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2014

February In This Issue

Staff

Off the reservation p.12

EDIT Christopher Twarowski

A Renewed Discourse on Inequality By Jed Morey

Editor in Chief/Chief of Investigations

FORTUNE 52 p.14

Spencer Rumsey

Laurie Carey: Full Steam Ahead, Creating Amazing Learning Experiences By Beverly Fortune

Senior Editor

Timothy Bolger Managing Editor

Rashed Mian Staff Writer

Jaime Franchi Staff Writer

THE Portrait p.16

Contributors:

Peter Chin, Peter Tannen

Ryan Cassata: Singer, Songwriter, Voice for LGBT Youth By Jaime Franchi

ART Jon Sasala

“Why ain’t I dead yet?”

Art Director

Jon Chim

Graphic Artist

Jim Lennon Contributing Photographer

Digital Mike Conforti

Director of New Media

Investigations p.18

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Homeless: More People Live on the Streets Amid Arctic Blasts Than Stats Show By Timothy Bolger

“I’m running because we need more independent problem solvers in Congress.”

Staff Picks

NEWS FEATURE p.24

L.I. Will Be a Hotbed of Politics in 2014: The Players, The Seats, The Stakes An Analysis By Spencer Rumsey Just sayin’ p.26

A Modest Plan to Save the NFL By Peter Tannen

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4 Corners p.28

L.I.’s 2014 Olympians: From Skier to Slider By Timothy Bolger & Rashed Mian

Art + Soul

REAR VIEW p.30

Slavery & Salvation: L.I.’s Underground Railroad By Spencer Rumsey Art & Soul p.34

Standardized: New Documentary Takes Testing Battle to Big Screen By Jaime Franchi Hot Plate p.38

16 the Portrait

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38 longislandpress.com Cronut Craze Sparks L.I. Donut-Pastry (R)evolution By Rashed Mian

Letters p.6 Sound Smart p.8 ExpresS p.10

sTaff Picks p.40 Events p.42 CrosswordS p.52

Connect

Hot Plate

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Readers React Here’s what you had to say...

I’m not surprised that Nassau’s supposedly “outraged” lawmakers “demand hearings” about the latest revelations regarding the ongoing Police Crime Lab scandal [“Nassau County Taxpayers Secretly Charged Millions for Police Crime Lab Scandal,” January 2014]. Of course, the odds are that these mere “hearings” will never result in any actual “doings” on their part, because when does the County Legislature ever take any meaningful action? As for First Deputy Nassau Police Commissioner Thomas Krumpter’s doubletalk about “supplanting” versus “supplementing,” what I’d like to say to him is: “You say ‘tomayto’ while I say ‘tomahto.’ You say ‘potayto’ while I say ‘potahto’, so let’s call the whole thing off!” Richard Siegelman

From a true Bruins fan, nothing but respect for this guy on and off the ice [“Clark Gillies: Power Player for Long Island Children,” January 2014]. Rachelle Manzelli Dickie

County Taxpayers Secretly Charged Millions for Police Crime Lab Scandal,” January 2014] Grant J. Smith Sr.

A blistering indictment of U.S. unwarranted intervention in affairs of foreign countries and a vindicaShould be an interesting year tion of Eisenhower’s for LI Senate races warning of the militaRT @LongIslandrization of America, Press: NY Sen. Let us know the military-industrial Fuschillo Resigning what you think complex [“When an to Head Nonprofit Empire Falls in the @JenniferMaertz World, Does it Make a Sound?” Off the It’s because of Letters@LongIslandPress.com Reservation, January derelicts like this 2014]. that legitimately Ben Calderone affected people were cheated out of very Facebook.com/LongIslandPress much needed funds Your “no taxes” [“Valley Stream Man at work. MT @ Stole FEMA Sandy LongIslandPress: Funds, Feds Say,” Nassau Taxpayers @LongIslandPress Jan. 24, 2014]. I am Secretly Charged glad the justice Millions for Crime system works on Lab Scandal occasion. @MakingMyPoint www.LongIslandPress.com Gilad Mizrahi That’s a lot of donuts! RT @ And the sheeple LongIslandPress don’t ever get angry 990 Stewart Ave., Suite 450, Rockville Centre Man enough to do Garden City, NY 11530 Admits Stealing anything about it $429K from Dunkin except vote in the Donuts next corrupt @CJ_Marchello politician [“Nassau

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Sound Smart at a Party By Jaime Franchi

If you have access to Google, you have a timer.

Type “timer for fifteen minutes” in the search bar and, lo and behold, Google will set off a beeping noise that sounds like an oven timer after the allotted time expires. The limit seems to be the 24-hour mark, but if that’s something you’ve decided you really need, set it for 23:59 and voila!

COFFEE DOWNER

Do you reach for coffee grounds described as “Dark Roast,” assuming that the deeper the brown color, the more caffeinated you’ll feel as a result? Do you believe that dark roast coffee will erase a poor night’s sleep and boost your energy levels to colossal heights? Hate to break it to you, but you’ve been doing it wrong. Dark-roasted coffee has been roasted longer, so while the flavor might be deeper and more robust, some of its potent caffeine is left in the roaster! Blonde roast coffee has more caffeine, but— also contrary to popular belief—not necessarily more fun.

What do you get when you cross residents of a city who both doubt the accuracy of the Bible and report the lowest frequency of Bible reading? The most Godless city in America! According to a study by the American Bible Society, Providence, R.I., and New Bedford, Mass., are the two least “Bible-minded” cities in the United States. You might think that New York (or at least Wall Street) would rank as its own Sodom or Gomorrah, but NYC didn’t even rank in the top 10. Or bottom 10, actually.

TOUCAN SCAM Breaking news on the cereal front: It turns out that the corresponding fruit flavors coinciding with the different colors in Kellogg’s Froot Loops are not what they seem. The yellow is not lemon. The purple is not grape. They are all, in fact, the same exact flavor. Bummer.

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Number of deaths in the winter Olympics since 1924. Two lugers and two downhill skiers perished in practice runs.

Do you think Edgar Allen Poe knew that a pack of ravens is called a “conspiracy” and an “unkindness”? Nevermore.

1/8 of U.S. workers have had a job at McDonald’s at some point in their lives.

Disney World’s legendary Space Mountain Roller Coaster’s first riders were the astronauts Gordon Cooper, Jim Irwin and Scott Carpenter.

¿Cómo estás? Voulez vous coucher avec moi? According to the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences, being bilingual has been shown to delay dementia by an average of four and a half years. Capische? (Note the bilingual word used at the end of the first write-up.)

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Justin Bieber

Off Target The Canadian Miley Cyrus lookalike allegedly egged a neighbor’s house, drag raced a Lamborghini with an expired license while DUI, resisted arrest and assaulted a limo driver. When police raided his house they found a pile of cocaine/Ecstasy in “plain view.” There’s a White House petition with more than 100,000 signatures demanding his deportation. Biebler, before you split, pick up Lindsay Lohan on your way to the border, would ya?

Jen Selter

On Target The 20-year-old fitness buff from Roslyn has become an Internet celebrity by posting photos of her tuckus on

Instagram, literally gaining exponentials of followers every minute (nearing 3 million as of press time), leading to a lucrative endorsement deal with a fitness company that will launch her own line of products. Huh. Perhaps Press staffers should give this a try?

NCPD

Partial Score The recently appointed Nassau County Police Department Acting Commissioner was named the president and CEO of the Nassau Care Corporation, which manages the operations of Nassau University Medical Center (NUMC). Really!? No one else in the whole county was qualified, huh. Wow. Good to know the top brass has their priorities straight

and are really focusing on cleaning up the department after yet another scandal last month. Well, at least hospital patients can feel a little safer now, right? Right!?

THe Target

Potholes

Lufthansa

Off Target The barrage of snow, subzero temperatures, freezing rain and consequential salt mixtures poured atop LI’s roads and parkways have transformed them into the surface of the moon, with countless craters knocking off wheel alignments, busting tires and causing crashes across the Island. Perhaps instead of deportation, some community service can be worked out for the Biebs? His Canadian roots must mean he’s handy with a shovel!

On Target The feds arrest a reputed Bonanno crime family leader for his alleged role in the infamous Lufthansa heist that netted mobsters nearly $6 million, making him the first alleged Goodfella directly charged in the case. Coincidentally, the Press had just revealed new details of the case on its recent 35th anniversary. Are you reading this, Bieber? Something you can aspire to in case serenading pre-tweens and South American prostitutes doesn’t work out!

Flavor Flav

Partial Score The clock-wearing Public Enemy rapper from Roosevelt pleaded not guilty to multiple charges related to his arrest last month for allegedly speeding on the Meadowbrook Parkway on his way to his mother’s funeral, telling reporters he’s hoping prosecutors show him some mercy due to the extenuating circumstances. Perhaps if he was a patient at NUMC? Or was a regular at certain card games? Cigar, anyone!?

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This may look like Alaska but it’s actually Ronkonkoma. Long Island MacArthur Airport snapped this photo of a Southwest Airlines plane on its frozen runway when a powerful winter storm struck LI Jan. 2-3. The heavy snow and freezing temperatures forced the airport to shut down operations for 12-plus hours.

The approximate lowest wind chill felt on Long Island during one of the polar vortex artic blasts to hit here last month, according to the National Weather Service.

Pink Slip

MICHAEL GRIMM

“If you tell them you’re safer on the street, they look at you like you have three heads.” —Maria, a 41-year-old mother of two who’s currently homeless and living on the streets. InVESTIGATIONS p.18

USDA to cull + 3,000 deer

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JFK kills + DEC eyes x snowy owls nixing swans

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JUSTIN BIEBER FRANCOIS HOLLANDE RECEP TAYYIP ERDOGAN THOMAS GALANTE RICARDO SCOFIDIO & LIZ DILLER GARY SOUTHERN, CLIFF FORREST, DENNIS FARRELL & CARL KENNEDY II DEVYANI KHOBRAGADE CHITPAS BHIROMBHAKDI STEVE PEARCE JOE RICKEY HUNDLEY To see why, go to longislandpress.com/pinkslip

LI wildlife = At least no new alligators fans outraged have turned up


The Rund wn

Re v i ew

COLUMBINE BY DAVE CULLEN

Your To-Do List for this month

KNOW YOUR HEART

February is American Heart Month, designated as such to raise awareness about the importance of keeping your heart healthy. That’s because each year, about 715,000 Americans have a heart attack, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and about 600,000 people die annually from heart disease in the United States—one out of every four deaths. Heart disease remains the leading cause of death for both men and women (!!) yet it’s completely preventable and controllable! A healthy diet, exercise, quitting smoking and checking your cholesterol are just a few tips from the agency, and it’s offering a new tip each day, all month long. Check them out at cdc.gov, look for related events near you, and please—keep your heart healthy.

EXPRESS YOURSELF

Download Wordeo. The new video-messaging app turns your plain texts into audiovisual poetry by illustrating them with related video clips from— wait for it—Getty Images’ stock video library. Wordeo gives texts emotions that just can’t be fully expressed through emoticons. Well, except for maybe the panda bear emoticon ;) Learn more at wordeo.com, then Tweet us a Wordeo message @longislandpress #urock

TELL SOMEONE YOU LOVE THEM

Why? Why not!? There is no excuse, really, but if you need a few: It’s National Heart Month, Valentine’s Day is this month, and most importantly, you’ll feel better about yourself (and hopefully whoever you tell will feel better about themselves, too) once you do! So just do it already and stop thinking about it, OK? You’re beginning to piss us off.

YOUTUBE “SKATEBOARDING CAT” Watch in amazement as Didga, an adorably cute feline who lives in Australia, performs the craziest tricks while zooming around on a remote-controlled skateboard named Ollie. Among other feats, the lil’ fuzz ball hops onto fences, walls, a tree—and even a Rottweiler—before landing perfectly back onboard, cruising around. It’s a must-watch. You’re welcome.

CELEBRATE BLACK HISTORY MONTH

With its mission of commemorating and celebrating the contributions those of African descent have made to the United States throughout history, February is a time for reflection and appreciation, a time to acknowledge the achievements and struggles those of color waged (check out “Rear View” on P. 30 to learn about the fight for freedom here on LI)— and still must wage to attain total equality. Black History Month’s founders, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, have declared this year’s theme “Civil Rights In America” to mark the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Asalh. org, constitutioncenter.org and africanamericanhistorymonth.org are but a few sites to find related events near you.

DOWNLOAD THE CHIHULY APP

Inspired by the gorgeous creations of glass artist Dale Chihuly, it transforms your iPhone and iPad into a glassblowing kit, enabling you to craft, shape and sculpt beautiful virtually blown glass works by literally blowing into your device’s microphone and then using your fingertips to further manipulate your creations. Then, you can share them across social media outlets, and Tweet your Chihuly to us @longislandpress!

Everything you think you know about the Trench Coat Mafia is wrong—unless you’ve read this clear-eyed examination of the 1999 massacre. It explains why the earliest reports were flawed and why the media were so quick to craft a narrative that the world was ready to ingest. The truth takes patience, which Cullen demonstrated in the 10 painstaking years he took to complete Columbine. Released in 2009, its relevance has only grown, as school shootings have become a gruesome part of this nation’s experience. Teachers and students make up a big percentage of Columbine’s readership, and Cullen has visited both Harvard and Yale for in-depth book discussions. To accommodate the vast amount of teachers at the high school and college level offering the book as a summer reading list choice or as part of a humanities curriculum, Cullen has recently completed a teacher-and-student guide. “I have the feeling it’s a win-win for some teachers,” he tells the Press. “[Teachers] are always looking for books that will help the kids, but especially that the kids will read! And every teacher tells me that happens, once they start… I’ve taught classes and know how much work is involved in writing a new unit/lesson, whatever. A new book means coming up with all sorts of material. But hopefully I’ve already done most of that for them—and have links to everything imaginable to fill in the gaps.” Discover—or rediscover—Columbine. —Jaime Franchi

HELP END CYSTIC FIBROSIS —WHILE ROCKING OUT The chronic disease affects the lungs and digestive systems of about 30,000 children and adults in the United States and 70,000 worldwide, leading to life-threatening lung infections and pancreatic obstructions that prevent the body from absorbing food. Advances in research and treatment have extended lives, but much more has to be done before this dreaded disease is eradicated once and for all. How can you help? Simply head down to Mr. Beery’s, at 4019 Hempstead Turnpike in Bethpage, on Feb. 16 for its 18th Annual Band Battle—all proceeds go to helping The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation—and rock out to 25 (!!) stellar bands playing from noon till near-dawn while sampling delicious beers, foods and winning prizes! For more details, go to mrbeerys.com or check out “Do This” on P. 42. Together, we can do this!

WATCH THE OLYMPICS The U.S. is sending the largest delegation of athletes from any

single country ever in the history of the Winter Games to Sochi, Russia to compete Feb. 7 through 23—and four of them are from Long Island. Learn who and in what competitions in this month’s “4 Corners” on P. 28.

JUMP LIKE A WINGED KANGAROO

Sky Zone Deer Park—the largest indoor trampoline park on LI— recently opened near the Tanger Outlet Mall, enabling guests to play dodgeball, volleyball, basketball and a ton of other activities while completely airborne, floating high above the mats, hurling toward the heavens as if transformed into a hopping, aeronautical marsupial! Check it out: skyzone.com.

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A Renewed Discourse on Inequality O f f t h e R e s e rvat i o n

BY Jed Morey Publisher, Long Island Press www.jedmorey.com @jedmorey

S

uddenly, it is in vogue to discuss economic inequality. The idea of inequality and how it is interpreted today is relatively new in human history and has its roots in the Enlightenment period. By the same token the discourse surrounding it is old enough to have evolved greatly since this period to where it has finally entered the public consciousness via the mainstream broadcast media today. As usual, now that the quicksand is up to our chins, we have decided it’s time to start looking for help. In many ways, having a rational conversation about economic inequality is like trying to have a rational discussion about climate change. Both have reached a consensus within their respective scientific communities that these issues are influenced by human behavior. Problematically, both are also highly charged and emotional matters being debated in high definition by a shallow pool of uniformed talent that panders to the lowest common intellectual denominator among us. Many of the themes examined by Enlightenment philosophers, scientists and scholars remain highly relevant and are worth revisiting. These figures attempted to define the role of man in civil society, which was revolutionary thinking as civilizations emerged from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. From the mid-17th to the mid-19th centuries, philosophers such as Descartes, Locke and Rousseau, scientists from Newton to Darwin, and writers such as Dostoevsky, Dickens and Melville created enduring masterpieces that challenge our concepts of liberty, democracy and the rights of man to this day. Yet while understanding the foundations of inequality is instructive when examining it through a modern lens, there is a disruptive shift that has occurred that cannot be overlooked. The idea that corporations enjoy the very liberties we associate with humans is a dangerous departure from the theories suggested by the intellectual luminaries highlighted above. Before we move further on, it is important to acknowledge that inequality is multifaceted and takes on several meanings depending upon the context in which it is raised. Gender and race, for example, are

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significant topics that move the discussion in meaningful directions but often correlate to the level of agitation. As economic inequality can serve as both the underlying cause and product of these factors, it therefore provides a more complete template for analysis. Without the polemic that surrounded the nature of liberty and man’s place in society, we would have little concept of equality and therefore no ability to debate tributaries such as sexual orientation, gender and race. Another reason it is important to become familiar with the arguments proffered by the great Enlightenment thinkers is that their words informed the founders and subsequent leaders of this nation. For many, America represented the living enlightened experiment across the sea. This great ideological laboratory, theoretically free from old world constraints was a curiosity to Enlightenment theorists and a danger to established secular and theological rulers. At times, the distance between this period and present day is incredibly short. To wit, the celebrated, and at times rancorous debate between Edmund Burke and Thomas Paine still plays out today, though diminished in both eloquence and erudition. Yet no matter how diminished our discourse has become and how far we have traveled from the egalitarian notions that inspired our founding, America as the

“Enlightened state” is a portrayal we hold dear to as a people. To be useful in today’s circumstances, any renewed discourse must begin by focusing on the nature and definition of equality in moral and economic terms before attempting to prescribe solutions to inequality. Until we evaluate our national sentiment toward inequality and determine what exactly we are striving for as a society, any practical solutions will be lost in the toxic ether of our rhetoric. Gross inequality is no longer a theoretical exercise, nor is it exclusive to underdeveloped or developing nations. It is a global phenomenon and one that is best illustrated by conditions in the wealthiest nation on Earth. In purely economic terms, inequality is both America’s greatest challenge and number one export. In an effort to focus the conversation on economic inequality in advance of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Oxfam International released a new report on the widening economic gap in the world. Its findings are hardly startling, but they are staggering. The report, compiled from numerous sources, concludes the following: • Almost half of the world’s wealth is now owned by just one percent of the population. • The wealth of the one percent richest

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people in the world amounts to $110 trillion. That’s 65 times the total wealth of the bottom half of the world’s population. • The bottom half of the world’s population owns the same as the richest 85 people in the world. • Seven out of 10 people live in countries where economic inequality has increased in the last 30 years. • The richest one percent increased their share of income in 24 out of 26 countries for which we have data between 1980 and 2012. • In the United States, the wealthiest one percent captured 95 percent of postfinancial crisis growth since 2009, while the bottom 90 percent became poorer. These findings seem more like verdicts; judgments handed down on capitalist society from the high court of natural law. How we act to reform these conclusions relies on our willingness to objectively interpret them and decide whether these are acceptable characteristics of modern society.

The Original Discourse

The title of this piece and much of the sentiment found within is drawn from the Swiss philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s work A Discourse On Inequality, published in 1755. In it he attempts to establish the nature of inequality by distinguishing between the perceived rights of “savage” man and civil society. The savage man, he claims, lives predominantly in a state of nature that values present existence and subsistence above all things. The civilized man lives within a system of laws designed to protect artificial geographic boundaries and places an economic value on property beyond what it provides for subsistence. “Savage man,” he states, “will not bend his neck to the yoke which civilized man wears without a murmur; he prefers the most turbulent freedom to the most tranquil subjection.” At its best and most functional, Rousseau believed civilized society exists to organize principles and laws around the natural rights of man within the context of modern civilization. According to Rousseau, the nexus between a natural existence and the need for civil society is founded in the concept of property. He begins the second half of A Discourse describing the evolution of human existence from savage and free to civil and enslaved with the following: “The first man who, having enclosed a piece of


land, thought of saying ‘This is mine’ and found people simple enough to believe him was the true founder of civil society.” Yet Rousseau sees civil society—when laws are meted out evenly and economic protections are in place—in more sanguine terms than other philosophers of the Enlightenment period such as Thomas Paine or later Karl Marx. In fact, A Discourse On Inequality, was intended as a defense of his hometown of Geneva, which he regarded at the time as the best example of progressive civil society and governance in terms of protecting man’s civil liberties. (Rousseau would feel differently after the same government he extols in A Discourse would later ban his work and accuse him of sedition. In this, Rousseau’s experience can be viewed as a cautionary tale regarding the vagaries of political corruption, but one that doesn’t diminish the intellectual scope of his earlier work.) “Inequality,” Rousseau believed, “derives its force and its growth from the development of our faculties and the progress of the human mind, and finally becomes fixed and legitimate through the institution of property and laws.” In linking “progress of the human mind” to inequality, Rousseau tacitly acknowledges the inevitability of inequality while arguing the need to protect some semblance of natural rights, lest our humanity be consumed by man’s insidious greed. “A devouring ambition, the burning passion to enlarge one’s relative fortune,

not so much from real need as to put oneself ahead of others, inspires in all men a dark propensity to injure one another, a secret jealousy which is all the more dangerous in that it often assumes the mask of benevolence in order to do its deeds in greater safety: in a word, there is competition and rivalry on the one hand, conflicts of interest on the other, and always the hidden desire to gain an advantage at the expense of other people. All these evils are the main effects of property and the inseparable consequences of nascent inequality.” Rousseau’s pessimism regarding ambition and greed informed his belief that a civil society is one in which our natural impulses are restrained by a just system of laws dispensed in an equitable fashion. This coincides with traditional Aristotelian theory that politics ordains all human sciences and artistic pursuits and therefore, “this end must be the good for man.” If we are to submit, as Rousseau did, to the idea that civil society exists to contain the human impulse of greed that grows relative to progress, then we must also surrender to the idea that we can never return to a natural, or “savage” state. Put simply, liberty—in its truest sense— can never be achieved within a civil society. The best state it can attain is equity in terms of man’s access to, and representation by, the system. To this end, we must therefore conclude that a system that restricts access

to capital and social mobility regardless of talent—one that places the means of production and extraordinary profit in the hands of a few individuals—can then only be defined as the opposite of civil society. Inequality is a form of social and moral anarchy.

Slaves to Corporate Masters

In the United States, inequality is exacerbated by the extension of our natural and civil rights to corporations, which are organized solely for profit and therefore exist in a state contrary to the good of man. The rise of corporate influence further alienates us from our rights as well as the means of production. Furthermore, we have allowed corporations access to the political process while extending protections to corporations previously reserved for the people. Corporate personhood and the civil and criminal protections it affords, accompanied by the ability to craft legislation and pour unlimited funds into the political process diminishes all civil political theories that revolve around democratic principles. Some in this country are awakening to the fact that our understanding of capitalism cradled within a democracy bears no resemblance to the world we live in. They have rightfully concluded that America is no longer a democracy, but a corporatocracy. Most of us, however, continue the grand delusion. We prefer

to be spoon-fed comfortable ideological anachronisms while debating the symptoms of inequality with little or no relation to the underlying cause. This is not a criticism; it’s an observation that recognizes that apathy is a direct corollary of inequality. Most of us are too busy and under too much financial pressure to remove ourselves from the cycle of madness. It’s the capitalist way. You snooze, you lose. Thinking is for the weak. Hard work and perseverance is enough. To question our corporate overlords (as Chris Hedges refers to them) is to commit economic suicide and to risk being ostracized from the system. It’s why so many marginalized people come to the defense of the very masters of their subjugation. Even Rousseau recognized this phenomenon: “The rich man under pressure of necessity conceived in the end the most cunning project that ever entered the human mind: to employ in his favour the very forces of those who attacked him, to make his adversaries his defenders, to inspire them with new maxims and give them new institutions as advantageous to him as natural right was disadvantageous.” Ultimately, a corporate system ensures that there is no failsafe for penury beyond what the government provides. And if corporations, which by definition require growth at any expense, subsequently seize complete control of government interests, inequality ceases to become a word. It becomes a foregone conclusion.

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Full STEAM Ahead

For t u n e 5 2

Laurie Carey CEO & Founder We Connect The Dots

Creating Amazing Learning Experiences By Beverly Fortune bfortune@longislandpress.com

M

ost women working in the computer science industry can trace their interest back to a compelling mentor or someone in their childhood who inspired them. Laurie Carey of Cold Spring Harbor got her start in this predominately male industry in a different way. Growing up in a small town in upstate New York, Laurie got a job on an assembly line at Fairchild Semi Conductor. In a twist on the famous I Love Lucy episode where Lucy and Ethel tried to keep pace with chocolate bonbons overflowing from the conveyor belt, Laurie had to assemble circuit boards at a fast pace. Laurie’s managers belittled the employees who could not keep up with her fast pace and they, in turn, gave Laurie a hard time. No matter what came her way, Laurie mastered every task that she was assigned. “They kept moving me,” she says. It was at her next job that she was asked to build a PC from scratch and her untapped technological aptitude was finally recognized. During the 80s, Laurie rose through the thin ranks of women in the STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) by working with many mentors. She built a networking community especially for women through Netware International, to not only open the lines of communication between women, but to encourage them to share their ideas and frustrations. “I like to build and bring people together,” she says. For more than 10 years, Laurie has been working at Microsoft and is currently a Partner Tech Strategist. Drawing from her own experience, Laurie wanted to make high school and

college students aware of the opportunities for STEM careers. She also wanted to inspire a greater population by adding an important element to the equation: the Arts. “The “A” in STEAM is for a student who is artistic. They have a spark you don’t want to squelch, they can use that talent. There are many industries that can be applied to their capabilities,” she says. Even today, less than 20 percent of undergraduate degrees in engineering are earned by women.

“There are so many bored high school students who are not using their talents. How do you make kids discover something exciting?” “There are so many bored high school students who are not using their talents. How do you make kids discover something exciting?” Laurie’s vision came to fruition when she founded the non-profit We Connect the Dots. Their mission is to empower both students and teachers by giving them the education and tools needed for pursuing STEAM careers. “We break it down for them. These are skills they can use to succeed for the rest of their lives,” she says. And it’s that passion and natural curiosity that Laurie is seeking in the students who are mentored by the We Connect the Dots (WCTD) organization. “We need to teach kids how to build their confidence and how to apply technology in business, like using a

CRM, online tools and office products.” Laurie explains. Laurie’s planning to roll out multiple WCTD programs throughout New York state and Long Island this year and then nationally, including a spring pilot program at the Digital Animation & Visual Effects School in Orlando, Florida. “We have a five-day curriculum for a select group of 10 students, 13 to 18 years old,” she explains. “We want to expose them to see what can excite them.” WCTD offers internships, job shadowing for students and teachers, career development and coaching. “It’s a team collaboration,” she explains but said there is a need for more companies to offer student shadowing. Laurie found her passion the hard way. Because of her own experience, she

Presented by

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wants to motivate children and young adults to learn STEAM skills while they’re still in school. “Going to work should not feel like work. My passion is to help others find the right career.” For more information, go to: we-connect-thedots.org or to contact Laurie: laurie@weconnect-the-dots.org or 917-597-6974.

In every issue of the Long Island Press and our sister publication, Milieu Magazine, the Fortune 52 column brings you stories of dynamic women who have made a significant and unique contribution to Long Island. To acknowledge their success, Beverly hosts tri-annual networking events that are attended by hundreds of LI business professionals, non-profit leaders and entrepreneurs. If you are interested in learning more about the Fortune 52, or know a super woman who deserves good Fortune—and a profile—email Beverly at bfortune@longislandpress.com.


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Photo by Kris Lyseggen

the

Portrait By Jaime Franchi

RYAN CASSATA

SINGER, SONGWRITER, VOICE FOR LGBT YOUTH Ryan Cassata doesn’t wait around for anything. The precocious 20-year-old singer/songwriter, activist, motivational speaker and YouTube sensation begged his parents for guitar lessons at just 6, and by his freshman year at Bay Shore High School, went against the advice of its Gay/Straight Alliance and came out as transgender. Coming out early was never a question, Cassata tells the Press, yet his becoming the first openly transgender person in school demanded that administrators make significant changes they were reluctant to make. Even now, as an outspoken advocate for LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender) rights who’s working to educate the public about transgender issues, he still faces backlash within that very community— accused of not being quite “trans enough,” despite having gone through chest modification surgery. His response to critics as well as his post-op recovery is well documented on YouTube. Cassata, born a female, never set out to be a renegade; he just wanted to be himself. As a freshman taking 12th grade English, his teacher, Mrs. Nell Kalter, encouraged him to come out in class to test the waters. Though the majority of students accepted his revelation as “no big deal,” Cassata says he ran into some opposition that made him afraid for his safety. “It was scary,” he explains, “and a lot of time, people didn’t agree with what I was doing,

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especially teachers. And I was just coming out, so I wasn’t that confident.” Since New York State’s Dignity for All Students Act against bullying and discrimination didn’t go into effect until 2012, Cassata began circulating petitions of his own for certain rights, such as a bathroom where he felt safe. When the yearbook committee refused to allow his legally changed name to accompany his picture, Cassata took his petition outside the student body into the community—and online—generating nearly 1,000 signatures and unwittingly giving a voice to kids who’d been going through similar circumstances. “The teachers…didn’t really know how to handle transgender students,” he laments. “Basically, they were really just ignorant. And I had to make a lot of changes within my high school…so that I could survive it.” Music gave Cassata an outlet to express himself during his most trying times. “Any time I was going through something that was difficult, I was able to write a song to express myself in that way,” says Cassata. “It made everything in my life easier.” He penned his first song “Wonderful, Beautiful” at age 12 and hasn’t looked back; his maturation is cataloged across six iTunes albums with lyrics covering the breadth of his experiences. Cassata’s been featured on Larry King Live and The Tyra Banks Show, among others, and his

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diverse audience includes transgender youth who are looking, Ryan says, “for hope.” With a folksy Bob Dylan-esque twang showcasing his selfconfidence while paying homage to his vulnerability, Cassata has grown from gigging at open-mic nights across Long Island to playing legendary venues across the country and even landing a date on the Van’s Warped Tour. Other musical accomplishments include composing the soundtrack to Loop Planes—an award-winning independent film that premiered at Tribeca Film Festival—to playing festivals, delivering a keynote address to the largest transgender conference in the world, and cultivating a YouTube following of more than 1 million views. His most popular song to date, the anti-bullying/ LGBT suicide awareness video “Hands of Hate,” exemplifies his message of love, peace and acceptance. In the end, Cassata not only survived, but thrived. Kalter presented him with the school’s first-ever Harvey Milk Memorial Award—named for the slain gay rights activist, San Francisco politician and Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient who also graduated from Bay Shore— for making positive changes to his school. These changes inspired two seniors to also come out as transgender. Cassata’s current home of San Francisco has proved to be “a lot more open-minded than Long Island,” he says, adding that LI still has a ways to go. And it’s not in his nature to wait. Ryan Cassata will be performing at Even Flow Bar and Grill in Bay Shore on February 15. For more information on this gig, Cassata’s activism and future lectures, check out ryancassata.com.


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Homeless

More People Live On The Streets Amid Arctic Blasts Than Stats Show By Timothy Bolger tbolger@longislandpress.com

Sharing a vodka bottle of “holy water” while mourning their friend who they say froze to death, six homeless people in the Hicksville train station waiting room ponder their fate on a recent snowy Saturday. One, a Syosset native who thinks a warm jail may be better than calling the so-called hotbox his living room, openly considers suicide before his fellow “skids,” as they prefer to be called, shout him down. The oldest among them, a 71-year-old ex-plumber named Irving, who says he’s been homeless 25 years, jokes about being murdered. The grim talk turns to the average life expectancy for those living on the streets, which is between 42 and 52—decades younger than most Americans. “Why ain’t I dead yet?” a member of the group jokingly asks the others, most of whom are middle-aged. Playing off their morbid, self-deprecating sense of humor hardened by years of being treated like trash, another replies: “Because only the good die young!” They all share a laugh, forgetting their misery, if only for the moment. Dim florescent lighting, faded-yellow brick walls and urine-scented metal benches are the only other respite from gray skies, subzero wind chills and the

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frozen ground outside. They may not have much, but they’ve got each other. “Queen Maria,” as the five homeless men who protect her from being raped a third time call her, sits in a blue plastic shopping cart to keep raised the ankle she sprained after slipping on the ice. The group makes up just six of likely hundreds of undercounted, unsheltered homeless who refuse to stay in one of the more than roughly 100 shelters on Long Island despite the threat of frostbite, hypothermia and gangs. “If you tell them you’re safer on the street, they look at you like you have three heads,” says Maria, a 41-year-old mother of two whose husband kicked her out when her drinking got out of control six years ago. “After a while you get used to this lifestyle and you learn survival skills.” With the recent loss of their friend, “Mineola Tommy,” who they say was a Korean War veteran, the group is fully aware of the risk their “lifestyle” poses. Especially during a string of rare, extracold arctic blasts that led the Long Island Rail Road to keep the waiting rooms open 24 hours for a change. “Most important right now is to stay warm,” says Bobby Angell, a 56-year-old former MTA worker who’s been homeless on and off for two decades since losing his job and family

to crack. “This is killer weather.” Local news outlets have reported the recent deaths of Tommy, another homeless man in East Meadow called “Wild Bill,” and an unidentified man in Medford, but confirming their cause of death—exposure or otherwise—with Nassau or Suffolk medical examiners is impossible without their full names and the consent of their likely estranged family. Tommy, the vet, wasn’t claimed right away at the morgue, an LIRR spokesman says. The population of people who are homeless on LI is by estimates up 18 percent in the five years following the 2008 Wall Street crash that caused the Great Recession—from 2,639 in ’09 to 3,123 last year, the latter nearly the population of Southampton village— according to latest annual homeless surveys, which a Press analysis found are lower than reality. The rise has caused tension in Nassau, where residents worry about aggressive panhandlers, and in Suffolk, where two new “megashelters” galvanized their neighbors to protest against the unwelcome additions to their community. Attempts to address the issue have had mixed results. LI’s rise comes as total homelessness fell 7 percent to 610,000 nationally last year with a 23 percent decrease in unsheltered homeless people (those not

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in shelters, living on the streets) since 2007, according to the U.S. Department of Housing an Urban Development (HUD), which counted more than one-third of those as unsheltered. Although homelessness on LI was down seven percent as the stats show that growth reversed from ’12 to last year, New York State bucked the nation’s downward trend with the largest increase in homelessness—11 percent— from ’12 to ’13 with 7,864 people and a 23 percent hike since ’07, according to HUD’s 2013 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress. Leading causes are still mental illness and substance abuse, with an increasing amount of aid emphasized for a subset of these sufferers, LI’s homeless veterans. Others who lost their homes in Sandy—both directly from storm damage or during its ensuing housing crunch—are still struggling, too, although it’s unclear how many of the 17 superstorm survivors the federal government was reimbursing for staying in hotels in New York as of December are from LI. Smaller subsets include people with HIV/AIDS, victims of domestic violence and runaway children. Homeless people may remain largely invisible—aside from the occasional panhandler or garbage picker— but more are teetering on the edge of


OUR HOUSE: A group of homeless people who refuse to stay in local shelters, including a woman who rides in a shopping cart after injuring her foot, warm up in the Hicksville train station’s platform-level waiting room.

joining their ranks, experts warn. “Working people are one check away from being homeless,” says Johnola Morales, executive director of the Hempstead-based Interfaith Nutrition Network, which has seen more clients at their soup kitchens across LI and three shelters in Nassau. “It would take a very small emergency for people to not pay their rent and wind up in the same situation.”

THE FORGOTTEN

Footprints in a foot of snow lead up to a graffiti-covered abandoned house in Wyandanch. Following them with a flashlight before dawn last month, Greta Guarton peers into a busted-out window and shouts: “Hello?” A voice from behind an upstairs window blocked by junk yells back, asking what she wants. After a backand-forth, she gets what she’s after: information. The man tells her that he spends time at the train station, has been on the streets for two years and isn’t alone—three others are in the boardedup house, too. Guarton, executive director of the Long Island Coalition for the Homeless, makes such vacant house calls for HUD’s Homeless Point-in-Time Count, held one day each January, a census of those in shelters and on the street. She

coordinates volunteers who count the unsheltered. The local tally is then rolled into national stats to be released later this year. In the broken window, she leaves four donated sweatshirts and paperwork with phone numbers for social service agencies that those inside can call. Then she trudges back through the freshly fallen flakes to her SUV. It’s more productive than when she follows tracks in the snow up to two other nearby vacant homes. No one answers at the second. At the third, she calls out in Spanish—she’s met undocumented immigrants staying there before—but again, there’s no answer, which she suspects is because they’re afraid she’s law enforcement looking to deport them. “We heard people in a lot of [vacant] houses that wouldn’t come out,” says Guarton, recalling surveys going back a decade. “They’re terrified to talk to us. “If they don’t have documents of being here legally, they’re not eligible for most services, including emergency housing,” she adds. Monica Diez, administrative director at the Workplace Project, a Hempstead-based nonprofit immigrant advocacy group, says many of those she works with avoid the shelters.

another, to ask if they know where the homeless are. One points to a vacant house she checked where nobody answered. She heads to a bodega where the homeless are said to congregate. A group of men eating breakfast inside point her to another bodega across the street, where a man in a camouflage jacket leaves upon hearing Guarton’s query. The rest claim ignorance. After sun-up an hour later, Guarton’s questioned more than a dozen around the downtown and only found the one vacant house dweller with three apparent friends. Other volunteers take over the search for the area after she leaves. “There are tons of people who are obviously homeless and they say, ‘No, I’m not homeless, but I know where they are,’” Guarton says, noting that she can’t count those who appear to be, but deny being homeless. Nassau, Suffolk and the shelter operators send her their stats tallying LONG ISLAND how 2013: 3,123many homeless are staying in 2012: 3,359 emergency and transitional housing 2011: 3,271 2010: 3,163 she relies on volunteers to count while 2009: 2,639 those on the streets all day and night for the survey. But the margin of error for polling such a transient group is incalculable. For one, “The Hicksville Crew,” as the sextet at the train station call

“Shelter-wise, they’re basically left on their own to fend for themselves,” Diez says. “They don’t know exactly where they stand with the immigration issue with sheltering and who’s eligible at least for a night, so they don’t really go through that resource.” Complicating the survey further is that everyone tends to look homeless bundled up in the dead of winter. Guarton stops a man on the street, then

Homeless By The Numbers All LONG ISLAND 3500 3,271

3,359

3,163

3,123

3000 2,639 2500

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

NASSAU SUFFOLK 2012: 891 2011: 955 2010: 732 2009: 679

2012: 2,468 2011: 2,316 2010: 2,431 2009: 1,942

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about the population of Shelter Island, last year. themselves, say they weren’t counted. That includes a 30-percent Guarton expects the stats for LI’s increase since May in homeless unsheltered to be lower than reality. families—totaling 535—consisting Especially since only about 50 volunof 684 adults and 1,282 children, as teers—half of those last year—were of December. To meet demand, the available when the survey came the county last year contracted two new day after an average of 14.5 inches family shelters, each fitting nearly 100 of snow covered parts of LI. Shelters may serve more clients on such snowy families, in converted hotels two miles nights, which compensates for some of apart from one another in Hauppauge and Brentwood. Neighboring school the unsheltered that could be missed, officials have complained that the but there are many more homeless that aren’t counted at all, such as those added homeless children overwhelm classrooms; outraged neighbors say temporarily in jail, rehab and psychithe mega-shelters ruin their communiatric wards. Statistics for how many homeless ties and the facilities’ legality has been are jailed, committed or in rehab were debated in the county legislature. And there’s still not enough not available. shelters, advocates and officials say. Suburban sprawl also makes the “The wintertime is the time homeless census harder than in New when demand for homelessness goes York City, where counters scour the metropolis in grids. Volunteers on the up,” Suffolk Social Services Commissioner John O’Neill told the legislaIsland mostly target known homeless ture’s human services committee in hangouts for their leg of the national December while being pressured to survey—but those living in cars, cut the number of families at the two for example, tend to go uncounted, advocates say. Volunteers counted 207 controversial shelters. “I’m not going to commit to shifting families out of unsheltered in ’09—8 percent of LI’s homeless that year—and less than 100 some place that I may need to place every year since, except last year, when homeless families.” Legis. John Kennedy Jr. 117 were tallied. Results of this year’s (R-Nesconset), the legislature’s Repubstreet count were not available as of lican minority leader, had proposed press time. a bill that would cancel the contract “I think it’s a useful exercise, with the new shelters, but the measure but I would have questions about its was tabled. He maintains the county absolute accuracy,” says Joel Blau, should abide by its law professor of social policy limiting shelter size to 12 at the School of Social families, but the county Welfare at Stony Brook attorney says state law University. He likens trumps county limits on the homeless stats to shelter sizes in these cases. the unemployment rate, Suffolk County “There are many, which is estimated to be Department of Social Services many, many shelters twice as high as reported Central Housing throughout Suffolk since it doesn’t count Unit hotline: County, but only three of those whose benefits ran 631- 854-9517 them that go to this size out. between 8 a.m. to and really nothing that “The problem with 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. eclipses this facility in the that is homeless people For emergencies center of Hauppauge,” often try to be elusive,” during non-business Kennedy said at the same he says. “You never hours, weekends meeting. “So right there know if you missed the and holidays, call 631-854-9100. we go to what is clearly an person under the bridge, equity issue.” or whether somebody’s Nassau County Dozens of residents, in the basement of the Warm Bed arguing they’ve absorbed abandoned house or Homeless Hotline: more homeless than other whether they’re in the 1-866-927-6233 Nassau Homeless communities, packed the woods at the end of a Help Line: meeting to sound off in dead-end street.” 516-572-2711 support of the bill, and are Nassau expected to do the same SKID ROW Department of Social Services: when the legislature holds In the easier-to516-227-8395. After its first full meeting of the count segment of the hours: 516-572-3143 year this month. homeless population, Long Island Crisis “What Suffolk Suffolk officials report Counseling & County wants to do to the a more than 62-percent Referral Center: 516-679-1111 Hauppauge community increase in individuNassau County is an outright disgrace,” als seeking temporary Coalition Against housing assistance over Domestic Violence: Joanne Garramone, a longtime resident of the past five years—from 516-542-0404 the area, told the panel. 1,405 in ’09 to 2,260,

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Important Numbers


“Concentrating all the homeless into our community…to save money for the county will in the long run severely hurt our residents’ safety, finances, taxes and value of their home.” Legis. Kate Browning (WF-Shirley) said at the same meeting that she received some “disturbing” emails with comments “derogatory” toward homeless families after she previously said that the anti-mega-shelter crowd are arging NIMBY—not-in-my-backyard. Aside from the size and school aspects of the issue—officials say many of the children in shelters are bused to their hometown schools—some mega-shelter opponents’ comments suggest the fear is that all homeless are alcoholics or drug abusers, like the Hicksville Crew. That isn’t necessarily the case. “A large portion of our homeless are the result of a slow-recovering economy coupled with the high number of bank foreclosures on Long Island,” says John Nieves, spokesman for the Suffolk Department of Social Services (DSS). “Another contributing factor is the high cost of living on Long Island.” While the federal government defines poverty for a family of four as a total income of $24,343 a year, the poverty level for LI is $46,000 a year, due to the higher cost of living, according to the Long Island Federation of Labor. And since much of the county’s homeless population and shelters are in western Suffolk, the safety net has holes on the ritzier East End. DSS officials say they’re planning to open more shelters around the Twin Forks, but it’s doubtful any new beds will open up before spring. “We cannot take everyone who comes walking through the door, we don’t have the capacity,” says Tracey Lutz, executive director of Maureen’s Haven, a network of 18 houses of worship that host up to 60 homeless nightly more than 100 times annually. “The system that we have in place right now doesn’t work, particularly on Long Island for long-term solutions... We have to give people opportunities to earn a living wage.” She also takes issue with DSS requiring eviction notices for clients to qualify for their shelters. “This is particularly concerning because many of the people that are looking for shelter have not lived in a traditional environment where they would easily have access to an eviction notice,” she says. “There doesn’t seem to be any wiggle room.” Nieves says DSS will except informal eviction notices as proof of homelessness, or conduct evaluations to corroborate an applicant in fact has no place to go.

for that county, provided stats for how many homeless people his agency placed in permanent housing and got out of motels. LI’s homeless coalition reports a 42-percent hike in sheltered people in the county from ’09 to ’12—595 to 847, about the population of Quioque. Survey results broken down by county were only available for that four-year span. Starting last year, LI’s homeless stats are lumped together. Imhoff says he has no plans to open any mega-shelters in Nassau, but he didn’t need to for sentiment rivaling that of Suffolk’s mega-shelter neighbors

to rear its head in East Meadow, home to Eisenhower Park, historically a hotspot for the homeless. That is, until last year, when Nassau police, tired of summonsing homeless people that ignore the tickets, stepped up arresting them for quality-of-life crimes. Especially after finding out that some had obtained keys to the bathrooms, where they made themselves at home. “They’ve made it very unpleasant for people who sign up to use the barbeque areas,” Third Precinct Inspector Sean McCarthy told an East Meadow community meeting last spring. “We’ve made it less hospitable for them in

Eisenhower Park. That’s a ship that doesn’t turn around right away. But, instead of writing appearance tickets at the scene, we usually bring them into the precinct and process them in a regular arrest fashion, not just write them a ticket that they’re never gonna answer anyway.” McCarthy was not available to provide an update on how this tactic has fared. A large homeless tent city tucked in the woods just west of the park that authorities shut down following a murder there a decade ago had one tent on a recent visit. Another camp along Continued on page 22

GIMME SHELTER

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“There, but for the grace of God, go any of us.”

For reliability, service and value

the Meadowbrook State Parkway, farther south near a Freeport day laborer hiring site, has seen two men living in those woods die in as many years, including a Hispanic man in his 20s found dead there last May. —tracy lutz, executive director of maureen’s haven “He lived over there all winter,” Fernando, who declined to give his see a difference,” Imhoff says. last name, told the Press following the Rev. Daphne Haynes, president of March 2012 death of 33-year-old Jose nonprofit Peace Valley Haven, which Garrido-Lobo, a father of four who they operates a men’s shelter in Roosevelt and nicknamed “El Cantante,” Spanish for does outreach to the unsheltered, says “The Singer,” because he would sing she’s noticed fewer people on the streets, when he drank. “He’s a good guy.” but convincing the chronically homeless As for the progress on solving the to seek help is still an uphill battle. overall problem of homelessness in “‘If I’m going to die, I’m going to die the county, Imhoff touts reducing the right here,’” one homeless person told number of families in motels from 44 to Haynes, she says. “If every person was 16 in the past three years and 142 to 112 accepting, I could bring in…20 people a in shelters for the same time span. He also says the county found homes for 328 night. We can’t turn our eyes and say the need is not there.” people in ‘12 and 629 last year. Blau, the Stony Brook professor, “I don’t think the economic condinotes that Nassau’s homeless arrest policy tions for many families have changed is likely to be as ineffective as Suffolk’s that radically, but I think that our mega-shelters—he favors smaller aggressive policy of working with our facilities—but notes that the issue needs a housing specialists and helping families fresh look from local leaders. acquire the means and support to get out “We have to figure our some way of shelters and motels [is] beginning to

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of addressing this so we don’t come to accept the fact that when you go to a local supermarket some guy’s gonna be outside collecting cans and possibly begging,” he says. “Thirty or 40 years ago it was shocking to see people in the street, and I think what’s happened is we got used to it and not only have we gotten used to it, but we’ve gotten used to it in the suburbs, which was supposed to be immune to the city’s problems.”

STAND YOUR GROUND

Aside from warmer weather on the horizon, silver linings are seen in new alliances formed to help tackle homelessness on LI, including veterans groups and the LIRR partnering with advocates. Railroad workers have begun sharing information on where the homeless are staying with the LI homeless coalition, says Guarton, the group’s director, who adds that Services for the Underserved, a large New York City-based homeless veterans group, set up an LI outpost in Farmingdale for the first time last year. “We thought it was time to expand our operation,” says Brett Morash, a retired U.S. Navy veteran who’s director of veterans’ services at the nonprofit, which partnered with several LI vets groups’ goal of helping 500 families. “The idea of the program is to prevent veterans from becoming homeless.”

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Guarton is as thankful for the reinforcements on the veteran front as she is for backup from the LIRR, where advocates say an average of half dozen homeless of all types are often found in waiting rooms, sometimes twice that. “This joint effort was prompted by a noticeable uptick in complaints about the homeless from our customers as we increased the hours of waiting room availability at many LIRR stations,” Salvatore Arena, an LIRR spokesman, tells the Press. “We are also working closely with the MTA Police on this issue.” For those homeless folks that take the advocates up on the offer to stay in one of their shelters, their odds increase for getting back on their feet with the help of social services. The mega-shelters offer even more programs because of their size, Suffolk officials say. “As long as there is life, there is hope,” says Haynes, of Peace Valley Haven. There’s another saying common in this line of work, too, repeated by Lutz at Maureen’s Haven: “There, but for the grace of God, go any of us.” Back at the Hicksville train station, Angell recalls making $40 hourly as a track worker. Now he’s lucky if he makes $40 a day recycling cans. Between swigs from a can of cheap beer, he says, “I wish I knew then what I know now.”


Keep New York a state of

mind n Over the last five years, SUNY and CUNY have been cut by nearly $2 billion — driving up tuition and endangering quality affordable higher education for all New Yorkers. n Our public colleges and universities are under intense pressure to eliminate programs and courses, erode quality and slash opportunities for students in need.

n Public higher education’s mission of teaching, research and health care is key to a bright future for all New Yorkers. New York State must invest now — in faculty, staff and student support — to keep our public colleges and universities great.

Take action! Defend quality. www.nySut.org/ qualityhighered

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N e w s F e at u r e

Long Island Will Be A Hotbed of Politics in 2014 The Players, The Seats, The Stakes An Analysis By Spencer Rumsey

Partisan politics will put Long Island voters in the crosshairs in 2014 because one of the hottest Congressional races in America is right in our own backyard while a serious suburban threat to the Republicans’ long-held power in New York is also gathering steam. Once again, big money will come pouring in from outside interests. It won’t put anybody back to work, necessarily, but at least it will keep the Island boiling come election time, which promises to be anything but boring. Republicans and their conservative super-PACS, whether run by Karl Rove or somebody of his ilk, have promised to spend millions of dollars to defeat the Democratic incumbent, Rep. Tim Bishop (D-Southampton), who’s been representing New York’s 1st Congressional District since 2003. They coughed up $4 million two years ago and lost. The GOP believes Bishop is more vulnerable this time thanks to Obamacare. Their most likely contender, state Sen. Lee Zeldin (R-Shirley), has been hammering that message home repeatedly in his fundraising. But Zeldin still has to fend off a well-financed challenge from George Demos, a former U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission prosecutor who ran for Congress in the 2010 Republican primary before losing out to wealthy entrepreneur Randy Altschuler. The headaches with the Affordable Care Act certainly are widely known now but local voters might be sick of hearing about them by November. House Republicans have already voted 47 times in vain to repeal Obamacare, but it’s apparently the only issue they really want to run on, even if they can do nothing but complain about it.

Rice Rolls the Dice

Thanks to the recently announced retirement of Rep. Carolyn McCarthy, the race in New York’s 4th Congressional District is suddenly wide-open this fall, but it may not be as heated as Bishop’s contest out east if the popular Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice is the Democratic candidate to replace her. McCarthy has been waging a longrunning fight against the National Rifle

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Will these two Long Island Democrats wind up in Congress together? Nassau D.A. Kathleen Rice hopes to replace Rep. Carolyn McCarthy. Suffolk’s Rep. Tim Bishop hopes to hold onto his seat.

Association over gun control, and on that issue Rice has pledged to follow in her footsteps. “I’ve spent my career combating gun violence and advocating for families and communities in need,” Rice said in a statement to the Press. “I’m running because we need more independent problem solvers in Congress who share these values and who care about people, not partisan politics.” Her spokesman, Eric Phillips, said that Rice is “someone who can work well with Democrats and Republicans.” Of all the Democrats running in Nassau last fall, Rice was the only one to win countywide. She trounced her Republican opponent by 18 points. But her relations with her Democratic Party chairman, Jay Jacobs, have soured recently over her refusal to bring criminal charges against former Nassau County Police Commissioner Thomas Dale for ordering the politically motivated arrest of a Roosevelt man who had testified against a long-shot county executive candidate. “We used to be very good and close friends,” Jacobs tells the Press, adding that “she should win. She stands an excellent chance.” Since Rice beat the longtime Republican incumbent, Denis Dillon, in 2005, Jacobs observed, “she has not had a

competitive race.” At this point, Rice is not the official nominee for her party—Nassau County Legislature Minority Leader Kevan Abrahams has also expressed an interest in the Congressional seat—but the Republicans haven’t made their pick, either. Topping their list so far is Hempstead Town Supervisor Kate Murray, whose spokesman said she had no comment on efforts to persuade her to declare her candidacy. McCarthy had soundly beaten the two other Republican men now being mentioned as interested in running again—Legis. Fran Becker Jr. of Lynbrook and attorney Frank Scaturro of New Hyde Park. In 2012, her victory margin was 30 points. Considering that Gov. Andrew Cuomo won the district with 63 percent of the vote in 2010 and that he’ll be on the ballot this fall, the Republican candidate, no matter who she or he is, looks to be facing an uphill climb. It’s a different dynamic in Suffolk’s East End, where Bishop has more of a balancing act appeasing his constituents— and his party.

Bishop to Crown

Interestingly, Bishop and three other New Yorkers in swing districts were among the 39 House Democrats who

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crossed party lines late last year to vote for a Republican bill allowing health insurers to resume selling low-cost policies that have been cancelled because they didn’t provide all the coverage required under the new law. That initiative grew out of President Obama’s misguided promise that “You can keep your health insurance policy if you like it.” As the conservative attack ads describe it: “They lied to you!” Perhaps Bishop voted with the Republicans to inoculate himself from the negative campaign virus to come, but he explained it differently: “This was not a vote against the health reform law,” Bishop told the Press in an email, “but a vote to ensure the intent of Congress when we passed it with a grandfather clause for existing plans. I, along with the President of the United States, said that people could keep their plan if they liked it, and for some people, that turned out not to be true. I voted for the bill because I stand by my statements, and this bill was a way to assist those that were losing their plans.” Nationally, Democrats hope they can change the subject and use the economy against their opponents, by drumming up support to raise the minimum wage, extend long-term unemployment insurance (this affects at least 10,000


Long Islanders) as well as enact immigration reform (and there are countless undocumented workers in the 1st District and elsewhere on the Island).

Strange bedfellows

Another factor to give the GOP pause this time around is that bipartisanship seems to be Cuomo’s singular achievement in Albany, if you can believe the most powerful elected Republican in New York, state Senate co-leader Dean Skelos (R-Rockville Centre). And Skelos clearly has his hands full trying to keep state Senate Republicans in power—especially since Zeldin is giving up his seat to run against Bishop and recently state Sen. Charles Fuschillo (R-Merrick) retired to take a job running a nonprofit. In 2012, President Obama carried both state Senate districts by more than 55 percent of the vote. Skelos is relying on a shaky coalition of Republicans and four members of the Independent Democratic Conference for support. “He is the co-majority leader now only because he has some dissident Democrats [voting with him],” says Jacobs. “He does not have the senate majority!” Right now, Legis. David Denenberg (D-Merrick) looks poised to run for Fuschillo’s vacated seat in the 8th Senate District. Jacobs says that Denenberg “is the most popular Democrat in that area” and that he has bipartisan appeal. But Skelos remains confident, his spokesman Scott Rief says, that his Long Island colleagues will all be Republicans, no matter whose names are on the November ballot, given that the last time Democrats ruled the Senate, they let New York City politicians shift school aid from the suburbs, impose an unpopular MTA commuter tax and take away the STAR rebate checks. Jacobs concedes that the race to fill Zeldin’s state Senate seat will be “competitive.” His counterpart in Suffolk County, Democratic Chairman Rich Schaffer, hasn’t picked a candidate but the two leading contenders are Patchogue Mayor Paul Pontieri and Adrienne Esposito, the executive director of the Citizens Campaign for the Environment. On the Republican side, Brookhaven Councilman Tim Mazzei, former Assemblyman Dean Murray, Islip Town Board Member Anthony Senft and Islip Supervisor Tom Croci are being considered. A decision should be made by February’s end, according to Jesse Garcia, Brookhaven Republican chairman. By all accounts, Zeldin will make this Congressional race more competitive than he did in 2008 when Bishop trounced him by 16 percentage points (58 percent to 42 percent). In 2010, Zeldin parlayed suburban anger over the MTA payroll tax to oust the Democratic state senator, Brookhaven’s popular former supervisor Brian Foley, and Zeldin has been staking out local positions on rolling

back the Common Core Curriculum as well as repeating his opposition to the payroll tax that seem to resonate with his constituents. But there’s something about the East End district that attracts do-overs. The 2012 race was a repeat between Bishop and millionaire entrepreneur Randy Altschuler, who had fallen 600 votes short in 2010. But two years later Altschuler lost more ground, losing by almost five percentage points, 52.4 to 47.5. This time around, Zeldin has the blessing of the local party officials. But George Demos is not to be denied. He’s reportedly raised $2 million and gotten the support of former Gov. George Pataki.

Demos lost a Republican primary to Altschuler and he may not win the party’s nod this year, either. But he certainly promises to be entertaining, if one of his recent 30-second campaign spots is any indication. It linked Bishop to President Obama and Toronto’s crack-smoking mayor, Rob Ford, asking viewers if they’re “tired of politicians?” Demos claims he’s “not a politician.” Few observers would dispute that. One issue sure to be heard more about—even though Bishop dealt with it two years ago—is that the Office of Congressional Ethics was looking into whether the Congressman had helped hedge fund magnate Eric Semler get an

environmental permit to launch fireworks at his son’s bar mitzvah in exchange for a campaign donation. “After the fact, after I got the permit, I did receive a request for a donation,” Semler told Politico in August 2012. “Tim never said anything to me about a donation. I didn’t know he was running for re-election...I would love to support a guy like that.” How all these issues will play out in November remains to be seen. For more of Senior Editor Spencer Rumsey’s honest take on L.I. and national politics, single-malt scotch and Lindsay Lohan, check out his blog “Rumsey Punch” at LongIslandPress.com.

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J u s t S ay i n ’

A MODEST PLAN TO SAVE THE NFL By Peter Tannen

Do you feel small and insignificant when Super Bowl Sunday rolls around?  Well, you should. Just take a quick look at some of the players in Super Bowl XLVIII:

FOR THE DENVER BRONCOS Orlando Franklin, 6’7”, 320 lbs. Winston Justice, 6’6”, 317 lbs. Vinston Painter, 6’6”, 309 lbs. Chris Clark, 6’5”, 305 lbs. Terrance Knighton, 6’3”, 335 lbs. Even their quarterback, Peyton Manning, is 6’5” tall and weighs 230 pounds. You have to admit that these are really, really large people. And any kid dreaming of playing in the NFL had better have some super-size genes in his family. I think this is grossly unfair to us ordinary-sized people—hey, we’re still the vast majority in this country—and frankly, does not bode well for the future of football. It is obviously one reason why soccer (which the rest of the world calls football) is making such enormous strides in America. Any kid, of any size, can dream of being a soccer star and playing in the World Cup. Seriously: Soccer’s super-star, Leo Messi of Barcelona, is just 5’6” and weighs 148 pounds. And the “2013 World Player of the Year” is Cristiano Ronaldo of Real Madrid, who is 6’1”, 165 pounds. No wonder that the last World Cup was watched by more than 3.2 billion people in every single country and territory on Earth, including Antarctica and the Arctic Circle. Even in the USA, more than 24 million people tuned into the final game. So here’s my idea to save the NFL: I propose that each team in the NFL should be limited to 1.25 tons of players on the field at the same time.  That’s right—one-and-a-quarter tons of players on offense vs. one-anda-quarter tons of players on defense, 2,500 pounds vs. 2,500 pounds. And

FOR THE SEATTLE SEAHAWKS Breno Giacomini, 6’7”, 318 lbs. Tony McDaniel , 6’7”, 305 lbs. Paul McQuistan, 6’6”, 315 lbs. Russell Okung, 6’5”, 310 lbs. Michael Bowie, 6’4”, 332 lbs. Their quarterback, little Russell Wilson, stands 5’11” tall, and weighs in at 206 pounds. not an ounce more on either team.  Sure, if a coach really wanted to, he could still put an offensive line of five 310-pound players on the field. But that would leave him with only 950 pounds for both tight ends and the whole backfield—an average of only 158 pounds per player! Is this an opportunity for us ordinary-sized people or what? The bottom line is that a whole bunch of very talented, regular-sized players would have a chance to play on NFL teams and maybe even get to the Super Bowl. And I predict that TV ratings will go through the roof—because people like watching people just like themselves. (Which is probably why we watch shows like American Idol in the first place!) A great feeling of pride will sweep America: “Hey, look at that 170-pound, 5’8” guy going down the field—I can do that! Now I suppose some nitpicker will say that we shouldn’t call it the “Super” Bowl anymore—not with our 1.25 ton-per-team weight limit. But I suspect that’s just a marketing problem. We can always call it “Super Bowl Light.” Or even better, ”The First Super Bowl With No Saturated Fat.” JustSayin@LongIslandPress.com

PeteR Tannen is a humor writer who has won multiple awards from the National Press Club (Washington, D.C.), the Press Club of Long Island and the Florida Press Association. His columns can also be heard on select Public Radio stations across the U.S. www.tannenweekly.com

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/// The Luger Rocking his luge sled back and forth before launching forward, then using his spiked gloves to paddle the ice below, Aidan Kelly quickly lays flat on his back as he slides 90 mph down a mile-long serpentine track in less than a minute. Just his racing suit, helmet and sled separate him from the frozen flume. “It’s really hard to describe the feeling,” the 19-year-old from West Islip says, recalling when he qualified for the 2014 Winter Olympics. Despite crashing amid a World Cup race that served as the Olympic qualifier, Kelly clinched the third spot on the US Luge Men’s Singles squad in December—the most dramatic day of his career so far. Kelly, who makes his Olympic debut in Russia the day after the Feb. 8 opening ceremony, was recruited after a tryout at Bald Hill in Farmingville following the last Winter Games. The sled was on wheels. He credits skateboarding with his gift for sliding, “because the way the sleds drive are similar,” Kelly says. “It’s scary sometimes, but that’s what makes it so exciting,” he says. “There’s gotta be a hint of fear or else there’s no fun to it. I think my whole team is full of adrenaline junkies.”

/// The Two-Man Luger

FOUR Corners local olympians

--By Timothy Bolger and rashed Mian tbolger@longislandpress.com rmian@longislandpress.com

/// The Skeleton John Daly’s first foray into ice sports that require riders to travel at ridiculous speeds started at Smithtown Middle School when his gym coach encouraged him to give luge a shot. He tried, but quickly learned it wasn’t for him. Daly opted for skeleton instead, a lesser-known sport with equally thrilling speeds that dares brave competitors to travel down an icy course at 80 mph-plus speeds headfirst. The decision paid off for the talented Smithtown-native who nine years later qualified for the Winter Olympics Games in Vancouver in 2010, where he finished 17th. Daly, 28, learned on Jan. 29 that he’d be making a second trip to the Olympics, and blasted a message to his hundreds of Facebook fans thanking “everyone who has supported me throughout my career,” adding: “It has meant the world.” Daly is forever grateful to his parents, who’ve spent years driving him from Suffolk County to his training grounds in upstate Lake Placid and back. “I know without a doubt I wouldn’t have become an Olympian without the support of my family,” Daly says in his Team USA bio. Daly predicted back in 2010 that it wouldn’t be his last Olympics. He was right, and now the veteran racer is hoping to return home with a shiny gold souvenir around his neck.

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Well-behaved women seldom make history, as historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich wrote. For daredevil Devin Logan, it’s her extreme sports successes that earned her a spot on the U.S. Freeskiing Team to compete in the first-ever women’s ski slopestyle Olympic event—performing aerial tricks off a series of mountainside box jumps and rail slides. “A lot of the world hasn’t seen what we do, but I think they’re gonna be amazed because it’s an action sport, and it’s high-flying, high-risk,” says Logan, who was born in Oceanside and grew up in Vermont. “It’s really fun to watch.” The event is one of eight new additions to the Winter Games, including the debut of women’s ski jumping. Logan, who turns 21 a week after she competes Feb. 11, made her name winning various Winter X Games events as a teenager. “Hopefully people don’t think we’re just going and hucking ourselves and hopefully landing on our feet,” she says. “It takes a long time to get where we are and have that air awareness and ability to know where we are and what tricks we’re doing.” She may be a world-class, polished pro skier, but when it’s time to get big air, she smiles and says: “Grip it and rip it!”

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As a member of the New York Army National Guard’s 1156th Engineer Company, Sgt. Matt Mortensen can’t be beyond a 100-mile perimeter of Lake Placid unless he receives permission. Apparently a trip to the Olympics is a good enough excuse. The 28-yearold Huntington Station native, one of nine soldiers in the U.S. Army World Class Athlete Program headed to Russia, and one of seven Mortensen children, got his first lugeinduced adrenaline thrill when he was only 10 years old. But his journey to the pinnacle of his sport officially began when he competed in his first international event at 13 in the Junior World Cup. “I’m a pretty determined person,” he says from a hotel in Latvia. “I don’t like to fail at anything that I do.” In the lead up to the 2014 Winter Olympics, Mortensen and his Men’s Doubles partner were considered favorites to compete for Team USA but lost a do-or-die race by .02 of a second, a crushing defeat. Making the team this time around “was the only outcome,” he says; Mortensen didn’t know how he would mentally cope with falling short again. “Being able to compete for the USA and represent my country means a lot to me. Also, being a soldier really means a lot to me.”

///The Skier


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The Maine Maid Inn in Jericho, shown here in the 19th century, was once the home of Valentine and Abigail Hicks, important Quaker abolitionists who played an important role in “conducting” Long Island’s branch of the Underground Railroad. (Photo courtesy Save the Maine Maid Inn in Jericho)

Slavery and Salvation L.I.’s Underground Railroad By Spencer Rumsey

B

y the light of single match a group of shadowy figures followed a path that would take them under the cover of darkness from their hiding place in the attic of a Quaker house in Old Westbury, through the fields, to a waiting boat in Roslyn Harbor, where they’d quietly board and hope to cross the Sound safely on their way to freedom. A cough or a sneeze could be suicide. Rachael Hicks, born there in 1857, wouldn’t learn about her own family’s role in Long Island’s Underground Railroad until her older siblings told her about it after the Civil War had ended. Another key way station in Jericho also held its secrets. Known to us today as the Maine Maid Inn, it was once the home of the Quaker abolitionist Valentine Hicks and his wife Abigail, whose father Elias Hicks had been the spark that helped convince Quakers and other like-minded people after the Revolutionary War that all men were created equal—including people of color who were enslaved. “Elias spread the word and Valentine made the connection,” says Kathleen G. Velsor, a professor in the school of education at SUNY-Old Westbury and author of The Underground Railroad on Long Island, which came out last year. She said that a removable

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srumsey@longislandpress.com

panel behind an upstairs linen closet at the Maine Maid Inn concealed a staircase to the attic where Hicks hid runaways until the coast was clear—and it’s still there today. The Town of Oyster Bay designated the site as an historic landmark in 2012. How many enslaved people used Long Island to escape their chains may never be answered with certainty. Quakers and other abolitionists didn’t advertise their undertakings. But the numbers had to be relatively small. According to the National Park Service, which oversees the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom, only 1,000 or so people a year came north, and Long Island was not on the direct route to Canada. But was it more than a detour? Velsor insists that the Island was actually an important destination, albeit a temporary one, because the Quaker “conductors” of the Underground Railroad, which was neither a real railroad nor a tunnel underground, used their Long Island Society of Friends to help the fugitives “hide in plain sight,” dispersed among different homesteads beyond the reach of the slave catchers until they could move “up the trail.” Unfolding this chapter of our Island’s history has been daunting for Velsor, because documents are

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scarce and skepticism abounds. One local librarian once condescendingly responded to her query thusly: “Don’t be silly, dear! There was no Underground Railroad here because there was no slavery on Long Island.” So, in keeping with Black History Month, a little lesson is in order.

Of Human Bondage

“Slavery was widespread on Long Island,” says Christopher Matthews, an anthropology professor at Montclair University who has done extensive research on this topic. “It was the principal basis of the economy in the 18th century.” Between 1619 and 1850, an estimated 12 million Africans were shipped across the Atlantic. Of this staggering amount of human cargo, about 5 percent ended up in North America. In the colonial era, historians say that New York City had the second-largest urban slave population after Charleston, S.C. On Long Island in 1771, 17 percent of the population was black and virtually all were enslaved. By 1790, when the first federal census was taken, 54.8 percent of Suffolk County slave owners had one slave, and 88.7 percent owned fewer than five.


THE

Friday, April 4, 2014 11:30am – 2:00pm th

The 28 Annual The first—and the largest—slave plantation on Long Island had begun on Shelter Island in 1651 when Nathaniel Sylvester, an Englishman raised in Amsterdam, brought 24 slaves to work the land so he could provide for his brother’s sugar plantation in Barbados. Today the Sylvester Manor is the Sylvester Manor Educational Farm, a nonprofit foundation, as well as the subject of a fascinating account of American history, The Manor: Three Centuries at a Slave Plantation on Long Island, by Mac Griswold, a cultural landscape historian and Guggenheim Fellow. Her book, published in 2013 and now in its third printing and soon to be out in paperback, is the featured selection for “Long Island Reads,” the Island-wide reading initiative sponsored in April by the Nassau Library System and the Public Libraries of Suffolk County. Back in 1984, Griswold and a friend were rowing a dinghy down Gardiners Creek when she spotted boxwoods looming over a garden by a yellow mansion. She judged by their huge size that these shrubs must have been hundreds of years old. She was right, as she later learned when she met the couple living there who subsequently pointed out the “slave staircase” leading from the west parlor to the attic. But Griswold didn’t start her research until 1997, after she’d written Washington’s Gardens at Mount Vernon, which drew her back to Shelter Island. “Every time Washington said ‘I’ in his account book and in his journal,” she tells the Press, “he didn’t mean: ‘I graded the lawn,’ or ‘I chopped the trees’... He meant the 300 people who were working for him for free.” Nathaniel Sylvester had employed a smaller workforce when he owned all 8,000 acres of Shelter Island. Today only 243 acres of his holdings remain and his original house is most likely under the foundation of the stately structure built in 1737 by his grandson, Brinley Sylvester, and renovated in the 1840s. But inside its walls Griswold found precious paperwork dating back centuries, such as

The owners of the stately Sylvester Manor in Shelter Island once commanded an 8,000acre slave plantation. Today the house is part of a non-profit educational foundation, an organic farm, and a major archaeological site. (Photo courtesy John Matsunaga)

Nathaniel’s will, which referred to his slaves by name, and his inventory, which listed them by value. Griswold also found a note written to Brinley in 1719 that he still owed the vendor money for “rum, molasses, and negros.” Interestingly, Nathaniel Sylvester and his wife Grizzell were Quakers, but, as Griswold writes, that “does not seem to have made them sensitive to the plight of their slaves.” Researchers who have been conducting fieldwork at the site off and on for almost 15 years have discovered that this plantation did not fit the Southern stereotype. In fact, Native Americans, Africans, and whites lived and worked closely together. Katherine Hayes, a University of Minnesota anthropology professor who will be returning to the manor later this spring to conduct an archaeological dig there, used an analogy by the historian Ira Berlin to distinguish between what he called “slave societies,” such as the sugar plantations in Barbados (or the Louisiana hellhole in the Oscar-nominated movie 12 Years a Slave), and “societies with slaves” like the manor on Shelter Island. “Slave societies are entirely dependent on the institution of slavery,” says Hayes, author of Slavery Before Race: Europeans, Africans, and Indians at Long Island’s Sylvester Manor Plantation, 1651-1884. “That’s why slavery becomes such a cruel institution.” Societies with slaves were more like a class system, she explains. “With slave societies, if you’re born a slave, your child is a slave,” Hayes says. “It runs in the family. Whereas in societies with slaves, there’s the possibility that your children will not be slaves, or that one day you may not be a slave as well.” As for why the slaves on Shelter Island didn’t turn on their outnumbered

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2nd Annual

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Tuesday

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Continued From page 31

masters, she says the threat of punishment was always present, but seldom necessary. “Just hauling someone across the ocean and putting them in unfamiliar circumstances—you put them at a severe disadvantage without ever having to beat them,” she says. Anthropologist Christopher Matthews found a similar pattern of mixed races working together in Hempstead at the Rock Hall Museum in Lawrence, formerly a 600-acre estate built in 1767 by Josiah Martin, a wealthy British sugar merchant from Antigua, who had the most slaves on a single plantation in what was then Queens. Last year in Stony Brook University’s Long Island History Journal, Matthews published an article with fellow researcher Ross Thomas Rava on their findings that the African slaves “actively participated in the construction and culture of the household rather than merely living and working there.” “These people came to an accommodation with each other,” Griswold tells the Press. “We have to consider the whole story of slavery as an American story, not as an African-American story.”

Road to Freedom Gold

Silver

Bronze

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Not too long ago, slavery was the norm. As Shelter Island’s Lodowick Havens, born in 1774, wrote in his memoir about the 1700s, “In them days all kept slaves as could afford it.” This entrenched American institution had only begun to be challenged when the Quakers became the first organized group of whites here to voluntarily forswear slavery in the 18th century. And Long Island’s Elias Hicks and his son-in-law Valentine were among the most active in this movement. But their efforts and those of other abolitionists took a long while— not to mention a Civil War—to produce their desired results. Joysetta Pearse, executive director of the African Museum of Nassau County, credits Long Island’s Quakers with being

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The Rock Hall Museum in Lawrence was built by Josiah Martin, a slaveholder from Antigua, in 1767. Today the Georgian-style mansion is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. (Photo courtesy Rock Hall Museum)

instrumental in hastening the end of slavery, at least up North. “If an editor of a local paper ran an ad for a runaway slave—and slaves did run away from Long Island slaveholders—Long Island Quakers would write to the editors that they would boycott the papers if the editors continued to run the slave notices... They did all the harassing they could do, and the [state] legislature finally moved to address the issue.” Under pressure, New York’s legislature amended its gradual manumission law in 1817 so that all enslaved blacks would be free as of 1827. As is so often true in this republic when reforms are passed, the drafters of the original bill had wanted to make sure the property owners were adequately compensated— even if their property was human chattel. Afterwards, abolitionists turned their attention to the slave states. And given how the stakes changed for the operators of the Underground Railroad in 1850 after the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act, which mandated the return of runaway slaves wherever in the Union they might be, it became very dangerous for both slaves and their “conductors.” “They couldn’t trust anybody,” says Velsor with admiration. “And that’s when you realize how heroic these people are.” Mac Griswold, the author of The Manor, will be speaking about her book on Feb. 9 and Feb. 21 at 2 p.m. at the WMHO Educational and Cultural Center, 111 Main St., Stony Brook. Admission is free. For more information, call 631751-2244 or go to www.wmho.org. The nationally acclaimed photographer Xiomaro, whose series on the slaves’ burial ground at the William Floyd Estate is currently on display at the African Burial Ground National Monument in New York City, will be giving a free lecture at the Oyster Bay Historical Society, 20 Summit St., Oyster Bay, on Feb. 9 at 2 p.m. Call 516-922-5032 for more information or go to www. oysterbayhistorical.org.


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A R T + So u l

New Documentary Takes Testing Battle To Big Screen BRINGING THE BIG GUNS: Dr. Mark Naison (L), of BAT (aka Badass Teachers) and Standardized documentary filmmaker Daniel Hornberger rally anti-testing advocates at South Side High School in Rockville Centre on Jan. 13. The documentary atttracted more than 120 supporters, including teachers, parents and Common Core protestors. (Jaime Franchi/Long Island Press)

A

By Jaime Franchi jfranchi@longislandpress.com

6-foot-tall pencil joins a life-sized Scantron sheet in thunderous applause when a 9-year-old kid dresses down Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, decrying, “That’s racism!” Cheers erupt at the appearance of a silver-haired man onscreen. In the audience, someone bearing a remarkable resemblance stands to wave at the crowd, the raised fist on his black T-shirt marked with the same letters of the tattoo that covers his bicep: BAT. This isn’t a midnight showing of The Rocky Horror Picture Show, despite all the costumes and raucous characters. This is the auditorium of Rockville Centre’s South Side High School on Jan. 13, where approximately 120 students, teachers and education advocates witnessed the latest front in what has been an all-out war against Common Core, the education reform created by the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers and financed with more than $4 billion of “Race to the Top” funds as part of the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The documentary Standardized: Lies, Money, and Civil Rights: How Testing is Ruining Public Education, the brainchild of producer and former teacher Daniel Hornberger, is a powerful artistic translation of this both cerebral and passionate battle. It stars real-life parents, teachers and experts from across this country testifying as to how schools are being destroyed by this federal education mandate—the Obama Administration’s answer to predecessor George W. Bush’s No Child Left Behind Act. The groundswell of protest from parents and teachers is quickly reaching critical mass, causing politicians who had previously dismissed critics of the reform to reconsider their positions. In New York, State Education Commissioner John King faces a

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vote of “no confidence” by the teachers’ unions for implementing the program. Standardized’s cinematic examination of the effects of high-stakes standardized testing on schoolchildren and the multi-billion-dollar industry perpetuating it comes as the battle here on Long Island is really heating up. The inspiration for the film comes from the book Making the Grade, by author Todd Farley, who spent his career working in the standardized testing industry and confirmed Hornberger’s suspicions that high-stakes testing not only stifles the creativity of teachers and is harmful to students, but it’s ultimately fraudulent, too.

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“Anyone who’s ever been in a test-scoring center can see that, as the places are filled with characters— people I heard called ‘the uglies’ and ‘un-hirables’— while the work itself is ridiculous and maddening but at times very, very funny,” Farley tells the Press. “Of course, it’s funny only if those tests aren’t being used to make actual decisions about students, teachers, and schools—if those decisions are being made based on the work I used to do, that seems pretty insane to me.” The book begins with Farley’s first day on the job, when he is asked to give third-grade students pass/fail grades based on their drawings of bicycle safety. The rubric was simple: If they showed a clearly identifiable


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MR BEERYS 18TH BATTLE OF THE BANDS TO END CYSTIC FIBROSIS safety rule, they passed. Farley thought it’d be a breeze. He was wrong. The book describes Farley’s first assessment: a child with a helmet strapped to his chin jumping a fiery pit of lava. Farley quickly clicked the “fail” button. But, because the lava-jumping child wore his helmet, a safety rule was demonstrated. So the student passed, even though Farley felt a helmet wouldn’t save a child’s head from liquid fire. No matter, he was advised. Move onto the next. Farley shrugged at the inconsistency of the grading policy and made a career in the standardized testing industry, where he earned plenty of money. He disagreed with the absurdity by which these tests were graded, but trusted that the elites who were in charge knew what they were doing—and thus spent his career not questioning them. That’s until his conscience could take it no longer. The prevalence of standardized tests and the fact that the entirety of education reform rests on them woke him to the realization that the living he had made so comfortably was hurting a generation of children. “The standardized testing industry is basically a for-profit endeavor with a long, well-documented history of fuck-ups that is completely unregulated, so you should trust it only if you feel good about trusting big businesses being run entirely on the honor system,” he concluded in an interview. “That seems problematic to me, which is why I’ve always thought large-scale assessment was one big (really lucrative for allinvolved) scam.” Standardized outlines the details of that scam in unmistakable clarity: from the political origins that began education reform and perpetuated it, crossing both political parties, to the business end of the testing machine. Hornberger entrusted much of his vision to Co-director and Director of Photography Jim Del Conte, without whom he says the film

DRESSED FOR SUCCESS: Pro-student advocacy group Lace to the Top co-founders Anthony Griffin (L) and Kevin Glynn show their support for Standardized by arriving at its Long Island premiere at Rockville Centre’s South Side High School Jan. 13 dressed as a Scantron sheet and pencil. (Courtesy of standardizedthefilm.com)

never could have been made. “Jim’s insight as a photographer and skills as an editor made this film solid in terms of visuals and pacing,” he says. Hornberger interviewed teachers and education policy experts, mothers and administrators to uncover the systemic culture pervading education policy, including the racial implications accompanying what many see as the eventuality of this reform: the closing of public schools. Standardized drives this point home in a scene from a Chicago protest rally, where thousands took to the street— capturing the fury and despair of those displaced by the school closings and making it real for viewers. The unchallenged star of the film is 9-year-old Asean Johnson, who took on Mayor Emanuel on the historic closing of more than 50 public schools in Chicago’s mostly black and Hispanic communities. “Rham Emanuel is not caring about our schools. He’s not caring about our safety,” he charges in an electrifying scene. “You should be investing in these school, not closing them. You should be supporting these schools, not closing them. We are not going down without a fight. This is racism,” he accuses. Dr. Mark Naison, a professor of history and chair of African and African American studies at Fordham University, concurs. In the film, Naison condemns Race to the Top as so much worse than No Child Left Behind because it “insists that you have to close schools, that you have to rate teachers and schools on the basis of student test scores, and you have to give preference to charters. Barack Obama has done more damage to public education than any president in modern history,” he blasts. Continued on page 36

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Continued From page 35

At South Side High School, Naison responds to cheers with a grin and a raised fist—like the one emblazoned across his T-shirt—which echoes the sentiment of his “BAT” tattoo. BAT is the acronym for Badass Teachers, a group of more than 36,000 teachers who use the association as an outlet for both the creativity they feel is stifled by Common Core as well as a place to find solace and validation among other professionals who understand how dispiriting teaching has become under the constant threat of the education reform’s harsh penalties against instructors. Naison is co-founder of the movement with Oceanside teacher Marla Kilfoyle. He not only stars in the film, but has also been a vocal opponent in protests from New York to Washington. The audience gasped throughout the testimony of Judge Rick Roach, who is in his fourth four-year term on Florida’s Orange County Board of Education. He subjected himself to the literacy tests that the children were condemned to—and failed, his two Masters degrees notwithstanding. His example speaks to the core of the protest: the invalidity upon which these tests are based. That the entire education system is dependent on these tests is the terrifying verdict Hornberger successfully drives home time and time again in the film. “For me, the process was frustrating and exhilarating at the same time,” Hornberger tells the Press. “The more I learned about the testing industry, the angrier I became. But due to the input of the terrific people in the film, I felt justified in doing what I was doing.” The film ended to robust applause and an emotional question-and-answer session, where parents voiced their frustrations. Though Hornberger had a long drive back to Pennsylvania, he led a discussion for more than an hour afterwards. Yet still, the audience was hesitant to leave. Naison was impressed by the film’s

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EYE FOR DETAIL: Documentary filmmaker Daniel Hornberger shoots a scene for Standardized, which exposes the detrimental effects of standardized testing on school children. (Courtesy of standardizedthefilm.com)

scope, remarking that it would undoubtedly inspire anger among parents who watched it. “I think anyone who watched Standardized, especially parents with children still in public school, came away appalled at what is being done to the nation’s children through uncontrolled testing, and enraged that these policies are supported by leaders of both major parties,” he says. “After the Long Island showing, the discussion among the audience was all about ‘what can we do to stop this?’ ” Anthony Griffin, the life-sized pencil and co-founder of Lace to the Top, a group of advocates who display bright green shoelaces to convey their message that kids are more than test scores, believes that Standardized provides the answer: to opt-out of the tests. “Standardized exposes the damage an education reform based on numbers and profits has on our children and schools,” he tells the Press. “In addition to great interviews about the problems and dangers of high-stakes testing, Standardized offers ‘the answer key’ for families and schools that want education to be about more than cut scores [state-determined passing grades], data points, and scripted lessons.” The last of the audience members trickled out of South Side well after 10 p.m., forming clusters and exchanging ideas. Opt-Out signs were hoisted out of the trunks of cars and shared. Bright green shoelaces changed hands. Friend requests were sent. And BATs took off into the night. South Side High School’s Jan. 13 screening of Standardized was the second stop on a national tour of high schools, colleges and theaters. For future dates, destinations and to learn more, check out standardizedthefilm.com.


St. Valentine’s Day tips from a Professional Matchmaker

Every year I get asked the same question before Valentine’s Day, “What is the easiest way of finding someone so I can enjoy Valentine’s Day?” You might think I would recommend my services at Maureen Tara Nelson Private Matchmaking as the only way to be successful, but I would never do that. In fact, I suggest that you start the dating process on your own, and I will give some helpful suggestions on how to make it easier. I recommend first giving yourself six months on your own. After six months, I suggest speeding up the process and making it easier for yourself. Come in for a free consultation to see if we can help you. In my over 13 years of matchmaking, I have over 1,000 success stories of people just like you who are very happy they came in and let me do the work for them. But again, first give yourself six months of trying to meet Mr./Ms.Right on your own. Here are some helpful suggestions that will make it easier for you: When you are ready for a committed relationship, let everyone you know you are ready and looking for someone who shares the same interests as you. Make sure you are at a healthy and happy place in your life. You need to love yourself first before someone else can love you. Be sure you are portraying yourself in a positive light. Stop looking for perfection. No one is perfect, not even you. Decide on the five most important attributes your partner must have. (If someone doesn’t possess something which is number seven on your list let it go; you are being too picky.) Always leave the house looking and feeling your best. Confidence is a huge turn-on. Do not get disappointed if you are not successful in your own search for six months. It truly is very difficult to find the right person. For a match to be “made in heaven” you must have two characteristics. You need to be compatible with one another, and you need to have chemistry with each other. Only after trying on your own unsuccessfully, please feel free to call for a complimentary, no-pressure personal interview with Maureen Tara Nelson at 516-444-2861 or 631-577-7940. L o n g I s l a n d P r e s s f o r F e b r u a ry, 2 0 1 4 / / / w w w. l o n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

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Spiga Bakery co-owner Luca Caravello and his brother Robert have become known for their delicious donuts, most notably, the Inis, a Sicilian Zeppoli delight. (Rashed Mian/Long Island Press)

Hot Plate

CRONUT CRAZE

SPARKS L.I. DONUT-PASTRY (R)EVOLUTION By Rashed Mian rmian@longislandpress.com

The craze that ensued after Scott Bollman introduced his latest magical pastry concoction at The Cheese Emporium & Cafe was totally unintended, he swears. The shop, known for, well, its cheese and other delectable delights, introduced the Sconut as a spoof on the immensely popular Cronut, a crunchy donut-croissant hybrid ingeniously imagined by Chef Dominique Ansel in Manhattan. The staff unveiled the scone-donut combination during the summer of 2013, and the donut on steroids— figuratively speaking, of course—flew off his shelves by the dozens, every day. Bollman, who now laughs about the Sconut obsession, has firmly entrenched himself in the donut-hybrid craze gripping America. “How many people have done this already?” he asks, excitedly. “It was just a silly trend that took notice; I don’t know how it came to be something so blown up.” Actually, while Bollman was in the process of introducing the Sconut to the masses, he turned to his father one day, and jokingly or not, prophesized: “‘Watch people go crazy over this.’” “I didn’t think it would get any press!” he laughs. Bollman, chef and co-owner of The Cheese Emporium, which will celebrate its 40-year anniversary in idyllic Greenport Village, admits his

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creation was born from Ansel’s Cronut. But he’s not the only Long Islander developing specialty donuts that have customers yearning for more. Over in Huntington at Fiorello Dolce, owner Gerard Fioravanti finally granted his customers’ wishes and introduced his own croissant-donut pastry, which he calls the French Donut. It comes in about a half-dozen different styles, and all are absolutely mouthwatering. Shoot out to Spiga Bakery in Bellmore and ask co-owners/brothers Robert and Luca Caravello for the Inis—a heavenly Sicilian-Zeppoli donut stuffed with cannoli cream and Ricotta and coated in sugar. Mangia, mangia! Their creativity shines in these tasty creations. “I didn’t even want to make rainbow cookies,” says Fioravanti, who grew up in the Bronx, studied at the French Culinary Institute in Manhattan, worked at a French pastry shop in the city, and visited France, where he soaked in the culture. “I didn’t want to be the typical baker.” “We decided to bring that here to Huntington,” he says on a brisk afternoon inside his cozy bakery, a jubilant aroma of desserts wafting joyously throughout the small shop. Fiorvanti’s French Donuts made its way to the shelves about eight months ago, after customers familiar with the Cronut inquired if he made them. They became a crowd-pleaser almost immediately.

Fiorvanti’s favorite is the Salted Caramel French Donut, a palate-pleasing crunch of salty-and-sweet flavors that mingle and dance upon the taste buds like soul mates who’ve at long last found one another after eternities apart. On any given day, customers can walk in and find a host of other flavors: Caramel with Pears and Candied Ginger, Chocolate Raspberry (he only uses raspberry jam from Switzerland), Belgium Chocolate, Nutella with Applewood Smoked Bacon and Vermont Maple Syrup, and Peanut Butter and Jelly with Banana, drizzled with chocolate (affectionately known in the Press newsroom as “The Elvis”). Fiorvanti follows the same strict philosophy with his French Donuts as with the dozens of other items served at Fiorello Dolce: Nothing is fried. “Baking is healthier for you,” he adds. The homely Italian Spiga Bakery, run by the Caravello Brothers and nestled in a small shopping center in Bellmore, is known for its prosciutto bread, among other fresh, inviting baked goodies. Robert and Luca have been baking since they were children. Robert Caravello, 41, majored in American Literature in college but was drawn to the family business. “Because it’s a family-run business, because it’s something that’s been passed down, we take a lot of pride in it,” Caravello says. “If we don’t like something or if we don’t like the way it came out, we don’t look at the cost of

Fiorello Dolce’s French Donut (top), a croissantdonut hybrid, became an instant favorite when baker Gerard Fioravanti introduced them eight months ago. The Cheese Emporium’s Sconut (below) has become wildly popular, selling by the dozens. each day.

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throwing it out. We look at the cost of putting it out and people not liking it.” Spiga offers about a dozen types of donuts at any given time—Banana Custard and Nutella, Italian Custard with Ganache (their take on the Boston Cream), Vanilla Sprinkles, and everyone’s favorite, the venerable Jelly Donut—including seasonal donuts that allow the baking brothers to get their creative juices flowing. During New Year’s they sold a champagne-glazed donut coated in edible glitter, a glitzy dessert that turned heads and became an immediate hit. But it’s the Inis that is well on its way to surpass Spiga’s Banana Nutella option as the top-selling donut on the menu. The donut is fried on the outside, yet the dough is soft and moist inside. Every bite is a glorious awakening that shocks the body and hangs around until the journey takes you to the delicious cannoli cream-filling finale heaven. “It goes down better, it feels better, it tastes better,” says Caravello, comparing Spiga’s donuts to the massproduced varieties. “You can tell it’s a custard that hasn’t been sitting in a refrigerator. It’s been taken care of properly.” But those wanting to relish the Inis’ supreme hybrid glory must arrive early, warns Caravello, for the magic pastries vanish almost as soon as they are laid out for sale! Out on the North Fork, Greenport’s The Cheese Emporium had been churning out scones for years before Bollman combined it with donuts. Visitors of the four-decade-old shop can try a variety of Sconuts: Chocolate Chip, Cinnamon Raisin, or a fruitbased option. “People enjoy it; we glaze it, we do different types, different flavors… and it became very popular,” Bollman says. “We pretty much make any type.” It’s become so popular that the shop now offers deliveries through Bollman’s wife’s online business (Farm2KitchenLongIsland). When he first launched his superstar hybrid donut, he started fielding calls from NPR and other media outlets, hungry to hear its scrumptious history (and undoubtedly sample a few). An idea born out of a spoof has turned his family-run business into a must-visit shop in Greenport, and the Sconut craze doesn’t seem to be going away anytime soon. “It became a mainstay,” he says.


ADVERTORIAL

Delicious Balls of Fun at Patchogue’s Exciting New Eatery! By Philip Maneri

Patchogue, NY — Enjoying fun food in a wonderful atmosphere reaches new heights at the newly opened That Meetball Place on Main Street in Patchogue. No pun intended, we had a ball. This cozy, one-of-a-kind restaurant delivers creative menu options of tasty food—in moist, juicy balls of goodness—along with a variety of delicious sides. Initially, I was intrigued by their catchy name so cleverly spelled with two “E”s in “Meetball.” I knew it was an eatery that just had to be tried. As I entered the stylish new restaurant to “meet” waiting friends (two “E”s also, get it!?), I was treated to the mouthwatering aroma of Italian-style meatballs. Its comforting fragrance set my expectations soaring and created an ear-to-ear smile upon my large face. That Meetball Place was founded by four childhood friends and is beautifully designed, with rustic bricks direct from New York City complementing exquisite oak from an actual barn in Pennsylvania and flatscreen TV monitors on every wall. The warm and inviting aura of the place is punctuated by numerous seating options—including a large, memorable community-style table—that further the all-encompassing good vibe. Joining my friends around one such table, the friendly staff soon brought us draft beers, wine, and exciting cocktails. They were the perfect beginnings to some really good conversation. Glancing around, other patrons in the barstyle setting were also clearly having great times. What a place! Then it was time for the main event, the Meetballs. The rousing new concept allows the foodie in everyone to indulge on their favorite style ball of food from the “Pick It” menu, which includes classic meatballs, chicken, veggie, seafood and spicy Mediterranean balls amongst nine choices. Once you choose your favorites, then you pick a sauce, such as spicy marinara, mushroom cream, pesto, spicy Asian, Pancetta Cream, Cool Tzatziki—or you can go with no sauce at all, a Plain Jane. From there, you also select your favorite form of delivery: in a bowl ($9), over pasta ($14), a slider with or without cheese ($3-$3.50), French baguette ($9) or a multi-grain Artisan roll ($8). You could even have an add-on or two, a scoop of fresh Ricotta or Mozzarella ($1.50), or a fried egg ($1)! The fun is in the many combinations and choices, as well as matching them with the many dipping breads and sauces. Each dish explodes with flavor and satisfaction, guaranteed. That Meetball Place serves fresh, high-quality food that is addicting and so much fun to eat. After the appetizers, we were introduced to some amazing salads ($5-$14), tasty soups ($5), tantalizing subwhiches ($12-$15) and a sidebar that just made my day, offering Dynamite Fries ($5) to Brocolli Rabe ($ 7), Risotto ($5), Homemade Smashed Potatoes ($ 5) and lots more. Totally content, we all agreed to try the spicy wings the next time we “meet” (Get it!? I laugh myself silly sometimes!) at The Meetball Place. I will remember its truly scrumptious dessert choices—including the Peanut Butter, Jelly and Nutella Waffle Dipped Sandwich and Hot White Chocolate Chip Iron Skillet Cookie with Schlag for a long, long time! We all agreed, That Meetball Place is an amazing gathering spot that is sure to not only squelch your hunger, but these cold wintery days—and turn them into delicious, irresistible fun, fun, fun! Bring your friends or go it solo, That Meetball Place is truly marvelous! That Meetball Place 52 W. Main Street Patchogue, NY 11772 (631) 569-5888

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SPENCER’S PICK THE GOLDFINCH BY DONNA TARTT Born in Mississippi, Donna Tartt is a rising star in the pantheon of young American writers. She made a name for herself when she published her first book, Secret History, before she reached 30. Then came Little Friend, which won her the WH Smith Literary Award in 2003. Now, a decade later, out flies The Goldfinch, a fiction finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. This woman is the real deal. Her Dickensian story involves Theo Decker, a 13-year-old New York kid who gets drawn into a criminal underworld, and revolves around his fixation on a real painting by Carel Fabritius from 1654, which Tartt first spotted in Amsterdam years ago and happened to be on display at the Frick Museum in Manhattan when this novel came out. In the book Decker steals the little painting from the Met. Don’t copy that!

CHRIS’ PICK OUT AMONG THE STARS BY JOHNNY CASH (COLUMBIA/LEGACY) Rare are those transcendental occasions when new material from one of your favorite artists (and by favorite I mean someone whose life and work has touched yours so deeply that you integrate some of theirs into your own), who have long since passed, is posthumously released. Rarer still is when that new material is not just throwaways and B-sides, but an entirely brand new album of truly great songs. So is the case with Johnny Cash’s Out Among The Stars, slated for release next month. Recorded in Nashville, Tennessee in 1981 and 1984 and produced by famed “countrypolitan” architect Billy Sherrill, it contains 12 tracks that had been tucked away in Columbia’s vaults and simply forgotten—only to be discovered by The Man In Black’s son, John Carter Cash, while cataloguing his father’s archives in 2012. The songs include duets with June Carter Cash and Waylon Jennings and Nashville’s “A-Team” of musicians at the time. They are tiny, sparkling, moving gems that demand to be cranked at maximum volume so they can travel through your eardrum, ricochet off your heart and join Johnny up there shining, glimmering, radiating out among the stars.

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Our Recommendations for the Month

#TOMOTHY’S PICK JUNIOR JOHNSON’S MIDNIGHT MOON You’ve got to love a label that says this about itself: “Few family recipes carry a jail sentence. But to Junior Johnson’s family, it was a way of life. With the law on his heels, Junior ran the finest moonshine to the dry rural south.” Each jar of Midnight Moon, distilled from corn at their place in Madison, N.C., is supposedly “hand-filled with real fruit, the way moonshine was meant to be made.” We started with the apple pie flavor—a blend of apple juice and a cinnamon stick—and found it hard to stop. In fact, we may never eat pie again if we can drink it instead from a mason RASHED’S PICK jar. Fortunately we didn’t have to cross state lines BRONX BOMBERS to get some of this moonshine (just try a liquor The ghosts of Yankees past are store in Nassau or Suffolk)—and we heard currently on loan to the intimate Circle in the no sirens following us when we took Square Theatre, where legends such as Babe it back home for a little nip just Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Mickey Mantle, Thurman Manson before bedtime. and Joe DiMaggio come to life in a witty and heartwarming play centered around the iconic Yogi Berra, whose love of the Yankees is only surpassed by his devotion to his wife Carmen. Bronx Bombers (opening Feb. 6) begins with a tense scene in a Boston hotel room one day after megalomaniac Reggie Jackson’s epic dugout blowup with manager Billy Martin at Fenway Park. The aloof Berra, played brilliantly by Peter Scolari (Bosom Buddies, Newhart), appears rattled and calls a meeting with Munson, Jackson and Martin. The audience is then invited into Berra’s dreams, where his brethren come together to bicker, laugh and inspire. All the while, Berra looks on quietly before his long-simmering emotions pour out in a fiery, impassioned speech. Bombers is replete with Berra’s adorable “Yogisms,” a brilliant feast (featuring hot dogs; what else?), a beautiful love story, and a front-row seat into baseball heaven that reminds us why this is America’s favorite pastime. 

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SATURDAY NIGHT DANCE PARTIES

A whole lotta bumpin’ and grindin’ to celebrity DJs spinnin’ the most infectious Hip Hop, House and Rock, every Saturday night! The Emporium, 9 Railroad Ave., Patchogue. theemporiumny. com $15 fellas/$10 ladies. 9:30 p.m. Every Saturday Night

Long Island Press Event Listings for February 2014

BRINGING HUMAN RIGHTS HOME

Amnesty International resurrects its Human Rights Concert series for the first time since 1998, attracting an unprecedented lineup including The Flaming Lips, Imagine Dragons, Cold War Kids, The Fray, Ms. Lauryn Hill, Tegan and Sara, Cake, Colbie Caillat, Madonna, Pussy Riot and many more! Barclays Center, 620 Atlantic Ave., Brooklyn. barclayscenter.com $54.50-$255. 8 p.m. February 5

PENGUIN ENCOUNTERS

ROSIE O’DONNELL

The multi-Emmy Award-winning TV, theater and movie star, celebrity blogger, New York Times-bestselling author and outspoken LGBT activist brings her hilarious, in-your-face brand of comedy to these special appearances, guaranteeing nonstop laughs and truly unforgettable nights! Governor’s, 90 Division Ave., Levittown. govs.com $40-$70. February 8 & 9

Celebrate the Reggae legend’s birthday with ultra-rare footage of the Wailers’ first practice and a young Marley back home in Jamaica, singing songs and strumming his guitar way before he was famous. Jammin’! Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington. cinemaartscentre.org $10 members/$15 public. 7:30 p.m. February 6

STEVE EARLE Solo and acoustic, the multi-Grammy

The Polar Vortex is a summer walk in the park for these uber-cute flightless birds! This 45-minute interactive experience allows tikes and adults to get up-close-and-personal with these fascinating creatures, meet and even pet the baby African penguins! Oh, how they swim, waddle, feed and shake those tail feathers! Long Island Aquarium & Exhibition Center, 431 E. Main St., Riverhead. longislandaquarium. com $50 plus Aquarium admission. Daily: M-F 1:30 p.m., Wknds 1:30 & 3:30 p.m. Daily through February

THE FAB FOUR:

THE ULTIMATE TRIBUTE Paul, Ringo, John and George are celebrating the eve of the 50th anniversary of their historic appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show with this show-stopping performance at the ’Mount, mop-toppin’ through all the hits from their pivotal years, complete with costume changes. Expect pure Beatlemania unrestrained, and hopefully “Octopus’ Garden,” Blackbird,” “Rocky Raccoon” and “Long, Long, Long.” Not to be missed! The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $20, $25, $30, $50. 8 p.m. February 8

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BOB MARLEY: THE MAKING OF A LEGEND

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Award winner will be performing songs spanning his nearly 30-year career as well as raw, intimate versions of gems from his latest, The Low Highway. With Brooklynite-by-way-of-Louisville singer/songwriter Dawn Landes, who’ll be serenading numbers off her latest, Bluebird. The Space at Westbury, 250 Post Ave., Westbury. thespaceatwestbury.com $35, $50. 8 p.m. February 8

HOPS & PROPS CRAFT BEER FESTIVAL Enjoy unlimited craft beer samples from more than 50 micro-

breweries spanning LI and the nation while admiring priceless antique planes, helicopters and even spacecraft and learning about the Island’s rich aviation history! Feast on platters from many local restaurants! Meet the brew masters! Smoke some premium cigars! Yes, yes, yes! There’ll be music, souvenir beer glasses and even a Beer Bus to get you to and fro safely! Not-to-be missed! Cradle of Aviation Museum, 51 Charles Lindbergh Blvd., Garden City.cradleofaviation.org $65 online/$75 DOS. $20 designated drivers. 7-10 p.m. February 8


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IMAGINE: JOHN LENNON

BRANDI GLANVILLE

A CONVERSATION WITH NOBEL PEACE LAUREATE JODY WILLIAMS

Two hundred and forty hours of John & Yoko’s personal videos mesh together to form an intimate and moving collage of the Beatles legend’s life, accompanied afterward by a discussion. Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington. cinemaartscentre.org $10 members/$15 public. 7:30 p.m. February 12

The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills star will be signing copies of her new relationship guide Drinking and Dating: P.S. Social Media is Ruining Romance, which chronicles her dating misadventures and bedroom escapades in the wake of her divorce from actor Eddie Cibrian. Book Revue, 313 New York Ave., Huntington. bookrevue.com 7 p.m. February 12

THE PSYCHIC SISTERS Mediums Jolene Paterson and Linda West will communi-

Join the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize winner whose tireless efforts led to the international banning of landmines in an interactive discussion, wine and cheese reception and book signing of her memoir My Name Is Jody Williams: A Vermont Girl’s Winding Path to the Nobel Peace Prize. Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington. cinemaartscentre.org $10 advance/$15 door. 7 p.m. February 10

cate with attendees’ deceased loved ones, offering guidance and hope, with proceeds benefiting The Marcie Mazzola Foundation, whose mission is to “help better the lives of abused and at-risk children.” Spiritual guidance for a great cause? Tough to beat. YMCA Boulton Center, 37 W. Main St., Bay Shore. boultoncenter.org $50. 7:30 p.m. February 13

SHPONGLETRON 3.0

A sensory explosion of sound experimentation punctuated by Moroccan drums, acoustic guitars, silver flute, double bass, Turkish operatic singing, cello, backing vocals and traditional sounds, melded together and set on fire by Simon Posford (aka Hallucinogen). Yeah. The Space at Westbury, 250 Post Ave., Westbury. thespaceatwestbury.com $29.50, $35. 8 p.m. February 13

BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S

Fall in love this Valentine’s Day, not just with your main squeeze, but the classic that encapsulates the craziness and romanticism of love itself. Afterward, enjoy chocolates, champagne, wine , live music by harpist Skyla Budd, long-stem roses and a romantic photo together in the Sky Room! Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington. cinemaartscentre.org $15 members/$20 public. 7:30 p.m. February 14

Whether you’re devoid of a significant other to snuggle with or find public brawling romantic, this is an unforgettable Valentine’s Day Massacre matchup guaranteed to turn this special day on its heels and begging for mercy! The main event: Undefeated Chris Algieri ”The Pride of Huntington” challenges world-ranked Baltimore native Emanuel “The Tranzformer” Taylor in a grudge match broadcast live on ESPN Friday Night Fights! The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny. com $50, $60, $100, $150, $200. 7:30 p.m. February 14

LET’S EAT: FOOD ON FILM

THE QUEERS

Forget roses. Forget hand-holding, lovey-dovey smooching and PDAs. Forget love. Choose punk rock. This is an insanely rare, do-not-miss “Death to Valentine’s Day” gig for all the jaded, broken-hearted and anti-social misfit romantics whose hearts are just too damn big to find perfect matches for. Two sets, with Love Songs for the Retarded performed in its entirety. Tell Joe and Jug Head Peter Chin sent ya! Insane. With Night Birds & The Scandals. Mercury Lounge, 217 E. Houston St., Manhattan. mercuryloungenyc. com $15 per set; $25 for both. 7 & 11 p.m. February 15

ROCKIN’ FIGHTS 12

MARC ANTHONY

Two of the best things in life converge in a cinematic gastrointestinal smorgasbord of local dishes paired with featured food from each film, including Miso Vegetable Chowder, Veggie Sliders, Pasta Pomodoro and brownies, among others, along with a guest speaker to serve up some delectable data about the feast! Yum! Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington. cinemaartscentre. org $40 advance members/$50 public/$55 DOS. 6:30 p.m. February 16

The Grammy Award-winning Latin crooner returns home. Barclays Center, 620 Atlantic Ave., Brooklyn. barclayscenter.com $65-$185. 8 p.m. February 15

governors is comedy

gift cards available

the biggest names in all of comedy, coming to a club near you! reserve your tickets now online before they’re gone!

tom cotter

@ governors friday, 2/7 @ mcguires sunday, 2/9 @ governors saturday, 2/22

joey kola

@ the brokerage in bellmore one night only friday, 2/28

michael che

dan soder c

jim florentine

steve rannazzizi

@ the brokerage in bellmore friday, 2/7 saturday, 2/8

@ governors friday, 3/7 @ mcguires saturday, 3/8

visit our websites for a complete listing of upcoming shows & to buy tickets online 44

@ m guires in bohemia friday, 2/7 saturday, 2/8

@ governors in levittown one night only saturday, 3/8 governor’s 90 Division Ave., Levittown (Behind Tri-County Shop Center)

rosie o’donnell

“vinny g &vinnyfriends” guadagnino

chris distefano

ted alexandro c

vic dibitetto

dave coulier

sebastian maniscalco c

charlie murphy

@ governors in levittown saturday, 2/8 ut! 2/9 sold osunday,

@ the brokerage in bellmore one night only friday, 3/28 the brokerage 2797 Merrick Rd, Bellmore (Corner of Bellmore Ave)

from jersey shore! @ mcguires wednesday, 2/12

@ governors in levittown one night only friday, 3/28

mcguire’s 1627 Smithtown Ave, Bohemia (Across from The Holiday Inn)

516-731-3358 516-781-LAFF 631-467-5413 5

2 3 3

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GOVERNORS COmEdy

dATE: 2-01-14 Publication: LI Press Size: 8.75 x 2.719 (¼ Page Horizontal)

@ governors in levittown friday, 2/14 saturday, 2/15

@ m guires thursday, 4/3 @ governors fri 4/4-sun 4/6

@ m guires in bohemia friday, 2/14 saturday, 2/15

@ governors in levittown one night only saturday, 4/12

www.govs.com


Salvatore Ranieri, a Board Certified Hypnotherapist and a member of I.A.C.T (International Association of Therapists and Councilors) has developed a very effective way of helping people to quit smoking by using Hypnosis and a technique he developed called “The Age of Innocence.”

(Q) So what makes your technique so different from any other Hypnotist who claims to be able to get people to quit Smoking? (SR) It’s simple, using my method the client comes out of Hypnosis feeling as if he or she never smoked at all. They go back to their natural state of being a non–smoker. Thus the name “Age of Innocence”; and because of this, they have no cravings, nor do they feel the urge to ever smoke again. (Q) Makes sense, but what happens if in time the Hypnosis starts to wear off? (SR) I am a not a Hypnotist. I am a Hypnotherapist. This means I go the distance and don’t just put a spell on people which will wear off in time like most Hypnotists do.

Being trained and experienced on how addictions affect the mind, I fully understand that my clients will be challenged over and over once they leave my seminar. This is why I teach my clients how to Self-Hypnotize, so they will have the ability to help themselves stay non-smokers. (Q) Is it true not everyone can be hypnotized? (SR) No, anyone can be Hypnotized as long as they wish to be. It is a two way street. The client must want to be helped and at the same time be able to follow basic verbal commands. (Q) I remember watching a T.V. show where this lady was Hypnotized and Hypnotist started to make her do all kinds of crazy embarrassing things. Will this happen to me if I get Hypnotized? (SR) No. Absolutely not, those shows you see on T.V. are all staged acts. You are always completely in control during Hypnosis and will never do or say anything that will make you uncomfortable. (Q) How long are the seminars? Do you limit the amount of people who want to attend? (SR) My seminars on average run for about ninety minutes and they are limited to only twenty five people per seminar. I like to be able to give my clients the attention they need, so keeping it limited allows me to do so.

TM©RUG1986

Newly developed Hypnos-technique that’s working wonders for Smokers comes to Long Island

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(Q) When and where will you be on Long Island and how will people who are trying to quit smoking be able to get info on your next seminars?

Pure Mind, Pure Body, Hypnotherapy

purembhypnotherapy.com Sal Ranieri 516 324-6246

QUITTING SMOKING SEMINARS ROCKVILLE CENTER INN, LONG ISLAND Saturday, February 22 2:00 pm- 5:00pm Sunday, February 23 2:00 pm- 5:00pm

Call for more info or visit our website for full details on attending.

Telecharge.com | 212.239.6200 OMAJESTIC THEATRE, 247 West 44th Street

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MR. BEERY’S BAND BATTLE TO END CYSTIC FIBROSIS

BILL BURR

Twenty five bands spanning a variety of musical genres will be rocking out all day and night to raise attention and much-needed funds to end cystic fibrosis. Now in its 18th year, this mega-music fest also features food and drink specials, prizes, gifts, and a raffle that will include BBQs, computers and a brand-new Fender electric guitar! The Band Battle is not only the perfect event to hear some of the best New York, Long Island and outof-state bands, but also help find a cure to this unforgiving disease (Mr. Beery has raised between $7,000 and $20,000 per event toward the cause)! Come show your support and celebrate music and life! This annual mustwitness event is not-to-be-missed. Mr. Beery’s, 4019 Hempstead Turnpike, Bethpage. mrbeerys.com $10. All day, all night, starting at noon. February 16

RINGLING BROS. BARNUM & BAILEY CIRCUS LEGENDS

The standup funnyman, actor and host of Bill Burr’s Monday Morning Podcast will unleash his comedic fury upon all those in attendance, leaving them gasping for air while they laugh and yelp uncontrollably amid his hilarious observations on dating, sports, politics and life in general. Yes, he’s that funny. NYCB Theatre at Westbury, 960 Brush Hollow Rd., Westbury. thetheatreatwestbury.com $29.50 & $39.50. 8 p.m. February 19

TAJ MAHAL TRIO

The legendary blues and roots multiinstrumentalist will be performing songs spanning his more than 45-year career creating some of the most moving and varied musical visions ever conjured. This is one of those rare shows that must be experienced to be believed. Your life and those of all who you meet in the future will be that much more enriched because of your attendance. Not an exaggeration. YMCA Boulton Center for the Performing Arts, 37 W. Main St., Bay Shore. boultoncenter.org $75, $80. 8 p.m. February 19

BETWEEN THE BURIED & ME

Heavy metal chaotic nirvana at its loudest and finest. With Deafheaven, Intronaut and The Kindred. The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $18, $20, $38. 7:30 p.m. February 21

This brand-new show involves daring death-defying feats, unbelievable demonstrations of super-human strength and strange, mysterious creatures—such as a unicorn, Pegasus and Woolly Mammoth—along with tons of mesmerizing acrobatics, trapeze acts, choreography, elephants, saber-toothed lions, tigers, cheetahs and even gymnastic kangaroos and baby pigs! Don’t forget the clowns! Tons of fun for the whole family! Barclays Center, 620 Atlantic Ave., Brooklyn. barclayscenter.com $30, $60, $85. 10:30 & 11 a.m., 3 & 7 p.m. February 20 through March 2

BOB WEIR & RATDOG

The former Grateful Dead rhythm guitarist and former bassist Rob Wasserman keep the legendary band’s music alive for future generations of Dead Heads, delivering a ferocious mix of classics sprinkled with covers and originals. Jerry would be proud. Phish fans, if you haven’t experienced Ratdog live you are surely missing out. So get your dance on, bro. NYCB Theatre at Westbury, 960 Brush Hollow Rd., Westbury. thetheatreatwestbury.com $39.50 & $49.50. 7:30 p.m. February 21 & 22

THINK BIG. THINK STABLE. THINK AN AVERAGE ANNUAL SALARY OF $60,000+!

THINK MARTIN-BROWER.

CDL Drivers – Class A $750 SIGN-ON BONUS! Payable after 90 days of employment. Requirements include a current, valid Class A CDL driver’s license; the ability to frequently lift and/or move up to 50 lbs./occasionally lift and/or move up to 85 lbs.; minimum 1 year of safe commercial driving experience or equivalent experience in the military; and the ability to work any shift and set of days, including holidays. Martin-Brower offers competitive wages and benefits, 401(k) and retirement plan, home daily, free uniforms, safety shoe allowance, and onboard computers. Must pass road test, background check, drug test and medical exam.

Learn more and apply at www.mbhires.com or call 1-877-MB-HIRES. AAP, EEO, M/F/H/D/V, Drug-Free Workplace. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential function of a position.

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KANYE WEST

THE PRINCESS BRIDE

The cult classic hits the “Big Screen” in all its gushy glory, accompanied by a delicious sampling of local craft beers from Great South Bay Brewery! YMCA Boulton Center for the Performing Arts, 37 W. Main St., Bay Shore. boultoncenter.org $8. 7:30 p.m. February 26

The Yeezus Tour hits the Coliseum—Yeezianity disciples will surely follow—but will the Jesus Christ lookalike!? Only one sure way to find out! Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, 1255 Hempstead Tpke., Uniondale. nassaucoliseum.com $39.50, $74.50, $104.50, $150. 8 p.m. February 23

THE TOASTERS

These ska pioneers headline a mega-ska-surf-rock-punk-reggae fest guaranteed to get you up and a-skankin’! With Mrs. Skannotto, The Pandemics & The Shipwrecks. 89 North, 89 N. Ocean Ave., Patchogue. 89northmusic.com $12 GA/$22 seated. Doors 5 p.m. February 23

DONOVAN: RARE CLIPS (1964-1970S)

Archival TV performance footage, promotional clips and early live concerts transport viewers on the complex musical journey that is this influential Scottish Rock and Roll Hall of Famer’s storied career, including “Catch the Wind,” “Colours” and “You’re Gonna Need Somebody When I’m Gone,” among many others. Guest speaker Bill Shelley will host a discussion afterward. Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington. cinemaartscentre.org $10 members/$15 public. 7:30 p.m. February 25

JOHN EDWARD

The acclaimed psychic medium, lecturer and author will be “Coming Home” to connect those in attendance with deceased family members, friends and loved ones. Will he be able to tell us when the Polar Vortex will return to the North Pole, for good, though? Probably not. The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $100, $150, $225. 7:30 p.m. February 25

STEPHEN MALKMUS & THE JICKS

Indie singer/guitar god of Pavement infamy. With Disappears. Bowery Ballroom, 6 Delancey St., Manhattan. boweryballroom.com $25 ADV/$30 DOS. February 26 (Music Hall of Williamsburg with Endless Boogie February 27)

WAR HORSE

A National Theatre Live performance complete with life-sized galloping horse puppets that have been winning over audiences worldwide, this timeless tale of a boy and his horse’s love and survival is not to be missed! Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington. cinemaartscentre.org $20 members/$25 public. 2 p.m. (Also March 6 at 7 p.m.) February 27

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DELGUIDICE MIKE BIRBIGLIA MIKE & BIG SHOT

Whether you’ve laughed uncontrollably watching one of his three Comedy Central specials, listening to any of his highly praised, equally hilarious comedy albums, his New York Times-bestselling book Sleepwalk With Me & Other Painfully True Stories, during his movie of the same name, or had the good fortune of experiencing his standup comedy and theatrical routine live, you know that Birbiglia is synonymous with uproarious, side-splitting hilarity. Expect the award-winning funnyman to crank it up a notch at this Win gig, and your belly to hurt the next day tickets to from laughing so damn hard. Not-to-be this show! missed! NYCB Theatre at Westbury, To enter, email contests@ 960 Brush Hollow Rd., Westbury. longislandpress.com thetheatreatwestbury.com $39.50. 7:30 with the subject “Mike p.m. February 27 Birbiglia Tickets.”

Since Billy’s doing a residency at MSG for the next several months and tickets are expensive and uber-hard to come by, this is the next-best thing! Hey, they’re the only BJ tribute band with members of The Kid’s band, and they’ll be playing his hits, not the obscure stuff he’s cranking out in the city! The Emporium, 9 Railroad Ave., Patchogue. theemporiumny.com $10 ADV/$15 DOS. 9:30 p.m. February 28

JOEY KOLA

The veteran funnyman, and Bethpage Best of LI 2014 Best Comedian, will be inciting uncontrollable, “I-can’t-breathe” laughter and ear-to-ear smiles from all those in attendance that will continue long after this can’t-miss gig! Hilarious! The Brokerage, 2797 Merrick Rd., Bellmore. govs.com $22. 8 p.m. February 28

DEEPAK CHOPRA

GET THE LED OUT BAND OF HORSES Fresh off their latest Grammy win for Best Rock Album, The Almighty Led Zeppelin—Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones and John Bonham—hit the ‘Mount for an intimate gig showcasing the virtuosity and absolute power that has defined their career for the past 45 years! Hey, a blurb writer can dream, right!? While not the Real McCoys, these boys, known as “The American Led Zeppelin,” will tear through Zep’s unparalleled canon, and yes, they will rock. Expect “Whole Lotta Love,” “Heartbreaker,” “Stairway To Heaven,” among many more classics. Will they attempt the violin-bow madness of “Dazed And Confused”? Or the crushingly brutal sadness that haunts “Tea For One”!? As I said, a blurb-writer can sure as hell dream. The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $24.50, $34.50, $50. 8 p.m. February 28

Intoxicatingly infectious indie rock darlings, all-acoustic. With Sera Cahoone. The Town Hall, 123 W. 43rd St., Manhattan. thetownhall. org $40. 8 p.m. February 28

The holistic health/ New Age mega-guru and author will be sharing his alternative medicine knowledge to audience members in an intimate appearance poised to inform and inspire. NYCB Theatre at Westbury, 960 Brush Hollow Rd., Westbury. thetheatreatwestbury. com $59.50 7:30 p.m. February 28

For more event listings go to LongIslandPress.com

Correction Nightlife & Spirits

BEST Irish Bar 1. Lily Flanagan’s Pub Babylon

345 Deer Park Ave., Babylon. 631-539-0816. lilyflanaganspub.com From St. Paddy’s to St. Baldrick’s, the days and nights all go better at Lily Flanagan’s Pub of Babylon, the perfect place for being Irish, thinking Irish and wishing you were Irish. Or, just hanging out with the Irish. Its welcoming staff, tasty food, good cheer and great drinks add up to a wonderful time where the Gaelic vibe feels just right. Erin go bragh!

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PUBLIC NOTICE OF COUNTY TREASURER’S SALE OF TAX LIENS ON REAL ESTATE Notice is hereby given that I shall on February 18, 2014, and the succeeding days, beginning at 10:00 o’ clock in the morning in the Legislative Chamber, First Floor, Theodore Roosevelt Executive and Legislative Building, 1550 Franklin Avenue, Mineola, Nassau County, New York, sell at public auction the tax liens on real estate herein-after described, unless the owner, mortgagee, occupant of or any other party-in-interest in such real estate shall pay to the County Treasurer by February 14, 2014 the total amount of such unpaid taxes or assessments with the interest, penalties and other expenses and charges, against the property. Such tax liens will be sold at the lowest rate of interest, not exceeding 10 per cent per six month’s period, for which any person or persons shall offer to take the total amount of such unpaid taxes as defined in section 5-37.0 of the Nassau County Administrative Code. As required by section 5-44.0 of Nassau County Administrative Code, the County Treasurer shall charge a registration fee of $100.00 per day to each person who shall seek to bid at the public auction defined above. The liens are for arrears of School District taxes for the year 2012 - 2013 and/or County, Town, and Special District taxes for the year 2013. The following is a partial listing of the real estate located in school district number(s) 203, 6, 4 in the Town of Oyster Bay only, upon which tax liens are to be sold, with a brief description of the same by reference to the County Land and Tax Map, the name of the owner or occupant as the same appears on the 2014/2015 tentative assessment roll, and the total amount of such unpaid taxes. IMPORTANT THE NAMES OF OWNERS SHOWN ON THIS LIST MAY NOT NECESSARILY BE THE NAMES OF THE PERSONS OWNING THE PROPERTY AT THE TIME OF THIS ADVERTISEMENT. SUCH NAMES HAVE BEEN TAKEN FROM THE 2014/2015 TENTATIVE ASSESSMENT ROLLS AND MAY DIFFER FROM THE NAMES OF THE OWNERS AT THE TIME OF PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. IT MAY ALSO BE THAT SUCH OWNERS ARE NOMINAL ONLY AND ANOTHER PERSON IS ACTUALLY THE BENEFICIAL OWNER. NameAmount ParcelGroup Lot WINSTON EVE STRAUSMAN  9,458.94 23 B 03640 MORSE JOHN & KATHLEEN  24,706.01 23 B 04690 DEPASQUALE JOHN  24,064.58 23 K 05750 575,626 BAST CHARLES & W207.06 23 K 06660 OLSON DONNA 20,402.91 23 K 07050 GRAHAM CATHLEEN & GRAHAM GORDON  3,558.97 23070 00140 KOSOFF STEVEN & HELENE  10,009.77 24024 00120 12 ZAHRINGER ANNE C & GEORGE J III 4,751.66 29 J 02080 FOX BRUCE R & VICTORIA  3,248.09 29 M 13950 DELROSARIO JUSTIN & DANA SCHILL 8,376.49 29 M 14050 KIEMLE MACHE RACE TRUST 1,792.23 29 M0200030 TREPETA LIVING TRUST  20,024.45 29 R0102620 COHEN MICHAEL & JOANNE  5,453.40 29 R0211520 1152 OLSON PETER W & DONNA M 8,954.36 29 R0211660 OLSON PETER W & DONNA

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M 17,288.02 29 R0211670 RIVARDO DONNA M & WAYNE 30,873.60 29 R0211780 FITZGERALD BRIAN J & MARY 32,492.16 29 R0302780 FROST MILL INC  172,969.96 29 R0303050 PASTER MARY ROSE  1,613.31 29001 00230 DE RANCY JAMES & M  700.62 29002 00330 O T S ASSOCIATES INC  364.44 29039 03130 313-321 MICRO LEASING 7,648.99 29040 03480 CATALFO LE MARIE DALLI, A & L 1,353.79 29063 04300 430 DELORENZO ETAL ANTHONY 2,694.86 29068 00180 HANSTON HOMES LTD  18,683.88 30 B 08010 RAYMOND L ENGEL & PAUL  28,029.22 30 B 12450 1245 ZACK I LLC & ZACK II LLC  44,684.60 30 B 12560 1256 MC CULLY ROBERT  28,213.90 30 F 03370 ESPOSITO WILLIAM A & KIEM 11,521.28 30 F 03540 354-355 NISSEQUOGUE REALTY GROUP LLC 9,657.64

30 G 04150 STIMOLA LE S BALES ETAL, EVELYN 6,012.29 30 H 00120 BROACH R MOHRING & KATHY 1,604.01 30 H 00560 56,155,157 BRESSEL BERND ELIZABETH 1,051.61 30 K 03640 DELLAQUILA MICHAEL & KELLY A 5,221.52 30 M 01620 CHAMBERLAIN JOHN  13,133.80 30 M 01640 HUTTON JANE 9,070.95 30007 01420 GALLO JOHN & GALLO AUGUSTINO  2,422.62 30016 01080 GALLO AUGUSTINO  1,870.52 30016 01090 29 BIRCH STREET LLC  16,925.11 30019 01030 103-104,205 NORTH GROVE ENTERPRISES INC  32,765.77 30020 00170 17-18 GROSS & RAMIREZ REALTY LTD 8,160.72 30022 00340 34-35 BROWN JOSEPH 1,062.98 30022 00570 57-58 ZAND LLC 24,255.03 30027 01100 110-112 PETRUZZIELLO L E L PETRUZZIELLO  3,545.21 30030 00770 77-78 DEARING GERALD  24,975.84 30045 00150 15-17 DALY KEVIN & KATHLEEN  30,364.64 30046 00230 APPEL JOCELYN & STEPHEN 22,145.97 30055 00190 ARDI STEVEN R & CARLA  12,196.84 30068 00380 MINOGUE JR JAMES J & MARY ELLEN  32,423.02 30084 00070 KARAGEORGIOU PETER & JOANNA  43,493.17 30084 00420 MINKOFF LAWRENCE A & DIANE B  16,895.77 30086 00170 COLEMAN ALEXANDER P  192.70 30089 00160 Town of Oyster Bay School: 6 Bayville SCOTT SIOBHAN 955.58 28004 00260 26-27 SCHETTINI FRANCIS D & MARY A 902.16 28004 00550 MUZIO JOHN 6,242.98 28018 00090 DUNN ROSEMARY R  5,250.94 28034 03450 SCHNEIDER ANDREW & YVESMAY 3,315.04 28037 01040 104-105 PACIFICO BEVERLY  4,681.19 28042 00010 1-4 KAPPEL MARY 1,037.97 28049 00710 71-74 DERIZIOTIS IRENE2,720.70 28072 00040 TEAGUE HOWARD C  10,845.34 28075 00040 4

R & R MOHRING ENTERPRISES INC 3,959.05 29 D 00100 10-15,21-26 CAMERA JERRY & CARMELA 2,669.28 29 D050018018-19,28-29 ARENA STEVEN & MARIA  1,186.18 29 D0800180 18-21 BARRY JAMES & ROSEMARY 743.92 29 D1201280 128-129 262 BAYVILLE AVENUE CORP 22,678.35 29 G 02310 231-232 GIUSTI JOHN E 2,110.09 29 G 02390 FLANAGAN MICHAEL V & VIRGINIA D  4,221.19 29007 00360 36-37 SPERANDEI LAWRENCE & SARAH 1,495.12 29007 00460 46-48 MACDONALD CINDY  1,029.55 29009 00420 SALTARELLI VINCENT & FRANCES 258.32 29009 03670 SALTARELLI VINCENT & FRANCES 274.64 29009 03710 DEBORAH GELFMAN TRUST  1,088.28 29012 00830 83-84 DEBORAH GELFMAN TRUST  311.97 29012 01630 ALESSI JAMES F & SUSAN B 632.77 29013 00250 ALESSI JAMES F & SUSAN B 650.96 29013 00260 26-27 MORTON DOUGLAS & MORTON LEONOR4,772.72 29018 01140 BRACKENRIDGE STEVEN  906.62 29020 01820 MARCARIO FRANK 2,412.06 29021 01920 BLAHA ROBERT & ELEANOR  1,779.79 29021 01990 PEDONE CHRISTINE  6,483.64 29024 00140 LUISI ANTHONY & CATHERINE 10,193.73 29024 00150 FINN WILLIAM G 2,029.20 29028 00250 BEBRY JANET 660.04 29033 01150 PORRELLO MARY 9,427.97 29054 03580 CHILKO LE K & L KOCH, PAULINE 4,221.42 29059 00800 80 DECESARE ANGELA  7,619.21 29062 05820 RUSSO EUGENE & MARIANNE 7,448.71 29071 00040 BLUE CHIP AERO SERVICES LTD  13,790.71 29073 00050 FULMER JR GEORGE T & SILVANA M  10,525.78 29073 00120 RAINERI LORRAINE  1,757.25 29079 00020 2 LEE DONNA 7,219.27 29080 00140 14 LUCRETIA MARTINO TRUST  1,163.35 29080 00220

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R H SPITTEL POST 1285 20,311.99 29082 00060 6 MANTEGARI M T STRECKER & C 7,068.48 29083 00320 ROSBORG ROBERT & LINDA 8,499.89 29084 00120 BARTOLOTTO KEVIN & DOROTHY &  1,549.49 29084 00160 SOBRERO JILL 2,416.51 29088 00050 DANNEBAUM WILLIAM & ANNE 571.27 29090 00090 MINICOZZI WILLIAM JR TRUST 2,336.01 29101 00040 VIVONA ESTATES INC  19,222.52 29103 00010 EHRLER ROGER K & JOYCE A 9,819.85 29103 00180 Town of Oyster Bay School:203 Roslyn UFSD CALO JOHN & ROCCO  9,768.07 20 G 05860 LIPA 516.41 3030203700 80 PU 07000 TERMS OF SALE Such tax liens shall be sold subject to any and all superior tax liens of sovereignties and other municipalities and to all claims of record which the County may have thereon and subject to the provisions of the Federal and State Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Civil Relief Acts. However, such tax liens shall have priority over the County’s Differential Interest Lien, representing the excess, if any, of the interest and penalty borne at the maximum rate over the interest and penalty borne at the rate at which the lien is purchased. The Purchaser acknowledges that the tax lien(s) sold pursuant to these Terms of Sale may be subject to pending bankruptcy proceedings and/or may become subject to such proceedings which may be commenced during the period in which a tax lien is held by a successful bidder or the assignee of same, which may modify a Purchaser’s rights with respect to the lien(s) and the property securing same. Such bankruptcy proceedings shall not affect the validity of the tax lien. In addition to being subject to pending bankruptcy proceedings and/ or the Federal and State Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Civil Relief Acts, said purchaser’s right of foreclosure may be affected by the Financial

Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act (FIRREA) ,12 U.S.C. ss 1811 et.seq., with regard to real property under Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation(FDIC) receivership. The County Treasurer reserves the right, without further notice and at any time, to withdraw from sale any of the parcels of land or premises herein listed. The Nassau County Treasurer reserves the right to intervene in any bankruptcy case/litigation where the property affected by the tax liens sold by the Treasurer is part of the bankruptcy estate. However,it is the sole responsibility of all tax lien purchasers to protect their legal interests in any bankruptcy case affecting their purchased tax lien, including but not limited to the filing of a proof of claim on their behalf, covering their investment in said tax lien. The Nassau County Treasurer and Nassau County and its agencies, assumes no responsibility for any legal representation of any tax lien purchaser in any legal proceeding including but not limited to a bankruptcy case where the purchased tax lien is at risk. The rate of interest and penalty at which any person purchases the tax lien shall be established by his bid. Each purchaser, immediately after the sale thereof, shall pay to the County Treasurer ten per cent of the amount for which the tax liens have been sold and the remaining ninety per cent within thirty days after such sale. If the purchaser at the tax sale shall fail to pay the remaining ninety per cent within ten days after he has been notified by the County Treasurer that the certificates of sale are ready for delivery, then all amounts deposited with the County Treasurer including but not limited to the ten per cent theretofore paid by him shall, without further notice or demand, be irrevocably forfeited by the purchaser and shall be retained by the County Treasurer as liquidated damages and the agreement to purchase shall be of no further effect. Time is of the essence in this sale. This sale is held pursuant to the Nassau County Administrative Code and interested parties are referred to such Code for additional information as to terms of the sale, rights of purchasers, maximum rates of interest and other legal incidents of the sale. This list includes only tax


liens on real estate located in the Town of Oyster Bay. Such other tax liens on real estate are advertised as follows: Town of Hempstead Dist 1001 HEMPSTEAD/UNIONDALE TIMES, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEW YORK TREND, NEWSDAY INC., UNIONDALE BEACON, Dist 1002 HEMPSTEAD/UNIONDALE TIMES, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., UNIONDALE BEACON, Dist 1003 EAST MEADOW BEACON, EAST MEADOW HERALD, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEIGHBOR NEWSPAPERS NEWSDAY INC., Dist 1004 BELLMORE HERALD/LIFE MERRICK/BELLMORE TRIBUNE, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., Dist 1005 HICKSVILLE ILLUSTRATED NEWS, LEVITTOWN TRIBUNE, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEIGHBOR NEWSPAPERS NEWSDAY INC., Dist 1006 NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., SEAFORD/WANTAGH CITIZEN, Dist 1007 BELLMORE HERALD/LIFE MERRICK/BELLMORE TRIBUNE, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEIGHBOR NEWSPAPERS NEWSDAY INC., Dist 1008 BALDWIN/FREEPORT TRIBUNE, LONG ISLAND GRAPHIC, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., POINT OF VIEW, Dist 1009 BALDWIN/FREEPORT TRIBUNE, FREEPORT BALDWIN LEADER, THE, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., POINT OF VIEW, Dist 1010 BALDWIN HERALD BALDWIN/FREEPORT TRIBUNE, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., Dist 1011 NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., OCEANSIDE TRIBUNE OCEANSIDE/ISLAND PARK HERALD, Dist 1012

MALVERNE/WEST HEMPSTEAD HERALD, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., VALLEY STREAM/MALVERN TRIBUNE, Dist 1013 NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., VALLEY STREAM HERALD, VALLEY STREAM/MALVERN TRIBUNE, Dist 1014 FIVE TOWNS TRIBUNE, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NASSAU HERALD (FIVE TOWNS), NEWSDAY INC., Dist 1015 FIVE TOWNS JEWISH TIMES FIVE TOWNS TRIBUNE, JEWISH STAR, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., Dist 1016 FRANKLIN SQ/ELMONT HERALD, FRANKLIN SQUARE BULLETIN, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., Dist 1017 FRANKLIN SQ/ELMONT HERALD, FRANKLIN SQUARE BULLETIN, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEW HYDE PARK ILLUSTRATED NEWS, NEWSDAY INC., Dist 1018 GARDEN CITY LIFE, GARDEN CITY NEWS, GARDEN CITY TRIBUNE, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., Dist 1019 EAST ROCKAWAY TRIBUNE LYNBROOK/EAST ROCKAWAY HERALD, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., ROCKAWAY JOURNAL, Dist 1020 LYNBROOK/EAST ROCKAWAY HERALD, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., ROCKVILLE CENTRE HERALD, Dist 1021 NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., ROCKVILLE CENTRE HERALD, ROCKVILLE CENTRE TRIBUNE Dist 1022 FLORAL PARK BULLETIN, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., THE GATEWAY, Dist 1023 NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., SEAFORD/WANTAGH CITIZEN, Dist 1024

NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., VALLEY STREAM HERALD, VALLEY STREAM/MALVERN TRIBUNE, Dist 1025 MERRICK HERALD/LIFE MERRICK/BELLMORE TRIBUNE, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., Dist 1026 HICKSVILLE ILLUSTRATED NEWS, LEVITTOWN TRIBUNE, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., Dist 1027 MALVERNE/WEST HEMPSTEAD HERALD, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., WEST HEMPSTEAD BEACON, Dist 1028 LONG BEACH HERALD LONG BEACH TRIBUNE, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., Dist 1029 MERRICK HERALD/LIFE MERRICK/BELLMORE TRIBUNE, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., Dist 1030 NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., VALLEY STREAM HERALD, VALLEY STREAM/MALVERN TRIBUNE, Dist 1031 ISLAND PARK TRIBUNE, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., OCEANSIDE/ISLAND PARK HERALD, Dist 1201 EAST MEADOW BEACON, EAST MEADOW HERALD, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., WESTBURY TIMES, Dist 1205 NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEW HYDE PARK ILLUSTRATED NEWS, NEWSDAY INC., WEST HEMPSTEAD BEACON, Town of North Hempstead Dist 2001 MINEOLA AMERICAN, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., WESTBURY TIMES, Dist 2002 MINEOLA AMERICAN, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., WILLISTON TIMES, WILLISTON,PARK EDITION Dist 2003 MANHASSET PRESS, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE,

NEWSDAY INC., ROSLYN NEWS, Dist 2004 NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., PORT WASHINGTON NEWS, Dist 2005 NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEW HYDE PARK HERALD COURIER, NEW HYDE PARK ILLUSTRATED NEWS, NEWSDAY INC., Dist 2006 MANHASSET PRESS, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., PORT WASHINGTON NEWS, Dist 2007 GREAT NECK NEWS, THE, GREAT NECK RECORD, JEWISH STAR, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., Dist 2009 MINEOLA AMERICAN, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., WILLISTON TIMES, WILLISTON,PARK EDITION Dist 2010 MINEOLA AMERICAN, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEW HYDE PARK ILLUSTRATED NEWS, NEWSDAY INC., Dist 2011 MINEOLA AMERICAN, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., WESTBURY TIMES, Dist 2122 FLORAL PARK BULLETIN, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., THE GATEWAY, Dist 2301 GLEN COVE RECORD PILOT, LOCUST VALLEY LEADER, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., Dist 2315 JERICHO NEWS JOURNAL, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., SYOSSET JERICHO TRIBUNE, Town of Oyster Bay Dist 3001 GLEN COVE RECORD PILOT, LOCUST VALLEY LEADER, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., Dist 3002 GLEN COVE RECORD PILOT, LOCUST VALLEY LEADER, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., Dist 3003 JERICHO NEWS JOURNAL, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., SYOSSET JERICHO TRIBUNE, Dist 3004 LOCUST VALLEY LEADER,

LONG ISLAND PRESS, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., Dist 3006 LOCUST VALLEY LEADER, LONG ISLAND PRESS, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., Dist 3008 NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., OYSTER BAY ENTERPRISE PILOT, OYSTER BAY GUARDIAN, Dist 3009 NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., OYSTER BAY ENTERPRISE PILOT, OYSTER BAY GUARDIAN, Dist 3011 NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., OYSTER BAY ENTERPRISE PILOT, SYOSSET ADVANCE, Dist 3012 NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., SYOSSET ADVANCE, SYOSSET JERICHO TRIBUNE, Dist 3013 NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., SYOSSET ADVANCE, SYOSSET JERICHO TRIBUNE, Dist 3014 JERICHO NEWS JOURNAL, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., SYOSSET JERICHO TRIBUNE, Dist 3015 JERICHO NEWS JOURNAL, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., SYOSSET JERICHO TRIBUNE, Dist 3017 HICKSVILLE ILLUSTRATED NEWS, HICKSVILLE/LEVITTOWN TRIBUNE, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., Dist 3018 BETHPAGE TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., PLAINVIEW/OLD BETHPAGE HERALD, Dist 3019 BETHPAGE NEWSGRAM, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., PLAINVIEW/OLD BETHPAGE HERALD, Dist 3020 BETHPAGE NEWSGRAM, BETHPAGE TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., Dist 3021 BETHPAGE NEWSGRAM, BETHPAGE TRIBUNE

NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., Dist 3022 FARMINGDALE OBSERVER, MASSAPEQUA POST NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., Dist 3023 MASSAPEQUA POST NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., THE MASSAPEQUAN OBSERVER, Dist 3024 GLEN COVE RECORD PILOT, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., THE GOLD COAST GAZETTE, Dist 3203 LONG ISLAND PRESS, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., ROSLYN NEWS, Dist 3306 FARMINGDALE OBSERVER, MASSAPEQUA POST NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., THE MASSAPEQUAN OBSERVER, City of Glen Cove City of Glen Cove Dist 4005 GLEN COVE RECORD PILOT, LOCUST VALLEY LEADER, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., THE GOLD COAST GAZETTE, City of Long Beach Dist 5028 LONG BEACH HERALD LONG BEACH TRIBUNE, NASSAU COUNTY WEB PAGE, NEWSDAY INC., Nassau County does not discriminate on the basis of disability in admission to or access to, or treatment or employment in, its services, programs, or activities. Upon request, accommodations such as those required by the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) will be provided to enable individuals with disabilities to participate in all services, programs, activities and public hearings and events conducted by the Treasurer’s Office. Upon request, information can be made available in braille, large print, audio tape or other alternative formats. For additional information, please call 571-2090 Ext. 13715. Dated: January 21, 2014 THE NASSAU COUNTY TREASURER MINEOLA, NEW YORK

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Double Xword Pt.1 AFTERWORDS ACROSS 1 Ecstatic joy 8 Injured 15 Heart chambers 20 Baseball’s “Hebrew Hammer” 21 The U.S., south of the U.S. border 22 Bucking horse 23 Two words that might follow BUTTER ... 25 Arledge of TV 26 Guess as to takeoff: Abbr. 27 Shortcoming 28 Yoga pad 29 Not as bright 30 The Louvre, e.g.: Abbr. 32 Stephen of films

33 SPORTS ... 36 HARD ... 39 Get choked by, as food 40 Baseballer David a.k.a. “Big Papi” 41 Secrete milk 45 Discontinued 48 - Moines, Iowa 49 Congo River feeder 53 Modify formally 55 Spain’s longest river 56 STORM ... 59 Winning line in tic-tac-toe 60 To be, to Jacques 63 “- in the bag!” 64 - -pah-pah band 65 Begin the cruise 67 - play (a simple job) 69 Country music

Last Month’s Answers “Isle Say!”

Answers can also be found online! go to facebook.com/longislandpress.

resort city in Missouri 73 Tenor Jan 74 More piquant 76 Detroit-to-Montreal dir. 77 Some toy batteries 79 “An apple - ...” 80 Summer, to the French 81 AIR ... 86 Castle-circling ditch 88 Roman 553 89 What the Tin Woodman asked for 90 Derek and Diddley 93 Sleep disorder 95 Toss in some seasoning 97 Plain as day 99 Buddhism’s - Lama 101 POWER ... 105 BLUE ... 110 Critical hosp. ward 111 Part of RSVP 112 Having disembarked 113 Pluralized -y 114 Becomes smelting waste 116 Letter before theta 118 Hipbone part 119 HAND ... 123 Get the suds out of 124 10th-century German king 125 Most pointless 126 See 44-Down 127 Maximally massive 128 Certifies (to) DOWN 1 Rally or relay 2 Far greater 3 Pieces of

merchandise 4 “Tik -” (2009 #1 hit for Kesha) 5 “Catch - You Can” (Dave Clark Five song) 6 Gain back, as trust 7 Took place as a result 8 Left 9 Aged 10 Mom’s bro 11 “- Rae” (1979 film) 12 Gloomy, in poetry 13 Les - -Unis 14 Rep.’s foe 15 Abbreviate 16 Tuba’s kin 17 SCHOOL ... 18 Central 19 Computers such as the Aspire and Extensa 24 Banned apple spray 29 Gene stuff 31 Enjoy a slope 33 Offed 34 “LA Ink” channel 35 Liaisons 36 Car axle, e.g. 37 France’s Côte d’38 Gymnastics great Korbut 42 Qdoba items 43 “Take -” (office order) 44 With 126-Across, multiple-gear bicycle 46 Beethoven’s Third 47 “Tom -” (1958 #1 hit) 50 Cap. of the Gem State 51 Pantry insect 52 Fed. crash

investigator 54 Far out from the coast 56 Sensed 57 Film director Stanley 58 I-90, e.g. 60 Itchy skin condition 61 Up-and-comer’s eventual goal 62 SUN ... 66 Sewing line 68 “What’s the -?” (“Who cares?”) 70 Changed the

décor of 71 Writer Nin 72 Of the entire U.S., e.g. 75 Installed anew, as a carpet 78 Shape of a parenthesis 82 Hat, in slang 83 Ken and G.I. Joe, say 84 In - (unmoved) 85 Give - to (approve) 87 Coffee shop’s cousin 90 Has faith

91 Non-written exam 92 Pigs’ hangout 94 Freaked out 96 iPhone extra 98 #2 corp. execs 100 Suffix with hex102 Adorn richly 103 Maine national park 104 Guitarist Ted 105 Carnivals 106 Suffolk County town 107 Metropolis,

in Milan 108 Microwaves, say 109 Ain’t right? 114 Vexed state 115 Crate piece 117 Part of A&E 119 Like kings: Abbr. 120 Vegas cube 121 “- for Alibi” (Sue Grafton book) 122 Suffix with Ernest

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Double Xword Pt.2 OOH, BABY! ACROSS 1 Singer Bette 7 Old name for the Congo 12 Miles - gallon 15 Spill the secret 19 Room recess 20 Dressed for Halloween 22 “The - of the Ancient Mariner” 23 Acquired a forbidden thing? 25 French clergyman 26 S&L part 27 Peddle 28 Waterways 30 Send in, as a check 34 Bolt out of a seating tier? 36 City in SW California

41 Gillette razor brand 43 Joel or Ethan of film 44 Silly - goose 45 Knockoff merchandise items? 49 Three-screen cinema 51 Hypnotized states 52 “ER” actor La Salle 53 Russia’s Alexis I, e.g. 54 Body of a cell 55 Actor Hunter 58 Chopin challenge 60 Port in Norway 64 Stopper 67 Refrigerated nut that can chip a tooth? 71 Rightful

Last Month’s Answers V8

Answers can also be found online! go to facebook.com/longislandpress.

73 “Tutti -” 75 The “E” of S.E. Hinton 76 Wedded 77 Smash hit that’s not performed outside? 80 Grammy winner India.82 Ukraine’s capital 83 Remove a curse from 84 Streets: Abbr. 86 Trim down 89 Gorbachev’s empire 92 American mail org. 94 Secretary of State Clinton 97 Start spasming, as a muscle 100 Say “It’s so foolish to play cards”? 103 Trouble 104 Lincoln and Beame 106 Fly like a vulture 107 Like a firstborn child 108 Wading bird barbecued on a rotating rod? 112 Last Greek vowel 114 Audible breather 115 Start of a magician’s cry 117 Sign of the future 123 - time flat 124 “Vacation on this marshy inlet on credit”? 129 Former Navajo foes 130 Italian range 131 Propelling a boat manually 132 Blister, e.g. 133 “Weekend Edition” airer 134 Rub it in 135 Fuses

DOWN 1 Charts (out) 2 Skater Kulik 3 Ovid’s 705 4 Norse trickster god 5 Parallel (with) 6 Merlot, say 7 Nada 8 Pantry crawler 9 Freud’s “I” 10 Richard and Jane in court 11 Actor Will 12 Part of PBS 13 Subgenre of punk rock 14 Arranges differently 15 “Great job!” 16 Progressive 17 “The Devil’s Dictionary” author Bierce 18 “None of your -!” 21 Verbalize 24 Put to work 29 Ancient Aegean land 31 - Zedong 32 “- be nice if ...” 33 Loyal 35 Certain finished lowercase letter 36 CPR givers, sometimes 37 Prefix with 90-Down 38 Cattle rush 39 Like most music 40 Site: Abbr. 42 Having lots of land 46 U leaders? 47 10% giver 48 Filth and misery 50 Big-leaguers 56 Follow, as an impulse

57 Bungle 59 “The Mystery of Edwin -” 61 Sneaker securer 62 Deighton of fiction writing 63 Pile up debt 65 Sci-fi saucer 66 Cur’s noise 68 “This way” 69 Stars and Bars org. 70 - Lingus 71 Browne who created Hägar

72 Quadri- minus three 74 One taking something forcibly 78 Egg, to Ovid 79 Old Montreal ball club 81 Stranded on land in the sea 85 “- ‘nuff!” 87 Riles 88 Hit PC game 90 “The final frontier” 91 Like outlying districts

93 “Scram!” 95 “Amen, bro!” 96 “Bad” cholesterol, briefly 97 - Clay (Muhammad Ali, once) 98 Lambaste 99 One who straightens 101 Grier of film 102 Refined find 105 Assassin 109 Just one of - things 110 Black, to Poe 111 Twisted forcibly 113 A student’s pride: Abbr.

116 Blue dye 118 Ardor 119 Hindu dress 120 On the job 121 Actor Wilder 122 Physicists’ work units 125 Smartphone extra 126 “Bed-in” stager Yoko 127 “Aren’t - pair?” 128 Seattle hrs.

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Horoscopes Aquarius

January 20 to February 18

Pisces

February 19 to March 20

Aries

March 21 to April 19

February by Psychicdeb

Don’t let indulgent habits get the better of you. Stay focused on your goals and you will recognize the opportunities at hand. Grab one that seems especially challenging.

Although you’ve lived with mood swings, it is still difficult for those around you. Try to catch yourself before a minor annoyance erupts into an unnecessary major argument with the one you love.

Friendships prove important this month, so hang on to those you can always depend on in times of stress and trouble. Fair-weather friends have no place in your life.

Taurus

Journeying to foreign places may be in the cards for you or you may venture into new areas of knowledge through books, courses or attending lectures. Choose friends that have the same interests.

Gemini

Enthusiasm and spontaneity are the key words this year. Do something you’ve never dared to do before and the patterns of your life may take a refreshing turn. Be prepared for a dramatic change.

Cancer

Adventure awaits as long as you let go of your need to be in control. If things do not go according to plan, it is important to be adaptable and have faith that things will work out.

April 20 to May 20

May 21 to June 20

June 21 to July 22

Leo

July 23 to August 22

Quarrels with your partner or family member might overshadow an otherwise harmonious relationship. Nip arguments in the bud and savor quality time. It may not always be there.

Virgo

Business ventures go your way so money worries should finally ease. Continue to be prudent and perhaps in the next few months you’ll reap the rewards you’ve been reaching for.

Libra

If you have any desire to move into a new home, change your office, or even move your furniture around, now is the time. Environmental changes will enable you to acquire a new attitude.

August 23 to September 22

September 23 to October 22

Scorpio

October 23 to November 21

SAGITTARIUS November 22 to December 21

Capricorn December 22 to January 19

Change your general attitude from pessimism and disappointment to optimism and self-confidence. Your fate really does lie in your hands and determination will see you through.

Family matters move into prominence this month. Use diplomatic skills to bridge any gaps which have recently developed. Harmony at home will provide the stability which will enhance your professional life.

Do your best to overcome lethargy and mental fogginess which have interrupted your productivity during last year. It may be difficult but try to begin each day with a positive attitude.

IF YOU KNOW YOUR RISING SIGN, CONSULT THE HOROSCOPE FOR THAT SIGN AS WELL.

“There is A solution.” 54

Psychicdeb has been a professional astrologer for over 25 yrs. Self-taught, she began her studies in astrology when she was 8 yrs. old learning what she could from her mother’s astrology magazines. As she got older and learned geometry, she searched for books on Astrology and taught herself how to construct a chart. She teaches Astrology for a nominal fee. Psychicdeb also uses the tarot to do psychic readings channeling her spirit guide Helen. Reiki is one of her obsessions. She is a Reiki Master and loves to teach others the benefits of Reiki. Namaste. You can find her at the Original Psychic Fairs on Sundays. A listing of the Fair dates can be found on her website at: www.astro-mate.org

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Volume 12, Issue 02 - February 2014 - Homeless