600 400 200 0

29%

31% 7%

Single or Cohabiting Poverty

30%

32%

16%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Red River Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Coushatta

876

60%

Hall Summit

126

27%

Martin

228

31%

Town

Household Survival Budget, Red River Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$434

$585

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$137

$384

Taxes

$203

$326

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,511

$4,220

$18,132

$50,640

$9.07

$25.32

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220813

1,800 1,600

Firm Size by Number of Employees

1,200

$35,796

500+

250-499

1,000

50-249

800

600

20-49 0-19

$34,428

400 200

0

$21,972 Small Firms

$46,272 Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

1,400


ALICE IN RICHLAND PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 20,692 • Number of Households: 7,581 Median Household Income: $35,684 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 10.7% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 28% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 23% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220831

9,000 8,000

7,676

7,581

55%

49%

7,401

7,566

57%

57%

22%

23%

25%

21%

20%

20%

23%

2010

2012

2014

2016

7,000

Households

6,000 5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000

0

Poverty

ALICE

28%

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220832

3,500

3,299

3,000 2,500

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

50%

2,131

2,151

45%

52%

2,000

1,500 1,000

33%

21%

500

34%

17% 0

Single or Cohabiting Poverty

27% 21%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Richland Parish, 2016 Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Delhi

1,070

50%

261

59%

1,394

70%

385

45%

Mangham Rayville Start

Household Survival Budget, Richland Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$430

$579

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$137

$383

Taxes

$202

$324

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,506

$4,211

$18,072

$50,532

$9.04

$25.27

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220833

4,500 4,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$27,048

3,000 2,500

500+

250-499

$28,548

50-249

2,000

1,500

20-49 0-19

$31,044

1,000 500

0

$25,044

$36,756

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

3,500


ALICE IN SABINE PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 24,144 • Number of Households: 8,984 Median Household Income: $39,372 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 9.8% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 30% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 20% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220851

10,000

9,133

9,246

9,174

8,984

53%

55%

52%

50%

25%

25%

27%

30%

22%

20%

21%

20%

2010

2012

2014

2016

9,000 8,000

Households

7,000 6,000 5,000

4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220852

4,000

3,644

3,500 3,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

2,893 47%

2,447

2,500

48%

2,000 57% 1,500 37% 1,000 500 0

34%

14%

29%

16% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

18%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, Sabine Parish

Sabine Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Belmont

169

19%

Converse

139

56%

Florien

210

49%

Fort Jesup

176

61%

Many

978

69%

Pleasant Hill

249

68%

Zwolle

721

75%

Town

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$454

$579

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$140

$383

Taxes

$209

$324

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,540

$4,211

$18,480

$50,532

$9.24

$25.27

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220853

3,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$29,460

2,000

$33,648

1,500

$31,800

500+

250-499 50-249 20-49 0-19

1,000 500 0

$28,128

Small Firms

$33,624

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

2,500


ALICE IN ST. BERNARD PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 44,091 • Number of Households: 14,732 Median Household Income: $43,565 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 11.1% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 32% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 20% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220871

16,000 14,000

14,051

13,694

Households

10,000

14,732

12,235

12,000 48%

52%

35%

32%

14%

17%

16%

2010

2012

2014

48%

47%

8,000

6,000 4,000

39%

2,000 0

Poverty

ALICE

32%

20% 2016

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220872

8,000

7,194

7,000 6,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

5,000

49%

4,962

4,000

46% 2,576

3,000 2,000 1,000 0

35%

26%

Poverty

38%

28%

16% Single or Cohabiting

46%

16% Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

St. Bernard Parish, 2016 Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Arabi

1,706

59%

Chalmette

7,308

55%

Meraux

2,165

34%

Poydras

867

60%

1,868

61%

Violet

Household Survival Budget, St. Bernard Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$669

$963

$–

$1,125

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$168

$460

Taxes

$274

$526

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,848

$5,061

$22,176

$60,732

$11.09

$30.37

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220873

4,500

Number of Jobs

4,000 3,500

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$49,956

$41,532

500+

3,000 2,500

250-499

$24,228

50-249 $54,396

2,000

20-49 0-19

1,500 1,000

$28,776

500 0

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

5,000


ALICE IN ST. CHARLES PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 52,708 • Number of Households: 18,586 Median Household Income: $61,691 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 8.2% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 25% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 12% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220891

20,000

18,700

18,267

18,421

18,586

67%

65%

66%

63%

20%

23%

22%

25%

13%

12%

12%

12%

2010

2012

2014

2016

18,000 16,000

Households

14,000 12,000 10,000

8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220892

9,000

8,352

8,000

7,000 6,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

6,479 65%

5,000 63%

4,000

3,755

3,000 2,000

56% 25%

22% 31%

1,000 0

10%

15%

Single or Cohabiting

Families With Children

Poverty

ALICE

13% 65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, St. Charles Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT $669

$963

$–

$1,125

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$168

$460

Taxes

$274

$526

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Ama

533

33%

Bayou Gauche

777

36%

1,015

55%

719

42%

Destrehan

4,078

27%

Hahnville

1,307

42%

Killona

237

94%

Luling

4,340

30%

Montz

689

30%

New Sarpy

503

65%

1,142

34%

Paradis

464

23%

St. Rose

2,907

53%

Boutte Des Allemands

Norco

Monthly Costs Housing

St. Charles Parish, 2016

$1,848

$5,061

$22,176

$60,732

$11.09

$30.37

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220893

16,000 14,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees 500+

10,000

8,000 6,000

4,000 2,000

0

250-499 50-249 $55,692

$76,116

$47,508

20-49 0-19

$36,336 $31,980 Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

12,000


ALICE IN ST. HELENA PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 10,714 • Number of Households: 4,033 Median Household Income: $36,418 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 14.3% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 31% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 26% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220911

4,500

4,072

4,202

4,155

4,033

4,000 3,500

Households

3,000

43%

49%

34%

28%

23%

23%

23%

26%

26%

2010

2012

2014

2016

51%

43%

2,500 2,000 1,500

31%

1,000 500

0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220912

2,000

1,904

1,800 1,600

37%

1,400

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

1,231

1,200 898

1,000 800

57%

39%

37%

600

400 200 0

24% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

27%

20%

36%

23%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

St. Helena Parish, 2016 Town Greensburg

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

268

67%

Household Survival Budget, St. Helena Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$594

$842

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$158

$418

Taxes

$249

$416

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,738

$4,601

$20,856

$55,212

$10.43

$27.61

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220913

1,000 $28,740

Firm Size by Number of Employees

Number of Jobs

800 700

$47,820

500+

600

250-499 50-249

500 400

20-49

$23,568

0-19

300 200

$25,392 $35,832

100 0

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

900


ALICE IN ST. JAMES PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 21,581 • Number of Households: 7,952 Median Household Income: $51,386 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 8.4% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 21% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 15% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220931

9,000 8,000

7,925

7,952

64%

64%

64%

21%

20%

21%

13%

15%

16%

15%

2010

2012

2014

2016

7,513

7,710

7,000

Households

6,000 5,000

68%

4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000

0

19%

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220932

4,000

3,803

3,500 3,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

2,500

66%

2,090

2,059

65%

57%

11%

28%

2,000 1,500 1,000

23%

500 0

11%

24%

Single or Cohabiting

Families With Children

Poverty

ALICE

15% 65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, St. James Parish

Town Convent

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

210

56%

1,196

36%

Grand Point

937

23%

Hester

143

22%

Lutcher

1,461

42%

North Vacherie

877

36%

Paulina

421

28%

1,356

28%

St. James

294

43%

Union

243

47%

Welcome

252

47%

Gramercy

South Vacherie

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT

St. James Parish, 2016

Monthly Costs Housing

$410

$579

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$134

$383

Taxes

$197

$324

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,478

$4,211

$17,736

$50,532

$8.87

$25.27

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220933

Number of Jobs

3,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$76,212

2,500 2,000 1,500

500+

$44,796

250-499 50-249

$34,668

$93,516

20-49 0-19

1,000 500 0

$30,624

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

3,500


ALICE IN ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 43,888 • Number of Households: 15,363 Median Household Income: $51,406 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 8.2% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 26% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 19% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220951

18,000 16,000

15,948

15,467

15,444

15,363

60%

58%

55%

26%

25%

25%

26%

15%

15%

17%

19%

2010

2012

2014

2016

14,000

Households

12,000

59%

10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000

0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220952

8,000

7,120

7,000 6,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

5,000

4,909

62%

4,000

3,334

51%

3,000 50% 2,000

24%

24%

14%

25%

Single or Cohabiting

Families With Children

33%

1,000 0

Poverty

ALICE

17% 65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, St. John the Baptist Parish

St. John the Baptist Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Edgard

891

47%

Garyville

945

52%

Laplace

9,917

41%

140

64%

Reserve

3,274

49%

Wallace

175

53%

Town

Pleasure Bend

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$669

$963

$–

$1,125

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$168

$460

Taxes

$274

$526

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,848

$5,061

$22,176

$60,732

$11.09

$30.37

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220953

7,000

5,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$60,228

500+

$45,048

250-499

4,000 3,000

50-249 $35,652

$63,636

20-49 0-19

2,000 1,000 0

$30,060

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

6,000


ALICE IN ST. LANDRY PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 83,883 • Number of Households: 30,302 Median Household Income: $31,207 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 4.1% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 30% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 27% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220971

35,000 30,518

30,937

59%

55%

14%

20%

27%

2010

28,739

30,000

Households

25,000 20,000

40%

15,000

10,000 5,000 0

30,302

43%

29%

30%

25%

31%

27%

2012

2014

2016

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220972

14,000

13,275

12,000 10,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

40%

9,089 7,938

8,000 47%

6,000

45%

38%

4,000

14%

2,000

39%

32%

0

22% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

23% Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, St. Landry Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT

St. Landry Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Arnaudville

442

51%

Cankton

236

51%

3,814

60%

Grand Coteau

355

65%

Krotz Springs

432

79%

Lawtell

544

60%

Leonville

297

69%

Melville

455

81%

Opelousas

6,192

72%

Port Barre

725

72%

1,046

52%

342

67%

Town

Eunice

Sunset

Monthly Costs

Washington

Housing

$370

$600

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$129

$386

Taxes

$186

$331

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,422

$4,242

$17,064

$50,904

$8.53

$25.45

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220973

Firm Size by Number of Employees

12,000

Number of Jobs

$39,252 10,000

500+

$35,124

250-499

8,000 6,000

50-249 $30,192

0-19

4,000 2,000 0

20-49

$33,768 $28,056

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

14,000


ALICE IN ST. MARTIN PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 53,385 • Number of Households: 19,268 Median Household Income: $46,450 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 7.0% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 33% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 16% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 220991

25,000

Households

20,000

19,268

18,672

18,834

52%

55%

29%

28%

33%

17%

19%

17%

16%

2010

2012

2014

2016

18,703

15,000

61%

51%

10,000

5,000

0

22%

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 220992

10,000

9,000

8,847

8,000 7,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

6,000

6,026

53%

5,000

3,000

2,000 1,000 0

4,395

54%

4,000

41% 35%

24%

41%

12%

22%

Single or Cohabiting

Families With Children

Poverty

ALICE

18% 65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, St. Martin Parish

St. Martin Parish, 2016 Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Breaux Bridge

2,992

62%

Cade

737

43%

Catahoula

355

66%

Cecilia

578

28%

Henderson

664

57%

Parks

327

54%

2,378

65%

St. Martinville

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$605

$877

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$159

$423

Taxes

$252

$429

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,753

$4,654

$21,036

$55,848

$10.52

$27.92

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 220993

9,000 $26,436

Firm Size by Number of Employees

Number of Jobs

7,000

6,000

$41,520

500+

250-499

5,000 4,000

50-249 20-49

$31,452

0-19

3,000 2,000 1,000

0

$28,716

Small Firms

$52,872

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

8,000


ALICE IN ST. MARY PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 53,053 • Number of Households: 20,164 Median Household Income: $40,771 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 10.9% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 30% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 20% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 221011

25,000 20,249

20,095

20,183

61%

59%

57%

19%

21%

30%

18%

22%

22%

20%

2010

2012

2014

2016

20,164

Households

20,000

15,000

50%

10,000

5,000

0

21%

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 221012

12,000

10,113 10,000

8,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

53%

6,000

4,000

43%

53%

30% 2,000

0

5,291

4,760

41%

16% 17%

31%

Single or Cohabiting

Families With Children

Poverty

ALICE

16% 65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

St. Mary Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Amelia

795

61%

Baldwin

876

59%

Bayou Vista

2,058

52%

Berwick

1,775

49%

770

56%

Franklin

2,524

57%

Glencoe

115

78%

Morgan City

4,770

46%

Patterson

2,282

48%

Siracusaville

207

44%

Sorrel

193

53%

Town

Charenton

Household Survival Budget, St. Mary Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$485

$638

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$144

$391

Taxes

$217

$344

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,583

$4,298

$18,996

$51,576

$9.50

$25.79

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 221013

12,000

8,000

$48,240

Firm Size by Number of Employees 500+

$41,844

250-499 50-249

6,000 4,000 2,000 0

20-49

$38,016

0-19 $63,912

$31,572

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

10,000


ALICE IN ST. TAMMANY PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 253,602 • Number of Households: 92,205 Median Household Income: $64,639 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 5.9% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 27% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 9% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 221031

100,000 90,000

86,363

89,333

88,123

92,205

80,000

Households

70,000 60,000

67%

64%

67%

64%

50,000

40,000 30,000 20,000

24%

10,000 0

23%

22%

27%

9%

13%

11%

9%

2010

2012

2014

2016

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 221032

45,000 40,000

39,921

35,000 30,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

25,000

26,594

67%

25,690

20,000

15,000 10,000

24%

35%

5,000 0

53%

72%

22% 9% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

6%

12%

Families With Children

65 and Over

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

St. Tammany Parish, 2016 Town Abita Springs

990

39%

3,547

41%

Eden Isle

3,241

28%

299

61%

3,362

52%

327

39%

Mandeville

4,757

32%

Pearl River

860

48%

10,240

43%

123

54%

Folsom Madisonville

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT

% ALICE & Poverty

Covington

Lacombe

Household Survival Budget, St. Tammany Parish

Total HH

Slidell Sun

Monthly Costs Housing

$669

$963

$–

$1,125

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$168

$460

Taxes

$274

$526

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,848

$5,061

$22,176

$60,732

$11.09

$30.37

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 221033

50,000 $44,316

Firm Size by Number of Employees

Number of Jobs

40,000 35,000

$41,964

500+

30,000 25,000

250-499 50-249

$35,220

20-49

20,000

0-19

15,000 10,000

$47,100

$36,168

5,000 0

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

45,000


ALICE IN TANGIPAHOA PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 130,710 • Number of Households: 47,756 Median Household Income: $48,162 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 8.2% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 29% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 19% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 221051

60,000

50,000

43,228

45,786

43,653

47,756

Households

40,000

30,000

56%

52%

52%

52%

20,000

10,000

25% 19%

0

2010

23%

27%

29%

25%

21%

19%

2012

2014

2016

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 221052

25,000

23,672

20,000 57%

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

15,000

13,070 11,014

10,000

5,000

0

49% 32%

47%

15%

37% 36%

11% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

16%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, Tangipahoa Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT

Tangipahoa Parish, 2016 Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Amite City

1,403

50%

Hammond

6,540

60%

Independence

629

63%

Kentwood

897

79%

Natalbany

1,276

64%

Ponchatoula

2,616

57%

Roseland

367

75%

Tangipahoa

259

70%

Tickfaw

227

63%

Monthly Costs Housing

$606

$783

$–

$1,125

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$160

$436

Taxes

$253

$462

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,756

$4,793

$21,072

$57,516

$10.54

$28.76

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 221053

25,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

20,000

15,000

10,000

5,000

0

500+

250-499

$35,268

50-249 20-49

$28,284

0-19

$33,684 $28,344

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

$29,616


ALICE IN TENSAS PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 4,793 • Number of Households: 1,941 Median Household Income: $22,385 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 15.0% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 33% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 33% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 221071

2,500 2,165

2,107

Households

2,000

1,500

1,000

49%

54%

19%

1,936

1,941

37%

34%

34%

19%

33%

500 32% 0

2010

27%

29%

33%

2012

2014

2016

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 221072

900

848

800

700

689

31%

600

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

40%

500 400

404 43%

32%

300 200 100 0

30%

17% 26%

Single or Cohabiting Poverty

51%

30%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Tensas Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Newellton

422

66%

St. Joseph

416

84%

Waterproof

276

85%

Town

Household Survival Budget, Tensas Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$430

$579

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$137

$383

Taxes

$202

$324

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,506

$4,211

$18,072

$50,532

$9.04

$25.27

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 221073

Number of Jobs

500 400

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$31,668

500+

$31,824

250-499 50-249

300 200

20-49 0-19

$26,496

100 0

$39,552 Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

600


ALICE IN TERREBONNE PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 113,220 • Number of Households: 40,102 Median Household Income: $46,026 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 6.3% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 30% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 18% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 221091

45,000 40,000

39,975

40,102

38,138

39,043

62%

62%

22%

21%

21%

16%

17%

18%

18%

2010

2012

2014

2016

35,000

Households

30,000 25,000

61%

52%

20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000

0

Poverty

ALICE

30%

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 221092

20,000

18,722

18,000 16,000 14,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

48%

12,003

12,000

9,377

10,000 56%

8,000 6,000

53%

38% 13%

4,000 2,000 0

Single or Cohabiting Poverty

36%

31%

14%

11% Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, Terrebonne Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT

Terrebonne Parish, 2016 Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Bayou Cane

7,883

44%

Bourg

949

51%

Chauvin

918

49%

Dulac

537

48%

Gray

1,916

59%

Houma

12,195

49%

Montegut

548

59%

Presquille

504

26%

Schriever

2,586

52%

Monthly Costs Housing

$639

$857

$–

$1,125

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$164

$446

Taxes

$264

$488

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,804

$4,903

$21,648

$58,836

$10.82

$29.42

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 221093

Number of Jobs

25,000 20,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$62,988

500+

$50,328

250-499 50-249

15,000 10,000 5,000 0

20-49

$39,672 $50,712

0-19

$35,592

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

30,000


ALICE IN UNION PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 22,460 • Number of Households: 8,194 Median Household Income: $37,049 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 6.6% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 31% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 24% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 221111

10,000 9,000

8,146

8,712

8,376

8,194

8,000

Households

7,000 6,000

57%

49%

52%

45%

5,000

4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0

25%

18%

2010

26%

31%

24%

25%

24%

2012

2014

2016

24%

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 221112

4,000

3,517 3,500 3,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

2,620

40%

2,500

2,057

2,000 1,500

55% 43% 43%

14%

1,000 500 0

43%

17% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

28% 17%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Union Parish, 2016 Town Bernice

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

549

73%

1,301

76%

Junction City

192

69%

Marion

337

63%

Farmerville

Household Survival Budget, Union Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$561

$737

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$154

$404

Taxes

$238

$379

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,690

$4,445

$20,280

$53,340

$10.14

$26.67

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 221113

Number of Jobs

2,000

1,500

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$21,744

500+

$61,404

250-499 50-249

1,000

500

0

$34,692

$31,368

20-49 0-19

$26,208

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

2,500


ALICE IN VERMILION PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 59,524 • Number of Households: 21,743 Median Household Income: $47,083 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 8.2% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 26% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 18% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 221131

25,000

22,122

21,659

21,623

21,743

66%

64%

59%

56%

16%

21%

23%

26%

18%

15%

18%

18%

2010

2012

2014

2016

Households

20,000

15,000

10,000

5,000

0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 221132

12,000

10,000

10,018

8,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

6,616

55%

6,000

5,109 64%

4,000

48%

27% 2,000

0

16%

35%

18%

20%

17%

Single or Cohabiting

Families With Children

65 and Over

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, Vermilion Parish

Vermilion Parish, 2016 Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Abbeville

4,511

62%

Delcambre

787

46%

Erath

850

54%

Gueydan

604

48%

Kaplan

1,772

53%

Maurice

550

34%

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$401

$634

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$133

$390

Taxes

$194

$343

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,465

$4,292

$17,580

$51,504

$8.79

$25.75

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 221133

7,000

Number of Jobs

6,000 5,000

4,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$67,992

500+

$39,936

250-499 50-249

$26,616

20-49

3,000

2,000

0-19 $27,696

$46,920

Small Firms

Large Firms

1,000

0

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

8,000


ALICE IN VERNON PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 52,101 • Number of Households: 17,789 Median Household Income: $46,561 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 8.2% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 38% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 13% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 221151

20,000

18,079

18,437

18,112

62%

57%

18,000

17,789

16,000

Households

14,000 12,000

65%

49%

10,000

8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 0

30%

38%

22%

27%

13%

11%

13%

13%

2010

2012

2014

2016

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 221152

9,000

8,197

8,000

7,000 6,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

6,267

48%

5,000

50%

4,000

3,000 2,000

3,325 42%

39%

1,000 0

47%

33%

10%

17%

Single or Cohabiting

Families With Children

Poverty

ALICE

14% 65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, Vernon Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT

Vernon Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Anacoco

399

37%

Fort Polk North

994

61%

Fort Polk South

2,258

61%

Hornbeck

176

59%

Leesville

2,522

65%

New Llano

923

54%

Pitkin

217

51%

Rosepine

692

59%

Simpson

204

22%

Town

Monthly Costs Housing

$532

$862

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$150

$421

Taxes

$230

$423

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,649

$4,631

$19,788

$55,572

$9.89

$27.79

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 221153

5,000 $34,140

Firm Size by Number of Employees

Number of Jobs

4,000 3,500

$36,300

500+

3,000 2,500

250-499 $28,512

2,000

$38,172

50-249 20-49 0-19

1,500 1,000

$25,260

500 0

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

4,500


ALICE IN WASHINGTON PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 46,367 • Number of Households: 17,487 Median Household Income: $31,013 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 13.1% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 30% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 28% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 221171

20,000 18,000

17,756

17,589

17,487

47%

49%

45%

42%

26%

22%

27%

30%

27%

29%

28%

28%

2010

2012

2014

2016

17,237

16,000

Households

14,000 12,000 10,000

8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 221172

9,000

8,332

8,000

7,000

36%

6,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

4,989

5,000 4,000

4,166 50%

38%

3,000

47%

2,000

14%

1,000 0

26%

Single or Cohabiting Poverty

29%

39%

21%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Washington Parish, 2016 Town Angie

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

109

27%

Bogalusa

4,792

72%

Franklinton

1,596

69%

185

66%

Varnado

Household Survival Budget, Washington Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$445

$599

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$139

$385

Taxes

$206

$331

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,527

$4,240

$18,324

$50,880

$9.16

$25.44

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 221173

5,000 $22,392

Firm Size by Number of Employees

Number of Jobs

4,000 3,500

$27,936

500+

3,000 2,500 2,000

250-499 20-49 0-19

1,500 1,000

50-249

$26,976 $37,320 $27,816

500 0

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

4,500


ALICE IN WEBSTER PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 40,335 • Number of Households: 15,806 Median Household Income: $31,920 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 8.3% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 31% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 25% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 221191

18,000

16,605

16,226

58%

55%

50%

20%

22%

26%

22%

23%

24%

25%

2010

2012

2014

2016

15,831

16,000

15,806

14,000

Households

12,000

44%

10,000 8,000 6,000

31%

4,000 2,000

0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 221192

8,000 7,000

7,004

6,000 43%

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

4,807

5,000 3,995

4,000 3,000

47% 45%

34%

2,000 1,000 0

20% 23% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

35%

35%

18%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Household Survival Budget, Webster Parish

Webster Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Cotton Valley

456

70%

Cullen

489

80%

Dixie Inn

123

71%

Doyline

299

58%

Minden

4,796

58%

Sarepta

344

46%

Sibley

530

57%

2,180

64%

Town

Springhill

2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$474

$585

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$142

$384

Taxes

$214

$326

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,567

$4,220

$18,804

$50,640

$9.40

$25.32

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 221193

Number of Jobs

6,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$21,156

5,000

500+

$47,760

250-499

4,000

50-249 20-49

3,000

0-19

$35,076

2,000 1,000 0

$40,092 $27,636

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

7,000


ALICE IN WEST BATON ROUGE PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 25,017 • Number of Households: 9,253 Median Household Income: $53,882 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 6.6% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 24% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 17% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 221211

10,000 9,000

9,253

9,016

9,030

63%

64%

27%

22%

19%

13%

15%

17%

17%

2010

2012

2014

2016

8,363

8,000

Households

7,000 6,000

60%

59%

5,000

4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0

Poverty

ALICE

24%

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 221212

5,000

4,500

4,474

4,000 3,500

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

3,000

60%

2,819

2,500 2,000

1,960

58%

1,500

1,000 500 0

59%

28%

12% 30%

31%

Families With Children

65 and Over

12% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

10% ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

West Baton Rouge Parish, 2016 Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Addis

1,665

32%

Brusly

1,012

30%

Erwinville

782

29%

Port Allen

2,251

54%

Household Survival Budget, West Baton Rouge Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$594

$842

$–

$1,125

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$158

$444

Taxes

$249

$483

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,738

$4,881

$20,856

$58,572

$10.43

$29.29

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 221213

Number of Jobs

6,000

Firm Size by Number of Employees

$90,576

5,000 4,000

1,000 0

250-499 50-249

3,000 2,000

500+

$45,036

$38,928

$50,676

20-49 0-19

$31,404

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

7,000


ALICE IN WEST CARROLL PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 11,370 • Number of Households: 4,185 Median Household Income: $36,670 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 11.1% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 29% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 20% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 221231

4,500

4,061

4,179

4,216

4,185

49%

51%

4,000 3,500

Households

3,000

52%

53%

26%

25%

29%

29%

22%

22%

22%

20%

2010

2012

2014

2016

2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 500

0

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 221232

1,800

1,678

1,600

1,348

1,400 1,200

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

1,159

51%

1,000

600

55%

47%

800 35%

19%

29%

400 200 0

34%

14% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

16%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

West Carroll Parish, 2016 Town

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Epps

221

64%

Forest

105

37%

Kilbourne

164

57%

Oak Grove

648

60%

Household Survival Budget, West Carroll Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$357

$579

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$128

$383

Taxes

$182

$324

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,404

$4,211

$16,848

$50,532

$8.42

$25.27

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 221233

1,200

$36,648

1,000

$25,596

Firm Size by Number of Employees 500+

250-499

800 600

50-249

$17,232

20-49 0-19

400 200 0

$23,808 $58,044 Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

1,400


ALICE IN WEST FELICIANA PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 15,384 • Number of Households: 3,879 Median Household Income: $53,364 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 10.5% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 31% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 18% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 221251

4,500

4,116

3,991

3,976

63%

58%

23%

21%

27%

15%

16%

15%

18%

2010

2012

2014

2016

4,000

3,879

3,500

Households

3,000

62%

2,500

51%

2,000 1,500 1,000 500

0

Poverty

ALICE

31%

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 221252

1,800 1,600

1,588

1,400 1,200

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

1,246 44%

1,045

1,000 800

60%

51%

600 400

49%

200 0

7% Single or Cohabiting Poverty

22%

16%

27%

24%

Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

West Feliciana Parish, 2016 Town St. Francisville

Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

677

55%

Household Survival Budget, West Feliciana Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$594

$842

$–

$1,125

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$158

$444

Taxes

$249

$483

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,738

$4,881

$20,856

$58,572

$10.43

$29.29

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 221253

Firm Size by Number of Employees

Number of Jobs

2,000

$55,548 1,500

500+

250-499

$25,152

50-249 20-49

1,000

0-19

$22,548

$81,660

500

$31,176 0

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

2,500


ALICE IN WINN PARISH 2016 Point-in-Time Data

Population: 14,695 • Number of Households: 5,440 Median Household Income: $32,063 (state average: $45,146) Unemployment Rate: 7.4% (state average: 7.0%) ALICE Households: 30% (state average: 29%) • Households in Poverty: 27% (state average: 19%)

How has the number of ALICE households changed over time?

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

What types of households are struggling? The way Americans live is changing. There are more different family and living combinations than ever before, including more adults living alone, with roommates, or with their parents. Families with children are changing: There are more non-married cohabiting parents, same-sex parents, and blended families with remarried parents. The number of senior households is also increasing. Yet all types of households continue to struggle: ALICE and povertylevel households exist across all of these living arrangements.

Households by Income, 2010 to 2016 221271

6,000

5,462

5,469

49%

53%

5,371

5,440

45%

43%

29%

30%

5,000

Households

4,000

3,000

2,000

28%

25%

1,000

0

23%

22%

26%

27%

2010

2012

2014

2016

Poverty

ALICE

Above ALICE Threshold

Household Types by Income, 2016 221272

3,000 2,554 2,500

2,000

Households

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed – households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the parish (the ALICE Threshold). Combined, the number of ALICE and poverty-level households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs. The number of households below the ALICE Threshold changes over time; households move in and out of poverty and ALICE status as their circumstances improve or worsen. The recovery, which started in 2010, has been uneven across the state. Conditions have improved for some families, but with rising costs, many still find themselves struggling.

41%

1,500

1,000

39%

1,416

1,470

45%

48%

10% 32%

500 45%

20% 0

Single or Cohabiting Poverty

20% Families With Children ALICE

65 and Over

Above ALICE Threshold


Why do so many households struggle? The cost of living continues to increase… The Household Survival Budget reflects the bare minimum that a household needs to live and work today. It does not include savings for emergencies or future goals like college. In 2016, costs were well above the Federal Poverty Level of $11,880 for a single adult and $24,300 for a family of four. Family costs increased by 33 percent statewide from 2010 to 2016, compared to 9 percent inflation nationally.

Winn Parish, 2016 Total HH

% ALICE & Poverty

Dodson

135

64%

Joyce

100

25%

St. Maurice

240

90%

1,753

69%

Town

Winnfield

Household Survival Budget, Winn Parish 2 ADULTS, 1 INFANT, 1 PRESCHOOLER

SINGLE ADULT Monthly Costs Housing

$477

$579

$–

$938

Food

$164

$542

Transportation

$322

$644

Health Care

$196

$726

Child Care

Technology

$55

$75

Miscellaneous

$143

$383

Taxes

$215

$324

Monthly Total ANNUAL TOTAL Hourly Wage

$1,572

$4,211

$18,864

$50,532

$9.43

$25.27

…and wages lag behind Employment and wages vary by location; firms generally pay higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living, although those wages still do not always cover basic needs. Employment and wages also vary by firm size: Large firms tend to offer higher wages and more job stability; smaller businesses can account for more jobs overall, especially in rural areas, but may pay less and offer less stability. Medium-size firms pay more but typically employ the fewest workers.

Private-Sector Employment by Firm Size With Average Annual Wages, 2016 221273

2,500 $50,988

Firm Size by Number of Employees

1,500

500+

$31,044

250-499 50-249

1,000

20-49

$42,408 $34,176

500

0

0-19

$29,772

Small Firms

Large Firms

Sources: 2016 Point-in-Time Data: American Community Survey. ALICE Demographics: American Community Survey; the ALICE Threshold. Budget: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Note: Municipal-level data on this page is 1 or 5-year averages for Incorporated Places. Totals will not match county-level numbers because some places cross county borders, data is not available for the smallest places, and county-level data is often 1-year estimates.

UNITED WAY ALICE REPORT – LOUISIANA

Number of Jobs

2,000


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$415

$435

$435

$435

$582

$582

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$135

$195

$212

$231

$343

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$198

$270

$179

$221

$230

$325

Monthly Total

$1,485

$2,142

$2,329

$2,427

$3,771

$4,215

Annual Total

$17,820

$25,704

$27,948

$29,124

$45,252

$50,580

Hourly Wage

$8.91

$12.85

$13.97

$14.56

$22.63

$25.29

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$544

$728

$728

$728

$892

$892

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$159

$285

$343

$352

$517

$545

Savings

$159

$285

$343

$352

$517

$545

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$390

$652

$674

$668

$989

$1,197

Monthly Total

$2,299

$4,073

$4,791

$4,896

$7,197

$7,737

Annual Total

$27,588

$48,876

$57,492

$58,752

$86,364

$92,844

Hourly Wage

$13.79

$24.44

$28.75

$29.38

$43.18

$46.42

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$477

$493

$493

$493

$579

$579

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$143

$202

$219

$239

$342

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$215

$284

$194

$237

$229

$324

Monthly Total

$1,572

$2,221

$2,409

$2,509

$3,766

$4,211

Annual Total

$18,864

$26,652

$28,908

$30,108

$45,192

$50,532

Hourly Wage

$9.43

$13.33

$14.45

$15.05

$22.60

$25.27

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$616

$724

$724

$724

$936

$936

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$166

$285

$343

$352

$522

$549

Savings

$166

$285

$343

$352

$522

$549

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$418

$650

$673

$667

$998

$1,208

Monthly Total

$2,413

$4,067

$4,786

$4,891

$7,260

$7,800

Annual Total

$28,956

$48,804

$57,432

$58,692

$87,120

$93,600

Hourly Wage

$14.48

$24.40

$28.72

$29.35

$43.56

$46.80

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$594

$728

$728

$728

$842

$842

$–

$–

$313

$604

$625

$1,125

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$158

$232

$255

$287

$386

$444

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$249

$354

$277

$362

$322

$483

Monthly Total

$1,738

$2,556

$2,801

$3,042

$4,241

$4,881

Annual Total

$20,856

$30,672

$33,612

$36,504

$50,892

$58,572

Hourly Wage

$10.43

$15.34

$16.81

$18.25

$25.45

$29.29

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 15 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$910

$1,053

$1,053

$1,053

$1,143

$1,143

$–

$–

$375

$625

$750

$1,333

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$196

$318

$383

$397

$557

$599

Savings

$196

$318

$383

$397

$557

$599

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$531

$778

$810

$818

$1,214

$1,485

Monthly Total

$2,880

$4,590

$5,404

$5,582

$7,898

$8,671

Annual Total

$34,560

$55,080

$64,848

$66,984

$94,776

$104,052

Hourly Wage

$17.28

$27.54

$32.42

$33.49

$47.39

$52.03

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 10 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 11 percent; and for a school-age child, by 7 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$447

$450

$450

$450

$596

$596

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$139

$196

$213

$233

$345

$385

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$207

$274

$183

$225

$233

$330

Monthly Total

$1,530

$2,162

$2,349

$2,448

$3,790

$4,236

Annual Total

$18,360

$25,944

$28,188

$29,376

$45,480

$50,832

Hourly Wage

$9.18

$12.97

$14.09

$14.69

$22.74

$25.42

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$563

$745

$745

$745

$1,018

$1,018

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$161

$287

$345

$354

$530

$558

Savings

$161

$287

$345

$354

$530

$558

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$397

$659

$680

$674

$1,059

$1,273

Monthly Total

$2,329

$4,101

$4,818

$4,923

$7,419

$7,965

Annual Total

$27,948

$49,212

$57,816

$59,076

$89,028

$95,580

Hourly Wage

$13.97

$24.61

$28.91

$29.54

$44.51

$47.79

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$363

$433

$433

$433

$579

$579

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$128

$194

$211

$231

$342

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$184

$269

$178

$220

$229

$324

Monthly Total

$1,412

$2,138

$2,325

$2,424

$3,766

$4,211

Annual Total

$16,944

$25,656

$27,900

$29,088

$45,192

$50,532

Hourly Wage

$8.47

$12.83

$13.95

$14.54

$22.60

$25.27

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$541

$724

$724

$724

$877

$877

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$159

$285

$343

$352

$516

$543

Savings

$159

$285

$343

$352

$516

$543

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$389

$650

$673

$667

$972

$1,180

Monthly Total

$2,295

$4,067

$4,786

$4,891

$7,163

$7,701

Annual Total

$27,540

$48,804

$57,432

$58,692

$85,956

$92,412

Hourly Wage

$13.77

$24.40

$28.72

$29.35

$42.98

$46.21

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$477

$500

$500

$500

$579

$579

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$143

$203

$220

$240

$342

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$215

$286

$196

$239

$229

$324

Monthly Total

$1,572

$2,231

$2,419

$2,519

$3,766

$4,211

Annual Total

$18,864

$26,772

$29,028

$30,228

$45,192

$50,532

Hourly Wage

$9.43

$13.39

$14.51

$15.11

$22.60

$25.27

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$625

$724

$724

$724

$980

$980

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$167

$285

$343

$352

$526

$554

Savings

$167

$285

$343

$352

$526

$554

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$421

$650

$673

$667

$1,037

$1,250

Monthly Total

$2,427

$4,067

$4,786

$4,891

$7,351

$7,896

Annual Total

$29,124

$48,804

$57,432

$58,692

$88,212

$94,752

Hourly Wage

$14.56

$24.40

$28.72

$29.35

$44.11

$47.38

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$477

$500

$500

$500

$579

$579

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$143

$203

$220

$240

$342

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$215

$286

$196

$239

$229

$324

Monthly Total

$1,572

$2,231

$2,419

$2,519

$3,766

$4,211

Annual Total

$18,864

$26,772

$29,028

$30,228

$45,192

$50,532

Hourly Wage

$9.43

$13.39

$14.51

$15.11

$22.60

$25.27

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$625

$724

$724

$724

$855

$855

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$167

$285

$343

$352

$514

$541

Savings

$167

$285

$343

$352

$514

$541

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$421

$650

$673

$667

$965

$1,171

Monthly Total

$2,427

$4,067

$4,786

$4,891

$7,130

$7,666

Annual Total

$29,124

$48,804

$57,432

$58,692

$85,560

$91,992

Hourly Wage

$14.56

$24.40

$28.72

$29.35

$42.78

$46.00

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$580

$692

$692

$692

$819

$819

$–

$–

$313

$604

$625

$1,125

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$156

$228

$250

$282

$382

$441

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$244

$344

$265

$349

$315

$475

Monthly Total

$1,717

$2,506

$2,748

$2,988

$4,207

$4,847

Annual Total

$20,604

$30,072

$32,976

$35,856

$50,484

$58,164

Hourly Wage

$10.30

$15.04

$16.49

$17.93

$25.24

$29.08

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 15 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$865

$1,024

$1,024

$1,024

$1,073

$1,073

$–

$–

$375

$625

$750

$1,333

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$191

$315

$380

$394

$550

$592

Savings

$191

$315

$380

$394

$550

$592

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$514

$766

$800

$809

$1,193

$1,463

Monthly Total

$2,808

$4,543

$5,359

$5,538

$7,793

$8,565

Annual Total

$33,696

$54,516

$64,308

$66,456

$93,516

$102,780

Hourly Wage

$16.85

$27.26

$32.15

$33.23

$46.76

$51.39

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 10 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 11 percent; and for a school-age child, by 7 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$580

$692

$692

$692

$819

$819

$–

$–

$313

$604

$625

$1,125

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$156

$228

$250

$282

$382

$441

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$244

$344

$265

$349

$315

$475

Monthly Total

$1,717

$2,506

$2,748

$2,988

$4,207

$4,847

Annual Total

$20,604

$30,072

$32,976

$35,856

$50,484

$58,164

Hourly Wage

$10.30

$15.04

$16.49

$17.93

$25.24

$29.08

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 15 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$865

$1,024

$1,024

$1,024

$1,002

$1,002

$–

$–

$375

$625

$750

$1,333

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$191

$315

$380

$394

$543

$585

Savings

$191

$315

$380

$394

$543

$585

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$514

$766

$800

$809

$1,166

$1,432

Monthly Total

$2,808

$4,543

$5,359

$5,538

$7,681

$8,449

Annual Total

$33,696

$54,516

$64,308

$66,456

$92,172

$101,388

Hourly Wage

$16.85

$27.26

$32.15

$33.23

$46.09

$50.69

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 10 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 12 percent; and for a school-age child, by 7 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$470

$604

$604

$604

$762

$762

$–

$–

$313

$604

$625

$1,125

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$142

$217

$238

$270

$375

$433

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$213

$321

$235

$318

$297

$454

Monthly Total

$1,562

$2,384

$2,618

$2,857

$4,125

$4,761

Annual Total

$18,744

$28,608

$31,416

$34,284

$49,500

$57,132

Hourly Wage

$9.37

$14.30

$15.71

$17.14

$24.75

$28.57

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 15 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$755

$953

$953

$953

$1,109

$1,109

$–

$–

$375

$625

$750

$1,333

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$180

$308

$373

$387

$554

$595

Savings

$180

$308

$373

$387

$554

$595

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$472

$739

$776

$785

$1,168

$1,440

Monthly Total

$2,634

$4,431

$5,250

$5,429

$7,812

$8,584

Annual Total

$31,608

$53,172

$63,000

$65,148

$93,744

$103,008

Hourly Wage

$15.80

$26.59

$31.50

$32.57

$46.87

$51.50

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 10 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 11 percent; and for a school-age child, by 7 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$477

$500

$500

$500

$579

$579

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$143

$203

$220

$240

$342

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$215

$286

$196

$239

$229

$324

Monthly Total

$1,572

$2,231

$2,419

$2,519

$3,766

$4,211

Annual Total

$18,864

$26,772

$29,028

$30,228

$45,192

$50,532

Hourly Wage

$9.43

$13.39

$14.51

$15.11

$22.60

$25.27

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$625

$724

$724

$724

$888

$888

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$167

$285

$343

$352

$517

$544

Savings

$167

$285

$343

$352

$517

$544

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$421

$650

$673

$667

$979

$1,187

Monthly Total

$2,427

$4,067

$4,786

$4,891

$7,183

$7,721

Annual Total

$29,124

$48,804

$57,432

$58,692

$86,196

$92,652

Hourly Wage

$14.56

$24.40

$28.72

$29.35

$43.10

$46.33

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$470

$604

$604

$604

$762

$762

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$142

$216

$233

$253

$365

$407

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$213

$316

$225

$275

$275

$388

Monthly Total

$1,562

$2,378

$2,565

$2,672

$4,018

$4,482

Annual Total

$18,744

$28,536

$30,780

$32,064

$48,216

$53,784

Hourly Wage

$9.37

$14.27

$15.39

$16.03

$24.11

$26.89

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 13 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$755

$953

$953

$953

$973

$973

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$180

$308

$366

$375

$525

$553

Savings

$180

$308

$366

$375

$525

$553

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$472

$739

$751

$742

$1,059

$1,265

Monthly Total

$2,634

$4,431

$5,139

$5,241

$7,364

$7,902

Annual Total

$31,608

$53,172

$61,668

$62,892

$88,368

$94,824

Hourly Wage

$15.80

$26.59

$30.83

$31.45

$44.18

$47.41

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$477

$500

$500

$500

$579

$579

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$143

$203

$220

$240

$342

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$215

$286

$196

$239

$229

$324

Monthly Total

$1,572

$2,231

$2,419

$2,519

$3,766

$4,211

Annual Total

$18,864

$26,772

$29,028

$30,228

$45,192

$50,532

Hourly Wage

$9.43

$13.39

$14.51

$15.11

$22.60

$25.27

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$625

$724

$724

$724

$861

$861

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$167

$285

$343

$352

$514

$542

Savings

$167

$285

$343

$352

$514

$542

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$421

$650

$673

$667

$970

$1,176

Monthly Total

$2,427

$4,067

$4,786

$4,891

$7,141

$7,679

Annual Total

$29,124

$48,804

$57,432

$58,692

$85,692

$92,148

Hourly Wage

$14.56

$24.40

$28.72

$29.35

$42.85

$46.07

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$456

$458

$458

$458

$579

$579

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$140

$197

$215

$234

$342

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$209

$275

$185

$227

$229

$324

Monthly Total

$1,542

$2,172

$2,361

$2,459

$3,766

$4,211

Annual Total

$18,504

$26,064

$28,332

$29,508

$45,192

$50,532

Hourly Wage

$9.25

$13.03

$14.17

$14.75

$22.60

$25.27

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$573

$724

$724

$724

$868

$868

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$162

$285

$343

$352

$515

$543

Savings

$162

$285

$343

$352

$515

$543

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$401

$650

$673

$667

$976

$1,183

Monthly Total

$2,345

$4,067

$4,786

$4,891

$7,156

$7,695

Annual Total

$28,140

$48,804

$57,432

$58,692

$85,872

$92,340

Hourly Wage

$14.07

$24.40

$28.72

$29.35

$42.94

$46.17

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$430

$433

$433

$433

$579

$579

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$137

$194

$211

$231

$342

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$202

$269

$178

$220

$229

$324

Monthly Total

$1,506

$2,138

$2,325

$2,424

$3,766

$4,211

Annual Total

$18,072

$25,656

$27,900

$29,088

$45,192

$50,532

Hourly Wage

$9.04

$12.83

$13.95

$14.54

$22.60

$25.27

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$541

$724

$724

$724

$854

$854

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$159

$285

$343

$352

$514

$541

Savings

$159

$285

$343

$352

$514

$541

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$389

$650

$673

$667

$1,019

$1,227

Monthly Total

$2,295

$4,067

$4,786

$4,891

$7,183

$7,721

Annual Total

$27,540

$48,804

$57,432

$58,692

$86,196

$92,652

Hourly Wage

$13.77

$24.40

$28.72

$29.35

$43.10

$46.33

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$580

$692

$692

$692

$819

$819

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$156

$227

$245

$265

$373

$415

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$244

$340

$252

$305

$291

$408

Monthly Total

$1,717

$2,501

$2,692

$2,802

$4,099

$4,567

Annual Total

$20,604

$30,012

$32,304

$33,624

$49,188

$54,804

Hourly Wage

$10.30

$15.01

$16.15

$16.81

$24.59

$27.40

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 13 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 12 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$865

$1,024

$1,024

$1,024

$927

$927

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$191

$315

$373

$382

$521

$548

Savings

$191

$315

$373

$382

$521

$548

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$514

$766

$775

$765

$1,021

$1,222

Monthly Total

$2,808

$4,543

$5,248

$5,349

$7,272

$7,803

Annual Total

$33,696

$54,516

$62,976

$64,188

$87,264

$93,636

Hourly Wage

$16.85

$27.26

$31.49

$32.09

$43.63

$46.82

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$594

$728

$728

$728

$842

$842

$–

$–

$313

$604

$625

$1,125

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$158

$232

$255

$287

$386

$444

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$249

$354

$277

$362

$322

$483

Monthly Total

$1,738

$2,556

$2,801

$3,042

$4,241

$4,881

Annual Total

$20,856

$30,672

$33,612

$36,504

$50,892

$58,572

Hourly Wage

$10.43

$15.34

$16.81

$18.25

$25.45

$29.29

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 15 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$910

$1,053

$1,053

$1,053

$1,136

$1,136

$–

$–

$375

$625

$750

$1,333

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$196

$318

$383

$397

$556

$598

Savings

$196

$318

$383

$397

$556

$598

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$531

$778

$810

$818

$1,219

$1,490

Monthly Total

$2,880

$4,590

$5,404

$5,582

$7,894

$8,667

Annual Total

$34,560

$55,080

$64,848

$66,984

$94,728

$104,004

Hourly Wage

$17.28

$27.54

$32.42

$33.49

$47.36

$52.00

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 10 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 11 percent; and for a school-age child, by 7 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$443

$446

$446

$446

$579

$579

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$139

$196

$213

$233

$342

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$206

$272

$182

$224

$229

$324

Monthly Total

$1,525

$2,156

$2,344

$2,443

$3,766

$4,211

Annual Total

$18,300

$25,872

$28,128

$29,316

$45,192

$50,532

Hourly Wage

$9.15

$12.94

$14.06

$14.66

$22.60

$25.27

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$558

$724

$724

$724

$884

$884

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$160

$285

$343

$352

$517

$544

Savings

$160

$285

$343

$352

$517

$544

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$395

$650

$673

$667

$956

$1,163

Monthly Total

$2,320

$4,067

$4,786

$4,891

$7,156

$7,693

Annual Total

$27,840

$48,804

$57,432

$58,692

$85,872

$92,316

Hourly Wage

$13.92

$24.40

$28.72

$29.35

$42.94

$46.16

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$594

$728

$728

$728

$842

$842

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$158

$232

$249

$270

$376

$418

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$249

$349

$265

$318

$298

$416

Monthly Total

$1,738

$2,551

$2,745

$2,856

$4,132

$4,601

Annual Total

$20,856

$30,612

$32,940

$34,272

$49,584

$55,212

Hourly Wage

$10.43

$15.31

$16.47

$17.14

$24.79

$27.61

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 13 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 12 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$910

$1,053

$1,053

$1,053

$1,028

$1,028

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$196

$318

$376

$385

$531

$559

Savings

$196

$318

$376

$385

$531

$559

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$531

$778

$785

$775

$1,035

$1,239

Monthly Total

$2,880

$4,590

$5,293

$5,394

$7,407

$7,943

Annual Total

$34,560

$55,080

$63,516

$64,728

$88,884

$95,316

Hourly Wage

$17.28

$27.54

$31.76

$32.36

$44.44

$47.66

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$357

$433

$433

$433

$579

$579

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$128

$194

$211

$231

$342

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$182

$269

$178

$220

$229

$324

Monthly Total

$1,404

$2,138

$2,325

$2,424

$3,766

$4,211

Annual Total

$16,848

$25,656

$27,900

$29,088

$45,192

$50,532

Hourly Wage

$8.42

$12.83

$13.95

$14.54

$22.60

$25.27

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$541

$724

$724

$724

$889

$889

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$159

$285

$343

$352

$517

$545

Savings

$159

$285

$343

$352

$517

$545

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$389

$650

$673

$667

$988

$1,196

Monthly Total

$2,295

$4,067

$4,786

$4,891

$7,193

$7,733

Annual Total

$27,540

$48,804

$57,432

$58,692

$86,316

$92,796

Hourly Wage

$13.77

$24.40

$28.72

$29.35

$43.16

$46.40

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$430

$433

$433

$433

$579

$579

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$137

$194

$211

$231

$342

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$202

$269

$178

$220

$229

$324

Monthly Total

$1,506

$2,138

$2,325

$2,424

$3,766

$4,211

Annual Total

$18,072

$25,656

$27,900

$29,088

$45,192

$50,532

Hourly Wage

$9.04

$12.83

$13.95

$14.54

$22.60

$25.27

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$541

$724

$724

$724

$768

$768

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$159

$285

$343

$352

$505

$533

Savings

$159

$285

$343

$352

$505

$533

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$389

$650

$673

$667

$937

$1,139

Monthly Total

$2,295

$4,067

$4,786

$4,891

$6,997

$7,531

Annual Total

$27,540

$48,804

$57,432

$58,692

$83,964

$90,372

Hourly Wage

$13.77

$24.40

$28.72

$29.35

$41.98

$45.19

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 10 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$553

$580

$580

$580

$726

$726

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$153

$213

$230

$250

$361

$403

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$236

$309

$218

$266

$266

$375

Monthly Total

$1,679

$2,344

$2,531

$2,636

$3,969

$4,429

Annual Total

$20,148

$28,128

$30,372

$31,632

$47,628

$53,148

Hourly Wage

$10.07

$14.06

$15.19

$15.82

$23.81

$26.57

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 13 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$725

$908

$908

$908

$852

$852

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$177

$303

$361

$370

$513

$541

Savings

$177

$303

$361

$370

$513

$541

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$460

$722

$736

$727

$983

$1,184

Monthly Total

$2,586

$4,359

$5,069

$5,171

$7,143

$7,676

Annual Total

$31,032

$52,308

$60,828

$62,052

$85,716

$92,112

Hourly Wage

$15.52

$26.15

$30.41

$31.03

$42.86

$46.06

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$525

$529

$529

$529

$708

$708

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$149

$207

$224

$243

$359

$400

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$228

$296

$204

$249

$261

$369

Monthly Total

$1,639

$2,274

$2,460

$2,561

$3,944

$4,402

Annual Total

$19,668

$27,288

$29,520

$30,732

$47,328

$52,824

Hourly Wage

$9.83

$13.64

$14.76

$15.37

$23.66

$26.41

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 13 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$661

$885

$885

$885

$932

$932

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$171

$301

$359

$368

$521

$549

Savings

$171

$301

$359

$368

$521

$549

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$435

$713

$728

$719

$1,019

$1,225

Monthly Total

$2,485

$4,323

$5,034

$5,136

$7,275

$7,813

Annual Total

$29,820

$51,876

$60,408

$61,632

$87,300

$93,756

Hourly Wage

$14.91

$25.94

$30.20

$30.82

$43.65

$46.88

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$459

$474

$474

$474

$635

$635

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$141

$200

$217

$236

$349

$390

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$210

$281

$189

$231

$243

$343

Monthly Total

$1,547

$2,197

$2,383

$2,481

$3,843

$4,293

Annual Total

$18,564

$26,364

$28,596

$29,772

$46,116

$51,516

Hourly Wage

$9.28

$13.18

$14.30

$14.89

$23.06

$25.76

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$593

$794

$794

$794

$1,075

$1,075

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$164

$292

$350

$359

$536

$563

Savings

$164

$292

$350

$359

$536

$563

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$409

$678

$697

$690

$1,074

$1,289

Monthly Total

$2,377

$4,179

$4,894

$4,998

$7,503

$8,048

Annual Total

$28,524

$50,148

$58,728

$59,976

$90,036

$96,576

Hourly Wage

$14.26

$25.07

$29.36

$29.99

$45.02

$48.29

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$430

$433

$433

$433

$579

$579

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$137

$194

$211

$231

$342

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$202

$269

$178

$220

$229

$324

Monthly Total

$1,506

$2,138

$2,325

$2,424

$3,766

$4,211

Annual Total

$18,072

$25,656

$27,900

$29,088

$45,192

$50,532

Hourly Wage

$9.04

$12.83

$13.95

$14.54

$22.60

$25.27

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$541

$724

$724

$724

$846

$846

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$159

$285

$343

$352

$513

$540

Savings

$159

$285

$343

$352

$513

$540

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$389

$650

$673

$667

$985

$1,191

Monthly Total

$2,295

$4,067

$4,786

$4,891

$7,139

$7,675

Annual Total

$27,540

$48,804

$57,432

$58,692

$85,668

$92,100

Hourly Wage

$13.77

$24.40

$28.72

$29.35

$42.83

$46.05

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$669

$787

$787

$787

$963

$963

$–

$–

$313

$604

$625

$1,125

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$168

$240

$262

$295

$403

$460

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$274

$372

$297

$383

$376

$526

Monthly Total

$1,848

$2,641

$2,887

$3,130

$4,433

$5,061

Annual Total

$22,176

$31,692

$34,644

$37,560

$53,196

$60,732

Hourly Wage

$11.09

$15.85

$17.32

$18.78

$26.60

$30.37

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 15 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$984

$1,204

$1,204

$1,204

$1,300

$1,300

$–

$–

$375

$625

$750

$1,333

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$203

$333

$398

$412

$573

$614

Savings

$203

$333

$398

$412

$573

$614

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$560

$836

$861

$868

$1,261

$1,533

Monthly Total

$2,997

$4,829

$5,636

$5,813

$8,134

$8,906

Annual Total

$35,964

$57,948

$67,632

$69,756

$97,608

$106,872

Hourly Wage

$17.98

$28.97

$33.82

$34.88

$48.80

$53.44

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 10 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 11 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$477

$500

$500

$500

$579

$579

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$143

$203

$220

$240

$342

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$215

$286

$196

$239

$229

$324

Monthly Total

$1,572

$2,231

$2,419

$2,519

$3,766

$4,211

Annual Total

$18,864

$26,772

$29,028

$30,228

$45,192

$50,532

Hourly Wage

$9.43

$13.39

$14.51

$15.11

$22.60

$25.27

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$625

$724

$724

$724

$944

$944

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$167

$285

$343

$352

$523

$550

Savings

$167

$285

$343

$352

$523

$550

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$421

$650

$673

$667

$1,013

$1,224

Monthly Total

$2,427

$4,067

$4,786

$4,891

$7,285

$7,826

Annual Total

$29,124

$48,804

$57,432

$58,692

$87,420

$93,912

Hourly Wage

$14.56

$24.40

$28.72

$29.35

$43.71

$46.96

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$605

$758

$758

$758

$877

$877

$–

$–

$313

$604

$625

$1,125

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$159

$236

$259

$291

$390

$448

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$252

$362

$288

$373

$333

$495

Monthly Total

$1,753

$2,598

$2,846

$3,087

$4,291

$4,932

Annual Total

$21,036

$31,176

$34,152

$37,044

$51,492

$59,184

Hourly Wage

$10.52

$15.59

$17.08

$18.52

$25.75

$29.59

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 15 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$948

$1,096

$1,096

$1,096

$1,199

$1,199

$–

$–

$375

$625

$750

$1,333

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$199

$322

$387

$401

$563

$604

Savings

$199

$322

$387

$401

$563

$604

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$546

$794

$824

$832

$1,242

$1,515

Monthly Total

$2,939

$4,657

$5,469

$5,647

$7,994

$8,767

Annual Total

$35,268

$55,884

$65,628

$67,764

$95,928

$105,204

Hourly Wage

$17.63

$27.94

$32.81

$33.88

$47.96

$52.60

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 10 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 11 percent; and for a school-age child, by 7 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$639

$643

$643

$643

$857

$857

$–

$–

$313

$604

$625

$1,125

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$164

$222

$243

$276

$387

$446

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$264

$333

$248

$332

$327

$488

Monthly Total

$1,804

$2,440

$2,675

$2,916

$4,262

$4,903

Annual Total

$21,648

$29,280

$32,100

$34,992

$51,144

$58,836

Hourly Wage

$10.82

$14.64

$16.05

$17.50

$25.57

$29.42

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 15 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$804

$1,071

$1,071

$1,071

$1,170

$1,170

$–

$–

$375

$625

$750

$1,333

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$185

$319

$385

$399

$560

$601

Savings

$185

$319

$385

$399

$560

$601

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$490

$785

$816

$824

$1,198

$1,470

Monthly Total

$2,711

$4,617

$5,432

$5,610

$7,915

$8,687

Annual Total

$32,532

$55,404

$65,184

$67,320

$94,980

$104,244

Hourly Wage

$16.27

$27.70

$32.59

$33.66

$47.49

$52.12

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 10 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 11 percent; and for a school-age child, by 7 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$430

$433

$433

$433

$579

$579

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$137

$194

$211

$231

$342

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$202

$269

$178

$220

$229

$324

Monthly Total

$1,506

$2,138

$2,325

$2,424

$3,766

$4,211

Annual Total

$18,072

$25,656

$27,900

$29,088

$45,192

$50,532

Hourly Wage

$9.04

$12.83

$13.95

$14.54

$22.60

$25.27

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$541

$724

$724

$724

$891

$891

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$159

$285

$343

$352

$517

$545

Savings

$159

$285

$343

$352

$517

$545

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$389

$650

$673

$667

$1,022

$1,231

Monthly Total

$2,295

$4,067

$4,786

$4,891

$7,229

$7,770

Annual Total

$27,540

$48,804

$57,432

$58,692

$86,748

$93,240

Hourly Wage

$13.77

$24.40

$28.72

$29.35

$43.37

$46.62

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$558

$561

$561

$561

$683

$683

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$153

$211

$228

$248

$355

$397

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$237

$304

$213

$260

$255

$360

Monthly Total

$1,685

$2,318

$2,505

$2,609

$3,909

$4,365

Annual Total

$20,220

$27,816

$30,060

$31,308

$46,908

$52,380

Hourly Wage

$10.11

$13.91

$15.03

$15.65

$23.45

$26.19

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 13 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$701

$854

$854

$854

$1,078

$1,078

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$175

$298

$356

$365

$536

$564

Savings

$175

$298

$356

$365

$536

$564

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$451

$701

$717

$709

$1,103

$1,318

Monthly Total

$2,549

$4,274

$4,986

$5,089

$7,535

$8,082

Annual Total

$30,588

$51,288

$59,832

$61,068

$90,420

$96,984

Hourly Wage

$15.29

$25.64

$29.92

$30.53

$45.21

$48.49

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$594

$728

$728

$728

$842

$842

$–

$–

$313

$604

$625

$1,125

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$158

$232

$255

$287

$386

$444

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$249

$354

$277

$362

$322

$483

Monthly Total

$1,738

$2,556

$2,801

$3,042

$4,241

$4,881

Annual Total

$20,856

$30,672

$33,612

$36,504

$50,892

$58,572

Hourly Wage

$10.43

$15.34

$16.81

$18.25

$25.45

$29.29

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 15 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$910

$1,053

$1,053

$1,053

$1,120

$1,120

$–

$–

$375

$625

$750

$1,333

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$196

$318

$383

$397

$555

$596

Savings

$196

$318

$383

$397

$555

$596

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$531

$778

$810

$818

$1,185

$1,455

Monthly Total

$2,880

$4,590

$5,404

$5,582

$7,842

$8,612

Annual Total

$34,560

$55,080

$64,848

$66,984

$94,104

$103,344

Hourly Wage

$17.28

$27.54

$32.42

$33.49

$47.05

$51.67

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 10 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 11 percent; and for a school-age child, by 7 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$430

$433

$433

$433

$579

$579

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$137

$194

$211

$231

$342

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$202

$269

$178

$220

$229

$324

Monthly Total

$1,506

$2,138

$2,325

$2,424

$3,766

$4,211

Annual Total

$18,072

$25,656

$27,900

$29,088

$45,192

$50,532

Hourly Wage

$9.04

$12.83

$13.95

$14.54

$22.60

$25.27

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$541

$724

$724

$724

$794

$794

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$159

$285

$343

$352

$508

$535

Savings

$159

$285

$343

$352

$508

$535

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$389

$650

$673

$667

$944

$1,148

Monthly Total

$2,295

$4,067

$4,786

$4,891

$7,036

$7,570

Annual Total

$27,540

$48,804

$57,432

$58,692

$84,432

$90,840

Hourly Wage

$13.77

$24.40

$28.72

$29.35

$42.22

$45.42

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$451

$454

$454

$454

$579

$579

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$140

$197

$214

$234

$342

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$208

$274

$184

$226

$229

$324

Monthly Total

$1,536

$2,167

$2,355

$2,454

$3,766

$4,211

Annual Total

$18,432

$26,004

$28,260

$29,448

$45,192

$50,532

Hourly Wage

$9.22

$13.00

$14.13

$14.72

$22.60

$25.27

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$568

$724

$724

$724

$911

$911

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$161

$285

$343

$352

$519

$547

Savings

$161

$285

$343

$352

$519

$547

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$399

$650

$673

$667

$1,002

$1,211

Monthly Total

$2,336

$4,067

$4,786

$4,891

$7,233

$7,774

Annual Total

$28,032

$48,804

$57,432

$58,692

$86,796

$93,288

Hourly Wage

$14.02

$24.40

$28.72

$29.35

$43.40

$46.64

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$488

$491

$491

$491

$651

$651

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$144

$202

$219

$238

$351

$392

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$218

$285

$194

$236

$247

$349

Monthly Total

$1,587

$2,220

$2,407

$2,505

$3,865

$4,317

Annual Total

$19,044

$26,640

$28,884

$30,060

$46,380

$51,804

Hourly Wage

$9.52

$13.32

$14.44

$15.03

$23.19

$25.90

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$614

$814

$814

$814

$1,008

$1,008

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$166

$294

$352

$361

$529

$557

Savings

$166

$294

$352

$361

$529

$557

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$417

$685

$704

$696

$1,063

$1,275

Monthly Total

$2,410

$4,210

$4,925

$5,028

$7,411

$7,955

Annual Total

$28,920

$50,520

$59,100

$60,336

$88,932

$95,460

Hourly Wage

$14.46

$25.26

$29.55

$30.17

$44.47

$47.73

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$669

$787

$787

$787

$963

$963

$–

$–

$313

$604

$625

$1,125

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$168

$240

$262

$295

$403

$460

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$274

$372

$297

$383

$376

$526

Monthly Total

$1,848

$2,641

$2,887

$3,130

$4,433

$5,061

Annual Total

$22,176

$31,692

$34,644

$37,560

$53,196

$60,732

Hourly Wage

$11.09

$15.85

$17.32

$18.78

$26.60

$30.37

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 15 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$984

$1,204

$1,204

$1,204

$1,475

$1,475

$–

$–

$375

$625

$750

$1,333

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$203

$333

$398

$412

$590

$632

Savings

$203

$333

$398

$412

$590

$632

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$560

$836

$861

$868

$1,420

$1,704

Monthly Total

$2,997

$4,829

$5,636

$5,813

$8,502

$9,288

Annual Total

$35,964

$57,948

$67,632

$69,756

$102,024

$111,456

Hourly Wage

$17.98

$28.97

$33.82

$34.88

$51.01

$55.73

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 10 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 11 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$561

$565

$565

$565

$737

$737

$–

$–

$313

$604

$625

$1,125

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$154

$212

$233

$265

$372

$429

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$238

$311

$224

$304

$289

$445

Monthly Total

$1,690

$2,330

$2,563

$2,799

$4,089

$4,723

Annual Total

$20,280

$27,960

$30,756

$33,588

$49,068

$56,676

Hourly Wage

$10.14

$13.98

$15.38

$16.79

$24.53

$28.34

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 16 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 14 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$706

$921

$921

$921

$986

$986

$–

$–

$375

$625

$750

$1,333

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$175

$304

$370

$384

$541

$583

Savings

$175

$304

$370

$384

$541

$583

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$453

$727

$765

$775

$1,130

$1,397

Monthly Total

$2,556

$4,379

$5,201

$5,381

$7,625

$8,394

Annual Total

$30,672

$52,548

$62,412

$64,572

$91,500

$100,728

Hourly Wage

$15.34

$26.27

$31.21

$32.29

$45.75

$50.36

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 10 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 12 percent; and for a school-age child, by 7 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$669

$787

$787

$787

$963

$963

$–

$–

$313

$604

$625

$1,125

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$168

$240

$262

$295

$403

$460

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$274

$372

$297

$383

$376

$526

Monthly Total

$1,848

$2,641

$2,887

$3,130

$4,433

$5,061

Annual Total

$22,176

$31,692

$34,644

$37,560

$53,196

$60,732

Hourly Wage

$11.09

$15.85

$17.32

$18.78

$26.60

$30.37

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 15 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$984

$1,204

$1,204

$1,204

$1,357

$1,357

$–

$–

$375

$625

$750

$1,333

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$203

$333

$398

$412

$578

$620

Savings

$203

$333

$398

$412

$578

$620

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$560

$836

$861

$868

$1,281

$1,556

Monthly Total

$2,997

$4,829

$5,636

$5,813

$8,221

$8,998

Annual Total

$35,964

$57,948

$67,632

$69,756

$98,652

$107,976

Hourly Wage

$17.98

$28.97

$33.82

$34.88

$49.33

$53.99

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 10 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 11 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$594

$728

$728

$728

$842

$842

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$158

$232

$249

$270

$376

$418

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$249

$349

$265

$318

$298

$416

Monthly Total

$1,738

$2,551

$2,745

$2,856

$4,132

$4,601

Annual Total

$20,856

$30,612

$32,940

$34,272

$49,584

$55,212

Hourly Wage

$10.43

$15.31

$16.47

$17.14

$24.79

$27.61

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 13 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 12 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$910

$1,053

$1,053

$1,053

$1,056

$1,056

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$196

$318

$376

$385

$534

$561

Savings

$196

$318

$376

$385

$534

$561

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$531

$778

$785

$775

$1,075

$1,282

Monthly Total

$2,880

$4,590

$5,293

$5,394

$7,481

$8,018

Annual Total

$34,560

$55,080

$63,516

$64,728

$89,772

$96,216

Hourly Wage

$17.28

$27.54

$31.76

$32.36

$44.89

$48.11

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$553

$580

$580

$580

$726

$726

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$153

$213

$230

$250

$361

$403

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$236

$309

$218

$266

$266

$375

Monthly Total

$1,679

$2,344

$2,531

$2,636

$3,969

$4,429

Annual Total

$20,148

$28,128

$30,372

$31,632

$47,628

$53,148

Hourly Wage

$10.07

$14.06

$15.19

$15.82

$23.81

$26.57

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 13 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$725

$908

$908

$908

$1,021

$1,021

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$177

$303

$361

$370

$530

$558

Savings

$177

$303

$361

$370

$530

$558

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$460

$722

$736

$727

$1,095

$1,306

Monthly Total

$2,586

$4,359

$5,069

$5,171

$7,458

$8,001

Annual Total

$31,032

$52,308

$60,828

$62,052

$89,496

$96,012

Hourly Wage

$15.52

$26.15

$30.41

$31.03

$44.75

$48.01

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$434

$437

$437

$437

$585

$585

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$137

$195

$212

$231

$343

$384

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$203

$270

$179

$221

$230

$326

Monthly Total

$1,511

$2,144

$2,331

$2,429

$3,774

$4,220

Annual Total

$18,132

$25,728

$27,972

$29,148

$45,288

$50,640

Hourly Wage

$9.07

$12.86

$13.99

$14.57

$22.64

$25.32

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$546

$731

$731

$731

$837

$837

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$159

$285

$343

$353

$512

$539

Savings

$159

$285

$343

$353

$512

$539

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$391

$653

$675

$669

$962

$1,167

Monthly Total

$2,302

$4,077

$4,795

$4,902

$7,105

$7,640

Annual Total

$27,624

$48,924

$57,540

$58,824

$85,260

$91,680

Hourly Wage

$13.81

$24.46

$28.77

$29.41

$42.63

$45.84

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$430

$433

$433

$433

$579

$579

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$137

$194

$211

$231

$342

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$202

$269

$178

$220

$229

$324

Monthly Total

$1,506

$2,138

$2,325

$2,424

$3,766

$4,211

Annual Total

$18,072

$25,656

$27,900

$29,088

$45,192

$50,532

Hourly Wage

$9.04

$12.83

$13.95

$14.54

$22.60

$25.27

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$541

$724

$724

$724

$911

$911

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$159

$285

$343

$352

$519

$547

Savings

$159

$285

$343

$352

$519

$547

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$389

$650

$673

$667

$990

$1,200

Monthly Total

$2,295

$4,067

$4,786

$4,891

$7,221

$7,763

Annual Total

$27,540

$48,804

$57,432

$58,692

$86,652

$93,156

Hourly Wage

$13.77

$24.40

$28.72

$29.35

$43.33

$46.58

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$454

$500

$500

$500

$579

$579

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$140

$203

$220

$240

$342

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$209

$286

$196

$239

$229

$324

Monthly Total

$1,540

$2,231

$2,419

$2,519

$3,766

$4,211

Annual Total

$18,480

$26,772

$29,028

$30,228

$45,192

$50,532

Hourly Wage

$9.24

$13.39

$14.51

$15.11

$22.60

$25.27

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$625

$724

$724

$724

$900

$900

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$167

$285

$343

$352

$518

$546

Savings

$167

$285

$343

$352

$518

$546

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$421

$650

$673

$667

$1,004

$1,213

Monthly Total

$2,427

$4,067

$4,786

$4,891

$7,222

$7,763

Annual Total

$29,124

$48,804

$57,432

$58,692

$86,664

$93,156

Hourly Wage

$14.56

$24.40

$28.72

$29.35

$43.33

$46.58

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$669

$787

$787

$787

$963

$963

$–

$–

$313

$604

$625

$1,125

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$168

$240

$262

$295

$403

$460

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$274

$372

$297

$383

$376

$526

Monthly Total

$1,848

$2,641

$2,887

$3,130

$4,433

$5,061

Annual Total

$22,176

$31,692

$34,644

$37,560

$53,196

$60,732

Hourly Wage

$11.09

$15.85

$17.32

$18.78

$26.60

$30.37

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 15 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$984

$1,204

$1,204

$1,204

$1,047

$1,047

$–

$–

$375

$625

$750

$1,333

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$203

$333

$398

$412

$547

$589

Savings

$203

$333

$398

$412

$547

$589

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$560

$836

$861

$868

$1,134

$1,393

Monthly Total

$2,997

$4,829

$5,636

$5,813

$7,702

$8,463

Annual Total

$35,964

$57,948

$67,632

$69,756

$92,424

$101,556

Hourly Wage

$17.98

$28.97

$33.82

$34.88

$46.21

$50.78

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 10 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 11 percent; and for a school-age child, by 7 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$669

$787

$787

$787

$963

$963

$–

$–

$313

$604

$625

$1,125

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$168

$240

$262

$295

$403

$460

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$274

$372

$297

$383

$376

$526

Monthly Total

$1,848

$2,641

$2,887

$3,130

$4,433

$5,061

Annual Total

$22,176

$31,692

$34,644

$37,560

$53,196

$60,732

Hourly Wage

$11.09

$15.85

$17.32

$18.78

$26.60

$30.37

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 15 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$984

$1,204

$1,204

$1,204

$1,349

$1,349

$–

$–

$375

$625

$750

$1,333

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$203

$333

$398

$412

$578

$619

Savings

$203

$333

$398

$412

$578

$619

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$560

$836

$861

$868

$1,299

$1,574

Monthly Total

$2,997

$4,829

$5,636

$5,813

$8,231

$9,006

Annual Total

$35,964

$57,948

$67,632

$69,756

$98,772

$108,072

Hourly Wage

$17.98

$28.97

$33.82

$34.88

$49.39

$54.04

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 10 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 11 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$594

$728

$728

$728

$842

$842

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$158

$232

$249

$270

$376

$418

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$249

$349

$265

$318

$298

$416

Monthly Total

$1,738

$2,551

$2,745

$2,856

$4,132

$4,601

Annual Total

$20,856

$30,612

$32,940

$34,272

$49,584

$55,212

Hourly Wage

$10.43

$15.31

$16.47

$17.14

$24.79

$27.61

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 13 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 12 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$910

$1,053

$1,053

$1,053

$1,003

$1,003

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$196

$318

$376

$385

$528

$556

Savings

$196

$318

$376

$385

$528

$556

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$531

$778

$785

$775

$1,029

$1,232

Monthly Total

$2,880

$4,590

$5,293

$5,394

$7,370

$7,905

Annual Total

$34,560

$55,080

$63,516

$64,728

$88,440

$94,860

Hourly Wage

$17.28

$27.54

$31.76

$32.36

$44.22

$47.43

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$410

$500

$500

$500

$579

$579

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$134

$203

$220

$240

$342

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$197

$286

$196

$239

$229

$324

Monthly Total

$1,478

$2,231

$2,419

$2,519

$3,766

$4,211

Annual Total

$17,736

$26,772

$29,028

$30,228

$45,192

$50,532

Hourly Wage

$8.87

$13.39

$14.51

$15.11

$22.60

$25.27

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$625

$724

$724

$724

$1,057

$1,057

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$167

$285

$343

$352

$534

$561

Savings

$167

$285

$343

$352

$534

$561

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$421

$650

$673

$667

$1,094

$1,311

Monthly Total

$2,427

$4,067

$4,786

$4,891

$7,501

$8,048

Annual Total

$29,124

$48,804

$57,432

$58,692

$90,012

$96,576

Hourly Wage

$14.56

$24.40

$28.72

$29.35

$45.01

$48.29

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$669

$787

$787

$787

$963

$963

$–

$–

$313

$604

$625

$1,125

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$168

$240

$262

$295

$403

$460

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$274

$372

$297

$383

$376

$526

Monthly Total

$1,848

$2,641

$2,887

$3,130

$4,433

$5,061

Annual Total

$22,176

$31,692

$34,644

$37,560

$53,196

$60,732

Hourly Wage

$11.09

$15.85

$17.32

$18.78

$26.60

$30.37

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 15 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$984

$1,204

$1,204

$1,204

$1,220

$1,220

$–

$–

$375

$625

$750

$1,333

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$203

$333

$398

$412

$565

$606

Savings

$203

$333

$398

$412

$565

$606

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$560

$836

$861

$868

$1,202

$1,469

Monthly Total

$2,997

$4,829

$5,636

$5,813

$7,979

$8,746

Annual Total

$35,964

$57,948

$67,632

$69,756

$95,748

$104,952

Hourly Wage

$17.98

$28.97

$33.82

$34.88

$47.87

$52.48

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 10 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 11 percent; and for a school-age child, by 7 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$370

$448

$448

$448

$600

$600

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$129

$196

$213

$233

$345

$386

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$186

$273

$182

$224

$234

$331

Monthly Total

$1,422

$2,159

$2,346

$2,445

$3,795

$4,242

Annual Total

$17,064

$25,908

$28,152

$29,340

$45,540

$50,904

Hourly Wage

$8.53

$12.95

$14.08

$14.67

$22.77

$25.45

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$560

$750

$750

$750

$877

$877

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$161

$287

$345

$355

$516

$543

Savings

$161

$287

$345

$355

$516

$543

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$396

$661

$682

$675

$988

$1,195

Monthly Total

$2,325

$4,108

$4,825

$4,931

$7,179

$7,716

Annual Total

$27,900

$49,296

$57,900

$59,172

$86,148

$92,592

Hourly Wage

$13.95

$24.65

$28.95

$29.59

$43.07

$46.30

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$605

$758

$758

$758

$877

$877

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$159

$236

$254

$274

$380

$423

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$252

$358

$275

$328

$309

$429

Monthly Total

$1,753

$2,594

$2,790

$2,900

$4,182

$4,654

Annual Total

$21,036

$31,128

$33,480

$34,800

$50,184

$55,848

Hourly Wage

$10.52

$15.56

$16.74

$17.40

$25.09

$27.92

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 13 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 12 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$948

$1,096

$1,096

$1,096

$977

$977

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$199

$322

$380

$389

$526

$553

Savings

$199

$322

$380

$389

$526

$553

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$546

$794

$800

$789

$1,054

$1,256

Monthly Total

$2,939

$4,657

$5,359

$5,459

$7,365

$7,897

Annual Total

$35,268

$55,884

$64,308

$65,508

$88,380

$94,764

Hourly Wage

$17.63

$27.94

$32.15

$32.75

$44.19

$47.38

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$485

$488

$488

$488

$638

$638

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$144

$201

$218

$238

$350

$391

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$217

$284

$193

$235

$244

$344

Monthly Total

$1,583

$2,215

$2,402

$2,501

$3,848

$4,298

Annual Total

$18,996

$26,580

$28,824

$30,012

$46,176

$51,576

Hourly Wage

$9.50

$13.29

$14.41

$15.01

$23.09

$25.79

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$610

$798

$798

$798

$977

$977

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$166

$292

$350

$359

$526

$553

Savings

$166

$292

$350

$359

$526

$553

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$415

$679

$698

$691

$1,036

$1,246

Monthly Total

$2,404

$4,184

$4,899

$5,003

$7,347

$7,887

Annual Total

$28,848

$50,208

$58,788

$60,036

$88,164

$94,644

Hourly Wage

$14.42

$25.10

$29.39

$30.02

$44.08

$47.32

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$669

$787

$787

$787

$963

$963

$–

$–

$313

$604

$625

$1,125

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$168

$240

$262

$295

$403

$460

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$274

$372

$297

$383

$376

$526

Monthly Total

$1,848

$2,641

$2,887

$3,130

$4,433

$5,061

Annual Total

$22,176

$31,692

$34,644

$37,560

$53,196

$60,732

Hourly Wage

$11.09

$15.85

$17.32

$18.78

$26.60

$30.37

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 15 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$984

$1,204

$1,204

$1,204

$1,304

$1,304

$–

$–

$375

$625

$750

$1,333

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$203

$333

$398

$412

$573

$615

Savings

$203

$333

$398

$412

$573

$615

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$560

$836

$861

$868

$1,333

$1,607

Monthly Total

$2,997

$4,829

$5,636

$5,813

$8,210

$8,986

Annual Total

$35,964

$57,948

$67,632

$69,756

$98,520

$107,832

Hourly Wage

$17.98

$28.97

$33.82

$34.88

$49.26

$53.92

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 10 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 11 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$606

$625

$625

$625

$783

$783

$–

$–

$313

$604

$625

$1,125

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$160

$219

$241

$273

$378

$436

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$253

$327

$242

$326

$303

$462

Monthly Total

$1,756

$2,413

$2,649

$2,889

$4,155

$4,793

Annual Total

$21,072

$28,956

$31,788

$34,668

$49,860

$57,516

Hourly Wage

$10.54

$14.48

$15.89

$17.33

$24.93

$28.76

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 15 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$781

$979

$979

$979

$1,219

$1,219

$–

$–

$375

$625

$750

$1,333

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$183

$310

$375

$390

$565

$606

Savings

$183

$310

$375

$390

$565

$606

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$482

$749

$785

$794

$1,223

$1,499

Monthly Total

$2,676

$4,471

$5,289

$5,470

$7,999

$8,775

Annual Total

$32,112

$53,652

$63,468

$65,640

$95,988

$105,300

Hourly Wage

$16.06

$26.83

$31.73

$32.82

$47.99

$52.65

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 10 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 11 percent; and for a school-age child, by 7 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$430

$433

$433

$433

$579

$579

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$137

$194

$211

$231

$342

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$202

$269

$178

$220

$229

$324

Monthly Total

$1,506

$2,138

$2,325

$2,424

$3,766

$4,211

Annual Total

$18,072

$25,656

$27,900

$29,088

$45,192

$50,532

Hourly Wage

$9.04

$12.83

$13.95

$14.54

$22.60

$25.27

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$541

$724

$724

$724

$773

$773

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$159

$285

$343

$352

$505

$533

Savings

$159

$285

$343

$352

$505

$533

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$389

$650

$673

$667

$937

$1,140

Monthly Total

$2,295

$4,067

$4,786

$4,891

$7,002

$7,537

Annual Total

$27,540

$48,804

$57,432

$58,692

$84,024

$90,444

Hourly Wage

$13.77

$24.40

$28.72

$29.35

$42.01

$45.22

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 10 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$639

$643

$643

$643

$857

$857

$–

$–

$313

$604

$625

$1,125

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$164

$222

$243

$276

$387

$446

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$264

$333

$248

$332

$327

$488

Monthly Total

$1,804

$2,440

$2,675

$2,916

$4,262

$4,903

Annual Total

$21,648

$29,280

$32,100

$34,992

$51,144

$58,836

Hourly Wage

$10.82

$14.64

$16.05

$17.50

$25.57

$29.42

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 15 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$804

$1,071

$1,071

$1,071

$1,110

$1,110

$–

$–

$375

$625

$750

$1,333

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$185

$319

$385

$399

$554

$595

Savings

$185

$319

$385

$399

$554

$595

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$490

$785

$816

$824

$1,169

$1,437

Monthly Total

$2,711

$4,617

$5,432

$5,610

$7,814

$8,582

Annual Total

$32,532

$55,404

$65,184

$67,320

$93,768

$102,984

Hourly Wage

$16.27

$27.70

$32.59

$33.66

$46.88

$51.49

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 10 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 11 percent; and for a school-age child, by 7 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$561

$565

$565

$565

$737

$737

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$154

$211

$228

$248

$362

$404

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$238

$306

$214

$261

$269

$379

Monthly Total

$1,690

$2,324

$2,510

$2,614

$3,984

$4,445

Annual Total

$20,280

$27,888

$30,120

$31,368

$47,808

$53,340

Hourly Wage

$10.14

$13.94

$15.06

$15.68

$23.90

$26.67

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 13 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$706

$921

$921

$921

$934

$934

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$175

$304

$362

$372

$522

$549

Savings

$175

$304

$362

$372

$522

$549

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$453

$727

$740

$731

$1,013

$1,218

Monthly Total

$2,556

$4,379

$5,088

$5,192

$7,273

$7,808

Annual Total

$30,672

$52,548

$61,056

$62,304

$87,276

$93,696

Hourly Wage

$15.34

$26.27

$30.53

$31.15

$43.64

$46.85

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$401

$548

$548

$548

$634

$634

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$133

$209

$226

$246

$349

$390

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$194

$299

$209

$256

$243

$343

Monthly Total

$1,465

$2,298

$2,486

$2,590

$3,842

$4,292

Annual Total

$17,580

$27,576

$29,832

$31,080

$46,104

$51,504

Hourly Wage

$8.79

$13.79

$14.92

$15.54

$23.05

$25.75

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$685

$793

$793

$793

$911

$911

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$173

$292

$350

$359

$519

$547

Savings

$173

$292

$350

$359

$519

$547

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$444

$677

$697

$689

$1,008

$1,216

Monthly Total

$2,522

$4,177

$4,893

$4,996

$7,239

$7,779

Annual Total

$30,264

$50,124

$58,716

$59,952

$86,868

$93,348

Hourly Wage

$15.13

$25.06

$29.36

$29.98

$43.43

$46.67

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$532

$644

$644

$644

$862

$862

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$150

$221

$238

$259

$378

$421

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$230

$329

$236

$288

$305

$423

Monthly Total

$1,649

$2,436

$2,621

$2,731

$4,161

$4,631

Annual Total

$19,788

$29,232

$31,452

$32,772

$49,932

$55,572

Hourly Wage

$9.89

$14.62

$15.73

$16.39

$24.97

$27.79

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 13 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 12 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$805

$1,078

$1,078

$1,078

$924

$924

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$185

$320

$378

$387

$521

$548

Savings

$185

$320

$378

$387

$521

$548

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$491

$787

$794

$783

$1,031

$1,232

Monthly Total

$2,713

$4,628

$5,331

$5,431

$7,279

$7,810

Annual Total

$32,556

$55,536

$63,972

$65,172

$87,348

$93,720

Hourly Wage

$16.28

$27.77

$31.99

$32.59

$43.67

$46.86

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$445

$448

$448

$448

$599

$599

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$139

$196

$213

$233

$345

$385

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$206

$273

$182

$224

$234

$331

Monthly Total

$1,527

$2,159

$2,346

$2,445

$3,794

$4,240

Annual Total

$18,324

$25,908

$28,152

$29,340

$45,528

$50,880

Hourly Wage

$9.16

$12.95

$14.08

$14.67

$22.76

$25.44

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$560

$749

$749

$749

$850

$850

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$161

$287

$345

$354

$513

$541

Savings

$161

$287

$345

$354

$513

$541

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$396

$660

$682

$675

$978

$1,184

Monthly Total

$2,325

$4,106

$4,824

$4,928

$7,136

$7,674

Annual Total

$27,900

$49,272

$57,888

$59,136

$85,632

$92,088

Hourly Wage

$13.95

$24.64

$28.94

$29.57

$42.82

$46.04

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$474

$477

$477

$477

$585

$585

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$142

$200

$217

$237

$343

$384

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$214

$280

$190

$232

$230

$326

Monthly Total

$1,567

$2,199

$2,387

$2,486

$3,774

$4,220

Annual Total

$18,804

$26,388

$28,644

$29,832

$45,288

$50,640

Hourly Wage

$9.40

$13.19

$14.32

$14.92

$22.64

$25.32

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$596

$731

$731

$731

$936

$936

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$164

$285

$343

$353

$522

$549

Savings

$164

$285

$343

$353

$522

$549

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$410

$653

$675

$669

$1,007

$1,218

Monthly Total

$2,381

$4,077

$4,795

$4,902

$7,269

$7,810

Annual Total

$28,572

$48,924

$57,540

$58,824

$87,228

$93,720

Hourly Wage

$14.29

$24.46

$28.77

$29.41

$43.61

$46.86

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$594

$728

$728

$728

$842

$842

$–

$–

$313

$604

$625

$1,125

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$158

$232

$255

$287

$386

$444

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$249

$354

$277

$362

$322

$483

Monthly Total

$1,738

$2,556

$2,801

$3,042

$4,241

$4,881

Annual Total

$20,856

$30,672

$33,612

$36,504

$50,892

$58,572

Hourly Wage

$10.43

$15.34

$16.81

$18.25

$25.45

$29.29

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 15 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$910

$1,053

$1,053

$1,053

$1,257

$1,257

$–

$–

$375

$625

$750

$1,333

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$196

$318

$383

$397

$568

$610

Savings

$196

$318

$383

$397

$568

$610

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$531

$778

$810

$818

$1,238

$1,514

Monthly Total

$2,880

$4,590

$5,404

$5,582

$8,058

$8,836

Annual Total

$34,560

$55,080

$64,848

$66,984

$96,696

$106,032

Hourly Wage

$17.28

$27.54

$32.42

$33.49

$48.35

$53.02

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 10 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 11 percent; and for a school-age child, by 7 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$357

$433

$433

$433

$579

$579

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$128

$194

$211

$231

$342

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$182

$269

$178

$220

$229

$324

Monthly Total

$1,404

$2,138

$2,325

$2,424

$3,766

$4,211

Annual Total

$16,848

$25,656

$27,900

$29,088

$45,192

$50,532

Hourly Wage

$8.42

$12.83

$13.95

$14.54

$22.60

$25.27

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$541

$724

$724

$724

$791

$791

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$159

$285

$343

$352

$507

$535

Savings

$159

$285

$343

$352

$507

$535

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$389

$650

$673

$667

$955

$1,159

Monthly Total

$2,295

$4,067

$4,786

$4,891

$7,042

$7,578

Annual Total

$27,540

$48,804

$57,432

$58,692

$84,504

$90,936

Hourly Wage

$13.77

$24.40

$28.72

$29.35

$42.25

$45.47

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$594

$728

$728

$728

$842

$842

$–

$–

$313

$604

$625

$1,125

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$158

$232

$255

$287

$386

$444

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$249

$354

$277

$362

$322

$483

Monthly Total

$1,738

$2,556

$2,801

$3,042

$4,241

$4,881

Annual Total

$20,856

$30,672

$33,612

$36,504

$50,892

$58,572

Hourly Wage

$10.43

$15.34

$16.81

$18.25

$25.45

$29.29

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 15 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 8 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$910

$1,053

$1,053

$1,053

$1,235

$1,235

$–

$–

$375

$625

$750

$1,333

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$196

$318

$383

$397

$566

$608

Savings

$196

$318

$383

$397

$566

$608

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$531

$778

$810

$818

$1,259

$1,535

Monthly Total

$2,880

$4,590

$5,404

$5,582

$8,053

$8,831

Annual Total

$34,560

$55,080

$64,848

$66,984

$96,636

$105,972

Hourly Wage

$17.28

$27.54

$32.42

$33.49

$48.32

$52.99

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 10 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 11 percent; and for a school-age child, by 7 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$477

$500

$500

$500

$579

$579

$–

$–

$275

$479

$550

$938

Food

$164

$372

$309

$258

$621

$542

Transportation

$322

$403

$403

$403

$644

$644

Health Care

$196

$392

$461

$345

$726

$726

Miscellaneous

$143

$203

$220

$240

$342

$383

$55

$75

$55

$55

$75

$75

$215

$286

$196

$239

$229

$324

Monthly Total

$1,572

$2,231

$2,419

$2,519

$3,766

$4,211

Annual Total

$18,864

$26,772

$29,028

$30,228

$45,192

$50,532

Hourly Wage

$9.43

$13.39

$14.51

$15.11

$22.60

$25.27

Child Care

Technology Taxes

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 14 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 13 percent; and for a school-age child, by 9 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016.

Single Adult Housing

Married Couple

1 Adult, 1 SchoolAge Child

1 Adult, 1 Infant

2 Adult, 2 SchoolAge Children

2 Adults, 1 Infant, 1 Preschooler

$625

$724

$724

$724

$844

$844

$–

$–

$303

$504

$605

$1,046

Food

$318

$685

$598

$490

$1,204

$1,039

Transportation

$370

$740

$740

$740

$1,184

$1,184

Health Care

$250

$569

$953

$953

$1,160

$1,160

Miscellaneous

$167

$285

$343

$352

$513

$540

Savings

$167

$285

$343

$352

$513

$540

Technology

$109

$129

$109

$109

$129

$129

Taxes

$421

$650

$673

$667

$970

$1,176

Monthly Total

$2,427

$4,067

$4,786

$4,891

$7,122

$7,658

Annual Total

$29,124

$48,804

$57,432

$58,692

$85,464

$91,896

Hourly Wage

$14.56

$24.40

$28.72

$29.35

$42.73

$45.95

Child Care

Note: The budgets reflect different costs based on the age of children in the household; full-day care for infants and preschoolers (4-year-old) and after school care for school-age children. To create budgets for additional family types: For an additional infant, increase the total budget by 9 percent; for an additional 4-year-old, by 10 percent; and for a school-age child, by 6 percent. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Internal Revenue Service; Tax Foundation; and Louisiana Department of Education, 2016. Reference: UnitedWayALICE.org


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Profile for Louisiana Association of United Way

The ALICE Report-Update for Louisiana (released January 2019)  

The ALICE Report-Update for Louisiana (released January 2019)