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About the Cover We reimagined an iconic image to help celebrate International Transgender Day of Visibility on March 31. Special thanks to our amazing volunteers and photo shoot crew members!

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On the Cover 1. Gina Bigham 2. Luckie Alexander 3. Luna 4. D Luna

5. Heidi Chairez 6. Alexandra Grey 7. Ryan Cassata

Art Director: Josiah Pak | Production Manager: Megan Kastner | Photographer: Lisa Allen | Hair & Makeup Stylist: Robin McWilliams


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Marketing & Communications Staff Jaguar Busuego

Production Designer

Ari DeSano Website Manager

Gil Diaz

Media and Public Relations Director

Kelly Freter Director

Greg Hernandez

Communications Manager

Melantha Hodge Project Manager

Joe Hui

Digital Communications Manager

Megan Kastner

Operations Manager

Josiah Pak Art Director

Callie Rodgers

Creative Services Coordinator

Kurt Thomas

Creative Services Manager

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Contributors Lisa Allen

Franklin Levert

Lorri L. Jean

Betsy Martinez

Photographer CEO, Los Angeles LGBT Center

SPRING 2018

Photographer Photographer

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Board of Directors Karim Abay

Dean Hansell

Tess Ayers Secretary

Ian Harvie

David J. Bailey Board Co-Chair LuAnn Boylan Tad Brown

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Marki J. Knox, M.D. Board Co-Chair Michael Lombardo

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Carlos Medina

Loren S. Ostrow

Kin W. Cheng

Peter Paige

Carolyn A. Dye

Jayzen Patria

Susan Feniger

Frank Pond

Alfred Fraijo, Jr.

Eric M. Shore

Annie Goto

Bruce Vilanch

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Resist. Persist.

SHARING THE KEYS OF SUCCESS

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A Beacon of Hope

The Buzz JOIN OUR CONVERSATION ON SOCIAL MEDIA

Mike Mueller

Tyler Cassity Treasurer

CEO Letter

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Going Green NEW FARMERS’ MARKET HELPS LGBT SENIORS

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Center of Attention INTRODUCING THE TRANS WELLNESS CENTER

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Reigning Men WHY A COUPLE IS LEAVING A LEGACY GIFT TO THE CENTER

UPDATES ON THE ANITA MAY ROSENSTEIN CAMPUS

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Center Notes

Take Five

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Center Voices

WITH VOLUNTEER TERRY LLOYD AND PHARMACY SERVICES’ NICOLE THIBEAU

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Photo Finish

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Why I Give

Karim of the Crop KARIM ABAY JOINS THE CENTER’S BOARD OF DIRECTORS

BY GUS KENWORTHY

Subscriptions Vanguard is published quarterly by the Los Angeles LGBT Center, a nonprofit corporation. 1625 N. Schrader Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90028, Voice 323-993-7400 • TDD 323-993-7698. Copyright 2018, Vanguard. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA. Publication of the name, quotation or photograph of a person in articles or advertising is not an indication of the sexual orientation or the HIV status of such person. Moving, getting duplicate mailings, or wish to be removed from the Vanguard mailing list? Please email mediarelations@lalgbtcenter.org.


CEO

LETTER

WHAT MY PARENTS GAVE ME

Sharing the Keys of Success

W CEO Lorri L. Jean  @LorriLJean

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Spring 2018

HEN I WAS GROWING UP on it was—to our own health and to the a farm in rural Arizona, my strength of our movement. No single act parents gave me and my sib- has been more personally and politically lings lots of rein. In the summers, we transformational. Back in 1971, the then left the house in the morning never to “Gay Community Services Center” dared be seen or heard from until we returned to speak its truth by boldly putting the for dinner that night. They were un- word “Gay” on the sign in front of its derstanding of the kinds of pranks and f irst headquarters on Wilshire Boulepetty larceny that farm kids get away vard. Truth-telling has been one of our with—like hypnotizing an unsuspecting guiding principles ever since. neighbor’s chickens and raiding the nearGENEROSITY by watermelon patch. But there were two cardinal sins in my Generosity has been a def ining family that my parents would not coun- characteristic of our community and tenance: selfishness and lying. They also movement for all the decades I’ve been believed that it was important to stand up a part of it. It’s one of the things that for one’s principles. The values my folks f irst attracted me to this work. The fact instilled in me—truth, generosity, cour- is, LGBT people have been here for each age—have been mainstays of my success, other, caring for each other, from the personally and professionally. They also very beginning of our movement. have been keys to the success of our moveSuch generosity fueled the actions ment for social justice for LGBT people. of the Center founders nearly 50 years ago who, as volunteers, leased houses TRUTH in their own names so homeless LGBT Truth has been the very foundation kids would have a safe place to stay. Unof our movement from its earliest days precedented generosity distinguished as we and our predecessors fought for the way our community rose to the octhe right to live our lives openly and casion in response to the horror of the proudly, without discrimination and AIDS epidemic. And generosity with violence. Coming out became our rally- our time and money has built a truly ing cry because we knew how important phenomenal movement!


Together, we have volunteered, built, COURAGE and supported an unparalleled infrastrucCourage has been our movement’s ture of organizations to fight for our rights watchword. It takes courage for LGBT and help our people, especially the most people to be honest about who we are. vulnerable among us. The greatest current It takes courage to demand freedom, testament to our community’s generosity justice, and equality from a society that is all of the visionaries has ignored and reviled who have so selflessly us. It takes courage to risen to the challenge stand up for issues that When an organization not of supporting the coneveryone supports struction of the Anita or a people have or understands but are May Rosenstein Cam- truth, generosity, integral to the aspipus, where we’ll be able ration of liberty and to exponentially expand and courage as part justice for all. our services for LGBT of their DNA, as It took courage youth and seniors. for the Center to sue the Center and our Plus, we can’t forthe Internal Revenue get our community’s community do, it’s no Service in 1971 when generosity of spirit, an wonder that success they refused to grant openness to learning us nonprof it, tax-exabout people who are has followed. empt status. (And we different from us, with won, becoming the concerns for—and appreciation of— nation’s f irst openly LGBT organization people that extends beyond sexual ori- to secure such status.) It took courage in entation and gender identity. We know, the early 1990s for the Center to launch f irsthand, what it’s like to be oppressed— the f irst capital campaign in the LGBT not only as LGBT people but as women, world that enabled us to buy and renopeople of color, and immigrants, among vate the old IRS building in Hollywood others—so we’re eminently able to un- into our current headquarters, the Mcderstand other forms of oppression and Donald/Wright Building. It is no small the struggles of many other communities. irony that this was the very building

where our original application was denied—and now it stands as a testament to the high ambitions and audacity of our community. And it takes courage every day to continue providing vital programs and services to our community in the toxic environment of growing antipathy and threats from our national political leaders. It’s our responsibility to be courageous, especially when we’re often acting on behalf of people who desperately need us to stand up for them. When an organization or a people have truth, generosity, and courage as part of their DNA, as the Center and our community do, it’s no wonder that success has followed. As long as we hold these tenets dear, I have no doubt that we will continue to succeed, no matter the forces that align against us. I’m equally certain that my parents would be very proud.

Spring 2018

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BUZZ WORTHY

Get Social

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THE CENTER’S SOCIAL MEDIA HIGHLIGHTS

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5 Safe and Supportive Schools Program for LGBTQ Students

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THIS IS ME Thank you to Broadway star Shoshana Bean for her cover of This is Me and support of the Center!

2.5 years ago the demo... today my cover. All proceeds go to benefit @LALGBTCenter!!!  @ShoshanaBean 2

THE FUTURE IS BLACK Social media influencer Amber Whittington of AmbersCloset received the Bayard Rustin Award for advancing the social movement of black and LGBT rights.

“All of this is bigger than me, thats what keeps me movin” - Rosa Parks So honored to be receiving this award. Thank you @lalgbtcenter #BayardRustinAward #FutureIsBlack #WAKANDATypeSh*t #BlackHistoryMonth  AmbersCloset

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SHOUT OUT U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters sent a message of unity while reclaiming her time.

When #Trump comes for one of us, he comes for all of us. Reclaim, resist, and #Impeach45 #ReclaimingMyTime #reclaimingourtime #MaxineWaters @LALGBTCenter  @MaxineWaters 4

#RISEUP After her testimony before the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee Hearing on the implementation of the Survivors' Bill of Rights Act, Center supporter Evan Rachel Wood shared our call for action.

Thanks @evanrachelwood and @RiseNowUS for being the change . Now, everyone else, join the fight to help pass #SurvivorBillOfRights in all 50 states: www.risenow.us  @lalgbtcenter

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GET OUT

WHO’S HIRING?

Teacher and former NEA Social Justice Activist of the Year Jose Lara tweeted his support for the Center’s OUT for Safe Schools program, which encourages school staff members to wear badges supporting LGBTQ students.

Writer, comedian, and This Just Out blue-blazed host Liz Feldman and Canadian pop duo Tegan and Sara helped spread the word about career opportunities at the Center.

So proud to work with the @GSANetworkCA and @LALGBTCenter to bring these cards to @ElRanchoSchools we work hard to make sure our schools are safe and empowering for all our students.  @JoseDelB arrio 6

IT’S GOOD KCRW’S award-winning Good Food helped spread the word about the Center’s 13th annual Simply diVine.

Chef and TV personality @SusanFeniger stops by to share about #SimplydiVine, the premier food and wine event for the LGBT community

Feels like @LALGBTCenter would be a cool place to work  @theLizFeldman

The fabulous @LALGBTCenter is hiring!  @TeganAndSara

JOIN the CONVO

For even more Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram interactions like these, plus all the latest LGBT community news, local highlights, and original content, find us on social media at:  @LALGBTCENTER

We’d love to hear from you.

 @KCRWGoodFood Spring 2018

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Spring 2018

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what it is!” teased one man as his friend picked up dandelion greens from one of the tables in the courtyard of the Center’s Village at Ed Gould Plaza. Both dissolve in laughter as they began f illing up their shopping bags. Dandelion greens were just one of the many fresh produce items available for LGBT seniors thanks to a new partnership between the Center and food rescue organization Food Finders. Starting last fall, on the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month, produce from a local farmers’ market is available at The Village to complement the non-perishable items stored in the Senior Services food pantry. Volunteer Amanda Lee-Benvegnu initiated the partnership with Food Finders and picks up the produce twice a month. “Food Finders has been a wonderful partner and is allowing us to get really high-quality produce for our seniors who really appreciate it,” said the Center’s Director of Senior Services Kiera Pollock. “Having the farmers’ market at The Village is convenient for the seniors who are already coming here for case work and activities. Now they can get fresh food to take home with them without needing to coordinate an extra trip to the grocery store.”

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ON’T ACT LIKE YOU KNOW

Spring 2018

The produce varies each week, ranging from dandelion greens and kale to purple carrots, persimmons, apples, and turnips. “Beets, beets, beets—that’s what I’m here for!” announced Mario, a retired security off icer, as he entered the courtyard. He was in luck. There were plenty of beets to be had on this Tuesday. “The last time I came here I found these beautiful, sumptuous beets,” he explained. “I took home a big bucket f illed with beets. They were delicious. I went through a beets frenzy. I never ate so many beets in my whole life. I’m ready for some more now.” With many LGBT seniors on fixed incomes, hunger is a major issue. Nearly one-quarter of them don’t have enough food to eat every week. “My food budget is on a shoestring and I come here to augment what I can’t afford,” retired Marine Corps veteran William Duckworth said as he waited in line. “I’m not the world’s best cook so if I’m not familiar with what it is, I’m not quite sure what to do with it. But if I know the name, I can at least go on the internet and figure out how to cook something with it.” Bill Kearney, who f illed his bag with two different kinds of kale as well as turnips and lemons, identif ied some of the more unfamiliar produce for his fellow shoppers. “Sometimes I see people pick up something here and ask, ‘What can I do with this?’” he shared. “I help them decide what to do for cooking, whether they can eat it raw or sauté it. I give them tips like, ‘You can bake the beets in the oven, or you can slice them real thin and grill them. The leaves on those radishes over there, you can use those in a salad.’” Several seniors say it’s not just a matter

of having enough food to eat, it’s also about not always having access to nutritious food. Many of them live in low income areas, often described as “food deserts,” where they’re forced to choose inexpensive, low-quality processed foods over healthier meal choices. That’s why Clarence, a two-time cancer survivor, calls the Center’s new farmers’ market “an absolute treasure.” “It’s really difficult to eat well, eat fresh, and eat nutritiously on a day-today basis,” he said. “The produce has been a godsend because I’m able to now have salads and eat a lot of mixed greens. Sometimes you open up a can of something, and it’s not always the healthiest. Having some fresh food to supplement it always helps.” Another senior, David Epstein, says he’s f illed with gratitude for the farmers’ market and food pantry. “In my apartment complex, nobody has enough food to eat by the end of the month,” he says. “Everyone is relying on food banks. It’s hard to tell you what it’s like to be someone who worked, had a paycheck, and provided food for myself. Now, in my golden years, I don’t have enough money for food. It’s frightening and very stressful.” He adds, after f illing a bag with produce: “I would not be able to afford healthy food like this if it were not for this program. I have only $500 a month to live on after I pay my rent. I could not afford good food. And without good food, there goes your health. So, this is a dream come true.”

With many LGBT seniors on fixed incomes, hunger is a major issue. Nearly one-quarter of them don’t have enough food to eat every week.

After informally offering food assistance to seniors for years, the Center expanded its program last year with food pantries at The Village and at Triangle Square. For more information about how to help, visit lalgbtcenter.org/pantry


Spring 2018

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BY THE COMMUNITY, FOR THE COMMUNITY HOW SIX LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS ARE JOINING WITH LOS ANGELES’ TRANSGENDER COMMUNITY TO CREATE A NEW HOME FOR WELLNESS.

Spring 2018

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McDONALD/WRIGHT BUILDING

HOLLYWOOD

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KOREATOWN

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HIGHLAND AVE

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TRANS WELLNESS CENTER

WILSHIRE BLVD

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MacARTHUR PARK

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DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES 10 FWY

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when you walk in the door? Welcoming. Compassionate. Safe. Inclusive. Friendly. Like a Ferrari. Those are just some of the answers from a community survey that helped develop Los Angeles’ new Trans Wellness Center (TWC). Opening this spring on Wilshire Boulevard near South Vermont Avenue, the 3,000-squarefoot space brings together comprehensive services and resources for transgender and gender non-conforming people under one roof. TWC is a community-based partnership between six local organizations: APAIT (Asian Pacific AIDS Intervention Team), Bienestar, Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles (CHLA), Friends Community Center, Translatin@ Coalition, and the Los Angeles LGBT Center, which is the lead agency coordinating management and operations. Through TWC, the partner organizations and the transgender community are working together toward one goal: wellness. OW SHOULD IT FEEL

FOR TODAY’S TRANSGENDER COMMUNITY, FINDING COLLECTIVE RESOURCES HAS BECOME A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH.

A COMMUNITY IN CRISIS Wellness is personal; there are as many definitions of what it looks and feels like as there are people you ask. One thing is clear, however: a sense of community is essential to improving the well-being of LGBT individuals. The fight for equality is historically and perpetually rooted in our ability to extrapolate enough

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commonalities across our individual stories to create a collective force for change. For today’s transgender community, finding collective resources has become a matter of life and death. In 2015, the National Center for Transgender Equality released its groundbreaking U.S. Transgender Survey (USTS). With nearly 28,000 respondents, it remains the largest survey examining the experiences of transgender people in the United States. It covers a wide range of issues connected to wellness, including education, employment, family life, health, housing, and interactions with the criminal justice system. Because of the scope and depth of the survey, stories from individual participants were woven together to form the framework for a community wellness narrative. What the collective stories revealed was alarming, with participants reporting high levels of mistreatment, harassment, and violence in every aspect of life, as summarized in the survey report: “The findings reveal disturbing patterns of mistreatment and discrimination and startling disparities between transgender people in the survey and the U.S. population when it comes to the most basic elements of life, such as finding a job, having a place to live, accessing medical care, and enjoying the support of family and community. Survey respondents also experienced harassment and violence at alarmingly high rates.”


The need for swift and effective r esponses to the issues revealed in the survey is critical. The report found that it’s also important that solutions reach people as individuals and as a community. TWC’s services are guided by an eight-member Community Advisory Board (CAB) made of people who identify as trans or non-binary. The board works together to ensure TWC truly reflects what the community needs. “Something like this would have made me so much more comfortable during my transition,” says CAB member Larissa Jade. “To have a place that had people to talk to who can relate to my situation would have made a world of difference. This is a real support system. Someone is out there caring.” TWC brings together the experience, resources, and support of the six organizations—a collaboration made possible by a $1 million annual grant for three to five years from the L.A. County Department of Public Health. The county’s support, paired with the vision of the six organizations, resulted in the historic genesis of the center, the first of its kind in the United States. TWC will offer HIV testing and care, mental health services, sexual health education, employment services, cultural competency trainings, youth services, healthcare and benefit enrollment, peer mentoring, workshops, and special events. General legal services will lend support with such issues as immigration, discrimination, and name changes, among others. “This is an outstanding model for other communities around the country,” said APAIT Director Jury Candelario. “We are so proud to join with our community partners to help provide culturally competent care.” Promoting healthcare engagement and reducing HIV and other sexually transmitted infections among trans women and men in Los Angeles is a primary goal of TWC. The 2015 survey found HIV rates five times higher in the transgender population than the U.S. population at-large; the rate for black transgender women was more than 60 percent higher.

• An early look inside

• Representatives from the coalition partners

BY THE COMMUNITY, FOR THE COMMUNITY

Spring 2018

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SIX TO ONE LEARN MORE ABOUT THE ORGANIZATIONS PARTNERING TO CREATE THE TRANS WELLNESS CENTER.

APAIT apaitonline.org  APAITSSG

BIENESTAR bienestar.org  bienestar.familia

CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL OF LOS ANGELES chla.org  ChildrensLA

FRIENDS COMMUNITY CENTER friendscommunity center.org  FriendsResearch

LOS ANGELES LGBT CENTER lalgbtcenter.org  lalgbtcenter

TRANSLATIN@ COALITION translatinacoalition.org  translatinacoalition

READ MORE FROM THE 2015 U.S. TRANSGENDER SURVEY AND SHARE YOUR STORY AT USTRANSSURVEY.ORG 16

Spring 2018

Clients who are HIV-negative but at high risk for exposure will be referred to clinics where they can obtain PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) or, if needed, PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis). Both medications have been proven to reduce the risk of HIV transmission when used as directed. Those who are living with HIV will be referred to HIV care, as will those who are at high risk and do not know their HIV status. “This has been a long time coming and I’m glad it’s finally here,” said Chandi Moore of CHLA’s Trans Youth Program. “When it comes to PrEP, I think it’s amazing to have a prevention method out there for us. We need more people to take it.” Comprehensive employment assistance is another core TWC offering. Nearly one-third of trans people are living in poverty, which reflects the fact that they experience a 15% unemployment rate—three times higher than the U.S. population—according to the 2015 survey. The unemployment rate among trans people of color is four times higher than the nation’s unemployment rate. Employment services will include résumé workshops, job interview training, and career counseling. There’s also a computer terminal for clients to send emails and craft their professional résumés and cover letters. The Center’s Transgender Economic Empowerment Project (TEEP) will be at TWC weekly. “Some of the biggest challenges we’re having include matching ID documents after a person’s gender identification change and having access to professional clothes,” said D Luna, the Center’s TEEP program manager. “Then there are also challenges once you are hired, such as being able to use the bathroom that matches your gender identity.”

TEEP also will hold a monthly clinic on employment discrimination. “When the client is transgender, the prejudice is often heightened,” said Roger Coggan, director of legal services at the Center. “Many people just don’t know what their rights are or that there are laws in California that may remove some of the barriers to seeking employment. What we do is help people know what their rights are and advocate on their behalf to make sure barriers to employment are removed.” Another goal of the work at TWC is to follow people through at least two years of supportive services.

A COMMUNITY OF HOPE At its heart, TWC is about engaging community within community. “This place will be many things,” said Jo-Dato, as she made her way down various hallways during a recent tour of TWC. “It was put together with the thought that trans people can lead themselves. Some people will come here thriving, some people will come here broken. Transitioning isn’t just something that happens and it’s done. It’s so many layers.”

READ MORE AT VANGUARDNOW.ORG/TWC


APRIL/ABRIL 20, 21, 22 Full schedule and tickets at Horario completo y entradas en

CineArteLA.org #CineArte @LALGBTCenter

Los Angeles LGBT Center The Village at Ed Gould Plaza 1125 N. McCadden Place, Los Angeles, 90038


Resist Persist

We Resist We Persist UPDATES ON THE CENTER’S ONGOING RESISTANCE AND POLICY ACTIONS

“THIS REPORT BEGINS TO FILL IN THE DETAILS OF WHAT MANY OF US ALREADY EXPECTED AND FEARED: IF YOU ARE IN AMERICA AND DO NOT LOOK, LIVE, AND WORSHIP LIKE PRESIDENT TRUMP AND HIS TOP ADMINISTRATION OFFICIALS, YOU ARE IN DANGER. THE TWO-THIRDS INCREASE IN HATE CRIMES INVOLVING WHITE SUPREMACIST IDEOLOGY LEAVES NO DOUBT THAT THERE ARE NOT ‘GOOD PEOPLE ON BOTH SIDES.’” Los Angeles County Human Relations Commission releases 2016 Hate Crime Report, which included a special section measuring hate crimes after the 2016 presidential election Read more at lalgbtcenter.org/hatecrime2016

“THE U.S. COURTS OF APPEALS FOR THE SIXTH AND SEVENTH CIRCUITS HAVE ALREADY RULED TO CONFIRM THE INCLUSION OF TRANSGENDER STUDENTS IN TITLE IX PROTECTIONS. EVEN MORE DISAPPOINTING THAN THIS REPUBLICAN ADMINISTRATION’S FAILURE TO UPHOLD THEIR LEGAL OBLIGATIONS IS THEIR RAMPANT DISREGARD FOR THE DIGNITY AND SAFETY OF ALL STUDENTS.” U.S. Department of Education will not investigate discrimination against transgender students who are banned from using restrooms that align with their gender identities Read more at lalgbtcenter.org/depted

"NOTHING ABOUT TODAY’S ACTION IS ‘MORAL’ OR ‘CIVIL.’ THIS IS AN ATTACK ON OUR CIVIL RIGHTS, ALLOWING ONE PERSON’S EXTREME RELIGIOUS BELIEFS TO BE FORCED UPON PEOPLE OF ALL FAITHS AND ANYONE WHO SIMPLY DOES NOT SHARE THEM. THAT IS NOT RELIGIOUS FREEDOM; IT IS RELIGIOUS TYRANNY.” Republican Administration’s directive allows healthcare providers to refuse care based on personal objections Read more at lalgbtcenter.org/hhs

“YOUNG PEOPLE SHOULD NOT HAVE TO WAIT YEARS—OR HAVE TO AGE OUT OF THE FOSTER CARE SYSTEM— TO RECEIVE CARE THAT IS MEDICALLY NECESSARY. TRANSGENDER AND GENDER NONCONFORMING YOUNG PEOPLE HAVE THE RIGHT TO LIVE THEIR AUTHENTIC LIVES.”

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“THE OBSESSIVE TARGETING OF VULNERABLE POPULATIONS BY THE PRESIDENT AND HIS ADMINISTRATION HAS VERY REAL AND VIOLENT CONSEQUENCES. RIGHT NOW, ONE IN FIVE PEOPLE WHO COMMIT HATE CRIMES IN THE UNITED STATES REFERENCE PRESIDENT TRUMP BY NAME.”

California legislation would enable foster youth to access gender-affirming care

President tweets endorsement of the far-right, anti-Muslim group Britain First

Read more at lalgbtcenter.org/foster

Read more at lalgbtcenter.org/antimuslim

Spring 2018


LGBT DREAMers Step Forward to Fight for Their Lives

“WE ARE HERE. IT’S TIME FOR ME TO STEP OUT OF THE SHADOWS, GET OUT OF MY COMFORT ZONE, AND LET PEOPLE KNOW THAT I EXIST. AS LOUDLY AND AS CONFIDENTLY AS I CAN SAY IT, I WANT LEGISLATORS TO HEAR OUR STORIES.” LGBTQ DACA recipient at immigration coalition press conference held at Mi Centro, the Center’s Boyle Heights location in partnership with Latino Equality Alliance Read more and watch press conference highlights at vanguardnow.org/dreamers

“DEPORTATION IS COMPARABLE TO A DEATH SENTENCE FOR LGBTQ PEOPLE IN MANY PARTS OF THE WORLD. RESCINDING DACA WOULD PUT THOUSANDS OF THESE YOUNG PEOPLE AT RISK BY FORCING THEM TO RETURN TO COUNTRIES WHERE HUMAN RIGHTS FOR LGBTQ PEOPLE ARE NONEXISTENT.” The Center joined a coalition of LGBT organizations to urge the passage of a clean #DreamActNow Read more at lalgbtcenter.org/dreamers

“LGBT PEOPLE ARE IMMIGRANTS, IMMIGRANTS ARE LGBT PEOPLE.” Center’s Resistance Squad joins Keep the DREAM Act Alive action in Los Angeles Read more at vanguardnow.org/dreamers2

Spring 2018

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CAMPUS UPDATE

A Beacon of Hope Watch construction webcam:

techcam.net/lgbt/#home

UPDATES ON THE CENTER’S NEW ANITA MAY ROSENSTEIN CAMPUS

C

ENTER

SUPPORTERS

GATHERED

50 for 50!

in February for an update on the progress of the Anita May Rosenstein Campus. Prior to the capital campaign that is raising money for the construction of the new campus, the Center had never had a seven-figure donation from a living donor. Today, the campus project has 14 seven-figure commitments from members of the community. "This campus is a legacy project that is going to be a beacon of hope and inspiration for people from all over the world. It will also be a source of amazing pride for Los Angeles and a testament to this community and its vision and generosity," said Center CEO Lorri L. Jean. Once completed, the f irst-of-its-kind project will provide much-needed space for the growing number of LGBTQ youth and seniors who come to the Center to fully participate in an expanded range of programs, to more easily connect and interact with one another, and to get the support and housing that will help change their lives. At the event, Robert Clement, a current client of the Center’s Senior Services and resident of Triangle Square, shared his story and more about how the new campus will impact his life and the lives of LGBT seniors.

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For older gay people, finding friends is extremely hard. The Center gave me my life back. Living at Triangle Square is the whipped cream and cherry on the cake of what the Center has done for me. With 8,000 square feet that includes the first drop-in center for LGBT seniors, I can only imagine what the Anita May Rosenstein Campus will do for LGBT seniors and youth in the years to come. – ROBERT CLEMENT

We have set our sights on a bold and ambitious new milestone by the time the ribbon is cut on the new campus in 2019: raising $1 million for every year the Center will have served our community. $50 million for 50 years! The additional $7.6 million beyond current commitments will make it possible to retire the mortgage on the new campus, enabling all private donations thereafter to be dedicated directly to the Center’s programs and services for those in our community who need us the most.

To learn more about what you can do to help us reach this goal, visit lalgbtcenter.org/campus or call Bill McDermott at 323-993-7679.

Spring 2018

2018 HARD HAT TOURS COMING SOON Early 2019 NEW CAMPUS OPENS AND RIBBON CUTTING


Take 5 NICOLE THIBEAU Minutes

TAKE FIVE

Staff ››

HOMETOWN Los Angeles

GET TO KNOW CENTER STAFF MEMBERS & VOLUNTEERS

YEAR STARTED AT THE CENTER 2013

STAFF POSITION Director of Pharmacy Services

I SEE FIRST HAND HOW MUCH THE CENTER MEANS TO THE PEOPLE WE HELP.

Working at the Center’s pharmacy at the McDonald/Wright Building has been the most rewarding time of my career. It’s very different from working at a retail pharmacy. For one thing, clients of the Center are much more engaged in their own health care. When I started at the Center, one of the first clients I really connected with was a transgender person who had moved here from another country and was just beginning their transition. We were able to help care for them through our entire gamut of services—from immigration assistance to HIV care. I witnessed what the Center does and how much it means to the people we help. That experience will always stand out to me.

READ MORE OF NICOLE’S STORY AT VANGUARDNOW.ORG/TAKEFIVE.

Volunteer ››

NICOLE THIBEAU

TERRY LLOYD HOMETOWN Oakland YEAR STARTED AT THE CENTER 2015 VOLUNTEER POSITION Special Events

I’VE EXPERIENCED MANY UNEXPECTED MOMENTS AND REWARDS. I volunteer a lot at Center events: the Anniversary Gala Vanguard Awards, Circle of Life luncheons, AIDS/LifeCycle, and special events for LGBT youth and seniors. I’m usually at the check-in table because I love working with the public and getting to know them. I’ve met guests from different stages and walks of life at Center events. I’ve had so many unexpected moments and rewards, which is inspiring and humbling. One time, after I was done with check-in at an event, I was talking with two of the Center’s youth clients who were kicked out of their homes for being LGBT. I tried to be encouraging, especially about staying in school. When I saw them again at another event, they told me they were both finishing school and thanked me for our previous conversation. It was a very emotional moment for me.

TERRY LLOYD

Spring 2018

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JUNE 3-9, 2018 REGISTER TODAY!

SAVE $25 CODE: VANGUARD AIDSLIFECYCLE.ORG


BOARD PROFILE

By Design NEW CENTER BOARD MEMBER KARIM ABAY IS READY FOR HIS CLOSEUP

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HEN K ARIM A BAY was contemplating whether to join the Center as a new board member, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti helped seal the deal. “I met the mayor at a fundraiser for the first time and mentioned that I was thinking about joining the board,” recalled Abay (pronounced uh-BY). “Mayor Garcetti said, ‘There’s nothing to think about. You need to join the Center.’” Now, as a new board member, Abay is already leaving an indelible impression. “When Center staff members and clients meet me for the first time, their eyes light up because they know I’ve got their backs—and that brings me great joy and motivation,” explained Abay. “I’m ready to get to work!”

Before joining the Center, Abay served as associate publisher of Nylon and jetted to both coasts every other week in order to manage the publication for more than a decade. (The magazine’s launch parties were held in Los Angeles; the magazine’s editorial and art designs were done in New York.) Abay would later become Senior Vice President at Paper magazine. But his first jobs were less glamorous— yet just as fulfilling—in the nonprofit sector. In 1995, he worked as an intake counselor at the Gay Men’s Health Crisis (GMHC) in New York at a time when protease inhibitors hadn’t been approved yet to prolong the lives of people living with HIV and AIDS. “Some of them were losing their vision. Some of them had Kaposi sarcoma. And yet in the face of adversity, many of them chose to shine in their lives,” recalled Abay. “Their sheer bravery inspired me.”

After his stint at GMHC, Abay continued to work on behalf of the LGBT movement as part of the Human Rights Campaign and for eight years as a board member of the Hetrick Martin Institute, which provides support and programming for LGBTQ youth. Abay hopes to continue his work for the LGBT community as part of the Center. “As an out black man, I am seizing this opportunity to erase the challenges and the stigma affecting gay and bisexual men of color,” said Abay, who was raised in Akron, Ohio, by an African American father and a German mother. “Right now, black and Latino gay and bi men are experiencing the highest rates of HIV infection in the country. The Center has been making great strides in protecting these marginalized communities, and I want to be part of that continued effort.”

When Center staff members and clients meet me for the first time, their eyes light up because they know I’ve got their backs—and that brings me great joy and motivation.

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THANK YOU

The Los Angeles LGBT Center is extremely grateful for the support of the following new Sustaining Donors and Circle of Life members.

DIAMOND CIRCLE

SILVER CIRCLE (CONT.)

$18,000-$34,999

$2,400-$3,599

David Beugen* Bill Frew* John Parker*

Eric Lo* Neal Murphy Margaret Nash & Susan Harlow* Paul Roeder Elizabeth Rosenblatt & Christine King* Curtis Sanchez & Steven Afriat* Marc Sobul The Verdon-Haight Trust* The Whittier Trust

PLATINUM CIRCLE $12,000-$17,999 Rick Garman John R. Sealy, M.D.* Barbara Timmer & Catherine Benkaim*

GOLD CIRCLE $6,000-$11,999 N. Keith Ashburn & Troy White Marc Berton* George Gonzalez & Michael Schidlowski Ned Harris* Luchita Mullican* Brian B. Wilson* Medel Reyes*

STERLING CIRCLE $3,600-$5,999

For information about Planned Giving or becoming a Sustaining Donor, please contact: Jennifer Dawson Director of Major Gifts jdawson@lalgbtcenter.org 323-993-8932

Kenneth Jones Major Gifts Associate kjones@lalgbtcenter.org 323-993-8939

Frank Stasio Senior Director of Planned Giving fstasio@lalgbtcenter.org 323-993-7690

Shaun Butler Kevin Callahan Ron Comer & Darryl Ingram Benjamin Cotner Bruce Fatz* James Henneberg & Jackie Henneberg* Leonora Horwin* David Kuivanen & Karim Ongko* Kuo-Wei Lee, M.D.* James McGruder* James McNamara & Francisco Laguna* Lauren Morelli & Samira Morelli Joseph Patrick* Tony Robinson* The Silton Family Foundation* Nikos Small & George Mariella* Alison Smith* Mike E. Worner & Marc W. Harnly*

SILVER CIRCLE $2,400-$3,599 James Anderson & Ronald Sinanian Joel Bennett Carleen Cappelletti* Gary Carnow & Barry Soroka* Lauri Crane & Dennis Crane Kenneth Delalcazar* Barry Goldbaum & Michael Rey* Kevin Hamilton & Michael Gapinski* Peter Johnson*

SILVER CIRCLE $1,800-$2,399 Daniel Barnhart Michael Beckson & Robert Gregory* Robert Cashman Brian Dubow, M.D. & Greg Self* Terry Foreman* Chris Fowler & John Schroeder Michael Garrett Sheryl Gold & Marla Sandow* Gary Gorchester Jessica Lowrey & Kristin Dehnert Jason Lue* Naoya Matsuda* John McDole Ken McLean & Todd J. Hurtubise* Joel Mendias & Michael Damodio* Bryan Mershon, Ph.D.* Gavin Newsom Ron Nyswaner Kathleen O'Kane & Cheryl Groves* Patton Oswalt Douglas Prinzivalli & John C. Carrozza Stephen M. Ratliff & David A. Swope William Randall Sheriff & Jeff Heglin* John F. Stephens Benjamin Teller & Benjamin Britt Alice Wong

SILVER CIRCLE $1,500-$1,799 Karim Abay & Todd Harvey Randi Caplan Beverly J. Dalby Stephen Dunkle Daniel Edelman & Ivan Ontiveros John Frenzel Sera Gamble Barry Kummer Norman Lear Toby Lent & Cameron Daniels Joel Mathis & Manabu Hao Le Joe O'Donnell & Vincent Lopez Christopher Pettis

REALIZE THE POWER OF A GIFT. Making the Center part of your legacy in your will is the most important contribution you can make to the organization. Ways to give include wills and living trusts; beneficiary designations; charitable gift annuities, remainder trusts, and lead trusts; memorials and tribute gifts; and real estate. By including the Center in your estate plan or making another type of planned gift, you help ensure a strong and vibrant future for the Center as we build a world where LGBT people thrive as healthy, equal, and complete members of society.

LEARN MORE AT LALGBTCENTER.ORG/LEGACY. 24

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DONOR PROFILE

SILVER CIRCLE (CONT.) $1,500-$1,799 Michael Reynolds Lance Skidmore Frank Stasio Shriya Venkatesh Scott Whiteleather Jeannie Wilkinson Ronald P. Wolff Jason Woodruff

CIRCLE OF LIFE

Robert “Tommy” Chambers and Todd Kusy Ron Attrell and Michael Oard Steven Boggs and Thomas De Vries David Booher and Steve Milam Danny Bozarth James Castranova Steven Chapman Kevin Chen Andrae Corrigan and Tigerlily Rosen Bruce Davidson and Quang Nguyen Jennifer and Faith Ehrman William Farnum and J.A. Benitez William Feaster and John Gregory Gerhardt Felgemaker and Jim Hill Dulce Flores Gabriel Flores David Gajda and Jose Malagon Patricia Gasior and Trisha Yamato Alvan Gendein, M.D, and Karl Kleinz Frances Glenn James Haley Ron Hitchcock Robert Jurkowski and Steven Carnine Constance Kaplan and Stephanie Small Jonathan Kaufman and John Rail Matthew Kearns Marki Knox and Suzanne Brown Kevin Kolanowski Mark McAlister Garrett McClure and Mike Gerle Paul Menke Marcy Miranda William Moore Charles Nicholson Terrance K. O’Brien Dan Ortiz Harvey Reese Gregory Ross and John Schuning Sheila Roth Steven Schleier W. Donald Shaw William and Cindy Shopoff Zachary Smith and Virginia Thorson Alberto Uribe Kevin Walter David R. Wood Harriet Zaretsky Chris Zeller

CIRCLE OF LIFE IN MEMORIAM Raymond Aleman Robert J. Brehler Charles L. White

Donor list as of January 31, 2018 *Indicates an increase in membership level. ^Indicates a multiyear pledge.

A Perfect Pairing COUPLE LEAVES LASTING GIFT TO THE CENTER

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or Tommy Chambers and Todd Kusy, the Center is an important part of their lives—past, present, and future. “Over the years many of my friends have benef ited from the services the Center offers. They are able to have full and healthy lives today because of the assistance they received,” said Chambers, a Texas native. “I’ve literally seen the Center save lives, and we want to be part of that and support the future endeavors of the Center.” As part of their family trust, the couple included the Center in their estate plan last year. The new Circle of Life members also regularly volunteer at the annual Models of Pride youth conference, attend signature Center events like Simply diVine and the Anniversary Gala Vanguard Awards, and are regulars at The Village at Ed Gould Plaza’s Renberg Theatre. Kusy participated in AIDS/ LifeCycle last year and will be making the 545-mile journey again this June. They met nine years ago in Provincetown, where they returned for their wedding in 2014. As the couple began

• Tommy Chambers and Todd Kusy

their life together, Kusy soon relocated to Los Angeles from Massachusetts and immediately shared Chambers’ enthusiasm for the Center. “Ever since my introduction to the Center in the early ‘90s, it was clear to me that we had something here that was giving and providing so much,” said Chambers, who owns an interior design business. “I just believed in the organization and admired it from day one.” They also consistently make an effort to get others involved. “We always try to take friends with us to events who aren’t as familiar with the Center in hopes of getting them involved and aware,” said Kusy, a certif ied personal trainer with his own private gym. “Our community is better and stronger because of the Center. It’s a well-oiled and well-working machine. And one of the most eff icient.” The couple is particularly excited about the Anita May Rosenstein Campus that will enable the Center to greatly expand its youth and senior services when it opens in 2019. “It is a dream come true for us,” said Chambers. “We were looking at the model of the new campus the other day and just thought, ‘Wow, think of all that this will provide for our community.’ As a young adult, I would never have thought we’d be able to have a campus dedicated to the well-being of our community. We are so proud, and we want to keep going, keep helping, keep inspiring our community to excel and f lourish.”

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Center Classes

Join the Center’s one-of-a-kind education and empowerment program, presented exclusively for the trans* community. More than 1,000 trans* individuals have joined the Trans* Lounge. Why haven’t you? How does Trans*Lounge work?

Trans* Lounge members:

• •

• • • • • • • • •

• •

Sign up online for free. Review and rate our library of workshops, groups, labs, and events. Your feedback determines our schedule. RSVP first for the programs you rated highest.

Participated in 80+ workshops and labs. Mastered the art of walking in heels. Performed original stand-up at The Comedy Store. Improved makeup skills. Received vocal training. Charted more optimistic career paths. Practiced yoga weekly. Wrote and performed personal monologues. Became more fit and learned how to live healthier lives.

Sign up at

translounge.org 26

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...and we are just getting started!


Community Groups

v AA Happy Hour Tuesdays-Fridays, 6:15-7:15 p.m. Canceled July 4

v 30+ Lesbian Chat Meet women outside of the bars Every 1st & 3rd Fri., 7:30-9 p.m.

v Al-Anon Gay Focus Thursdays, 7:30-8:30 p.m.

v Bears L.A. Every 3rd Mon., 7-10 p.m.

v Alcoholics Anonymous: It’s Come to This Mondays, 6:15-7:15 p.m. Canceled March 26 and May 28

H Bi-osphere* Explore and discuss the many shades of today’s diverse bisexual community Every 2nd & 4th Mon., 8-9:30 p.m. Canceled March 26 and May 28

v Crystal Meth Anonymous Saturdays, 9:15-10:15 a.m.

Gay & Lesbian CODA Tuesdays, 8-9 p.m. v

Gay Men’s Prostate Cancer Support Group Every 1st & 3rd Tues., 7-9 p.m. Sponsored by Cancer Support Community Benjamin Center. Call 310-314-2555 or visit CancerSupportCommunity BenjaminCenter.org M

v Marijuana Anonymous Wednesdays, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Canceled July 4

NA: Heartbeat of Recovery Mondays, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Canceled March 26 and May 28 v

OA Thursdays, 7:30-8:30 p.m. v

Sex & Love Addicts Anonymous Thursdays, 6:15-7:15 p.m. v

Sexual Compulsives Anonymous Mondays, 8:45-9:45 p.m. Wednesdays, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Saturdays, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Canceled March 26, May 28, and July 4 v

UA: Artist in Prosperity Tuesdays, 6:15-7:15 p.m. v

Women’s AA Wednesdays, 8:45-9:45 p.m. Canceled July 4 v

L Health Education Risk Reduction (H.E.R.R.) Discussion group for gay/bi men of color ages 16-29. Mondays, 3-5 p.m. Wednesdays, 2-4 p.m. Fridays, 4-6 p.m. Canceled March 26, May 28, and July 4 Call 323-860-7345 to RSVP

HERstories* A gathering place for all LGBT women who want strong community and great conversation Mondays, 8-9:30 p.m. Canceled March 26 and May 28 H

Ki Ki Drop-in, social networking group for gay/bi men of color ages 16-29 Mondays, 5-8 p.m. Canceled March 26 and May 28 Call 323-993-7587 to RSVP L

Coming Out Coming Out Workshops for Women Coming Out Workshops for Men Safe, nurturing workshops for anyone who is facing their own coming out process. Call 877-OUT-4-LIFE for recorded information and instructions for enrollment. More information at comingoutla.org.

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L Movie Night For gay/bi men of color ages 16-29 Tuesdays, 5-7 p.m. Call 323-860-7345 to RSVP

Positive Images HIV+ Men’s Forum Mondays, 1-3 p.m. Wednesdays, 7-9 p.m. Thursdays, 6-8 p.m. Canceled March 26 and May 28 Call 323-860-7384 to RSVP L

v Queers+Questions Every 2nd Mon., 7-8 p.m. Call 323-993-7587 to RSVP

v Financial Chat 3-5 p.m. Call 323-860-5830 for dates

L Rated M For gay/bi men of color, ages 16-29 to discuss dating, relationships, and healthy sex Tuesdays, 1-4 p.m. Thursdays, 5:30-8.30 p.m. Call 323-993-7587 to RSVP

v HIV+ 50+ Men’s Drop-In Support Group Thursdays, 1-3 p.m. v Housing Supportive Network Every 2nd Thurs., 11 a.m.-Noon

H Transgender Perceptions* Conversation & communitybuilding for transgender and gender non-conforming people Fridays, 8-9:30 p.m.

v Village Readers An LGBT reading and discussion group Every 1st Wed., 7:30-9 p.m. April 4: Barbara Jordan: American Hero by Mary Beth Rogers

May 2: The Heart’s Invisible Furies by John Boyne

Senior Groups

L Lit Life Group Weekly discussion groups and activities for gay/bi or questioning men of color ages 16-29 who are LIT about LIFE. Tues., 2-5 p.m. Call 323-860-7353 or 323-862-7334 to RSVP

Alzheimer’s LGBT Caregiver Support Every 2nd and 4th Thurs.,

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Highland Annex 1220 N. Highland Ave.

10:30 a.m.-Noon v Art Lab Fridays, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Bereavement Support Group Tuesdays, 1-3 p.m. v

Offices on Las Palmas 1111 N. Las Palmas Ave.

v Men’s Drop-In Support Group Wednesdays, 10 a.m.-Noon Canceled July 4

Mi Movie Club Every 4th Thurs., 2 p.m. v Movies for Everyone Call 323-860-5830 for dates and times

v Silver Sensuality for Everyone Every 1st Mon., 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Thursday Hikes Thursdays, 9:30 a.m. Valley Social and Networking Group Thursdays, Noon-1:30 p.m. Metropolitan Community Church 5730 Cahuenga Blvd., North Hollywood Call 323-860-5830

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Life Connections 21+ meets 50+ Call 323-860-5830 for dates and times. v

v Qi Gong Call 323-860-5830 for dates and times

June 6: Less by Andrew Sean Greer

To RSVP, email seniors@ lalgbtcenter.org or call 323-860-5830.

McDonald/Wright 1625 N. Schrader Blvd.

Chair Yoga with Master Lakshmi Wednesdays, 11 a.m.-Noon Canceled July 4 v

v Country Line Dancing Call 323-860-5830 for dates and times

LGBT Adult Special Needs Support Group Every 2nd Wed., 6-7:30 p.m. v

v Bingo 1-2:30 p.m. Call 323-860-5830 for dates

Mi Coffee Club Every 2nd and 4th Thurs., 1-2 p.m.

For more information about Senior Services classes, please call 323-860-7322 or visit facebook.com/50pluslgbt.

Men’s Speakeasy* Great conversation for gay, bisexual, and trans men Tues., 8-9:30 p.m.

The Village 1125 N. McCadden Place

Senior Groups (Cont.)

L L.A. Runway Assassins (LARA) Creative outlet for gay/bi men of color ages 16-29 interested in fashion and entertainment Fridays, 3-5:30 p.m. Call 323-993-7587 to RSVP

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Community Groups (Cont.)

Group Meetings

12-Step Groups

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v Veteran’s Support Group Every last Tues., 1-3 p.m.

* Groups may not welcome late arrivals.

Mi Centro 553 S. Clarence St.

Empty = Offsite

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CENTER NOTES

News and notes from the Center’s life-changing and life-saving programs and services THE FUTURE IS BLACK It was a day of celebration and inspiration for more than 300 people who gathered at the Center’s Village at Ed Gould Plaza for The Future is Black: Reclaiming Our Power. The Black History Month event included live music and spoken word performances, an art exhibit, a resource fair, rousing speeches, informative panels, and an assembly presented by the Center’s Youth Ambassadors Coalition, all honoring black history, culture, and the power of our future. Center youth member Nova Monet Mirari was honored with the Marsha P. Johnson Award, an accolade given to a burgeoning community activist. YouTube personality Amber Whittington of AmbersCloset was presented with the Bayard Rustin Award for her prominence in advancing the social movement of black and LGBT rights. See more from the event, including photo and video highlights, at vanguardnow.org/futureisblack

DOWN TO A FINE ARTS The National Endowment for the Arts awarded a $35,000 grant to the Center for three art education projects tailored to youth: OutSet: The Young Filmmakers Project; We Can Be Heroes mural project; and Somos Iguales (We Are Equal) mural project offered in partnership with Latino Equality Alliance (LEA). “Our life-enriching arts programs are integral to the health and well-being of our youth members, who deserve the opportunity to achieve their full—and creative—potential,” said Center CEO Lorri L. Jean. “Some of the world’s most dynamic and unforgettable works of expression have been created by LGBT people, and thanks to this prestigious grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, we can continue to inspire and invigorate the next generation of imaginative minds.”

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PREPPING THE TRANS COMMUNITY The Center is conducting the first PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) study in the United States focused on transgender and gender non-conforming people. When used as directed, PrEP has been proven to reduce HIV transmission. The one-year study requires participants to take one PrEP pill a day and complete six clinic visits at the Center, which include routine testing for HIV and sexually transmitted infections. Participants also will have regular lab tests done to ensure against any adverse effects on their general health and hormone treatments.

If you are interested in participating in the study, please call 323-993-8919.

BRAVO! For providing life-enriching productions and performances spanning two decades, the Center’s Lily Tomlin/Jane Wagner Cultural Arts Center has been honored with the Margaret Harford Award for sustained excellence in theatre by the Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle. The Lily Tomlin/Jane Wagner Cultural Arts Center is the programming division of the Center’s Cultural Arts department, which was formed in 1998 following the opening of The Village at Ed Gould Plaza. Some of the notable productions hitting the Center’s stages include The Laramie Project, Blackbird, The Goat, Hit the Wall, and most recently, the West Coast premiere of Ike Holter’s Exit Strategy.

For more information about upcoming productions and performances at The Village, visit lalgbtcenter.org/theatre

LEADING BY EXAMPLE The Center’s Director of Human Resources SharonFranklin Brown was honored with the 2017 Leadership Award by the Employment Round Table of Southern California. Established in 1983, the Employment Round Table aims to reduce discrimination and promote equal opportunity in employment covered by the California Fair Employment and Housing Act. Brown is in excellent company. Past recipients of this accolade have included some of the most influential leaders in Los Angeles history, among them Dolores Huerta, co-founder of the National Farm Workers Association; Rev. Chip Murray, pastor of First African Methodist Episcopal Church; and Fr. Gregory Boyle, founder of Homeboy Industries.


CENTER VOICES

Analysis and insight from the Center’s staff on current issues and events facing our community The City of West Hollywood unveiled the short video Getting to Zero, featuring how Center-WeHo is helping the city fulfill its HIV Zero plan—zero new infections, zero progression of HIV to AIDS, zero discrimination, and zero stigma— by having frank discussions about sexual health and PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis), as reported by Wehoville:

Unhealthy body image issues—clinically known as body dysmorphic disorder (BDD)—continue to run rampant among gay and bisexual men. Those affected become obsessed with particular aspects of their appearance they deem unworthy, often turning to plastic surgery or compulsive exercise as a solution, as reported by Vice:

In an effort to help LGBT people find community and safe spaces, the Center offers an abundance of support and social networking groups, including Coming Out Workshops which help participants feel comfortable with coming out to themselves and others, as reported by The Fight Magazine:

A California judge ruled that forcing a baker to provide service to a same-sex couple against her religious objections violates her right to free speech. Citing that baking is “artistic expression,” the anti-LGBT decision stirs fears about the upcoming U.S. Supreme Court ruling in the Masterpiece Cakeshop case, as reported by Gay Star News:

CAÍN ANDRADE JEFFREY RODRIGUEZ Senior Program Manager Health and Mental Health Services

“I think if you’re exploring your sexuality, it should be a positive thing. Excerpt:

It shouldn’t be a negative. I have this little mantra that I always tell people: sex should feel good at the beginning, middle, and end. Once you feel empowered about something, you’re going to protect yourself.”

SHARON NESSELLE, MFT Mental Health Clinician IV Health and Mental Health Services

Excerpt: “Regular exercise is important to maintain one’s well-being, [but] I mainly hear it as a way of being socially desirable. There are those who think intently about doing things that build muscle and find that their only intent is to improve physical appearance. My hope

is that over time the right intentions and motivation will keep them doing it.”

Social Networking Groups Coordinator Cultural Arts

Excerpt: “Surprisingly, people continue to feel like they’re the only ones who are going through this. If I can

just encourage them to come once [to a workshop] and have them be surrounded by people like them — people who are able to laugh and cry with them about the journey they’re going through—then they start to crave more and more community.”

DAVE GARCIA Director Policy and Community Building

Excerpt: “The religious exemption is the single greatest threat to our community. This goes far beyond cake. The bottom line is these individuals have business licenses. When you have a business license, we make certain compromises in the public square. You have to abide by some of those compromises. You make an agreement to serve the public.”

Watch the full video at

Read more at

Read more at

Read more at

bit.ly/getting2zero

bit.ly/overcomeBDD

bit.ly/comeoutwithus

bit.ly/wewantcake Spring 2018

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PHOTO FINISH

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The Future Is Black: Reclaiming Our Power (1) Hundreds of guests converged at The Village at Ed Gould Plaza to celebrate Black History Month, which included (2) a resource fair, (3) workshops, and music and spoken word performances, including those by (4) Jurni Rayne, (5) Celina Graves, (6) Transparent cast member Alexandra Grey, (7) and Edwin Bodney. (8) YouTube personality Amber Whittington of AmbersCloset was presented with the Bayard Rustin Award for her prominence in advancing the social movement of black and LGBT rights.

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AIDS/LifeCycle Expo (9) Coney the Safety Mascot made a special appearance with a cheer squad in Griffith Park at the annual expo designed for (10, 11) new and returning participants to absorb expert advice on training, fundraising, and life in camp during the seven-day, 545-mile ride from San Francisco to Los Angeles. It’s not too late to register for this year’s ride, June 3-9, commemorating the 25th year riding to end AIDS! Register at aidslifecycle.org and use code VANGUARD to receive $25 off the registration fee.

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Simply diVine Kickoff Party (12) Held at PUMP Restaurant in West Hollywood, (13, 14) guests and supporters reveled in the official launch celebration of the annual food and wine tasting event benefiting the Center’s programs and services.

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To learn more about Simply diVine, visit simplydivinela.org

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PHOTO FINISH

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Volunteer Appreciation Dinner Held at Pickwick Gardens, the annual fête honored the Center’s dedicated volunteers, among them (15, l-r) Lacey Howcroft, David Nguyen, (16, l-r) Simone Benjamin, Danny Mora, Michael Miller, (17, l-r) and Russ Ford and Mimi Schneider, who selflessly donate their time and services each month. Be a volunteer! Visit lalgbtcenter.org/volunteer for details.

Women's March (18) Center CEO Lorri L. Jean roused the throng of demonstrators who gathered at City Hall with an exhilarating speech following (19) the march in downtown Los Angeles. Are you ready to take action to defend the LGBT community? Join the Center’s Mobilization Squad at lalgbtcenter.org/mobilize

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Distinguished Supporters of the Center

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Many of the Center’s life-saving programs and services are sustained by the generosity of companies and individuals who want to help the Center build a world in which LGBT people can be healthy, equal, and complete—among them (20, l-r) MAC Cosmetics employees and Macy’s management (Chastity Brown, Carlisha Gizelle, Cyrus Douglas, Tripoli Beard, Meghan Onsrud, and Ruth Torres) representing the MAC AIDS Fund, who presented a $40,000 check benefiting the Center’s HIV and AIDSrelated services; (21, left) Los Angeles Councilman David Ryu (with the Center’s Director of Children, Youth & Family Services Simon Costello), and (22) Orange Is the New Black writer Lauren Morelli, who spoke about her career to LGBTQ youth. Support the Center and become a Center Advocate! Visit lalgbtcenter.org/donate for details.

Then known as the California AIDS Ride, thousands of cyclists and volunteer roadies rejoice in solidarity on the streets of Los Angeles after completing the seven-day, 545-mile journey from San Francisco. A total of nine California AIDS Rides took place from 1994 to 2002 before it was renamed AIDS/LifeCycle. This year’s ride, June 3-9, commemorates the 25th year of riding to end AIDS. Just announced: the finish line will be in downtown Los Angeles directly in front of the historic and iconic Los Angeles City Hall! Enjoy the Finish Line Festival at nearby Grand Park! Don’t miss out on this year’s momentous AIDS/LifeCycle! Register today at aidslifecycle.org and use code VANGUARD to receive $25 off the registration fee.

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WHY I GIVE

Why I Give Gus Kenworthy

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ROM THE MOMENT I came out to ESPN three years ago, I made a pledge to myself to live my life authentically. When MeUndies asked me last summer to be a spokesmodel for their Celebrate Yourself fundraising campaign benefiting the Center, I didn’t hesitate. It gave me a chance to use my media platform to support a good cause—the Center stands for everything I believe in. For instance, we both speak up when we must. During the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, my social media was flooded with people wishing me failure because I publicly supported Adam Rippon’s stance against Vice President Pence leading the U.S. delegation. The Olympics is about inclusion, and Pence is very vocally anti-LGBT. He’s supported conversion therapy and is part of an administration determined to set our community back. Then, when television networks aired a clip of me sharing a kiss with my boyfriend, people said things like, ‘I don’t care what you do behind closed doors, but don’t put it in my face.’ My kiss isn’t about shoving it in people’s faces—it’s

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about us simply existing. And I had no idea our kiss would be broadcast. What people don’t realize is that I, all of us, witness affection between heterosexuals all the time.

For me, this year’s games felt amazing because I was able to be myself. It was an honor to represent our country as an out and proud athlete. The Center has stood up for the existence—not to mention the health and well-being—of LGBT people for almost 50 years. They work every day to provide food and housing to homeless youth,

enrich the lives of seniors with social activities, and improve the quality of life for people living with HIV or AIDS. And they don’t remain silent while our community is under attack, whether it’s the administration trying to ban transgender people from serving in the military or not protecting trans students or when it gave health care workers the ability not to treat us because of their personal feelings. Progress in the LGBTQ movement doesn’t happen when we remain silent. For me, this year’s games felt amazing because I was able to be myself. It was an honor to represent our country as an out and proud athlete. I hope the encouragement I received throughout the games will inspire other athletes to come out, too. And I’m proud to be from a country where I can speak up and where organizations like the Center can exist. Together, we’ll continue to be a voice in the LGBT movement for those who can’t. Because doing anything otherwise is un-American.

Two-time Olympian freestyle skier Kenworthy won a silver medal at the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi and recently competed in the 2018 Winter Games in Pyeongchang. Follow @guskenworthy on Twitter and Instagram.


SHOW OFF YOUR SWAG SHOP ONLINE

LALGBTCENTER.ORG/STORE


McDonald/Wright Building 1625 N. Schrader Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90028

The PRIDE Study is the first national, large-scale, long-term health study of LGBTQ people in the United States. Your answers will help change–and save–lives. Participate on your computer, tablet, or smartphone. As more people participate, the results will be more influential and meaningful.

Learn more and register at pridestudy.org

Profile for Los Angeles LGBT Center

Vanguard Quarterly Spring 2018  

Vanguard Quarterly Spring 2018  

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