Page 1

THE GROWTH ISSUE

LOST FREEDOM vol. 2, issue ix,| march 2014

march 2014

1


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue

Growth

2

1

3 1. Mario Macedo // 2. Marianna Santikou // 3. Lucrezia Senserini // 4. Alfonso Gavilรกn Sรกnchez // 5. Caro

4


5

march 2014

3


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue

Photo by Iris May


STAFF EDITOR IN CHIEF LAYOUT DESIGNER

Angela WU

CO-EDITOR

Natalie CHYI

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Chiara ROTA Daniyel LOWDEN

FIND US AROUND ISSUU http://issuu.com/lostfreedom FACEBOOK http://facebook.com/lostfreedommagazine MAGCLOUD http://magcloud.com/user/lostfreedom FLICKR http://flickr.com/groups/lostfreedom TUMBLR http://lostfreedommag.tumblr.com 8TRACKS http://8tracks.com/lostfreedom EMAIL lostfreedommag@hotmail.com WEBSITE http://lostfreedommagazine.com/

march 2014

5


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue

contents 008 016 022 030 036 042 048 056 058 064 072 078 084 092 098 104 110 116

-

Elizabeth GADD Julia LEVINE Everything Must Come to an End by Daniyel Lowden Dora KONTHA Moritz AUST Melissa HARRISON Rachel DOWDA To Start Over: A Playlist Sunny LEI Davis AYER Fugitive Dreamer by Chiara Rota Holly LEVEY Polina WASHINGTON Murugi THANDE Mike ALEGADO Tasha FAYE Francesca PERTICARINI STAFF PICKS

Cover Photograph by Daniyel Lowden


022

008 016

036

030

048 084

064

042

078 098 112


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


Vancouver,

a b e t h g a d d

Elizabeth Gadd 20 YEARS // : / / w w w . e l i z

h t t p

.

CANADA / c o m

9

march 2014


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue Introduce yourself. Who are you? I’m Elizabeth Gadd, 20 year old photographer from Vancouver, Canada. How did you first begin taking photos? How has your work grown since then? I first started taking photos about 7-8 years ago when my dad gave me a point-andshoot digital camera. Most of these photos consisted of my pets, close-ups of flowers, landscapes, and other little details in nature. I grew more and more in love with taking photos over the years, gradually updating to better cameras. In 2010, I stepped out of my comfort zone and decided to take a creative self portrait every single day for a year. By the end of this 365 project, my skills with the camera and post-editing had grown immensely, and I also discovered my real forte in the photography world - the combination of portraits with landscapes. I fell in love with the way I could display peaceful (sometimes awe-inspiring) human interactions with such huge expanses of nature (whether mountains, fields, ocean, forests, ect.) These kind of photos are what effect me most, and I hope they can inspire others, too. Do you prefer taking self portraits or portraits of others? Why? While I love taking portraits of others (new faces, less work for me, and it goes much faster which is nice in cases of freezing weather when I just want a quick photoshoot!), I still think I actually prefer taking self-portraits. The reason being that I usually like to go on photoshoots alone (with the exception of my dogs) so that I can take the time to think/pray and let my imagination roam freely without interruption. It often feels therapeutic or meditative while taking self-portraits, going back and forth from the camera, taking my time and just enjoying the calm around me.

How important are locations to your work? Locations are pretty important to me. As you can tell, I love landscapes and nature, so wherever there is a location with beautiful landscapes, that’s where I want to be! :) Describe your dream location to shoot at. The current dream location I’ve had in mind for the past several years is Iceland. And as it turns out, this Icelandic dream is most likely coming true for 2 weeks in Spring of 2014! What has been the best experience or your life (photography or otherwise)? The best experiences of my life thus far have been the chances I’ve had to travel and meet up and collaborate with all the wonderful artists and friends I’ve gotten to know through the photography community online. These people have become some of my best friends and I truly feel blessed to be able to travel/photograph the world with people of similar passions! What advice would you have for those just beginning photography? The best advice I can give is to never give up! Experiment lots. Keep creating photos every day. Sure, a lot of them will turn out awful (I have countless numbers of terrible photos), but every hour you put into it helps you learn and sculpts you into a better photographer. When I did my 365 project, it wasn’t even until the very last week of the entire project that I discovered my niche in the photography world. Seems like those first 360-something days were a waste, right? No! All those days leading up to the last week were preparing me, because as soon as I discovered my style, I had already learned so much with the camera (and post-processing skills) that my work absolutely took off! So don’t give up. Hard work pays off. :)

It often feels therapeutic or meditative while taking selfportraits, going back and forth from the camera, taking my time and just enjoying the calm around me.


march 2014

11


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

13


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

15


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


Julia Levine

17 YEARS // Wisconsin, UNITED STATES h t t p s : / / w w w . f l i c k r . c o m / p h o t o s / j l e v i n e 312 / Tell us a bit about yourself. How old are you and where are you from? I’m 18 years old and I’m Madison, Wisconsin. Though currently I’m going to school in New York. How important do you think location is to your work? Very important! I pretty much always shoot outdoors. Natural light is important to me when I’m shooting because it’s in the uncertainty and mystery of the light that I garner most of my inspiration. Describe your dream location to shoot. I really love city streets; they’re so full of life and constantly in a state of changing. So I think the streets of any beautiful city in the world would be a dream for me. Is there a certain idea or concept you try to portray in your work? I hope that my work can connect emotionally with others. If people feel nostalgic, curious, or happy (for instance) than I’ve done my job. The point, for me, is to inspire a reaction. I also want to develop some sort of a connection with the models, so that I shoot them as truthfully as possible. My goal is to capture the essence of a person.

Do you prefer taking self portraits or portraits of others? Portraits of others, self-portraits can feel a bit limiting. Who or what inspires you? For me, both impressive gestures of grandeur and minor slivers of beauty can spark curiosity. This curiosity fosters inspiration, when the parts of life that mostly go unnoticed are transformed into electrifying experiences. By compartmentalizing beauty into a limited space, say a waterfall or a cathedral, we miss these fleeting moments of beauty-moments that transcend the ordinary and help us see the extraordinary within it. If I enter an elaborate museum or watch a well-regarded movie with the expectation to leave inspired, I probably will. But equally profound inspiration could be found in the way light shines down through snowcoated branches or in a friend’s smile. I find most of my inspiration from the ways people interact daily or act when they believe that no one is paying attention. How would you say the theme “growth” is present in your photos? I’m not sure if growth is present in specific photos but my photography has definitely grown dramatically over the past few years. I started out taking photos basically in my backyard, then everywhere around my hometown, then to other cities in America, and eventually internationallylike in Spain. I also used the same models multiple times throughout the years and the growth of my relationship with these particular girls can also hopefully be seen in my photographs.

march 2014

17


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

19


march 2014

21


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue

everything must come to an end

STYLIST & CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Kate Sutton // facebook: https://www.facebook.com/KateSuttonStylist

website: www.katesuttonstylist.co.uk instagram: katesuttonstylist PHOTOGRAPHER: Daniyel Lowden // facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DaniyelLowden website: http://www.daniyellowden.com/ instagram: daniyellowden


march 2014

23


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

25


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

27


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

29


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue

Dora Kontha 26 YEARS // h t t p : / / w

w w

Introduce yourself. Who are you? My name is Dora Kontha, I am a Copenhagen based designer, an enthusiast analogue photographer and an adventurer. Why do you create? This is my way of holding on to those very special moments in life. I try to capture their essence and preserve them through my photographs. Memories might fade over time but these keepsakes will always take me back to relive my adventures and by sharing them I hope others will join me on my journey. Where has been your favorite place to take pictures at? Iceland. Iceland is the most magical place I have ever been to. The island is fascinating, incomparable to anything. A mystical place where you can

.

Copenhagen,

d o r a k o n t h

DENMARK a . c o m

discover wonders far and near; the North Atlantic Ocean, the beautiful mountains, the endless national parks, the glaciers, the breath-taking lava fields, the geysers and not to mention the wonderful northern lights. The couple of days I spent there were not enough, I didn’t want to leave. If you could travel anywhere in the world, where would it be and why? Greenland and The Faroe Islands. For some peculiar reason I have always been longing to the North. I love Scandinavia and currently I live in the capital of Denmark, which is one of the best cities in the world, but I still have the urge to go up and up north. Greenland and so The Faroe Islands are amazing and have so much to offer. My dream is to have a backpack trip there one day. I love getting lost and discovering new places. Do you primarily shoot with digital or film? With film. For me, analogue photographs are way more beautiful and real than digital ones. The colors and the atmosphere are inimitable and I just love the role of the coincidences and surprises, the fact that there’s no option for deleting pictures, you just have what you have. It’s pure, honest and beautiful. Why do you prefer taking landscape photos rather than portraits? I love wilderness, open spaces and freedom. How is the theme of “growth” important to you and your work? Growth is vital part of my life and so of my work, as I persistently strain after improving and challenging myself. Roving and travelling can for example give a new perspective on life. The new places and experiences keep me mentally awake, make me wonder, give me inspiration and open up new roads in every sense.


march 2014

31


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

33


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

35


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


Moritz Aust 17 YEARS // h t t p : / / w w

w

.

Schweinfurt,

m o r i t z a u

Tell us a bit about yourself. How old are you and where are you from? My name is Moritz Aust. I am 17 years old and I come from Schweinfurt, Germany. Why do you create? I started photography about 3 years ago and now I’m doing surreal photography most of the time. I started doing these surreal pictures after I saw several surreal work online and it drew interest to me. Then I tried it myself and fell in love with it. Now it’s my passion. How important do you think post-processing is to your photography? How long do you typically spend editing a photo? Post processing is really important to my photography. I think I wouldn’t really be able to create these surreal work else how. Especially with my age and my not existing money. I think doing these surreal things without photoshop would need a huge budget I typically spend about half an hour up to 10 hours editing a photo. Half an hour for less complicated photos and up to 10 hours for really heavy photo manipulation and stuff like that.

GERMANY s t . c o m

Do you often plan out your shoots beforehand? If so, do you think this is helpful? I don’t plan my shoots on a regular base but I do sometimes. I often write down ideas I get throughout the day so I won’t forget them and can execute them later. And sometimes I sketch my ideas or plan them a little bit. The downside of writing them down instead of executing them instantly is that you kind of lose passion for it after a while. Who or what inspires you? I love how different all birds look and how different the act and fly. They are a huge inspiration as well as clouds and nature, feelings and many more things. People I really admire as photographers are Annie Leibovitz and Tim walker. The theme of this issue is “Growth.” How would you describe this theme, and how do you think it is shown in your photography? I get inspired by nature and especially from birds and the sky. Growth is a really big thing with being creative. Growing is a very important part. I always say to others that trying is the best way to grow. Nobody was born with the skills they have right now. We have to try and fail to achieve the things we want. And that’s the most important thing: not being afraid to try.

march 2014

37


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

39


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

41


Melissa Harrison 28 YEARS // Masachusetts, UNITED STATES h t t p :// w w w . m e l i s s a h a r r i s on p h oto g r a p h y . c o m

march 2014

43


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue Tell us a bit about yourself. I am 28 years old, a photographer currently living about an hour outside of Boston, Massachusetts. When and why did you first begin taking photos? I started with a 35mm film camera about 10 years ago. After graduating high school I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do. I chose to begin studying forensic science because I was fascinated by bone structure, however the math and science aspect of it was overwhelming so instead I spent most of my time setting up self-portraits in abandoned houses and buildings. I was very introverted and shy so putting myself in front of a camera, acting out different characters and then watching the images come to life in the campus dark-room was exhilarating. How would you describe your style? Is there a certain mood you try to achieve in your work? I would describe my work as feminine, dreamy and mysterious. Mood is very important for me to attempt to achieve in my work and is something I’m constantly trying to improve! Whether it is lighthearted or darker depends on the subject, location and lighting. I’m often asked what camera and lights I use, but I think once you learn the basics, developing an eye for mood and style is so much more important than any piece of equipment. You can have the most expensive strobe and camera set-up but without mood images are powerless. How much do you a plan a shoot beforehand? Do you think this is helpful? For me planning involves selecting the best team for the project. For fashion work it’s important to have a great wardrobe and make-up team, for personal work I rely more on the physique and energy of the model to help tell the story. I also usually pull inspiration images of photos and artworks, to create ‘mood boards’. I think this is helpful to get the team on the same page of the over-all direction of the shoot, even if it changes the day of, it gives everyone a creative starting point.

What role does fashion play in your photos? Fashion plays a big role in my photos because the model is often playing a character. For example a strong, sexy and fearless woman would have a completely different sense of style from a sweet, quiet, daydreamer. I also admire a wellcrafted garment and enjoy working with designers; fashion is an amazing, intricate and inspiring art in itself. I am still in awe from visiting the 2011 Alexander McQueen exhibit at the MET in NYC, the craftsmanship was incredible and each garment had a personality! Brands however are not always important to me; a stylist with a creative eye and passion can put together the perfect wardrobe from just a thrift shop. How do you manage to stay inspired? My inspiration comes from many sources. It usually starts with conflicting emotions within myself that I can’t quite understand the root of. For me trying to explain my own emotions with words is difficult, it’s like staring into the sun and trying to grab hold of the rays “why I am feeling down today, why am I feeling light and free today?” I find it almost therapeutic to attempt to manifest these feelings through photography. Also I am always inspired by femininity and beauty no matter where the inspiration originated. I’m also inspired by the work of others through magazines, books, films and blogs. Some artists prefer to limit their media consumption for fear of being too heavily influenced. I feel the opposite. If your work grows from your own personal unique perspective it’s impossible to make a replication. It’s a wonderful thing to be able to appreciate and enjoy the creations of other artists! How does the theme of “growth” relate to you and your photography? In a technical sense growth is learning and experimenting. I can compare starting out not even knowing what an F-stop was and just fiddling with all the buttons until it came out right, to today having a firm grasp on the technical aspects of photography and retouching. In a personal sense when I first began fashion photography I was really shy. The first time I worked with a make-up artist and model, I was so anxious about meeting new people I was sick and almost cancelled the shoot. Now I love meeting new people, even though I am still shy I am comfortable with that aspect of my personality. I’m currently trying to find a balance between satisfying my creative drive and making a living in a place where the market is competitive and it’s hard to stand out, so hopefully I’ll keep growing and find my way.


march 2014

45


march 2014

47


Rachel Dowda

23 YEARS // Florida, UNITED STATES http://www.flickr.com/raindrop-photography/


march 2014

49


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue Introduce yourself. How old are you and where are you from? My name is Rachel Dowda. I am 23 years old and live in South Florida, where it’s summer all year long. Why do you create? I first starting creating as a form of self-medicating, but it eventually became a way of life. Taking photos makes me feel alive. I love freezing moments I never want to forget, and now it’s just like breathing. I’m always thinking about how things would look through the lens… I notice lighting, moods, and poses, even when I don’t have my camera with me. How long have you been doing photography seriously for? I did a 365 project in 2010 where I took a photo every day for a year, and I would say that that’s when I became serious about it. I learned how to use my camera and photo shop. Then in 2011 I did a 52 week project, and attempted another 365 in 2012.

Do you typically shoot with digital or film? Why? I almost only use film, and it’s definitely my favorite. I love the permanent nature of it, and how you only have one chance to shoot a photograph right. I love the idea that you never truly know how the colors will come out and the dust and scratches add so much rawness and beauty. I use a Canon ae-1, a Yashica A (medium format), and an instant film camera. Most of the black and white film photos I have were developed in my bathroom and scanned in. Tell us a bit about your favorite experience in your life (photography or otherwise). I’ve grown up around the swamps and beaches of south Florida, but two years ago I had the chance to spend the summer working at a high adventure camp in the mountains of northern California. It was there I fell in love with the wildflowers and mountains of the northwest. Some of my favorite photographs were taken there. My favorite experience in life was the chance I had last spring to live and work on a vineyard in Alabama. Twenty of us lived in community, in a beautiful barn next to an airstrip with the most beautiful sunsets. We learned together, ate together, worked together, and enjoyed life


together. My faith has always been important to me, but it was there that I learned how to truly enjoy Jesus Christ as a part of a community of people, completely separate from religion. Instead of going to church in a building, we were the church, able to worship in a field, in a barn, on an airstrip, under stars unaffected by light pollution, or pruning a vineyard. The whole experience was life changing and beautiful. Those people are now my family. I tried to capture it on camera but I couldn’t truly do it justice. How do you manage to stay inspired? Ever since I was a little kid I thought creatively, so I think it’s something that just comes naturally. I read a lot, am outside a lot, and dream a lot. A lot of my ideas come during these times. I also enjoy looking at other people’s work, which inspires me to create and grow in my own. There are times where I feel like I have no ideas, and am in a rut creatively, and during those seasons I just keep taking pictures. I think the worst this you can do is put down your camera, because eventually you will break through. The theme of this issue is “Growth.” How would you say this theme can (or cannot) be shown in your work? If you look at my portfolio and my Flickr, from the beginning until now,

you can definitely see how my work has evolved through the years, how my style has changed and how even I have changed. I definitely think my work reflects growth: from being a young, insecure teenager afraid to leave home, to a confident young woman with a sense of wanderlust. My old work takes place mostly in my bedroom and backyard, and now it reflects a lot of the United States.

I love the idea that you never truly know how the colors will come out and the dust and scratches add so much rawness and beauty.

march 2014

51


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

55


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue

to start over : A PLAYLIST http://8tracks.com/lostfreedom/to-start-over

1. Best Day of My Life - AMERICAN AUTHORS 2. Eat That Up, It’s Good for You - TWO DOOR CINEMA CLUB 3. Wild Heart - THE VAMPS 4. Soco Amaretto Lime - BRAND NEW 5. The Permanent Rain - THE DANGEROUS SUMMER 6. Open Season - HIGH HIGHS 7. Do Better - SAY ANYTHING 8. Luck- AMERICAN AUTHORS 9. Woman - THE 1975 10. Sore Thumb - THE FORMAT 11. Young Volcanoes - FALL OUT BOY 12. Guns for Hands - TWENTY ONE PILOTS 13. Dreaming - SMALLPOOLS


Top: Veronika Anna Bottom: Hallie Sigwing

march 2014

57


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue

Sunny Lei

17 YEARS // Sydney, AUSTRALIA h t t p : / / w w w . f l i c k r . c o m / pa p e r p l a n e s f ly /


Introduce yourself. How old are you and where are you from? 17 year old student / photographer living in Sydney, Australia. Tell us a little bit about your work. When did you first begin taking photos, and how has your style changed since then? I started taking photos because I enjoyed it, basically. I received by first DSLR when I was 14 and photography has become something I would never give up on. I think my style has evolved greatly over time. I first started experimenting with still-life, and now I focus more on portraiture and fashion photography. My work has become more personal and I’ve developed more confidence in expressing what I envision.

Why do you create? I create because it allows me to express myself creatively and it makes me happy. Who or what inspires you? Locations are one of my biggest inspiration when it come to photography. I like to travel a lot and when I stumbled upon a beautiful place, I start picturing a shoot and what I’d like to do there.

Who or what would you most like to photograph? I’ve had a few conceptual projects in mind that I’d really like to start working on in the near future. One How important do you think fashion is to your work? I think it’s important to have a distinct style and vision when it comes to of them revolves around the connection of humans fashion photography. Working with a stylist who share the same vision as and nature. you is also very useful!

march 2014

59


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

61


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

63


Davis Ayer

h t t p

://

//

w w

California UNITED STATES w . d av i s ay e r . c o m /


march 2014

65


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

67


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

69


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

71


fugitive dreamer

PHOTOGRAPHER: Chiara Rota (http://facebook.com/pages/Chiara-Rota-photography/395894290482867) MODEL: Jennifer Scalzo

march 2014

73


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

75


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

77


23 YEARS h t t p : / /

// w w w . f l i c k r . c

o m

Holly Levey / p h o t o s

/ h o l

IRELAND l y a p l /

LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue Introduce yourself. Who are you? I’m Holly Levey (or hollyapl on flickr); 23, Irish, and yearning for adventure. What are some of your interests apart from photography? Apart from photography, I enjoy walking alone, reading, and staring at the sky at sunset. Why do you prefer taking nature/ landscape shots over portraits? Nature and landscape shots speak to me more than portraits. Land comes without direct human expression. I can stand alone in the middle of an empty field and feel more at ease than when I stand among hundreds of people. The human body can be a beautiful thing, but will never beat the beauty of a bare tree standing strong against freezing winds. How important do you think locations are to your work? Marginally. Some locations just fail to inspire me. However, I do believe that the right subject (be it human or other) can bring an exquisiteness to an otherwise lacking location. Describe your ideal location to shoot at. My ideal location... Anywhere with long empty roads, lined with rolling green hills, and an incredible expanse of sky. Tall trees with heavy trunks. Jutting mountainous rocks. Roaring waterfalls. An empty world.

Do you typically shoot digital or film? Why? Generally, film. Film is more aesthetically pleasing to me. It remains unpredictable and unstable, while still, mainly, giving me the shot I intended; what I saw, rather than what was there. Digital is too intangible, too defined; perhaps too realistic for me. Who has inspired your photography the most? The Flickr and Tumblr worldw opened my eyes to new realms of photography. Photographers such as Randy P. Martin, Theo Gosselin, Matt Lief Anderson, Tamara Lichtenstein, and Julian Bialowas are particular favourites. How would you define the theme “Growth” in your work? My work shows the growth of my little world; from falling sunsets I embraced alone to the warmth of the sunrise against my skin; from blooming flowers hidden by the harsh grey of the road to a house drowning in nature; from speeding cars on motorways to lazy days in bed hand in hand; rising industrial buildings left abandoned, the indestructible evergreen tree, the glorious light leak - all signify a growth in my world, in nature, in industry. Our world is constantly growing. My work shows a side of that growth; though barely begins to scratch its surface.


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

83


Polina Washington

22 YEARS // Saint-Petersburg, RUSSIA h t t p : / / w w w . p o l i n awa s h i n g t o n . c o m Introduce yourself. How old are you and where are you from? I’m 22 years old. I was born in Veliky Novgorod but moved to Saint-Petersburg. How long have you been taking pictures for? Why did you first begin photography? Since 14 or so I began shooting some stuff around. In a small town where I had been living I began exploring some extraordinary or abandoned places and shooting them. This habit is present. It gets you in peace with yourself and your eyes and mind take a rest from the scenery that you ought to see daily. I always build strong connection with unusual places, and these bonds get stronger each time. That’s how everything began, I guess. How would you describe your own style? My journey in photography had been long - until the moment came when I could say I could portray myself through the pictures I take. I’m still in this journey though now I recognize my own path. Experimenting with multiexposure led me into delusory world. Catching sight of something beyond real in all things around us - that’s my point. Taking photographs helps me to run away from boredom and melancholy.

march 2014

85


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue Tell us a bit about the typical process you go through when producing a photograph. The method sounds very simple - you take two or three exposes for one frame. And you get different images connected. That’s a base. Then you let your imagination flow and use all you use out of it. I tried to experiment with reflections on glass and colour filters, with dirt on my lens and dust on the negatives. One of my favorite tricks is playing with condensed vapor on lens (after you breathe on it). It gives smooth effect of glowing as a result. After the film is developed the other interesting part begins. I’m not a kind of some film bigot and don’t deprive my shots of post colour correction. You never can guess what colours you’ll get on that or another film, with that lens or this lightning. Sometimes I look at my shot and see that colours don’t need to be corrected sometimes they perfectly complete the image. But mostly I try my best with colours for the photograph. It’s not so easy sometimes. Some shots even take several months to be completed when I’m in doubt about the best connection between lights, shadows and colours. Do you mainly use digital or film? Why? I always shoot only film because I love the cycle: before you see the results the film has to end and be developed. I’m a hopeless romantic. You get the whole spectre of feelings such as disappointment or happiness or even magical enchantment and it suits me absolutely well.

I’m a hopeless romantic. You get the whole spectre of feelings such as disappointment or happiness or even magical enchantment and it suits me absolutely well.

Do you prefer taking portraits or landscape? Portraits and landscapes - I love both. It depends on if I’m accompanied or not. I always try to capture someone in some beautiful place but there are moments when I walk alone and when there’s no possibility to make a self-shot. In such moments I try to make that stunning landscape a protagonist of my shot. How would say the idea of “growth” is important in your work? Yes, it’s absolutely essential аnd I don’t mean only technical skills. My view is always changing - It reflects my ever changing thoughts and my ever growing soul. I am all these things I capture. My shots are the mirror of my dreams and visions. Thats why I try to grow as a person most of all. I try to keep kindness in my heart and bright thoughts in my brain and it’s not always so easy. Photography plays a huge role in this fight. I always can run from my gray moods to the shore and take a break.


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

89


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

91


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue

Murugi Thande 19 YEARS // h t t p : / /

Washington w w w .

D.C.,

m

u

r

UNITED u

g

i

STATES . c o


march 2014

93


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue

My name is Murugi Thande. I am a nineteen year old college student living in Washington DC. I take my camera everywhere and love documenting life. Besides photography, I find joy in traveling, meeting new people, and making art. Growth means constantly rediscovering yourself. I had been photographing digitally for years. But it was not until I used my first roll of film that I grew from a point-andshooter into photographer. The film’s 36-frame limit forced me to develop an editing eye and thus helped me uncover my artistic style.


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

97


Mike Alegado

28 YEARS // Manila, PHILIPPINES http://www.flickr.com/mikealegado/ Introduce yourself. How old are you and where are you from? I’m Mike Alegado, a conceptual fine art photographer and I am 28 years old. I just started learning photography around early 2013 and I have finally found my passion. I am from the summer-all-year-round country, Manila, Philippines. Although in my pictures it doesn’t show it but I live right in the middle of a suburban area. What do you want to convey through your photos? For the past few months it has always been different each time. From emotions to stories that just seem impossible in real life. But most of the time I like to play with the topic of nature. How it is with the relationship with humans and how things would be if it were different. When I make my images I always make sure that it would look either surreal, fantasy, fairy tale or dark. I love to take the characters in a different world that seems to defy reality and answers the question of “What if…”. I want the viewer to be engaged in the photo and feel immersed in this world that could have been.

How important is post processing to your work? Describe your typical editing process. For my work, Post processing is important because it enables me to accomplish what I am aiming for in an image. It enhances the mood and gives the otherworldly feel to it. When I edit it usually starts by stitching a few photos together to expand my frame and then that’s when it starts to become really complicated. If a concept calls for some composition then that would take me a few hours to finish and then after everything has been added, I then add some adjustment layers like curves and hue/ saturation and also play around with the blending modes for those layers. I usually do this to make the certain parts that I want to stand out from the rest of the photos. Usually I end up with a very large file and sometimes more than 50 layers.


march 2014

99


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue I’ve noticed you mostly take self portraits - why is this? Do you prefer taking self portraits over portraits of others? Well actually at first I wasn’t very comfortable being in front of the lens, but when I started photography I wanted to learn to take portraits and I didn’t have the resources to find anyone available to me, except some occasional friends who are free to do so. But after a while of taking self-portraits I find it very convenient that I don’t have to look for anyone and drag them in the middle of nowhere just to get a decent photo. All I have to do is pack everything I need for the shoot and I’m off to wherever I wander to. Also, using myself as a subject I can easily create the mood that I want for the photo because I know what I want and I can do it faster without the hassle of forcing the idea to someone who doesn’t see/understand the concept as I do. Although I love taking photos of other people as well, I have a thing with taking self portraits. It enables me be alone with myself and just be free to do anything that I can think of and I am surprised that I come up with things that I didn’t know was inside of me. Self portraiture also gave me more appreciation towards myself which I didn’t have before and really made me have some positive outlook in life. Describe your ideal location to shoot at. Oh my God, if I were to describe it, it would probably be a very complicated place but mostly it would probably in the a forest with many tall trees and animals running about freely with a stream that flows through the forest that sparkles when hit by the sun, the sounds of flowing water and wild animals in the background and a beautiful mountain could be seen at the horizon with snow caps at the top. A place where everything looks magical, inspiring and therapeutic at the same time. Aside from this fantasy of a realm that I dream of, I do enjoy shooting in the woods and around nature because it gives me a sense of being a small entity of this big world.

How would you define the word “growth”? How do you think this theme is shown in your work? I have two definitions for the word “growth”. First is growth in nature and how everything starts from something small and goes into utter proportions. I like how nature grows and it seems magical and mysterious at the same time. Sometimes it makes you think if nature took a different turn during evolution and everything we know could be very well be just another possibility in the world of dimensions, like nature conquering the human race instead of the other way around or man has evolved into nature and they form a new type of being. The possibilities are endless. And secondly, personal growth of myself and the skills that I put in my work as an artist in which my journey as a photographer has taught me through different experiences which would never have happened if I didn’t take on photography.


march 2014

101


march 2014

103


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


Tasha Faye

28 YEARS // h t t p : / / f l i

c k r

.

Perth, /t

c o m

AUSTRALIA -faye

a s h a

Tell us a bit about yourself. Who are you? My name is Tasha Faye and I am a fine art and creative portrait photographer. I will turn 20 this year and have just relocated from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia to Perth, Australia.

break a photograph, in my opinion. Light helps you express yourself better through an image as it can add to the mood of a photo and I really enjoy experimenting with different kinds of lighting when I shoot. It’s the most interesting thing when light can change up a whole scene and/or the subject from different angles/perspectives.

What are some of your interests apart from photography? Well besides photography, I read quite a bit in my free time and write as well. Also I watch lots of TV shows (probably one too many haha), mostly crime/murder mystery shows, I’m such a sucker for those kind of shows!! I love movies as well, I think they’re a great source of inspiration for my photography.

Describe the perfect lighting to shoot in. I have to say that my absolute favourite lighting to shoot in is at the golden hour when the sun is setting or in the late afternoon, in direct sunlight or backlit. The light is all soft and golden and not exactly overhead that it would cast shadows on your subject’s face. Also I like shooting indoors when there is a source of natural light (by the window for example) as well as the perfect balance of shadows.

Do you prefer taking self portraits or portraits of others? Why? It kind of just depends on my mood, I suppose. Most of the time I prefer self-portraiture because I usually have a hard time finding models and/or some of them wouldn’t want to get down and dirty for a photo. But I prefer self-portraiture also because I find that I’m able to express myself better that way and it’s somewhat therapeutic. It also gives my work a more personal feel. I like photographing others almost as much as I do taking self-portraits but I feel that I’ve still got a lot of room to improve on it and experiment. How important do you think light is to your work? Like all other artists, I think that light is an essential part of work because it’s such a powerful component. It can really make or

Who or what has inspired your photography the most? Well almost everyone whose work I follow on flickr/facebook has influenced my work (Laura Makabresku, Gina Vasquez, Carol Persons & Moritz Aust, to name a few), but it really just changes around everytime I guess. I pick up inspiration from a lot of people as well as other forms of art like books, paintings, movies and music. The little things that I come across in my everyday life inspire me too, like the way light falls between a thick canopy of trees or a cool-looking tree or a stranger I see on the street. Sometimes I get an idea/concept in my head at the unexpected times and places! How important do you think the idea of “growth” is to your work? I think growth is the quintessence of my work. I’m rarely very pleased with my work and I’m always reminding myself to keep creating and growing in photography. I don’t think there will be a point where I will be happy with everything I shoot/create so I’ll have to keep pushing myself to do better, create better images, technically and aesthetically. I also grow emotionally and overall as a person and as an artist through my work. Sometimes when I’m in a creative rut I just feel like there is so much bottled up inside of me and once I start creating and expressing myself again, everything just gets better and it passes (as cheesy as it sounds).

march 2014

105


march 2014

107


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

109


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


Francesca Perticarini

16 YEARS // ITALY ://www.flickr.com/freenflash/ http

111

march 2014


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue Introduce yourself. Who are you? I’m Francesca but everybody calls me Freen. I live in a small town along the east coast of Italy. I love travelling, exploring unknown places, music and all art in general. I’m a student and I use photography to express myself and to escape from my daily routine. How long have you been taking photos for? How has your work developed since you first started? It can be strange but everything started when I wrote a letter to Santa Claus! I’ve finally received my camera at the end of 2010 and I took photos of everything just for fun and to try something new. I went more through photography when I saw awesome works on flickr and other websites. I began gradually to take it seriously and I started to learn, to make mistakes and to try all over again. I think my works are changed a lot and I’ve made the same thing too. Now I’m definitely more confident with my works but I know how much I have to improve. Do you typically take self portraits or portraits of others? Why? I’m not able to take portraits as well as fine photography or nature, however I take portraits of others because it gives you the opportunity to stand out the person in front of the camera and it is also a new way to met new people.

Tell us a bit about the photos you’ve chosen. Which photo is the favorite photo you’ve ever taken? I think ‘’Stand by me’’ is absolutely my favorite one. This photo is a symbol of a friendship with my classmate and is the best photo where I can see an impressive progress on editing. How important do you think post-processing is to your photography? How long do you typically spend editing a photo? I think is the best part of my photography. I love editing photos because you can create anything you want. You can be an owner of a different world and you can push you over your limits. I usually take around 30-60 minutes according to the idea I have. Why do you create? I create to make my own world and to explore different viewpoints. It is just a different way to escape from the reality. How is the theme of ‘’growth’’ important to you, and how do you think it can be shown in your art? I am growing up both like a person and like an artist. Being mature is really important, it isn’t when you blow out a candle makes you a better person, but is a long process of constancy, patience and determination. I learned from my mistakes and I always try to make my best setting new goals and accepting critical.


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue


march 2014

115


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue

1

4

2


3

Staff Picks 1. Marija Majerle // 2. Christina Moschino Wilson // 3. Corali Cros // 4. Daniel Ernst

march 2014

117


LOST FREEDOM MAGAZINE // the growth issue

Interested In Submitting? Beginning with the next issue, Lost Freedom is going to return to unthemed issues! To submit please send an email to submit@lostfreedommagazine.com with the following: 1. Name/age/location and a link to your work (flickr, blog, portfolio, etc.) 2. At least 3 (low-res) pieces of artwork that exemplify the theme. (For writers please send 2 pieces of writing) 3. A short answer of why you create and why art is important to you.


march 2014

119


LOST FREEDOM

MAGAZINE

LOST FREEDOM March 2014  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you