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L E A D E R P O ST.CO M /Q C | A L E A D E R - P O ST P U B L I CAT I O N

CITY NEWS:

Heritage area’s diversity draws young families P. 12

FASHION:

British expat sticks to classic, fitted style

P. 14

SPACES:

Cozy Louis’ Loft is a modern place for students P. 15

WHAT TRUTH SOUNDS LIKE LINDSAY KNIGHT TURNS POETIC RHYMES INTO POWERFUL MUSICAL MESSAGES AS EEKWOL P. 7

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NEXT WEEK: How do you deal with sibling fighting? Email QC@leaderpost.com

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PA R E N T T O PA R E N T

Each week QC gathers advice from parents to share with other moms and dads. This week we asked:

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“Ask yourself this: What is your best childhood memory of Christmas? And answer it before you read on. Most people answer this question with an experience or a person. My favorite memory of Christmas was tobogganing with all my cousins at my grandma’s farm. Not many people answer this question with the time that they received a certain gift. Now, what does that tell us? It’s not the gifts that really matter, it’s the love and experience. Just this lesson alone has taught me to scale down the gifts and to focus on giving your love and time.” — Shelley Stahl Heuchert “The children are taught to be thankful for what they have, and are encouraged to donate clothes and toys that they no longer use to kids that don’t have anything.” — Carla Contreras “I will admit, I spoil my little five-year-old a bit... this is the period in his life when Christmas is the most magical! I love that he ‘believes’ in Santa! We have so much fun with that! However, this is also a great age and opportunity to teach your kids about helping out less fortunate families. The generosity and compassion of kids always surprises me. Ask your child to donate something off their Christmas list to a child who doesn’t have many toys... I bet you they will!” — Lisa D. “If our kids start to not act happy or interested when they receive something, we just stop giving them things. This is when we do more home made crafts and games to pass the time. You can never spoil your kids by loving them too much.” — Alysia Czmuchalek “Every time children ask for something you do not have to give in. Treats and special events should be in moderation or otherwise they start expecting it all the time.” — Crystal Robertson

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“It’s hard not to spoil my boys but the big thing

for me is to make sure I don’t always give them what they want…that’s what grandparents are for!” — Michelle Grodecki “Every year we try to book a yearly weeklong ski trip to Panorama Ski Village during the February break. My boys are well aware of how costly that can be so when we ask them if they would rather have lavish, expensive gifts or the family ski trip, they always pick the ski trip! They don’t go without by any means but Christmas gifts usually are essential items that they need down the road anyway, such as clothes, shoes, jackets or items for the upcoming ski trip. I also found that because of this, they look more forward to all the family coming together for a big gathering. My youngest always tells me this is the best part about Christmas!” — Treena W. “Simple. Say ‘NO’ and stick to it. Love and attention were always shared freely, but when it came to having the best games and toys around, we refused to keep up with the Joneses.” — Judy S. “Honestly I do think that we spoil our children a little too much. My kids have too many toys and we take them to a lot of places. We try to balance this out with ensuring they help with chores around the house and that they do their school work, however I still think they are spoiled much more then we were because that is the world we now live in.” — Nikki Melnyk


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INDEX #

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M Y FAV O U R I T E P L A C E P. 5

ON THE COVER PG. 7

Rapper Lindsay Knight’s music fuses indigenous history with the present. QC PHOTO BY MICHELLE BERG

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TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

PARENT TO PARENT — 2 How do you make sure you’re not spoiling your child? IN THE CITY — 4 Photographer Bryan Schlosser’s best shot of the week INVENTORY — 6 North Central’s newest grocery store offers healthy Taiwanese food COVER — 7 Lindsay Knight turns poetic rhymes into powerful musical messages as Eekwol CITY NEWS — 12 Community and diversity in Heritage Neighbourhood draws young families FASHION — 14 British expat sticks to classic, fitted style SPACES — 15 Modern, yet cozy Louis’ Loft on the U of S campus a gathering place for students

ON THE SCENE — 16 At the Gibson’s Finest CFL Player Awards MUSIC — 18 Online ad leads to band’s formation and a romantic relationship CROSSWORD/SUDOKU — 19 ASK ELLIE — 20 READ MY BOOK — 21 Author Jeanne Martinson’s Generation Y and the New Work Ethic EVENTS — 22 OUTSIDE THE LINES — 24 Artist Stephanie McKay’s weekly colouring creation SHARP EATS — 25 Vegan raw chocolate chock full of superfoods WINE WORLD — 26 Columnist James Romanow’s top pick for Californian Pinot Noir

There isn’t anything especially unique about the studio where Dan Reynish hosts his weekly show on CBC Radio, but his love for the job makes this soundproof room his favourite place in Regina. QC PHOTO BY ANDREW MATTE

QC COVER PHOTO BY MICHELLE BERG QC is published by the Leader-Post – a division of Postmedia Network Inc. – at 1964 Park St., Regina, Sask., S4N 3G4. Rob McLaughlin is editor-in-chief. For advertising inquiries contact 781-5221; editorial, 1-855-688-6557; home delivery, 781-5212. Hours of operation are Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The contents of this publication are protected by copyright and may be used only for personal, non-commercial purposes. All other rights are reserved and commercial use is prohibited. To make any use of this material you must first obtain the permission of the owner of the copyright. For more information, contact the editor at 1-855-688-6557.


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IN THE CITY #

N O V E M B E R 2 4 , 2 0 1 3 — 9 : 5 0 P. M .

Celebration time on Green Mile

Fans poured onto the Green Mile on Albert Street to celebrate the Saskatchewan Roughriders’ victory in the 101st Grey Cup held in Regina on Sunday. The Riders beat the Hamilton Tiger-Cats 45-23. QC PHOTO BY BRYAN SCHLOSSER


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YOUR FAVOURITE PLACE QC wants to hear about your favourite place in Regina. Email qc@leaderpost.com

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M Y FAV O U R I T E P L A C E

Ordinary place begets extraordinary enthusiasm By Andrew Matte When Regina’s Dan Reynish describes his favourite place, he spends no time describing the colour of the walls or placement of furniture. Instead, he boasts about his job and the people he works with as host of CBC Radio’s Saskatchewan Weekend. Even though this radio studio in the CBC Regina building isn’t much more than a desk surrounded by a bunch of technical equipment, it’s his favourite place because, as he describes, “it’s where the magic happens,” every Saturday and Sunday morning.

Q: What’s your favourite thing about this studio? A: The fact that it’s soundproof and that I can yell in here and nobody can hear me is tremendous. Q: What’s unique about the studio? A: There is absolutely nothing about this room that makes it seem that it has a personality. There’s nothing about it that would be a reason why anyone would like it, other than the fact that I have it a little cooler that some people like — comedy comes from the cold. That’s why so many Canadians are great writers and actors. Q: How can an ordinary place be your favourite? A: This studio is my favourite place because of (how) I am afforded the opportunity to do what I do, which is communicate with people, tell their stories and share them with people across the province. Q: Where do you keep your personal stuff ? A: My desk has all the personality. Q: This doesn’t look like the studio from the old sitcom WKRP in Cincinnati. A: We still have a turntable in here and we still have a CD player. But everything now comes from the computers. Q: Do you like that you work in the digital world instead of using tape to prepare your material and records to play music? A: The digital archiving stuff makes it easier, but I love physically having my hands on things … I could give you a thousand “I remember when I first started in this business”

There isn’t anything especially unique about the studio where Dan Reynish hosts his weekly show on CBC Radio, but his love for the job makes this soundproof room full of knobs and switches his favourite place in the Queen City. QC PHOTO BY ANDREW MATTE

stories, but technology has made doing the show easier. But it’s had tremendous effect on the entire communications and news industries.

Q: Why do you like your work so much? A: I absolutely love my show. I have been all over the province doing unique stories from all over Saskatchewan … it’s a weekly conversation that affords you the time to have meaningful conversations with people. And that part of it is cool … As much as we bring in people like (actor) Rick Moranis or Ed Robertson of the Barenaked Ladies for the listeners of Saskatchewan, we’re here telling Saskatchewan

stories. And that’s what we’re supposed to do.

Q: How many people work on Saskatchewan Weekend? A: I’m the only one who works on the show. So on the weekends, other than (journalist) Tory Gilles, I’m the only one here. On Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, I produce it and prepare for it. And on Saturday and Sunday, I host and perform it. Q: How long have you been doing the show? A: We just celebrated 10 years. Saskatchewan Weekend debuted on the Labour Day weekend 2003.

Q: What do you say about criticism of the CBC? And do you ever feel your show is in jeopardy because of funding cuts? A: The government is going to do what they feel is right. But I can only produce my show until somebody tells me not to. Am I worried? We live in the 21st century where there is not a lot of people who wake up every morning and know that they are not guaranteed a job a year from now. And I am one of those people. Q: That doesn't bother you? A: I don’t let it keep me up at nights. I’m a glassis-three-quarters-full person.


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INVENTORY

We want to hear from you: Tell us about your local business. Email qc@leaderpost.com

# 898 FOOD STORE Inside a colourful freezer flashing the names of popular ice cream brands, Pizza Pops and Healthy Choice Gourmet Steamers are displayed next to Taiwanese hotpot kits. At 898 Food Store, a new grocery store in North Central, the co-owners’ goal is to serve the community while introducing Canadians to healthy, delicious Taiwanese food. Jinggong Yu and Yu Lin Shen moved to Canada two years ago with their wives and children. They immediately began learning English and looking for the perfect location to open a store, which they found in April. Lin thought about just selling Canadian food, but realized a better idea was to champion the food of his homeland. It’s a small but diverse store: 898 offers an array of foods like noodles, seafood, dried mushrooms, lychee honey, kelp and snacks — coconut- and five-spice-

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flavoured potato chips among them. They hope to form an 898 chain of stores and also plan to start doing Taiwanese takeout. 898 Food Store is open 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday to Saturday, at 898 Retallack St.

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1. BLACK SESAME PIE: $4.50 2. TEA: Mint, lavender, rose; $4.25 each

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3. JAN JAN SOYBEAN FLAVOUR CANNED PASTE: $7.50 4. ALOE VERA DRINK: $1.50 each

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5. CUTTLEFISH BALLS: $5

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6. PINEAPPLE CAKE: $3.70 7. ROASTED PIKE: Various flavours; $1.85 each QC PHOTOS BY BRYAN SCHLOSSER

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on the cover #

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W E D NTES DAY, rNpOV 27,m2/ 0 H esTa H oEeMnBi E xR .Co b 1r3i d g es

Things can change; we have to rise up. I have a revolutionary way of thinking. — Lindsay Knight

Rap, motherhood, academia and community collide By Angelina Irinici

You may know Eekwol as Canada’s first solo female aboriginal hip hop artist. What you may not know is that Lindsay Knight isn’t too fond of that title. For starters, Knight doesn’t like the term aboriginal because it’s been developed and defined by the government and not its own people. She prefers “indigenous” because it reflects the people on an international level as being different nations and tribes. And she doesn’t like to be pigeonholed — she questions why female rappers are put in a separate category from males. She’s heard people say, “You’re pretty good for a girl” far too often. Her response: “It’s words. It’s using your throat to create words. Why is it any different?” Knight has been writing all her life; she still has a journal from when she was six years old, and she doesn’t have the heart to throw it away. Her words went from journal entries to poetry, song lyrics and even a master’s thesis. (She recently convocated from the University of Saskatchewan.) The song lyrics turned into four albums, one of which won Best Hip Hop Album at the Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards in 2005. Knight wrote when she was angry, she wrote when she was sad and she wrote the emotions of others. She wrote what she felt, what she heard, but most importantly, what she was learning. And at times, what she was Hip hop artist Lindsay Knight (Eekwol) and her daughter Kisay. The activist incorporates spiritual and historical themes in her music. bridges pHoTo by miCHelle berg learning was frustrating. the U of R. The research labs give ry their activism within the art and Her inner-activist was born. Knight was on a path of aware- from a more spiritual, historical and “And the only way I can do that students the opportunity to engage it certainly comes from a place of an ness — she began studying Native informed place. “(I’d) think about the history of is by recognizing the strengths we in hip hop culture; they can learn to underlying politics of resistance,” Studies at the University of Regina (graduating in 2005) and exploring our people, the aspects of our people have/Power in numbers/We got pow- make beats, write, breakdance and Marsh says. Hip artist Lindsay and her Kisay. The activist incorporates spiritual and historical themes in her music. QCgraffiti PHOTO BY MICHELLE BERG “Lindsay offers a variety of very work. in spirit/I got power in music/I got do anddaughter the dysfunction, poverty and all er her hop roots. Knight isKnight from (Eekwol) Muskoday Marsh has published a number of unique experiences and perspectives First Nation. Most of her teenage of the social issues,” she explains in power in my voice/Hear it!,” she raps By poetry, asong lyrics and even a masthroat toabout create words.She’s Why currentis it any within tions andcalled tribes. And she doesn’t articles title.soft For starters, Knight fairly masculine genre, and Knight. a song Apprento. voice. “I started to lookdoesn’t at his- in yearsAngelina were spent inIrinici Saskatoon. She her ter’sworks thesis. (She recently convocatdifferent?” be pigeonholed — she queslike the aboriginal it’s like against a lot of norms and co-editing a reader with scholarly she “I to could talk about Lindsay and ly andterm colonization andbecause residential was raised in a Cree and Saulteux tory ed from the University of SaskatchKnight has been writing all her cultures tionsmusic why all female put hip-hop been developed defined with by the You may know Eekwol way, as Canada’s of that genre. Her work and articles (the first in Canada), day,” rappers says Dr. are Charity and I wasand bombarded all her traditional ceremonial but she schools, ewan.) The song turned life; she still hasaapiece journal from when contributions in a separate category from profesmales. which government and notand its knowledge. own people.I Marsh, first solo female aboriginal hip was hop of to lyrics her art form into are includes about Knight. University of Regina this information left those traditions when she four albums, one and of which won Best was six years old, and she doesn’t She’s heard people say, “You’re pretShe prefers “indigenous” because artist. provocative important as a “Lindsay is a really important ac- both and Canada Research Chair in she that in my music to speak to the sor younger. Once she came back to used Hip Hop Album atvoice the Canadian have the to throw away.isHer ty good for a girl” far often. Her tivist it reflects an we internaWhather youmusic may not know that reality of political for youngAbinandheart an artist, anditwhat so kind Media andtoo Performance of the the people historyon that don’t Interactive them, started to is reflect on Page 8 words about went from journal to Continued response: words. It’sIMP using your tionalabout levelmuch as being different na- (IMP). Lindsay isn’t of that digenous people.” hip hop is oneentries can marShe“It’s directs the labs at lovely in schools.” that; sheKnight thought — too andfond rapped — hear


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I started to look at history and colonization and residential schools, and I was bombarded with all of this information and knowledge. I used that in my music to speak to the reality of the history that we don’t hear about much in schools. — Knight

Knight wrote when she was angry, she wrote when she was sad and she wrote the emotions of others. She wrote what she felt, what she heard, but most importantly, what she was learning. And at times, what she was learning was frustrating. Knight was on a path of awareness — she began studying Native Studies at the University of Regina (graduating in 2005) and exploring her roots. Knight is from Muskoday First Nation. Most of her teenage years were spent in Saskatoon. She was raised in a Cree and Saulteux traditional ceremonial way, but she left those traditions when she was younger. Once she came back to them, her music started to reflect that; she thought — and rapped — from a more spiritual, historical and informed place. “(I’d) think about the history of our people, the aspects of our people and the dysfunction, poverty and all of the social issues,” she explains in her soft voice. “I started to look at history and colonization and residential schools, and I was bombarded with all of this information and knowledge. I used that in my music to speak to the reality of the history that we don’t hear about much in schools.” Her inner-activist was born. “And the only way I can do that is by recognizing the strengths we have/Power in numbers/We got power in spirit/I got power in music/I got power in my voice/ Hear it!,” she raps in a song called Apprento. “I could talk about Lindsay and her music all day,” says Dr. Charity Marsh, University of Regina professor and Canada Research Chair in Interactive Media and Performance (IMP). She directs the IMP labs at the U of R. The research labs give students the opportunity to engage in hip hop culture; they can learn to make beats, write, breakdance and do graffiti work. Marsh has published a number of articles about Knight. She’s currently co-editing a reader with scholarly hip-hop articles (the first in Canada), which includes a piece about Knight. “Lindsay is a really important activist and an artist, and what is

Lindsay Knight with her husband Randy Morin, and their children Keesik (left) and Kisay in their home in Saskatoon. QC PHOTO BY MICHELLE BERG

so lovely about hip hop is one can marry their activism within the art and it certainly comes from a place of an underlying politics of resistance,” Marsh says. “Lindsay offers a variety of very unique experiences and perspectives within a fairly masculine genre, and she works against a lot of norms and cultures of that genre. Her work and contributions to her art form are both provocative and important as a kind of political voice for young indigenous people.” But she wasn’t always a proud Cree woman. Knight’s mother is Russian and she used to hide her ancestry behind that, but she remembers it being “devastating”

when her indigenous father would pick her up from school. “I always grew up around addiction, abuse, violence. I knew that was all there but I didn’t know why. I was led to believe it was a genetic thing — that we were genetically inferior and that’s just the way it was.” That’s where the shame came from, but then she started learning. “It became very clear that it had to do with a history and government decisions and we’re not inferior. Things can change; we have to rise up. I have a revolutionary way of thinking.” Her life’s goal is maintaining an open dialogue about resistance, but not in a defensive way. She used to rap in anger, but she’s since realized

a better way to relay a message. “It’s more of an open dialogue and more thinking about it from a perspective where it’s a gentle knowledge of a really hard truth,” she says. “That’s the way that we create dialogue and people listen and ask questions, because if we’re yelling and rah rah-ing, it shuts a lot of doors.” Another reason for softening her lyrics: her children. Five-year-old Keesik is curled up on the couch, watching The Magic School Bus on Knight’s iPad. He says hello quietly and she explains that he’s shy and a bit introverted like herself. Keesik means ‘sky’ in the Cree language. Later, in her basement studio, she and her hus-

band Randy Morin talk about how musical and artistic Kessik is — he creates intricate drawings of churches and bells with great detail. He freestyles like his mom, and loves to play the guitar. “He just showed us a new song he made up,” explains Eekwol. “Don’t mention it,” Keesik says quietly to his mom. Their daughter Kisay, which means ‘compassionate’ in Cree, is 10 months old and very outgoing. A great big smile is ever-present on her face as she claps her hands and swings her feet, which don tiny little moccasins. She’s sitting on the kitchen floor on a big fuzzy blanket. A tiny tambourine sits in front of her, as well as a Fisher Price piano.


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In her genre, she’s well respected. She’s helped develop a theme in the city and the province in that genre. — Derek Bachman

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Lindsay Knight performed at the 2007 Celebration of Aboriginal Music in Saskatoon.

“Keesik, astam,” Morin says from the kitchen. Astam means ‘come’ in Cree, the only language Morin speaks to his children. He is known as a language activist and is one of the few people of his generation who speak Cree fluently in the community. When he’s not playing percussion or teaching, he volunteers his time teaching language classes and leading storytelling workshops and other seminars. Knight is learning Cree along with her children and she often includes the language in her music. One song, Ahtay Weecasin, which means ‘things will get better’ in Cree, describes her experience with post-partum depression after having Keesik.

QC FILE PHOTO

“I couldn’t believe this little being was outside/emptiness came crashing in to fill the void,” she raps. “It totally floored me,” she recalls. “It hit me like a ton of bricks; this heaviness, this heartache, it was so powerful.” When it was too much to bear, Knight got help for the depression and says it was important that she got help early. Then she did what was natural — she wrote about it. Knight wanted to talk openly about the experience because of the stigma attached to mental illness and depression. She used Cree language so the song could be understood in different areas, particularly in northern communities.

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Those are powerful things for young people and one of the reasons why Lindsay is such an important mentor and figure within hip hop music in Canada, and especially in the Prairie provinces. — Charity Marsh

Lindsay Knight (shown here with her daughter Kisay) and her drum group performed recently at a University of Saskatchewan event that honoured indigenous women’s voices. bridges pHoTo by miCHelle berg

“He just showed us a new song he teers his time teaching language she wrote about it. Knight wanted she was born; she wanted Kisay to these guys being taken away from classes and leading storytelling to talk openly about the experience know what she was thinking and me.’ And I started crying. I’m not made up,” explains Knight. “Don’t mention it,” Keesik says workshops and other seminars. because of the stigma attached to how she was going to raise her, but usually emotional about things ... Knight is learning Cree along with mental illness and depression. She then it turned into a song about (but I felt) the powerful emotions quietly to his mom. Their daughter Kisay, which her children and she often includes used Cree language so the song women. That was just one change of those parents who had to watch their kids being taken away,” she could be understood in different ar- in her music after having children. means ‘compassionate’ in Cree, is the language in her music. Lindsay Knight (shown her daughter One Kisay) and her drum groupWeecasin, performed recently at a University in of Saskatchewan event that honoured indigenous women’s voices. explains. QC PHOTO BY MICHELLE “The hurt BERG and the pain ... Her latest EP, Niso, meaning ‘two’ eas, particularly northern comsong, Ahtay 10 months old and here verywith outgoing. in Cree, was written and recorded I could feel it.” A big smile is ever-present as she which means ‘things will get bet- munities. She sat wrote an entire the first year of Keesik’s life. It panels and down, do workshops and conhasupalways been sure honest away,” she explains. “The hurt and Cree, describes her wanted experi- as Knight they grew so she made to in whenin she was born; she claps her has hands and been swings her ter’ Knight always honest and students. cried the whole way came out... in 2009 feel andit.” reflected a song certs with heramusic. the pain I could post-partum leave positive legacy. Kisaywith to know what she depression was think- in feet, in herwhich music.don tiny little mocca- ence because “I was “She’s a very powerful voice for “I alwayslyrics hope come when from people lis- new Shestage, sat down, wrote an thinkentire through. having Knight’s withing and how Keesik. she was going to raise sins. sitting on when the kitchen “SoShe’s I always hope people after “A lot of these that come two and everything I didway in- young people and lyrics I see young peoto the and instrumentasongforand cried the whole couldn’t believe little be- ten in, but she words humbly thinks of — and ing then it turnedthis into a song floor bigwords fuzzy and blanket. A tiny her,“Ibut listenon to athe instrumenout respond of me, toI’m they him and I.” She realized her ple her convinced, in an incredible the her. honesty through. outside/emptiness feels they’ll — thosehear around Just and one volved aboutwas women. That was justcame one tion tambourine in the front of her,and as ing tation they’llsits hear honesty aren’tsays necessarily mine. I may have would listen to her Marsh. “Identifying with to the andexperience reflect on children “A lot of these lyrics that music come way,” to music fill theafter void,” she listen mention of honesty a family’s change ininher having well Fisher Priceand piano. listenastoa the honesty reflect on crashing way wording in a cool, she made sure to a her … of (and having)them a mentor who their experience.” outthey of grew me, up I’mso convinced, they raps in the song. with own residential school resonated as children. “Keesik, astam,” …” says their own experience sheMorin says. rhyming way, of butconfusion as far as leave positive legacy. expresses the kinds She’s about all kinds of aren’tanecessarily mine. I may have lyrical “It floored me,” she‘two’ re- with her.written She went home and put Her totally latest EP, Niso, meaning from the kitchen. Astam means She’s written about all kinds of emotion Knight’s lyrics come that concepts might be and part the of their livesbe… but to during many years of wording themfrom in a withcool, the “It was hit me like a ton bricks; issues her kids bed. her “Imagine these a way in Cree, written andof recorded ‘come’ in Cree, theher only language issues but during many years calls. I feel like it comes from but she humbly thinks thosethem. are powerful things for young writing recording, Knight lyrical rhyming way, but of as — farand as hind heartache, it of guys being and taken away from me,” in, in theheaviness, first year this of Keesik’s life. It Morin speaks to recording, his children. He is this of writing and Knight place.” She attributes this — those and around Just one people and one of the reasons why wrote a“And songIabout women. the concepts the her. emotion be- another When it was she thought. started crying. feels came so outpowerful.” in 2009 and reflected a never known as a language activist and is was never wrote a song about women. the spiritual a family’s experience Lindsay is suchworld. an important men“I not thought, ‘I don’t ever want to mention hind themofI feel like it comes from to bear, Knight gotthinkhelp I’m usually emotional about newmuch stage,tobecause “I was one the few people of his genera“Iofthought, ‘I don’t ever want too often within asks her bemuon residential school resonated and figure hip to hop song about women because with another place.” She attributes this torMarsh depression and saysI did it was thingsa ... (but I felt) the powerful ing the for two and everything in- write tion who speak fluently in the to write a songCree about women be- for panels, and toand do especially workshopsinand She went home, put her sic in Canada, the shouldn’t HAVEparents to,’” she to theher. spiritual world. sheShe gotrealized help early. of those whosays had with volved him that and I.” her Iemotions community. When he’s notto,” playing cause I shouldn’t HAVE she important with students. to bed and asks thought, Prairie provinces.” She their wrote kids Kisaybeing a song taken when kids Marsh often her “‘Imagine to be on concerts shewould did what was — boldly. to watch children listen to natural her music percussion or teaching, he a volunsays boldly. She wrote Kisay song Then


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(Knight builds) unbelievable trust; when they see Lindsay here it’s like immediately they relax because they know they’re going to have some sort of relief that day. She’s a listener. — Danielle Genest

first, something talented. She’sCommunity ness Initiative Toward Health that goes a long Plus, she’s “She’s a very been powerful aroundvoice for a “She’s while. incredibly way with SWITCH’s clients. gotwas an incredibly strong (SWITCH). Thepresence list goes on. for Knight youngstarted people rapping and I see when young she “(Knight builds) unbelievable on stage. ... ISWITCH think, onprogram an internacoordinate Danielle people about 15 respond and has to been her indoing an incredso professiontrust; whenThey they see Lindsay here tional she speaks could definitely Genest highly of the couple. ible says Marsh. “Identifying ally way,” for the last 10 years. She released her level, it’s like immediately they relax to grow in.” put community first, something that goes with her (and mentor first album in having) 1999 anda is workingfind onthe a markets oneway of with two SWITCH’s artists because clients. they know they’re going who expresses kinds of connew one, set to the come out this spring. Knight aislong to have some sort of relief that represent “(Knight tobuilds) unbelievable trust; fusion thatgenre, mightshe’s be part their chosen “In her wellofrespected. She’s by SaskMusic day,”it’s Genest the the province at world music festi- here when they see Lindsay like says. im- “She’s a listener. lives helped … develop those are a theme powerful in the things city and Unless youknow ask her something she Mundial Montreal later this mediately they relax because they for province younginpeople that genre,” and onesays of the Derekval Bachdoesn’t sayrelief anything about herself month, anthey’re opportunity verysome going she’s to have sort of reasons man, program why Lindsay manager is such an at imSaskMusic. — she’s so modest.” excited that day,” Genest says. “She’s a just listener. “She’s incredibly She’s got an about. portant mentor andtalented. figure within A couple of times a week, Knight doesn’t you just ask saveher hersomething talshe doesn’t incredibly strong presence ones-stage. Knight ... I Unless hip hop music in Canada, and into schools and say creativity anything for about the stage. herselfgoes — she’s just so around Saskatchthink, on level, sheents could pecially inan theinternational Prairie provinces.” Each day modest.” of the week is reserved ewan to perform, do workshops definitely Plus, she’s findbeen the markets around to forgrow a in.” andKnight talks goes on everything from for community A couple work; of times there’s a week, while. Knight started rapping when chosen Knight was one of two artists songwriting totoself-esteem buildMorin’s into schools evening free around Cree Saskatchewan she by SaskMusic was about 15 to and represent has been thedoprovince at Monday ing.talks Knight’s main message is to class, Knight’s Tuesday wom- and perform, do night workshops on evlastso week’s world music ing professionally for thefestival last 10 Mundial She urges youth to group andfrom mentoring on betoconfident. songwriting self-esteem years. Montreal. She released her first album en’s drumerything stand upis fortowhat Wednesday nights at the Student Knight’s main message be they believe, and in Knight 1990 anddoesn’t is working a new one, justonsave her talents and building. to never Initiative Toward Comand urges youth stand stay up silent. for set to come for out this creativity the spring. stage. Each day Wellness of the confident “Whenstay I stopped doing that, evThe and list to never what (SWITCH). they believe, si“In her she’s well respect- munity week is genre, reserved for community work: Health erything started happening for goes on. lent. ed. She’s helpedMonday develop evening a theme free there’s Morin’s Cree me,” everything she says. SWITCH “When program coordinate I stopped doing that in the Knight’s city and Tuesday the province in women’s class, night Danielle highly startedspeaks happening forofme,”airinici@thestarphoenix.com/ she says. that Bachman, drumgenre,” groupsays andDerek the two mentoring on Genest Lindsay Knight performed at the 2007 Celebration Aboriginal at thethe Lakeview Lindsay Knight’s husband Randy Morin speaks only Cree with Keesik andof Kisay. KnightMusic is learning lanChurch inQC Saskatoon. File photo couple. They put community @angelinairinici program manager Wednesday nights atatSaskMusic. the Studentthe Wellairinici@thestarphoenix.com/@angelinairinici guage alongside her children. PHOTO BY bridges MICHELLE BERG

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CITY NEWS #

H E R I TA G E N E I G H B O U R H O O D

Helping make core improvements By Andrew Matte Josh Haugerud’s love for the Heritage Neighbourhood happened overnight. When he realized he had forgotten to close the trunk of his car, he returned to its Osler Streetparking spot the next morning to discover his trunk closed and its contents untouched. “They could have stolen my brand new golf clubs, but they didn’t. Somebody must have seen it open and closed it,” said Haugerud. The five-year-old story made him eager to return the favour by helping improve the neighbourhood’s reputation, historically known for street crime and prostitution. He moved out of the city but returned a few years ago to become a community volunteer. “Five years ago, things here were way worse than they are now,” said Haugerud, president of the local community association. This month, Haugerud was among a group of volunteers, city officials and sponsors to gather for the official celebration of new playground equipment at Core Community Park, installed in a green space on 11th Avenue Haugerud praised neighbours for coaxing the city to make improvements to the park and finding companies to help pay for the collection of slides and climbing equipment. The $60,000 structure was built to accommodate the growing number of young families and students from nearby Thomson Community School. Similar to when the area was renamed and called Heritage Neighbourhood nearly a decade ago, the playground stands as tangible evidence of the evolution of inner-city Regina. This polyethylene monument in primary colours serves as a reminder to residents and its visitors that the core and its inhabitants seek a new reputation, said Haugerud. “There are new families moving into this neighbourhood … more people see this place as great place to raise kids. And the new playground really illustrates that,” he said. ■ ■ ■ ■ Nichole Huck recently moved to Heritage with her husband, City Coun. Shawn Fraser, and their two-year-old son. They wanted neighbours who reflected the economic and cultural diversity of the city and were willing to look past the neighbourhood’s reputation in favour of its central location. And they were drawn to the idea of contributing to its evolution.

Nichole Huck and her two-year-old son Rye Huck Fraser play at the Core Community Park in Regina. QC PHOTO BY TROY FLEECE

“We are where Cathedral was 20 years ago,” said Huck, referring to the Regina neighbourhood west of downtown, which draws housebuyers for its celebrated homes and trendy 13th Avenue retail strip. Huck dismisses suggestions she and her family are at risk of coming into contact with criminals or that they’re in danger because they live a short block from where negotiations are held between prostitutes and their customers. “I don’t see how sex workers could be a danger to my family,” said Huck, who helped raise playground-equipment money by going doorto-door to sing Christmas carols. The Heritage area is bordered by College Avenue, Broad Street, Winnipeg Street and the CPR tracks. It also includes the Arcola Triangle, the area within Arcola Avenue, Winnipeg Street and Victoria Avenue. Huck said her family is among many who’ve sought out homes on Toronto, Ottawa and St.

John Street for the same reasons. And helping making the area safer is a task that many residents enjoy. “One of my neighbours would go out on the street and tell the johns to move along,” said Huck. She also makes a point to go for late-night strolls or take her son to a park as a way to show others she feels it’s safe. “It’s important for us to be able to walk and bike to work … And there are three playgrounds within walking distance to my house,” said Huck. “It’s a very safe place — and it’s getting better.” ■ ■ ■ ■

Regina real-estate agent Kashlee Parmiter said improvements to the city’s economy has

made Heritage attractive, not just because prices are lower than in places like Whitmore Park and Lakeridge, but because of its location and proximity to the General Hospital. “The statistics for the Heritage area are really interesting. Development in the General Hospital area particularly has driven prices higher than in other parts,” Parmiter said. The average sale price in the Heritage Neighbourhood jumped to $209,000 in 2012 from $135,000 in 2009, she said. “The south side of Victoria Avenue has seen more improvement from first-time home buyers and young families moving in to be closer to work. This section has seen dramatic improvements from renovations and rebuilds in the last few years. “The north side of Victoria Avenue still has quite a high renting demographic, so while not as improved as the south, there are still opportunities to be had there.”


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We have neighbours who are 80 or 90 years old. A lot of them are women who have lived here for 50 years. And they have kept up their properties and have these cute homes. That, to me, really instils a sense of community. — Shaunna Dunn

Similar improvements are happening in places like North Central, Broders Annex and Arnheim Place, Parmiter added. ■ ■ ■ ■

Oliver Dunn, Heather Cameron, Shaunna Dunn, and Sabine Manera (from left) walk in Regina’s Heritage Neighbourhood. QC PHOTO BY MICHAEL BELL

Shaunna Dunn didn’t hesitate when she moved into the house owned by her husband several years ago. Having lived in Montreal, she was accustomed to having neighbours from all economic backgrounds. “If you don’t want to live in a neighbourhood where there are people walking down the sidewalk late at night or there’s just generally a lot of activity or someone going through the garbage in the back alley, then this neighbourhood isn’t for you,” said Dunn. She understands why homebuyers seek the tranquillity of new subdivisions, but she and her family enjoy the community’s history.

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“If you want to isolate yourself and move to an area where you can’t see this kind of diversity, then that’s your decision,” she said. “I find that Regina is made up of all these isolated areas. And people don’t associate with people from different areas very much.” Dunn also appreciates the history of her community and her relationship with her neighbours. “We have neighbours who are 80 or 90 years old. A lot of them are women who have lived here for 50 years. And they have kept up their properties and have these cute homes. That, to me, really instils a sense of community.” Heather Cameron and her husband bought a house nearby about three years ago. They were willing to accept incidents of petty crime in exchange for what the eclectic area offers their family. “The sketchiness of the neighbourhood is something that I deal with so

I can take advantage of all the things I enjoy,” said Cameron. “We’re raising our son in a neighbourhood that’s diverse and where there are people from all walks of life.” She also enjoys how the neighbourhood helps her appreciate all people, even though not all Reginans do, she said. “When you see someone across the street, at first glance you might have an opinion of that person. But if you look again, you realize that it’s a normal person who has had a life that has taken them down a certain path,” said Cameron. “I think the people we bought our house from sold because they wanted to leave and go to a suburb where it’s all cookie-cutter and everything is neat and tidy. “Besides, we moved here because a lot of our friends were already here.” amatte@leaderpost.com

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FASHION #

What’s your winter style? Send a note to QC@leaderpost.com

S A S K AT C H E WA N S T Y L E

Moh Yusuf:

Small accessories make a big difference By Angelina Irinici Moh Yusuf moved from the U.K. to Saskatoon more than three months ago for a job transfer in geotechnical engineering. He finds the city “lovely, friendly, obviously cold,” and the fashion laid back. He says he spots many well-dressed people around the city and it’s clear people put an effort into fashion, but admits that the style is quite different here in Saskatchewan compared to London, England. Yusuf began paying more attention to fashion when he was in university. He said he’d spend hours in the dressing room trying to find the perfect fit and what worked for him. He doesn’t follow trends, but sticks to a classic style. “Because if (you) follow fashion trends and it goes out of date, then you’re technically out of date,” he explains. Accessories — like ties, pocket squares, lapel pins and even socks — play a huge role in Yusuf’s look. Typically, he’ll choose a piece he wants to highlight that day and whether it’s his tie, pocket square or blazer, he’ll co-ordinate the other pieces to complement the chosen statement piece. That’s part of his style, which works for him, while other things may not. While some people look great in black, he’d never wear an all-black outfit. He adds that others pull of some things well that he doesn’t: skinny jeans, a pink tie or the colour lemon-green. “You need to harness your strengths and conceal your weaknesses — that’s what fashion is all about, really,” Yusuf says. “You need an identity. When I see you I can say, ‘This style is Moh,’ or, ‘This style is this person.’ Don’t get me wrong you don’t want to be predictable, but (keep in mind) this is what suits me and this is what suits you.” Yusuf just started writing a men’s fashion blog; his first post was all about fit — something hesays is crucial for men Although Yusuf doesn’t spend too much money on his clothes, he says that if you do and the fit isn’t right, it can make an expensive outfit look the opposite.

Outfit: 1. TIE: Zara. 2. SHIRT: Hawes & Curtis, London. “It’s a British designer that’s been around for years.” 3. JACKET: Ted Baker, London. “I like their jackets, especially their winter jackets; wool and tweeds.” 4. POCKET SQUARE: Burton Menswear, London. 5. LAPEL FLOWER: New York. “It didn’t cost a lot and they are easy to get. It only cost me about $10.” 6. CARDIGAN: Topman. 7. CHINOS: Calvin Klein from TK Maxx in London. “TK Maxx is just like the Winners here. I need to go and see what it looks like.” 8. SHOES: Magnanni, Italian shoemaker. 9. SOCKS: Burtons Menswear, London. “I do like my socks and my accessories.”

Moh Yusuf.

QC PHOTOS BY MICHELLE BERG


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SPACES #

S A S K AT C H E WA N ’ S B E S T S PA C E S

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Spaces celebrates beauty both indoors and out. If you have a living space we should highlight email qc@leaderpost.com

New space offers students lunch and relaxation By Angelina Irinici WHO? James Haywood, Louis’ food and beverage manager at Louis’ Loft. WHERE? On the second floor of the Memorial Union Building on the University of Saskatchewan campus. WHAT? What used to be Browsers Café — a coffee shop and used bookstore — has been extensively renovated and turned into Louis’ Loft. Part of the University of Saskatchewan Students’ Union (USSU), Louis’ Loft is a licensed coffee shop by day and an event venue, complete with catering, by night. The large space boasts plenty of natural light, a large bar and a new menu featuring locally sourced booze, baking and coffee. Although unique paninis, sandwiches and salads are featured on the menu (Haywood’ favourite part), you can still order from Louis’ pub downstairs. The space is meant to accommodate students who want to take a lunch or coffee break and sit for a while to study or chat. There is ample seating and a cozy yet modern feel. The space is also available to book catered events from 30-250 people for weddings and Christmas parties, to student events. WHY? Book sales at Browsers had taken a “nose dive,” so staff found a need to change the space. It offers students a place to go when Louis’ is closed for events and concerts. “There aren’t very many places for students to chill out and use their laptops and just relax in a nice atmosphere,” Haywood says. When envisioning the space, staff wanted a “warm, neutral type of updated modern space.” But something that was also conducive to hosting events, so designing a café and event space at the same time had its challenges. WHEN? The space closed at the end of last year’s school term and about $75,000 was spent renovating the space. It first opened during summer classes in June; Louis’ Loft threw a full launch party earlier this month. HOW? The USSU contracted the same architecture firm that renovated Place Riel to help with the design and renovation. The whole space was gutted — only the fireplace and windows are original to the building. “(The fireplace) is one thing we had to keep intact because it’s been there forever. We didn’t want to ruin that for anyone.” Because the space is used for events, the colour palette was kept neutral. Browns and greys were debated, finally settling on grey to keep a contemporary look.

QC PHOTOS BY MICHELLE BERG

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ON THE SCENE #

2 0 1 3 G I B S O N ’ S F I N E S T C F L P L AY E R AWA R D S

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Fans, players and dignitaries attended the 2013 Gibson’s Finest CFL Player Awards on Nov. 21.

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Brendon LaBatte of the Saskatchewan Roughriders received an award at the Nov. 21 ceremony.

“I recommend Vitamin C and Lysine for Heart Health” W. Gifford-Jones, MD

Fourteen years ago following my own coronary attack I decided to follow the research of Dr. Linus Pauling, Professor Williams Stehbens and Dr. Sydney Bush and take high doses of vitamin C plus lysine. I am turning 90 soon and I am glad I did! Dr. Linus Pauling, two-time Nobel Prize winner, was ignored for reporting that large amounts of vitamin C and lysine are needed to prevent coronary attacks. Twentyfive years ago Pauling reported that animals make vitamin C but humans do not and must supplement this important vitamin. Lysine must also be supplemented. Vitamin C is required to manufacture healthy collagen, the glue that holds coronary cells together, just like mortar is needed for bricks. Lysine, like steel rods in cement, makes collagen stronger. Pauling claimed it takes a mere 10 milligrams of vitamin C to prevent scurvy, but several thousand to prevent heart attack.

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Dr. William Stehbens, Professor of Anatomy at Auckland University in New Zealand emphasized that coronary arteries are under more pressure than any other arteries in the body. After all, they’re situated in the heart’s muscle, not in the big toe. Moreover they’re under constant pressure while the heart beats 100,000 times every 24 hours, or 37 million times a year, and 2.2 billion times if you live to 70 years of age. Without sufficient vitamin C and lysine this constant pounding causes minute cracks in collagen, resulting in blood clots and possible death, or a weakened artery can break, causing a stroke. Dr. Sydney Bush, an English researcher, has now proven that vitamin C and lysine can reverse atherosclerosis. Bush took retinal photographs, then started his patients on high doses of vitamin C and lysine. One year later new pictures showed atherosclerosis had regressed in retinal arteries.

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Hundreds of football fans, league representatives and dignitaries filled the Conexus Arts Centre on Nov. 21 for the 2013 Gibson’s Finest CFL Player Awards. The awards, held annually prior to the Grey Cup game, saw a record number of Canadians recognized. Seven won awards, the most in CFL history. This year’s winners are: Most Outstanding Player: Jon Cornish (CGY) and Ricky Ray (TOR); Most Outstanding Defensive Player: Charleston Hughes (CGY) and Chip Cox (MTL); Most Outstanding Canadian: Jon Cornish (CGY) and Henoc Muamba (WPG); Most Outstanding Special Teams Player: Rene Paredes (CGY) and Marc Beswick (HAM); Most Outstanding Rookie: Brett Jones (CGY) and CJ Gable (HAM); Most Outstanding Offensive Lineman: Brendon LaBatte (SSK) and Jeff Keeping (TOR).

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MUSIC #

W E’ R E O N FAC EB O O K : Visit us at Facebook.com/qcregina

EAST OF EDEN

Couple creates sparks with new band By Angelina Irinici Alexandra Thomson and Justin Pelan have Kijiji to thank for two major things in their lives: their relationship and their band. Both moved to Saskatoon for university and met in 2010 through a Kijiji ad Thomson posted looking for a musician to jam with. The ad intrigued Pelan and soon a romance budded and a band got started. East of Eden was born this past summer after the two felt they had performed enough covers and were ready to harness their own sound. Haunting, dark and passionate are how the duo describes their music, which they say is a combination of folk, pop, indie and jazz. And it all comes from an honest place. “Music writing acts as my therapy. I’m not somebody who really expresses or deals with negative emotions but that comes out through song writing. I think that’s why it’s so dark because it’s inspired by dark emotions,” Thomson says. The band’s name follows suit. The two explain that the biblical reference East of Eden means paradise lost. Thomson explains their music reflects that humanity will always be flawed and that the “dark, elegant and crispness” of the name matches how the two sound. They’ve written and recorded five songs, plan to release an album and hopefully tour nationwide. Their first single, She Cries Beauty, is complete with a video and was released in September. They’ve played a few gigs in Saskatoon and Regina, including the Regina Jazz Festival. The duo has something else in common aside from music — both are studying engineering at the University of Saskatchewan. They find a few similarities between the two: for Pelan it’s the repetition and structure; for Thomson it’s the release. “Math was sort of also this therapy where I would practise and concentrate so hard it would sort of take me out of reality and I was able to just let

Alexandra Thomson and Justin Pelan at D’lish by Tish Cafe in Saskatoon. Both study engineering at the University of Saskatchewan. QC PHOTO BY MICHELLE BERG

go, and I feel the same thing happens with music. Math and music are a universal language.” Both want to make livings as engineers and music as East of Eden. “How cool would it be to earn a month of holidays … and instead of a holiday make it a tour? That’s a dream,” Pelan says. “I don’t want to be making music to try to make money. I feel like that could take away from the creativity and realness of who I am within the

music,” Thomson adds. Pelan is from Edmonton and Thomson from Regina and Carry the Kettle First Nation. Both were exposed to music as children. Pelan grew up listening to Eric Clapton around his house and when he got his first pair of headphones when he was 12, he’d lock himself in his room and listen to music. He didn’t pick up his first guitar until he was 17, but after he did, he never put it down. Thomson’s mother was in a band that often went on tour.

Thomson knew she could sing but hid her talent until she was 16. She sang for her mom who put her into vocal lessons and shows including Regina’s Applause Dinner Theatre. Now, the two practise together a couple of times of week. Being in a relationship and a band can cause a bit of friction, but for the most part it’s only positive. “It’s like a second life to our relationship,” Pelan says. “Some of those deeper emotions

come out and I’m comfortable expressing those with Justin because he’s so close to me,” Thomson explains, adding that arguments can arise if one person makes a mistake or isn’t pulling their weight in the band. “We’re in a relationship not just a musical partnership. I think being in a close relationship the band will last a lot longer.” “I haven’t actually heard those words spoken, so I’m pleased,” Pelan smiles.


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# CROSSWORD N EW YO RK TI MES ACROSS �1 Keystone place �5 Some vacation spots 10 Uttered, as a farewell 14 Carnaby Street’s locale

15 Brown, in a way 16 Gershwin’s

1

2

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Music

23 Deg. from M.I.T. Sloan 25 Note in a poker pot 28 Cafeteria stack 29 What the only

manners

35 Prefix with classical 38 What a bouncer may confiscate

40 Makes tough 42 Medevac destinations, briefly

43 New British royal of 2013

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50 Send as payment 53 Classic car whose

name is a monogram

54 ___ Antiqua 55 Draw out 57 Get into 59 Wash. neighbor 62 Doubleheader … or what 17-, 29- and 48-Across are?

66 To be, to Béatrice 67 Make blond, maybe 68 Primordial ___ 69 Spanish province or its capital

70 Fraternity letter 71 Band with the 1987 hit “Need You Tonight”

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71 PUZZLE BY ROBYN WEINTRAUB

DOWN

�1 Sparkling Italian

export �2 Toils on a trireme �3 High-pitched group with a 1958 #1 hit, with “the” �4 Yuletide interjections �5 “Point taken” �6 Rush-hour subway rider, metaphorically �7 Director Jean-___ Godard �8 Ordinal suffix �9 Flow slowly 10 Business with an enticing aroma 11 Fight site 12 Like some looks and laundry

13 Slacks off 18 Disneyland vehicle 19 Often-breaded piece of meat

24 ___ noire 26 Shot-to-the-solar-

plexus sound 27 Reuters alternative 29 It may have outdoor seating 30 “That is so not true!” 31 Happy Meal with a Sprite, e.g. 32 Beginning 35 “Lost in Yonkers” playwright 36 Airline that doesn’t fly on the Sabbath 37 Kon-Tiki Museum city 39 Outfielder’s cry

41 In perpetuum 44 Legendary Boston

Garden skater 45 Part of a Reuben 46 Half a police interrogation team, maybe 48 Make queasy 49 Pend 50 Revolting sort 51 Make up? 52 Prefix with brewery 56 Clock sound 58 Gumbo need 60 Pierre’s pair 61 Deadly snakes 63 Deadly snake 64 Peak next to a glacier, maybe 65 “Just ___ suspected”

#

JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU

Level: Gold Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process of elimination to solve the puzzle. The difficulty level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).

Dine with

COPPER KETTLE

65

66

47 Smelling salts holder 48 What a remorseful

Iago might have said?

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detective on a case has?

33 “It ___ over till …” 34 Improve, as one’s

4

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“Summertime” is one

17 Tornado monitors? 20 AOL or MSN 21 Like Mao’s “little” book 22 Tito, the King of Latin

Edited by Will Shortz

Gift Certificates Available!

1953 Scarth St.

306-525-3545 REG32003088_1_3

Treasured Moments DESIGNED D ESIGNED FOR PEOPLE JUST LIKE YOU! “Treasured Moments” is an ideal way to announce...

Solution to the crossword puzzle and the Sudoku can be found on Page 26

• engagements • weddings • anniversaries

• births • birthdays • graduations

• retirements • reunions • ‘Come & Go’ events, etc.

...in an attractive, inexpensive way that delivers your announcement in both print and online! Plus by placing your announcement in “Treasured Moments” we also include your announcement on our online website celebrating.com where your announcement will also appear online for 3 months from the date that it appears in The Leader Post!

CALL (306) 781-5466 FOR MORE INFORMATION.

Deadline is Two Fridays prior to Saturday’s publication. Prepayment is required.

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#

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L E A D E R P O ST.CO M /Q C

ASK ELLIE

Ex-boyfriend must make amends for his ‘stray kiss’ Q. I recently broke up with my girlfriend of two years, though I was deeply in love with her. After eight months we had a little blip and a short break in which I kissed someone else. I didn’t tell her, as I didn’t want to hurt her. She found out recently and ended our relationship. I can’t sleep at night as I’m stressed, and everything that I do reminds me of her. Do you believe she’ll come around if I leave her alone for a few weeks? Or just wait for her to contact me? Missing Her A. A stray kiss during an agreed break is a minor crime, yet the punishment of ending it seems harsh. This may have to do with either being young and inexperienced (if this is so), or the kiss having far more significance (e.g. she heard or guesses it was more). Whatever the reason for her strong reaction, “leaving her alone” is NOT the right approach. Send flowers to her with a note of apology and missing her, send one text daily that you’re

Ask Ellie

thinking of her (do not harass, and stop if she insists), send one email saying that you’ll never look at that person again, you can only think of her. It may work. Or not. But waiting for her to contact you is just giving up.

Q. My boyfriend and I, both late-40s, are looking to move in together. Neither of us wants to get married. What formulas do you have for a couple to figure out fair sharing of expenses? He makes $15,000 more than me annually, but his support obligations drain that quickly. I bought a modest house this year and moved into it while dating him. I

can afford it myself, so this isn’t about having someone move in to pay my mortgage. He’s renting a sad little apartment after coming out of a divorce, and is paying huge alimony and child support for the next few years until the kids are adults. He works an extra job and works overtime to faithfully fulfil his financial obligations to his ex and his kids, which I suppose is admirable. I don’t know if 50/50 is fair or how other couples split the expenses. Don’t worry about a single chick losing her head, he won’t be moving in without signing some sort of pre-nuptial agreement so I never lose my house. Practical Romantic A. Practicality IS important when starting this new arrangement, especially because it’s harder to change the set-up later unless earnings change significantly. Caring and compassion are also important — and you indicate both here — or why else bother to move together? Especially, since he comes

with emotional (children) ties and financial (support) obligations elsewhere. There are obvious expenses to share completely, through a joint account in which you both deposit an equal amount. These include: food, utilities, cable, and house insurance. They cover the common needs as well as expenses you’d each pay for, if living on your own. Once a pre-nup is in place, you continue to pay the house mortgage and taxes, as it’s your asset. If he earned a lot more, I’d suggest he pay for recreation (meals out, even travel) but besides practicality and caring, there’s being realistic. This guy doesn’t have disposable money beyond the same amount you earn, since his added amount (and likely more) is spoken for. So, if you love him and want to live with him, share the cost of life’s extras, and enjoy a truly equal relationship.

Q. For most of her life, my friend was

very overweight. Over the past two years, she lost almost 150 pounds. We rekindled our friendship last year, and I saw that she looked very sick. I’ve rarely seen her eat anything. She recently confided that she’d make herself throw up after eating junk food, which happens frequently. Also, she uses marijuana multiple times daily for pain maintenance for her condition of endometriosis. She broke up with her longtime boyfriend five months ago. She thinks no one else will ever love her. Worried Friend A. You have good reasons to worry. She’s apparently depressed, also bulimic, addicted to pot, and battling pain. All are harmful enough, but their combined physical and mental health effects after massive weight loss can be extreme. Show her the supportive love of friendship by insisting you accompany her to a doctor for a physical checkup and also for referral for potential depression and addiction.

Next week in Michael Fougere forged a slow-but-steady path from rural Michigan, through the Maritimes to the top of City Hall


W E D N ES DAY, N OV E M B E R 27, 2 0 1 3

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READ MY BOOK #

21

LOCA L AUT H O RS: Writers tell us what makes their book worth reading

JEANNE MARTINSON

Learning how different generations get along Managers ask me frequently, “When will Gen Ys grow up, quit rebelling and get with the program?” Unfortunately for managers and co-workers everywhere, there is more to generational difference than rebellion and a desire to be different from the previous generation. Our generational identity is also about the beliefs and values that were developed in our growing up years. By the time we hatch into the workforce, our perspectives of others, work and the world are well formed. The perfect storm is now brewing for generational conflict in the workplace is due to two unique factors: First, we now have four distinct generational groups in the workplace. Thanks to interrupted plans for re -

tirement due to the 2008 economic downturn, a genuine enjoyment of the work they are engaged in and an anticipation of a longer life span, members of our oldest generation find themselves still in the workplace. At the same time, baby boomers are Jeanne Martinson closing in on retirement and are primarily occupying the positions of power in our organizations. Due to advanced health care providing expectations of a

long and healthy life, and meaningful work to occupy themselves with, baby boomers may be finding the workplace more attractive and will possibly push back retirement plans. Secondly, Gen Ys came into the workforce at the end of the analog to digital shift. This is significant as Generation Y is the first to see digital technology as normal, both in their work and personal life. These two factors have collided to place employees from different generations in heightened conflict. In the workplace, these different generations are now judging each other as having good or poor work ethic, commitment and loyalty to the organization. If you are a colleague trying to un-

derstand your multi-generational coworkers, a front line manager trying to get your youngest workers to show up and show up on time, or are a member of Generation Y and looking for ways to maximize your effectiveness and success in the workplace, this book is for you. It gives you concrete information about the different generations with a focus on work ethic and the motivations and values of Generation Y. Jeanne Martinson is a diversity strategist and best-selling author on the topics of diversity and leadership. Her book is available as an eBook on Kobo and Kindle, in print in Saskatoon at McNally Robinson and online at www.martrain.org.

The holiday season is quickly approaching oac oachin oaching aching and Santa Claus is wondering what wh wha h With gifts to help every animal big and small - you’ll be helping Regina’s animals while honouring the people you care about. The Regina Humane Society 2013 Holiday Catalogue. Select from close to thirty items and provide comfort and joy. All gift purchases made through the catalogue come with a Happy Holidays card and an item description which can then be given as a meaningful gift to a chosen recipient. With gifts starting at just $10, there are items available to suit everyone’s budget.

you would like for Christmas! s! s! Send in your “Letters to Santa” and d we we will w be b sure to get them to the North Pole; some ome me e may mayy even be published in the Leader-Post. Pos Post. Drop Off or Mail your letters to: Leader-Post Letters to Santa ta c /o Box 1130, Regina, SK S4P 3B4 3B 4

Every letter submitted will receive a letter from the North Pole!!! REG45001246_1_2 REG00183612_1_1


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EVENTS #

MUSIC

Johnny Reid A Christmas Gift To You Conexus Arts Centre 200 Lakeshore Dr.

Wedn esd ay, N ov. 27 Wednesday Night Folk: Bradford Bushwakker, 2206 Dewdney Ave.

Sunday, D ec . 1 Dvorak’s Quintet Regina Symphony Orchestra 1:30 p.m., Government House, 4607 Dewdney Ave.

Jam Night McNally’s, 2226 Dewdney Ave. Amanda Rheaume The Exchange, 2431 Eighth Ave.

Cecilian Concert Series Jan Lisiecki 4 p.m., Knox Metropolitan Church, 2340 Victoria Ave.

Thursd ay, N ov. 28 Student Recital U of R music students Noon, Riddell Centre Shu-Box

Monday, D ec . 2 Monday Night Jazz & Blues Bushwakker, 2206 Dewdney

John McCuaig Band McNally’s, 2226 Dewdney Ave.

Lucid Skies, Bonfire, No Blood No Foul, Birch Hills, Generator The Club at the Exchange 2431 Eighth Ave.

Chester Knight and the Wind, Hugh Poorman The Exchange, 2431 Eighth Ave. The Service The Pump, 641 Victoria Ave E. Bermuda Love, RCDP, Birch Hills, Sea of Dead Serpents The Club at The Exchange, 2431 Eighth Ave. Friday, N ov. 29 Ross Osmun piano recital 8 p.m., U of R Riddell Centre Shu-Box Theatre Robot Hive, Slim City Pickers, The Treasures O’Hanlon’s, 1947 Scarth St.

Tu esday, D ec . 3

Johnny Reid will perform at the Conexus Arts Centre on Saturday. FILE PHOTO

Bobby Bruce as Nearly Neil Casino Regina Show Lounge 1880 Saskatchewan Dr. Sonic Orchid The Sip, 306 Albert St.

Bobby Bruce as Nearly Neil Casino Regina Show Lounge 1880 Saskatchewan Dr.

Louis-Jean Cormier, Anique Granger 8 p.m., Bistro/Carrefour des Plaines, 3850 Hillsdale St.

Dvorak’s Quintet Regina Symphony Orchestra 8 p.m., Government House, 4607 Dewdney Ave.

S a t u rday, N ov. 3 0

Raleigh, Danny Goertz Creative City Centre 1843 Hamilton St.

John McCuaig Band McNally’s, 2226 Dewdney Ave.

The Service The Pump, 641 Victoria Ave E.

Big Chill Friday The Lancaster, 4529 Gordon Rd.

Sonic Orchid The Sip, 306 Albert St.

Stephanie Thomson and East of Eden Applause, 1975 Broad St.

John McCuaig Band McNally’s, 2226 Dewdney Ave.

The Service The Pump, 641 Victoria Ave E.

The Steadies Artful Dodger, 1631 11th Ave.

The Jazz Bandits 8 p.m., Le Bistro, Carrefour des Plaines, 3850 Hillsdale St.

Carson Aaron, Braindead Romeo, The Patch, Hell Hounds, Port Noise The Club at The Exchange, 2431 Eighth Ave. Sofia House Rock! Val Halla, The Fortunate Isles, The Spoils, Megan Nash The Exchange, 2431 Eighth Ave.

Gentlemen Husbands, Dear Rouge O’Hanlon’s, 1947 Scarth St.

#

ART

Christmas Art Galore Show and Sale One-of-a-kind Saskatchewan art by art guild members. Nov. 29, 1-9 p.m. Nov. 30, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Dec. 1, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Art Gallery of Regina, Neil Balkwill Civic Arts Centre, 2420 Elphinstone St. Spectate by Belinda Kriek Until Dec. 1. MacKenzie Art Gallery, 3475 Albert St. Quilting for a Cure Pink Ribbon Quilts. Until Dec. 10. Cumberland Gallery, Legislative Building, 2405 Legislative Dr. Passages Terri Fidelak and Laura Hale Until Dec. 24. Mysteria Gallery,

2706 13th Ave.

Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Our Town show and sale A group exhibition and sale from Saskatchewan artists. Nov. 29-Dec. 31. Hague Gallery, Creative City Centre, 1843 Hamilton St.

#

Drawing Our Communities Together Until Jan. 5. MacKenzie Art Gallery, 3475 Albert St. 7: The Professional Native Indian Artists Inc. Until Jan. 12. MacKenzie Art Gallery, 3475 Albert St. Clint Neufeld: The Chandelier, the Trans-Am, the Peacock, the Greyhound and My Grandmother’s China Cabinet Five lightboxes of intricately cut backlit vinyl. Until Jan. 12. Dunlop Art Gallery – Sherwood Village Branch, 6121 Rochdale Blvd. Fool Me Twice Tammi Campbell and Marc Courtemanche present trompe l’oeil in paintings and sculptures. Until Jan. 19. Dunlop Art Gallery – Central Branch, 2311-12th Ave. Beyond Friberg: The Mounted Police in Art Dec. 2-March 31. RCMP Heritage Centre, 5907 Dewdney Ave. The Artists of Scott Nicholson Fine Arts New exhibitions quarterly. Until July 31, 2014. Regina Centre Crossing, 1621 Albert St. --Assiniboia Gallery 2266 Smith St. Open Tuesday to Friday 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Nouveau Gallery 2146 Albert St. Open Tuesday to Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Slate Fine Art Gallery 2078 Halifax St. Open Tuesday to Friday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.,

COMEDY

Combat Improv Nov. 27, 8 p.m. The Artesian, 2627 13th Ave. Cyclone Comedy Nov. 28 Artful Dodger, 1631 11th Ave. Comedy Grind Every Saturday night Gabbo’s, 2338 Dewdney Ave.

#

T H E AT R E

American Idiot Nov. 28 and 29, 8 p.m. Conexus Arts Centre, 200 Lakeshore Dr. Tackled … A Football Play Nov. 27, 28, 29, 30. Weekly shows until Dec. 21. Applause Dinner Theatre, 1975 Broad St., lower level The Wizard of Oz Nov. 28-30, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 30 matinee at 1 p.m. Winston Knoll Collegiate, 5255 Rochdale Blvd. The Wizard of Oz Nov. 28-30. Balfour Collegiate, 1245 College Ave. Edna Jaques Live! Starring Michele Sereda. Nov. 29-Dec. 1, 8 p.m. The Artesian, 2627 13th Ave. Broadway Musical Tribute Belly Dance with Linda Nov. 30, 7:30 p.m. Royal Saskatchewan Museum, 2445 Albert St. Thriller: A Michael Jackson Tribute Show Dec. 1. Weekly shows until Dec. 14. Applause Dinner Theatre, 1975 Broad St., lower level Sleeping Beauty Until Dec. 29. Globe Theatre, 1801 Scarth St.


W E D N ES DAY, N OV E M B E R 27, 2 0 1 3

L E A D E R P O ST.CO M /Q C

What you need to know to plan your week. Send events to QC@leaderpost.com

#

SPECI A L EV E NTS

Men’s wrestling U of R vs. Dickinson State Nov. 27. Cooperators Centre, Evraz Place 1914: A Turning Point in History and Culture The Non-British in Saskatchewan and the First World War by Dr. James Pitsula Nov. 27, 7-8 p.m. Archives Reading Room, Archer Library, U of R Regina Farmers’ Market Nov. 28, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. U of R Riddell Centre Multi-Purpose Room 16 Days of Activism Why we still need feminist activism by Jill Arnott Nov. 28, 11:45 a.m.-12:45 p.m. U of R College West room 113 Saskatchewan’s Got Talent — In Support of Forever Friends of Hope Foundation Inc. Dinner and entertainment by Saskatchewan performers. Nov. 28, 5 p.m. Casino Regina Show Lounge 1880 Saskatchewan Dr. Women’s volleyball U of R vs. UBC. Nov. 29, 6 p.m. U of R Centre for Kinesiology, Health and Sport Regina Pats vs. Prince Albert Nov. 29, 7 p.m., Brandt Centre, Evraz Place Women’s hockey U of R vs. U of C Nov. 29, 7 p.m., Cooperators Centre Men’s volleyball U of R vs. UBC. Nov. 29, 8 p.m., U of R CKHS French Social Club Nov. 30, 10-11:30 a.m. U of R Riddell Centre (look for Institut Francais banner) Christkindl Markt German Christmas market with mulled wine, food, crafts and gifts. Nov. 30, 3-8 p.m. Regina German Club, 1727 St. John St. Women’s volleyball U of R vs. UBC Nov. 30, 5 p.m. U of R CKHS Women’s hockey U of R vs. U of C Nov. 30, 7 p.m., Cooperators Centre Regina Pats vs. Moose Jaw Nov. 30, 7 p.m., Brandt Centre, Evraz Place

23

“Coming here was the safest I���ve felt in years.”

Men’s volleyball U of R vs. UBC, Nov. 30, 7 p.m. U of R CKHS

Anonymous abuse victim and Leader-Post Christmas Cheer Fund recipient

U of R Track Instrasquad Meet Nov. 30. U of R CKHS Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman: Behind the Myth Tour Dec. 1, 7:30 p.m., Conexus Arts Centre

#

NEW MOVIES

Black Nativity Drama A streetwise teen Baltimore who was raised by a single mother travels to New York City to spend Christmas with his estranged relatives, Reverend Cornell Cobbs (Forest Whitaker) and Aretha Cobbs (Angela Bassett). He’s frustrated by the Reverend’s strict rules, but eventually discovers the true meaning of faith, healing, and family. Homefront Thriller A widowed ex-DEA agent retires to a small town for the sake of his 10-year-old daughter – but he picked the wrong town. Starring Jason Statham, James Franco, Winona Ryder, Kate Bosworth, Rachelle Lefevre. Written and produced by Sylvester Stallone.

GIVE THE GIFT OF HEALING THIS CHRISTMAS. Your donation Cheer Fund Your donation to to the the Leader-Post Leader-PostChristmas Christmas Cheer will help four organizations shelter families from physical, Fund will help four organizations shelter families from sexual andsexual emotional abuse. 100% of your donations physical, and emotional abuse. 100% of your will be shared equally by: SOFIA House, Regina Transition donations will be shared equally by: SOFIA House, House, Isabel Johnson Shelter and WISH Safe House. Help Transition House, Isabel Johnson Shelter/Regina those in need. Give the gift of healing this Christmas. YWCA, and Wichihik Iskwewak WISH Safe House. Help those in need. Give the gift of healing this Christmas.

Oldboy Thriller An ad executive (Josh Brolin) is kidnapped and held hostage for 20 years in solitary confinement. When he is released, he embarks on a mission to discover who orchestrated his capture, only to find he is still trapped in a web of conspiracy and torment.

PLEASE DONATE NOW

Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom Drama The story of Nelson Mandela’s extraordinary life journey from his childhood in a rural village through to his inauguration as the first democratically elected president of South Africa. Galaxy Cinemas 420 McCarthy Blvd. N.; 306-522-9098

Online at www.leaderpost.com/cheerfund www.leaderpost.com Phone at (306) 781-5211, Monday to Friday from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm Please send only cheques, money orders or credit card donations by mail $ Cash donations can be made in person at the Leader-Post, 1964 Park Street, Regina, SK

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OUTSIDE THE LINES # Colouring contest Each week, artist Stephanie McKay creates a timely illustration meant to please kids of all ages. Children can colour the page, have a picture taken with the finished product and email it to qc@ leaderpost.com. One winner will be chosen each week. Please send high-resolution pictures and include the child’s name and contact information.

Last week’s QC colouring contest winner was Brie Mattick. Congratulations! Thanks to all for your colourful submissions. Try again this week!

Win an iPhone 5s, iPad Mini or other great prizes!

o! Try our Playa Del Taco Tri

49 days, 49 prizes. Details in store.

777 Albert Street • 306.775.3000 regina.gotorickys.com REG00183582_1_1


W E D N ES DAY, N OV E M B E R 27, 2 0 1 3

L E A D E R P O ST.CO M /Q C

SHARP EATS #

25

See a food trend you think deserves a highlight? Email qc@leaderpost.com or visit us on Facebook

S A S K AT C H E WA N F O O D T R E N D S

Boost mood, energy and libido with raw chocolate By Jenn Sharp Great news! I’m sure we’ve all heard this, but chocolate is good for you. Dark chocolate and only one square a day though. The problem with this recommendation (apart from the limited quantity) is the preservatives found in your average grocery store chocolate bar. Enter Shannon Richards. The holistic health coach held a raw chocolate making workshop at the Saskatoon Farmers’ Market recently (she does workshops in Regina too). She taught a small group how easy it is to make your own, incredibly delicious chocolates. These vegan, raw chocolates are packed full of so-called “superfoods” (I say so-called because I think the term superfood tends to get overused). However, the ingredients in these chocolates can definitely be considered super. Richards uses organic cacao, the unprocessed form of cocoa powder, which has a dense, earthy flavour. Cacao in its raw form is great for the metabolism and is high in magnesium and iron. It’s also a natural mood booster. Coconut oil, vanilla beans (did you know you can save the pods, dry them and grind to use as a powder?), a small amount of maple syrup and maca powder are used too. “Maca will change your life,” said Richards with a big smile. She was happy to give me a quick tutorial on the powder’s benefits. Taken from the root of the maca plant that grows in Peru’s mountain ranges, it’s been used for centuries for everything from an energy booster to libido enhancer. Yes, that’s right. Maca has been proven to enhance fertility and sexual function in men and to increase sex drive in both men and women. On top of that, many women find it helps balance their hormones, thus relieving PMS and menopause symptoms. Now that’s

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS

Vegan raw chocolates made with a few choice superfoods make a perfect pre-Christmas treat. QC PHOTOS BY JENN SHARP

the definition of a superfood. Richards likes to add little extras to her chocolates, like hemp hearts (which contain 40 per cent of your recommended daily protein value in 1 tbsp.), turmeric spice (an antiinflammatory and anti-oxidant), goji berries (another superfood touted for its high amino acid content) or nuts. Richards’s goal through her nutrition coaching and vegan, raw food workshops is “getting people back into the kitchen.” It’s a philosophy she takes to heart. Both of

her sons, Aiden, 12, and Ethan, 7, spend a lot of time with her learning how to make meals. So much so that the trio is releasing a cookbook soon, Monkeys in the Kitchen, full of their favourite, simple and fun recipes (all are gluten and dairy free; most are raw vegan as well.) On a blustery day, we started the class off with a cup of guilt-free hot chocolate. Richards uses dates for sweetness and adds a dash of cayenne for an unexpected hit of spice that warms you to the core.

HOT CHOCOLATE RECIPE INGREDIENTS: — 6 to 7 medjool dates — 1 tbsp. raw cacao powder — 1/2 tsp. cinnamon — pinch cayenne pepper — 2 cups hot water METHOD: Mix all ingredients in a food processor or blender. Adjust quantities to suit taste. Serves 2. Adapted from Ashley Clark: www. naturallyashley.com.

RAW FOOD FOR THE HOLIDAYS Eat Healthy Foods, 3030 12th Ave. Nov. 30, 2 p.m. An afternoon of raw food fun with Shannon Richards, who will share some of her favourite raw food recipes for the holidays. For more details and to register online: www. infinitezenergy.org or call 306-260-0336.


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WINE WORLD #

S A S K AT C H E WA N W I N E T R E N D S

Make your game picks against the spread-earn points-and you could WIN! It’s easy and fun to play... and most importantly it’s FREE!

Drink Sterling Pinot Noir chilled for best taste By James Romanow California is one of those places where if big is good, bigger is better. Subtlety, whether you are talking movie stars or wine, is generally not a selling point for the state. When this point of view meets Pinot Noir it makes for an interesting version of the wine. Pinot Noir is traditionally thought of as an elegant wine, a wine of restraint and subtlety. Californian PN has about the same amount of restraint and elegance you would expect from Pam Anderson. On the other hand, compared to Zinfandel, it is indeed elegant and subtle. Any number of people find this flavour profile knee-weakening delicious. If you count yourself among them you’ll want to try Sterling Pinot Noir. I generally prefer New Zealand to California, however Sterling is something of an exception to my rule. The wine, like most Californian PN, is dominated by cherry and vanilla flavours with just a hint of raspberry. The finish is dry, but the entry and mid-palate are slightly sweet. The tannins are extremely restrained. It is an inoffensive, quite pleasant wine, and it will pair with pretty much all foods. This is a great wine to pair with things like squash, a spicy Indian lentil dish or the more usual roast chicken.

My only complaint is the acidity is low-ish, and I therefore drink the wine between 5 and 10 degrees. If you want to have some fun with a friend, buy a supermarket “barbecued” chicken and two bottles of Sterling. Refrigerate one bottle overnight and serve the other at room temperature and do a tasting with the chicken. I suspect you too will be a convert to drinking this wine chilled. Sterling Pinot Noir $16 **** More wine in Monday’s edition of the Leader-Post or on Twitter @drbooze.

Crossword/Sudoku answers

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LEADERPOST.COM/QC

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2013

THE

27

proudly presents… A Leader-Post annual tradition featuring, babies born during the past year will be published on Tuesday, December 31, 2013. This feature will also be posted online at: Leaderpost.com for all your

…the Babies

of

2013!

family and friends to access. This feature has proven to be a favorite of our readers and a great keepsake. You can be one of the proud parents or grandparents to announce the newest member of your family. Complete the attached form, include a clear picture of your baby and prepayment of your announcement to:

BABIES OF 2013 c/o Leader-Post Classifieds

EARLYB IRD DEADLI NE: M

80 37 After Early Bird $ 4200

January 5, 2011 8 lbs. 10 oz. 20”long Proud parents are John and Mary Smith

mluti@postmedia.com. Please include your daytime & evening phone number so we can contact you for credit card payment. Or visit us in person at our classified advertising counter Mon-Fri. 8:30 – 4:30. For further information please contact us at 781-5466

GST INCL

DOUBLE SPOT Early Bird Price

GST INCL

JOHN SMITH JR.

Email a jpeg photo and your wording to

onday, Novemb er 18, 2 013 Final Dea dline: Thursd Decembe ay, r 5, 201 3

SINGLE SPOT Early Bird Price

$

1964 Park St., Regina, SK, S4P 3G4.

49 $ 5460 $

35

Sorry, Pink/Girl frames are UNAVAILABLE

GST INCL

Laminations: ……………………

After Early Bird

**All prices include applicable taxes.

GST INCL

TRACY JOHNSON

FRONT PAGE SPOT Born January 2, 2011 7 lbs. 3 oz. 21”long

10500

GST INCL

Limited Space

Proud parents are Michael & Shauna Zimmer Proud grandparents are Richard & Kim Smith and Fred & Milly White

INSIDE FULL COLOR SPOT Early Bird Price

87 $ 9240 $

Limited quantities of frames available

— PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY — Please do not include any photos larger than 5x7. If you would like us to mail your photo back, please print name and address on back.

Proud parents are Bill and Susan Johnson

$

1100 each $ 85 3 each

$

Final Booking Deadline: Thursday, December 5, 2013

Born December 27, 2011 7 lbs. 2 oz. 19”long

EMILY ZIMMER

Framed Announcement: ………

05 GST INCL

After Early Bird

Daytime Phone: ______________________________ Home Phone:___________________________________ ____________________ Customer Name: ___________________________________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________City: ___________________ Postal Code: ____________ Email address: _____________________________________________________________________________ Select from the following options (only 12 front page announcements available): Front Page:______________Inside Full Color: _____________________ Double Spot: _______________Single Spot: ______________________ Framed Announcement: _________________ Lamination: Blue ________________ Pink ________________ (please specify how many) BABIES NAME (AS IT WILL APPEAR IN PRINT): __________________________________________________________________________________________ Date of Birth: _________________ Weight: ______________ Length: __________________ Check one for your choice of phrasing: Proud Parents are: __________________________ Son of: ______________ Daughter of:______________ First and Last Name of Parents:_____________________________________________________________ __ Or specify alternate wording – “Grandson of Bill and Jean Smith” If you choose the Front Page, Inside Full Color or Double Spot option please include any additional write up about your baby that you would like included in the announcement.

Maximum words for Front Page, Inside Full Color and Double Sport – 30 words Single Spot – 18 words Requests to place cousins side by side must be placed at the same time to accommodate.

Payment Method: Visa _____MC______ Amex ______ Cheque ________ Credit Card Number:___________________________________________ Expiry Date (Mo/Yr): __________________________________________ TOTAL AMOUNT PAID: _______________________________________

GST INCL REG00181941_1_6


28

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2013

LEADERPOST.COM/QC

BLACKFRIDA Y ONE DAY ONLY! FRIDAY NOVEMBER 29, 2013 (9AM-6PM)

UP TO

SALE STARTS 9

A.M. SHARP

70% O FF!

PRICES ARE BETTER THAN BOXING DAY! NO REASON TO WAIT!

SAVINGS! HUGE

STORE WIDE! ®

Limited Quantities!

www.audiowarehouse.ca

• • • • • •

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Turntables Speakers Sub Woofers Clock Radios Mini stereo systems

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REGINA

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1329 Lorne St. 525-8128

1601 Quebec Ave. 664-8885

44 Dracup Ave. N 782-6677 REG35005793_1_1


QC Nov 27 2013