Page 1


KARL HALE JAMAICA TENNIS CAMP 2016

#1 Camp in the Caribbean Jamaica Tennis Camp and Grade 3 Senior ITF Championships #"!  " 

" "

   

April 19 – 24th, 2016 !  " 

Deadline August 23rd, 2015  !  " ""! www.sportstravelexperts.com EVENT SPONSORS


COMING IN SEPTEMBER 2015

Distribution scheduled for 08/26/15

This 2015 U.S. OPEN edition will feature: • 2015 U.S. Open Preview • Guide to Top New York Tennis Clubs • Summer Camp/Summer Events Recap

Distribution across New York at 300+ locations: • Indoor tennis clubs • Country clubs • Restaurants and health food stores • Tennis camps • Retail stores • Gyms • Supermarkets and • Many more!

Bonus Distribution: • U.S. Open • Taste of Tennis Events • Pre U.S. Open Events • Camps/City Parks/Hamptons • JMTA Benefit Night with Rafael Nadal

Don’t miss the advertising opportunities in the next edition of New York Tennis Magazine September/October 2015!

2015 U.S. OPEN EDITION Submissions for both advertising and editorial are due by2015 August 1,Tennis 2015Magazine 1 NYTennisMag.com • July/August • New York For more information, please call 516-409-4444 or e-mail Advertise@NYTennisMag.com


nytennis MAGAZINE

New York Tennis Magazine

New York Tennis Magazine 1220 Wantagh Avenue • Wantagh, NY 11793-2202 Phone: (516) 409-4444 • Fax: (516) 409-4600 Web site: www.nytennismag.com

Staff David Sickmen Publisher (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 • david@usptennis.com Joel M. Berman President (516) 409-4444, ext. 310 • joel@usptennis.com Eric C. Peck Editor-in-Chief (516) 409-4444, ext. 312 • eric@usptennis.com Brian Coleman Senior Editor (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 • brianc@usptennis.com Joey Arendt Managing Art Director Francine Miller Advertising Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 301 • francinem@usptennis.com Matthew Cohen Director of Business Development (516) 409-4444, ext. 306 Emilie Katz Assistant Marketing Coordinator Beverly Bolnick National Sales Manager (516) 409-4444, ext. 316 Scott Koondel VP of Operations (516) 409-4444, ext. 324 Andrew Eichenholz Editorial Contributor

Calvin Rhoden Staff Photographer

Julia Raziel Intern

Trevor Mitchel Intern

Gabby Raziel Intern

Jessica Haverlin Intern

Jacob Mishkin Intern

Samantha Sklar Intern

Alyssa Gorman Intern

Sarah Sklar Intern

Advertising To receive any information regarding advertising rates, deadlines, and requirements, call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. Article Submissions/Press Releases To submit any material, including articles and press releases, please call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. The deadline for submissions is the first of the month preceding the target issue. Subscriptions To receive subscription information, contact (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com or check out our Web site: www.nytennismag.com. Fax subscription changes to (516) 409-1600. Statements of fact and opinion in New York Tennis Magazine are the responsibility of the authors alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of United Sports Publications Ltd. New York Tennis Magazine reserves the right to edit, reject and/or postpone the publication of any articles, information or data.

JUL/AUG 2015 • Vol 5, No 4

Table Of Contents

Solidifying Greatness: Wawrinka Inches Closer to the Big Four By Brian Coleman The ATP Tour’s Big Four may have a new member in Stan Wawrkina as he moves onward and continues his successful 2015 campaign. See page 8

Cover photo credit: Beth Wilson/Tennis Connected

Featured Stories 18 Your 2015 Guide to Sports Medicine Some of the best in the area at keeping you in shape and on the court. 36 2015 Boys & Girls High School Recap 52 Second Annual KidsFest Hits Engineers CC for a Day of Tennis Grassroots tennis grows as New York Tennis Magazine hosts a day of fun.

Featured 4 Locals Compete for Spot at U.S. Open By Brian Coleman 12 Arthur Ashe Stadium Roof Project Takes Another Step Toward Completion 16 Injury Prevention and Healing Techniques for Tennis Players By Suzanna McGee 27 Saddlebrook Tennis Academy: A Premier Destination for Athletes 30 NYJTL Opens Cary Leeds Center for Tennis & Learning 32 Hopefuls Aim for Grand Stage at U.S. Open Tryouts By Jacob Mishkin 35 Har-Tru Sports: Developing Champions Around the World 44 NTC Hosts 18th Annual “Say Yes to Tennis, No to Violence” Event 48 Orange Ball Workshop By Richard Thater 51 Did You Win? By Elizabeth Right Reiss 64 Backhand Volley Cures By Bill Longua

Featured Columns 14 22 24 28 34 42 46 50 54 56 57 58 60 63 65

Across Metro New York Sports Medicine By Dr. Leon Popovitz USTA Eastern Metro Region Update Court Six: New York Tennis Magazine’s Gossip Column By Emilie Katz Tips From the Tennis Pro By Erik Scharf More Than an Athlete By Rob Polishook, MA, CPC New York Collegiate Roundup The Jensen Zone By Luke Jensen The Rise of Ivy League Tennis By Steven Kaplan Adult League USTA Leagues Updates Metro Corporate League Recap, Presented by Advantage Tennis Clubs New York Tennis Magazine’s Charitable Initiatives A Celebration of Tennis History and the Ripple Effect By Lonnie Mitchel New York Area Upcoming Tennis Events Your Post-Match Routine and Why It’s the Only Way to Improve By Dr. Tom Ferraro 68 New York Rankings 71 USTA/Metropolitan Region 2015 Tournament Schedule

New York Tennis Magazine is published bi-monthly by United Sports Publications Ltd. • Copyright © 2015 United Sports Publications Ltd.


Love tennis?

Advantage Passport Membership was created just for you! Enjoy membership in all 3 Advantage Tennis Clubs, FREE outdoor/indoor court time, advance booking & more. Choose a home club and get home club advantages there. Plus complete access to the other two         • Full membership at New York Tennis Club & FREE summer court time from May-October (22 weeks)

New York Tennis Club 6 HarTru Outdoor Courts

3081 Harding Ave., Throgs Neck, NY 10495 Contact: Delilah Bartels (718)239-7919 dbartels@advantagetennisclubs.com

• FREE court time every day at Roosevelt Island Racquet Club from noon till closing for the 12-week summer season • 14-day reservation privileges at your home club – either Roosevelt Island Racquet Club or Manhattan Plaza Racquet Club • Includes health club membership at Manhattan Plaza Health Club

Roosevelt Island Racquet Club 12 HarTru Indoor Courts

281 Main St., Roosevelt Island, NY 10044 Contact: Gordon Kent (212) 935-0250 gkent@advantagetennisclubs.com

• Game-arranging services

Sign up now for triple tennis privileges! Manhattan Plaza Racquet and Health Club advantagetennisclubs.com

5 Cushioned Hard Indoor Courts

450 West 43rd St., New York, NY 10036 Contact: Milos Vojvodic (212)594-0554 milos@advantagetennisclubs.com

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

3


Locals Compete

U.S. O he finals of the USTA Eastern Sectional Qualifying Tournament of the U.S. Open National Playoffs recently came to a close, as local players battled it out for a chance to qualify for the U.S. Open in late August. The Sectionals consisted of five divisions, with the winners of each moving on to play in the U.S. Open National Playoffs Championships in New Haven, Conn. In Women’s Singles, Oyster Bay’s Julia Elbaba defeated Brooklyn’s Malika Rose 6-0, 6-1 to capture the title. Elbaba started the match by doublefaulting the first point in her opening service game, but played nearly flawless after that, winning 12 of the match’s 13 games. Despite the lopsided score, this match was played at a very high level. There were a number of deuce points that could have swung either way, but Elbaba was able to pull the majority of those out.

T

“I think playing my game worked really well,” said Elbaba, who also happened to be celebrating her 21st birthday. “I was just playing aggressive and using my favorite shots. The score didn’t reflect the level and intensity of the match. Almost every game was deuce. It was a very competitive match. I’m just happy to have won it.” For the third straight year, Flushing’s Nikita Kryvonos won the Men’s Runner-up Malika Rose from Brooklyn with Women’s Singles Singles Tournament. He winner Julia Elbaba from Oyster Bay, N.Y. downed second-seeded Max Wennakoski 6-1, 3-6, 6-1 to win the sive shots and going for my shots he section and book his spot in the National was missing more,” said Kryvonos. “In Playoff Championships in August. the second set, I got a little tight and “I started well and was pretty confi- started making some more errors and dent in the beginning. I think from the he got more confident. In the third, I rebaseline when I was hitting my aggres- focused and started going for my shots again. That was the difference.” Kryvonos has come up just short in New Haven the last couple of years, but hopes that the third time is the charm. “Right now, I just need to stay healthy and play more matches, that’s the main thing,” Kryvonos said. “It’s more about mental consistency for me. I think if I play more matches and work on my mental strength I’ll be good. I feel good physically and I’m hitting the ball well now. This is my third time winning this tournament so hopefully this New York City time I can go all the way. I live 20 min303-918-3140 utes from [the National Tennis Center] Elizabeth.Right@gmail.com so this is my court, it would be amazing to play here [in the U.S. Open].” www.ElizabethRight.com Daniel Cochrane & Phillip Simmonds

Mindfulness Sport Psychology Nutrition

4

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com


e For Spot in the

Open

BY BRIAN COLEMAN

“We just kept our calm,” said Simmonds. “It was windy and really sunny. But we tried to just control what we could control and not worry about the elements.” The pair is still trying to develop chemistry, as they entered this event after playing just Flushing, N.Y.’s Nikita Kryvonos won the Men’s Singles Division over Max three tournaments together, but this Wennakoski win went a long won the Men’s Doubles Division with a 7- way in figuring out how their games com5, 7-6(6) victory over Gary Kushnerovic plement each other. & Keith Kessler. “Dan’s really aggressive at the net and Cochrane & Simmonds were able to it helps me out a ton because I don’t feel pull out the tie-breaker in the second set the pressure of having to hit first volleys after falling down a break early. and other things that most doubles play-

ers have to do,” added Simmonds. “I’m a little bit older so I have a little more experience. It’s nice to play doubles so you can help each other out and talk each other through some points.” A pair of sisters captured the Women’s Doubles Title as Magda & Ketevan Okruashvili knocked off Olga Kalodzitsa & Linda Templefelde 3-6, 6-2, 10-7. After splitting the first two sets, the Okruashvili’s were able to outlast their opponents in a super tie-breaker to take home the victory. “When you play outside it is usually windy so you need to make sure you control the ball,” said Magda Okruashvili. “The girls played very well and we just had to try harder to get our balls in.” The two have recently come back from college and are eager to play some continued on page 6

Book Your Seasonal Court Time Now • 22 Tennis Courts (Outdoor Season) • 10 Bubbled Courts (October-April) • New, State of the Art, 12,000 sq. foot Clubhouse • Pro-Shop • Locker Rooms • Meeting & Lounge Areas For more information please contact

Ron Nano - General Manager rnano@nyjtl.org or 347-417-8176 1720 Crotona Avenue, Bronx, NY 10457 www.caryleedstennis.org NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

5


The team of Hleb Maslau & Simona Weymar, both who train at the Ross School in East Hampton, N.Y., were crowned Mixed-Doubles champs at the USTA New England Sectional Playoffs

Women’s Doubles Title winners Magda & Ketevan Okruashvili defeated the team of Olga Kalodzitsa & Linda Templefelde 3-6, 6-2, 10-7

locals compete continued from page 5

Mixed-Doubles Division runners-up Alison Adamski & Keith Kessler with winners Ilia Shatasvili & Rima Astarian

more tournaments together before heading up to the National Championships. “We can work on our serves and getting a little stronger,” added Magda. “We didn’t play tournaments while we were away at school, so we need to play more and continue to improve.” The final match of the afternoon was the final of the Mixed Doubles Division, as Rima Astarian & Ilia Shatashvili defeated Alison Adamski & Keith Kessler 6

6-3, 6-4. “I thought we served really well. We held all of our service games,” said Shatashvili when asked what the difference in the match was. “I started the match serving and they chose their return side so that she [Astarian] would be serving against the sun, and she just served like a champ despite that.” The two had played very little tennis together coming into the tournament. In fact, they barely even knew each other

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

Daniel Cochrane & Ph 5, 7-6(6) victory over

until the assistant coach of the women’s tennis team at Columbia suggested they pair up. “I asked the assistant coach if she had anybody who would be interested and she gave me Rima,” said Shatashvili. “It was almost like an arranged marriage.” It worked out though as the two have quickly developed a very nice tennis chemistry, going through the sectional tournament without dropping a set. “We got better and better each match,” said Astarian. “Learning each other’s game and where we would be on the court so I think we developed a rhythm as it went on.” Nearby, at the USTA New England Sectional Playoffs, Hleb Maslau, who trains at Ross School in East Hampton, N.Y., won all three of the divisions he was eligible to compete for: Men’s Singles, Men’s Doubles and Mixed Doubles. In Men’s Doubles, Maslau partnered with his former college teammate at North Florida, Daniel Sotomarino, as the duo reached the final without dropping a set, and in the finals, defeated the Ivy League duo of Joseph Haig of Dartmouth & Benjamin Tso of Princeton 6-4, 6-4. He then partnered with Simona Weymar, who also trains at the Ross School, in the Mixed-Doubles Tournament, as the


hillip Simmonds won the Men’s Doubles Division with a 7Gary Kushnerovic & Keith Kessler

two defeated Taylor Fay & Diego Valdenegro 6-2, 7-5 in the finals. “In the first round, I started playing badly and my partner Simona [Weymar] always has that unique ability to perform when it matters most,” said Maslau. “She was able to pull us through after losing the first set and being match points down to win in the super tie-breaker.” Maslau met former world number 311 Blake Strode, who won the entire National Playoffs tournament back in 2010 and 2011, in the Men’s Singles Final, and beat him 6-3, 3-6, 6-2. “I knew I had my hands full, but the match was moved indoors and I knew that this would help my game,” said Maslau. “I was able to win a tough three-setter, relying on my backhand down the line and my fitness.” Maslau heads up to New Haven, Conn. in late August to compete in the U.S. Open National Playoffs in three different divisions. The U.S. Open National Open Playoffs Championships will run from Aug. 21-24 in conjunction with the Connecticut Open in New Haven, Conn. Brian Coleman is senior editor for New York Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by phone at (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 or e-mail brianc@usptennis.com. NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

7


Solidifying Greatness: Wawrinka Inches Closer to the Big Four S TA N T H E M A N LOOKS TO BUILD UPON GRAND SLAM SUCCESSES BY BRIAN COLEMAN

Credit photo to Beth Wilson/Tennis Connected

he year 2015 was supposed to be the year Novak Djokovic captured the lone trophy that has eluded him up to this point in his career, La Coupe des Mousquetaires (The Musketeers’ Trophy), the Men’s Singles Championship at the French Open. The chips fell into place. With Roger Federer aging and nine-time champion Rafael Nadal still struggling to find his form, the stars aligned for Djokovic to complete the career Grand Slam.

T 8

But it was not to be. Djokovic ran into a buzzsaw, in the form of Stan Wawrinka of Switzerland, who outclassed Djokovic over the final three sets to win the second major title of his career with a 4-6, 6-4, 6-3, 6-4 victory. Wawrinka, seeded eighth, became the lowest seed to capture the title at Roland Garros since Gaston Gaudio in 2004. With his win at the French Open, Wawrinka became the first player to beat the number one seed (Djokovic)

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

and number two seed (Roger Federer) on his way to the title since Sergei Bruguera defeated the top-seeded Pete Sampras and second-seeded Jim Courier en route to his title win in 1993. In Wawrinka’s first Grand Slam title win, the 2014 Australian Open, the Swiss also knocked off the top two seeds, Djokovic and Nadal, on his way to hoisting the title in Melbourne. His devastating one-handed backhand gave Djokovic trouble all-match long, and Wawrinka’s unwavering ag-


gressiveness pushed him through the whole tournament. In his quarterfinal win over fellow Swiss Federer, a man who has overshadowed him for years, he fired 43 winners to just 28 unforced errors in a straight-set win. In the semis against Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, Wawrinka hit 60 winners, and then hit 60 more in the final against Djokovic, prompting great praise from the world number one. “He probably has the best onehanded backhand on the tour,” said

Djokovic. “No question … one of the best one-handed backhands I have seen in tennis.” The power and force he put on his backhand made it extremely difficult to return on the clay courts of Roland Garros. Winning a second Grand Slam title goes a long way in terms of how you are viewed on the totem pole of the sport. There have been a number of one-hit wonders in the sport’s recent history, including Juan Martin del Potro

winning the U.S. Open in 2009 and Marin Cilic, winner of the 2014 U.S. Open championship. Wawrinka’s win at Roland Garros in 2015 solidifies him as one of the best in the sport, and might signify an end to the dominant reign of the Big Four (Djokovic, Federer, Nadal and Andy Murray). But can Wawrinka stay consistent, something that has eluded him after his Australian Open title last year continued on page 10

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

9


solidifying greatness continued from page 9 and throughout the season? “I don’t know,” Wawrinka said honestly after his win. “I’m trying. I’m trying in every tournament, but so far it’s just me. I’m not as strong as the Big Four. They are winning everything. But I’m strong enough to win some big titles during the year.” Wawrinka’s coach, Magnus Norman, has had a lot to do with the attitude change in the 30-year-old. Norman is a former world number two and retired from the sport in 2004. He has been with Wawrinka for both of his Grand Slam titles. Norman has stressed to his player that he must continue to put in the work, tournament after tournament, even at some of the ATP’s lower level events, because that is what the great ones do. “That’s why he is a very interesting player to watch, because you never know what to expect,” said Norman after the French Open. “At Roland Gar10

ros, we saw the greatness of Stan, but next week, it could be something else. This is my job: To try to make him a lit-

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

tle bit more consistent. If he wants to break into the top four and do well, he has to be more consistent, week in and week out.” Finding consistency will be the key for Wawrinka moving forward not only for the remainder of 2015, but for the rest of his career. In his first tournament following his victory in Paris, Wawrinka was defeated by Kevin Anderson at the Aegon Championships in the third round in his only grass-court tune up prior to Wimbledon. Wawrinka admitted that he was tired, both physically and emotionally, from winning the French Open, and the numerous obligations that come along with winning a Grand Slam title. “I’m tired physically, but especially mentally,” he said after the loss to Anderson. “I need to find the right balance between relaxing now and practicing hard for Wimbledon.” While the Swiss star has shown that he can beat the best in the world on the biggest of stages, maintaining that form from tournament to tournament is the next step he needs to take if he


is to be considered a regular threat to the reign of the Big Four. With Federer’s age potentially catching up with him and Nadal’s injuries hampering him, there is suddenly room at the top of the sport’s pecking order. Wawrinka’s showing through the remainder of 2015 will go a long way in

proving to himself, and many others, that he will be a mainstay in the later rounds of Grand Slams. It will be very interesting to see how Wawrinka fares as the ATP World Tour wraps up its grass-court season and inches closer to the hard-court season. If consistency is king, “Stan the

Man” must grab his crown in order to continue to pose a true threat to the Big Four of the ATP Tour. Brian Coleman is senior editor for New York Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by phone at (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 or e-mail brianc@usptennis.com.

Providing the highest quality orthopedic care for NY & NJ. Orthopedic Surgery & Sports Medicine l Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Our expert orthopedic doctors treat all bone, joint, and musculoskeletal injuries of tennis athletes. Dr. Leon Popovitz is a former orthopedic surgeon for the US Open. Main Location 205 E. 64th St., Ste. 402 l New York, NY 10065 l Phone: (212) 759-4553

www.nyboneandjoint.com NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

11


Arthur Ashe Stadium Roof Project Takes Another Step Toward Completion The final piece of steel has been placed in the superstructure that will support the retractable roof over Arthur Ashe Stadium at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. In all, 5,000 tons of steel were needed to complete the project. The roof will be fully operational for the 2016 U.S. Open. The retractable roof is the centerpiece of a complete re-imagining of the National Tennis Center. The transformation of the site will include the roof over Arthur Ashe Stadium, a new 8,000-seat Grandstand Stadium, a new 14.000-seat Louis Armstrong Stadium, and the reconfiguration of the entire southern campus of the site. Construction on the new Grandstand Stadium has begun, with 90,000-cubic yards of fill removed from the site. The steel shell of the new stadium will begin to rise as foundation work is ongoing. The Grandstand Stadium will open for the 2016 U.S. Open. 12

Credit photos: USTA/Michael LeBrecht II

The USTA began the first phase of upgrades last year when the organization re-designed and rebuilt the West Stadium Courts and Practice Gallery. Platform seating for 3,000 people was constructed so that, for the first time, fans could enjoy unobstructed views of U.S. Open seeded players practicing. The structure also provided a prime viewing location for the three tournament courts to the west of Arthur Ashe Stadium. “We are redefining ‘spectacular’ at the

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center and this transformation will allow the U.S. Open to maintain its place at the pinnacle of sporting experiences in the U.S. and around the world,” said Gordon Smith, USTA chief operating officer. “With a retractable roof over Arthur Ashe Stadium, two new stadiums and an expanded southern campus, the National Tennis Center will become the best tennis venue in the world.” This transformation of the National Tennis Center, a $500 million project that is privately funded by the USTA, will include: A retractable roof over Arthur Ashe Stadium (operational in 2016); a new Grandstand Stadium (slated to open in 2016); a new Food Village adjacent to Grandstand Stadium (2016); an expanded southern campus that will include new tournament courts and enhanced fan amenities (2016); and a new Louis Armstrong Stadium (scheduled completion date 2018).


Eser Atilla/USTA Eastern

Youth Y o ou h T out Tennis e Leagues. ennis Leagues. Let’s Play. Let’ t’’s Pla y. A child’s first match experience on the tennis court is so important. That’s why outh Te Leag we’ve combined learning with play. Yo ennis Leagues is a new program for kids featuring one hour of instruction plus one hour of team match play. Leagues continue ork City. Sign up today at www.youthtennisleagues.com. this summerr in New Yo NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

13


Across Metro N Centercourt Chatham celebrates Orange Bowl Eastern Sectional Champs

Congratulations to the U10 Orange Bowl USTA Eastern Sectional Champions from Centercourt Chatham. Pictured here are is the team of Nicholas Ciordas, Aryik Yadav, Ronin Banerjee and Yash Khanna.

Columbia’s Lin closes out his collegiate career Columbia’s Winston Lin enjoyed a fantastic senior campaign to wrap up his collegiate tennis career. In his final season on the team, Lin reached the quarterfinals of the NCAA Singles Championships, before losing to Virginia’s Thai-Son Kwiatkowski. For the second consecutive year, Lin was named to the All-American team and was honored with the Northeast ITA Senior Player of the Year Award.

Summer camp season gets underway Summer tennis camps have arrived in New York City. Tennis Innovators (on the left) and Gotham Tennis Academy (on the right) recently began their camps as summer has officially begun.

Kingsborough CC Coach Goldsmith inducted into Hall of Fame Kingsborough Community College (KCC) Head Tennis Coach Barry Goldsmith (pictured here on the right) was recently inducted into the National Junior College Athletic Association Hall of Fame. Goldsmith has been the head coach of both the men’s and women’s tennis teams at KCC since 1983, winning a national championship with the men in 1998 and the women in 1999. The school has also renamed its tennis facility the Rachelle and Barry Goldsmith Tennis Facility. 14

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com


ew York New

… News and notes from across the New York Metro tennis community

Rubin and Loeb take to the diamond Noah Rubin and Jamie Loeb, both who train at John McEnroe Tennis Academy (JMTA), were honored by the New York Mets at Citi Field following their success at the NCAA Singles Championships. The two hung out on the field during batting practice and were featured on the team’s scoreboard in between innings.

Top acts take the stage at West Side Tennis Club West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills continued its concert series recently, as fans filled the club’s stadium to take in shows from the likes of Ed Sheeran and Van Morrison. James Taylor and Santana will also be performing at the famous stadium this summer.

Falconi making WTA waves Irina Falconi, who grew up in Washington Heights, N.Y. after her family moved to the United States from Ecuador, recently reached her highest career WTA Women’s Singles Ranking at 71st in the world.

NYC Aces gather for event at Roosevelt Island The USTA Eastern Metro Board hosted its second New York City Aces tennis social event at Roosevelt Island Racquet Club and it was a success. The USTA Metro Board is rallying behind young professionals to stay active.

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

15


IN J URY P RE V E NT ION A N D H E A L I N G T E C H N I Q U ES F OR T E N N I S P L AY E R S By Suzanna McGee As the U.S. Open approaches, we are extremely motivated to play harder and more often so we can feel like the pros. With only so many hours in a day, the more tennis we play, the more we ignore fitness preparation and injury prevention. And then one day … we develop overuse injuries. The good news is that almost all overuse injuries are preventable. Tennis is such a repetitive sport and it makes it hard for your body to keep up with the imposed demands and compensations. The more advanced and more intense of an athlete you are, the more your body adapts to the demands of training and you may start compensating and developing faulty movements. To prevent that, you need a proactive injury prevention and “prehabilitation” training. The way to do it is surprisingly simple. Your primary goal is to keep your body aligned and balanced in strength, flexibility and range of motion, in all planes. In other words, check yourself and your posture

regularly and look for this one thing: All of the major joints—shoulders, hips, knees and ankles—should be aligned above each other in all planes. When you look from the side and front/back, the shoulders should be above the hips, the hips above the knees, the knees above the ankles … all in one nice line. Looking from the front, the joints should be in horizontal lines, parallel to each other. When you have this perfect alignment, you can be almost sure that you won’t have any future problems with overuse injuries. Only a few tennis players are this beautifully aligned. You will notice that one shoulder is higher or more in front than the other, and therefore, the hips compensate to create a better balance with one hip higher and shifted forward/back. The same goes with the knees and ankles. When you notice a faulty alignment, immediately start strengthening the weak

muscle groups and stretching and (myofascial), releasing the tight and shortened muscles. Do this regularly until you even out these imbalances. Your body is a finetuned dynamic system that adjusts on a continuous basis, so check your posture frequently. Keep the injuries away with this proactive prehabilitation regimen. A perfectlyaligned body is more functional in its movement and your performance will improve dramatically. With a good proper alignment, there is a great chance that you will feel awesome as well. Suzanna McGee is a former Ms. Natural Olympia bodybuilding champion, now competitive tennis player, author, speaker, raw vegan athlete, and performance and injury prevention specialist with more than 20 years of experience. She is certified by National Academy of Sports Medicine and also holds a Certificate in Plant Based Nutrition from eCornell University. She is an author of Tennis Fitness for the Love of It and The Athlete’s Simple Guide to a Plant-Based Lifestyle. For more information, e-mail sixftlion@gmail.com or visit TennisFitnessLove.com.

T E N N I S

R U S H

Come play where the surf applauds every shot. The Seaside Tennis Club at the legendary Mauna Kea Beach Hotel on Hawaii Island. 866.977.4589 I MaunaKeaBeachHotel.com

16

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com


NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

17


Dr. Tom Ferraro (516) 248-7189 drtferraro@aol.com www.drtomferraro.com Dr. Tom Ferraro is an internationally known sport psychologist designated as one of “the nation’s top mental game gurus” by Golf Digest. He has a full-time sport psychology practice in Nassau County, working with elite and professional athletes, including top-ranked tennis players. He is also affiliated with the Winthrop University Hospital Psychiatry Department, where he teaches resident doctors about the history of psychotherapy. He has also worked with professional teams in the New York area as their team psychologist. Dr. Ferraro remains one of the few sport psychologists in the nation who is also a senior level, fully-credentialed psychoanalyst. This allows him to not only use standard behavioral techniques to help tennis players control emotions, but also enables him to diagnose accurately and fully treat underlying issues, such as depression, anxiety or attention deficit disorders that can plague an athlete’s career. He publishes columns and feature articles in the U.S., Asia and Europe, and has appeared on major television networks. His work has been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The London Times, Newsday, The Daily News and The New York Post. He can be reached by phone at (516) 248-7189 or e-mail drtferraro@aol.com or visit www.drtomferraro.com. Dr. Ferraro’s office is located in Williston Park, which is in Mid-Nassau County.

18

Metropolitan Acupuncture & Herbal Medicine (347) 565-4255 www.metropolitanacupuncture.com Metropolitan Acupuncture & Herbal Medicine is an affiliate of Sher Institutes for Reproductive Medicine. Headed by Michael Bennett L.Ac., Dipl. O.M., who is a licensed acupuncturist in New York and New Jersey and is a BoardCertified Herbal Medicine Consultant by the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM), the practice specializes in the relief of pain, stress and the treatment of female and male infertility. Acupuncture is a safe and scientifically-proven method to enhance fertility and increase your chances of conception. As the official acupuncture and herbal medicine practice for the renowned Sher Institute for Reproductive Medicine in Manhattan, Metropolitan Acupuncture & Herbal Medicine specializes in helping couples make the journey from infertility to family. Metropolitan Acupuncture offers free consultations to new patients. The practice is conveniently located on the third floor of 425 Fifth Avenue, at the corner of 38th Street in New York City. For more information, call Dr. Bennett at (347) 565-4255 or visit www.metropolitanacupuncture.com.

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com


NY Bone and Joint Specialists (646) 741-7723 ww.nyboneandjoint.com NY Bone and Joint Specialists is an elite orthopedic practice in New York City. Dr. Leon Popovitz and Dr. Michael Mizhiritsky, globally-recognized in sports medicine, built a premier team to treat all orthopedic conditions, including: Shoulder Labrum/ SLAP tears, rotator cuff tears, shoulder dislocations, tennis elbow, elbow cartilage damage, knee ACL tears, knee cartilage damage, knee meniscus tears, knee patella instability, ankle sprains and strains, and back and neck injuries. NY Bone and Joint Specialists practice a systems-based approach to treating patients, providing the highest safety and quality of patient care in orthopedic surgery, sports medicine and rehabilitation. l Dr. Leon Popovitz: Orthopedic surgery and sports medicine, specializing in arthroscopic surgery of the shoulder and knee. l Dr. Michael Mizhiritsky: Rehabilitation specialist and EMG testing. l Dr. Roman Issac: Hand and general orthopedic surgeon. l Dr. Allyson Shrikhande: Rehabilitation specialist and pelvic pain expert. l Dr. Nickhil Gupta: Interventional pain management. l Dr. Christine Ellie: Podiatric surgeon. l All Sports Physical Therapy: Specializing in all sports injuries. Dr. Popovitz, ranked among the top orthopedic surgeons in America since 2004, and who had the honor of being a team physician for the U.S. Open Tennis Championships, says: “As specialists in sports medicine, we take a team approach to treating our patients. We return all types of recreational or professional athletes to their optimal physical condition and help make healthy adjustments to prevent future injuries.”

Orlin & Cohen Orthopedic Group (516) 536-2800 www.orlincohen.com Orlin & Cohen Orthopedic Group is Long Island’s leading private orthopedic practice with a team of 37 board-certified and board-eligible physicians. The group features orthopedic subspecialists who have completed advanced fellowship training, focusing solely on a single area of concern. This focused approach results in optimum patient outcomes, as the doctors are on top of the latest advances for each specific area of expertise. The group’s highly trained and experienced orthopedists cover the entire spectrum of subspecialty needs, including sports medicine, hip, knee, shoulder, elbow, joint replacements, foot and ankle, spine, neck and back, hand and upper extremities, and general orthopedics. Orlin & Cohen Orthopedic Group has multiple offices in both Nassau and Suffolk Counties, with a recently-opened new office on the North Shore in Woodbury, N.Y. This new state-of-the-art, full-service facility addresses all of your orthopedic related needs, including in-house diagnostic testing, digital x-ray, MRI, physical rehabilitation and a fully-accredited pain management/fluoroscopy suite. This site is part of the Orlin & Cohen network, which consists of seven orthopedic offices, five physical rehabilitation centers, four MRI centers and two fully accredited fluoroscopy suites for pain management. Conveniently located at 45 Crossways Park Drive, the Woodbury office is a natural extension for the Orlin & Cohen team of board-certified, fellowship-trained subspecialists with offices in Rockville Centre, Cedarhurst, Lynbrook, Merrick, Massapequa and Bohemia. For more information, call (516) 536-2800 or visit www.orlincohen.com.

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

19


Peak Performance Physical Therapy (516) 599-8734 info@peakptfit.com www.peakptfit.com Don’t let pain keep you from your passion … Peak Performance Physical Therapy has been keeping Nassau County on the tennis court for more than 25 years. With four locations and 21 physical therapists, Peak Performance is one of Nassau County’s largest physical therapy groups, offering personal care, while maintaining a direct relationship with referring doctors. Orthopedic and sports therapy is one of Peak Performance’s specialties, featuring a combination of physical therapy modalities, hands-on manual therapy and a full range of exercise equipment. Whether you suffer from tennis elbow, a torn rotator cuff or total knee replacement, Peak Performance’s facilities are designed to meet your healing needs. Renowned for its state-of-the-art HydroWorx Therapy Pool, Peak Performance understands that Aquatic Therapy reduces pain and increases flexibility. The water’s buoyancy lessens pressure on knees, ankles and hips, as well as decreases post-operative swelling, accelerating the rehabilitation process, and in turn, a quicker recovery. From its Aquatic Therapy Pool to an area dedicated to sports conditioning and an in-house fitness center, Peak Performance’s facilities offer cutting-edge equipment and a caring staff to help you achieve the results you deserve. For more information, visit www.peakptfit.com.

20

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine (855) 321-ORTHO www.totalorthosportsmed.com Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine is comprised of the most respected and experienced surgeons in Long Island. At Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, treatments range from the conservative to surgical. Total Orthopedics believes in an individualized approach to treatment determine each patient’s treatment protocol based on their health, lifestyle and goals. The team of specialists collaborates to determine the most effective treatment plan for each patient. For those who do require surgery, the surgeons of Total Orthopedics provide the most innovative and minimally-invasive procedures at some of Long Island’s most esteemed medical centers. Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine has locations throughout Long Island, and treats athletes from amateur to professional. Specialties include: l Shoulder injuries l Spinal conditions l Elbow injuries l Hip injuries l Knee injuries l Foot and ankle injuries l Hand/wrist injuries l Sports medicine The goal of Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine is to get all of its patients back to an active and healthy lifestyle as quickly and effectively as possible. For more information, call (855) 321-ORTHO or visit www.totalorthosportsmed.com.


NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

21


SPORTS MEDICINE

Shoulder Injuries in Overhead Sports By Dr. Leon Popovitz epetitive overhead sports, such as tennis or throwing sports, can lead to various conditions in the shoulder. One common condition is a SLAP tear (Superior Labrum Anterior Posterior). This refers to a tear in the ring of cartilage that surrounds the glenoid (socket bone) in the shoulder. The labrum is composed of cartilage and functions to create greater depth to the socket, as well, greater stability. The labrum attaches to the biceps tendon at the top of the glenoid. In fact, it anchors the biceps tendon to the bone and, therefore, this is the weak link that leads to tears in the labrum. The biceps tendon, in the shoulder, provides restraints to the shoulder joint. Therefore, a tear in the labrum at the site where it meets the biceps tendon can be a cause of significant pain and loss of stability. This is the typical SLAP tear.

R

22

Recreational or professional athletes that suffer a SLAP tear will experience pain, weakness, clicking and, possibly, limited range of motion in the shoulder. Commonly, the symptoms present a few weeks after the inciting sports event. Many players experience a decline in athletic performance. An orthopedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine is the typical doctor that treats SLAP tears. The orthopedic surgeon will do a history and physical, obtain routine x-rays and, likely, get an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) to confirm the diagnosis. SLAP tears are categorized into seven different types of tears based on their pattern of tearing, degree of involvement of the biceps tendon anchor, and extension into other stabilizing structures in the shoulder joint. The orthopedic surgeon may choose to initially treat the patient with physical therapy and anti-inflammatory medication. If symptoms do not improve, then shoulder arthroscopic surgery is often

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

performed. During the arthroscopic surgery, and depending upon the type of tear, the degree of involvement with the biceps tendon, and extension of the tear into other structures, the orthopedic surgeon may choose to: l Repair the labrum; l Debride (clean up) the labrum; and/or l Stabilize the biceps tendon to another part of the bone (biceps tenodesis). Another common condition in overhead sports is an injury to the rotator cuff tendons. The rotator cuff is a group of four tendons whose function involves movement for the shoulder as well as stability to the joint. A tear to the rotator cuff can occur from above the tendons (where the acromion bone may develop a spur and dig into the tendon) or it may occur from below the tendons (from inside the joint itself). When there is damage from below to the under-surface of the tendons that is commonly called internal impingement. 


Internal impingement can represent a wide spectrum of conditions that include: l Partial under-surface rotator cuff tear, SLAP tear, cartilage damage to the back portion of the glenoid (socket bone), or scarring of the back portion of the capsule that surrounds the shoulder joint. All of this may be related to the micro-instability caused by a SLAP or labrum tear and/or tightness of the back capsule. l Overhead athletes may experience pain in the back of the shoulder in addition to the symptoms of a SLAP tear (already mentioned). They may also experience pain with throwing. l A sports medicine orthopedic surgeon’s diagnosis of this condition based on history and physical exam, x-rays, as well as an MRI. Treatment may include physical therapy for rotator cuff strengthening and capsular stretching. If symptoms do not improve then an orthopedic surgeon may perform a shoulder arthroscopy to either repair or debride the rotator

cuff tear, repair the labrum, and/or release the posterior (back) capsule of the shoulder joint. Shoulder injuries in overhead athletics, such as tennis or throwing sports, are very common. Most often these injuries can be treated conservatively. If surgery becomes warranted, then it can be done with minimally invasive techniques with excellent results.

Dr. Leon Popovitz of NY Bone and Joint is an internationally-recognized orthopedic shoulder and knee surgeon who specializes in the field of arthroscopic surgery of the shoulder and arthroscopic surgery of the knee, in addition to sports medicine. Dr. Popovitz has had the honor of being part of the team of physicians for the U.S. Open, and has been elected as a fellow to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery.

Is LED Your Best Solution? Best Lights Super Reflector Technology Designs  Magnifies the light source  Directs the light for optimal performance We are a 21 year manufacturer illuminating all types of Indoor Sports Facilities with High Performance:  LED  T-9 CDM  Fluorescent

Since 1994

Why Best Lights?  More Light, Less Energy  Simple and Easy Installation  Complete dimming capabilities  Qualifies for Energy Rebates  Free point by point calculations  Free Energy analysis  Financing Available Experts in helping our clients select the BEST solution.

Toll Free (US Only) (800) KIL-A-WAT (545-2928) Phone: (248) 588-4980  Fax: (248) 589-0134

www.bestlights.com

Triangular LED-XL Indirect Series PATENTED

100 Park Drive Troy, Michigan 48083 Best Lights are made in America

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

23


USTA Metro Region NYC ACES fun at Roosevelt Island The USTA Eastern Metro Region had another fun Metro NYC ACES Social at Roosevelt Island Racquet Club! Young professionals hit the courts with pros and enjoyed drinks and food. Stay tuned for the next Metro NYC ACES event, and for more information, e-mail nycacesmetrotennis@gmail.com or visit www.MetroRegion.USTA.com.

Highland Park 12U Ravens win JTT Sectionals The Highland Park Ravens 12U team has won the USTA Eastern Junior Team Tennis Sectionals. Congrats to all of the players and coaches.

Highland Park Hawks 18U team headed to JTT Nationals Metro Region’s Highland Park Hawks 18U team won the USTA Eastern Junior Team Tennis Sectionals. With this victory, they are now getting prepared to travel to the National Championships in Cayce, S.C. in October. Congratulations to all the players and Coach Hector on a job well done!

24

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com


USTA Metro Region USTA Metro partners with Friends of South Oxford Park on community tennis festival The USTA Eastern Metro Region Board recently partnered with the Friends of South Oxford Park Inc. to organize a community tennis festival for kids. Metro Board member Mel Swanson took the lead to organize this event, along with other Metro Board members and community volunteers. The kids of all ages and skill levels took part in tennis drills, played for prizes and enjoyed delicious pizza for lunch. It was a great event and the Metro Board was very happy to support this community program. For more information on grants and community support, visit www.metroregion.usta.com. Credit photos to Pablo Sierra

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

25


USTA Metro Region South Brooklyn Tennis Association in action The South Brooklyn Tennis Association (SBTA) recently hosted a number of tennis events, including NYU Lutheran Family Day, Visitation Festival, the Loisada Festival and Brooklyn Volunteer Day.

26

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com


Saddlebrook Tennis Academy: A Premier Destination for Aspiring Athletes The Saddlebrook Tennis Academy, located on the 480acre property of Saddlebrook Resort, was acquired in 1986 from the legendary Harry Hopman. Harry’s philosophy and focus on fitness made Hopman one of the most successful tennis coaches in history, and became the foundation of the Saddlebrook program. The Hopman Tennis Program at Saddlebrook offers programs for players of all ages and ability levels. Our renowned facilities attract enthusiasts from across the globe, and are home to 45 courts, including all four Grand Slam surfaces. Saddlebrook Tennis has the ability to cater to the true tennis fanatics who choose to participate in our demanding five-hour a day program, offered 365 days a year, while also providing corporate meeting attendees with an opportunity to fit in a quick lesson or a few sets of competitive play. The combination of tranquility, privacy and exclusivity on property, coupled with the energy of the world’s top players training to reach their goals of ATP and WTA success has made Saddlebrook a historic and legendary training ground. In fact, guests have enjoyed watching some of the world’s best players during their training at Saddlebrook, including in the past: Jim Courier, Pete Sampras, Martina Hingis, James Blake, and currently, John Isner, Jack Sock, and Bob and Mike Bryan. Hundreds of talented players come to Saddlebrook each year to vastly improve their game through training, hard work, discipline and motivation. Saddlebrook’s program includes on- and off-court performance routines, including specialized drills for consistency and accuracy, as well

as supervised match-play under the supervision of a professional coaching staff. After years of experience and proven success with professional players, Saddlebrook’s junior program has been designed to improve each camper’s technical, tactical and mental games. Juniors train up to five hours daily, in addition to making new friends and enjoying fun social activities with other campers.

In addition to the tennis facilities, Saddlebrook boasts 95,000-square-feet of versatile meeting space, two Arnold Palmer Golf courses, a newly renovated golf training area, a half-million gallon pool, stateof-the-art fitness center and an international boarding school. Saddlebrook Preparatory is a premier destination for education and aspiring junior golf and tennis athletes who wish to get the intensive training offered at Saddlebrook, whilst enjoying the luxuries of a world-class resort year-round. Some of the schools past alumni include Andy Roddick, Jennifer Capriati and Ashley Harkleroad. Receive 20 percent off Camps Weeks in July and August by using the promo code “Isner” when you book your Junior Camp by Wednesday, July 15. For more information, call (813) 907-4200.

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

27


courtsix New York Tennis Magazine’s Gossip Column By Emilie Katz Li Na gives birth to baby girl Former tennis player Li Na and her husband Dennis had their first child, Alisa, in June. Li Na retired from tennis last year due to recurring knee injuries, following a stellar career that saw her become the first Asian Grand Slam champion.

Nadal sports $525,000 watch during French Open

Andy Roddick joins BBC’s coverage of Wimbledon British Broadcasting Channel (BBC) announced that American Andy Roddick joined the network for its coverage of Wimbledon. Roddick is a three-time finalist at the Grand Slam tournament. “I’m honored to join the BBC team for Wimbledon,” said Roddick. “The Championships will always have a special place in my heart, and I’m excited to cover them.”

Federer and Sharapova among top earning athletes in the world Not only was Rafael Nadal trying to win at the 2015 French Open, but he also wanted to look good. The nine-time Roland Garros champion donned a $525,000 RM 027 Tourbillon timepiece. The watch weighed just 20 grams as to not affect the Spaniard’s play. He lost in the quarterfinals to eventual French Open runner-up Novak Djokovic. 28

grossing among men’s and women’s tennis players, respectively. Federer came in at number five overall on the list, while Sharapova was listed at 26th. Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal, Serena Williams, Andy Murray and Kei Nishikori all made their way onto the list as well.

Wozniacki visits the Dr. Oz Show

Caroline Wozniacki recently visited the Dr. Oz show to talk about fitness and healthy living. Wozniacki discussed eating right, her relationship with Serena Williams and how she has learned to bounce back from tough times.

Tweets from the pros

Forbes released its list of the “100 HighestPaid Athletes in the World,” and Roger Federer and Maria Sharapova were the top

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

l Andy Roddick (@AndyRoddick): Just insane how clutch that 3 wood was ... Unreal #speith l Victoria Azarenka (@Vika7): Happy Father’s Day to all incredible men who inspire and help their kids achieve their dreams and love unconditionally! My dad is my hero


l Nicholas Kyrgios (@NickKyrgios): Too good to be true, doing bunny hops on my scooter, phone falls out, screen cracked l Angelique Kerber (@AngeliqueKerber): Pierogi Time #bestpolishfood l Rafa Nadal (@RafaelNadal): Working hard to make our #RafaNadalAcademy a reality in 2016. l Aga Radwanska (@ARadwanska): I want @stanwawrinka backhand. Crazy how he played today l Stanislas Wawrinka (@StanWawrinka): Happy to be part of ESPN #BodyIssue !! It was fun @espn l Mardy Fish (@MardyFish): Gael Monfils such a fickle player … In my opinion the best pure athlete to ever play tennis … l Venus Williams (@VenusesWilliams): Elevators are a little small in Europe, I’m no small person you see ...! l Novak Djokovic (@DjokerNole): Thank u all for believing in me and cheering for me. Congrats @stanwawrinka on an amazing performance! Well deserved. l CoCo Vandeweghe (@CoCoVandey):

l l

l

l

l

l l

The moment when people that have cooler shades than you could ever dream of follow you! You know who you are #Pimpin’ Noah Rubin (@Noahrubin33): First tourney as a pro here in Tulsa, Oklahoma. First step in a long journey. #NoahsArk Serena Williams (@SerenaWilliams): No one gets there alone. #Gratitude to all my friends and partners who helped me get this far on the journey. Roger Federer (@RogerFederer): Love that @andyroddick is going to be commentating @Wimbledon this year. A-Rod is the man Sabine Lisicki (@SabineLisicki): Yeess ...with my 27 aces I’ve got another record. Too bad I missed the 131mph serve by a few inches ... Milos Raonic (@MilosRaonic): I will continue my rehab and proceed with preparations for a 100 percent strong Wimbledon and Queens run. Thank you for the love and support Eugenie Bouchard (@GenieBouchard): Stuff on the Internet is weird. John Isner (@JohnIsner): Life is good

l l l l l l l l

when you can golf cart to practice with coach @justingimelstob #neighborhoodpractice Justin Gimelstob (@JustinGimelstob): Fun and productive first practice @wimbledon Truly a special place Chris Evert (@ChrissieEvert): Guilty pleasure watching @BacheloretteABC ... Boy, is SHE confused … Grigor Dimitrov (@GrigorDimitrov): Doesn’t get better than that! #grasscourtseason Lindsay Davenport (@LDavenport76): Because who doesn’t want to spend a Sunday at a trampoline place Jack Sock (@JackSock): Spieth is a legend Tomas Berdych (@TomasBerdych): #gettingready All white ... it’s alright #HMSport Madison Keys (@Madison_Keys): I am not okay with @GameOfThrones right now Sloane Stephens (@SloaneTweets): Shout out to this guy, who doesn’t get nearly enough credit for putting up w/ me on a daily basis! Happy Father’s Day!

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

29


NYJTL Opens Cary Leeds Center for Tennis & Learning Credit all photos to Barry Williams and Sal Mokhtari

New York Junior Tennis & Learning (NYJTL) launched its flagship facility, the Cary Leeds Center for Tennis & Learning, in Crotona Park in the South Bronx with a ribbon-cutting and celebration. The event drew hundreds of names from the worlds of tennis, fashion, government and civic engagement. “It would be very difficult to find any other city in the world that has built a facility like this to give boys and girls an opportunity to get an education and improve their athletic skills,” said Hall of Fame Coach Nick Bollettieri. The $26.5 million Cary Leeds Center for Tennis & Learning has been decades in the making, and a testament to the longstanding commitment of public and private partners to create a center that will touch the lives of 30

an estimated 30,000 students in the South Bronx area. Conceptually, the venue is designed as a series of platforms—both for viewing tennis, from beginner to professional level, and metaphorically a platform to encourage after-school learning—a project to create the opportunity for inner city kids to experience success on the tennis court as well as in life. The Center is a tribute to Cary Leeds, a star on Yale’s tennis team who went on to become a world-ranked player (ranking 12th in doubles), competing in six U.S. Opens and five Wimbledon tournaments, where in 1981, he reached the semifinals in mixeddoubles. After retiring from professional tennis, he attended business school and then co-founded a software company, all while enthusiastically teaching tennis to gifted

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

youngsters until he passed away in 2003. “Cary Leeds loved teaching the sport, especially to young players,” said Cary’s father, Larry Leeds, who served as Project Campaign co-chair. “As a place where children of all backgrounds will access tennis and educational opportunities, the Center will be a fitting memorial to Cary’s life and will make the world a better place, because he was here.” Designed and constructed by GLUCK+, with the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation, the Cary Leeds Center will house a two-story, 12,000-square-foot clubhouse and educational facility, with two world-class exhibition courts and 20 outdoor courts, 10 of which will be indoors seasonally under air structures. “This complex public-private tennis


project in the heart of the South Bronx will positively impact so many young lives,� said Founder and Chairman Emeritus Lewis “Skip� Hartman. “That will quickly overshadow and make us forget the 15 long years it took to locate, fundraise, build and organize the operations of this fabulous facility.� The building and stadium courts are partially buried as a strategy to minimize the impact of a large structure in the park and also to take advantage of natural geothermal heating and cooling of below ground surfaces. Courtside, the lower level opens directly onto the two sunken exhibition courts. It will serve as the flagship home for NYJTL coaches and tutors and provide free yearround instruction and play for young people, as well as regional facility for competition and recreational tennis. “NYJTL’s new Cary Leeds Center is rooted in a great cause, promoting the love of tennis and healthy exercise in one of the most impoverished neighborhoods in our country,� said Billie Jean King. “NYJTL strives to build champions on and off the court, and I fully expect this new venue to not only foster a deep appreciation of tennis and education in this community, but to make a difference in the lives of so many.� The Cary Leeds Center–located in the 127-acre Crotona Park—will serve children in one of the poorest Congressional districts in the United States, offering more than 6,000 free court hours for community use and providing space for educators to help young people improve their

performance in school. “This location dovetails with our mission to develop the character of young people through tennis and education for a lifetime of success on and off the court,� said NYJTL CEO and President Deborah Antoine. “We’re deeply committed to serving young people who would not otherwise have the opportunity to learn and play tennis, which is especially important in low-income communities.� NYJTL is naming the new clubhouse after sports icon and social justice pioneer Billie Jean King. The clubhouse will contain classrooms, the youth lounge and fitness center, and a technology center, the Tennis Channel Learning Lab. “Of the many ideas and projects that Skip Hartman has put forward to improve the lives and experiences of our city’s children, including the founding of the NYJTL, his perseverance in developing the Leeds Center over these long years, has got to be among the greatest things he has done,� said former New York City Mayor David Dinkins. “I am thrilled to have been part of this project’s evolution and share in its opening day.� In addition to the 20 adjacent tennis courts (10 outdoor and 10 covered in winter for year-round play) and two-story clubhouse, the Cary Leeds Center will also be home to two exhibition courts donated by the Kiam and Ackman families, with stadium seating for 1,000 people. This final component will be completed during the project’s final phase in 2016. The Cary Leeds Center will offer a variety

of programs for adults throughout the indoor (October to April) and outdoor (April to October) seasons, such as cardio tennis, learn and play, private and group lessons, and league competition. Hourly court rentals also will be available and senior discounts will be offered. Additionally, the Cary Leeds Center will bring new energy and financial vitality to the South Bronx, by featuring major local, national and international professional tennis tournaments that will draw visitors from around the world. Asked how it feels to finally see the club ready to open after years of hard work, Skip Hartman said, “I never doubted that it would happen. We have such a wonderful group of people supporting the Cary Leeds Center. Every time we needed a little something extra, there was someone there to step up and get it done and this is still a work in progress, but we are off to a very good start ‌ it’s a beautiful facility. We think that we will see a lot of events happening here, a lot of kids participating, I’d be surprised if there weren’t 1,000 children impacted by this facility per year, and it’s going to do a lot of good for a lot of people. With 22 tennis courts and a clubhouse as beautiful as this, I think it will attract a lot of people. This is not Manhattan, but it’s a wonderful place and a beautiful park. From the overlook [viewing bridge] you can see the five courts and two stadium courts. You are also going to be able to see the park and that should be ready inside another year.â€?

A TENNIS SHOP FOR THE PROS

!!  !  CLOTHING & ACCESSORIES GROMMET INSTALLS   FREE DEMOS

SHIPPING AVAILABLE! CONTACT US! WWW.HIGHCOUNTRYSKIANDTENNIS.COM !   !!! !

 !!   !! NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

31


Hopefuls Aim for Grand Stage at U.S. Open Ballperson Tryouts BY J A C O B MIS H K IN

t the four Grand Slam events, fans often forget the preparations that make for a successful tournament. One of these significant provisions is to find ballpersons who are fit to be on the court and make each tennis match run efficiently. In late June, the 2015 U.S. Open Ballperson Tryouts were held at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis

A 32

Center, and were open to prospective ballpersons 14 years of age and older. To begin the afternoon, optimistic ballpersons patiently stood on line to register and try out for one of the 80 open positions. As registration concluded, candidates rushed through the U.S. Open gates and continued onward to the outer courts to receive further instruction. After everyone arrived, U.S. open staff told them which courts they will be try-

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

ing out on. On multiple outside courts, candidates were judged on their throwing strength and accuracy, catching skills and overall hand-eye coordination, running abilities, and listening skills. Before the tryouts were underway, hopefuls were smiling and chatting away. Talking with high school student Matthew Hirschfeld from The Ramaz School in the Upper East Side of Manhattan, his ex-


citement for the opportunity to make the “ballperson team” was clear. “I think it will be a remarkable experience, I’d talk about it for the rest of my life and to be so close to some of the sport’s biggest stars. But to also be able to help out at the U.S. Open would be

special,” said Hirschfeld. Similar to that of his younger brother, Ben Hirschfeld, a recent graduate of The Ramaz School, also looked forward to the chance to be a 2015 U.S. Open ballperson. “I consider myself to be an athletic guy, so anything involving running,

throwing and catching would be fun for me,” said Ben Hirschfeld. “I am also a huge tennis fan and I always watch the U.S. Open, so now to actually be part of it would be really exciting to me.” The Hirschfeld brothers have experience as ballboys at the semi-professional level and used their experience at the tryouts to their advantage. Great Neck middle school students Jonathan Robani and Matthew Yezan made their aspirations known. Robani and Yezan mentioned this would be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to be up close and personal with the best players in the world. With hundreds competing, there will be some disappointment, but one thing is for sure … those who try out will gain a memorable experience. Jacob Mishkin is an intern with New York Tennis Magazine. The Woodbury, N.Y. native is currently a junior at St. Bonaventure University where he plays for the Men’s Tennis Team.

The West Teennis Club West Side Tennis New FForest orest Hills, Ne w YYork ork Augustt 23-29, 2015 Augus Boys ages Boys & Girls: ag es 8-12 Singles/Doubles/Mixed Singles/Doubles/Mixed Doubles Doubles All Yellow Yellow Ball on full ccourt ourt

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

33


Injury Prevention Through Exercise By Erik Scharf njury prevention in tennis is vital for all ages and all levels. The inherent repetitive motions in tennis can cause injuries and imbalances in professionals, juniors and adults just looking for some weekly exercise. According to the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), a complete physical activity program consists of four components: Strength training, cardio, balance and flexibility. In tennis, the most physically demanding stroke is the serve. The sheer volume of serving and overheads while training or competing necessitates a muscle strengthen regimen to avoid injury. Lateral deltoid raises, latissimus dorsi pull downs, pullups, seated or upright rows and wrist curls (palms up and palms down) are some exercises which target the rotator cuff, scapular and elbow. Torque or the forces generated by twisting and turning, is also an intrinsic component of tennis. Torque induced stress on the lower back requires core strengthening exercises as a preventive measure against lower back injury. Exercise modalities such as yoga and Pilates develop core strength in addition to enhancing balance and flexibility.

I

34

Dynamic stretching is an essential activity to loosen one’s body before hitting the first tennis ball. Static stretching is strongly beneficial after exercising since the muscles are warm. However, static stretching is strongly contraindicated for cold muscles. Elastic resistance provides dual benefits for muscles; increased strength and flexibility. Tennis is a weight-bearing sport, whereby compressive forces exert significance stress on the musculoskeletal system. Scientific research has demonstrated that weight training increases both muscle density and bone density. Weight training will enable one’s body to absorb and dissipate impact more easily. The knees are also subject to considerable amounts of compressive forces. Strengthening the surrounding leg muscle is critical to injury prevention. Exercises which target muscles surrounding the knees include leg curls, leg extensions and leg presses and can be performed using machines. Nutrition and hydration also play a pivotal role in injury prevention. An intake of 20-25 grams of protein in addition to electrolyte supplemented water within 30-45 minutes after exercising is an optimal time frame for aiding the recovery and cellular rebuilding processes. The consumption of protein more than one

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

“According to the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), a complete physical activity program consists of four components: Strength training, cardio, balance and flexibility.” hour after exercise curtails the recovery and rebuilding processes. The incorporation of a complete physical training program complemented with the appropriate nutritional components will enable one to thoroughly enjoy tennis—the sport for a lifetime. Erik Scharf was recently named head professional at Gotham Tennis Academy and Stadium Tennis Center. Erik attended Roosevelt High School, where he was the top player in New York State, winning the Boys Singles Titles in 1995-1997. He went on to play number one singles all four years at St. John’s University, going undefeated in Big East conference play, and amassing a 60-6 overall record during his tenure at SJU. He may be reached by phone at (718) 665-4684.


Har-Tru Sports: Developing Champions Around the World The first Har-Tru court was constructed in Hagerstown, Md. in 1932 and a brand was born. Har-Tru is consistent, timeless and intimately acquainted with some of the greatest moments in the history of the game. Har-Tru Sports is a global, values-based, sports company with its roots in the tennis industry. Our expertise in tennis includes more than 200 years of collective experience on our team. Based in Charlottesville, Va., Har-Tru is the leading provider of clay courts, court consultation, court accessories and maintenance

equipment in the tennis industry. We are proud of our legacy of developing innovative tennis products, dating back to the 1970s, when Har-Tru developed our first complete line of brushes and line sweepers and the first tennis court roller. From court maintenance products, to shoe cleaners, to court organizers and products that enhance the player experience, the company continues to evolve its existing products and develop new ones. With a focus on developing champions worldwide through innovative products, Har-

Tru Sports, one of the business divisions operated by Luck Companies, is best known for its Har-Tru brand of clay courts and uses its products, knowledge, advocacy and passion to further the development of tennis champions around the world. The company ships products around the world and its global reach includes courts in Canada, Australia and China, with a focus on innovative green technology to provide world-class products. For more information about Har-Tru Sports, visit www.hartru.com.

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

35


NEW YORK CITY

BOYS & GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL RECAP Beacon Captures Both Boys and Girls PSAL Titles In the finals of the A League Tennis Tournament, held at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, the Beacon “Lady Demons” Girls Tennis Team defeated McKee Staten Island Tech (MSIT), 3-2. Being crowned PSAL Division A Champions for three consecutive years did not come easy. This year, the team’s players experienced various injuries, but despite the adversity, they stuck together, dug

deep and pulled out another win, even as number one singles Victoria Sec watched from the bench due to an injury that had sidelined her for nearly a month. In match play, Veronika Semenova, number three singles for MSIT, brought in the first win, defeating Beacon’s Sabrina Dabakarov 6-0, 6-1. Beacon answered with a quick win from seasoned veterans Sofia Pascual & Michelle Khaimov at first

Credit photos to Damion Reid

The Beacon “Lady Demons” Girls Tennis Team defeated McKee Staten Island Tech for its third consecutive PSAL Division A Championship

The Beacon High School Boys Tennis Team defended its City Championship, defeating Brooklyn Tech 4-1 in the finals of the PSAL Championship 36

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

doubles. Pascual & Khaimov, the PSAL Doubles Individual Champions, overpowered their MSIT opponents Caitlin Balagula & Elizabeth Khusid, taking the match 6-2, 6-2. Beacon took the lead as the second doubles pairing of Maria Kogarova & Natasha Osses Konig worked hard to take out Chloe Trang & Rebecca Krupatkin, 7-6, 6-2. Sophia Kryloff evened up the team score for MSIT with an impressive win over Beacon’s Alexus Gill, 6-3, 3-6, 6-4. The girls experienced long, hard-hitting baseline rallies with both players hitting numerous winners. Freshman Aleksandra Bekirova pulled out the team win for Beacon in a three-setter. Bekirova took the first set 6-4. Her opponent, Anastasiya Mainouskaya, came back, taking the second set 6-2. But it was Bekirova who responded with a vengeance and relentlessly pressured Mainouskaya with a 6-0 win in the third set to give Beacon their third straight title. The Beacon girls, seeded fourth, beat rival Stuyvesant 3-2 in the quarterfinals, then beat Madison 5-0 in the semifinals to move into the finals. MSIT, seeded second, beat league rival Tottenville 5-0 in the quarterfinals, and then moved into the finals with a dominant 5-0 win over Francis Lewis High School. On the boy’s side, it was Beacon High School who also defended its City Championship, defeating Brooklyn Tech 4-1 in the finals of the PSAL Championship. The Beacon team was led by captain and first singles player Oliver Sec, one of the topranked players in the USTA Eastern Section. The senior recorded a perfect record of 32-0 throughout his four years playing in the PSAL. Sec recorded the first win for Beacon by defeating William Trang 6-1, 6-0. The second doubles team of Amer Hossain & Lucas Larese De Santo gained the second win for Beacon over Tech’s Dan Negru & Dan Masayev 6-0, 6-1. Brooklyn Tech


NEW YORK CITY

BOYS & GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL RECAP countered at third singles, as freshman Sam Vagner won a 6-3, 6-3 contest over senior Michael Gardiner. The match was decided by two three-set victories by Beacon at first doubles and second singles. The senior duo of Garret Sopko & Kevin Hyunh won 6-1, 3-6, 6-0 over Tech’s Bojidar Todorov & Denis Korol. Senior Felipe Osses-Konig, with a relentless style, outlasted Brooklyn Tech junior Philip Raytburg in a three-set victory, 6-2, 6-7, 6-2.

In the PSAL quarterfinals, Beacon defeated division rival Hunter College High School 5-0. Although they swept its semifinal opponent Townsend Harris 5-0, the first singles match between Sec and senior Ethan Nittolo was the match of the team playoffs. Sec cruised to a 6-1 lead, but as weather conditions changed and the wind picked up, Nittolo changed his tactics and was able to even the match with a 6-3 second set win. The third set was even and eventually entered a tie-breaker. Nittolo

went up 5-3 in the tie-break. On the ensuing point, Sec hit a shot that hit the net and trickled over to get back on serve. He ultimately won the last four points of the tiebreaker to win 7-6(5). “I was proud of the whole team … those who started and many subs who led us to an undefeated season,” said Beacon Boys HS Head Coach Bayard Faithfull. “Above all else, I appreciated the leadership of our five senior starters, especially co-captains Oliver Sec and Felipe Osses Konig.”

Trinity Wins San Marco Invitational Title

The Trinity School defeated Harrison 4-0 in the championship match at the Dick Savitt Tennis Center to capture the Jim San Marco Invitational

The 2015 Jim San Marco Invitational saw the Trinity School defeat Harrison 4-0 in the championship match at the Dick Savitt Tennis Center at Columbia University in New York City. The event brought together the top teams from New York State and presented some of the most competitive tennis of the spring season. Trinity moved past Syosset 4-1 and Half Hollow Hills West in a tie-breaker to reach the semifinals. In the semis, the Tigers edged Brooklyn Tech 4-2 to advance to the final against Harrison, after Harrison knocked off Byram Hills 4-2 in the other semifinal match. The Tigers proved to be too much for Harrison in the championship, winning 4-

0. Despite a slow start to some of the doubles matches, Trinity used its experience to hang tough and work itself back into the contest. “I felt that we got off to a slow start on all three doubles courts, largely because Harrison came out firing,” said Trinity head coach Damon Lopez-O’Dwyer. “We are an experienced group, though, and our guys were able to weather that storm and not let the matches get away from them before it was too late.” Trinity was led by junior Ananth Raghavan, who was named the tournament’s Most Valuable Player. “It’s exciting to be able to compete against teams from around the region, not

just the city,” said Lopez-O’Dwyer. “This year, due to weather delays, the tournament was a long and winding road. It was literally with us all season, which gave it a feel like playing in a second league rather than a tournament. It actually reminded me of the Davis Cup, where months go by between ties over the course of the year. We are happy to have emerged and represented New York City well.” “Winning always breeds confidence,” said Lopez-O’Dwyer. “Our regular season ended two weeks ago, so it was important for us to get a quality match in—regardless of the outcome—to get ourselves refocused and back into our routine as we prepare for the Mayor’s Cup.”

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

37


NEW YORK CITY

BOYS & GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL RECAP NYJTL Brings 600-Plus Together for 27th Annual Mayor’s Cup

New York Junior Tennis & Learning (NYJTL) capped off the 27th Annual Mayor’s Cup AllScholastic Championships at the Cary Leeds Center for Tennis and Learning. The Mayor’s Cup is the largest junior scholastic tennis competition in the United States, with players from a wide diversity of backgrounds and neighborhoods representing, public, parochial and private schools through the greater New York City areas. With nearly 600 participants, players had the privilege to enjoy the sport they love, while competing at a high level. The event offered free head-to-head competition for elementary, middle school and high school students. Seventeen elementary schools participated in a fun-filled team tennis event, while competitive matches were being played in 10 different divisions. Below are the results from the 2015 Mayor’s Cup All-Scholastic Championships: l Boys Elementary Singles: Solomon Brown (Central Park East) defeated Mike Sheppard (Collegiate School) 4-0, 4-0 l Boys Middle School Singles: Ethan Leon (JHS 210Q) defeated Sujay Sharma (MS 67) 7-5, 6-1 l Boys Varsity Singles: Shawn Jackson (Wagner HS) defeated Jonah Jurick (Bronx HS of Science) 6-2, 4-6, 6-4 l Girls Elementary School Singles: Natalie Eordekian (St. Sebastian) 38

l l l

l

defeated Sarah Youngberg (Spence School) 4-1, 4-2 Girls Middle School Singles: Nadeja Maslova (PS 206K) defeated Sonia Tartakovsky (The Chapin School) 6-1, 7-5 Girls Varsity Singles: Shelly Yaloz (Laurel Springs) defeated Aleksandra Bekirova (Beacon HS) 6-0, 6-2 Boys Varsity Doubles: Ameer Hosain & Garret T. Sopko (Beacon) defeated Daniel Nover & Douglas Nover (St. Francis Prep) 5-7, 6-4, 6-1 Girls Varsity Doubles: Alexus Gill & Michelle Khaimov (Beacon) defeated Joanne Chiu & Danielle Young (Stuyvesant) 6-1, 6-0

All matches were competitive, but three matches stood out from the rest. Boys’ Middle School Singles winner Ethan Leon of JHS 210Q had a great match with Sujay Sharma of MS67. Every point was a battle as both players were playing very well, but Leon was just a little bit more consistent. Down a break 4-5 in the first set, Leon broke back at 40-30 after a 30-30 point that lasted 22 shots. Leon looked comfortable for the rest of the match as he won eight of the next nine games. “I did well, I was serving good and executing my shots,” said Leon. “I stayed mentally focused.” Girls’ Varsity Singles winner Shelly Yaloz

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

of Laurel Springs High School competed at a high level against opponent Aleksandra Bekirova of Beacon High School. Yaloz used her defense to keep her opponent on edge, while transitioning to offense nicely. Yaloz was aggressive when the time was right. “It was windy out here today, so I moved my feet a lot more and went for bigger targets,” said Yaloz. Excited about the award ceremony later in the day, Yaloz, with a big smile, grinned and said, “I feel amazing.” For the Boy’s Varsity Singles match, Shawn Jackson of Wagner High School and Jonah Jurick of Bronx High School of Science faced off. The match was a grind, as it went down to the wire. Jackson wound up victorious, defeating Jurick 6-2, 4-6, 6-4 in a long three-set match. Up 5-0 to begin the match, Jackson looked to be in control for most of the way. Toward the end of the set however, Jackson surrendered two straight games, which gave Jurick some confidence going into the second set in which he won 6-4. After the match, Jackson noted his struggles and also spoke highly of his opponent, stating that Jurick’s level increased in the second set which caught him off guard. Pleased with his victory, Jackson believed his offensive mindedness paid off for him. “Aggressiveness is why I won,” Jackson said. “If I wasn’t aggressive, he would win the long points.” Sure, the Mayor’s Cup had great, com-


NEW YORK CITY

BOYS & GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL RECAP

petitive tennis throughout the day, but that’s not what the entire day was all about. Mayor’s Cup Tournament Director and NYJTL Director of Advanced Training and Competition Elena Bantovska, Mayor’s Cup Chairman and General Manger of the Cary Leeds Center Ron Nano of NYJTL, President & CEO of NYJTL Dr. Deborah Antoine, and

Gary Davis of NYJTL, all played important roles in making the day a success. “It was tough getting everything in, but we did it,” said Bantovska. “I am so proud of everyone, they worked really, really hard. It’s a big deal for the kids … they put this on their resume and feel very proud. Today is all about feeling

continued on page 40

Immerse yourself in performance tennis. Get a head start on your 2015 game. With 5-hours of tennis coaching per day, we unlock your tennis potential. Adult Weekends and Junior Camps.

R

TENNIS

S

at ADDLEBROOK ESORT

CAMPS

good, proud and the best in the city.” Nano also had great things to say about the event. “To be honest with you, I want to give credit to the staff who really did an amazing job this year. It was the first time that we

John Isner’s training base

5700 Saddlebrook Way ♦ Wesley Chapel, FL 33543 800.729.8383 ext. 4200

www.saddlebrooktennis.com

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

39


NEW YORK CITY

BOYS & GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL RECAP

played this event somewhere other than the National Tennis Center,” said Nano. “We knew transitioning was going to be tough, but they did a great job in delivering to make the tournament happen.” While on-court teaching young kids the foundation of tennis, Gary Davis had time to give his take on the event. Pleased with the showing, Davis noted, “This is probably one of our better turnouts. As you can see, some parents have come out to watch and now we have an audience so, the event is growing.” Relating back to the kids, Davis made light of the event and its positive impact. “You can see the progression, it’s very nice to see that the kids have definitely improved their games,” said Davis.

NYJTL President & CEO Dr. Deborah Antoine was all smiles as she watched the all of the tennis being played. “It’s such an amazing opportunity for kids to play, be with friends, compete, and the level of sportsmanship that you see in every match,” said Deborah Antoine. “And when they shake hands at the end it’s really spectacular.” The takeaways from the 2015 Mayor’s Cup All-Scholastic Championships were upbeat and very positive. All of the events went smoothly and kids and spectators were all smiles, whether they won or lost. The sunny weather and setting of Crotona Park made the day event more special. Having 600 kids come to the event was great, but wouldn’t 30,000 be even better?

“You can see the turnout today with all the kids and their families, but when you think about it, there are 30,000 kids within walking distance of this place,” said Dr. Antoine. Problem solved. The brand-new, state of the art Cary Leeds Center had its grand opening in June. The two-story, 12,000square-foot clubhouse and educational facility will serve as the home for NYJTL coaches to provide free year-round instruction for young people from beginners to ranked junior players. The Center will serve more than 30,000 families and children in and around Crotona Park, one of the poorest Congressional districts in the United States. Antoine hopes the facility will be “dignifying to the community it serves and will be a beacon of light and hope to the community.”

NYSPHSAA/NYSFSSAA Boys Tennis Championships Gamble Defends His Title at State Championships Webster Schroeder Junior Matt Gamble won his second consecutive singles title at the 2015 NYSPHSAA/NYSFSSAA Boys Tennis Championships at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, defeating PlainviewOld Bethpage JFK’s Yuval Solomon 6-3, 6-1. “I think I played my best match of the tournament today,” said Gamble. “I felt like this one was one of my best serving matches and that I was hitting my forehands really well. I felt in control the whole time out there.” 40

In control was an understatement, as Gamble got out to a 4-1 lead in the first set by using his powerful forehand to work Solomon back and forth on the court. He kept the sophomore from Plainview JFK on the defensive the whole match using a combination of power and placement, and hitting key volleys at opportune times. “He is a solid player. I think he had a little too much power for me,” said Solomon, who was ranked third in the tournament. “I

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

thought I played the first set pretty well against him, but overall, I needed to be more consistent.” Solomon, who won the Nassau County Singles Title, said that he will work hard to get back to the NYSPHSAA/NYSFSSAA Championship in 2016. In the doubles finals match, Hope & Courage Crawford of Mamaroneck High School defeated Cold Spring Harbor’s Sean Mullins & Patrick Hannity 7-5 6-3.


NEW YORK CITY

BOYS & GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL RECAP Serving was an issue for both sides, as there were multiple breaks throughout the match. In the first set, momentum shifted back-and-forth as the Crawford Brothers went up 5-3, but Mullins & Hannity rebounded to even the set at 5-5. After holding to go up 6-5, the Crawfords were able to secure their third break of the set to take the set 7-5. In the second set, the teams held serve for the first three games, giving the Crawfords a 2-1 lead. In the fourth game, the first break of the set was secured and the Crawfords took a 3-1 lead. From there, they stayed in the lead, and up 5-3, tried to serve it out. Mullins & Hannity fought off three match points in the final game showing the heart they exemplified throughout the tournament, but the Crawfords were not to be denied, and on match point number four, they closed out the win. Cold Spring Harbor Junior Sean Mullins said that serving and communication was an issue for him and his partner. “I did not think we were serving great today … we were both a little off,” said Mullins. “Also, our communication was not as good as it could have been, particularly at the net.” Hannity, a sophomore at CSH, credited the Crawford Brothers for a well-played match, but wished his serve was a little more on point. “I had chances on my serve, but at key points, I felt like I did not serve as well as I could have,” said Hannity. The Crawfords also had their issues with serving early on in the match. “Serving was a big issue, especially in the first game of the match,” said Courage, who is a freshman at Mamaroneck. “We dropped that game, but after that, we had hold after hold.” Courage also said he and his brother kept their composure and didn’t get mad at each other and supported each other throughout the match. “We’ve had times where we’d start fighting with each other and we start losing our focus on the match,” said Courage. “But today, we didn’t get mad at each other and had each other’s back the entire time.” NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

41


More Than an Athlete The Seven Biggest Fears That Fake You Out of the Zone “Society views vulnerability as weakness, whereas in reality, awareness of vulnerability equates to true strength.”

By Rob Polishook, Mental Training Coach MA, CPC How many times have you heard kids cajole each other and say these two words: “Bring It!”? The problem is that no one really knows what that “It” is! It’s actually worth knowing, so let me explain. Ultimately your “It” will be the key to sustained peak performance. “Bring it!” Means to bring your whole self, it’s really another way of saying “more than an athlete.” When we watch tennis or any sporting event, it is clear what is on the athlete’s outside: Their talent, technique and skill. But bringing your whole self means to bring what’s on the inside, too: Spirit, inspiration, story and soul. By bringing your whole self, you are not only bringing your “It,” you are bringing your “More.” Think about Rafael Nadal … he brings his deep determination and grit. Serena Williams brings her feisty spirit and

never-say-die attitude. At the French Open, Jack Sock talked about bringing the inspiration of his brother’s bravery in the face of illness. All of these players are bringing their own “It.” This “It” is what people cannot see but what drives and motivates the performer. This “It” is the athlete’s X Factor that makes him or her more than an athlete. In an ideal world, everyone would be loose and relaxed enough to bring their whole self to the court and play inside the zone. But what gets in the way of bringing “It” to the court? Our fears and every day experiences can throw us off balance when we least expect it. They

Our facility features 18 outdoor courts, including 4 stadium courts, 12 indoor courts and 4 bubbled clay courts in our state of the art, 245,000 square foot indoor tennis facility. We are open 11 months of the year and offer the following:  t :  FBSSPVOE1SPHSBNTGPS"EVMUT BOE+VOJPST  t BOE6OEFS  t 4VNNFS$BNQT  t 4FBTPOBM$BNQT  t 0QFO$PVSU5JNF  t $POUSBDU$PVSUUJNF

      

t $PSQPSBUF&WFOUT t #JSUIEBZQBSUJFT t 'JFME5SJQT t 5PVST t 1SJWBUF-FTTPOT t $BSEJP5FOOJT t "OEPUIFS4QFDJBM&WFOUT

For more information call

718.760.6200 (ext. 0) or visit ntc.usta.com © 2012 USTA. All rights reserved.

42

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

can be emotional, physical or both. We often say “everything is fine,” but carry stress around from one activity to the next. Simulating dominos, the stress picks up steam. Then, when the nervous system is overwhelmed, we feel blocked. We can no longer bring “It” to the court because we are dealing with excess nervousness, anxiety, chokes and tightness. One of my clients described it as, “The body shuts down, it’s overwhelmed and says ‘no more.’ The body knows and recognizes this internal state of extreme chaos, before your head and heart do.” So, how do you get back “Home?” How do you bring your whole self to the court? Your biggest tool is to be able to recognize, identify and understand your fears. Below, I’ve listed seven of the biggest fears that can take us out of the zone. When you are feeling blocked, you can come to this list, and just by identifying your fear, you can begin to move through it. 1. The fear of not being good enough: This fear rears its head all the time, both on and off the court. In fact, just thinking about it may trigger an “ah-ha” moment. We all want to believe in ourselves and feel that we have the ability and intelligence to be successful, and any-


thing short of that can be disheartening. In match play, players sometimes get discouraged and begin to fear that they are not good enough to compete with an opponent. They then lose their will and compete at less than optimal levels. Sometimes both in life and in tennis, setbacks may seem like validation of not being good enough. However, while we may have setbacks, what really determines our strength is how we respond to them. 2. The fear of failure: This fear usually rears its head during a close match, especially when a player is perceived as being better than their opponent. The seemingly lesser player plays without expectations, but the favored player seems to be playing with a weight on their shoulders. The favored player is afraid to fail because they tie their identity and self-worth to their performance. Additionally, they may be afraid of what others will think and the subsequent reaction if they perform below expectations. Oftentimes when a player is afraid to experiment, afraid to try new techniques, or afraid to take a risk, their fear of failure is the cause. 3. Fear of the unknown: This fear often rears its head in preparation for a big match. The player cannot possibly know for sure whether they will win or lose. This “fear of the unknown” creates a high level of anxiety about what’s going to happen, and then “if that happens” what “will happen” after that. Along with this is the fear of not being in control. This can be seen when a player is on the defensive. This player may over-hit, perhaps attempting a low percentage winner, because they are so uncomfortable with their opponent dictating the point. However, being aware of their defensive positioning and accepting the situation will allow them to play in the present and play solid defense, eventually working their way back to neutral or the offensive.

4. The fear of being judged: This often comes up when a player is thinking about what their parents, coach, friends or teammates are thinking as they are playing. The simple act of this thought takes the player away from their present situation on the court, towards something they cannot control off the court. It is here that unconditional acceptance from the support system is so important. When such support is provided, the player can feel calm, relaxed and safe. Thus, the player can play free without any worry of the results. 5. The fear of not meeting expectations: This is similar to the fear of being judged, in that the player cannot control what someone else expects. Often, the expectations of parents, coaches and friends are a moving target in which only wins and losses are taken into account, and the process (their journey) is completely dismissed. For a player to play their best, they must be in the present and focus directly on the experience. Focusing on expectations creates a mental distraction, not to mention enhanced feelings of pressure on the court. 6. The fear of success: This fear manifests itself when a player has a lead and then begins to think things like, “I shouldn’t be beating this person, they are ranked higher than me.” Or a player may not view themself at a certain level, and therefore, does not feel deserving of a victory. Other times, the uncertainty and subsequent anxiousness of putting themselves on the line for a possible victory is too much to handle. The certainty of losing, while disappointing, is well-known and a familiar road already traveled. 7. The fear of injury or re-injury: This fear is referred to as the “silent epidemic.” It is often driven by our macho sports culture’s unwillingness to deal with the emotional stress and trauma-like experiences that may result from injuries. Specifically neg-

lected is the athlete’s uncertainty about recovery, alienation from the team, fear of not being able to return at full strength, and even the anxiety about what might happen should the situation recur. It’s important to note, while the athlete may be cleared physically by doctors, emotionally, they still may not have processed through the fear. Anyone who has experienced an injury understands how psychologically the injury doesn’t just disappear when the doctor says “You’re cleared to play.” In today’s sporting society, exhibiting any sign of weakness or fear is difficult for a player. Society views vulnerability as weakness, whereas in reality, awareness of vulnerability equates to true strength. It is from this platform of awareness that change and improvement are best triggered. Fears like the seven mentioned above pop up all the time, especially in pressure situations. They are a defense mechanism to prevent us from trying something which may make us uncomfortable. Yet recognizing such fears and having the courage and support system to work through them is what truly enables us to grow and reach our individual sustained peak potential. Rob Polishook, MA, CPC is founder and director of Inside the Zone Sports Performance Group. As a mental training coach, he works with athletes and teams, focusing on helping athletes gain the mental edge. Rob has spoken to athletes, coaches, parents both nationally at USTA, USPTA, ITA conferences, and has conducted international workshops and has worked with top-ranked juniors in United States, India and Israel. Rob is author of Tennis Inside the Zone: Mental Training Workouts for Champions is an experiential book for all players looking to take their mental game to the next level. He was awarded the 2008 USPTAEastern Division High School Coach of the Year Award and has coached USTA Zonals numerous years. He may be reached by phone at (973) 723-0314, email rob@insidethezone.com or visit www.insidethezone.com.

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

43


NTC Hosts 18th Annual

“Say Yes to Tennis

44

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com


s, No to Violence”Event

BY BRIAN COLEMAN

ueens District Attorney Richard A. Brown hosted the 18th Annual “Say Yes to Tennis, No to Violence” event at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, where 800-plus children from various schools in Far Rockaway hit the courts for a day of tennis and other fun activities. Part of DA Brown’s STAR Track Program, the event is a way to encourage kids to live a healthy and active lifestyle in hopes of steering them away from violence. “It’s a powerful event,” said Whitney Kraft, director of tennis at the National Tennis Center. “For a lot of these youngsters, it’s their first real exposure to tennis. We stress the advantages of movement, exercise and fitness. It’s a big partnership with

Q

the help of the NYJTL, USTA Eastern, the DA’s office and the New York City Police Department.” The kids got lessons from instructors from the National Tennis Center, as well as the New York Junior Tennis and Learning, and even heard an inspiring story of forgiveness from NYPD Detective Steven F. McDonald, who was shot in the line of duty over two decades ago. “I hope that the kids learn that life is a series of decisions,” Kraft added. “And that one of their outlets to deal with the stresses of life is physical fitness and exercise.” Some top junior players from the National Tennis Center put on an exhibition match to demonstrate how a tennis match is played and illustrate specific tennis shots.

Deborah MacFarlane Antoine, president and CEO of New York Junior Tennis & Learning (NYJTL), said the event is a great way to try and get kids on the right path. “I think it’s just a fabulous event to celebrate healthy living,” said Antoine. “When Arthur Ashe started the NYJTL 44 years ago, the mission he states then is what we’ve been doing ever since. It wasn’t just about teaching them tennis, but to help build healthy and trusting relationships. And that really is the key to living a successful life.” Brian Coleman is senior editor for New York Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by phone at (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 or e-mail brianc@usptennis.com.

Corporate Tennis League presented by

The Largest Corporate League in the Country! Team format with refreshments every night afterwards, and opportunities for exclusive tennis clinics.

EASTERN METRO

f tennis programs for all kinds of play “All kinds o ers.” Low cost adult beginner group tennis lessons throughout New York City PLAY TENNIS April thru September. NEW YORK

Singles and doubles competition in a team format by ability levels-fun and competitive! We'll find you a team, or bring your own team!

metrotennis.com 212-244-2845

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

45


NEW YORK CO

ASA College captures second straight NJCAA Championship

The women’s tennis team at ASA College won the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) for the second consecutive season, edging out Tyler Junior College in Texas. In addition to winning the championship, ASA racked up some individual awards as well, as Megane Bianco was named the In-

tercollegiate Tennis Association’s (ITA) Player to Watch and Macarena Olivares was named ITA Rookie of the Year. Bianco was a top 10 player in both the ITA Junior/Community Colleges National Singles and Doubles Rankings all season. She is currently ranked ninth nationally in singles and first in doubles for ASA. She owns singles victories over two NCAA Division I and four NCAA Division II opponents this spring. Olivares, the 2015 ITA Rookie Player of the Year, spent time atop the ITA Junior/Community Colleges National Singles and Doubles Rankings, along with helping ASA remain the number one team in the nation for the entire season. She has compiled a 9-3 singles record this spring, winning six sets by a score of 6-0. Among her victories are wins over NCAA Division I squads Bryant, Buffalo, Duquesne, and Louisiana Tech.

Columbia’s Endelman named ITA Assistant of the Year The Columbia Men’s Tennis team reached the Sweet 16 at the NCAA Men’s Championship, before losing to eventual champions Virginia. In addition, Columbia Athletics Hall of Famer and Associate Head Men’s Tennis Coach Howard Endelman was named the 2015 ITA National Assistant Coach of the Year. Endelman is pictured on the left with ITA Coach of the Year David Roditi of Texas Christian University (on the right).

46

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com


OLLEGIATE ROUNDU P New Yorker Loeb wins NCAA Women’s Singles Title

Jamie Loeb of the University of North Carolina captured the NCAA Women’s Singles championship, beating Carl Zhao of Stanford 6-2, 4-6, 6-1 in the final. Loeb, an Ossining, N.Y. native

who trains at the John McEnroe Tennis Academy (JMTA) was also named an ITA All-American and was a finalist for the ITA’s Player of the Year Award.

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

47


Coaches practice some drills in order to perfect them for their students

Kirk Anderson, Department director for Coach Education at the USTA, explains a drill in the classroom

Orange Ball Workshop

By Richard Thater

Even a massive traffic tie up on the highway near La Guardia Airport couldn’t stop 40 determined tennis trainers from attending a recent orange ball workshop, the USTA Player Development Team USA Early Development Camp Coach Training, at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. The program’s facilitators were Kirk Anderson, the USTA director of coaching education; and Jeff Rothstein, USTA Early Development Camp faculty lead coach. According to USTA Eastern Assistant Executive Director Jenny Schnitzer, 15 of the registered participants were PTA pros, 15 were PTR pros, and 10 had completed the online CoachYouth Tennis program. I was surprised to find myself sitting next to Whitney Kraft, director of tennis at the National Tennis Center. He said he registered as a participant in the workshop so he could better understand 10 & Under programs, and develop strong selling points for his meetings with parents. After trading knee surgery stories with USTA Eastern Long Island Region President Dan Burgess, I asked why he was on court rather than just observing the program. He told me he felt it was the best way to stay up-to-date, and easier than reading memos. The official name of the workshop, the “USTA Player Development Team USA Early 48

Development Camp Coach Training,” is a wordy mouthful, and it reflects the comprehensive, highly-detailed technical program outlined by the USTA. But the language gets simpler as the fundamentals find their way onto tennis courts. Kirk and Jeff suggested that we learn some new ways and words to describe what we do on tennis courts with students. Instead of calling what we do “lessons,” try instead referring to this time as “practices.” They said not to use the word “drills,” but call them “activities.” In the same way homework becomes a take-home activity, the reason for these language changes is to make the underlying new teaching concepts more userfriendly. The USTA is heading toward programs that develop athletes first. Even while children are developing their tennis skills, they should not be playing tennis on a daily basis. Rather, they should be playing other sports and balancing their athletic development. With our new knowledge, we followed Kirk and Jeff onto the courts to put our skills into practice. A neutral observer watching us learn a different method of teaching children to serve may have asked, “What the ‘L’ is going on?” The new technique is to have children hit the serve as if they were throwing a ball. The “L” is the angle made by the upper and lower arm as the student strikes the ball. This new method might be the obituary for phrases like “scratch your back” and “elbow

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

high to the sky.” There should be an emphasis in classes on teaching children how to throw, and how to run faster. Children who do not play games requiring them to throw often lead with their right foot when they throw right-handed. This can lead to life-long problems while serving and hitting overheads. So, making students better athletes leads to making them better tennis players. I feared being embarrassed when Kirk gathered us to learn what I would call “horizontal four-ball,” or two-person juggling. I was amazed at how quickly I adapted to this activity. Just this week, I taught this to a group of fifth graders who came to my club on an outreach event. They easily convinced the teachers who have been with them all year to join them as they kept four balls rotating in the air. A great exercise to develop balance, core strength and coordination is to have students face each other across the doubles alley while assuming a one-handed push-up position or even a yoga plank. Then, have them simply push balls back and forth cooperatively. Jeff made two critical points about rackets for children. The USTA believes we need better-quality children’s rackets. The USTA recommends that teachers themselves use 25-inch rackets when working with youth programs. I have started doing this, but I am still stuck using a 26-inch frame. I am hoping to move to a 25-incher soon. Using a smaller racket has forced me to concentrate on my


Coaches trying to keep up with the instructors during a footwork drill at the USTA Player Development Team USA Early Development Camp Coach Training workshop

take-back, point of contact and followthrough. The rate at which children should transition from red to orange to green dot balls should be based on earned advancement, rather than just age. The USTA has a great slogan to guide these transitions: “It is not a race to the yellow ball.” The range of correctness for teaching ten-

Jeff Rothstein, USTA Eastern board member and executive regional director of junior tennis development and programming for Centercourt, goes over some coaching points

nis techniques has been broadened. There should be no one-way or strict catechism for teaching. A teacher or program that is too rigid could drive a student into that 70 percent of youngsters who quit organized sports by the age of 13. Jeff and Kirk both made a very simple request of all the participants: “Don’t be a child‘s last coach.”

Richard Thater is a long-time teacher and player on New York City courts. He is PTR-certified in both Junior and Adult Development, and has played in senior tournaments in the Greater New York area. Richard currently teaches at the West Side Tennis Club. He may be reached by phone at (917) 749-3255 or e-mail richthater@aol.com.

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

49


Keeping a Cool Head in Tight-Pressure Situations By Luke Jensen Jensen Zone fans! I hope this finds your summer filled with aces and winners! If you are a tennis player who likes the sting of competition, this is your season. From hard to grass court with some clay action sprinkled in, the summer is a time for the competitive player to shine. I receive more questions about mental approaches to pressure than any other technical or tactical part of the game. For the inner champion in us all, we all compete to win. We compete to see who is the best on any given day. At some point in your competitive journey, a player clicks into an understanding that the best player or favorite does not always finish on top. It is at this point where I begin with an approach to being a tougher competitor between the ears.

Ask yourself what kind of competitor you currently are and then ask yourself what type of competitor you would like to be. This is not outcome-based. I’m not asking what kind of mental approach you want to bring into the fight. This is what I call your competitive character. I always wanted my opponents to know that I would run down every ball, and emotionally, stay in every match no matter how far I was down. This was the cornerstone of any Jensen’s approach to competition. I believe this armed all four of us Jensens—Murphy, Rebecca, Rachel and I— to play in Grand Slams. The emotional swings of a fragile emotional state takes players out of the match, where modern day warriors like Rafael Nadal and Maria Sharapova tap into their fighting spirit when things are looking their worst. My tennis idols were Bjorn Borg, Jimmy Connors and John McEnroe. Three Hall of

Play Tennis @ Towers Country Club 5 Har-Tru courts, 2 lighted courts for night play USPTA Certified Pro & Assistant Pro on duty PLUS - you get full Country Club membership which includes: use of gym with aerobics, spin & Zumba classes; indoor & outdoor swimming pools; lockers; VIP Restaurant; country club & tennis association social events and entertainment.

All of this for $1750 membership & $75 association dues For information contact the Country Club @ 718.428.5030 ext. 0 27286 Grand Central Parkway, Floral Park, NY 11005

50

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

Fame competitors, but with three different approaches to the game. Borg was quiet in his approach, where Connors was engaged in the conflict, and Johnny Mac was enraged with the chaos of the battle. I was a player that used all three of these traits in my mental game. What my tennis idols taught me was to have a fearless approach to my matches. The more I welcomed the pressure, the more I wanted to play on the stadium court and win that big point … the better I played! I didn’t win all of those matches, but I never had to worry that I wouldn’t have the guts to attack a pressure-packed moment. My advice to you is to make the choice, make the change and take charge of your mental approach to any situation that you will face under pressure. The pressure of the moment will measure the very best you can be if you allow yourself to engage fearlessly into the big points. Until next time … step into that ball and go for the winner! Born in Grayling, Mich., Luke Jensen’s resume includes 10 ATP Tour doubles titles and singles victories against Andre Agassi, Pete Sampras, Ivan Lendl, John McEnroe, Bjorn Borg, Jimmy Connors, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg and Jim Courier. Jensen and his brother, Murphy, won the 1993 French Open doubles title. He was also a member of the 1991 and 1992 Davis Cup Teams. His ambidextrous play, including his ability to serve the ball with either hand at 130 mph, earned him the nickname “Dual Hand Luke.” Luke is currently director of tennis at Sea Island Tennis Center in Georgia. He may be reached by phone at (315) 4433552 or e-mail lukejensen84@yahoo.com.


Did You Win? By Elizabeth Right Reiss ftentimes, “Did you win?” is the first question from a parent, caregiver or friend after a match or practice group. Although always with the best of intentions, these words can often cause our athletes to become tense, and sometimes, exhibit anxiety, anger and maybe even fear. Although a pretty straightforward response can usually be given, if it was practice, does winning or losing really matter? If it was a really close match that your athlete had played the game of his or her life in, that question can make the loss not only burn every part of his or her body, but also diminish self-confidence and resiliency. Instead of starting the conversation focusing on defeat or victory, try to encourage athletes to reflect on the match or practice in a more mindful way. Your guidance will allow them to examine the match or the practice points, create a trustworthy

O

relationship where they believe you are on their side and allow them to evaluate their performance practically without too many emotions. You may ask: l What did you do well today? l What was the best part of your game? l How did you feel halfway through the match? l Do you think maybe you need a jolt of energy halfway through? l What about bringing a power bar in your bag? These contemplative questions allow the players to study their game in a more productive way, where they feel in control. This will create competitors (not only in athletics, but what they chose to do off the court as well), who are able to be introspective about their game, thoughtful in their growth and improvement and able to overcome minor setbacks and losses. Constructive communication also creates a partnership between you and the athlete. The athlete is no longer anxious that they are judged solely on the win or loss, but more in the more measurable

aspects that they can control. Did I have quick feet? Did I transfer my weight well? Was I coming to the net enough? These more specific questions can aid in helping the athlete understand WHY they were successful or not in a more precise manner, and hopefully, once they have reflected on this, the changes can be made so they’re more successful in the future. Elizabeth Right Reiss works with a variety of student-athletes ages in small groups, teams and privately. Her work involves fitness, sports, exercise, mindfulness, nutrition, confidence building and athletics. After several years coaching and mentoring athletes on success both on and off the field, she received a Masters in Counseling Psychology from Harvard Graduate School of Education as well as a Master’s in Sport and Exercise Psychology from the University of Virginia. She may be reached by phone at (303) 918-3140, e-mail elizabeth.right@gmail.com or visit www.ElizabethRightReiss.com.

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

51


GROW TENNIS

Grow Tennis New York Second Annual KidsFest Hits Engineers CC for a Day of Tennis and Fun B Y TREVO R MITC H EL

s part of New York Tennis Magazine’s 2015 Summer Series, kids and parents recently gathered at Engineers Country Club in Roslyn, N.Y. for the 2nd Annual New York Tennis Magazine KidsFest. The event provided kids with a day of funfilled activities, both on and off the court, to enjoy their tennis experience, which, for some, was their first. New York Tennis Magazine put together tennis clinics for all ages, outdoor carnival games, a dance competition, a very popular dunk tank, face-painting, and an array of prizes. Food and drinks were supplied by Engineers Country Club. With parents surrounding the courts and taking in the action, more than 100 kids of all ages and skill took to the courts to receive lessons and clinics given by top tennis pros from Sportime Roslyn. The pros worked with the kids, fully engaging with them, while supplying the necessary insights on the basics of the game. Sportime’s pros spread the kids out by skill level and worked with them on strokes, while also supplying a Hit for Prizes Court. “These prizes are awesome … I’m having so much fun,” said seven-year-old Cooper Gold as he ran by with his tennis racket in hand and a smile on his face. There was something for everyone at KidsFest, as DJ Curtis McCalla kept everybody entertained with music, danc-

A

52

ing and prizes. “DJ Curtis kept the party going all afternoon … it was a great day.” said Nancy Krosser. For those who wanted to take a break from the tennis courts, lawn games such as horse shoes, corn hole and ring-toss were a perfect way to get out of the sun and relax. “I love KidsFest,” said Randy Thompson. “It’s a terrific event as the kids are active, they love the dunk tank, and they love the tennis. They have a chance at lots of prizes which keeps them motivated.” The biggest hit of the afternoon off the court was the dunk tank, which kept everybody entertained as staffers from both New York Tennis Magazine and Engineers CC continuously dropped into the water as kids hit the bull’s-eye and enjoyed their accuracy. “My son is having a fabulous time with the dunk tank and he keeps trying to get the girl in the water, and now, we are going to play a little tennis and get some prizes.” said Joanna Cepler, one of the parents. Emilie Katz and the staff of Engineers Country Club were fantastic in helping to set up the event, collaborating with New York Tennis Magazine to get details in order, working on-court with the kids, and making sure the event ran smoothly. The Engineers staff was extremely attentive to all of the attendees who came in for the day. Engineers Country Club member Rob

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

Greenberg, whose son Madden took part in the event, said, “KidsFest was a fun and exciting way to get my son talking about playing tennis while at home. The instructors did a great job of getting every child involved and boosting their confidence regardless of skill level. Madden is already excited for next year’s event.” KidsFest was the second part of the eightpart Summer Series hosted by New York and Long Island Tennis Magazines, and served as a great way to get face-to-face with the publication’s readership and be on the court with them. These events continue to grow grassroots tennis in the area and further enhances the magazine’s relationships within the tennis community. Lani and Ally Miller enjoyed their time at KidsFest. On their way out, carrying bags of prizes, they were asked how they liked the event with Ally saying, “It was awesome” and Lani just gave a big smile and a thumbs up. As she was leaving, another child yelled out, “I have too many prizes! I can’t hold them all!” New York Tennis Magazine will return to Engineers Country Club for another segment of its Summer Series, The Long Island Tennis Challenge on Saturday, July 11. Don’t miss out! Trevor Mitchel is an intern with New YorkTennis Magazine.


NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

53


The Rise of Ivy League Tennis

How the Ivies became a tennis power conference By Steve Kaplan vy League tennis is hot, and only getting hotter as the League’s level of play and recruits continue to rise to new heights. As one men’s Ivy League coach explained, “We no longer recruit four star players. Personally, I’m looking for the player who might otherwise choose Stanford or Duke.” As proof of the new power of this conference, look to Columbia’s Men’s team under the leadership of Bid Goswami and cohead coach Howard Endelman, who, I am proud to say, is a longtime student. On Feb. 17, Columbia’s Men’s team was ranked 11th in the country by the Intercollegiate Tennis Association (ITA), the highest rank-

I

54

ing for an Ivy League team in 35 years. Seven of the eight Ivy League men’s and women’s teams have regularly been ranked in the top 80 of Division I this year, putting the Ivies as a first tier tennis conference. The consensus among the coaches is that this is not an anomaly. “We really believe that we can have a team break out and achieve a top 10 yearend ranking,” said an Ivy League men’s coach. I asked another longtime student, and first-year Brown University Head Coach Bryan Koniecko, as well as highly respected Brown Women’s Coach Paul Wardlaw, whose team was ranked 36th this year, to distribute a brief questionnaire to their Ivy League peers. Thanks to their help, I got a strong e-mail and personal interview

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

response. I have displayed information from the Ivy League coaches anonymously to encourage their candor, unless I was given permission to attribute a quote. Consider that Ivy schools rank among the costliest in the nation, and have no scholarships, yet in an economic downturn, their tennis programs are thriving. It would be easy to say that these elite schools are simply immune to fluctuations in the economy, but the truth is a little more layered. In many ways, difficult economic conditions have created an opportunity for the Ivy League to ascend. The consensus among the coaches is that the rising cost of college tuition nationwide has placed the Ivies in greater economic parity with other schools. “The high cost of an Ivy League school is now more in line with the high cost of every-


where else,” said one coach. Financial aid is on the upswing for Ivy League tennis players in a big way. As one coach revealed, “We use a 10 to one formula. There are variables, but if you make $150,000, a year we can offer you a package that enables you to pay only $15,000 a year in tuition.” Other coaches confirmed this formula and one added that “10 to one is likely the most generous package of all the schools in the league, but if we want you, our school will match that offer.” In NCAA Division I, men’s tennis can offer the monies equal to 4.5 full scholarships and women’s tennis can offer eight full scholarships in total. While the Ivies offer no “Athletic Grant in Aid,” generous financial aid packages can and do exceed the monies given by fully-funded men’s programs and come close on the women’s side. For many tennis families, the chance to attend an Ivy League institution is not a difficult sell. Tennis remains an exclusive sport that requires great resources to excel. The level of family education that produces exceptional players is high. As the demographics of the age in which women bear children climbs, the appreciation of the value of an Ivy education also rises. So just how valuable is an Ivy education for a tennis player? As one coach explained, “It can open many doors.” That’s the understatement of the year, and I suggest there is no better fraternity on Earth for breaking into the exclusive world of Wall Street finance than coming from an Ivy League tennis team. I have been fortunate enough to have coached many exceptional people who are now prominent hedge fund managers, investment bankers and analysts on Wall Street. I have seen firsthand the great pride taken by tennis alumni in helping the next generation of tennis players succeed. Chris Drake, men’s tennis coach at Dartmouth and one of the new generation of top Ivy League coaches, explained: “Alums in the Ivy League have always well-supported opportunities for internships and employment.” The current group of highly competitive coaches are reaching out to bring this support to a new level. The Brown’s Men’s Team, under freshman coach Koniecko, is a great example of the power of fostering a winning culture among highly motivated and intellectually

“In many ways, difficult economic conditions have created an opportunity for the Ivy League to ascend. The consensus among the coaches is that the rising cost of college tuition nationwide has placed the Ivies in greater economic parity with other schools.” capable athletes. Coach Koniecko has imparted the same drive and desire that helped him become the number oneranked college player in the country on his team. The Brown culture of synergistic team energy has awakened a sleeping giant and has helped Brown to a top 50 ITA ranking. Expect the Bears, under coach Koniecko’s tremendous leadership, to continue to rise. Another recent success story of the Ivies is the Princeton Men’s Tennis program, under the guidance of Billy Pate, who explained this about the upside of the Ivy League. “There is serious potential at each of these universities to do something special and be a top 25 program,” said Pate. “If you add the opportunity to work with such gifted and highly motivated young people, it makes for a special culture.” It’s also a unique culture because of the lack of scholarships. Players make a decision each day to show up obligated only by the desire to be part of a team. “We’ve had some attrition over the years,” said one coach. “But the players who have stayed all four years wouldn’t trade this experience for anything in the world.” While Ivy sports are deep in history, tennis has seen its ups and downs. At one time not long ago, coaches avoided the Ivy League because they felt limited in career development. As one coach explained, “It’s difficult to use Ivy coaching experience as a stepping stone for advancement outside the League, because the athletic director wants to hire coaches with experience handling scholarships. Today, the Ivy League’s coaches have stellar resumes with the allure of new attractive facilities, larger ath-

letic budgets and top players.” College has seen a movement toward recruiting and admitting international players, and the Ivy League is not insulated from this trend. Some of the schools are more welcoming than others, but as one coach explained, “International financial aid deals are bringing new players in, and increasing the talent pool.” Many of the coaches mentioned the international brand equity of the Ivies in attracting students from around the world. “It’s not hard to sell Harvard, Yale or Columbia, etc. overseas … they know who we are,” one coach commented. I asked Columbia’s Howard Endelman about his biggest challenge as an Ivy coach. He told me, “Finding the right players who will thrive in our system at Columbia. We are looking for players who have big goals—academically, athletically and career-wise and are willing to work toward those goals.” Howard cares deeply about his players as people and “Columbia is always finding these motivated players. They are true student-athletes.” As the landscape of college tennis and all of college sports changes as a result of the “Northwestern” court ruling allowing student- athletes to engage in collective bargaining, expect some changes in the near future. Budgets for non-revenue sports like tennis could be stripped to the bone in many conferences. The Ivies are different, as many coaches explained. One coach summed this idea up well by saying, “The school does not expect us to generate revenue and does not need us to make revenue. Alumni donors love their sports.” In a time of uncertainty in college tennis, the Ivies might very well be the future of top-level collegiate tennis. Steve Kaplan is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as the director of Lacoste Academy for New York City Parks Foundation. Over the last 34 years, Steve has been the longtime coach of more than 600 nationally-ranked junior players, 16 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. Steve’s students have been awarded in excess of $8 million in college scholarship money. He may be reached by e-mail at stevenjkaplan@aol.com.

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

55


adult league U S T A L E A G U E S U P D AT E Teams from the leagues in Manhattan, Queens, Brooklyn and Staten Island will be finishing up their seasons in July. The winners of their respective leagues will advance to Regional Playoffs, scheduled for July 31-Aug. 1 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center and the Cary Leeds Tennis Center in the Bronx. The winners of Regional Playoffs will advance to Sectional playoffs later in the year. Best of luck to all playoff teams.

2015 Manhattan Adult 18 & Over District Playoff Schedule Schedule is subject to change. The rain date is Sunday, July 26 at Cary Leeds Tennis Center. Please make sure players are on-site and ready to play 30 minutes prior to scheduled match time. Friday, July 24 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center 7:00 p.m. ......................3.0 Women’s Semifinal 8:30 p.m. ......................3.0 Women’s Semifinal Saturday, July 25 at Cary Leeds Tennis Center (1720 Crotona Avenue, Bronx N.Y.) 7:30 a.m. ......................3.5 Men’s Semifinal 9:00 a.m. ......................3.5 Women’s Semifinal 10:30 a.m. ....................4.0 Men’s Semifinal 12:00 p.m. ....................3.5 Men’s Final & 3.5 Women’s Final 1:30 p.m. ......................5.0 Women’s Final & 5.0 Men’s Final 3:00 p.m. ......................4.5 Men’s Final & 4.0 Men’s Final 4:30 p.m. ......................3.0 Women’s Final & 3.0 Men’s Final 6:00 p.m. ......................4.0 Women’s Final

2015 Queens Adult 18 & Over District Playoff Schedule Schedule is subject to change. Rain date is Sunday, July 26Thursday, July 30. We will use first available date and time so you may play a different night than originally scheduled. Please make sure players are on site and ready to play 30 minutes prior to scheduled match time.

Tuesday, July 21 ..........7:00 p.m. ..........3.0 Women’s Final Tuesday, July 21 ..........8:30 p.m. ..........3.0 Men’s Final Wednesday, July 22 ....7:00 p.m. ..........4.0 Women’s Final Wednesday, July 22 ....8:30 p.m. ..........4.0 Men’s Final Thursday, July 23 ........7:00 p.m. ..........3.5 Women’s Final Thursday, July 23 ........8:30 p.m. ..........3.5 Men’s Final

2015 Adult 18 & Over Regional Playoff Schedule is subject to change. Rain date is Sunday, Aug. 2. Please make sure players are on-site and ready to play 30 minutes prior to scheduled match time. Friday, July 31 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center 7:00 p.m. ......................3.5 Women’s: Brooklyn vs. Queens 8:30 p.m. ......................3.5Women’s: Manhattan vs. Staten Island Saturday, August 1 at Cary Leeds Tennis Center (1720 Crotona Avenue, Bronx N.Y.) 7:30 a.m. ......................3.5 Men’s: Queens vs. Manhattan & 4.0 Men’s: Queens vs. Manhattan 9:00 a.m. ......................3.0 Women’s: Queens vs. Manhattan & 3.0 Men’s: Manhattan vs. Queens 10:30 a.m. ....................3.5 Women’s: Brooklyn vs. Manhattan & 3.5 Women’s: Staten Island vs. Queens 12:00 p.m. ....................3.5 Men’s: Brooklyn vs. Manhattan & 4.0 Men’s: Brooklyn vs. Manhattan 1:30 p.m. ......................3.0 Women’s: Queens vs. Staten Island & 3.5 Women’s: Queens vs. Manhattan 3:00 p.m. ......................3.5 Women’s: Brooklyn vs. Staten Island & 3.5 Men’s: Brooklyn vs. Queens 4:30 p.m. ......................3.0 Women’s: Staten Island vs. Manhattan & 4.0 Men’s: Brooklyn vs. Queens 6:00 p.m. ......................4.0 Women’s: Queens vs. Manhattan

USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Sunday, July 19............7:00 p.m. ..........3.5 Women’s Semifinal Sunday, July 19............8:30 p.m. ..........3.5 Women’s Semifinal Monday, July 20 ..........7:00 p.m. ..........4.0 Men’s Semifinal Monday, July 20 ..........8:30 p.m. ..........4.0 Men’s Semifinal 56

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com


he Metro Corporate Tennis League, presented by Advantage Tennis Clubs, is a joint initiative of the Metrotennis Community Tennis Association (MCTA) and USTA/Eastern–Metro Region. The League is divided into three levels of play, Intermediate (3.0-3.5), Advanced Intermediate (4.0) and Advanced (4.5+). Also offered is an Advanced Beginner Clinic program for teams that are not ready to compete. More than 47 teams took part in the Winter season. However, during the Summer season, the Metro Corporate Tennis League can only accommodate approximately 25 teams. The Summer Season will run from June-August, culminating with an end-of-season party at Roosevelt Island Racquet Club. The roster of teams for the Summer 2015 Season are as follows:

T

Advanced Division 1 1. BNP Paribas (Pierre) 2. Bloomberg (Vighnesh) 3. Patterson Belknap Webb & Tyler LLP 4. Ernst & Young 5. Horizon Media Advanced Division 2 1. Bank of America 2. Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP 3. Corcoran Group 4. Nielsen 5. Google

Intermediate Division 1 1. Bloomberg (Aditya) 2. D.E. Shaw & Company 3. White & Case 4. Deutsche Bank (Elena) 5. Akin Gump 6. Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP 7. The Corcoran Group 8. Google Intermediate Division 2 1. Bloomberg (Ankur) 2. BNP Paribas (Nicolas) 3. Sullivan 4. Deutsche Bank (Armen) 5. Barclay’s 6. Moody’s

For more information, please visit www.metrotennis.com/corporate/main.html, or call Luis Espinoza at (347) 886-3117 or e-mail luis@metrotennis.com. NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

57


N E W

Y O R K

T

charitabl The World Competes in Queens NTC hosts 15th Annual Jana Hunsaker Memorial W h e e l c h a i r Te n n i s To u r n a m e n t

thletes gathered at the 15th Annual Jana Hunsaker Memorial Wheelchair Tennis Tournament at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows, N.Y., as the Wheelchair Sports Federation and USTA hosted the four-day event in early June. Wheelchair tennis is one of the fastest growing sports and maintains almost all rules and regulations as standing tennis with the exception of two bounces of the ball instead of one. Local youth with disabilities took part in a clinic teaching tennis during the tournament. The ITF Division divided $12,000 in prize money among all competitors who made it to the quarterfinals and beyond. The winner of the Men’s Open was Yusuke Nishimura from Japan. He is relatively new to wheelchair tennis and is ranked 57th internationally and fourth in Japan. Nishimura won against Philippe Bedard from Canada, ranked 45th in the world, with a score of 6-2, 7-6 (5). Shelby Baron from Hawaii won the Women’s

A

58

Open against Yuka Chokyu from Canada, 6-7(4), 7-5, 6-2. The Quad Division win went to Gary Luker from Canada who defeated Julio Rueda from Guatemala, 6-1, 6-0. Jongchul Sah from Queens, N.Y. competed against Patrick Donaghey from Roslyn Heights, N.Y. for the A Division win, 6-1, 6-3. Donaghey initially learned wheelchair tennis from Jana Hunsaker herself. The B Division saw Gill Owen defeat Ricardo Corral from Queens, N.Y., 4-6, 6-1, 11-9. In the C Division, it was Charles Smith winning

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

6-2, 6-2 over Stephen Riley. The winning teams for Doubles included Patrick Donaghey & Cristobal Rivera (New York) in the A Division, Chris Lamp & Nathan Melnyk (New York) in the B Division, and Henry Hasson & Joe Mendez (New York) in the C Division. Many New York locals trained hard and ended up taking most of the wins at this tournament on their home court. For more information on wheelchair tennis, visit www.WheelchairSportsFederation.org and www.usta.com/AdultTennis/Wheelchair-Tennis/Wheelchair.


T E N N I S

M A G A Z I N E ’ S

le initiatives Kings County Tennis League Builds a Fifth Youth Tennis Club in Brooklyn

he Kings County Tennis League (KCTL), a non-profit organization that mentors New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) public housing’s youth residents through tennis, has expanded its program to a new community of kids. KCTL is comprised of tennis clubs—the

T

parks, playgrounds or blacktop surfaces that frame their students’ homes—at which tennis balls zoom, racquets swing and high-fives fly each Saturday from May through September. This year, KCTL created a fifth tennis club, Jackie Robinson, to bring tennis to the children of Bedford-Stuyvesant’s Brevoort

Houses on the tennis courts of adjacent Jackie Robinson Park. Team Jackie Robinson met tennis for the first time in late May for the KCTL’s site-wide season opener. Of the 15 students who attended the inaugural class at Jackie Robinson, all were rookies. To simplify their first day and to facilitate hands-on instruction, makeshift mini-tennis courts with portable nets were used in lieu of the park’s full-size, hard-surface tennis courts. The students learned the basics of the sport: Terminology, racquet grips, ready position and footwork. They played games that reinforced agility and hand-eye coordination, like ball tossing/catching and relay races with balls balanced on their racquets. The class wrapped up with an introduction to volleys. Team Jackie Robinson responded enthusiastically to the season opener’s friendly introduction to the sport. A strong first day laid the foundation for following weeks’ encouraging lessons in groundstrokes, serves, rallies and match play. For more info about Jackie Robinson Tennis Club and KCTL’s other teams, visit www.kingscountytennisleague.org.

FREE Summer Community Tennis Program Your child can learn to play tennis for free! NYJTL’s Community Tennis Program is for children and youth who are: • Between the ages of 5 and 18 • At any level of tennis skill, from “never held a racquet before” to “tomorrow’s champion” • Anywhere within NYC’s five boroughs District 75 (special needs) students have their own adaptive tennis program once a week at many Community Tennis locations. Racquets and balls are available for children to use during program hours. The only thing participants need to bring is their own water bottle and tennis sneakers. Visit our website for Locations, Dates & Times – www.NYJTL.org NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

59


60

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com


A Celebration of

Tennis History and the Ripple Effect By Lonnie Mitchel As I pondered what to write about as the publication deadline for submission rapidly approached, the light bulb went off in my head. Politics, religion and civil rights really do not belong as subject material in New York Tennis Magazine or does it? After all, New York City is a melting pot of people of varying backgrounds this magazine caters to is the audience. What can I write about that concerns our audience? In terms of politics or history, what exists that can be so important that it transcends the game of tennis? So, I did some research and share with you in no particular historical timeline, some people who made our game what it is today, and at the same time, transcended the sports world. Billie Jean King who worked tirelessly for equality of women and equal prize money became one of the most influential people of the 20th Century. Our National Tennis Center here in New York bears her name. Arthur Ashe, an inspiring role model for African-Americans, social activist and highprofile campaigner for the HIV and AIDS communities, died in 1993. His measure of influence 22 years after his death legacy burns as brightly as ever. A former U.S. Open and Wimbledon Champion, U.S. Davis Cup participant and Davis Cup captain, Ashe has the main stadium court at the National Tennis Center named in his honor,

along with a striking statue of his likeness adorning the grounds. Eighteen-time Grand Slam champion, Martina Navratilova, and one of the greatest women players ever, is a lesbian. Navratilova expanded the dialogue on issues of gender and sexuality in sports. Then there was Richard Raskind, born in New York City in 1934, as she put it, was raised “a nice Jewish boy.” Who is Richard Raskind you may ask? As Renee Richards, she was denied entry into the 1976 U.S. Open by the USTA, citing an unprecedented women-born-women policy. She disputed the ban, and the New York Supreme Court ruled in her favor in 1977. This was a landmark decision in favor of transsexual rights. Through her fight to play tennis as a woman, she challenged gender roles and became a role model and spokesperson for the transgender community. She later went on to coach Martina Navratilova from 1981-1983. Althea Gibson was an American tennis player and professional golfer, as well as being the first African-American athlete to cross the color line of international tennis. In 1956, she became the first person of color to win a Grand Slam title (the French Open) followed by Wimbledon and the U.S. Open in 1957 and again in 1958. She was given a ticker-tape parade down Broadway in Manhattan in July of 1957 after her first Wimbledon Championships. All of the above examples are great people who are rooted in tennis and helped make the world a better place for all people and all

athletes in all sports. Once Jackie Robinson broke the baseball color barrier, the foundation was formulated which paved the way for many of these individuals to accomplish great things beyond just winning some tennis matches. I was recently appointed head coach for USA’s tennis team in the Berlin European Maccabi Games, in partnership with the United States Olympic Committee, that coincides with the 70th anniversary of the ending of World War II. I am just Lonnie Mitchel, a guy who loves to coach and give back to the game of tennis under the auspices of my heritage. I realized that this opportunity would have never come my way without the efforts of those great men and women who came before me. However, more than the honor itself to represent my country and heritage is that this assignment helped me understand the importance of their pioneering efforts. Their greatness proves that no matter the obstacles in your path, you can conquer and achieve enormous things. In Germany in the spring of 1933, an “Aryans Only” policy was instituted in all German athletic organizations. “NonAryans”—Jewish or part-Jewish athletes— were systematically excluded from German sports facilities and associations. The German Boxing Association expelled amateur champion Erich Seelig in April 1933 because he was Jewish (Seelig later resumed his boxing career in the United States). Another continued on page 62

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

61


a celebration of tennis history continued from page 61 Jewish athlete, Daniel Prenn—Germany’s top-ranked tennis player—was removed from Germany’s Davis Cup Team. Gretel Bergmann, a world-class high-jumper, was expelled from her German club in 1933 and from the German Olympic team in 1936. In 1931, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) foolishly awarded the 1936 Summer Olympics to Berlin. The choice was to have signaled Germany’s return to the world community after its isolation in the aftermath of defeat in World War I. Two years later, Nazi party leader Adolf Hitler became chancellor and turned the nation’s fragile democracy into a one-party dictatorship that persecuted Jews in particular and all political opponents, no matter the denomination. The Nazi claim to control all aspects of German life also extended to sports. Members of the U.S. American Olympic Team were not immune to such discrimination as U.S. sprinters and Jewish athletes Marty Glickman and Sam Stoller were pre-

vented from participating in the 1936 Olympic Games having been pulled from the 4x100 meter shortly before the event was to take place simply to not offend Adolf Hitler and his policies. There was already a lot of controversy with Jesse Owens competing in that Olympics in that he represented an obstacle to Aryan superiority. Yet, the United States saw fit for Owens to compete, but the two young Jewish men were pulled from competition well after qualifying for those events in the U.S. Trials. On the 70th anniversary of the USA’s victory over Germany in WW II, the largest contingent of people of the Jewish faith since that time will come to Berlin, the site of the 1936 Olympics. The United States will send a delegation of 200 athletes with 20 of those individuals being tennis players from various parts of the USA joining more than 2,300 Jewish athletes from 30 countries to compete in a variety of sports in the European Maccabi Games. On July 28, the athletes will

march in the opening ceremonies on the grounds of the 1936 Olympics, the same grounds where Adolf Hitler so proudly thought he would be showcasing Aryan supremacy. Our game of tennis has done so much to close the differences between many. Although there is still so much war and political unrest in the world, maybe in my idealistic view of tennis beyond the courts has done its share to make the world a little better. It is unlikely the European Maccabi Games of 2015 in Berlin will get any television or newspaper coverage. However, names like Billie Jean King, Renee Richards, Arthur Ashe, Martina Navratilova and Althea Gibson may have a little something to do with the expansion of sports in competitions and venues such as this. Lonnie Mitchel is head men’s and women’s tennis coach at SUNY Oneonta. Lonnie was named an assistant coach to Team USA for the 2013 Maccabiah Games in Israel for the Grand Master Tennis Division. Lonnie may be reached by phone at (516) 414-7202 or email lonniemitchel@yahoo.com.

More camp choices. More facilities. More fun! At Advantage All-City Camps. Sign up today! Junior Tennis – Lots of tennis plus optional sports and arts. • 3 to 6 hours of daily tennis • Swimming, field sports & arts • Ages 6-17

ALL-CITY SPORTS

Call 212.935.0250 gkent@advantagetennisclubs.com



NEW Sports & Arts – Lots of sports and arts plus tennis. • 1 hour daily tennis, plus basketball, swimming & more • Daily art program with artist Bonnie Lane • Ages 5-14 Call 646.884.9644 pfontana@advantagetennisclubs.com

Located at Roosevelt Island Racquet Club a short F train or tram ride away!

Visit www.advantagecamps.net 62

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com


NEW YORK AREA UPCOMING TENNIS EVENTS JULY 2015

AUGUST 2015

Friday-Sunday, July 3-5 New York Open at Central Park Tennis Center Over the July 4th weekend, New York’s best players will complete for the championship of New York City and $9,000 in prize money at the famed Central Park Tennis Center. For more information, visit CentralParkTennisCenter.com.

Saturday, August 8 New York Tennis Challenge New York Tennis Magazine will be hosting its third New York Tennis Challenge of 2015 on Saturday, Aug. 8 at Engineer’s Country Club in Roslyn, N.Y. For more information, visit NYTennisMag.com.

Saturday, July 11 Battle of the Boroughs Tennis Challenge USTA Eastern and City Parks Foundation are teaming up again to present the 3rd Annual Battle of the Boroughs Tennis Challenge, an adult recreational tournament to be held in June and July in New York City parks. The tournament will feature the best of team competition and neighborhood pride, and support CityParks Tennis, which provides free tennis lessons and activities for children at 40 parks citywide. For more information, visit Eastern.USTA.com/boroughs/. Saturday, July 11 New York Tennis Challenge New York Tennis Magazine will be hosting its second New York Tennis Challenge of 2015 on Saturday, July 11 at Engineers Country Club in Roslyn, N.Y. For more information, visit NYTennisMag.com. Saturday, July 18 John McEnroe Tennis Academy Scholarship Tryouts Sportime’s John McEnroe Tennis Academy will host its annual scholarship tryouts for New York City players on Saturday, July 18 at Sportime Randall’s Island. For more information, visit JohnMcEnroeTennisAcademy.com.

Sunday-Saturday, August 23-29 4th Annual “Little Mo” Internationals The 4th Annual “Little Mo” Internationals in Forest Hills will be played from Aug. 2329 at the West Side Tennis Club, located at 1 Tennis Place in Forest Hills, N.Y. For more information, visit MCBTennis.org. Wednesday, August 26 Celebrity Chef Tennis Challenge Taste of Tennis NYC will be hosting the Celebrity Chef Tennis Challenge on Wednesday, Aug. 26 from 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. at City View Racquet Club, located at 43-34 32nd Place in Long Island City, N.Y. For more information, visit TasteOfTennis.com/Events/CelebrityChefT ennisChallenge.aspx.

Saturday, August 29 Party With the Pros Party With the Pros will take place Saturday, Aug. 29 from 6:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m. in the Measure Lounge at Langham Place Fifth Avenue Hotel, located at 400 5th Avenue in New York City. For more information, visit TasteOfTennis.com/Events/PartyWithTheP ros.aspx. Saturday, August 29 2015 U.S. Open Qualifying Tournament The qualifiers take to the court at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center beginning Saturday, Aug. 29 for the 2015 U.S. Open Qualifying Tournament. For more information, visit USOpen.org. Monday-Sunday, August 31-September 13 2015 U.S. Open Main Draw The main draw of the final Grand Slam of the season, the 2015 U.S. Open, begins Monday, Aug. 31 at 11:00 a.m. and runs through Sunday, Sept. 13 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. For more information, visit USOpen.org.

Wednesday, August 26 Johnny Mac Tennis Project Benefit Night Rafael Nadal will join John McEnroe at Sportime Randall’s Island to benefit the Johnny Mac Tennis Project on Wednesday, Aug. 25 at 4:00 p.m. For more information, visit JohnMcEnroeTennisAcademy.com/Johnn yMac. Thursday, August 27 Taste of Tennis The Taste of Tennis, presented by AYS, will be held Thursday, Aug. 27 from 7:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m. at the W Hotel, located at 49th and Lexington in New York City. For more information, visit TasteOfTennisNYC.com.

For updates on upcoming events in the New York area, please visit our website www.nytennismag.com/events

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

63


Backhand Volley Cures By Bill Longua ne of the more common problems for the rising tennis player is the backhand volley. Here are some tips that will help. If you read my articles often enough, you know I am a stickler for volleying using the Continental Grip for both the forehand and backhand volley (“V” formed between the thumb and index finger will be at one o’clock on the grip for right-handed players when you use the top center of the grip as 12 o’clock, 11 o’clock for lefties). When playing at the net, there is not enough time for grip changes, especially as your opponents improve and the shots are coming faster. The one grip system is the solution.

O

If you hit a onehanded backhand volley, remember that your opposite hand is key for correct preparation. To help form the correct angle between the forearm and shaft of the racquet, the opposite hand should cradle the throat of the racquet, keeping the head of the racquet above the handle. The wrist is in a locked up position. Without the opposite hand on the throat, your angle will fall, you may take the racquet back too far and you will not 64

feel stable. The opposite hand comes off the throat right before impact. The volley is attacked, so make sure to step forward on your opposite leg. This forward step will have you hitting the ball early and create the correct shoulder rotation. Without the step, the odds of making a late hit are high since you will be back on your heels with your shoulders facing the net. The volley is a slight high to low shot that will put backspin on the ball, thus creating a low bounce for your opponent. To achieve this, the butt of the handle leads the hit and the wrist is always very firm and locked up. The head of the racquet should be lined with the handle at the point of impact. There is nothing wrong with a twohanded backhand volley. I often recommend it if the player is having a hard time getting the feel of the Continental Grip, or the shot is continually too weak. Now, the opposite hand should be on top and touching the dominate hand. The grips for both hands can be an Eastern Grip where the “V” in the hand is at 12 o’clock. Just remember that you will also be hitting the forehand volley in the Eastern Grip, which will cause the face of the racquet to be

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

closed more so the step and slight shoulder turn is mandatory or your volleys will end up in the net. The opposite, or top hand, will now be reaching forward for the shot. Make sure to keep the elbows away from your ribs so that forward extension is possible. There are two scenarios that will force you to let go of the opposite hand. One is when the oncoming shot is too wide and the second is when the shot is coming directly at you. With all traditional volleys, the keys are: No backswing, a cross-over step, a firm wrist and reach. Good luck and have fun! Bill Longua is the tennis director and head pro at Palm Island Resort in Cape Haze, Fla. Bill is a member of the USPTA, has been teaching tennis for more than 35 years and is the author of Winning Test Strokes. Bill also enjoys teaching tennis on his Web site, www.onlinetennistraining.com. Search the Apple App Store or Google Play for Bill’s new 117 lesson app, “Complete Tennis Mastery” or to purchase Bill’s book, visit www.onlinetennistraining.com. He may be reached by e-mail at bill@onlinetennistraining.com.


Your Post-Match Routine and Why It’s the Only Way to Improve By Dr. Tom Ferraro n the last issue of New York Tennis Magazine, we spoke of the value of a good pre-match routine and mentioned how important physical and mental preparation was to the tennis player. In this issue, we will discuss what you do following the match. The most important skill a tennis player can possess is the ability to learn from their losses. If they can work through disappointment and despair and forgive themselves, then they can have an enormous opportunity to learn about the game and what needs improvement. As the saying goes: “The only way to learn is to fail.” The following article will discuss the importance of a post-match routine and the six steps every touring player uses in order to improve.

I

1. After a big loss, the feeling of anger, despair and disappointment are great and one ought to feel these emotions. It may take a few hours to recover from the emotion, and though painful, this should trigger an awareness to learn and grow. This phase ends with forgiveness to oneself. This is a mature defense and a good one.

2. This is then followed by Phase II, which is a careful review of where one went wrong. Review each point and identify the biggest flaws in your game. Maybe it’s a weak backhand, failure to attack, playing it too safe, getting too angry, a weak serve, etc. You must pick the one big flaw that caused the loss. Memorize this mistake and write it down. And do not think you can figure the solution out on your own because you cannot. 3. Go to your coach the next day and share the flaws with him and detail what occurred during the match. The coach will listen and will know what caused the flaw. This will be followed by an answer, which, in all likelihood, be both simple and accurate. This needs to be followed by scheduling an on-court lesson to reinforce the new move. 4. During the lesson, you need to exchange dialogue with the coach and demonstrate the new move so that it becomes engrained in the body and the mind. 5. Finally, in Phase V, you need to use the new move in a match. At the beginning, the new move will not be natural, so one

needs to be patient and allot time to commit to this. 6. As time goes on, this will produce more wins and then your job during the postmatch routine is to again review the new move so that it becomes refreshed and not forgotten. If you can manage to instill this postmatch routine into your tennis career, you will actually learn and improve in ways you could never do alone. It takes the courage to face your losses. Review your flaws and pinpoint the biggest one, and then have the humility to realize you need help with this matter. Then, have the trust in your coach so that they can help you make the changes necessary. You also need the verbal skills to engage in dialogue with your coach during the playing lesson. Finally, you must have the fortitude, memory and patience in order to put the new move into action. This is what we call a post-match routine and something all of the top players in the world do after every match. For consultations, treatment or on-site visits, contact Dr. Tom Ferraro Ph.D., sport psychologist, by phone at (516) 248-7189, e-mail drtferraro@aol.com or visit www.drtomferraro.com.

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

65


NEW YORK TENNIS CLUB

ALLEY POND TENNIS CENTER 79-20 Winchester Boulevard Queens Village, N.Y. (718) 264-2600 www.alleypondtenniscenter.com CARY LEEDS CENTER FOR TENNIS & LEARNING Elena Bantovska 1720 Crotona Avenue Bronx, N.Y. (347) 417-8168 ebantovska@nyjtl.org www.nyjtl.org CENTERCOURT PERFORMANCE TENNIS CENTER Clay Bibbee—Managing Partner and Academy Founder 65 Columbia Road Morristown, NJ 07960 (973) 635-1222 clay@centercourtclub.com www.centercourtclub.com GOTHAM TENNIS ACADEMY Eric Faro—Director of Tennis 358 W. End Ave #3A New York, NY 10024 (646) 524-7069 info@gothamtennis.com www.gothamtennis.com MANHATTAN PLAZA RACQUET CLUB Gertrud Wilhelm—General Manager 450 West 43rd Street New York, NY 10036 (212) 594-0554 gwilhelm@advantagetennisclubs.com www.advantagetennisclubs.com MIDTOWN TENNIS CLUB Jennifer Brown—Director 341 8th Avenue New York, NY 10001 (212) 989-8572 midtowntennisnyc@gmail.com www.midtowntennis.com 66

DIRECTORY

NEW YORK TENNIS CLUB Lauren Hartman—General Manager 3081 Harding Avenue Bronx, NY 10465 (718) 239-7916 lhartman.nytci@gmail.com www.advantagetennisclubs.com ROOSEVELT ISLAND RACQUET CLUB Tom Manhart—Membership Director 281 Main Street Roosevelt Island, NY 10044 (212) 935-0250 tmanhart@rirctennis.com www.advantagetennisclubs.com SOUTHAMPTON RACQUET CLUB & CAMP 665 Majors Path Southampton, N.Y. (631) 488-4700 www.southamptonrcc.com SPORTIME HARBOR ISLAND Carlos Campo—General Manager & Director of Tennis In Harbor Island Park P.O. Box 783 Mamaroneck, NY 10543 (914) 777-5151 ccampo@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/harbor-island SPORTIME RANDALL’S ISLAND Flagship Home of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy Jared Karlebach—Assistant General Manager Allison Hodgkins—Assistant General Manager One Randall’s Island New York, NY 10035 (212) 427-6150 ahodgkins@sportimeny.com jkarlebach@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/manhattan

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

SPORTIME LAKE ISLE Westchester Annex of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy Harel Srugo—General Manager 660 White Plains Road Eastchester, NY 10709 (914) 777-5151 hsrugo@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/lake-isle SPORTIME SCHENECTADY Jed Murray—General Manager Philippe Ceas—Director of Tennis 2699 Curry Road • Schenectady NY 12303 (518) 356-0100 jmurray@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/lake-isle STADIUM TENNIS CENTER AT MILL POND Joel Kassan—Executive Director 725 Gateway Center Boulevard Bronx, NY 10451 (718) 665-4684 joel@gothamtennis.com www.stadiumtennisnyc.com TENNIS INNOVATORS NYC Juan Andrade—Executive Director 520 2nd Avenue (Kips Bay Court) 899 10th Avenue (John Jay Court) New York, NY (646) 476-5811 www.tennisinnovators.com USTA BILLIE JEAN KING NATIONAL TENNIS CENTER Whitney Kraft—Director of Tennis Flushing Meadows Corona Park Flushing, NY 11368 (718) 760-6200 kraft@usta.com www.usta.com WEST SIDE TENNIS CLUB Bob Ingersole—Director of Tennis 1 Tennis Place Forest Hills, NY 11375 (718) 268-2300 tennisdirector@foresthillstennis.com www.foresthillstennis.com/index.html


ip sh

om

s.c

ve Fo rti r I n Inf 51 sing for o@ 6- an ma US 409 d S tion PT -4 po en 44 ns ni 4 or

ted Sports

d.

•U

ub

lica t

io ns, Lt

USP

ions, Lt

nited Sports P

on

P

licat

Ad

d.

Uni

ub

SERVING UP THE LATEST IN TENNIS NEWS: Local Coverage The hottest local tennis news!

Professional Tennis Coverage Breaking Pro Tennis News

Junior Tennis Recaps/results from the Junior Tennis World

Charity Events Information on tennis related charity events in the local area.

Adult Leagues Stay up to date on USTA Adult League information

Go to LITennisMag.com and sign up for free subscription.

Connect with us on facebook.com/LongIslandTennis Follow us on twitter@LITennisMag (twitter.com/LITennisMag)

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

67


NEW Boys & Girls Metro Rankings (as of 06/15/15)

BOYS Metro Boys 12 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1 ........Sabian Kosinov ..............Forest Hills, N.Y. 2 ........Solomon Brown ..............New York, N.Y. 3 ........Ryan David Brandes ......Rego Park, N.Y. 4 ........Rafe Photopoulos ..........New York, N.Y. 5 ........Joshua Ashvil ..................Forest Hills, N.Y. 6 ........Brandon Torres................Bronx, N.Y. 7 ........Winter Forest Fagerberg New York, N.Y. 8 ........Joshua Staroselskiy ........Brooklyn, N.Y. 9 ........Sebastian Brustein..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 10......Nicholas Suhanitski ........Staten Island, N.Y. 11......Dylan Lachmanen ..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 12......Isadore Jude Axinn ........Brooklyn, N.Y. 13......Jasper August Hunt ........New York, N.Y. 14......Guy Ferrera......................New York, N.Y. 15......Safin Shaikh ....................Bayside, N.Y. 16......Andrew Mendelson ........New York, N.Y. 17......Nicholas Scott Doupsas New York, N.Y. 18......Marko R. Gural ................New York, N.Y. 19......Eric Dubilirer ....................Little Neck, N.Y. 20......Cooper Williams ..............New York, N.Y. 21......Albert Y. Wan ..................Forest Hills, N.Y. 22......Mathias Isaac Davila ......Whitestone, N.Y. 23......Michael Zlatnik ................Forest Hills, N.Y. 24......Donovan Spigner ............New York, N.Y. 25......Jonathan Rabinowitz ......Bayside, N.Y. 26......Alexander Oh ..................New York, N.Y. 27......Charles Robertson ..........Whitestone, N.Y. 28......Daniel Galisteo Gordon ..New York, N.Y. 29......John Hilledgar ................New York, N.Y. 30......Jonathan Laforest ..........Queens Village, N.Y. 31......Nicholas Laffont ..............New York, N.Y. 32......Jeffrey Yu ........................Forest Hills, N.Y. 33......Ronald Aaron Fridlyand ..Forest Hills, N.Y. 34......Gabriel E. Chiha ..............Staten Island, N.Y. 35......Luca Photopoulos ..........New York, N.Y. 36......Achille Sarachek..............New York, N.Y. 37......Paul Elghouayel ..............New York, N.Y. 38......Jordan Rechtschaffen ....New York, N.Y. 39......Neel Epstein ....................New York, N.Y. 40......Noah Butler......................New York, N.Y.

Metro Boys 14 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1 ........Christopher Tham ..........Flushing, N.Y. 2 ........Christian Rabinowitz ......Bayside, N.Y. 3 ........Jonathan Glinsky ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 4 ........Igor Maslov......................Brooklyn, N.Y. 5 ........Jack Mascone ................New York, N.Y. 6 ........Daniel Leon-Maseyev ....Brooklyn, N.Y. 7 ........Tadd Long........................Woodside, N.Y. 8 ........Matthew Mosejczuk........East Elmhurst, N.Y. 9 ........Donald James Smith ......Roosevelt Island, N.Y. 10......Jasper Hunt Thomas ......New York, N.Y. 11......Solomon Brown ..............New York, N.Y. 12......Eli Taylor-Kerman ............New York, N.Y. 13......Donovan Brown ..............New York, N.Y. 14......Dylan Conner Charles ....New York, N.Y. 15......Sadi Guicelik....................New York, N.Y. 16......Michael Kaydin................Brooklyn, N.Y. 17......Sachin Palta ....................Forest Hills, N.Y. 18......David Dylan Pines ..........New York, N.Y. 19......Ethan King ......................New York, N.Y.

68

YORK

20......Alfonso Laffont ................New York, N.Y. 21......Simon Camacho ............New York, N.Y. 22......Jeffrey McCready............Brooklyn, N.Y. 23......Jeffrey Yu ........................Forest Hills, N.Y. 24......Milian Kavi Jain................New York, N.Y. 25......Winter Fagerberg ............New York, N.Y. 26......Noah Hunter Kaye ..........New York, N.Y. 27......Robert Shinder ................Brooklyn, N.Y. 28......Albert Y. Wan ..................Forest Hills, N.Y. 29......Noah D. Edelman............New York, N.Y. 30......Scott Fischer ..................New York, N.Y. 31......Alex Portnoy ....................New York, N.Y. 32......Michael Gechka ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 33......Alexander L. Chiu............New York, N.Y. 34......Shanay Ashesh Amin......New York, N.Y. 35......Justin S. Taub..................New York, N.Y. 36......Daniel Levy ......................New York, N.Y. 37......Benjamin Goldstein ........New York, N.Y. 38......Kevin Daniel Golub..........New York, N.Y. 39......Evan Chen ......................New York, N.Y. 40......Daniel Simon Mikaul ......Rego Park, N.Y.

Metro Boys 16 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1 ........Fayed Fayaz Uddin ........Elmhurst, N.Y. 2 ........Jonathan Glinsky ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 3 ........Christopher Tham ..........Flushing, N.Y. 4 ........Nicholas Pustilnik............Brooklyn, N.Y. 5 ........Wiley Schubert Reed ......Brooklyn, N.Y. 6 ........David Krasner..................Staten Island, N.Y. 7 ........Justin Arrington-Holmes..New York, N.Y. 8 ........Eli Taylor-Kerman ............New York, N.Y. 9 ........Mark Karpovas................Staten Island, N.Y. 10......Jack Mascone ................New York, N.Y. 11......Leaf Fagerberg ................New York, N.Y. 12......Richard Wickman............Bayside, N.Y. 13......Michael Kamsky..............New York, N.Y. 14......Lucas DeSanto................New York, N.Y. 15......Igor Maslov......................Brooklyn, N.Y. 16......Ameer Hosain..................New York, N.Y. 17......Jonathan Shapiro............Brooklyn, N.Y. 18......Jackson Trevor ................New York, N.Y. 19......Umar Akhmedjanov ........New York, N.Y. 20......Daniel Ertel ......................New York, N.Y. 21......Leonardo Escudero ........Ozone Park, N.Y. 22......Leonidas Vrailas ..............New York, N.Y. 23......Donovan Brown ..............New York, N.Y. 24......Gabriel Sifuentes ............Flushing, N.Y. 25......Stephen Mai ....................Flushing, N.Y. 26......Joseph Zac Namtalov ....Staten Island, N.Y. 27......Alexander Kucherina ......Brooklyn, N.Y. 28......Justin Belnavis ................Jamaica, N.Y. 29......Jaime Gomez ..................New York, N.Y. 30......Sadi Gulcelik....................New York, N.Y. 31......Matthew Joshua Ross....New York, N.Y. 32......Benjamin Thier ................New York, N.Y. 33......Bryan Chu........................Flushing, N.Y. 34......Derek Lung ......................Brooklyn, N.Y. 35......David Dylan Pines ..........New York, N.Y. 36......Simon Ross Heinberg ....New York, N.Y. 37......Damon Watson................New York, N.Y. 38......Ethan Finley ....................New York, N.Y. 39......Andre Agregado ..............New York, N.Y. 40......Dylan Ruhl........................New York, N.Y.

Metro Boys 18 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1 ........Nicholas Pustilnik............Brooklyn, N.Y. 2 ........Nicholas Rudman............New York, N.Y. 3 ........Michael Gardiner ............New York, N.Y.

RANKINGS 4 ........David Farina ....................New York, N.Y. 5 ........Douglas Nover................Bayside, N.Y. 6 ........Oliver Jevtovic ................Astoria, N.Y. 7 ........Shawn Jackson ..............Staten Island, N.Y. 8 ........Justin Arrington-Holmes New York, N.Y. 9 ........Richard Wickman............Bayside, N.Y.

GIRLS Metro Girls 12 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1 ........Nadejda Maslova ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 2 ........Rachel Zhang ..................Forest Hills, N.Y. 3 ........Niki Truszkowski..............Middle Village, N.Y. 4 ........Nicolette Fundator ..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 5 ........Leila M. Epstein ..............New York, N.Y. 6 ........Blakely Dushkin ..............New York, N.Y. 7 ........Alina Kargin-Utkin............Brooklyn, N.Y. 8 ........Taylor Overstrom ............New York, N.Y. 9 ........Beyonce Blake ................Brooklyn, N.Y. 10......Sophia Cisse ..................New York, N.Y. 11......Cassie Tian ......................Flushing, N.Y. 12......Samantha Bentsianov ....Staten Island, N.Y. 13......Bukky Alalade..................Rosedale, N.Y. 14......Alyssa An ........................New York, N.Y. 15......Sofie Shen ......................New York, N.Y. 16......Nathalie Williams ............New York, N.Y. 17......Celina Liu ........................Forest Hills, N.Y. 18......Sarah Lucy Youngberg ..New York, N.Y. 19......Sage Loudon ..................New York, N.Y. 20......Talia Helen Kahan............New York, N.Y. 21......Nathalie Williams ............New York, N.Y. 22......Sofia Allinson ..................New York, N.Y. 23......Emma Sofia Ostlund ......New York, N.Y. 24......Angelica Schell................New York, N.Y. 25......Nina Wiese ......................Flushing, N.Y. 26......Maxie Molly Karen ..........New York, N.Y. 27......Alyssa Pustilnik................Brooklyn, N.Y. 28......Paula Ann Maseyev ........Brooklyn, N.Y. 29......Jasmine Leon Soon ........Brooklyn, N.Y. 30......Julia T. Werdiger ..............New York, N.Y. 31......Alina Ongeyberg..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 32......Nadzeya Filaha................Brooklyn, N.Y. 33......Sheyna Esther Karen ......New York, N.Y. 34......Kelly Chen........................Forest Hills, N.Y. 35......Nicole Wooyin Lee ..........New York, N.Y. 36......Catalina Haberman ........New York, N.Y. 37......Arielle Bakst ....................New York, N.Y. 38......Katherine Krieger ............New York, N.Y. 39......Nia Lashawn Dabreo ......Brooklyn, N.Y. 40......Linda Ziets-Segura..........New York, N.Y.

Metro Girls 14 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1 ........Amy Kaplan ....................Brooklyn, N.Y. 2 ........Rebecca Sitkovetsky ......Staten Island, N.Y. 3 ........Casey Brandes................Rego Park, N.Y. 4 ........Hillary Sherpa ..................Astoria, N.Y. 5 ........Alanna Levitt....................New York, N.Y. 6 ........Niki Truszkowski..............Middle Village, N.Y. 7 ........Nadejda Maslova ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 8 ........Cassie Tian ......................Flushing, N.Y. 9 ........Kristina Pali ......................Briarwood, N.Y. 10......Nicole Koi Massa ............Astoria, N.Y. 11......Sofia Kate Levine ............New York, N.Y. 12......Jamila Akhmedjanova ....New York, N.Y. 13......Rebecca Izyayeva ..........Staten Island, N.Y. 14......Anastasya Menshikova ..Brooklyn, N.Y. 15......Leah Margulies ................New York, N.Y. 16......Danielle P. Kezeli..............Staten Island, N.Y.

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

17......Taylor Simone Williams ..New York, N.Y. 18......Josephine Kimball ..........New York, N.Y. 19......Isabella Sifuentes ............Flushing, N.Y. 20......Rebecca MacDonald......Brooklyn, N.Y. 21......Naomi Park......................New York, N.Y. 22......Lauren Wooyoung Lee....New York, N.Y. 23......Isabella T. Hartman..........New York, N.Y. 24......Theodora Vrailas..............New York, N.Y. 25......Julia Kirsh ........................New York, N.Y. 26......Michelle Kleynerman ......Staten Island, N.Y. 27......Amalia M. Parrish ............Queens Village, N.Y. 28......Anna Borovinskaya ........Bronx, N.Y. 29......Kate Yamin ......................New York, N.Y. 30......Nicole Sin Ming Chu ......Flushing, N.Y. 31......Diana McCready ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 32......Katrine Zlatnik..................Forest Hills, N.Y. 33......Nadzeya Filaha................Brooklyn, N.Y. 34......Emma Eisenberg ............New York, N.Y. 35......Elisabeth G. Schlossel ....New York, N.Y. 36......Alina Kargin-Utkin............Brooklyn, N.Y. 37......Nicolette Fundator ..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 38......Rachel Musheyev............Forest Hills, N.Y. 39......Mia Simone Parrish ........Queens Village, N.Y. 40......Sophia Africk ..................New York, N.Y.

Metro Girls 16 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1 ........Tamila Latif-Zade ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 2 ........Amy Kaplan ....................Brooklyn, N.Y. 3 ........Gianna Gaudio ................Staten Island, N.Y. 4 ........Natalie Marguiles ............New York, N.Y. 5 ........Barbara Podvorchani......Bronx, N.Y. 6 ........Tomi Alalade ....................Rosedale, N.Y. 7 ........Nadejda Maslova ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 8 ........Denise Marie Trerotola ....Brooklyn, N.Y. 9 ........Isabella Rendon ..............Oakland Gardens, N.Y. 10......Sophia Hartman ..............New York, N.Y. 11......Kelsey Emma Gund........New York, N.Y. 12......Mariam Shengelia ..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 13......Alanna Levitt....................New York, N.Y. 14......Maxine Beata Zaretsky ..Brooklyn, N.Y. 15......Emma Wrazej ..................New York, N.Y. 16......Anna Maite Kaplan..........New York, N.Y. 17......Jamila Akhmedjanova ....New York, N.Y. 18......Rachel Okin ....................New York, N.Y. 19......Hillary Sherpa ..................Astoria, N.Y. 20......Lejla Redzematovic ........Whitestone, N.Y. 21......Alexandra Coulombe ......New York, N.Y. 22......Maryna Bohdanovska ....Brooklyn, N.Y. 23......Anastasia Lukyanovich ..Brooklyn, N.Y. 24......Grace L. Kennedy ..........New York, N.Y. 25......Kayla Schumacher..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 26......Nicole Koi Massa ............Astoria, N.Y. 27......Joanna Urena ..................Hollis, N.Y. 28......Anastasya Menshikova ..Brooklyn, N.Y. 29......Shelby Lau ......................Brooklyn, N.Y. 30......Elizabeth Khusid..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 31......Danielle P. Kezeli..............Staten Island, N.Y. 32......Carolyn Silverstein ..........New York, N.Y. 33......Gianna Medici ................Bayside Hills, N.Y.

Metro Girls 18 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1 ........Julia Zbarsky ..................New York, N.Y. 2 ........Tamila Latif-Zade ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 3 ........Liana Weitzman ..............Whitestone, N.Y.


NEW Boys & Girls Sectional Rankings (as of 06/26/15)

BOYS Sectional Boys 12 Singles— Metro Region Rank Name............................City 7 ........Sebastian Sec ................New York, N.Y. 9 ........John-Thomas Bilski ........New York, N.Y. 10......Wesley Zhang..................Staten Island, N.Y. 12......Tyler Korobov ..................Brooklyn, N.Y. 13......Ty Switzer ........................New York, N.Y. 14......Donovan Brown ..............New York, N.Y. 20......Cooper Williams ..............New York, N.Y. 27......David Krasner..................Staten Island, N.Y. 32......Donovan Spigner ............New York, N.Y. 33......Sachin Palta ....................Forest Hills, N.Y. 35......Jace Alexander................New York, N.Y. 38......Hudson Beaudoin ..........New York, N.Y. 40......Jasper August Hunt ........New York, N.Y. 45......Solomon Brown ..............New York, N.Y. 49......Noah Abels Eisenberg ....New York, N.Y. 50......Mitchel Pertsovsky..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 51......Kole Henry Moses ..........New York, N.Y. 56......Bradley Bennett ..............New York, N.Y. 61......Joseph Phillips ................New York, N.Y. 64......Luca Anthony DeMare....New York, N.Y. 65......Jeffrey Yu ........................Forest Hills, N.Y. 67......Jonathan Laforest ..........Queens Village, N.Y. 69......Benjamin Ebanks ............New York, N.Y. 74......Paul Elghouayel ..............New York, N.Y. 75......Adrien Svilen Jippov ......New York, N.Y. 81......Nicholas Suhanitski ........Staten Island, N.Y. 87 ....Eric Dubilirer ....................Little Neck, N.Y. 88......Nicholas Murphy ............New York, N.Y. 89......Sabian Kosinov ..............Forest Hills, N.Y. 91......Rafe Photopoulos ..........New York, N.Y. 92......Coby Matthew Brown ....New York, N.Y. 96......Jack Benavides ..............New York, N.Y. 97......Astro Brundo Pilipovic ....New York, N.Y. 104....David Dove Hendon........New York, N.Y. 108....Mathias Isaac Davila ......Whitestone, N.Y. 110....Ryan David Brandes ......Rego Park, N.Y. 111....Joshua Ashvil ..................Forest Hills, N.Y. 115....Guy Ferrera......................New York, N.Y. 122....Ryuichi Nitta ....................Bronx, N.Y. 132....Sebastian Brustein..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 141....Joshua Staroselskiy ........Brooklyn, N.Y. 143....Marko R. Gural ................New York, N.Y. 145....Steven Polishchuk ..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 150....Nicholas JSteiglehner ....New York, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 14 Singles— Metro Region Rank Name............................City 5 ........Ethan Leon ......................Woodhaven, N.Y. 8 ........Lantis Wang ....................New York, N.Y. 10......Derek Raskopf ................New York, N.Y. 11......Igor Maslov......................Brooklyn, N.Y. 14......Steven Nazaroff ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 15......Jeffrey Fradkin ................New York, N.Y. 17......Nicholas Pustilnik............Brooklyn, N.Y. 19......Shawn Jackson ..............Staten Island, N.Y. 21......Alexander Petrov ............Middle Village, N.Y. 24......Shand Stephens..............New York, N.Y. 26......Noah Edelman ................New York, N.Y. 32......Brandon T. Cohen ..........New York, N.Y. 36......Robbie F. Werdiger..........New York, N.Y.

YORK

40......Marcos Souza Lee ..........New York, N.Y. 41......Oliver Worth ....................New York, N.Y. 42......Oliver Obeid ....................New York, N.Y. 50......Donovan Brown ..............New York, N.Y. 51......Blake Frank......................New York, N.Y. 53......Kai Yuminaga ..................Oakland Gardens, N.Y. 55......Christopher Tham ..........Flushing, N.Y. 58......Jeffrey McCready............Brooklyn, N.Y. 59......Maxwell Igor Kachkarov Flushing, N.Y. 67......Tristan Taylor....................New York, N.Y. 69......Joseph Wilkanowski ......Long Island City, N.Y. 72......Ryan McCook..................Saint Albans, N.Y. 81......John-Tomas Bilski ..........New York, N.Y. 84......Alex Portnoy ....................New York, N.Y. 85......David Krasner..................Staten Island, N.Y. 94......Alexander Nielsen ..........New York, N.Y. 96......Jonathan Glinsky ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 99......Daniel Leon Maseyev......Brooklyn, N.Y. 104....Aleksa Pljakic ..................Forest Hills, N.Y. 106....Harry Portnoy ..................New York, N.Y. 107....Wesley Zhang..................Staten Island, N.Y. 109....Scott Fischer ..................New York, N.Y. 110....Zachary Portnoy..............New York, N.Y. 129....Donald James Smith ......Roosevelt Island, N.Y. 136....Simon Camacho ............New York, N.Y. 137....Anthony Cataldo ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 148....Ty Switzer ........................New York, N.Y. 150....Dylan Conner Charles ....New York, N.Y.

RANKINGS 28......Felipe Osses-Konig ........Rego Park, N.Y. 41......James Wasserman ........New York, N.Y. 64......Cole Gittens ....................New York, N.Y. 72......Jack Haroche ..................New York, N.Y. 80......Leonard Margolis ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 82......William J. Trang ..............Staten Island, N.Y. 86......Adam Bryan Borak..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 88......Michael Gardiner ............New York, N.Y. 90......Nicholas Rudman............New York, N.Y. 92......Alex Chao ........................New York, N.Y. 93......Robert Kennedy ..............New York, N.Y. 95......Xavier Pacthod ................New York, N.Y. 98......Alexander Thrane............New York, N.Y. 102....Jordan D. Jordan ............Astoria, N.Y. 111....Faris Nathoo ....................New York, N.Y. 112....Maurice Russo ................New York, N.Y. 115....Avery Bicks......................New York, N.Y. 128....Igor Maslov......................Brooklyn, N.Y. 137....Jacob Kern ......................New York, N.Y. 140....Mitchell Ostrovsky ..........Brooklyn, N.Y.

GIRLS Sectional Girls 12 Singles— Metro Region Rank Name............................City

15......Sumit Sarkar....................New York, N.Y. 20......Gary C. Fishkin................Staten Island, N.Y. 26......Calvin Chung ..................Bronx, N.Y. 32......Zachary Jordan Lieb ......New York, N.Y. 44......Jeffrey Gorilovsky............Brooklyn, N.Y. 46......Sam Vagner ....................Staten Island, N.Y. 53......Christopher Kolesnik ......Staten Island, N.Y. 54......Lantis Wang ....................New York, N.Y. 56......David Mizahi ....................Brooklyn, N.Y. 61......Nicholas Rudman............New York, N.Y. 63......Jacob Kern ......................New York, N.Y. 64......Allan Ethan Magid ..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 66......Philip Belmatch ..............Staten Island, N.Y. 67......Robert Kennedy ............New York, N.Y. 69......Shawn Jackson ..............Staten Island, N.Y. 78......Dylan Friedman ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 79......Michael Tyutyunik............Brooklyn, N.Y. 83......Igor Maslov......................Brooklyn, N.Y. 84......Gabriel Sifuentes ............Flushing, N.Y. 98......Nicholas Pustilnik............Brooklyn, N.Y. 102....Derek Raskopf ................New York, N.Y. 114....Jonah Jurick ....................New York, N.Y. 128....Steven Daniel Nazaroff ..Brooklyn, N.Y. 131....Ameer Hosain..................New York, N.Y. 135....Gabriel Isaac Rissman....Brooklyn, N.Y. 141....Eli Taylor-Kerman ............New York, N.Y. 143....Peter Frelinghuysen ........New York, N.Y. 144....Lucas Larese DeSanto....New York, N.Y. 149....Alden Radoncic ..............New York, N.Y.

7 ........Miriam Aziz ......................Staten Island, N.Y. 9 ........Daniella Benabraham......New York, N.Y. 12......Elvina Kalieva ..................Staten Island, N.Y. 13......Nadejda Maslova ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 17......Lorraine Bergmann ........Forest Hills, N.Y. 21......Karolina Lankamer ..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 22......Shawnte Beale ................Bronx, N.Y. 25......Carolyn Brodsky..............New York, N.Y. 30......Shakima Hotaki ..............Flushing, N.Y. 31......Michelle Kleynerman ......Staten Island, N.Y. 32......Natalie Eordekian ............Woodside, N.Y. 36......Sarah Youngberg ............New York, N.Y. 42......Nathalie Williams ............New York, N.Y. 45......Rachel Zhang ..................Forest Hills, N.Y. 50......Deliala Friedman..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 58......Alyssa An ........................New York, N.Y. 64......Sage Loudon ..................New York, N.Y. 67......Kassia Taylor....................New York, N.Y. 76......Lara Rose Berliner ..........New York, N.Y. 78......Alina Kargin-Utkin............Brooklyn, N.Y. 91......Sofie Shen ......................New York, N.Y. 103....Leila M. Epstein ..............New York, N.Y. 104....Julia T. Werdiger ..............New York, N.Y. 108....Angelica Schell................New York, N.Y. 115....Blakely Duskin ................New York, N.Y. 119....Sophia Cisse ..................New York, N.Y. 123....Taylor Overstrom ............New York, N.Y. 125....Beyonce Blake ................Brooklyn, N.Y. 127....Catalina Haberman ........New York, N.Y. 130....Nina Wiese ......................Flushing, N.Y. 133....Sofia Allinson ..................New York, N.Y. 139....Lulu Jenkins ....................Bronx, N.Y. 142....Elizabeth Serjantov..........New York, N.Y. 143....Bukky Alalade..................Rosedale, N.Y. 148....Emma Sofia Ostlund ......New York, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 18 Singles— Metro Region

Sectional Girls 14 Singles— Metro Region

Sectional Boys 16 Singles— Metro Region Rank Name............................City

Rank Name............................City

Rank Name............................City

1 ........Oliver Sec ........................New York, N.Y. 12......Christopher Paul Auteri ..Staten Island, N.Y. 13......Ananth Raghavan............New York, N.Y. 21......Ethan Nittolo....................Flushing, N.Y. 25......Marcus T. Smith ..............Little Neck, N.Y.

4 ........Shelly Yaloz......................Little Neck, N.Y. 7 ........Michelle Sorokko ............Little Neck, N.Y. 9 ........Dasha Kourkina ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 14......Rosie Garcia Gross ........New York, N.Y. 21......Katherine Kachkarov ......Flushing, N.Y.

23......Perene Wang ..................New York, N.Y. 24......Chelsea Williams ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 27......Nadejda Maslova ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 28......Kyra Bergmann ..............Forest Hills, N.Y. 29......Christina Huynh ..............Astoria, N.Y. 33......Sonia Tartakovsky ..........New York, N.Y. 41......Marie Ivantechenko ........Brooklyn, N.Y. 46......Amanda Solecki ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 47......Diana McCready ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 49......Isabella Sinclair Cooper..Brooklyn, N.Y. 53......Rebecca Eliana Fisch......New York, N.Y. 58......Miriam Irfan Aziz..............Staten Island, N.Y. 59......Diana Sosonkin ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 65......Isabella Nicole Tushaj......Bronx, N.Y. 68......Khyanna Singh ................Queens Village, N.Y. 69......Gabriella Eitkis ................Brooklyn, N.Y. 71......Giuliana Rosa Gibson ....Bayside, N.Y. 75......Amy Kaplan ....................Brooklyn, N.Y. 76......Rachel Rubenzahl ..........New York, N.Y. 79......Audrey Pacthod ..............New York, N.Y. 82......Shawnte Beale ................Bronx, N.Y. 91......Sofie Kate Levine ............New York, N.Y. 97......Anastasya Menshikova ..Brooklyn, N.Y. 98......Sabrina Boada ................Woodhaven, N.Y. 103....Shakima Hotaki ..............Flushing, N.Y. 108....Daniella Benabraham......New York, N.Y. 109....Zoe Kava..........................New York, N.Y. 111....Grace L. Kennedy ..........New York, N.Y. 113....Lorraine Bergmann ........Forest Hills, N.Y. 114....Elvina Kalieva ..................Staten Island, N.Y. 119....Emily Moczulski ..............Oakland Gardens, N.Y. 120....Isabella T. Hartman..........New York, N.Y. 121....Daniela Hernandez..........Corona, N.Y. 127....Casey Brandes................Rego Park, N.Y. 128....Nicole Koi Massa ............Astoria, N.Y. 129....Michelle Kleynerman ......Staten Island, N.Y. 131....Rebecca Sitkovetsky ......Staten Island, N.Y. 140....Medina Garunja ..............Bronx, N.Y. 141....Carolyn Brodsky..............New York, N.Y. 142....Anna Tselikovskaya ........New York, N.Y. 149....Hillary Sherpa ..................Astoria, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 16 Singles— Metro Region Rank Name............................City 7 ........Shelly Yaloz......................Little Neck, N.Y. 9 ........Michelle Sorokko ............Little Neck, N.Y. 13......Dasha Kourkina ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 18......Nicole Semenov..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 20......Alexus Gill ........................Brooklyn, N.Y. 24......Aleksandra Bekirova ......Brookln, N.Y. 27......Victoria Sec......................New York, N.Y. 32......Chelsea Williams ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 34......Sarah Rahman ................East Elmhurst, N.Y. 38......Lauren Munari..................Middle Village, N.Y. 40......Alexandra Koniaev ..........Forest Hills, N.Y. 46......Regina Furer ....................Brooklyn, N.Y. 47......Sydney Lynn Katz ..........New York, N.Y. 48......Dakota Fordham ............New York, N.Y. 49......Sonia Tartakovsky ..........New York, N.Y. 52......Stephanie Li ....................New York, N.Y. 55......Katherine Kachkarov ......Flushing, N.Y. 66......Jennifer Yu ......................Forest Hills, N.Y. 76......Lia Kiam ..........................New York, N.Y. 79......Valicia Browne ................Brooklyn, N.Y. 80......Kyra Bergmann ..............Forest Hills, N.Y. 87......Christina M. Huynh ........Astoria, N.Y. 94......Barbara Podvorchani......Bronx, N.Y. 96......Kiara A. Rose ..................New York, N.Y. 102....Rosie Garcia Gross ........New York, N.Y. 105....Anastasya Menshikova ..Brooklyn, N.Y.

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

69


NEW 109....Miriam Irfan Aziz..............Staten Island, N.Y. 117....Nadejda Maslova ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 118....Diana Sosonkin ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 122....Amy Kaplan ....................Brooklyn, N.Y. 126....Brittny Jo Ferreira............Brooklyn, N.Y. 128....Amalia M. Parrish ............Queens Village, N.Y. 129....Daniella Benabraham......New York, N.Y. 130....Isabel Balilo......................Flushing, N.Y. 140....Katelyn Walker ................New York, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 18 Singles— Metro Region Rank Name............................City 3 ........Anna Ulyashchenko........Brooklyn, N.Y. 7 ........Sabrina Xiong ..................Fresh Meadows, N.Y. 16......Alexandra Koniaev ..........Forest Hills, N.Y. 18......Alexus Gill ........................Brooklyn, N.Y. 21......Isis Gill..............................Brooklyn, N.Y. 22......Jessica Livianu ................Brooklyn, N.Y. 26......Yuka Lin ..........................Kew Gardens, N.Y. 35......Sheely Yaloz ....................Little Neck, N.Y. 36......Brianna Williams..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 42......Patricia Obeid..................New York, N.Y. 45......Sonia Tartakovsky ..........New York, N.Y. 47......Jessica Golovin ..............New York, N.Y. 48......Jillian Rose Auteri............Staten Island, N.Y. 49......Christina Puccinelli..........New York, N.Y. 53......Sarah Rahman ................East Elmhurst, N.Y. 59......Arnelle Sullivan ................Brooklyn, N.Y. 60......Michelle Sorokko ............Little Neck, N.Y. 62......Lisa Marchelska ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 63......Shayna Spooner..............New York, N.Y. 70......Sophia Kryloff ..................Brooklyn, N.Y. 76......Dakota Fordham ............New York, N.Y. 77......Emma Brandes Kassan..New York, N.Y. 84......Annie Reiner ....................New York, N.Y. 91......Elizabeth Tsvetkov ..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 94......Kiara A. Rose ..................New York, N.Y. 95......Isabelle Rovinski..............New York, N.Y. 100....Lauren Munari..................Middle Village, N.Y. 112....Sydney Lynn Katz ..........New York, N.Y. 113....Dea Koiava ......................New York, N.Y. 114....Stephanie Johnson ........Richmond Hill, N.Y. 118....Sofia Anouk Alsiks ..........New York, N.Y. 121....Khyanna Singh ................Queens Village, N.Y. 122....Katherine Kachkarov ......Flushing, N.Y. 125....Jennifer Yu ......................Forest Hills, N.Y. 131....Tamila Latif-Zade ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 138....Darya Kolesnichenko......Brooklyn, N.Y. 142....Dasha Kourkina ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 146....Brianna Baichulall............Queens Village, N.Y.

Boys & Girls National Rankings (as of 06/24/15)

BOYS National Boys 12 Singles— Metro Region Rank ..Name ..........................City 59......John-Tomas Bilski ..........New York, N.Y. 81......Wesley Zhang..................Staten Island, N.Y. 109....Sebastian Sec ................New York, N.Y. 142....Ty Switzer ........................New York, N.Y. 164....Tyler Korobov ..................Brooklyn, N.Y. 201....Donovan Brown ..............New York, N.Y. 278....Cooper Williams ..............New York, N.Y.

70

YORK

317....Hudson Beaudoin ..........New York, N.Y. 395....Jace K. Alexander ..........New York, N.Y. 408....Sachin Palta ....................Forest Hills, N.Y. 421....Sidharth Chawla..............New York, N.Y. 530....Winter Forest Fagerberg New York, N.Y. 648....Donovan Spigner ............New York, N.Y. 660....Jasper August Hunt ........New York, N.Y. 671....Solomon Brown ..............New York, N.Y. 722....Kole Henry Moses ..........New York, N.Y. 726....David Krasner..................Staten Island, N.Y. 804....Noah Abels Eisenberg ....New York, N.Y.

National Boys 14 Singles— Metro Region Rank ..Name ..........................City 65......Lantis Wang ....................New York, N.Y. 90......Derek Raskopf ................New York, N.Y. 96......Ethan Leon ......................Woodhaven, N.Y. 143....Nicholas Pustilnik............Brooklyn, N.Y. 184....Jeffrey Fradkin ................New York, N.Y. 220....Igor Maslov......................Brooklyn, N.Y. 225....Shawn Jackson ..............Staten Island, N.Y. 233....Steven Daniel Nazaroff ..Brooklyn, N.Y. 357....Joshua Berman ..............New York, N.Y. 362....Alexander Petrov ............Middle Village, N.Y. 466....Shand Stephens..............New York, N.Y. 571....Marcos Souza Lee ..........New York, N.Y. 579....Noah D. Edelman............New York, N.Y. 603....Brandon T. Cohen ..........New York, N.Y. 669....Robbie Werdiger..............New York, N.Y. 740....Joseph Wilkanowski ......Long Island City, N.Y. 779....Tristan Taylor....................New York, N.Y. 781....Donovan Brown ..............New York, N.Y. 810....Maxwell Kachkarov ........Flushing, N.Y. 871....Richard Zusman..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 877....Kai Yuminaga ..................Oakland Gardens, N.Y. 878....Oliver Worth ....................New York, N.Y. 955....Harry Portnoy ..................New York, N.Y. 976....Christopher Tham ..........Flushing, N.Y.

National Boys 16 Singles— Metro Region Rank ..Name ..........................City 244....Sumit Sarkar....................New York, N.Y. 277....Gary C. Fishkin................Staten Island, N.Y. 499....Calvin Chung ..................Bronx, N.Y. 692....Lantis Wang ....................New York, N.Y. 796....Zachary Jordan Lieb ......New York, N.Y. 835....Derek Raskopf ................New York, N.Y. 837....Jeffrey Gorilovsky............Brooklyn, N.Y. 851....Christopher Kolesnik ......Staten Island, N.Y. 861....Sam V. Vagner ................Staten Island, N.Y. 898....Jacob Kern ......................New York, N.Y. 916....Gabriel Sifuentes ............Flushing, N.Y. 966....Allan Ethan Magdid ........Brooklyn, N.Y. 983....Dylan Friedman ..............Brooklyn, N.Y.

National Boys 18 Singles— Metro Region Rank ..Name ..........................City 39......Oliver Sec ........................New York, N.Y. 130....James Wasserman ........New York, N.Y. 152....Ethan Nittolo....................Flushing, N.Y. 176....Christopher Auteri ..........Staten Island, N.Y. 196....Ananth Raghavan............New York, N.Y. 264....Felipe Osses-Konig ........Rego Park, N.Y. 394....Marcus T. Smith ..............Little Neck, N.Y. 634....Alexander Pintilie ............New York, N.Y. 811....Cole Gittens ....................New York, N.Y.

RANKINGS 954....Maurice Russo ................New York, N.Y. 973....Mitchell Ostrovsky ..........Brooklyn, N.Y.

National Girls 18 Singles— Metro Region

GIRLS

67......Anna Ulyashchenko........Brooklyn, N.Y. 74......Sabrina Xiong ..................Fresh Meadows, N.Y. 111....Jessica Melanie Livianu..Brooklyn, N.Y. 237....Arnelle Sullivan ................Brooklyn, N.Y. 271....Jessica Golovin ..............New York, N.Y. 378....Brianna Williams..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 406....Alexandra Koniaev ..........Forest Hills, N.Y. 431....Isis Gill..............................Brooklyn, N.Y. 483....Sonia Tartakovsky ..........New York, N.Y. 515....Sheely Yaloz ....................Little Neck, N.Y. 544....Alexus Gill ........................Brooklyn, N.Y. 573....Stephanie Johnson ........Richmond Hill, N.Y. 609....Michelle Sorokko ............Little Neck, N.Y. 631....Sophia Kryloff ..................Brooklyn, N.Y. 693....Alexandra Sanford ..........New York, N.Y. 739....Patricia Obeid..................New York, N.Y. 756....Dasha Kourkina ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 936....Julia D. Fisch ..................New York, N.Y.

Rank ..Name ..........................City

National Girls 12 Singles— Metro Region Rank ..Name ..........................City 18......Elvina Kalieva ..................Staten Island, N.Y. 32......Nadejda Maslova ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 64......Miriam Irfan Aziz..............Staten Island, N.Y. 99......Daniella Benabraham......New York, N.Y. 151....Lorraine Bergmann ........Forest Hills, N.Y. 347....Shawnte Natalique Beale Bronx, N.Y. 353....Carolyn Brodsky..............New York, N.Y. 360....Sarah Lucy Youngberg ..New York, N.Y. 363....Shakima Hotaki ..............Flushing, N.Y. 427....Michelle Kleynerman ......Staten Island, N.Y. 489....Karolina Lankamer ..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 588....Nathalie Williams ............New York, N.Y. 655....Rachel Zhang ..................Forest Hills, N.Y. 672....Deliala Friedman..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 685....Alyssa An ........................New York, N.Y. 827....Natalie Eordekian ............Woodside, N.Y. 993....Kassia Taylor....................New York, N.Y.

National Girls 14 Singles— Metro Region Rank ..Name ..........................City 21......Shelly Yaloz......................Little Neck, N.Y. 30......Michelle Sorokko ............Little Neck, N.Y. 34......Dasha Kourkina ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 132....Rosie Garcia Gross ........New York, N.Y. 149....Katherine Kachkarov ......Flushing, N.Y. 163....Perene Wang ..................New York, N.Y. 202....Anastasia Koniaev ..........Forest Hills, N.Y. 272....Sonia Tartakovsky ..........New York, N.Y. 290....Kyra Bergmann ..............Forest Hills, N.Y. 343....Nadejda Maslova ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 354....Christina M. Huynh ........Astoria, N.Y. 516....Chelsea Williams ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 571....Marie Ivantechenko ........Brooklyn, N.Y. 610....Amanda Solecki ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 715....Diana McCready ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 742....Diana Sosonkin ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 879....Rebecca Eliana Fisch......New York, N.Y.

National Girls 16 Singles— Metro Region Rank ..Name ..........................City 148....Dasha Kourkina ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 170....Michelle Sorokko ............Little Neck, N.Y. 203....Brianna Williams..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 206....Shelly Yaloz......................Little Neck, N.Y. 299....Alexus Gill ........................Brooklyn, N.Y. 361....Lauren Munari..................Middle Village, N.Y. 377....Aleksandra Bekirova ......Brooklyn, N.Y. 389....Victoria Sec......................New York, N.Y. 430....Nicole Veronica Semenov Brooklyn, N.Y. 531....Sarah Rahman ................East Elmhurst, N.Y. 603....Anastasia Koniaev ..........Forest Hills, N.Y. 713....Dakota Fordham ............New York, N.Y. 780....Chelsea Williams ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 944....Katherine Kachkarov ......Flushing, N.Y.

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com


USTA/Metropolitan Region

2015 TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. JULY 2015 Friday-Sunday, July 17-19 L2O Sportime RI July Open Sportime Randall’s Island 1 Randalls Island New York, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Clay, Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail mmoore@sportimeny.com or call (646) 783-5301. Friday-Sunday, July 17-19 L3 Alley Pond TC July UPS Alley Pond Tennis Center 7920 Winchester Boulevard Queens Village, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14-16 (RR) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail hemco2@aol.com or call (718) 264-2600. Friday-Monday, July 24-27 L1 North Shore Tower CC Summertime Championships North Shore & Towers Country Club 27286 Grand Central Parkway Floral Park, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $$54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, July 20 at 10:00 p.m.) For more information, call (718) 428-5030. Friday-Sunday, July 24-26 L1B NYJTL Summer Challenger New York Junior Tennis and Learning 5812 Queens Boulevard Woodside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-14 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 13 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ebantovska@nyjtl.org or call (347) 417-8168.

Friday-Thursday, July 24-30 L1B APTC July Challenger Alley Pond Tennis Center 7920 Winchester Boulevard Queens Village, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Wednesday, July 22 at 6:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail hemco2@aol.com or call (718) 264-2600. Saturday-Sunday, July 25-26 PSP L2; Sportime RI Eastern Orange Challenger Series #7 Sportime Randall’s Island 1 Randalls Island New York, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 60’ Orange Ball 10 (FRLC) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, July 19 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail mmoore@sportimeny.com or call (646) 783-5301. Monday-Friday, July 27-31 L2R City Parks Junior Tournament Series: Central Park, Manhattan City Parks Foundation Central Park Tennis Center New York, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $33 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, July 21 at 9:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tomtvedt@yahoo.com or call (718) 760-6999. Monday-Friday, July 27-31 L1B City Parks 10U Junior Tournament Series: Central Park, Manhattan City Parks Foundation Central Park Tennis Center New York, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $33 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, July 21 at 9:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tomtvedt@yahoo.com or call (718) 760-6999.

Friday-Sunday, July 31-August 2 L2O NYJTL Summer Open New York Junior Tennis and Learning 5812 Queens Boulevard Woodside, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, July 20 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ebantovska@nyjtl.org or call (347) 417-8168. Friday-Sunday, July 31-August 2 L1B CityView Summer Challenger Series Cityview Racquet Club 4334 32nd Place Long Island City, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-14 (SE); and Challenger Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles For more information, e-mail jperez@cityviewracquet.com or call (718) 389-6252. Friday-Monday, July 31-August 3 L1B APTC August Challenger Alley Pond Tennis Center 7920 Winchester Boulevard Queens Village, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 27 at 8:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail hemco2@aol.com or call (718) 264-2600. AUGUST 2015 Monday-Friday, August 3-7 L1B Stadium Tennis Center August Challenger Stadium Tennis Center 725 Exterior Street Bronx, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE); and Challenger Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Wednesday, July 29 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail lauren@stadiumtennisnyc.com or call (718) 665-4684.

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine

71


USTA/Metropolitan Region

2015 TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, August 7-9 L2O Lincoln Terrace Tennis Open Lincoln Terrace Tennis Association Buffalo Avenue and Eastern Parkway Brooklyn, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-16 (SE); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $38.13 for first singles/$23 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, Aug. 3 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tcgosl@hotmail.com or call (917) 379-0094. Friday-Sunday, August 7-9 L1 Harlemweek Tri-State Championships Harlem Junior Tennis Program 40 W 143rd Street New York, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 31 at 7:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail dantebrown@hjtep.org or call (212) 491-3738. Friday-Sunday, August 7-9 L1 EmblemHealth BIYTC August Championships New York Junior Tennis League 1701 Crotona Avenue Bronx, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 31 at 7:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail wwiese@nyjtl.org or call (917) 443-6751. Monday-Thursday, August 10-13 L2O Staten Island Community Tennis Center Summer Open Staten Island Community Tennis Center 2800 Victory Boulevard Staten Island, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, Aug. 3 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail klastique@yahoo.com or call (718) 982-3355. 72

Monday-Friday, August 10-14 L2R City Parks Junior Tournament Series: Staten Island City Parks Foundation Bard Avenue and Delafield Place • Staten Island, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $33 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Aug. 4 at 9:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tomtvedt@yahoo.com or call (718) 760-6999.

Friday-Sunday, August 14-16 L1B CityView Summer Challenger Series Cityview Racquet Club 4334 32nd Place Long Island City, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-14 (SE); and Challenger Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles For more information, e-mail jperez@cityviewracquet.com or call (718) 389-6252.

Monday-Friday, August 10-14 L2R City Parks Junior Tournament Series: Staten Island City Parks Foundation Bard Avenue and Delafield Place • Staten Island, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $33 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Aug. 4 at 9:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tomtvedt@yahoo.com or call (718) 760-6999.

Saturday-Sunday, August 15-16 L3 Alley Pond TC August Segment Alley Pond Tennis Center 7920 Winchester Boulevard Queens Village, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (RR) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, Aug. 13 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail hemco2@aol.com or call (718) 264-2600.

Monday-Friday, August 10-14 L1B Stadium Tennis Center End of Summer Challenger Stadium Tennis Center 725 Exterior Street • Bronx, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE); and Challenger Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Wednesday, Aug. 5 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail lauren@stadiumtennisnyc.com or call (718) 665-4684.

Friday-Monday, August 21-24 L1B APTC August Challenger Alley Pond Tennis Center 7920 Winchester Boulevard Queens Village, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Aug. 17 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail hemco2@aol.com or call (718) 264-2600.

Friday-Sunday, August 14-16 L2O NYJTL Summer Open New York Junior Tennis and Learning 5812 Queens Boulevard • Woodside, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (RR); Intermediate Boys Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16-18 (SE); Intermediate Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28.88 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, Aug. 7 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ebantovska@nyjtl.org or call (347) 417-8168.

Monday-Friday, August 24-28 L2R City Parks Junior Tournament Series: The Bronx City Parks Foundation Aileen B Ryan recreational Complex Bronx, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $33 per player For more information, e-mail tomtvedt@yahoo.com or call (718) 760-6999.

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com


THE WORLD’S PREMIER

FOOD & TENNIS EXPERIENCES AUGUST 26, 2015 • 10:00AM – 2:00PM

CITY VIEW RACQUET CLUB • 43-34 32ND PLACE • LONG ISLAND CITY, NY 11101

AUGUST 27, 2015 • 7:00PM – 10:00PM W NEW YORK HOTEL • 541 LEXINGTON AVE • NEW YORK, NY 10022

T ickets, ssponsorship, ponsorship, a nd gr Tickets, and group oup d discounts iscounts ccall all (2 15)925 -7875 or or vvisit isit ttasteoftennisnyc.com asteofftennisnyc.com (215)925-7875 NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • New York Tennis Magazine 114


SPORTIME 2015 SUMMER CAMPS SPORTIME has the perfect camps for competitive and aspiring tennis players of all ages and levels! 





EXCEL TENNIS CAMP, PRESENTED BY THE JOHN McENROE TENNIS ACADEMY AGES 7-18 U10 TENNIS & SPORTS CAMP AGES 5-10 TENNIS WHIZZ PRESCHOOL CAMP AGES 3-5

SIGN UPS FOR OUR FALL TENNIS SEASON GO ING ON NOW! Call or visit us online to fin d out more: www.SportimeNY.com/M anhattan www.SportimeNY.com/Lak e-Isle

SPACE IS LIMITED SO REGISTER TODAY! SPORTIME Randall’s Island 212/427-6150 www.SportimeCamps/NYC CampsNYC@SportimeNY.com

115 New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • NYTennisMag.com

SPORTIME Lake Isle 914/777-5151 www.SportimeCamps/Lisle CampsLisle@SportimeNY.com

New York Tennis Magazine July / August 2015  
New York Tennis Magazine July / August 2015  
Advertisement