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Marketing & Communications Staff Jaguar Busuego

Production Designer

Ari DeSano Platform and Systems Manager

Gil Diaz

Media and Public Relations Director

Kelly Freter Director

Greg Hernandez Writer/Editor

Melantha Hodge

Strategic Partnership Manager

Megan Kastner

Operations Manager

Jeremy Kinser Managing Editor

Josiah Pak Art Director

Callie Rodgers

Multimedia Production Manager

Kurt Thomas

Creative Services Manager

Chase Torrence

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Content Manager

SUMMER 2018

Contributors Lisa Allen

Camille Elston

Christina Dodson

Sam McGuire

Photographer

Photographer

Lorri L. Jean

CEO, Los Angeles LGBT Center

Photographer

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Photographer Photographer

Dominic Wendel Photographer

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Tess Ayers Secretary David J. Bailey Board Co-Chair LuAnn Boylan Tad Brown Tyler Cassity Treasurer Kin W. Cheng Carolyn A. Dye Susan Feniger Alfred Fraijo, Jr. Annie Goto

Dean Hansell

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Ian Harvie Marki J. Knox, M.D. Board Co-Chair

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Michael Lombardo Mike Mueller Peter Paige Jayzen Patria

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A Beacon of Hope

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Resist. Persist.

JOIN OUR CONVERSATION ON SOCIAL MEDIA

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Take Five WITH VOLUNTEER HERMINA BAN AND PROGRAM COORDINATOR CAMERON VARNEY

Let’s Move!

You’re F*cking Worth It GET PrEP’d AF

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UPDATES ON THE ANITA MAY ROSENSTEIN CAMPUS

The Buzz

LGBT SENIORS FIND THEIR GROOVE AT THE CENTER

Carlos Medina Loren S. Ostrow

CEO Letter 25 YEARS OF RIDING TO END AIDS

Board of Directors Karim Abay

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Leka Romao

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Past is Prologue ALFRED FRAIJO, JR. JOINS THE CENTER’S BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Hollywood Gives Back WHY ONE ACTRESS IS LEAVING A LEGACY GIFT TO THE CENTER

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Center Notes

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Center Voices

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Photo Finish

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Why I Give BY SHOSHANA BEAN

Frank Pond Eric M. Shore Bruce Vilanch

Subscriptions Vanguard is published quarterly by the Los Angeles LGBT Center, a nonprofit corporation. McDonald/Wright Building, 1625 N. Schrader Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90028, Voice 323-993-7400 • TDD 323-993-7698. Copyright 2018, Vanguard. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA. Publication of the name, quotation or photograph of a person in articles or advertising is not an indication of the sexual orientation or the HIV status of such person. Moving, getting duplicate mailings, or wish to be removed from the Vanguard mailing list? Please email mediarelations@lalgbtcenter.org

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CEO

LETTER

25 YEARS OF RIDING TO END AIDS

Together We've Made a Difference J

CEO Lorri L. Jean  @LorriLJean

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ust over 25 years ago, a rag-tag band of about 500 cyclists and 100 volunteers rolled into West Hollywood after spending a week on the road from San Francisco. We could hardly believe it—we had raised a million dollars from our friends and families to provide critical medical services at the Center to people with HIV and AIDS! This is what I reflected on, just a few weeks ago, as some 2,340 cyclists and 700 “roadie” volunteers crossed the finish line of this year’s AIDS/LifeCycle. It surely would have seemed like a pipe dream in 1994 that in 2018 we would raise $16.6 million for the HIV and AIDS-related services of the Center and San Francisco AIDS Foundation. It was, as always, an astonishing and inspiring feat—more so given the longevity of this event. For 25 years (eight years as California AIDS Ride and 17 as AIDS/ LifeCycle) we have been riding and evangelizing to raise scores of millions of dollars for HIV care, prevention, and education. As usual, I was with the participants every mile of the way. I’ve done it on a bike three times, powering myself home.

Every other time I’ve traveled in a motorized vehicle, visiting all of the rest stops and lunches, cheering on cyclists, thanking volunteers, and doing my best to entertain folks and put the whole thing in context each night from camp stage. So much has changed since our first ride in 1994. Back then, AIDS was the No.1 cause of death of adults in this country. Our state-of-the-art Jeffrey Goodman Special Care Clinic was just a year old. The stigma that surrounded HIV and AIDS was intense and often debilitating. LGBT people had become far too accustomed to death and dying among our young friends, and it often felt like we were in the fight alone. California would not pass broad non-discrimination protections for LGB people for another six years (10 years for trans people). The prospect of marriage equality seemed like an impossible dream. Twenty-five years later much in our world has changed. In 1994, 49% of the public felt that homosexuality should be discouraged by society. Today, 70% believe it should be accepted and majorities in both political


parties support acceptance (86% of Dem- make sure people who need care get it, ocrats and 54% of Republicans). And HIV is now a chronic, manageable disease marriage equality is the law of the land. for most Americans. While stigma has not We’re also no longer alone in the fight disappeared, it has certainly diminished against HIV/AIDS. While it was an al- for many. Best of all, now a pill taken most-entirely LGBT crowd of courageous once a day can prevent HIV infection and participants on the vastly reduce the ride in 1994, the likelihood of group is about 30% Today AIDS is no longer transmission. (For allies today. They more information get a huge dose of the No. 1 cause of death. on pre-exposure queer culture on the Thanks to the advent of prophylaxis, or ride, and I always PrEP, which is new medications, ever feel like we’ve creat99% effective in ed allies for life as a improving treatments, preventing HIV, result of our experi- and organizations like the visit PrEPhere.org) ence together. But this doesn’t Of course, the Center that make sure mean the crisis AIDS/LifeCycle is an people who need care get is over. In the athletic accomplishmost recent year it, HIV is now a chronic, ment, but the most reported by the powerful transfor- manageable disease for CDC (2016), nearmation is that—no ly 7,000 Amerimost Americans. matter our age, race, cans died because sexual orientation, of AIDS-related gender identity or HIV status—over the complications, 18,160 received an AIDS week of riding and working together, we diagnosis, and nearly 40,000 were newly become a community dedicated to one diagnosed with HIV. And, more than single goal: making a difference in the 15% of those living with HIV don’t know fight against HIV and AIDS. their status. HIV continues to disproporAnd we have made a difference. To- tionately affect our community. Gay and day AIDS is no longer the No. 1 cause bisexual men account for 67% of the diof death. Thanks to the advent of new agnoses nationwide and over 87% in Los medications, ever improving treatments, Angeles. Within this group, the greatest and organizations like the Center that rates of infection are among gay and

bisexual men of color, especially young Black and Latino men. Transgender women are also at great risk. According to recent statistics, around a quarter of all transgender women—and more than half of Black transgender women—are living with HIV. These sobering facts clearly signify that we must remain vigilant. It takes hard work to ensure that our community, especially those most at risk, get the care they need. Our staff continues to work with commitment and compassion, and our AIDS/LifeCycle riders and roadies continue to rise to the challenge. For 25 years, we have battled headwinds and brutal hills, experienced political and social upheavals, and suffered electoral setbacks. Through it all, one thing endures: The Center remains as dedicated to the fight against HIV and AIDS as we were in 1994.

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tQ B g L Y a D F r E e A l L CoN f E r E n C e Y o Ut H

PRESENTED BY

CaL StAtE L a SaTuRdAy, OcToBeR 20 YoUtH TrAcK

PaReNt & PrOfEsSiOnAl InStItUtE

Models of Pride is the world’s largest FREE conference for LGBTQ youth and allies ages 24 and under. The full-day event features an Opening Session, over 100 workshops, lunch, resource fair, college fair, job fair, an exciting entertainment hour, dinner, and outdoor dance party–all free! Come learn about the LGBTQ community, make lifelong connections, and have a blast!

The Parent & Professional Institute (PPI) at Models of Pride offers family members, educators, professionals, and all other adult supporters of LGBTQ youth an unparalleled opportunity to learn, network, and develop community with others on a similar journey. The day will include dozens of tailored workshops, discussions, resources, and exclusive programming.

Learn more and register at

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#MoDeLsoFPrIdE 6

Summer 2018

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Información en Español: modelsofpride.org/espanol


BUZZ WORTHY

Get Social Soc THE CENTER’S SOCIAL MEDIA HIGHLIGHTS

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HOW THE CENTER’S

LGBT SENIORS ARE

WORKING THEIR

BODIES AND MINDS

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P eterson had already spent an hour taking part in a juggling class before heading downstairs to the Center’s Advocate & Gochis Galleries at The Village at Ed Gould Plaza to teach more than a dozen of her fellow seniors how to tap dance. “I turned 60 two days ago,” Peterson, pictured left, tells the beginners tap class as they do warm-up stretches to Cher’s power ballad You Haven’t Seen the Last of Me. She then teaches the group some basic tap steps. By the end of the hour, most have caught on and are able to complete a routine set to Frank Sinatra’s The Best is Yet to Come. »» auren

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The tap class is among more than 100 different health and fitness classes, activities, and events offered each month at the Center for LGBT seniors. In addition to beginning tap dancing lessons and juggling, recent classes include chair yoga, country line dancing, ballroom dancing, hiking, and Qi Gong, which is a holistic system of coordinated body posture and movement, breathing, and meditation. “There are actually too many activities to do,” Peterson jokes as she packs up her music after class. “It’s like, ‘When do we f it tap class in? We have to do it after chair yoga and we don’t want to interfere with juggling.’” She adds: “it’s important for seniors to stay active for our quality of life. We want to be able to be mobile. We want to be able to do things that are fun. We’re getting up, we’re active, we’re improving our own health and forming community.” Kenny Navran, one of the students in Peterson’s class, had been wanting to learn tap dancing for 25 years. He’s thrilled to f inally be doing it. “It’s a pretty good workout—I never sweat anymore at my age,” he says. “This class is turning into one of my major exercise routines of the week. It’s not just fun, it’s good for you physically and mentally. It requires a lot of thought to do the steps correctly and in time.” Meanwhile, Larry Rubenstein, who teaches a computer class at the Center, couldn’t resist taking up juggling. “I think our bodies are ready to close down after 50,” he says. “You have to force yourself to stay active to keep yourself going.” Phyllis Rose-Child has also been taking the juggling class which she says has helped her maintain her policy of leaving the house at least once a day.

Getting out, moving, connecting with other people, learning, and laughing is what we need to do as we get older.

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“It is a quality of life issue,” she says. “I love coming here because there are so many different things to do and to learn and it challenges me every time. It doesn’t matter if I’m perfect at it or not. There are so many activities. I’m totally amazed that all of this is offered for free.” Kiera Pollock, the Center’s director of Senior Services, has noticed an increase in participation in health and wellness activities in general during the past year. “We know the more active you are, and the more engaged you are in the community around you, the more it helps you live longer and be more vibrant,” she says. “Getting out, moving, connecting with other people, learning, and laughing is what we need to do as we get older.” Pollock has seen first-hand how being less sedentary has resulted in some of the Center’s seniors having less feelings of depression and anxiety. “One senior came up to me who had never done line dancing before and told me that he’d found his groove for the first time in his life,” she says. The line dancing class is instructed by senior volunteer Matthew Dubois, who enthusiastically teaches the cowboy cha-cha, country western waltz, and other dances. “Learning line dance requires a part of your brain you don’t normally use,” Dubois explains. “It forces you to stretch your brain which is really good for seniors, like learning a new language but easier. It’s fun and you can do it with a big old cowboy flair. When I dance I feel like the music transports me and I go to another place, one that is gentler and kinder. I see the same thing with my students. They smile so much during class.”

When do we fit tap class in? We have to do it after chair yoga and we don’t want to interfere with juggling.

TO LE A R N M O R E A B O U T A LL O F T H E C E N T E R ’ S PRO G R A M S A N D ACTI V ITI E S F O R LG BT S E N I O R S , V I S IT L A LG BTC E N T E R .O RG/S E N I O R S

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PrEP TALK

Safe. Affordable. Effective. THE CENTER’S NEW CAMPAIGN WANTS YOU TO GET ‘PrEP’d AF’

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n communities of color, there is so much stigma around sex, being gay, and HIV that people are scared to even talk about PrEP—and • Milan Christopher (left) as featured in a campaign ad. many more don’t even know about messages and commands attention,” says Center Chief of Staff Darrel it,” says Milan Christopher, the open- says the Center’s Associate Director Cummings. “Communities of color ly gay music artist, actor, model, and of Community Health Programs Bri- continue to be the hardest hit by new face of the Los Angeles LGBT Center’s an Toynes. HIV infections, making the awareness new PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) Ever since F*ck w/out Fear and accessibility of PrEP an ever more awareness and education campaign. launched in early 2017, the Center urgent priority.” With Christopher’s help, the has seen a 130 percent increase in the Christopher recently helped PrEP’d AF campaign will reach those number of young gay and bisexual launch PrEP’d AF at an event held most at-risk for HIV. According to the men who have accessed PrEP. But, in collaboration with B.A.S.H. L.A.’s U.S. Centers for Disease Control and there’s still plenty of work to be done. STARBOY Sundays party at RAGE Prevention (CDC), minority commuAccording to a study from AIDS nightclub in West Hollywood. nities, especially African-American/ Project Los Angeles “We have got to get Black men who have sex with men, (APLA) Health, those rid of this disease,” he are particularly at-risk for new HIV most at risk for new Communities of told the crowd. “PrEP infections. When used as prescribed, HIV infections—gay is here, and PrEP will PrEP is a safe and effective once-daily and bisexual youth of color continue to help us get rid of it!” medicine that has been proven to re- color and transgender be the hardest PrEP is covered by duce the risk of HIV infection by up women—are the least most insurance plans hit by new HIV to 99 percent. and, for those who are likely to know about “I’m proud to be a part of this PrEP. In fact, the study infections, making uninsured, the Center campaign because I want PrEP to be found that less than 10 can help make it affordthe awareness something we can talk about in the percent of Latino and able through patient open so, ultimately, we can stop the A f r ic a n - A m e r ic a n / and accessibility assistance programs. To spread of HIV and save lives,” says Black youth are using of PrEP an ever renew a three-month Christopher, who is sharing his per- PrEP. Among those prescription for PrEP, sonal experience with PrEP as part of who do know about more urgent clients need to return the campaign. to their provider for PrEP, misconceptions priority. The new campaign, which encour- about its safety and HIV and STI screenages the community to be as prepared eff icacy, as well as stigma from the ings. Although PrEP has been proven as possible to protect themselves community, have impacted its use. to be 99 percent effective at preventing against the spread of HIV, expands “We are so pleased to have Milan HIV, it offers no protection from other upon the success of the Center’s atten- as a spokesperson for PrEP’d AF to sexually transmitted infections (STIs). tion-grabbing F*ck w/out Fear HIV raise awareness for PrEP and to help Condoms remain the best protection prevention campaign. dispel stigma and misconceptions that for most STIs. “That campaign was a throwback may be preventing people from takto the rallying, rebellious spirit on ing advantage of this important opwhich the Center was founded, us- portunity to stop the spread of HIV,” ing authentic language that breaks through the clutter of prevention To learn more about the campaign and PrEP, and to book a free PrEP consultation online, visit PrEPHere.org.

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Summer 2018


YOU’RE YOU’REFF CKING CKINGWORTH WORTHITIT SAFE. SAFE.AFFORDABLE. AFFORDABLE.EFFECTIVE. EFFECTIVE.

PREPHERE.ORG PREPHERE.ORG Summer Summer 20182018 13 13


CAMPUS UPDATE

Topping Off: A Campus Milestone UPDATES ON THE CENTER’S NEW ANITA MAY ROSENSTEIN CAMPUS

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s a crowd of more than 200 people

watched, a crane hoisted the final steel beam high into the air and placed it on the eastern wall of the new Senior Center at the Los Angeles LGBT Center’s Anita May Rosenstein Campus on Thursday, May 24. It was the key moment in an emotional topping off ceremony–a traditional event held by builders when the last beam is placed atop a structure during its construction. “This new campus is not only going to be a dynamic and vibrant hub and be iconic for our community around the world, it is going to provide much-needed homes to some of the most vulnerable parts of our community,” said Center CEO Lorri L. Jean at a lunch following the ceremony for construction crews from Swinerton Builders alongside the Center’s Capital Campaign donors.

GOT

HARD HATS? Hard hat tours of the campus construction site are starting to get underway! For more information, call Bill McDermott at 323-993-7679. 14

Summer 2018

“This isn’t just some office complex you’re creating,” Jean added. “Instead, you have some very precious lives in your hands. What you are building will become a safe and loving home for hundreds of people who desperately need such homes. Thousands more will visit every day to get services that will make an enormous difference in their lives, enabling them to live up to their full potential.”

50 for 50!

The topping off ceremony is a rare opportunity “when the suits get to honor the boots,” said Rodney Freeman of Freeman Group Inc., the Center’s representative in overseeing the construction. “We get to honor these people in the trades that are helping us create this incredible center. There’s a tree on the beam that’s a symbol of bringing life to our new building. It’s a symbol of appreciation with good luck, future growth, and activity.”

We have set our sights on a bold milestone by the time the ribbon is cut on the new campus in 2019: raising $1 million for every year the Center will have served our community.

To learn more about what you can do to help us reach this goal, visit lalgbtcenter.org/campus or call Bill McDermott at 323-993-7679.


This isn’t just some office complex you’re creating. You have some very precious lives in your hands.

Watch construction webcam:

techcam.net/lgbt/#home


PERSIST

We Resist We Persist UPDATES ON THE CENTER’S ONGOING RESISTANCE AND POLICY ACTIONS

"THIS CASE—AND NOW THIS DECISION—HAS CONFUSED MANY WELL-INTENTIONED PEOPLE WHO ASK, 'WHY DIDN’T THIS COUPLE JUST GO SOMEWHERE ELSE TO GET THEIR CAKE?' IT IS CRITICAL TO UNDERSTAND THAT, AT ITS HEART, THIS CASE IS NOT ABOUT BUYING A WEDDING CAKE ANY MORE THAN THE SIT-INS AT LUNCH COUNTERS DURING THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT WERE ABOUT GETTING A HAMBURGER AND A COKE.” U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission Read more at vanguardnow.org/cake

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SCENES FROM THE RESISTANCE

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A special contingent (1-3) was added to the Los Angeles LGBT Center’s marching group at L.A. Pride in the aftermath of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Masterpiece Cakeshop decision. The group wore pink shirts and carried signs highlighting the 31 states where discrimination against LGBT people is still legal. Members from the Center’s Youth Center also held a “Gaykery Cake Off” (4) featuring Pride-themed cakes. Center supporters (5) joined this year’s May Day march for immigrant rights in Los Angeles and a rally (6) in front of Los Angeles Unified School District’s headquarters urging the district’s board of education to take action in a wide range of areas including increased LGBTQ+ competency training for teachers, staff, and administrators. Members of the Center’s Resistance Squad also participated in (7) LGBTQ Advocacy Day at the State Capitol in Sacramento to advocate for LGBTQ youth and HIV healthcare; a rally (8) at the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in Pasadena in support of preserving the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program; and an office visit (9) with California’s Senator Leyva to talk about supporting foster youth access to gender-affirming care, providing services to LGBTQ young people experiencing homelessness, and getting CA to zero HIV transmissions.

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The Center’s tremendous volunteers help provide programs and services for more LGBT people than any other organization in the world. Thank you! Join our community of more than 1,800 active monthly volunteers at lalgbtcenter.org/volunteer.


Take 5 HERMINA BAN Minutes

FIVE

Volunteer ››

HOMETOWN Safed, Israel

GET TO KNOW CENTER STAFF MEMBERS & VOLUNTEERS

YEAR STARTED AT THE CENTER 2001 VOLUNTEER POSITION Cultural Arts/ Special Events

I FEEL LIKE THE CENTER IS MY SECOND HOME, MY SECOND FAMILY.

I have volunteered at hundreds of events over the years, including most shows, plays, and musical events at the Renberg Theatre and the Davidson/Valentini Theatre (both at the Center’s Village at Ed Gould Plaza). This has enriched my life in so many ways and allowed me to gain insight into a variety of things that occur behind the scenes when putting on a major event or show. I love talking to people, meeting people. I’m really interested in them and I’m a good listener. It’s important to be friendly, welcoming, and to help ensure people have a good time. I feel like I’m kind of hosting. The Center is like my second home, my second family. When people come here I want to make sure they feel welcome. I just feel proud to be associated with a center like this one. The pride and joy I feel at the end of my volunteer shift often stays with me for days. LEARN MORE ABOUT WHAT’S ON THE CENTER’S STAGES AT LALGBTCENTER.ORG/THEATRE READY TO VOLUNTEER? GET STARTED AT LALGBTCENTER.ORG/VOLUNTEER

Staff ››

HERMINA BAN

CAMERON VARNEY HOMETOWN Whittier, CA YEAR STARTED AT THE CENTER 2016 STAFF POSITION Program Coordinator at Trans Wellness Center

CAMERON VARNEY

THE CENTER WAS ALWAYS A BEACON OF HOPE. Growing up in Los Angeles in a conservative Christian family, the Center was always a beacon of hope for me. Once I was out on my own, I was able to pursue transitioning and nine years ago sought services at the Center as a client. In the fall of 2015, I attended the Center’s Trans Job Fair. I was hired a few months later as a health education specialist then later became a benefits navigator, which meant I was helping people figure out their health insurance options. Becoming an employee felt like coming full circle. I was able to provide better client care because I knew exactly what it was like on their side of things. I applied for my job at the Trans Wellness Center as soon as it was posted. I want to help make sure the community knows we are there for them. Some of the most rewarding interactions I have had are with our most vulnerable populations, including trans sex workers. I was able to help some of them get on PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) as a way to help prevent HIV transmission. This is critical because the trans community is so overrepresented in new cases of HIV. LEARN MORE ABOUT THE TRANS WELLNESS CENTER AT MYTRANSWELLNESS.ORG Summer 2018

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BOARD PROFILE

What’s Past is Prologue MEET NEW CENTER BOARD MEMBER ALFRED FRAIJO, JR.

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os Angeles native Alfred Fraijo, Jr., knew little about the Los Angeles LGBT Center while growing up on the Eastside. That changed when he became a student at Loyola Law School. “Being a poor student in law school, I couldn’t afford healthcare,” he explained. “When I learned that the Center operated a health clinic, it quickly became an amazing resource for me whenever I needed to see a doctor.” Fast forward a couple of decades. Fraijo, now a successful partner with global firm Sheppard, Mullin, Richter & Hampton specializing in state and federal land use and environment law, would connect with the Center again—this time to play an integral role in expanding the Center’s programs and services to better serve the same Latino working class neighborhood where he grew up. Fraijo and his husband, Arturo Becerra, had purchased a commercial building located next to the Pico Gardens housing project in Boyle Heights in 2014. They created City Labs, a locally owned, purpose-driven collaborative space for innovators, entrepreneurs, and creatives who want to serve

the Boyle Heights community. The couple then began to look for organizations that needed a place—or lab—to grow. One of the first people Fraijo approached was Latino Equality Alliance (LEA) Co-Founder and Advisory Board Chair Ari Gutierrez Arambula. “Ari told me she was searching for an office space to launch Mi Centro, a joint project between LEA and the Center that would provide bilingual social services for LGBT Latinos,” said Fraijo. “I had this dream to one day open an LGBT resource center in Boyle Heights so that LGBT Latinos didn’t feel as isolated as I did while growing up in this neighborhood. After learning more about Mi Centro’s mission, I decided this was the beginning of my new journey with the Center!” With Fraijo’s help, Mi Centro opened in 2015. “The opening of this Boyle Heights facility realizes a longtime objective of the Center to expand services beyond our Hollywood sites,” said Center CEO Lorri

L. Jean. “We have many clients who travel long distances to obtain services at the Center and we also know there is a growing need for LGBT-specific services throughout eastside neighborhoods.” Now, Fraijo is connecting to the Center again as one of the newest Board members. As the son of Mexican immigrants, Fraijo wants to help further shape the Center’s priorities to continue increasing services for, and outreach to, LGBT Latinos. “After living in the Bay Area where I began my environmental law practice, I decided to move back to Los Angeles and get involved locally. I realize I could have chosen to live anywhere, but I wanted to return because I feel committed to investing in my neighborhood and the city,” said Fraijo, who still lives in Los Angeles with his husband and their son. “That’s the same feeling I have for the Center: I want to strengthen this organization’s legacy for future generations. Plus, I’m incredibly grateful for what the Center provided for me during law school. It’s my time to give back.”

I want to strengthen this organization’s legacy for future generations. It’s my time to give back.

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THANK YOU

GOLD CIRCLE

The Los Angeles LGBT Center is extremely grateful for the support of the following new Sustaining Donors and Circle of Life members.

$6,000-$11,999

Laurie Crane & Dennis Crane* Ted Gagliano Glenn D. Smith Kevin M. Williamson*

Timothy J. Cunningham Alfred Fraijo & Arturo Beccera Richard Gadsden^ Scott J. Harris Robert Loving Jeffrey A. Martin Kate Motonaga^ Michael Newby James Noel^ William Petrasich^ Konrad Ribeiro & Jenn Ribeiro Alejandro Villageliu

SILVER CIRCLE

CIRCLE OF LIFE

Christopher Carrington & Joshua P. Sassoon* Gerhardt H. Felgemaker & Jim Hill*

STERLING CIRCLE $3,600-$5,999

$2,400-$3,599

Robert Cashman* Jack A. Jones Jonathan G. King* David Lubell* Charlie Pohlad* John R. Nicholson* David R. Wood*^

SILVER CIRCLE For information about Planned Giving or becoming a Sustaining Donor, please contact:

SILVER CIRCLE (cont.)

$1,800-$2,399

Jarryd Christensen*^ Kelly Freter Paul Menke* Josh Ravetch Steve Schleier*

Steve Blackwell Robert Bracken & George Applegate Alvan Gendein, M.D. Gregory Ross & John Schuning Jim Rudolph & Gonzalo Herrara-Rudolph W. Donald Shaw Zachary Smith & Virginia Thorson John F. Stephens

CIRCLE OF LIFE IN MEMORIAM Kenneth P. Hahn Kermit E. Hartley Karl Kleinz Charles L. White

Jennifer Dawson Director of Major Gifts jdawson@lalgbtcenter.org 323-993-8932

Scott Comer

SILVER CIRCLE $1,500-$1,799

Gloria Angelica Alba Lee Brinkmoeller Jasmin Savoy Brown

DONOR LIST AS OF APRIL 30, 2018

*Indicates an increase in membership level. ^Indicates a multiyear pledge.

Major Gifts Officer scomer@lalgbtcenter.org 323-993-7667

Kenneth Jones Major Gifts Associate kjones@lalgbtcenter.org 323-993-8939

Frank Stasio Senior Director of Planned Giving fstasio@lalgbtcenter.org 323-993-7690

REALIZE THE POWER OF A GIFT. Making the Center part of your legacy in your will is the most important contribution you can make to the organization. Ways to give include wills and living trusts; beneficiary designations; charitable gift annuities, remainder trusts, and lead trusts; memorials and tribute gifts; and real estate. By including the Center in your estate plan or making another type of planned gift, you help ensure a strong and vibrant future for the Center as we build a world where LGBT people thrive as healthy, equal, and complete members of society. LEARN MORE AT LALGBTCENTER.ORG/LEGACY.

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From Latchkey to Legacy ONE OF HOLLYWOOD’S OWN GIVES BACK

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ctress Michelle C. Bonilla grew up in Hollywood and was raised by a working mother. She often found herself in the position of being a latchkey kid and would go to Shakey’s Pizza on Santa Monica Boulevard to play video games after school. She fondly remembers a group of “beautiful, tall, gorgeous, friendly gals” with boas, incredible clothes, and fabulous make-up standing on the corner who would always look out for her. “They told me to get home when it was getting dark and always watched out for me while I skateboarded my way home up work grew. “When I took the tour of the Center and the street,” Bonilla remembers. “Of course saw what it does for youth now I know they were either men in drag in Los Angeles, I was just or transgender and working to make ends meet. They cared enough to make sure I floored and touched beyond belief,” she recalls. was okay and I will never forget that.” As an adult, Bonilla found that same “I believe in the mission feeling of community connection and sup- of the Center and what it does to help our commuport at the Los Angeles LGBT Center. “The Center cares, much like ‘the gals’ nity thrive.” Her partner passed did for me when I was little, for the unaway more than two years der-protected in our community, all while ago, but recently, when it uplifting the spirits of those they serve,” she says. “The Center is helping the commu- came time to give away her nity I grew up in with incredible passion, things, Bonilla donated her partner’s entire wardrobe compassion, and direction.” to the Center’s TransgenBonilla, who has had recurring roles on ER and Dr. Quinn: Medicine Woman, der Empowerment Project met her partner at a Center event in 2003. because “she was always As the couple got to know the Center bet- willing to help those she could.” Her partner’s passing also led Bonilla ter, their appreciation and respect for its

to realize the importance of leaving a gift to someone or something that means a lot to you, including an organization close to your heart. Now, Bonilla has joined the Center’s Circle of Life by including it in her estate plan. “When it came time to put my own affairs in order, I absolutely wanted to name the Center as one of the beneficiaries,” she says. “This was something I had to do. It was the right thing to do and I feel great knowing I have done it. It’s up to us to keep the Center going. I have great confidence in the future of the Center and support for its vision.”

When I took the tour of the Center and saw what it does for youth in Los Angeles, I was just floored and touched beyond belief.

Summer 2018

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Center Classes

Join the Center’s one-of-a-kind education and empowerment program, presented exclusively for the trans* community. More than 1,170 trans* individuals have joined the Trans* Lounge. Why haven’t you? How does Trans*Lounge work?

Trans* Lounge members:

• •

• • • • • • • • •

• •

Sign up online for free. Review and rate our library of workshops, groups, labs, and events. Your feedback determines our schedule. RSVP first for the programs you rated highest.

Participated in 100+ workshops and labs. Mastered the art of walking in heels. Performed original stand-up at The Comedy Store. Improved makeup skills. Received vocal training. Charted more optimistic career paths. Practiced yoga weekly. Wrote and performed personal monologues. Became more fit and learned how to live healthier lives.

Sign up at

translounge.org

...and we are just getting started!

¡Hablemos! Participe en la conversación en Mi Centro en Boyle Heights. Si usted es un adulto LGBTQ con 18 años o más y habla español, encuentre una comunidad de apoyo como parte del grupo Let’s Talk! (¡Hablemos!).

Cada segundo y cuarto Martes a las 7 p.m. (Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday at 7 p.m.) Mi Centro • 553 S. Clarence St. • Los Angeles, CA 90033 Para más información, escriba a groups@lalgbtcenter.org o llame al 323-860-7332.

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Community Groups (Cont.)

V AA Happy Hour Tuesdays–Fridays, 6:15–7:15 p.m. Canceled July 4

Al-Anon Gay Focus Thursdays, 7:30–8:30 p.m. V

V Alcoholics Anonymous: It’s Come to This Mondays, 6:15–7:15 p.m. Canceled September 3

 ay Men’s Prostate Cancer G Support Group Every 1st & 3rd Tues., 7–9 p.m. Sponsored by Cancer Support Community Benjamin Center. Call 310-314-2555 or visit CancerSupportCommunity BenjaminCenter.org

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Gay & Lesbian CODA Tuesdays, 8–9 p.m. V LFK (Leather, Fetish, and Kink) in Sobriety CMA Meeting Fridays, 8–9 p.m.

H HERstories* A gathering place for all LGBT women who want strong community and great conversation Mondays, 8–9:30 p.m. Canceled September 3

Marijuana Anonymous Wednesdays, 7:30–8:30 p.m. Canceled July 4 V

NA: Heartbeat of Recovery Mondays, 7:30–8:30 p.m. Canceled September 3 V

V OA Thursdays, 7:30–8:30 p.m. V Sex & Love Addicts Anonymous Thursdays, 6:15–7:15 p.m. V Sexual Compulsives Anonymous Mondays, 8:45–9:45 p.m. Wednesdays, 7:30–8:30 p.m. Saturdays, 10:30–11:30 a.m. Canceled July 4 and September 3 V UA: Artist in Prosperity Tuesdays, 6:15–7:15 p.m. V

Women’s AA Wednesdays, 8:45–9:45 p.m. Canceled July 4

 oming Out Workshops C for Women Coming Out Workshops for Men Safe, nurturing workshops for anyone who is facing their own coming out process.
 Call 877-OUT-4-LIFE for recorded information and instructions for enrollment. More information at comingoutla.org.

Community Groups

L L.A. Runway Assassins (LARA) Creative outlet for gay/bi men of color ages 16-29 interested in fashion and entertainment Fridays, 3–5:30 p.m.

L

Positive Images HIV+ Men’s Forum Mondays, 1–3 p.m. Wednesdays, 7–9 p.m. Thursdays, 6–8 p.m. Canceled July 4 and September 3 Call 323-860-7384 to RSVP

Movie Night For gay/bi men of color ages 16-29 Tuesdays, 5–7 p.m. Call 323-860-7345 to RSVP

McDonald/Wright 1625 N. Schrader Blvd.

H

Highland Annex 1220 N. Highland Ave.

 hair Yoga with C Master Lakshmi Wednesdays, 11 a.m.–Noon Canceled July 4

V Country Line Dancing Call 323-860-5830 for dates and times

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The Lounge at Las Palmas Social Support/Health Education group for gay/bi men of color, ages 16-29. Tuesdays, 6–8 p.m. Call 323-860-7345 for more information. H Transgender Perceptions* Conversation & communitybuilding for transgender and gender non-conforming people Fridays, 8–9:30 p.m.

Village Readers An LGBT reading and discussion group Every 1st Wed., 7:30–9 p.m. V

October 3: The Diamond Setter by Moshe Sakal

Men’s Speakeasy* Great conversation for gay, bisexual, and trans men Tuesdays, 8–9:30 p.m.

V

L Rated M For gay/bi men of color ages 16-29 to discuss dating, relationships, and healthy sex. Tuesdays, 1–4 p.m. Thursdays, 5:30–8.30 p.m. Call 323-993-7587 to RSVP

L Lit Life Group Drop-in social support group for gay/bi men of color ages 16-29 Tuesdays, 2–5 p.m. Call 323-860-7353 or 323-862-7334 to RSVP

H

V Bingo 1–2:30 p.m. Call 323-860-5830 for dates

Mi Coffee Club Every 2nd and 4th Thurs., 1–2 p.m.

LGBT Adult Special Needs Support Group Every 2nd Wed., 6–7:30 p.m.

L The Lounge A social support and health education group for same genderloving men of color ages 16-29. Tuesdays, 6–8 p.m. Call 323-860-7345 to RSVP

Senior Groups (Cont.)

V Queers+ Questions Every 2nd Mon., 7–8 p.m. Call 323-993-7587 to RSVP

August 1: Logical Family: A Memoir by Armistead Maupin

L

V 30+ Lesbian Chat Meet women outside of the bars Every 1st & 3rd Fri., 7:30–9 p.m.

M

L Ki Ki Drop-in, social networking group for gay/bi men of color ages 16-29 Mondays, 5–8 p.m. Call 323-993-7587 to RSVP Canceled September 3

V

Coming Out

The Village 1125 N. McCadden Place

V Bi-osphere* Explore and discuss the many shades of today’s diverse bisexual community Every 2nd & 4th Mon., 8–9:30 p.m. M

V Crystal Meth Anonymous Saturdays, 9:15–10:15 a.m.

V

V Bears L.A. Every 3rd Mon., 7–10 p.m.

Community Groups (Cont.)

September 5: Hindoo Holiday by J.R. Ackerley

Group Meetings

12-Step Groups

V HIV+ 50+ Men’s Drop-In Support Group Thursdays, 1–3 p.m. V H  ousing Supportive Network Every 2nd Thurs., 11 a.m.–Noon V Juggling Hour Thursdays, 10–11 a.m. V

L  ife Connections 21+ meets 50+ Call 323-860-5830 for dates and times. V Men’s Drop-In Support Group Wednesdays, 10 a.m.–Noon Canceled July 4 Mi Movie Club Every 4th Thurs. 2 p.m. V Movies for Everyone Call 323-860-5830 for dates and times V Qi Gong Call 323-860-5830 for dates and times V Thursday Hikes Thursdays, 9:30 a.m.

Senior Groups For more information about Senior Services classes, please call 323-860-7322 or visit facebook.com/50pluslgbt. To RSVP, email seniors@ lalgbtcenter.org or call 323-860-5830.

 alley Social V and Networking Group Thursdays, Noon–1:30 p.m. Metropolitan Community Church 5730 Cahuenga Blvd., North Hollywood Call 323-860-5830 V

Veteran’s Support Group Every last Tues., 1–3 p.m.

 lzheimer’s LGBT A Caregiver Support Every 2nd & 4th Thurs., 10:30 a.m.–Noon V

* Groups may not welcome late arrivals.

V Art Lab Fridays, 10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. V Bereavement Support Group Tuesdays, 1–3 p.m.

L

Offices on Las Palmas 1111 N. Las Palmas Ave.

Mi

Mi Centro 553 S. Clarence St.

Empty = Offsite

Summer 2018

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CENTER NOTES

News and notes from the Center’s life-changing and life-saving programs and services A SWEET RIDE On the 25th year of riding to end AIDS, more than 3,000 participants of AIDS/LifeCycle raised an amazing $16.6 million—a record amount in the event’s history—for San Francisco AIDS Foundation and the HIV/AIDS-related services of the Center. For the first time ever, cyclists of the weeklong event, held June 3-9, crossed the finish line in front of City Hall in downtown Los Angeles. The triumphant Finish Line Festival held at adjacent Grand Park—with promotional support from DTLA Proud—featured live music from DTLA’s hottest DJs, a bevy of food trucks, and a cheering section for friends and families who welcomed the stream of cyclists and volunteer “roadies” to Los Angeles. Register for AIDS/LifeCycle 2019, June 2-8, at aidslifecycle.org

CITI OF GOLD The Center has been selected by the prestigious Citi Foundation’s Community Progress Makers Fund to receive a $500,000 grant that will provide core support programs and services to LGBTQ youth experiencing homelessness and low-income seniors, including those who will live in the future Anita May Rosenstein Campus.

kers #ProgressMa “LGBT people continue to face threats to their longterm health, economic stability, and well-being. A staggering 40% of youth surviving on the streets of Hollywood identify as LGBTQ, and nearly a quarter of the LGBT seniors in Los Angeles live on less than $1,000 a month,” said Center CEO Lorri L. Jean. “With help from the Community Progress Makers Fund, we will continue to address barriers to affordable housing and steady employment as we work to build a world where every member of the LGBT community can thrive.” 26

Summer 2018

BY THE COMMUNITY. FOR THE COMMUNITY. After 10 years in the planning, the Trans Wellness Center opened its doors near the Koreatown and Wilshire Center neighborhoods. The Los Angeles LGBT Center joined five other local organizations to form the first-ofits-kind center. The Center is leading the management and operations support for the new wellness center. Funded through a $1 million grant spanning three to five years from the L.A. County Department of Public Health, the 3,000-square-foot center provides comprehensive resources and services for the transgender and non-binary communities.

For more information about the Trans Wellness Center, visit mytranswellness.org

IN SAFE HANDS

PRIDE NIGHT(S)

As part of its annual Public Safety Awards, the City of West Hollywood honored the Center’s Youth Center for “Outstanding Contribution to Public Safety.” This award is given to individuals, businesses, and organizations demonstrating leadership in any variety of ways that have contributed to a safer community.

Two of Los Angeles’ favorite franchises teamed up with the Center to celebrate Pride season.

In 2017 the Youth Center—open seven days a week—served more than 75,500 meals and more than 22,200 bed nights to youth experiencing homelessness. Through its Youth Employment Program, the Youth Center helped more than 146 homeless youth find jobs as a pathway to financial stability.

The Los Angeles Dodgers hosted LGBT Night in early June, with the Center's contingent cheering from the stands, courtesy of the Dodgers. U.S. Marine Corps Chief Warrant-2 William Duckworth, also part of the Center's Senior Services, was recognized during the middle of the second inning as the Dodgers’ Military Hero of the Game. Major League Soccer’s LA Galaxy celebrated their fifth annual Pride Night in late May at StubHub Center. In addition to partnering with the Center for promotions and tickets, the night featured various in-game activations celebrating the LGBTQ community, including special gear and giveaways.


CENTER VOICES

Analysis and insight from the Center’s staff on current issues and events facing our community The Center’s anti-domestic violence program, known as the STOP Violence Program, received funding for a new Safe Shelters Program, which also provides emergency housing assistance to LGBTQ+ victims of crime, as reported by The Pride LA.

SUSAN HOLT, PSYD, LMFT STOP Violence Program Manager Health Services

Excerpt: “Disturbingly, LGBT people experience intimate partner violence, sexual violence, and stalking at higher rates and, yet, few programs provide full services. The

Center is taking a vital step to protect, save, and empower victims of violent crimes.”

Los Angeles’ new Trans Wellness Center, formed by six local community organizations, including the Center which is leading the management and operations support, helps ensure trans individuals get access to necessary medical care, as reported by MetroWeekly.

As part of his online series Chosen Family, YouTube influencer Tyler Oakley visited the Youth Center to explore the harsh reality of LGBTQ youth experiencing homelessness. On any given day, there are 6,000 homeless youth ages 18-24 surviving on the streets in Los Angeles County—with a staggering 40 percent of them identifying as LGBTQ.

TANYA WITT

MARIANA MARROQUIN Program Manager Trans Wellness Center

“For the first time in the history of the transgender movement, trans and non-binary

KEVIN McCLOSKEY Associate Director Children, Youth & Family Services

Excerpt:

individuals finally have a safe, friendly, and non-judgmental area where they can find a wide range of vital services under one roof created by — and for—the community.”

Two years ago, the Center formed the Mob Squad, a volunteer group of LGBT seniors 50 years and older who are dedicated to changing policies against the LGBT community through letter writing, phone calls, and— soon—lobbying visits, as told to The Out Agenda.

Excerpt: “A lot of people think of the Los Angeles LGBT Center as a shelter, but we’re so much more than just beds. We have programs that serve the whole youth—from employment, education, and youth development to health services and mental health services. We look at all

the different aspects of the youth and try to meet their needs.”

National Community Center Policy Manager Policy and Community Building

Excerpt: “People often overlook that the senior population is one of the biggest turnouts at the polls so their voices are really important. It’s great to

get seniors involved in something like the Mob Squad because it helps the younger generation see that you can be older and still do activist work and be a vital part of the community.”

Read more at

Read more at

Watch at

Listen at

bit.ly/LGBTSTOPdv

bit.ly/TWCopens

bit.ly/LGBTChosenFamily

bit.ly/LGBTmobsquad Summer 2018

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PHOTO FINISH

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LA Pride Parade “Building the Future” was the Center’s theme for this year’s LA Pride, as (1) marchers maneuvered giant balloons depicting the Anita May Rosenstein Campus along the parade route on Santa Monica Boulevard in West Hollywood. The Center’s march contingency was comprised of (2-5) youth, seniors, volunteers, staff, and community members. Joining in the festivities were (6, left) U.S. Congressman Adam Schiff and Center CEO Lorri L. Jean (right).

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AIDS/LifeCycle

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(7) More than 2,300 cyclists rode out of Cow Palace in Daly City to begin their seven-day, 545-mile ride to end AIDS. Some of the week’s highlights included (8) the fantastical Otter Pop Stop at Mission Soledad; (9) the infamously challenging Quadbuster, where the steepest part of the climb ascends more than 800 feet; (10-11) the halfway point to Los Angeles; (12) and the traditional Red Dress Day. For the first time in the ride’s history, (13) participants triumphantly crossed the finish line in downtown Los Angeles. This year’s participants raised a record-breaking $16.6 million benefiting the HIV/AIDS-related services of the Center and San Francisco AIDS Foundation.

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PHOTO FINISH

WxW: For Women. By Women. More than 400 LBTQ women attended the inaugural day-long community celebration held at Barnsdall Art Park in Hollywood. (19) The Voice Top 11 finalist Stephanie Rice and (20) SORORITY theater troupe were among the entertainment lineup to perform on stage, while (21) DJ 2lips rocked the crowd at the outdoor resource fair, which included (22) Angel City Derby as one of the dozens of exhibitors.

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Simply diVine (14) Held for the first time at Hollywood Forever, (15) guests—among them (16, l-r) professional women’s basketball player Crissa Jackson and YouTube celebrity AmbersCloset; (17, second from right) Simply diVine co-chair and Center Board Member Susan Feniger surrounded by Superstore cast members (l-r) Nico Santos, Ben Feldman, and Lauren Ash—sampled delectable food and drinks offered by some of Los Angeles’ most popular restaurants, wineries, and breweries. (18) MasterChef Junior cast member Emily Chavez proffered delightful confections made by Milk Bar. For more information about Simply diVine, visit simplydivinela.org

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Summer 2018

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CineArte (23, l-r) Guitarist Hubie Wang and music artist Marley Munroe mesmerized audiences who attended the 5th annual queer Latinx festival at The Village at Ed Gould Plaza, among them (24, l-r) Candace Lopez, CineArte Film Program Director Karla Legaspy, and Marisa Rivas. The threeday event included short film programs, a special screening of STARZ network’s original series Vida, and (25) the Paraísos art exhibit. For more information about CineArte, visit cineartela.org

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Trans Wellness Center Grand Opening Providing comprehensive resources and services for transgender and non-binary people under one roof, including (29) a health exam room, the nation’s first-of-its-kind center opened its doors near the Koreatown and Wilshire Center neighborhoods with a community celebration, hosted by TWC’s leadership, including (30, l-r) Program Coordinator Cameron Varney, Community Advisory Board Member Thea Eskey, Community Advisory Board Staff Liaison Frankie Darling-Palacios, Program Manager Mariana Marroquin, Community Advisory Board Member Kery Ramirez, and Dominique Guillermo.

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LifeWorks LGBTQ Youth Awards (26, middle) With Farrah Moan of RuPaul’s Drag Race as the event’s hostess—flanked by Sister Bearonce (left) and Sister BamBam (right) of Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence—more than $37,000 in college scholarships were given to deserving youth, among them (27, middle) Eladio Gonzalez with guests Lourdes Arevalo (left) and Cristina Leal (right), and (28, middle) Safieh Moshir-Fatemi with friends Andrea Stain (left) and Bridget Brown (right).

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For more information about LifeWorks and its youth development and mentoring programs, visit lifeworksla.org

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Summer 2018

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PHOTO FINISH

GetCentered Luncheon (31) Held at the Taglyan Center, the annual soiree was held for guests to learn more about the Center’s vital programs and services.

LGBT Professional Reception (32) In addition to seeing a model of the future Anita May Rosenstein Campus, (33) LGBT professionals from a variety of industries gathered to socialize and network.

House Party: Michael Hadley Epstein (35, left) Longtime Center supporter Michael Hadley Epstein—with his partner Scott E. Schwimer (right)— hosted a party at the home of his late mother to raise support for the Center.

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Emerging Leaders Program For the first time, the Center’s newest group of LGBT activists from China was comprised of four women: (34, l-r) May Hou, Rex Zhang, Joelle Cai, and Frankie Law. Pictured with Center Chief of Staff Darrel Cummings (back row).

OneToCelebrate Sock Donation (36) The new sock company donated 150 single socks with several black-and-white designs to the Youth Center, delivered by company founder Philia Beroud. The socks were delivered stored inside two specially-designed drawers at the Center’s Youth Center and will be refilled by the company as the supply dwindles.

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Come and Knock on Our Door

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(37, second from left) Member of Parliament Dawn Butler of Britain, with (l-r) Children, Youth & Family Services Director Simon Costello, Butler’s LGBT Adviser Anthony Watson, and Youth Center volunteer Alan Reade, spoke to youth members about her political work. (38, left) U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin toured the Center, led by Center CEO Lorri L. Jean (right). (39, l-r) Singer-songwriters Jurni Rayne, Daphne Willis, and Johnny Lives helped to kick-off the Center’s new music fellowship with young people. (40, middle) writer, actor, producer Lena Waithe, with guests (l-r) Uzo Ejikeme and Stoney Michelli of Stuzo Clothing, hosted a brunch party benefiting the Youth Center. (41, middle) Grammy nominated and multi-platinum singer-songwriter Gizzle toured the Center, led by staff from the Center’s Marketing & Communications department, (left) Content Manager Chase Torrence and (right) Strategic Partnership Manager Melantha Hodge. (42) Youth members filmed an episode with YouTube personality Tyler Oakley (second row, right) for his Chosen Family web series. (43) Arrow cast member Colton Haynes dropped off gently-used clothing benefiting the Center’s youth members.

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GIVE

Why I Give Shoshana Bean

I

don’t know when—or how— it  began,  but I’ve never had any semblance of tolerance for inequality.  The  idea that someone’s skin color, sexual orientation,  gender identity,  or religion made them different, lessthan, or wrong is not how I was raised. My  inner circle  of friends and colleagues  have  always  been made up of a literal rainbow of f lavors, but I realize not everyone in the world was raised like I was.  I realize not everyone shares my views and my feelings.  I realize we are still dealing with a lot of hatred, fear, judgment,  and intolerance—forces that are destructive. The only way I know to respond to destruction is to create: Create more love, more art, more music, more beauty, more connection. When opposing forces seek to destroy or diminish, I seek to build. Three years ago,  I  sang the original demo for This Is Me which would later be used in the blockbuster movie The Greatest

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Summer 2018

Showman. When I heard the song for the first time, I knew instantly that Justin Paul

I wanted to call attention to the Center that has been fighting for, protecting, empowering, and caring for the underdogs for nearly 50 years. and Benj Pasek had written an incredibly important song. It was more than a hit record. It was an anthem for all underdogs:

all of us who have ever felt misunderstood, underestimated, unseen, unappreciated, unaccepted, unloved. I waited three long years to sing that song again and recorded my own version as soon as I was able. To donate the proceeds to the Center was a no-brainer for me  because I wanted to give to a place that’s local and speaks to a powerful and important cause. I wanted to call attention to the Center that has been f ighting for, protecting, empowering, and caring for the underdogs for nearly 50 years.  My peers, my co-workers, co-creators, best friends, my employers, and employees are all part of the LGBT community. They are my family. Their struggle is my struggle, their f ight is my f ight. And this song is our anthem. This is me. And this is why I give.

Broadway veteran and Billboard chart topping recording artist Bean is donating all of the proceeds from her single This Is Me to the Center. Download This Is Me on iTunes. To learn more, visit ShoshanaBean.com.


SHOW OFF YOUR SWAG SHOP ONLINE

LALGBTCENTER.ORG/STORE Summer 2018

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McDonald/Wright Building 1625 N. Schrader Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90028

Profile for Los Angeles LGBT Center

Vanguard Quarterly Summer 2018  

Vanguard Quarterly Summer 2018  

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