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mASSE [en]

Executive Editor/Founder Lola C. Shepard lola@enmassmag.com Creative Director/Founder Jill Tashlik jill@enmassmag.com Art Curator Anna Di Stasi, societycontemporary.com Copy Editor Z. Nelson Marketing Director Karen Salema karen_salama@hotmail.com Contributors Alejandro Almanza Pereda Bob Wolfenson Catalina Bauer Jose Picayo Karine Basilio Miler Lagos Rogério Cavalcanti Rosâgela Rennó Sandra Cinto Sol Abadi Tomas Saraceno Special Thanks To: Anna Di Stasi at Society Contemporary, Galleries: Casa Triângulo, Die Ecke Arte Contemporáneo, Magnan Metz, Robin Rice, Tanya Bonakdar and Vermelho.

EnMasse magazine is owned and published by Studio O2 LLC. Copyright 2010 by EnMasse magazine. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content, in whole or in part, in any manner, without permission is prohibited. EnMasse reserves the unrestricted right to accept or reject any editorial or advertising material.


Contents:

007. Emerging Perspectives, Anna Di Stasi 008. Dress Rehearsal, Bob Wolfenson 016.The Last Photo, Rosângela Rennó 022. Madame Butterfly, Bob Wolfenson 030. A New Utopia, Tomas Saraceno 036. Minimal Distractions, Karine Basilio 042. Routines Transform, Catalina Bauer 048. Picture Imperfect, Rogério Cavalcanti 058. Palm Tree Escape, Jose Picayo 064. On The Range, Bob Wolfenson 072. Paper Trail, Miler Lagos 078. Child’s Play, Sol Abadi 086. Dream Scapes, Sandra Cinto 092. Summoning Of The Muse, Rogério Cavalcanti 100. Precarious Balances, Alejandro Almanza Pereda 106. Above And Beyond, Karine Basilio.


influences [emerging]

We invite you to peruse the pages of the third issue of EnMasse magazine exhibiting the diverse and original artwork of Latin American artists. In the past decade, there has been a large and growing interest in Latin American artists based out of the Caribbean Islands, South America, Central America and Mexico. In the Spring of this year, EnMasse magazine had the fortuitous opportunity to speak with Anna Di Stasi regarding this movement. Anna Di Stasi is the owner of Society Contemporary, a New York City gallery specializing in contemporary art from Latin America and the Iberian Peninsula, the go-to gallery on emerging Latin American art. In response to our enlightening conversation, this issue is dedicated to recognizing and advocating emerging talented Latin American artists. In addition, it is our greatest pleasure that Anna Di Stasi graciously offered to curate this special issue. Anna Di Stasi has gathered together a select group of prominent emerging Latin American artists who have an influence on today’s globally produced contemporary art. What makes these artists important is that even though they belong to the international contemporary art scene they still maintain very close ties to their heritage, seamlessly blending the personal and the political, the local and the global. Di Stasi’s compiled list include the beautifully intricate yet complex installations of Chilean artist Catalina Bauer, the precariously balanced installations of Mexican artist Alejandro Almanza Pereda, the magical wall drawings of Brazilian artist Sandra Cinto, the utopian inflatable modules containing plant-based ecosystems of Argentinean artist Tomas Saraceno, the tree-like sculptures of Columbian artist Miler Lagos and Brazilian born Rosângela Rennó’s transformations of pre-existing photographs. EnMasse magazine also recognizes that fashion photography is an art form in itself and so we give homage to the illustrious Latin American photographers who provided us with their resplendent fashions editorials.


18 AUG - 10 SEP 17 SEP - 08 OCT 15 OCT - 12 NOV 17 NOV - 10 DEC 01 DEC - 04 DEC

ALICE SHINTANI JACK STRANGE YURI FIRMEZA GUILLERMO MORA ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH

PAES DE ARAÚJO 77 | SÃO PAULO | 04531-090 | BRAZIL | 55 11 3167-5621


Alejandro Almanza Pereda, Out To Lunch, 2008. Drawing. One 9B pencil, paper and mirror paper. 41 x 46.75 inches

Rich in its diversity and fueled by an international collector base, the market for Contemporary Art from Latin America has never been hotter. Eluding the confines of national identities and opting instead for a truly global art practice, a new generation of Latin American artists find themselves equally at home in large megalopolies such as Mexico City and Sao Paulo, or well established artistic centers such as Paris, Berlin, and New York. Common threads found throughout Contemporary Art from Latin America include a shared regard for producing experiential, sensorial, and conceptually engaging work that is simultaneously complex and aesthetically seductive. On the curatorial front, museums in the US and Europe continue to enhance the public’s interest in the field by producing astounding exhibitions showcasing contemporary artists from Latin America. Some recent examples of landmark exhibitions include: Carlos Cruz-Diez: Color in Space and Time at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston (2011); Gabriel Orozco (2010) and Tangled Alphabets: León Ferrari and Mira Schendel at The Museum of Modern Art, New York (2009); Cildo Meireles at the Tate Modern (2008); Hélio Oiticica, The Body of Color at The Tate Modern and at The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (2007). Institutional collectors such as The Tate Modern (London), Los Angeles County Museum of Art (Los Angeles), The Museum of Modern Art (New York) and The Solomon R. Guggenheim (New York), the Daros Foundation (Zurich), The Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia (Madrid), amongst others, have been instrumental in championing and promoting Contemporary Latin Artists by acquiring their artworks for their permanent collections. Their efforts as well as those of passionate [emerging] collectors, scholars, and private art dealers will no doubt continue to raise the international profile and appreciation for Contemporary Art from Latin America.

persPECTIVES

As a tribute to them, the following edition of EnMasse magazine features a select group of promising artists working in an international context and represented by some of the continent’s most prestigious galleries. We thank them and their respective dealers for their enthusiastic support of this Latin American Art edition and look forward to enjoying their work for many years to come.

Anna Di Stasi. A former Specialist at Christie’s Latin American Paintings Department, Di Stasi has over ten years of experience

appraising and evaluating contemporary artworks. She is the Co-Founder of Society Contemporary, an art gallery specializing in Contemporary Art from Latin America and the Iberian Peninsula. For details, please visit: societycontemporary.com or via email at anna@ societycontemporary.com

007


dress rehearsal


Opposite: Organza dress, Acquastudio. This page: Tulle dress with organza, FĂĄtima JĂşlia; Velvet headpiece, Davi Ramos.

Photography: BOBWOLFENSON.COM.BR Hair & Makeup: Daniel Hernandez Model: Ana Claudia Michels at way courtesy of elle magazine

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Organza tulle dress, Samuel Cirnansck; Crinoline headpiece, Daisy & Ruth; Silk heels, Studio TMLS.

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Vintage fencing mask, Stylist Own; Jacket, RUBIN CHAPELLE.

Tulle and silk embroidered blouse and skirt, Triton; Thigh highs, Wolford.

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Organza and silk dress, Gloria coelho; Crinoline headpiece, Daisy & Ruth; Silk shoes, Peach by Constanรงa bastos.

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Tulle dress embroidered with crystals, Lino Villaventura; Leather hat with metal, Davi ramos.


Vintage fencing mask, Stylist Own; Jacket, RUBIN CHAPELLE.

Tulle dress, Fause Haten; Crinolin headpiece, Daisy & Ruth; Sequin belt, NK; Gloves, Lino Villaventura; Leather ankle boots, Daslu.

015


phOTO

[the last]

Rosâgela Rennó. Conceptual photographer Rennó rarely takes photos of her subjects but rather, collects pre-existing photographs found from flea markets, family albums, penitentiary files, official documents and the national press. These images are retouched and manipulated to take on new life thus changing the ordinary into something extraordinary. In Biblioteca, Rennó designed her “artist’s book” by bringing together hundreds of travel and family photos assembled over 10 years. Here Rennó rescues the photos from oblivion; ostensively giving back the families and individuals their identities. In A Última Foto series (The Last Photo), Rennó invited 43 photographers to photograph the iconic Rio de Janeiro monument Christ the Redeemer using mechanical cameras of different formats that she collected over the last fifteen years. This was to be the last picture the cameras will ever take. The final 43 diptychs of the monument is exhibited alongside the camera, never to be used again, creating an homage to the end of film photography in an increasingly digital world.

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Odires Mlรกszho, The Last Photo, 2006. Framed color photograph and photographic camera Nikon F2 (diptych). Photo 57.7 x 41.9 x 15.8 cm / camera 20 x 18.4 x 15.8 cm. Courtesy of Galeria Vermelho.

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Rochelle Costi, Mercury II of the project The Last Photo, 2006. Framed color photograph and photographic camera Mercury II (diptych). Photo 92.9 x 71 x 7.9 cm / camera 14.3 x 22.5 x 7.9 cm. Courtesy of Galeria Vermelho.

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Debora 70, TLC Lumiere of the project The Last Photo, 2006. Framed color photograph and photographic camera TLC Lumiere (diptych). Photo 50 x 72.9 x 11 cm / camera 14.3 x 21.9 x 11 cm. Courtesy of Galeria Vermelho.

Luiz Garrido, Zeiss Super Ikonta of the project The Last Photo, 2006. Framed color photograph and photographic camera Zeiss Ikon Super Ikonta 533/16 (diptych). Photo 41 x 62.8 x 14.3 cm / camera 15.4 x 22.2 x 14.3 cm. Courtesy of Galeria Vermelho.

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Vicente de Mello, Box Tengor of the project The Last Photo, 2006. Framed color photograph and photographic camera Box Tengor 54 (diptych). Photo : 68 x 68 x 13 cm / cam 13.4 x 15.4 x 12.4 cm. Courtesy of Galeria Vermelho.

020


Rosângela Rennó (b. Belo Horizonte, Brazil 1962) lives and works in Rio de Janerio, Brazil. She graduated with her PhD in Fine Arts at the Escola de Comunicações e Artes in Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil. Her solo exhibitions extend internationally to Galeria IBEU-Madureira in Rio de Janeiro, De Appel Foundation in Amsterdam, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, Galeria Luis Adelantado in Valencia, LombardFreid Fine Arts in New York City, Australian Centre for Photography in Sydney, Galeria Módulo in Lisbon, Galeria de la Raza in San Francisco, Galeria Juana de Aizpuru in Madrid and Cristina Guerra Contemporary Art in Lisbon. Rennó’s work can be viewed at prestigious museum collections such as Centro Galego de Arte Contemporáneo, Museu de Arte Moderna in Rio de Janeiro, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid and Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo. www.galeriavermelho.com.br / www.rosangelarenno.com.br

Rosângela Rennó, Ricoh 500 of the project The Last Photo, 2006. Framed gelatin/silver print and photographic camera Ricoh 500 (diptych). Photo 82.8 x 55 x 9.4 cm / camera 18.9 x 16.5 x 9.4 cm. Courtesy of Galeria Vermelho.

Dani Soter, Brownie Reflex of the project The Last Photo, 2006. Framed color photograph and photographic camera Brownie Reflex (Synchro Model), (diptych). Photo 78 x 78 x 7.8 cm / camera 16.8 x 16.8 x 7.8 cm. Courtesy of Galeria Vermelho.

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Dress, FauSe Haten made with recycled blankets.

m

MADAME BUTTERFLY

PHOTOGRAPHY: BOBWOLFENSON.COM.BR FASHION EDITOR: PAULO MARTINEZ HAIR & MAKEUP: RICARDO DOS ANJOS COURTESY OF FFW MAGAZINE


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Dress, Lino Villaventura made of 500 guatambu seeds.

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Organic silk dress, AndrĂŠ Lima.

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Organic woolen dress, Tereza Santos.

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utOPIA [a new]

Tomas Saraceno is internationally recognized for his architectural installations of utopian environments where society naturally integrates with our planet in an ecological and sustainable coexistence. Saraceno designs inflatable modules that he terms“Biospheres.” Several of the biospheres contain plant-based ecosystems, with the largest of them inviting the public to move inside and be part of the installation. Saraceno is interested in airspace that is not subject to restrictions, allowing for the free movement across borders, in effect creating aerial cities. Saraceno explains his concept: “Like continental drift at the beginning of the world, the new cities will search for their positions in the air in order to find their place in the universe… [this structure is] capable of imagining more elastic and dynamic border rules (political, geographical, etc.) for a new space/cyberspace.” Saraceno’s work applies the scientific principles of engineering, physics, chemistry, aeronautics and architecture; specifically following in the tradition of architects and theorists R. Buckminster Fuller, Peter Cook, Yona Friedman, and other visionaries.

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Galaxies Forming Along Filaments, Like Droplets Along The Strands Of A Spider’s Web, 2008. Elastic rope installation. Courtesy of Tanya Bonakdar Gallery.

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2009 Installation view Statens Museum Kunst, Copenhagen, Denmark. Courtesy of Tanya Bonakdar Gallery.

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2009 Installation view Statens Museum Kunst, Copenhagen, Denmark. Courtesy of Tanya Bonakdar Gallery.

Tomas Saraceno (b. Tucuman, Argentina, 1973) has a Postgraduate degree in Art & Architecture from Escuela Superior de Bellas Artes Ernesto de la Carcova in Buenos Aires and from Staatliche Hochschule fßr Bildende Kunst in Frankfurt. He has participated in a number of group exhibitions including, the Hayward Gallery in London, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota and El Museo de Arte Contemporaneo de Monterrey in Mexico. His solo exhibitions include the Tanya Bonakdar Gallery in New York City, Matrix 224 at the University of California at Berkeley, California, Centre d’Art Santa Monica in Barcelona and Barbican Art Gallery in London. www.tanyabonakdargallery.com

2009 Installation view Statens Museum Kunst, Copenhagen, Denmark. Courtesy of Tanya Bonakdar Gallery.

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Galaxies Forming Along Filaments, Like Droplets Along The Strands Of A Spider’s Web, 2009. Elastic rope installation at La Biennale di Venezia, Venice 2009. Courtesy of Tanya Bonakdar Gallery.

035


Dress, CAMILLA & MARC; Necklace, HELEN YARMAK. Opposite: Bodysuit, VICTOR DE SOUZA.

Minimal Distractions Photography: KARINEBASILIO.COM Styling: eric orlando Hair: yoich tomizawa Makeup: min min ma Model: sam rayner at new york models


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Coat, RICK OWENS; Heels, STEPHEN VENEZIA; Bracelet, Stylist’s own.

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Bodysuit, MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA.

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Dress, VICTOR DE SOUZA; Glove, LACRASIA; Bracelet, HELEN YARMAK.

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] [ 041


transform [routines]

Catalina Bauer. Daily routine and art is intermixed in Bauer’s work with a high sense of economy and efficiency in developing her sculptural pieces. Her artwork is created by incorporating inexpensive everyday materials from plastic bags and rubber bands to the intricacies of dry point. It is not only the final presentation of her work that is meaningful but the process in which Bauer revels in. Bauer states “The technique, time and dedication to transform these materials and give them new life are a symbolic gesture of giving value to something that means nothing in our everyday life.” In her piece, Column, thousands of rubber bands are knitted together, suggesting the method of fabrication in which Chilean women routinely undertake. Bauer’s work is frequently produced on a communal basis, with volunteers providing the labor to create complex pieces allowing process and transformation to become part of the medium. Through this process, Bauer reiterates that routine and dedication can serve to produce impressive artwork.

042


Detail of Column (2nd version, red and white), 2010. Courtesy of Philips De Pury & Company.


Column (2nd version, red and white), 2010. Eighty kilos of red and white knitted rubber bands. Exhibited in Tectonic Shifts: Contemporary Art from Chile, Saatchi Gallery, London, 2011. Courtesy of Philips De Pury & Company.

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Material Ligero (Traveling light): Five Artists From Santiago, Chile, Margarette Lawrence Gallery. Courtesy of Catalina Bauer.

Material Ligero (Traveling light): Five Artists From Santiago, Chile, Margarette Lawrence Gallery. Courtesy of Catalina Bauer.

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Lapso: A Collective Drawing Experiment. Courtesy of Die Ecke Arte Contemporáneo.

Catalina Bauer (b. Santiago, Chile, 1976) lives and works in Santiago, Chile where she studied Fine Arts at Universidad Finis Terrae. Bauer’s work has been exhibited in numerous solo and group art shows, including the Museum of Anthropology and the International Biennial of Contemporary Textile Art - both in Veracruz, Mexico. She has also exhibited at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chile and Casa de América in Spain. Bauer also participates in international art fairs such as “Ch.ACO” in Chile, “Arte BA” in Argentina and “La Otra” in Colombia. She received the Beca AMA award for establishing the Residence Program at Gasworks in London and has been nominated for the Chilean Altazor Prize for Visual Arts. www.dieecke.cl / www.catalinabauer.wordpress.com

Hamaca, 2006. Hammock, flour, and dirt. Courtesy of Catalina Bauer.

046


Map (3rd version), 2005. Plastic bags filled with water. 12 x 4 meters. Courtesy of Catalina Bauer.

Menester, 2008. Dry point over transparency paper over a black background. Courtesy of Catalina Bauer.

047


Picture imPerfect PHOTOGRAPHY: ROGÉRIOCAVALCANTI.COM ART DIRECTION: DANIEL BURMMAN STYLING: JULIANO PESSOA & ZUEL FERREIRA HAIR & MAKEUP: CECÍLIA MACEDO MODEL: DAIANE CONTERATO COURTESY OF L’OFFICIEL BRASIL

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esCAPE [palm tree]

Jose Picayo’s palm tree photographs taken at the Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden in Florida were inspired by his love of plants and gardens. Reminding him of his childhood growing up in Cuba, he felt connected to these lush groves – the quintessential Cuban imagery expressing calm and serene beauty. Picayo explains how he views the Cuban landscape: “I like things about it that don’t perfectly go there. You’ve got five cities in one: sometimes it looks like Venice without the water, some parts look like Paris and some parts look like the modern sections of San Juan and Madrid. So it’s all these different cities in one…and Havana architecture is its own thing, too. They call their architecture ‘three different styles in one.’ Havana is very different than any city I’ve ever been in.” To Picayo, the palm tree photographs evoke his ethereal ideal of the élan vital in Cuba’s architecture and its bountiful botanical terrain.

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Bismarck Palm, 2003. Brown toned/silver gelatin. Courtesy of Robin Rice Gallery.

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Bailey Palm, 2003. Brown toned/silver gelatin. Courtesy of Robin Rice Gallery.

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Common Screw Pine, 2004. Brown toned/silver gelatin. Courtesy of Robin Rice Gallery.

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Triangle Palm (Detail), 2004. Brown toned/silver gelatin. Courtesy of Robin Rice Gallery.

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Royal Palm, 2004. Brown toned/silver gelatin. Courtesy of Robin Rice Gallery.

Petticoat Palm, 2004. Brown toned/silver gelatin. Courtesy of Robin Rice Gallery.

José Picayo (b. Havana, Cuba 1959) received his BFA from Parson’s School of Design in 1983. In 1987 he began to work professionally as a fashion photographer and has appeared in several illustrious publications, including Harper’s Bazaar, L.A. Style, New York Times Magazine, Esquire, Rolling Stone, New York Magazine, Elle Decor, House & Garden, and Martha Stewart’s Living. During the 1990’s he also taught photography at Parson’s School of Design and at the International Center of Photography in New York City. Picayo has participated in several group gallery exhibitions throughout New York City and has held five solo exhibitions at the Robin Rice Gallery in New York City. www. robinricegallery.com / www.josepicayo.com Bambusa Malingensis (Detail), 2004. Brown toned/silver gelatin. Courtesy of Robin Rice Gallery.

063


Dress, IRINA SHAPOSHNIKOVA; Sunglasses, MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA; Stockings, WOLFORD; Shoes, COSTUME NATIONAL.

R On The Range R

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PHOTOGRAPHY: BOBWOLFENSON.COM.BR STYLING: FLAVIA POMMIANOSKY & DAVI RAMOS SET DESIGNER: COCOH ALMEIDA & VALERIA ANDRIGHETT HAIR & MAKEUP: DANIEL HERNANDEZ HAIR & MAKEUP ASSISTANT: HENRIQUE MARTINS MODEL: NATHALIE EDENBURG COURTESY OF VOGUE MAGAZINE

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Coat, RICK OWENS; Heels, STEPHEN VENEZIA; Bracelet, Stylist’s own.

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This page: Jacket, JIL SANDER; Sunglasses, MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA; Shoes, Christian Dior. Opposite: Coat, DRIES VAN NOTEN; Necklace, ANN DEMEULEMEESTER.

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Top, IRINA SHAPOSHNIKOVA; Skirt, CORSAGE RESEARCH; Stockings, WOLFORD; Shoes, COSTUME NATIONAL.

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trAILS [paper]

Miler Lagos. Columbian born artist Lagos produces sculptural works using paper, sculpting foam, rubber and formica to produce artwork that appears to be made of wood or cast bronze. In his Cimiento series, Lagos carved out the shape of a tree log from a stack of six thousand sheets printed with Albrecht Dürer’s engravings. Lagos states that the paper sculpture is “a reflection on the support, origin, root or foundation on which humankind has represented its ideas.” The viewer is encouraged to peel off a sheet of paper, a gesture that replicates the democratization of knowledge that print has fostered from its beginnings. In Silence DoGood (a word game meaning either “good quiet dog” or “quiet intruder”), rolled recycled newspaper replicates tree rings. The reference stands for the passing of time in which each sheet of paper in this roll offers the information of the day to day life of our society. In El Papel Aguanta Todo (Paper Can Handle Anything), 2008, Lagos creates an installation of tree-like sculptures by stacking various reference books. In each piece the books’ spines and titles are left partially revealed, drawing attention to the physical quality of these specialized texts. The abundance of printed material included in the installation points to the standardizing nature of the books format.

072


Cimientos, 2007. Carving on printed paper pile. Centro Cultural Universidad de Salamanca, Bogotรก, Colombia. Courtesy of Magnan Metz Gallery.

073


Paper Holds Everything, 2008. Carving on book piles. Photo by Oscar Monsalve. Courtesy of Magnan Metz Gallery.

074

Universal Support, 2008. Carving on newspaper pile. Base 87 x 59 x 133.66 inches. Courtesy of Magnan Metz Gallery.


Silence Dogood, 2010. Rolled newspaper, 100 x 60 cms. Philadelphia, PA. Courtesy of Magnan Metz Gallery.

Miler Lagos (b. Bogota Colombia, 1973) lives and works in Bogotá, Columbia. He graduated from the National University of Colombia with a degree in Fine Arts. Recent solo exhibitions include Resurfaced (Magnan Metz Gallery, New York City, 2011), Philigrafika (Philadelphia, 2010), Attraction (Faria-Fabregas Gallery, Caracas, Venezuela, 2009), Paper Can Take Anything / El Papel Aguanta Todo (Nueveochenta Gallery, Bogotá, Colombia, 2008), Semillas Mágicas (Galería Enrique Guerrero, Mexico City, 2008), and Los Términos del Juego (Alianza Colombo Francesa, Bogotá, 2006). He has taken part in numerous group exhibitions, such as Other Florae (Galeria Nara Roesler, Sao Paulo, 2008) and Mentiras Verdaderas (Museo de Arte Moderno de Barranquilla, Barranquilla, 2008), among others. Miler Lagos has a solo exhibition in September 2011 at Magnan Metz Gallery in New York City. www.magnanmetz.com

075


Los TĂŠrminos Del Juego, 2006. Rubber balls filled with concrete and blocks of printed paper. Courtesy of Magnan Metz Gallery.

076


Harmonizing Forces, 2010. Stack of architectural books. Courtesy of Magnan Metz Gallery.

077


child’s play

Photography: SOLABADI.COM.AR photography Assistant: soledad allami ART DIRECTION: JIMENA NAHÓN Styling: Valeria Heavy Hair: NACHO AT STUDIO H Make up: LORENA URCALAY AT SOFIA ALVAREZ courtesy of catalogue magazine All clothes made by Students from UNIVERSIDAD DE PALERMO (BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA)

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scAPES [dream]]

Sandra Cinto. Since the 90’s Cinto’s body of artwork is likened to the stuff of dreams with drawings overtaking the walls of the room reminding us of nostalgic moments, of our place in the world, and the ambiguity which that can create. Her work utilizes two-dimensional drawing as a starting point; intercrossing lines and links, creating waves, swirls, stars and cobwebs that extend beyond the gallery walls to include installations or photography, such as The Island (opposite page), which further expand her ethereal aesthetic. The spellbinding hint of darkness, as well as a child-like quality, leaves the viewer with the potential to find solace in Cinto’s work.

086


The Island, 2008, São Paulo, Brazil. Courtesy of Casa Triângulo.

087


Imitation of Water, 2010. Courtesy of Casa Triângulo.

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Blue Stars-For Sun, 2008. Acrylic and permanent pen. Courtesy of Casa Triângulo.

All The Light That I Will Be Able To Give, 2008. Toyota Municipal Museum of Art, Japan. Courtesy of Casa Triângulo.

089


Untitled (We Are Star Dust), 2007. Acrylic and permanent pen on mdf board, 275 x 370 cm. Courtesy of Casa Triângulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

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Storm, 2011. Acrylic and permanent pen on canvas, 150 x 190 cm. Courtesy of Casa Triângulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Sandra Cinto (b. Santo André, Brazil, 1968) lives and works in São Paulo, Brazil and graduated in Fine Arts at Faculdades Integradas Teresa D’Ávila, Santo André, Brazil. Her work has been largely seen in museums and cultural centers such as the Museum of Modern Art of Bahia in Salvador, Brazil, Museum of Modern Art of São Paulo, Museum of Modern Art of San Diego and the Institute of Contemporary Arts in Boston. Cintos’ works have been awarded prestigious prizes throughout her career, such as Acquisition Prize at Santo André Contemporary Art Salon in Brazil, Acquisition Prize at Victor Meirelles Contemporary Art Salon, in Brazil and the Residency Prize at Civitella Ranieri Foundation in Italy. Sandra Cinto was the resident artist at Cité Internacionale in Paris. www.tanyabonakdargallery.com / www.casatriangulo.com Black Wave, 2009. Acrylic and permanent pen on mdf board, 180 x 180 cm. Courtesy of Casa Triângulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

091


THE SUMMONING OF THE MUSE

PHOTOGRAPHY: ROGÉRIOCAVALCANTI.COM ART DIRECTION: DANIEL BURMANN STYLING: JULIANO PESSOA & ZUEL FERREIRA HAIR & MAKEUP: ELIÉSER LOPEZ COURTESY OF L’OFFICIEL BRASIL

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Jacket, Felicia Adelina Mak.

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balaNCES [precarious]

Alejandro Almanza Pereda’s artwork explores a fascination with the idea of caution and safety. His precarious installations employ materials such as concrete, light bulbs and chains which challenges the viewer and elicits a response. Perada further explains that “people attend shows where there is danger involved, like the circus or the bullfights. I think the spectator deeply wants to see an accident.” He achieves this by exploiting the weaknesses of an unstable structure. Pereda’s art is masterful at taking advantage of our unfamiliarity of physical and structural laws, while capitalizing on our mounting vulnerability. In Andamio (Temporary Frameworks), a wooden scaffolding is tenuously held up by an arrangement of fluorescent lights. Spare the Rod, Spoil the Child further provokes uneasiness as the light bulbs are balanced by bowling balls.

100


De Arquitectura, 2010. Collage. Courtesy of Magnan Metz Gallery.

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Horror Vacui, 2010. Concrete and painting, 25 x 38 x 13 inches. Courtesy of Magnan Metz Gallery.

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I Was Adored Once Too, 2010. Plaster Statues. Radius: 72.5. Courtesy of Magnan Metz Gallery.

103


The Tie That Binds, 2010. Cinder blocks, chain, lock and key chain. Courtesy of Magnan Metz Gallery.

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Spare The Rod and Spoil The Child, 2008. Fluorescent light bulbs and bowling balls. Courtesy of Magnan Metz Gallery.

Alejandro Almanza Pereda (b. Mexico, 1977) received his BFA in Sculpture from the University of Texas in 2005. He has participated in group exhibitions at prestigious museums such as El Museo del Barrio in New York City, Museo de Arte Moderno, Mexico City and the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto. Solo exhibitions include Magnan Emrich Contemporary, New York City Chert Gallery, Berlin, Magnan Metz, New York City and the College of Wooster Art Museum, Wooster, OH. Published titles include Alejandro Almanza Pereda: Work and Process, Program Book Series Vol. X and Alejandro Almanza Pereda: Andamio (Temporary Frameworks). www.magnanmetz.com / www.alejandroalmanzapereda.com Andamio, 2007. Floresecent bulbs, metal brackets, plywood, light bulbs, forge steel clamps and ballast. Commissioned by and exhibited at Art In General, New York. Courtesy of Magnan Metz Gallery.

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above and beyond Photography: karinebasilio.com Styling: Raphael Mendoรงa & Carlos Nazario Hair & Makeup: Sergey Logvinov Models: Maxine at next, Samantha Rayner at Nathalie models


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Coat, RICK OWENS; Heels, STEPHEN VENEZIA; Bracelet, Stylist’s own.

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enmassemag.com


CIA DE FOTO

www.galeriavermelho.com.br

Profile for Lola Shepard

EnMasse Magazine: Latin Contemporary  

EnMasse Magazine: Latin Contemporary  

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