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THE FREEDOM ISSUE

LOST FREEDOM

vol. 2, issue vii | september 2013 september 2013

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Freedom

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6 1. Joel Sossa // 2. Luiza Potiens // 3. Brandi Douglas // 4. Yulia Krivich // 5. Tina Negara // 6. Birgitt Surma


Photos by Maria Sedelnikova


STAFF EDITOR IN CHIEF LAYOUT DESIGNER

Angela WU

CO-EDITOR

Natalie CHYI

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Jessica DONNELLAN Katya SCHULZ Sam WILLIAMSON Claire Alice YOUNG

FIND US AROUND ISSUU http://issuu.com/lostfreedom FACEBOOK http://facebook.com/lostfreedommagazine MAGCLOUD http://magcloud.com/user/lostfreedom FLICKR http://flickr.com/groups/lostfreedom TUMBLR http://lostfreedommag.tumblr.com 8TRACKS http://8tracks.com/lostfreedom EMAIL lostfreedommag@hotmail.com WEBSITE http://lostfreedommagazine.com/


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Seaside Wanderer by Claire Alice YOUNG Sarah STEWART Victoria PATERNO Molly BAKER May XIONG Freedom: A Playlist Ocean Surrender by Sam WILLIAMSON David UZOCHUKWU Clara NEBELING Ian KOMAC Untitled by Katya SCHULZ Noukka SIGNE Melania BRESCIA Marit MYKLEBUST Michelle LARTIGUE Emily ROPER Bright Lights by Jessica DONNELLAN Megan WILSON Carol PERSONS Belle JUNE Codie HOBBS STAFF PICKS

cover photography by Claire Alice YOUNG


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seaside wanderer PHOTOGRAPHER: Claire Alice Young

MODEL: Josephine at FRM model management MAKE UP: Jordanna Hicban-Moss // STYLING: Claire Alice Young


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Sarah Stewart

16 YEARS // UNITED STATES h t t p :// w w w . f l i c k r . c o m /64591477@N07/ Introduce yourself. How old are you and where are you from? Hi, my name is Sarah Stewart, and I’m a 16 year old from the southern USA! When did you first begin taking photos? Do you think you’ve developed a “style” in your work since then? I first began taking photos when I was 13, but i didn’t get into photography seriously until I got my first DSLR in the winter of 2011. And as far as my style goes, I would say it’s personal, fresh, and has a touch of whimsy, but who knows, that could change by next month! That’s the cool thing about photography, you never know where it’ll take you. Do you often plan out your ideas for a photo beforehand? If so, do you believe this is helpful? For practically every photo I take, unless it takes a lot of props or editing practice, I just wing it. I usually just have an image in my head that I try to reproduce through my camera; I never write anything down, I never draw pictures, because the picture in my head is strong enough to go by. So no, it’s not very helpful for me, but I’m sure it is for others! How important do you think post-processing is? How much time, on average, do you spend editing? I consider it VERY important - a lot of my photos have taken shape in Photoshop and have become a little more special through it. I definitely commend people who can take a beautiful picture with no need for editing, but for a person with a more conceptual style like me, editing in Photoshop is what makes my photos, well....mine.

Do you prefer taking self portraits or portraits of others? Why? If I had models readily available, I would hardly ever take self portraits, trust me. But since a lot of the time I don’t want to force my friends to model for me, it’s easier to do it myself. Plus, there’s something about going into the woods by yourself with just your camera that’s a little bit like therapy. How would you define the word “freedom” and how do you think this can be expressed in photography? I think my definition of “ freedom” is letting things go. This can be in a physical sense by letting go of your comfortable bed and flat iron when you’re going on a road trip, or by letting go of your anger or envy. Both of these things can be absolutely freeing, because you’re letting go of things that may seem safe to go on an adventure! For photography, I think the same thing applies; if you let go of your self consciousness and shyness, you’re free do do anything! You can take a self portrait in the the middle of a crowd, you can try new, crazy editing techniques, you can approach a person on the street and ask them to model for you. You can truly do anything you put your mind to, and for me, that’s freedom.


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Victoria Paternó 26 YEARS // Caracas, VENEZULA h t t p : / / w w w . f l i c k r . c o m / v e pat e r n o

Tell us a bit about yourself. How old are you and where are you from? I’m from Caracas, Venezuela. I’ve been living in Paris for almost two years now, a city that I’ve always loved, that I feel a strong connection with, and that doesn’t stop surprising me. I would love to keep moving around, who knows what’s next! How long have you been taking photos for? How has your work changed since you started? I bought my first camera over seven years ago. It was a cool point and shoot with a big lens, kind of crappy when I think about it now, but perfect for what I needed. I was really happy with it and it was the first purchase that I put a lot thought into, a birthday present from my parents. I took it on my travels, shooting average travel stuff, mostly landscapes, but I also started to frequently taking pictures of sunsets that I always used to admire from the kitchen window back home. It was doing this that I got interested in capturing those fleeting ordinary moments of beauty. I was eager to communicate through the image what I felt at that exact second, I wanted to freeze that moment because each sunset was so different from the other one in so many little ways. I think my work (if I can call it that) radically changed the minute I started using film, suddenly everything was new, fresh and simple. I always kept an old camera from my dad (a Pentax Asahi from the 70’s) in my room, I though it didn’t work and I never really tried to do something with it, I just loved looking at it thinking one day I’ll fix it and learn how to use it. When I moved to Paris, I took it with me, went to a shop in Bvd Beaumarchais (photography heaven) and turns out all it needed was batteries and a lens adjustment to the body! It hasn’t left my side ever since.

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Do you prefer taking landscapes or portraits? Why? Ilovelandscapes,Iconnectwiththemimmediatly, photographing them is a very natural process for me. I see the big picture with my eyes, and then through the viewfinder I see something entirely different, I try to mix both views. I’m an outdoors enthusiast, I feel an instant sense of calm and vulnerability the moment I step into nature and I want my pictures to reflect that state of mind. I love adding a human touch to the frame, not only to show the dimension of the place but more importantly, the connection between that person and the context. Lately I’ve been getting more and more interested in people, but not necessarily portraits, more like specific moments and actions that only exist in seconds. Who are some of your biggest inspirations? I spend hours and hours on Flickr (and on Cargo Collective websites/portfolios) looking at the work of so many talented, amateur photographers out there. I really don’t know a thing about professional photography or how to properly handle a camera, it’s a process of just getting out there and doing it all the time, eventually you’ll find your way; that’s why I love to see photos of regular people that do it mostly as a hobby, through them you see their vision of the world, a picture can say so many things and exude so many emotions. My biggest source of inspiration is photography itself, its ability to show the tiny things that constitute the essence of happiness or sadness and how those moments become timeless, it’s a very melancholic activity in both the process and the results. If I could name some photographers whose work I admire, I would definitely mention Ana Cabaleiro, Jocelyn Catterson, Ana Kras, Rhis Ellis and Nicola Odemann. But there are lots of great ones whose names I don´t necessarily remember, that’s what’s amazing about internet, it’s a viewfinder to the world.

“ “ I wanted to freeze that moment because each sunset was so different from the other one in so many little ways.

Do you prefer using digital or film? Why? I started with digital, then discovered film and now I’m starting again to enjoy with digital. But I stick to film, and this would be my choice, hands down. It’s more real, the final result that we get from film is so special and unique. It’s a simple process with an organic result. It’s how I see life. What is your interpretation of freedom and how would you say it’s shown through your photos? Freedom is being able to walk away, is moving while being still, knowing that you can take action, is respecting others while they respect you. Freedom is watching the sun set, it’s those slowmotion seconds when you feel cold and carefully submerge yourself into the sea, is walking through mountains and feeling as small as an ant; freedom is owning your time, your decisions, is having a passion, is listening, is being grateful, is accepting. Freedom is looking at a horizon of endless possibilities.

When I’m taking a picture, I know is the first and last time I’ll be looking live at that exact moment, but I know I’ll have it forever in that picture. I try to convey that through my photos, I can only try...

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Molly Baker

18 YEARS // California, UNITED STATES h t t p : / / m o l ly b a k e r p h o t o g r a p h y . w e e b ly . c o m /


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These three sets of photos are from my “Washed Away” Project. This student run project was created about resilience, inner strength and the ability to overcome personal shadows that have made the person small and powerless. The people in these photos write the word (or words) that represented their own personal adversity or hardship they have faced in their lives. Their word is written on their face or any part of the body they choose. They are then splashed with water to “wash away” the word that once held them back. The water represents the resilience to not let personal struggle dominate who you are and what you are limited to. Notice that the ink left over from the water is still there, representing how our adversities are always remembered but they do not have to become who you are. My main focus with this project is resilience and self acceptance with struggles that are a part of life and having the ability to move forward from them. I have spoken in front of large audiences in schools to stand against bullying and to advocate for self love. Before I took the subject’s portraits, I interviewed all of them for accurate portrayal of what their misfortunes were. But more importantly, they told me how they have prevailed despite the “word” that is now washed away from them. I have all the story’s that every participant sent in to me from this year as a more personal way to see the real person behind my photographs. You can look at their stories here: http:// meepphotos.blogspot.com/2013/08/thewash-away-project-2.html The three words on this triptych are “Desolate,” “Unworthy,” and “Scary.”

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May Xiong 22 YEARS

California, UNITED STATES

h t t p : / / w w w . fac e b o o k . c o m / M ay - X i o n g - P h o t o g r a p h y

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Introduce yourself, how old are you and where are you from? My name is May Xiong. I’m twenty-three years old, born and raised in Fresno, California. Why do you create? I believe that creating for me, has always been something that I’ve been drawn to do. The idea of creating something entirely your own, inspired by the many things in my life - is something to feel great about. It is also a gateway to how you see things and to share that with others. It is such a rewarding feeling and that’s why I do it. Do you think your photos are more candid or staged? My photographs are a bit of both. I personally enjoy candid shots more so than staged because it looks and feels more natural to me. If I do have a series of work or project that I’m working on and have sketches for them, then they are a bit more staged. If I had to choose between staged and candid, I’d go for candid. The moment then becomes more real.

I look for the details of things, how the color of something suddenly changes because of how the sunlight hits it, the weather and how it hints of a moody afternoon - it’s the simple things that inspire me most.

Do you often plan your shoots beforehand? If so, do you think is helpful? Sometimes but for the most part, I improvised based on a certain theme/ look that I’m trying to go for. Having said before, doing projects/series of work, it’s helpful to have them planned, but it’s always those shots that are in between the planned ones, that always turn out the best. Tell us a little about your favorite photo/ series of photos you’ve ever taken? Is there a specific concept or message behind it? My favorite photo series I’ve ever taken has to be my Geometric Maps series. The series is based on the idea of geometric shapes representing maps of the minds of people, also using black and white paint to portray both light and dark sides of a person. Always been fascinated with the understanding of how we think and why we do the things we do and how the mind works, was the inspiration that started this series itself. Reason why is that is my favorite is because it was my first successful project/series that I’ve done and felt really good about. From day one to the very end of it and I feel like I’ve accomplished something that I did my best to achieve. How do you stay inspired? Do you have any advice for those that are uninspired? I stay inspired by always looking at art, places, people, things. It keeps my brain creatively active because I look for the details of things, how the color of something suddenly changes because of how the sunlight hits it, the weather and how it hints of a moody afternoon - it’s the simple things that I feel that inspires me most. My advice for those who are uninspired is, to take a deep breath, look at art every day, go outside and sink into nature, be more active and keep yourself afloat. All of those things will keep you moving forward, even if it’s small steps, you’ll eventually create things along the way.


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FREEDOM: A PLAYLIST http://www.8tracks.com/lostfreedom/freedom

1. Holocene - BON IVER 2. Candles - DAUGHTER 3. Featherstore - THE PAPER KITES 4. Soul Meets Body - DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE 5. Unbelievers - VAMPIRE WEEKEND 6. After the Moment - CRAFT SPELLS 7. Such Great Heights - THE POSTAL SERVICE 8. Tennis Court - LORDE 9. The City - THE 1975 10. Radio - LANA DEL RAY 11. Sail - AWOLNATION 12. Afraid - THE NEIGHBOURHOOD 13. Fred Astaire - SAN CISCO 14. Bravado - LORDE


Photos by Abby Billington

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ocean surrender

PHOTOGRAPHER: Sam Williamson (www.samwilliamsonphotography.com) MODEL: Hazel Imrie @ Superior Model Management


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David Uzochukwu 14 YEARS // LUXEMBOURG h t t p : / / w w w . f l i c k r . c o m / dav i d e j i /

Tell us a bit about yourself. How old are you and where are you from? My name is David, I’m fourteen years old. I’m from Austria, but living in Luxembourg. I started taking pictures on a vacation a few years ago, and I began with portraits and conceptual photography in summer 2012. Do you mainly take self portraits or pictures of others? Why? My work consists mostly of selfportraits- they’re very therapeutic, and practical too. Is there a certain style you try to portray in your work? If so, how would you describe it? I’m still asking myself every day when I will finally find my own style, but I guess that I’ll just have to keep shooting alot. How important do you think postprocessing is to your photos? How long do you typically spend editing? Post-processing is definitely very important to me as it helps me to actually realize the vision that I’ve got in my head. Editing takes me from ten minutes to three or four hours, depending on how much I have to change.

Who are some of your favorite photographers? Some photographers that I really admire are Katarina Plotnikova, Laura Zalenga, Lissy Elle and Greg Ponthus. How important to you think the idea of “Freedom” is to your work? How would you define it? Freedom is one of the main themes in my work. I interpret it as being able to breathe and connect to the environment, as being liberated or breaking free from every restraint. Freedom is a theme that I connect to very much, as I’m living in a very small, stuck-up country that is not my homeland, and am desperately longing to see the world and connect with people.


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Clara Nebeling 19 YEARS // GERMANY h t t p :// w w w . f l ic k r . c o m / c l a r a p h oto g r a p h y /


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LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the freedom issue Tell us a bit about yourself. How old are you and where are you from? I am 19 years old, I am from Germany and I recently moved to Berlin. How did you get interested in photography? How do you think your work has changed since then? I think I was always interested in creating. When I was around 6 years old I was very sure that I would become an artist one day. Maybe I will archieve this goal one day, but I am on my way. When I first started photography with my compact camera and my best friend as my model, I wanted to do fashion photography. After a while when I got my first DSLR, I only shot very personal images and specially portraits, scenes that took place in my head and had to come to life. Now in 2013 I think I do a mixture of both, fashion and personal work merged into one. But if I had to choose between the two I would still choose my personal images. Is there a certain style that you try to achieve in your work? If so, how would you describe it? I don’t think I “try” to archieve a style, I just do what I do, and what turns out afterwards seems to be my style. But I like when a photograph gives you the hint of a story, not the whole story but a little something that let’s the viewer imagine something more. And I also like when models are comfortable and free in front of the camera, I always chat with them and try to connect.

“ “ I set a frame for my pictures but taking the photo is a very spontaneous process

Do you normally take self portraits or pictures of others? Which do you prefer? I hate being photographed, even photographing myself seems strange and rarely happens. So the second one. How important do you think location is to your work? Sometimes I see a place and already have the whole picture in my head, Locations are one of my main inspirations. Would you say your photos are more candid or staged? Difficult question, I think Diane Arbus once said she never took a picture she intended. They were always better or worse. I set a frame for my pictures but taking the photo is a very spontaneous process. How important do you think the idea of “freedom” is to your work? Freedom is everything. Freedom behind and infront of the camera.


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Ian Komac

16 YEARS // BELGIUM h t t p : / / w w w . f l ic k r . c o m / i a n p rod u c t ion s /

Introduce yourself, how old are you and where are you from? I’m Ian Komac, a sixteen year old photography enthusiast currently living in Belgium. Is there a certain mood that you try to achieve in your work? When I’m taking photos I usually try to show a reality with a bit of a twist. It might seem like something that could happen but then you realize there is something surreal. The feeling I try to convey differs from photo to photo. It all depends on how I feel at that time.

Why do you prefer taking self portraits over portraits of others? The biggest reason for that is probably that I always want to be in control. I love working together with other people but in the end, it’s another interpretation of my vision. Of course there is also the fact that I don’t have models around me 24/7, that would be amazing though. Taking self portraits is a way to relax and just be alone, doing what I love.

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“ “ Freedom, for me, is when I have the feeling that I’m at the exact place in my life where I should be.

How important do you think postprocessing is to your work? How long do you typically spend editing a photo? For me, the post-processing is almost as important as the actual shooting. A lot of my photos are manipulated in some sort of way, without Photoshop I probably wouldn’t be the photographer I am today. On a regular photo I spend about 1 hour in postproduction and when it’s a manipulation it can be up to 8 hours. It all depends on the level of difficulty, and of course the quality of the photos to start with. Who or what are you inspired by? It’s a cheesy thing to say but I’m inspired by everything in my life. The most stupid and tiny things that happen to me can give me ideas for photos. When I am feeling uninspired I just take a walk around my house and I look at everything to see how I could incorporate it in my photo. Tell us a bit about the photos you’ve chosen, how do you think the theme of freedom is shown? Freedom, for me, is when I have the feeling that I’m at the exact place in my life where I should be. The photos I’ve chosen represent freedom in a way that they’re calm and intense at the same time. Art is different for everyone else so I can’t say that everyone will see freedom in them but I hope it will make the viewer feel something. If I succeed in that I’m satisfied.


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untitled

PHOTOGRAPHER: Katya Schulz (http://www.flickr.com/katyainwonderland/) MODELS: Ann Van Gansen and Sebastien Marchand // MUA: Katya Schulz


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Noukka Signe 21 YEARS // h t t p : / / w w

Amsterdam, the NETHERLANDS w . n o u k k a s i g n e . c o m /

Tell us a bit about yourself. How old are you and where are you from? I am Noukka Signe, 21 years old and I’m from Amsterdam. Though the past year and a half I’ve lived in Utrecht and Alkmaar, and I’m currently living in Berlin for an internship. Do you prefer taking self portraits or portraits of others? Why? Both are very different, and have quite different goals. I take self portraits to express myself and to get the images from my head and the feelings inside of me on the outside. I feel happy when others can relate to the emotions or moments in my photos, but it’s mainly just to get my thoughts and ideas out there. Shooting portraits of others is very gratifying because I work to make them happy. I love it when I take a photo of someone and they proudly show it off. So many people tell me they don’t look good on photos, and I really want to show them how beautiful they actually are. I also love shooting candid moments, to capture a precious second of someone being happy or at peace, or anything really. People are endlessly fascinating.

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Being able to have your own thoughts and create your own world is a huge part of freedom as well.

How do you think your work and style has developed since you first began taking pictures? In essence it stayed the same: showing emotions has always been important to me. But I’ve broadened my view and tried a lot of new things. I’m not really sure what my style is yet, but I know what I like or don’t like. I think my style will always keep evolving, I’m way too indecisive to stick with one thing.

What keeps you motivated to take more photos? What advice would you have for others that may be uninspired? I know it makes me really happy to be taking photos. Sometimes I get so busy and forget to pick up my camera, and I’ll really start missing it. So knowing it makes me feel good is a huge motivation. There are periods of time when inspiration comes easily, but I learnt that inspiration is something you have to actively look for if you feel like it’s not there. Take a moment in your day and just browse the web or read a book and realize you’re looking for inspiration. Be aware of the images around you, the words you read and you’ll find inspiration. There is so much you can do, there’s always something new you can try to make things exciting again or to give you new angles to work with.

Do you normally have an idea in your head before you shoot? If so, do you think your final images turn out as you initially planned? This differs a lot, it’s about 40% planned and 60% unplanned. Sometimes I just go out, bike around and see what comes along. Other times I have a clear view of what I want and I’ll work towards that. The “Quiet moment” photo here for example, was one I had in mind. Focus on the grass, a book with me and I’m a little hidden to suggest security and quietness. The images usually turn out how I want them to be, but I have to admit that I haven’t tried the more complicated ideas in my head yet. I know that some things are just not in my capability (yet). How important do you think location is to a photo? It’s important, but not everything. Framing is a lot more important. Most of my Project 365 photos are taken in the same area along a canal. It’s just three different fields, but using perspective and framing, it keeps looking like a different place. As long as a location had decent light, framing and settings can do a lot to make a photograph look good. How would you say the theme of “freedom” is shown in your work as a whole? I’m a dreamer, and freedom to me is things like traveling, being with your friends, deciding to sit in the park all day… things like that. But being able to have your own thoughts and create your own world is a huge part of freedom as well. Expressing yourself is freedom. So besides the more ‘obvious’ ways like open spaces, movement and light (the themes I chose in these photos), the whole idea of why I take photos is freedom. Simply to express myself.


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Melania Brescia

21 YEARS // SPAIN http://www.flickr.com/photos/emsweet/

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Introduce yourself, how old are you and where are you from? My name is Melania Brescia, I’m 21, I’m from south Spain, and I’ve been working with photography since almost four years ago. Who would you say are your biggest photography influences? I love tones of unknown photographers on flickr, they inspire me alot, and big ones like Tim Walker, Eugenio Recuenco, Paul de Luna and tones of others. How would you describe your style? Is there a certain tone or mood you aim to achieve? I don’t know if I have a certain style. I’ve actually never thought about it. I just do what I like to do and I don’t put labels to my work. Do you normally have concepts for your photos? If so, do you think of these before you shoot? Sometimes I take a picture without even thinking about, I had and idea but not a meaning, but lately all I do is because I thought about it before, so everything in the picture means something to me. How important is lighting to your photos? Is there a certain time that you prefer shooting at? Light is everything. I try to take really good care of it everytime I work, although I don’t like artificial light. I work with natural light. I prefer cloudy days or morning or dawns and afternoons, those minutes when the sun is leaving. But I enjoy the sun too, I just prefer to work with it in winter.

Do you prefer taking self portraits or portraits of others? Why? I prefer selfportraits, obviously. When I’m calm and alone is when I create. I don’t feel pressure for the result because it’s only has to please myself, that’s why basically my work is based on selfportraits. I work with models too and I enjoy that world too, but sometimes when you feel motivated to work there’s no models around. How would you define the word “freedom” and how do you think this idea can be shown in your photos? I think when people think about freedom they almost think about the same image or thing. In my work I think is something you have to think about a little bit, maybe it’s easier for me because I know the meaning of them, but I think my work is really simple so everybody can find the meaning somewhere..


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Marit Myklebust

17 YEARS

// HTTP://LOVELY-FOOL.TUMBLR.COM

DO NOT TELL ME THAT I AM DOOMED FOR LEAVING When I was a child I believed in everything you said and after you would stand behind the rostrum screaming the name of the Devil, I would go home and place flower patches in my shirt pocket; it seemed important to keep beautiful things closer to my heart. I know you think that the people who contradict You are the children of Hell. But I do not think that God will punish me for criticizing anymore and besides, I have never feared Hell as much as I am scared of the devil inside of you as you speak to the children. See, I have had nightmares about labyrinths for months now and every morning it takes me a while to remember that I have already cut open the ropes binding me to the electrical chair. I have seen how you painted a stairway to Heaven with dirty hands and how you talked about God in a voice that made my little sister have a panic attack in the car after your sermon.

PHOTOGRAPH BY MOLLY BAKER

Later that afternoon I told her that Heaven is a place you will reach without climbing muddy stairs, and that God is a woman who changes clouds into cotton candy every time there is a sunset. See, my tongue did not wither the day I stopped soaking up the blood from your chapel walls. My heart did not turn into a pillar of salt the day I carried the first brick into a city that will be all mine. My God did not doom me the day I realized how free I can be in the leaving. Oh, my lungs, I have finally started breathing!


A LETTER TO MY BIG SISTER TO LET HER KNOW THAT I AM FINALLY DOING OKAY WITHOUT HER The last time you told me you loved me the sky was orange. The day you decided to die, the sky fell down on me and it burned me up from inside. My bedroom walls are filled with various colors, not because I like it that way, but because one day when I was at school, mom used her spare paint to cover up all the stuff I wrote about you. I wrote about how one of your school friends told me that you always smiled when you were on the bus but you and I both know that’s not true. It made me laugh and it made me angry that he’d say that. I wrote about how funny I found it when you’d put on Metallica to calm yourself down. I wrote about the day when I wouldn’t loan you my cell phone because I knew you’d only beat my Tetris high score.

The day of your funeral the sky was blue and I remember thinking how I wish I could bury the sky instead. For years after you passed away there were salt on my cheeks from carrying the letters bombs that I intended to send myself. I guess I always assumed that one day I’d go the way you did. But the day I decided to set fire to the bridges to that kind of safety the sky turned Gold. As I watched the flames I coughed, but did you know that ladybugs are brightly colored to ward away potential predators? And did you know that the collective name of a group of peacocks are called a party? Lately I’ve been missing parties, because I’ve been missing you, but it’s okay because now I know that I’ll be well again in a while. There are so many things wishing me well: There’s a monk in Mumbai breathing, and every time he prays, he mentions every country in the world. There’s a lady in Vienna dancing, and as she moves, her cells recalls being stardust. Do you think Neil Armstrong held his breath when he first stepped out on the moon? Do you think The Devil covered his eyes the first time Hellen Keller held her clenched fists under water, thus learning her first word in sign language? There is a boy in Sri Lanka biking, and as he goes downhill he lets go of his handlebars, and for a moment, - he’s free. See, I think our hearts are barrels made to contain all kinds of beauty. Even our hearts casts shadows sometimes and I’ve been collecting countless “I miss you’s”, but you know I’ve also been collecting wonders in a jar. I don’t know where you are but I can’t stop imagining you in Heaven: turning ashes into flames, and searching for ways to burn every misconceived letter and turn everybody’s sky to Gold.

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Michelle Lartigue 20 YEARS // w w w . f l i c k

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Introduce yourself, how old are you and where are you from? I am 20 years old and I’m from Monterrey, Mexico. Do you normally take self portraits or portraits of others? Which do you prefer? I normally take self portraits because photography is like a therapy to me, it always makes me feel much better after a bad day. I prefer self portraits because when I have an idea, I don’t have to wait until someone is available, I am available 24/7. But I’d love to take portraits of others soon.

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Is there a certain mood or style you try to achieve in your work? If so, how would you describe it? I would describe my work as feminine, delicate and fragile. I like to use pale and pastel colors and I’m always trying to achieve something dreamy, soft or melancholic. Which photo is the favorite you’ve ever taken and why? My favorite until now is “Party for one” because it was the photo that marked the beginning of a new phase of my life: when I was getting more confident about me and my work. It was the first picture I took since I started defining my style and my first self portrait that went exactly as I planned. Would you say your photos are more candid or staged? I love candid but I would say my photos are more staged because I like to have the control of what is happening in the picture. Most of the time I think about an idea or a feeling and then I try to recreate that with my body or with things I have around me. How would you describe the use of the theme “freedom” in your own work? I have the freedom to create everything I want, no matter the rules of photography or the critiques because this is my art.

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Emily Roper

23 YEARS // NEW ZEALAND h t t p : / / w w w . c l i pic . c o . n z / Tell us a bit about yourself, how old are you and where are you from? Hello!! My name is Emily and I am 23 years old. I grew up on the outskirts of a small, rural town called Feilding here in New Zealand. I now live in our capital city Wellington, and I’ve been based here for about 3 years now. I love to drink herbal tea, lounge about in the sunshine with good friends or a good book, and I absolutely love getting lost in new places! When and why did you first begin taking photos? Photography has been a part of my life for a long time. Growing up in rural NZ, my father was a photographer. I spent a lot of time watching him process his photographs in his dark room he had set up in our woolshed. When everything started to move to digital, he purchased photoshop for us when I would have been about 9 or 10… I began manipulating images and taking photos of my sister and friends, and I would spend hours manipulating the photographs in post. I’d always said I’d like to start doing a lot more of my own photography, but it wasn’t really until about 3 years ago when my life went into a bit of a downward spiral that it really started to fill up my life. To be honest, photography provided an escape for me during what was undoubtedly the most challenging and hardest time of my life. I began feeling ill, and it went on for the next year and a bit. I was working full time for a film & television documentary house when it started. I ended up having to quit my job because I was so ill and spent a decent amount of the year in and out of hospital and operations. I didn’t want to let my health consume me, I started to take a camera outside everyday and began to capture anything and everything in sight. After about a year or so of constant shooting, I began to write up a business plan… and here I am today.


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Do your normally work with models when taking photos? How important do you think a certain “look” of a model is to your photos? Yes quite often I do. I love meeting new people and getting inspired by different looks. In fact, a particular “look” of a model often can inspire the entire series. I’ve had plenty of moments where I’ve met someone for the first time, and I’ve just asked them if I can shoot them. It can be more than just the look though, I think the personality of the model can come into play a lot more often. You could have the most beautiful person in front of a lens, but it’s really the personality of a person that shines through most brightly in photographs. How much of a shoot do you plan before hand? Do you think your results are what you initially aimed for? It depends largely on the client, who they are and what sort of thing they’re after. I will often get ideas suddenly rush up to me when I least expect it…. in the middle of the night or perhaps while I’m walking somewhere… I simply write them down and come back to them later. I have a folder that I hold onto that has all sorts of ideas that I’ve piled into it. Often when executed, these ideas can change entirely, as more often than not I’ll get even more inspired once I start shooting. My most favourite work I’ve done is largely unplanned though, it’s just me, a model, sometimes a MUA. We will just go on a little adventure together and see what inspires us along the way. That will always be my most favourite way to shoot.

Nothing is more liberating to me than having my camera in my hands and my head swimming with ideas.

Who or what inspires you the most? So many things… It could be a lyric in a song, a person, a place…. most of

the things that inspire me are the little things I come across in day-today life. For instance, often i’ll be driving or walking somewhere and suddenly i’ll see a place that looks absolutely stunning, or a particular moment where the light is perfect and soft… often i’ll kick myself that I don’t have my camera with me! I just take note of where I am, sometimes the time as well, and be sure to head back there again with my camera. How do you think “freedom” is shown through your photos? I think freedom is a huge part of my inspiration, particularly the drive behind why I first got into photography. It started as a way for me to be free, and it just grew from there. Nowadays, if I’ve ever have a hard time or I want to escape, I simply take my camera and go on an adventure to clear my head. Nothing is more liberating to me than having my camera in my hands and my head swimming with ideas.


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bright lights

PHOTOGRAPHER: Photography: Jessica Donnellan (http://www.jessicadonnellan.com/) MODEL:Toni Mennella @ Product Model Management / STYLING: Jessica Russo


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Megan Wilson

20 YEARS // CANADA h t t p s :// w w w . fac e b o o k . c o m / m e ga n w i l s o n p h oto s

Tell us a bit about yourself. How old are you and where are you from? My name is Megan Wilson, I’m 20 years old and I live in Winnipeg, Canada. When and why did you begin taking photos? I started taking photos around the age of 16. I travel quite a bit and I’ve always loved taking photographs of the places I go and people I meet. It slowly grew from a hobby, to a passion, to a career choice! Is there a certain style that you try to achieve in your work? If so, how would you describe it? I’m still working on developing my style. However I do see myself as a portrait/editorial photographer. I like adding my own twist to my work. I use a lot of colour and I pay very close attention to light and the focus in my photographs.

Who or what are your biggest inspirations? One of my biggest inspirations are my friends. There is something fantastic about being around other artists who understand the passion that drives you to create. I’m so lucky to have them all in my life. Music and books are another place I often find inspiration. As well as the simple things like words, colour, and light. Do you prefer taking portraits or landscapes? Why? Portraits! I love taking photographs of people! Although, this past year I’ve really opened to landscapes and I have found a new appreciations and love for them. I love photographing people because I find them so interesting. I love photographing little quirks, stories, and the souls of people. I love making connections with the people I photograph. I don’t think a lot of people realize this, but taking someone portrait is a very personal thing. What is your interpretation of the word “Freedom” and how do you think this is shown in your photos? Freedom to me means to be yourself. The freedom to act and say what you will without judgement. This relates to my work because I believe in the freedom of being who you want to be, and being able to do what you love. To be free of judgement, hate, and discrimination. But also to accept yourself and to feel free, alive, and loved.

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Carol Persons

19 YEARS // UNITED STATES h t t p : / / w w w . f l ic k r . c o m / p h oto s / ca ro l p e r s on s /


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Introduce yourself. How old are you and where are you from? My name is Carol Persons. I am a 19 year old college student from central Massachusetts, now living in Northern Virginia. More importantly, I am a photographer and an adventurer. Tell us a little bit about your travels this summer - where did you go and what did you do? Every kid, upon hitting age eighteen and/or going to college, experiences the feeling of complete freedom and independence. My first year of college went by with a diminished sense of said feeling, and it wasn’t until my travels this summer that I felt it more than I ever have. I finally visited another country and saw some breathtaking sites in Quebec City, Canada. The highlight of this past summer, however, was undoubtedly the Northeast Flickr Gathering. This trip can be summed up with a few words: twenty photographers, one roof, four cars, sleeping bags, s’mores, star gazing, and a craving for exploration. For seven days the whole lot of us drove to different nearby locations and spent hours hanging out and taking photos. But this trip wasn’t just about the photos, it was about the people we met. The most crucial part of that week was meeting so many amazing and talented people that I connected so well with. People that understand the photographer’s way of life, and love to fully live in that mentality of admiring art and beauty, and never letting an opportunity to catch it go by.

How would you define the word “Freedom” and how do you think this theme is shown in your photos? I think freedom is the ability to go out and create new experiences for yourself. The freedom to change your life (to add something new or take something away) is very powerful, and important. It is the ability to physically bring yourself to new places and new sites. It is also the ability to free yourself into a mentality that is peaceful and productive, that brings you closer to your dreams and aspirations and the discovery of what these things are. This is what my pictures represent. I create a world where the main characters are running, escaping, jumping, as a way to represent their freeing themselves from the everyday average, into something newer and more exciting – something I think we should all do.

This trip (the Northeast Flickr Gathering) can be summed up with a few words: twenty photographers, one roof, four cars, sleeping bags, s’mores, star gazing, and a craving for exploration.

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Belle June

16 YEARS // UNITED STATES http :// www . flickr . com / photos / livelovelaughdream /

Introduce yourself. How old are you and where are you from? My name is Belle. I’m a sixteen year old artist living in the US with a mind that is always elsewhere. I’ve been documenting the world from behind a camera for about four years now, although art has been part of my life for much longer. Why do you create? What motivates you to continue doing art? I create for myself, and a fluctuating audience consisting of anyone willing to open their eyes and mind to view and interpret my art. I seek out the essence of beauty around me, and through photographs, I am able to share that beauty with the world. That feeling after a long day of shooting and arriving home knowing that I got that shot is what keeps me going. The encouragement from people I both know and don’t know, and the idea that there is always more to be explored in the world makes me feel motivated to create. Who or what inspires you? I am inspired by countless artists and photographers, some who I know personally, and others who I only dream of meeting. I’m inspired by the stories of strangers, the night, and the singing of the birds. Tell us a bit about these photos you’ve selected and their meaning to you. This particular collection of photographs has been created over a span of years and contains work from more recent shoots as well as when I was just starting photography. Movement and colour have become reoccurring themes in my work- I’m always chasing the light through the trees or down to the last setting ray, and this series is no

exception. In more than one of these I was capturing the last glimmer of sun, and always photographing until feeling tired. As for many artists and their work, these photos evoke individual memories for me, some of more importance than others. Fin, shot at sunset, was taken on a trip to the ocean, and reminds me of that weekend we spent laughing on the beach and watching the moon rise over the water’s horizon every night. Rebellion(lines) was created at a point in my life when my view point on the world seemed to be shifting and I couldn’t manage to escape, or, rebel. How would you define the theme of “freedom” and how do you think this can be shown through art? Freedom is both power, and the feeling of it. Of infinite space and no sense of enclosure. It’s the right to opinion, yet also the ability to escape at any given moment from having to give an opinion. Freedom is expressed through dance, light, running, and movement, and captured from behind a camera via the aura of happiness.

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Codie Hobbs

21 YEARS // ENGLAND h t t p : / / w w w . c odi e - h o b b s - p h oto g r a p h y . c o m /

Introduce yourself. How old are you and where are you from? Hi, my name is Codie Hobbs; I am a twentyone year old fashion photographer from Plymouth, in the South West of England. I have recently completed my BA (Hons) in Photography at Plymouth College of Art and am ready to embark into the creative industry. Tell us a little bit about the photos you’ve selected. Was there a certain idea you were trying to capture? My intention with all of my photographic work is to create imagery with an underlying sense of narrative. The photographs displayed here are from the series ‘Nomad’ - a set of images portraying the use of fur as clothing and its relation to our ancestors. The idea was to capture our modern day fur clothing, by showing a direct link to its past and the people in which it originated. By putting the clothing in its original context allows the viewer to then see it in a different light and remember its source. Do you prefer taking portraits or landscapes? My work is predominately fashion based - so portraits, all of my work navigates around people and the way I want to portray them. I find it very difficult to come up with creative ideas that don’t revolve around a person - although I do like to incorporate the subject within the landscape, but very rarely shoot solely landscape. I enjoy seeing all aspects of a photograph come together to create the final piece and I don’t feel as though I have as much creative control over a landscape that can’t be molded.

How much of a shoot do you plan before hand? Do you think your final photos show what you first envisioned? I do a lot of intense planning before a photo shoot. I go in with everything preplanned, and with a direct plan in my head. Hours and hours of organising of the correct models, hair, make-up, locations, props and more all occur before the photoshoot even begins.This is how I enjoy to work, and for me achieves the best results, there is always a huge sense of achievement when everything works together to look how you originally imagined and all the hard work pays off. There are always those unexpected moments that happen spontaneously on set, but they come amongst the pre-visualised idea. The final photographs always come home as envisioned, but with a few extra moments that have been captured during the shoot. Do you shoot primarily with digital or film? I primarily shoot digital, but always like to dip back into my love for film. The images displayed from ‘Nomad’ are all shoot on film on my beloved Pentax 67. But with the nature of the industry my work sits in, digital is a more intelligent choice. How important do you think the idea of “Freedom” is to your work? How is it shown through your photos? Being in the creative industry it is always exciting to have the freedom to produce the ideas you want to portray without any ties. This is one of the reasons I choose to pursue a creative direction and as a recent graduate of photography, ready to embark out of my five years of education and into the journey of the industry; having my own freedom to produce the work I want is very important. I have my own style and my own way of working, all I can do is continue to create and push my work to get where I need to be.


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staff picks


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6 1. Luiza Potiens // 2. Tim Khadeyev // 3. Darina Kayce // 4. Sara Iacona // 5. Sarah Evers // 6. Carly Hildebrant // 7. Myles Katherine

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PHOTOGRAPH BY CAMERON G //http://www.flickr.com/photos/camerongardner/


Interested In Submitting? THEME OF THE NEXT ISSUE:

EPHEMERAL To submit please send an email to submit@ lostfreedommagazine.com with the following: 1. Name/age/location and a link to your work (flickr, blog, portfolio, etc.) 2. At least 3 (low-res) pieces of artwork that exemplify the theme. (For writers - please send 2 pieces of writing) 3. A short answer of your description of ephemeral, and what it means to you.

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MAGAZINE

LOST FREEDOM September 2013  

Inspirational photomagazine featuring young and talented artists such as Claire Alice Young, Sarah Haley Stewart, Clara Nebeling, and much m...

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