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FALL 2020

Timeless Style for a Brand New World


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ON THE COVER:

SHAYNA MCNEILL AND ALTON MASON PHOTOGRAPHED BY CASS BIRD AND STYLED BY STELLA GREENSPAN MAKEUP: Frank B HAIR: Dylan Chavles tie, and belt CELINE SHAYNA: Dress CHANEL Brooch VAQUERA Earrings VINTAGE ABOVE–ALTON: Jacket, sweater, and jeans APC Shirt PAUL STUART SHAYNA: Jacket, sweater, and jeans APC Shirt PAUL STUART Rings CARTIER ALTON: Coat, blouse, pants, bow

Volume 3, Number 14 | lofficielusa.com | L’Officiel USA | Lever House 390 Park Ave New York, NY 10022


WHAT MAISIE KNOWS Julien Welter PHOTOGRAPHY BY Marili Andre BY

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The Game of Thrones star forges her own path.

BEAUTY NOSTALGIA

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THE NUDES

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Our two favorite runway beauty looks this season riff on iconic styles from decades past.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

Holly McGlynn

The fresh-faced look receives an update via pops of color.

A FRESH LOOK PHOTOGRAPHY BY

Ezra Petronio

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Lanvin’s creative director Bruno Sialelli breathes new life into the historic brand.

DAILY LUXE PHOTOGRAPHY BY

Coppi Barbieri

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

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Tiffany & Co.’s new collection reimagines the iconic ‘T’ motif for everyday wear.

DREAMING IN COUTURE PHOTOGRAPHY BY Axle

Jozeph

THE ART OF SELF-EXPRESSION Sergio Corvacho

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A peek inside the elegant home of Mathilde Favier, Dior’s public relations director.

KEEP LOVE ALIVE BY

Kat Herriman

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Contemporary art is full of romantics.

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A sculptural symphony of spectacular shapes and shimmering jewels.

FEARLESS 62 PHOTOGRAPHY BY

Pandora Graessl

Nicolas Lecourt Mansion’s bold designs are catching the fashion world’s attention.

THE COAT’S THE THING PHOTOGRAPHY BY Alberto Tandoi

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This season, strong, statement-making outerwear takes center stage.

FULL BAROQUE PHOTOGRAPHY BY Angelo

Lamparelli

Bulgari looks to its native Rome for inspiration for Barocko, the jeweler’s vibrant new collection.

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THE FLOW OF TIME BY

Lisa Immordino Vreeland

We asked three talented young designers to style their muses in Tiffany jewelry and their own creations.

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THINK GLOBAL

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L.A. BY LAURE

A NEW ENERGY/A NEW WORLD

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Laure Hériard Dubreuil demonstrate what happens when French style meets a laissez-faire Los Angeles attitude.

A special section celebrating global style.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

Cass Bird

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

Chantal Anderson

PARIS BY LYNA

Shayna McNeill and Alton Mason celebrate the timeless joy of fashion.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

Marili Andre

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Wes Anderson’s newest star, Lyna Khoudri, takes a stroll around Paris.

PIERRE & SIMON BY

Pamela Golbin

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The legendary Pierre Cardin and beloved up-and-comer Simon Porte Jacquemus sit down for a candid conversation.

FRENCH BY FRENCH

We asked a select group of French stylists, models, and boldface names to help us answer the question: “What is French style?”

TINA BY JULIE PHOTOGRAPHY BY

Sonia Sieff

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Julie de Libran imagines the model Tina Kunakey Cassel in modern Parisian staples with a glamorous twist.

ZOÉ BY VANESSA

Maxwell Granger Contemporary meets vintage in a collaboration between Vanessa Seward and It Girl Zoé Lenthal. PHOTOGRAPHY BY

FARIDA BY FARIDA

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FÉTICHE

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The former muse to Jean-Paul Gaultier, Farida Khelfa, reflects on her legendary time as a fixture of Parisian nightlife.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

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Jennifer Livingston

Our readers choose the season’s most desirable accessories. BELOW: Shiny crumpled calfskin bag CHANEL

L’LOOK BACK BY

Hervé Dewintre

L’Officiel’s former editors cleverly used fringe to look forward.

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A sustainable collection by Tracy Reese

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FASHION FEATURES EDITOR

FEATURES EDITOR

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Laure Ambroise CASTING DIRECTOR

Jennifer Eymere

GIAMPIETRO BAUDO

Delphine Valloire

ART DIRECTION

MANAGING EDITOR

Giulia Gilebbi, Luca Ballirò

BOOKINGS EDITOR

SENIOR EDITOR

Joshua Glasgow

Sara Ali

EDITORS AT LARGE

Sabrina Abbas

Peter Davis, Vanessa Bellugeon

INTERNS

Agatha Krasuski, Alexia Flores, Ana Fernanda Flores, Ashton Ebersole, Felicity Cain, Hannah Amini, Irene Kim, Isabella Armus, Jessica Dawn Wendt, Johnny Rabe, Juliana Bakumenko, Lexi Hempel, Lizzie Brill, Margaux Bang, Monique Wilson, Natalie Hojel, Nicolette Salmi, Paige Levenson, Robbie Gutman, Sarah Kearns, Taylor Jeffries

CONTRIBUTORS

CONSULTING EXECUTIVE MANAGING EDITOR

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Regan Solmo

PHOTOGRAPHY

Axle Jozeph, Cass Bird, Marili Andre, Coppi Barbieri, Alberto Tandoi, Sergio Corvacho Pandora Graessl

PRODUCTION

Rhianna Rule, Miriam Herzfeld, Marla Weinhoff

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

GLOBAL DEPUTY CEO

Michael Riso

FEATURES

FASHION

Lisa Immordino Vreeland, Pamela Golbin, Kat Herriman

Julie de Libran, Vanessa Seward, Laure Hériard Dubreuil, Stella Greenspan, Giulio Martinelli, Gaultier Desandre Navarre

CHAIRMAN

Benjamin Eymère

Maria Cecilia Andretta

DESIGN DIRECTOR

TREY LAIRD

CHRISTOPHER BROWN

GLOBAL CRO, GENERAL MANAGER USA

PUBLISHERS

Marie-José Susskind-Jalou, Maxime Jalou

DIGITAL GLOBAL CHIEF CONTENT OFFICER

Erica Bartman

Caroline Grosso

CONSULTING GLOBAL CHIEF CREATIVE OFFICER

Stefano Tonchi

In this Issue

Cass

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHER

“A NEW ENERGY/ A NEW WORLD”

“Global style is when you put your heart into it.”

Axle

JOZEPH PHOTOGRAPHER

“DREAMING IN COUTURE”

“In a global world we share this sense of uniqueness. Irreverence is our tradition.”

Pamela

GOLBIN WRITER

“PIERRE & SIMON”

“In these uncertain times, Pierre Cardin’s conversation with Simon Porte Jacquemus was a moment that linked the golden age of couture with the flickering torch of the future.”

Julie de

Trey

LIBRAN

LAIRD

STYLIST

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

“TINA BY JULIE”

“It was exciting to think about this issue as a new beginning. With so many challenges in the world, being able to focus on a fresh new energy brings a muchneeded spirit of optimism.”

“It is more important now than ever to make things that are timeless and crafted more responsibly. I have always liked classic style with a twist.”


Photo by Alex Delfanne

Lehmann Maupin London Opening 5 October Cromwell Place, South Kensington

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What

MAISIE KNOWS

Putting Game of Thrones behind her, the 23-year-old British actress is ready to forge her own path, both with a new crop of films and as a brand ambassador for Cartier’s Pasha collection. By JULIEN WELTER Photography MARILI ANDRE


L’HEROINE


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Juste un Clou necklace in yellow gold and diamonds, Clash de Cartier ring and Juste un Clou ring in white gold, Juste un Clou bracelet in white gold and diamonds CARTIER Shirt COPERNI Leather pants ACNE STUDIOS Juste un Clou necklace in yellow gold and diamonds, Clash de Cartier ring in white gold, Juste un Clou ring in white gold and diamonds, Juste un Clou bracelet in white gold and diamonds, Pasha de Cartier watch CARTIER Sweater OTTOLINGER OPPOSITE PAGE: Pasha de Cartier watch CARTIER Sweater, skirt, and boots COPERNI OPENING PAGE:


Last fall, Maisie Williams turned heads during Paris fashion week, wearing matching outfits (and makeup) with her boyfriend, Reuben Selby, while sitting front row at Thom Browne. This year, the actor spent her summer in Paris, building partnerships with brands such as Cartier, Jacquemus, Courrèges, and awaiting her next chapter: “As an actress, the best advice I received was to put my personality aside in order to find one that matches each role. In fashion, it’s different—you have to understand exactly who you are to be able to represent the brand and the look.” It’s nearly impossible to forget Arya Stark’s personality. The ruthless warrior Williams played on Game of Thrones for 8 seasons, from ages 13 to 21, was beloved among a cast of distinct, oversized personalities. Arya begins as a mischievous young girl and grows into an avenging assassin—a tomboy surviving in a male-dominated world. And it can’t be easy to experiment with one’s masculine side when also becoming a young woman; nor to build one’s own character when playing someone else. With short hair and flattened breasts, Arya had to grow up very fast and learn how to protect herself. Williams too. Both Arya and Williams silenced their critics: the pretenders to the throne for Arya, and the internet trolls who disparaged Williams’s looks. Both subverted feminine stereotypes. We’ll never forget Arya discussing her period between two battles, and reminding Jon Snow that women continually see more blood than men. Now Williams is free to take back her own body, and become herself. For all that, Williams is still not finished with blood and violence, and joins the Marvel Cinematic Universe in her role as Rahne in the latest X-Men movie: The New Mutants. Sitting amid the horror and superhero genres, The New Mutants is a real lockdown movie, perfect for a generation traumatized by the global pandemic: “The young mutants are in lockdown in a medical center, apparently to protect themselves and understand their powers, since they don’t know their nature or how big they can get,” she says. “My character is discovering her sexuality, falling in love with another girl, and they are protecting each other instead of fighting. It offers a new perspective to the Marvel movies. It’s somewhere in between The Breakfast Club and Stephen King.” In an ironic twist, Williams also released two other projects that deal with confinement this year. In the TV series Two Weeks to Live, she stars as Kim, a young woman who has been raised in violent doomsday-prepper isolation for years. She rejoins society to avenge the death of her father, and quickly finds herself mixed up in a prank gone horribly wrong. Williams also stars in The Owners, a horror film based on a graphic novel, in which a group of young lawless kids try

As an actress, the best advice I received was to put my personality aside. In fashion, it’s different—you have to understand exactly who you are. to break into an old Victorian mansion owned by an elderly couple. “It’s set in the ‘90s, so I created a style for it, full of denim and with bleached hair. Like everyone else I’m obsessed with ‘90s style,” says Williams. The actress has also recently invested her time and resources in Daisie, an app that connects creators to one another. Daisie is Williams’s answer to everyone who asked her how to succeed; a question that Williams still doesn’t know the answer to (she scored an audition for Game of Thrones—only her second audition ever—at age 12, with no acting experience). The platform’s mission is to create relationships and help build a new, modern path to talent discovery. Williams also has her own production company, Pint-Sized Pictures. “I created Pint-Sized Pictures with two girlfriends to showcase unknown women’s talents. We’re working on music videos, short and long films, and sometimes shows. As for the name, it’s because I’m short, the height of a pint!” she says. From supporting creative talents and mentoring young women to establishing her own style in acting and fashion, in addition to speaking out in support of animal rights, Williams is very much a product of her generation. She’s determined to make up for all that lost time after the many years she spent in Westeros.

Clash de Cartier ring in white gold, Juste un Clou ring in white gold and diamonds CARTIER Dress OTTOLINGER

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Juste un Clou necklace in yellow gold and diamonds, Clash de Cartier ring in white gold, Juste un Clou ring in white gold and diamonds, Juste un Clou bracelet in white gold and diamonds, Pasha de Cartier watch CARTIER Bodysuit and jacket ALAĂ?A Skirt and boots COPERNI OPPOSITE PAGE:Same as above PHOTO ASSISTANT: Valentine Lacour STYLIST: Jennifer Eymere STYLIST ASSISTANT: Kenzia Bengel de Vaulx HAIR: Kazue Deki MAKE UP: Mickael Noiselet MANICURE: Marieke Bouillette


A FRESH LOOK Creative Director Bruno Sialelli breathes new life into LANVIN

Lanvin’s Creative Director since 2019, 32-year-old Bruno Sialelli has succeeded in reviving one of the most storied French fashion houses thanks to a handful of collections, his fascinating stories, and his cinematic heroines.

obsessed with fashion and costumes and was very close to Jean-Paul Gaultier. At 15 I came to understand that I needed to express my creativity, and that fashion could be my way to do it.

You grew up at La Cité Radieuse, the residential complex created by Le Corbusier in Marseille, south of France. Has that influenced your career as a designer? BRUNO SIALELLI: I think so. My parents chose to raise us in this extreme environment. My idea of “normal” was different. My preschool was on the 8th floor and all the activities were creative: acting, painting, or calligraphy. I was very hyperactive, so my parents were happy to send me to the movie theater, to the pool, or the gymnasium… all I had to do was move from one floor to another.

Tell us about your time at the Marseille Opera. After graduation, I worked for two years at the opera in Marseille. I learned how to drape and discovered different fabrics. Then at 17, I had an internship at Christian Lacroix, for couture, and it became quite clear that I was made for this world. It was fabulous! Couture with a capital C! It was a dream. It inspired me to enroll at the Studio Berçot in Paris to pursue my apprenticeship.

L’OFFICIEL:

Who were your early inspirations? My mom was quite extravagant and experimental in the way she dressed. She wore brands such as Marithé + François Girbaud, Versus, or Jean-Paul Gaultier. She worked with her younger brother, the comedian Élie Kakou, who was L’O: BS:

L’O: BS:

Before starting at Lanvin you worked with Nicolas Ghesquière at Balenciaga, Jonny Johansson at Acne Studios, Julien Dossena at Paco Rabanne, and Jonathan Anderson at Loewe. Can you talk about these collaborations? BS: At Balenciaga, with strong personalities like Nicolas Ghesquière and Natacha Ramsey, I got to travel as far as my ideas will let me. Extreme precision paired with innovation. L’O:

Photography EZRA PETRONIO


L’INTERVIEW


ALL IMAGES ON THESE PAGES: Backstage

at LANVIN Fall/Winter 2020


At Acne I admired the Swedish culture’s respect for its employees. As a man from the south of France, it was an experience of endless winters! Then I went back to Paris, where I did a season for Paco Rabanne with Julien Dossena, whom I knew from Balenciaga. It felt like a homecoming for me. Finally, I met Loewe’s Jonathan Anderson, who loved my breadth of experience, and found it quite ‘plural:’ not trapped in one category. At Balenciaga I was called the ‘hybrid designer.’ Jonathan was looking for a senior designer for Women and a head designer for Men. After our meeting, he said, “I have something to tell you. I think you’ll do menswear really well.” It was an amazing opportunity to resize my creativity on another body type. L’O: You were born at the end of the 1980s, the ‘90s were your childhood years, and the 2000s were your teens. Are you attached to these decades creatively? BS: The decade that stays with you the most is that of your teenage years. Look at Marc Jacobs and the ‘80s!

L’O: Is it difficult to be a Creative Director for both men and women’s collections? BS: No, menswear and womenswear have the same creative process for me. That’s why when I arrived at Lanvin I had them walk the runway together. Even my creative teams work in the same studio.

Who are the heroes of your last collection? Varla, Rosie, and Billie, the three outlaws in Russ Meyer’s Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill! L’O: BS:

What artists inspire you? Lina Lapelyte, Vaiva Grainyte, and Rugile Barzdziukaite, from the Lithuanian Pavilion, who won the Golden Lion in Venice in 2019 for “Sun and Sea,” an opera about climate change. I also love the electro and techno scene. I dance a lot; it’s an outlet for me. –Laure Ambroise L’O: BS:

How do you approach your work at Lanvin? The Lanvin archives are vast. They tell the story of how life was lived during a certain period of time. The brand always had the ability to understand the present moment. I’m probably most interested in Lanvin’s approach to the postwar period in the 1920s, with its spectacular glamour and opulence. L’O: BS:

How do you maintain the values of Lanvin and also stay true to your artistic vision? BS: Each of the Lanvin designers expressed theirtime. Jules-François Crahay represented the freespirited ‘70s, and Claude Montana the strong women of the ‘80s. L’O:

You once said that Jeanne Lanvin was ahead of her time by creating the first lifestyle brand, and that you want to bring back her forward-looking vision. Did you succeed? BS: Not at all, but it’s a goal. Madame Lanvin was a visionary. L’O:

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Long gone are the days when women waited for a lover or family member to gift them a piece of fine jewelry. Why not take the reins and choose a piece for yourself? Tiffany & Co., through the introduction of their new collection, Tiffany T1, begs the question. Tiffany T1 invites the wearer to consider adding extraordinary jewelry into daily rotation. Pairing graphic forms with elegant proportions, the collection takes everyday jewelry up a notch with the addition of diamonds intricately set in rose, yellow, and white gold. “At Tiffany, we believe that luxury should be effortless and irreverent,” says Reed Krakoff, Tiffany’s Chief Artistic Officer. “Through these pieces, we convey that precious stones aren’t just for special occasions—they can be worn everyday as a celebration of yourself.” Whether you opt for a simple ring or a bracelet set with diamonds, a Tiffany T1 piece will feel right at home in your daily jewelry tray. ­­—Sabrina Abbas

Photography COPPI BARBIERI

Tiffany T1 wide diamond ring in 18k rose gold, Tiffany T1 diamond necklace in 18k rose gold TIFFANY &. CO.


L’OBSESSION


Dreaming in

COUTURE Let your mind wander through a sculptural symphony of spectacular shapes and shimmering jewels Photography AXLE JOZEPH

Tweed tunic with embroidery chain outline and suede boot trousers with camellia embroidery CHANEL Haute Couture


L’PORTFOLIO


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Long tweed coat embroidered with rhinestones and jewel buttons, leather shoes with grosgrain ribbons CHANEL Haute Couture. MODEL: Marie-Lou Gomis @ The Claw Cotton trench coat, chiffon top and trousers “Zip Antique Ondée” ALEXANDER VAUTHIER Couture. Necklace with yellow gold, emeralds, spinels and diamonds VAN CLEEF & ARPELS. Bracelet “Opart” in yellow gold, emeralds, lapis lazuli, onyx and diamonds VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

OPPOSITE PAGE:

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Long draped tulle dress embroidered with Marcel Mariën quote “white and mute, dressed in the thoughts that you lend me” DIOR Haute Couture Handmade mask of leaves of Swarovski crystals, Baroqco Couture jewelry. “Lumiere” bracelet in white gold and diamonds, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS OPPOSITE PAGE: Double-breasted coat and duster from the “Recicla” collection worn with heat-insulating socks, hat, bag and Tabi sandals over Tabi tartan boots by MAISON MARGIELA Artisanal designed by JOHN GALLIANO

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Cotton trench coat, chiffon top and trousers “Zip Antique Ondée” ALEXANDER VAUTHIER Couture Necklace with yellow gold, emeralds, spinels and diamonds VAN CLEEF & ARPELS. Bracelet “Opart” in yellow gold, emeralds, lapis lazuli, onyx and diamonds VAN CLEEF & ARPELS GlovesCausse and sandals CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN OPPOSITE PAGE: Right–Brocade coat dress entirely hand embroidered with lurex lace and crystals Azzaro Couture. “Derek” hat in leather MAISON MICHEL Earrings: “Vossi” and brooch in white gold and diamonds, CARTIER Fine Jewelry Left–Mini lacquered sequins dress with a “Point D’Esprit” cape, and satin shoes by GIAMBATTISTA VALLI Haute Couture CASTING EDITOR: Elliott Foote STYLIST: Gaultier Desandre Navarre HAIR STYLIST: Clara Costenoble MAKEUP ARTISTS: Maëlys Jallali and Alexia Mzallag PHOTOGRAPHER ASSISTANT: Emma Vadon LOCATION: Le Petit Oiseau Va Sortir studio, Paris


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This season, strong, statement-making outerwear takes center stage. Photography ALBERTO TANDOI

Re-nylon gabardine coat, organza dress, silk top and stockings PRADA, Belt “PRADA vanity” in saffiano leather, “PRADA Louise” leather bag, “Mary Jane” shoes in leather and patent leather PRADA OPPOSITE PAGE: Sheepskin coat with varnish detail MAX MARA Earrings & Necklace: “Pluie de CARTIER” in white gold and diamonds, CARTIER Fine Jewelry


L’TREND


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embroidered wool cape, chiffon top, wide pants VALENTINO Long gloves and leather combat boots VALENTINO “Cartier geometries & contrast” parure set in white gold adorned with onyx, rock crystal and diamonds, CARTIER THIS PAGE BOTTOM: Double-breasted cashmere coat embellished with embroidery voile on the cuffs and belt CHANEL OPPOSITE PAGE TOP: Double-breasted wool and cashmere coat with sequin floral embroider, Cotton shirt with bow collar, tailored trousers and moccasins TOD`S OPPOSITE PAGE BOTTOM: Long velvet coat with leather ruffled collar GIORGIO ARMANI Pink gold “Pasha de Cartier” watch set with diamonds and crocodile strap CARTIER MODEL: Caterina Ravaglia IMG MODELS STYLIST: Giulio Martinelli HAIR STYLIST: Matteo Bartolini using BALMANI HAIR COUTURE MAKEUP ARTIST: Barbara Bonazza using MAC COSMETICS THIS PAGE TOP: Long

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Celebrating life in vibrant color and fanciful shapes, Bugari looks to its native Rome for inspiration for Barocko, the luxury jeweler’s latest collection. A confection of vivid hues, voluptuous silhouettes, and precious gems, the collection echoes the extravagance of the Baroque movement. Photography ANGELO LAMPARELLI

diamonds BVLGARI. Top PRADA. quartz, aquamarine, tanzanite, and diamonds Barocko High Jewelry brooch in pink gold with peridot, rubellite, topaz, amethysts,mandarin garnet, rhodolite, and diamonds BVLGARI. Top GRETA BOLDINI

TERESA, LEFT: Barocko High Jewelry necklace in pink gold with citrine, amethyst, topaz, tourmaline, emeralds, and DIARRA, RIGHT: Barocko High Jewelry necklace in white gold with rubellite, green tourmaline, amethyst, citrine, greenish yellow


L’INSPIRATION


Barocko High Jewelry earrings in platinum with emeralds and dimonds. Barocko High Jewelry necklace in white gold with emeralds, pearls, and diamonds. Barocko High Jewelry ring in platinum with fancy color diamonds, BVLGARI Bodysuit, ARRABAL

ABOVE:

FAR LEFT: Teresa– Rings, from left Barocko High Jewelry ring in yellow gold with tanzanite and diamonds, Barocko High Jewelry ring in pink gold with tourmalines, turquoises, amethysts, and diamonds BVLGARI Silk dress MIU MIU Diarra–Barocko High Jewelry Necklace in yellow gold with cabochon tanzanites, cabochon tourmalines, cabochon rubellite, cabochon aquamarines, emerald beads, and diamonds. Barocko High Jewelry earrings in yellow gold with cabochon aquamarines, cabochon tourmalines, emerald beads, and diamonds, BVLGARI Silk dress MIU MIU CENTER: Barocko

High Jewelry necklace in white gold with zircon metal elements, tanzanite, diamonds, and pearls, BVLGARI RINGS, FROM LEFT: Barocko High Jewelry ring in yellow gold with tanzanite and diamonds. Barocko High Jewelry ring in platinum with fancy color diamonds, BVLGARI Velvet top and pants, ACNE STUDIOS

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ABOVE: Same as previous spread LEFT: Barocko High Jewelry ring in

platinum with ruby and diamonds, Barocko High Jewelry ring in platinum with emeralds and diamonds, Barocko High Jewelry ring in platinum with rubies and diamonds BVLGARI Hat OFFWEAR RIGHT: Teresa–Barocko

High jewelry bracelet in white gold with diamonds. Barocko High Jewelry earrings in yellow gold with diamonds, rubies, and sapphires BVLGARI Bag BOTTEGA VENETA Diarra–Barocko High Jewelry necklace in platinum with diamonds, BVLGARI Cotton and silk dress BOTTEGA VENETA Hat FLAPPER Photographer: Angelo Lamparelli SIMPLE AG Stylist: Özge Efek LES ARTISTS Models: Diarra Ndiaye WHY NOT MODELS and Teresa Lui MONSTER MANAGEMENT Makeup: Manola Spaziani SIMONE BELLI AGENCY Hair: Fulvia Tellone SIMONE BELLI AGENCY Photographer’s Assistant: Martina Lannuzzi Stylist’s Assistant: Federica Frieri

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BEAUTY nostalgia

RODARTE

From a broad array of makeup trends, we chose our two favorite runway looks. Riffs on iconic styles from recent decades, they evoke a strong sense of the past while leaving us feeling confifident and liberated in a very modern way.

SELF-PORTRAIT

MATTY BOVAN

CHROMAT


L’INSTANT EMILIO PUCCI

MAX MARA

MARC JACOBS

‘90s Grunge Lives On The ‘90s were about expressing individuality and rebelling against the status quo. Grunge went mainstream even while adopting an anti-mainstream philosophy. For beauty, this meant the heavy, haphazard use of kohl pencil and dark lipstick: combined, they created a goth-punk look that was edgy and effortless. Today’s grunge looks focus a bit more on technique: black eyeshadow was excessively blended and smudged on the lips at Marc Jacobs and Max Mara to pull off a more polished take on the smoky eye. Emilio Pucci and Rodarte cranked up the drama by giving us the most wearable interpretation of grunge: vampy pouts.

‘80s Now and Forever A decade of extremes, the ‘80s defined “More is More.” It was a time of bold selfexpression through experimental, impactful statements, personified by larger-than-life beauties like Madonna and Cyndi Lauper. We couldn’t help but reminisce about bright, neon eyelids as a number of shows paraded pops of optimistic hues. Self-Portrait and Matty Bovan sported a swipe of traffic-cone orange and heavy circles of bubblegum pink. Feeling a little more adventurous? Then take on Ashish and Chromat’s attentiongrabbing method of artfully executing various graphic, multi-coloured creases in a trio of vivid highlighter shadows.

ASHISH


Optimistic pops of color on lips and cheeks round out the fresh-faced look for right now. Photography HOLLY MCGLYNN SKIN: CHANEL Vitalumiere Foundation, CHANEL Les Beiges Healthy Glow Powder CATHRINA: Eyes CHANEL Les Beiges Healthy Glow Eyeshadow Palette in Warm, Lips L’OREAL Matte Lipstain in 438 I Decide, Cheeks MAC Breath of Plum Blush Eyes URBAN DECAY Naked 1 Palette, Lips CHARLOTTE TILBURY Lip Cheat in Kiss n’ Tell, CHANEL Rouge Allure Lipstick in Pirate, Cheeks BOBBI BROWN Pot Rouge in Pale Pink TINA: Eyes CHANEL Quadra Eyeshadow in Légèréte et Expérience, DIOR Waterproof Eyeliner in Intense Brown, Lips CHANEL Lip Liner in Blood Orange, MAC Lipstick in Morange, Cheeks DIOR Backstage Contour Palette GRACE:


GRACE: Skin CHANEL Vitalumiere Foundation, CHANEL Les Beiges Healthy Glow Powder Eyes CHANEL Teak Eyeliner, CHANEL Le Volume de CHANEL Mascara, BOBBI BROWN The Essential Eye Palette in Burnished Bronze Lips LANCÔME Le Lipliner in Sheer Raspberry, DIOR Rouge Dior Ultra Care Lipstick in Lychee Pink, Cheeks BOBBI BROWN Pot Rouge in Pale Pink


TINA:

Skin CHANEL Vitalumiere Foundation, CHANEL Les Beiges Healthy Glow Powder CATHRINA: Eyes CHANEL Les Beiges Healthy Glow Eyeshadow Palette in Warm, Lips L’OREAL Matte Lipstain in 438 I Decide, Cheeks MAC Breath of Plum Blush Eyes CHANEL Quadra Eyeshadow in Légèréte et Expérience, DIOR Waterproof Eyeliner in Intense Brown, Lips CHANEL Lip Liner in Blood Orange, MAC Lipstick in Morange Cheeks DIOR Backstage Contour Palette


TINA: Eyes L’OREAL Paris Super Liner Gel Eyeliner in Black, CHANEL Quadra Eyeshadow in Légèréte et Expérience Lips DIOR Backstage Lip Palette, Cheeks CHANEL Joues Contrast Blush in Rouge Profond Blush mixed with NARS Exhibit A Blush CATHRINA: Eyes CHANEL Les Beiges Healthy Glow Eyeshadow Palette in Warm, Lips DIOR Lipliner in Fig, Cheeks STILA Convertible Colour in Coral and CHANEL in Love Blush PHOTOGRAPHER ASSISTANT: Ceilidh Tucker MAKEUP: Christabel Draffin EMMA DAVIES MAKEUP ASSISTANTS: Candienne Vongsavanthong, Georgia Northwood STYLIST: Emma Iannotta HAIR STYLIST: Evan Huang, RETOUCHING: Sam Trenouth MODELS: Tia Rolph MODELS1, Grace WILD MODEL MANAGEMENT, Cathrina M+P MODELS

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the ARTof

SELF– Expression

At home with Mathilde Favier, Dior’s public relations director and a paragon of Parisian elegance. Photography SERGIO CORVACHO


L’INVITATION Between your sister Victoire de Castellane, artistic director of the jewelry department at Dior, and your uncle Gilles Dufour, who ran the Chanel studio, fashion is very much a part of your home life. What influence has it had on you? MATHILDE FAVIER: Fashion is in my DNA. That’s probably why I’ve always felt very comfortable in this business. When you went to Karl Lagerfeld’s school, you couldn’t help but look at fashion theater with a lot of humor and lightness. L’OFFICIEL:

As a teenager, you did several internships at Chanel, where you met Sofia Coppola, then you collaborated with Carine Roitfeld, and then became public relations director at Prada and finally Dior. What do you love about this profession? MF: What I love about this job is the people—I love to observe them. The human race is certainly terrifying, but it fascinates me. L’O:

L’O: You have just redecorated your Parisian apartment. Can you tell us about it? MF: My house corresponds to a new phase of my life. I am 50 years old, my children have left home, I am in love. I finally know who I am, and my decor is the translation of that.

Why do you like prints so much? How do you mix them? I’m terribly Parisian but at the same time, I’ve gone around the world. All these prints and mixes of fabrics and colors are from my travels, a testimony to the beauty of the world. I never get tired of craftsmanship.

L’O: MF:

You are passionate about the art of the table. What advice would you give for hosting? MF: I love to invite people I appreciate: Then they meet each other, have a good time, and appreciate each other. This of course will take place around a good meal—I love to cook— and a nice table. I insist on the fact that table art, for me, is not about plates. The success of a dinner is above all the alchemy that happens between these people. The rest is just decoration. —Laure Ambroise L’O:


KEEP

LOVE ALIVE

There are more romantics in contemporary art than they tell you. And they are doing the work so we can all see each other a little more clearly. Very few artworks touch the emotional register that Nan Goldin’s seminal slideshow and book, The Ballad of Sexual Dependency (1986), hits. A tour de force, Ballad is a visual memoir that documents both the grizzly and glamorous truths about being in love and falling out of it. The scenes that compromise the volume are extreme in their intimacy. In them, we see the photographer in bed with friends and her lover; we also see her before the mirror taking account of the bruises he leaves on her face. I could barely look at some of them, and yet these impossible fractions added together form what I consider to be one of the most important double portraits of the era. A pioneer of this kind of explicit selfexploration, Goldin’s The Ballad of Sexual Dependency sits amongst a halcyon of work from the 1980s and ‘90s toying with autofictionlike tendencies. For proof, a list of masterpieces including but not limited to: Jeff Koons and La Ciccolinas’ pornographic Made in

Heaven series, Tracy Emin’s blackbook-turned-tent sculpture Everyone I Have Ever Slept With 1963–1995, Sophie Calle and Greg Shephard’s filmic rocky road epic No Sex Last Night (1996), and Glenn Ligon’s missed-connections-like plaque project, Lest We Forget (1998). However in the post-9/11 aughts, the winds changed. This confessional mode began to disappear from contemporary art’s mainstream in order to make room for the rise of a new desire—one tied to the art market rather than its content. Decorator-friendly movements swooped into the early 2000s, steering the spotlight away from personal narratives towards work that lent itself to more open-ended, and ultimately, more benign readings. There are the minimalists of this era, the Wade Guytons and Carol Boves, the Post-Internet conceptualists whose sleek essentialism makes it all but impossible to see the

By KAT HERRIMAN


L’EMOTION

Illustrations by JEAN PAUL GOUDE


individual on the other side. There are also the maximalists: The Walter Robinson-coined Zombie Formalists like Dan Colen, Joe Bradley, and Katharina Grosse, who (collectively although perhaps not intentionally) charted a monoculture of process-based abstraction in which all meaning lives at the mercy of pareidolia. Things continued this way for almost a decade until 2010, when a newly-minted social media platform made documenting and sharing one’s life as integral as living it.

Princess Diana’s tragic death and the pop cultural phenom that was Leonardo DiCaprio’s role in Titanic, but if you look closely you’ll notice more specific artifacts, like a destroyed office chair, which in the materials is listed as belonging to Rogers’ ex. Kind Kingdom’s garden-level tableau reminds me of Karen Kilimnik’s early scatter art installations, except in Rogers’ work, any meaning derived from the Relational Aesthetics reading must also take into account the piece’s diaristic gravity.

I got an Instagram account in 2011; the same year my two of my favorite works of art were born: Frances Stark’s My Best Thing and Jordan Wolfson’s Animation, masks. I would guess it’s not a coincidence. Both milestone works for their creators, these animated videos translate real episodes from the artists’ respective love lives into scripts. I like to think of them as art’s answer to authors like Rachel Cusk and Ben Lerner because as the viewer we are no longer in the position of possibly observing the archived receipts of love as in Goldin’s The Ballad of Sexual Dependency or Koons’ Made in Heaven, but experiencing the relationship as a holistic reality. This mode of storytelling makes it harder to maintain strict boundaries between ourselves and the author. The further we go, the more we are subsumed and implicated by their POV narrative.

UNREQUITED LOVE is ONE SMALL STEP AWAY from OBSESSION... THE STALKER and the LOVER ARE CLOSER THAN YOU might THINK.

I experienced this same sensation in sculptural form years later in Torey Thornton’s 2018 Jeffrey Stark show, Sir Veil’s Faux Outing, which converted the entire small Chinatown storefront into a giant bed. Once you climbed into the gallery, you were immediately confronted by a reflective panel into which the artist had embedded photographs of other bedrooms. Fully visible to all those who passed the glass storefront, the installation forced you to consider all the beds you’d occupied, literally and metaphorically, and who you’d shared them with. “The bed is a vehicle for a few things but initially I was thinking about business relationships, especially that intimacy between artists and how the ins-and-outs of this type of closeness is not often spoken about,” Thornton tells me. “Of course though, when you invoke the bed, you inevitably rub up against sex, but that’s where it gets interesting. I don’t think intimacy is interesting alone, but engaging with these kinds of close relationships in my work allows me to use our shared shyness to get a place where I can talk about everyone at once because these are actually universal experiences.” The universality of love lost as a communal experience serves as the main chakra for Kind Kingdom, Bunny Rogers’ recently closed solo exhibition at Kunsthaus Bregenz in Austria. Unfolding across four floors of the Peter Zumthor-designed museum like a video game, Kind Kingdom takes the shape of an elaborate mourning ritual in which the viewer passes through several stages to emerge transformed on the other side. The first floor is an imagined funeral for the artist, replete with generous floors and mood lighting. The second floor is the afterparty that follows, or at least the remains of it. A real blanket of grass has been put down to die in the windless expanse, and then covered in what looks like the remains of a rowdy collegiate get together, an aesthetic the artist describes as a “personal shipwrecking.” A kind of crime scene, Rogers’ stylized refuse offers the viewer a confetti of signifiers drawn from both the artist’s life and ‘90s news cycles. Among the plastic garbage bags, there are plentiful plooms of memorabilia and clippings linked to

The same could be said of Divorce Dump (2019), Andra Ursuta’s contribution to the last Venice Biennale. Installed in the central Giardini pavilion, this wall-mounted sculpture features a series of garbage cans made from inverted models of human rib cages—the contents of which, as the title suggests, include actual souvenirs from the artist’s failed marriage. “Marriage trash,” as it is listed in the materials, is defined here as everything from a taxidermied alligator face to what looks to be pleasantly worn-in tee. By putting these loaded artifacts on display for the world to see, the artist turned herself inside out. However, like the work of Thornton, Wolfson, and Stark, Divorce Dump doesn’t really function as an effective peephole into Ursuta’s life, but instead as a visual shortcut to a larger conversation about that uncanny moment where an object transforms into a time machine. I remember observing this piece in the Giardini only in passing, as at the time I was in full crush, having doused my doubts of the previous summer in Aperol Spritzes. Ursuta’s offering of heartwrenching disaster felt so far from my experience that the weight of its message didn’t hit until a year and some change later, when artist Diamond Stingily reminded me of this inverted messenger while on the phone. Even looking at documentation of Divorce Dump on David Zwirner’s website makes my stomach flip—as I think about the time my partner misplaced a stranger’s small heart necklace amongst my things. Objects aren’t just time machines. They can be triggers too, and in the best case, tools, as Doreen Chan teaches me. Chan doesn’t necessarily make work about her private life, but for her 2019 solo exhibition, Hard Cream, the artist transformed the HB Station Art Project Lab No.24 in Guangzhou into an approximate model

PREVIOUS PAGE: “Divorce Dump,” 2019 by ANDRA URSUTA, Courtesy of the artist and DAVID TOP: “Trash Mound,” 2020, by BUNNY ROGERS PHOTO: Markus Tretter BOTTOM: “Cement Garden,” 2020, by BUNNY ROGERS

ZWIRNER

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of an apartment she used shared with her ex at the encouragement of Para Site Curator Qu Chang. “Our relationship felt like it grew inside my body and when I finally decided to cut it, it bled and bled. As I was beginning to prepare for Hard Cream, it was beginning to heal, but that show was about pushing my finger in the scar and awakening those memories,” Chan acknowledges by phone. “I had to push myself into that emotion in order to generate. It’s kind of dangerous for my well being, but I tried not to think too much about the repercussions because I know this kind of work can connect people who have similar heartbreak experiences and I believe that’s what makes my work potentially meaningful.”

If you MERGE YOUR RELATIONSHIPS and EVERYTHING ELSE into YOUR ART—WHAT IS LEFT for YOU?

In Hard Cream, the biographical elements that spurred Chan are all but invisible. In the end, the exhibition is not about airing dirty laundry of a past relationship or counting grievances, but instead using the artist’s experience as a case study. The goal? To find out how romantic relationships inscribe themselves as patterns on top of our environments and daily rituals, and how those textures in turn shape and break us. There are benefits to playing guinea pig, as Chan learned. The first work that came into focus when planning Hard Cream is a short video called Happy (2019), which served as an entryway to the show. Inspired by the numerous traditional treats the artist had to assemble to impress her partner’s family over countless birthdays and celebrations, Happy features footage of the artist slowly removing tropical fruits from a whipped cream cake played in reverse. As a first time viewer, it appears as if the artist is making the dessert rather than destroying it, but then footage loops and the Sisyphean task of pleasing becomes clear. The artist’s subtitles for the work is “We never need a cake.” And what did filming Happy taste like? Could it be sweet revenge? “Not exactly, but it was definitely a satisfying high creating that video, I felt a flush throughout my body,” Chan says. “I think in general the show for me was about digesting and healing myself, and in some cases that process manifested physically.”

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Chan’s answer makes me think of Audre Lorde, who asserts in I Am Your Sister: “Art for art’s sake doesn’t really exist for me, but then it never did. What I saw was wrong, and I had to speak up. I loved poetry and I loved words. But what was beautiful had to serve the purpose of changing my life, or I would have died. If I cannot air this pain and alter it, I will surely die of it. That’s the beginning of social protest.” In Lorde’s view, romance and artmaking are entangled, and inextricable from daily life, politics, philosophy, and the other

valences of individual experiences. This is the vision of art I see being currently built out by my peers—a landscape in which the artist leans into individual responsibility, preference, and experience as a way to unleash moments of shared empathy and understanding. Curator Qu Chang of Para Site sees the value in studying this kind of work as not limited to itself, but as a model for better understanding the world around us and what we are attracted to. A self-proclaimed romantic, Qu’s specialty is unrequited love, which she utilized as a central theme for Crush, a well-received group show she staged in 2018 at the influential Hong Kong artspace. When we speak about the exhibition, Qu reveals that Chris Kraus’ I Love Dick was a major source of inspiration because of the way that novel showcases how easily good intentions and loving feelings can slide into perversion and destruction. “Unrequited love is one small step away from obsession, a difference that pop culture tends to exaggerate for its own entertainment,” Qu tells me. “But the stalker and the lover are closer than you might think. Once you start looking for it, obsessive love is more or less ubiquitous in our culture, from current calls for unquestioned nationalism to the romantic repackaging of consumer goods. And oddly, while we are quick to condemn each other for being perverts, we are constantly introducing and promoting these sharing these kinds of relationships—whether as a producer, consumer, lover or friend.” On reflection, I’m proud to be part of a generation willing to put themselves out there not as an exercise in biographic disclosure but as a means to commonality, especially after a childhood sheltered by the anonymity of usernames and virtual avatars. Because there is a cost to be paid when making work in this way, as Thornton reminds me: “Art is already so personal and in just making it you give so much to it, and expose yourself in a vulnerable way. If you merge your relationships and everything else into your art, what is left for you?” Thornton asks. “There are times where I’ve done stuff, disclosed certain realities of intimate situations, but once you go that way, it’s hard for you to live freely. You open yourself up to talking about the things no one else talks about, in the hopes that they might.”


“Voyeur’s Chameleon (The Rest),” 2017-2018, by TOREY THORNTON OPPOSITE PAGE: ”Happy,” 2019, by DOREEN CHAN


FEARLESS At just 26, Nicolas Lecourt Mansion, winner of the 2019 Andam Creative Label prize, is a force of nature with an uncompromising boldness.

Was Haute Couture a passion for you when you were young? My father worked in men’s retail, and I would look at fashion magazines in his office. I would try to draw Christain Lacroix’s and John Galliano’s wedding gowns. My favorite designer will always be Azzedine Alaïa. He knew how to listen to women.

L’OFFICIEL:

NICOLAS LECOURT MANSION:

You’ve worked with Rita Ora and Nicki Minaj during their tours. How does show business influence your designs? NLM: Clothes must allow an artist to move freely. For Nicki and Rita, I was their personal tailor. L’O:

Why so much glitter? I’m obsessed with brilliance, light, reflection—that’s why I enjoy designing stage costumes. For Andam, I worked with Swarovski. That collaboration gave me the opportunity to with work with some amazing craftsmen. It was almost surgical, very meticulous. I love this way of working: staying connected to the manufacturing. L’O:

NLM:

How would you define your fashion? Fearless. I create clothes the way I wear them. It’s almost visually therapeutic. It’s quite powerful. L’O:

NLM:

Did receiving the Andam prize in 2019 change the way you worked? Yes, immensely. It gave me so much confidence. I was on tour with Nicki when the finalists were announced. I was so surprised when I heard my name!

L’O:

NLM:

Do you think that French fashion is inclusive enough? No, fashion is never inclusive enough. I am a trans person, and I try to create fashion that is label-free. Jean-Paul Gaultier and Galliano were pioneers of inclusivity, but they were seen as freaks and used as marketing tools. Those who are nonconformist are not freaks. I’m different but not a freak. L’O:

NLM:

Is there such a thing as ‘French style,’ and if so, what is it? Yes! It’s couture, the process of turning craft into flamboyance. It is impertinent, sexy, and maybe slightly vulgar. –Laure Ambroise L’O:

NLM:

Photography PANDORA GRAESSL


L’CHIC


Timeless, to me, means immortal; it means enduring, ageless, and constant. The word can also carry a suggestion of being antiquated, but this project aims to change that. In the following pages, as a special collaboration, we present Tiffany jewelry through the eyes of fashion’s new guard of three talented young designers: Antonin Tron , Angel Chen, Christopher John Rogers—who are redefining timelessness as being free from the traditional boundaries of gender and race.

For this project, we asked each designer to style their muse in a fantastic mix of Tiffany jewelry and their own creations, and captured the creative partnerships on video. (The three “Styled to a T” films can be seen in their entirety on lofficielusa.com.) On these pages, you will see arresting still images from these films, and you’ll read each designer’s musings on their love of fashion, their own creativity, and their personal relationship with jewelry. L’Officiel and Tiffany: the perfect pair. — Lisa Immordino Vreeland, Director


L’ATELIER


Antonin TRON Where does the name of your company, Atlein, come from? ANTONIN TRON: It’s an homage to the Atlantic Ocean. I spend as much time there as I can. I love surfing; it’s my favorite thing in life. LIV: When did the subject of sustainability become so important to you? How have you applied it to your collection? AT: The concept of sustainability has always been in my life, thanks to my parents. When we would drive the car in the summer, my mom wouldn’t put the air conditioner on because said we needed to save the oil for our future. It’s something that I grew up with, but I also think—same as everybody—I’ve become aware of this very unsustainable lifestyle we are all living. We are in a transitional moment. When you start a company, every choice you make has an impact on the environment. It was very important to me to create a company with certain values. LISA IMMORDINO VREELAND:

We started Atlein in 2015 after I spent many years working for big companies. There was so much waste—it became really difficult for me to cope with, so I wanted to create an alternative system. How do you create fashion today? Whenever you create something, you destroy something. I believe the answers to a lot of these environmental issues lie in making things smaller: making fewer things, and working more locally. Atlein is a family business. It’s me, and it’s Gabriele [Forte], who is my partner in life. My brothers help, and my mom also works with us. She does the accounting, and makes the jewelry for the shows, and then she cooks for everyone after. I couldn’t do it all without her. LIV: What story are you trying to tell by taking Tiffany jewelry and mixing it with your aesthetic? AT: It’s about contrast. Most of my dresses are this very fluid jersey construction, and having this jewelry—this harder element—creates a very nice tension.


All jewelry TIFFANY & CO. All Clothing ATLEIN EDITED BY John Northrup


Angel CHEN When you are creating a collection, what are some of the most important elements that you keep in mind? ANGEL CHEN: When I’m creating a collection, the first element I keep in mind is color. I want to make sure the collection is full of color, because my family background is in painting and my dad is kind of a color engineer, and he has been sitting in a lab and discovering color his whole life, so I want to keep the color DNA in my collection. The second is having a mix between Eastern and Western culture. I always want to bring traditional Chinese elements to a more contemporary aesthetic. The third is creating a collection that is somewhat genderless and more contemporary in that way, without boundaries between country, age, and gender. LIV: How did your family inspire you? AC: I think my drawing was inspired by my dad. He was always working with color and different materials and textiles, and I always have tons of inspiration come out from seeing his work. LISA IMMORDINO VREELAND:

My mom is very stylish. When I was young, I would always hide in her closet and steal her beautiful vintage scarf and wrap it around my body, which I guess you could say was my first creation. And my grandma is very kind and good at lots of techniques, especially sewing and crochet and knitting. She’s such a fascinating lady. She taught me how to sew my first pair of trousers by cutting off a piece of a curtain. LIV: How closely interlinked do you feel jewelry is to emotion and sentimentality? AC: I think jewelry has spirit. It might be strange to say that, but I do think it has spirit because it can be something that lives with you. There are some kinds of jewelry you really cannot take off. That jewelry might even protect you. That’s my spiritual thinking. Lots of old Chinese people think jewelry can protect you from harm or some jewelry can bring you luck. Some jewelry can bring you wealth, and some jewelry can bring you love or health or happiness.


All jewelry TIFFANY & CO. All Clothing ANGEL CHEN


Christopher John ROGERS Is there a woman in your head who you have as a reference when designing? CHRISTOPHER JOHN ROGERS: I think the women or the people that I always reference end up being my closest friends. It’s really about a person who mixes and matches different things, who isn’t beholden to one type of aesthetic or reference, and who creates their own world—not to impress anyone, but solely because they enjoy the journey of getting dressed. :You have to be super self-assured to feel comfortable in these clothes. I also hope that even if you aren’t, the clothes can help you muster that within yourself. LIV: You clearly love color. What does color mean to you? CJR: Color is the way that I see the world, more than any specific reference, any decade, or type of garment, or silhouette. It’s a way to make people feel happy. It’s what has always made me feel happy. My fifth grade school picture was me in headto-toe yellow, which looking back, was hilarious. And my mom was like, “I don’t know what you’re wearing.” LISA IMMORDINO VREELAND:

What is your personal relationship with jewelry like? My grandmother had a ton of jewelry and she definitely loved it, loved it, loved it. She always dressed monochromatically and presented herself in head-to-toe one color, so whether it was costume jewelry that was red that matched her red suit, or it was diamonds that she wore with an all-white ensemble, it was really for her about self-expression and not really taking it too seriously. That aesthetic and that point of view has manifested itself into the work that I do. LIV: How was working with Alek Wek on this project? What kind of story are you telling together? CJR: Alek is one of my top inspirations. Whenever I think of high glam and high fashion, I think of Alek. And that’s definitely something that we’re all about here at CJR is self-expression, taking up space, being glamorous wherever you go. So whether it is a black tie event or you’re just walking down the street to grab a carton of milk, fashioning yourself in a way that allows you to be most yourself. LIV:

CJR:


All jewelry TIFFANY & CO. All Clothing CHRISTOPHER JOHN ROGERS Shoes MANOLO BLAHNIK


NEW YORK FASHION WEEK LIVE ON

DISCOVER ON RUNWAY360.CFDA.COM © Serichai Traipoom Checl_ADV_USA.indd 72

14/09/20 13:19


For a full century, this magazine has served as an official voice of fashion, beginning as the house organ of French Couture in Paris and evolving into a collection of international publications. The very first issue, in Fall 1921, was already in 3 languages—French, English, and  Spanish, and today, L’Officiel exists in more than 20 countries. With a specific focus on the way we dress and on what fashion creates, L’Officiel has survived multiple revolutions and one World War, never ceasing publication during global turmoil or crises. Deploying the technology of the moment—from

illustration to photography, film to Instagram and video—its mission has always been to reflect on the culture of fashion with an eye to the past, and a vision for the future. In our fast-changing world, we want to bring back an honest, direct look at fashion, and to foster a constructive, respectful dialogue across cultures and continents, races and genders. This special global section of L’Officiel wants to celebrate fashion with decency and a lack of pretension, starting with questioning what French style stands for in a cosmopolitan culture. To focus not on what divides us, but rather on what unites us.


A NEW ENERGY/ A NEW WORLD

Shayna McNeill and Alton Mason bring together fashion heritage and a joyful outlook. Photography CASS BIRD Styled by STELLA GREENSPAN


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PREVIOUS PAGE—ALTON: Blazer, shirt, and pants TELFAR Cummerbund GIORGIO ARMANI Boots SHAYNA: Dress GUCCI Boots LEMAIRE Belt and earrings PILGRIM VINTAGE

JAMES VELORIA


Blazer, pants, and necklace BERLUTI Shoes JAMES VELORIA Jacket VAQUERA Hat NEW YORK VINTAGE Brooch PILGRIM VINTAGE

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ALTON - Blazer Dunhill Turtleneck DAVID HART Leggings SAINT LAURENT SHAYNA - Blazer, blouse, and leggings SAINT LAURENT Earrings LAURA LOMBARDI


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Sweater APC Bodysuit ALAÏA Skirt SARAH APHRODITE Beret NEW YORK VINTAGE Bracelet PILGRIM VINTAGE Tights CHANEL Rings TIFFANY & CO. DUNHILL Turtleneck DAVID HART Leggings SAINT LAURENT SHAYNA - Blazer, blouse, and leggings SAINT LAURENT Earrings LAURA LOMBARDI

OPPOSITE PAGE: ALTON - Blazer

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ALTON - Jacket, sweater, and jeans APC Shirt PAUL STUART SHAYNA -Jacket, sweater, and jeans APC Shirt PAUL STUART Rings CARTIER

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Dress SCHIAPARELLI Gloves WING + WEFT Jacket ADRIENNE LANDAU Top and brief FENDI Belt SARAH APHRODITE Tights FALKE Socks WE LOVE COLOR Shoes MARC JACOBS Earrings LAURA LOMBARDI ALTON: Jacket ADRIENNE LANDAU Pants BEAUFILLE Belt ARTEMAS QUIBBLE Boots CELINE MODELS: Shayna McNeill and Alton Mason IMG MODELS MAKEUP: Frank B HAIR: Dylan Chavles MANICURIST: Lolly Koon SET DESIGN: Marla Weinhoff Studio CUSTOM PAINTING: OLIPHANT STUDIO PRODUCTION: Tali Magal FREEBIRD PRODUCTIONS VIDEOGRAPHER: Tyler Kohlhoff VIDEO EDITOR: Tyler Kohlhoff MUSIC: Stelios RETOUCHING: Gloss VIDEO EDITOR: Val Thrasher c/o Emily Spiegelman VIDEO COLOR: Cody Kent VISUAL DIRECTOR: Miriam Herzfeld POST PRODUCTION DIRECTOR: Patrick Kinsella OPPOSITE PAGE–SHAYNA:


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It’s a mystery. French style can’t be properly explained, written about, or analyzed. Coco Chanel once said: “Fashion changes, but style endures,” and Yves Saint Laurent adapted her quote in his own words: “Fashions fade, style is eternal.” These legends of French fashion agreed on one existential element: style. Complex, different, and hard to find, style is a modern grail. To approach this ideal, we asked three remarkable women to portray the French style in three fashion stories. Julie de Libran imagined for model Tina Kunakey Cassel a glamorous, sexy, modern look. De Libran grew up in Aix-enProvence and San Diego, and studied and worked in Milan with Gianfranco Ferré, Gianni Versace, and Muccia Prada before moving back to Paris to become Sonia Rykiel’s artistic director. Her French eye was sharpened by these powerful influences. Vanessa Seward, despite being born in Argentina and growing up in London, incarnates the French style in her own way: inspired by couture while remaining casual and timeless. Seward worked in the accessories department for Chanel and

Saint Laurent before becoming the artistic director of the elegant French house Azzaro for eight years. For L’Officiel, she created a chic ‘70s look, worn by the young Zoé Lenthal. Laure Hériard Dubreuil, a brilliant Parisian, graduated from FIT with an emphasis on economics, Chinese, and merchandising. In 2007 she founded the luxury concept store The Webster in Miami. In her story, shot on a cast of French expats living in Los Angeles she created a style that reflects her own: arty, passionate, eclectic and colorful. To represent the Parisian ideal, we chose the actress Lyna Khoudri, who stars in the upcoming Wes Anderson film The French Dispatch. Shot in France, the film has a French New Wave feel—and Khoudri’s revolutionary character reflects the modern vibe of that important period. Together these French by French stories show, each in their own way, that the French novelist Henry de Montherlant was right when he wrote: “The real strength of the style is in feeling.” — Delphine Valloire


Julie de Libran imagines the model Tina Kunakey Cassel in modern Parisian staples with a glamorous twist. Photography SONIA SIEFF


headband, MIU MIU Necklace JULIE DE LIBRAN Shoes VALENTINO Dress JULIE DE LIBRAN Bag HERMÈS Shoes FABRIZIO VITI

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Jacket and pants SCHIAPARELLI Shoes MANOLO BLAHNIK OPPOSITE PAGE: Top, pants, and necklace VALENTINO

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Sweater, skirt, and bag KENZO Shoes ALAÏA Sweater, top, and skirt ALAÏA Shoes SAINT LAURENT

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Top, pants, and shoes PRADA Body, pencil skirt and shoes JACQUEMUS

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Jacket, tank top, and jeans CELINE Scarf and cape ALEXANDRA Ring BVLGARI Shoes ISABEL MARANT OPPOSITE PAGE: Sweater, skirt, earrings, bag, and shoes HERMÈS ASSISTANT STYLIST: Kenzia Bengel HAIR & MAKEUP: Harold James

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Vanessa Seward teams up with It Girl ZoĂŠ Lenthal in a collaboration where contemporary meets vintage. Photography MAXWELL GRANGER


PREVIOUS PAGE: Dress CELINE Belt VANESSA SEWARD Shoes ZOE’S OWN FAR LEFT AND OPPOSITE PAGE: Dress CHANEL Tights FALKE Shoes DIOR Bow CUSTOM Dress (hanging) MIU CENTER: Shirt SAINT LAURENT Skirt, belt and cowboy boots ZOE’S OWN

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MIU


Shirt and pants VANESSA SEWARD X LA REDOUTE Belt, collar and cowboy boots ZOE’S OWN OPPOSITE PAGE: Shirt, bow tie and belt CELINE Trousers DIOR Shoes VANESSA SEWARD

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PHOTO ASSISTANT:

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What happens when French style collides with a laissez-faire Los Angeles attitude? Laure HĂŠriard Dubreuil captures the eclectic results on a cast of French expats. Photography CHANTAL ANDERSON


ABOVE AND PREVIOUS PAGE: SOKO is a multi-talented singer-songwriter and SOKO - PREVIOUS PAGE: Shirt CASABLANCA Jeans RE/DONE Sunglasses LOEWE

actor who recently released her third studio album, “Feel Feelings.”

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and ALEC BE are emerging talents in their fields. As a model and musician/producer, respectively, they are making strides in defining the next generation of fashion and music.

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AMMAR is a model, actor, and musician. SONIA - Suit VÊTEMENTS - Top KHAITE ALEC - Shirt ACNE STUDIOS

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SAUBADU

is a multi-hyphenate stylist and designer. DON RAPH is a former competitive soccer player turned abstract painter.

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Lyna Khoudri, Wes Anderson’s newest star, channels La Nouvelle Vague in a stroll around Paris. Photography MARILI ANDRE


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Wes ANDERSON’S the FRENCH

DISPATCH IS ONE of THE MOST ANTICIPATED NEW FILMS. Starring ALONGSIDE an ALL-STAR ENSEMBLE CAST INCLUDING Timothée CHALAMET, Bill MURRAY, Tilda SWINTON & Frances McDORMAND, THE RISING FRENCH-ALGERIAN ACTRESS Lyna KHOUDRI HOLDS her OWN. In the film, Lyna plays Juliette, a student activist in Paris. Motorbike helmet on, she protests for women’s rights with her equally passionate boyfriend, played by Timothée Chalamet. Every night during production, Anderson helped her expand her cinematic knowledge. In the film, you play Juliette, a student activist in Paris who protests for women’s rights while wearing a Motorbike helmet. What was it like to be on set? LYNA KHOUDRI: In the lobby of the hotel where we were all staying, there was a table full of DVDs. Dinners were almost like quizzes. Wes would ask me: ‘Did you watch Partie de Campagne by Renoir?’ ‘No.’ ‘Watch it.’ Le Pont du Nord by Jacques Rivette was the reference for my role, especially with the motorbike helmet and the leather jacket that the hero—played by Pascale Ogier—wore. Also La Vérité by Clusot—Brigitte Bardot is amazing. She stands up for her rights and fights. Juliette fights too. Under my helmet I was wearing Bardot’s hairstyle. L’OFFICIEL:

What was it like to work with Wes Anderson? Wes knows exactly when to reference French culture and when he needs to be the American director that he is. His precision is so inspiring. During my first scene with Timothée, Wes told us to follow our feelings. L’O: LK:

How did you find out you got the role? I was filming a movie in Algeria with my friends. It was the first time I went to the desert, I was amazed. The rest L’O: LK:

of the world seemed so far away. I only looked at my emails at night. My agent was looking for me everywhere to tell me that I’d got the part. You grew up in Algeria during a tumultuous time. What was that like? LK: I was born in Algeria in 1992, when extremist politics were on the rise. My father was a politically engaged journalist, and he was in danger—we had to leave the country. But my social awareness started with the 2005 workers’ strikes in France. I felt that, fundamentally, I was on the strikers’ side.The Algerian war and the colonization were terrible. I started to read anti-establishment writers such as Aimée Césaire and Frantz Fanon. They built my understanding of where I am from, and who I am. L’O:

How would you describe your style? Classic: a good pair of jeans, a T-shirt. But I also love having the right bag, the right shoes. I’ll change my outfit three or four times before going out. I decide on the spur of the moment. L’O: LK:

L’O: Tell us about your other film that was released this year, Haute Couture. LK: It’s a social comedy about a suburban girl who becomes the apprentice of Dior’s head seamstress, played by Nathalie Baye. I spent a lot of time in this environment with all the seamstresses. I saw what perfection, precision and savoir-faire were. — Virginie Apiou


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A meeting of two visionary French designers representing past and future: The legendary Pierre Cardin and beloved newcomer Simon Porte Jacquemus. By PAMELA GOLBIN


seen it as a vital independence. PG: And this freedom always forces you to push the limits and open new doors? PC: No, I actually opened prisons (laughing). It’s a joke of course because I’m tributary to all the responsibilities that come with employing hundreds of people. I always kept the problems for myself. The joys, happiness, and parties were for others. SPJ: I’ve always shared positivity so that the energy of the brand shines on others. So I do understand. Is it hard to be both the creative force and CEO of a company? Yes, but some are capable of both, which is indeed my case. (laughing) SPJ: I agree, and it’s important to find a balance. In the morning, I take care of the financial responsibilities and my afternoons are dedicated to creation. We can’t live in a bubble all the time. You have to be in the real world. PG: PC:

Are some artistic decisions made for financial reasons? No. Everything has to make sense without forgetting the human side to it. I’m not going to organize a show in three weeks because I PG:

SPJ:

We find ourselves in Provence, comfortably seated at the Café de Sade, in the company of Pierre Cardin, 98 years old, owner of the property and still the active doyen of French fashion, and next to him, Simon Porte Jacquemus, 30 years old, young and at the top of the class, eagerly reclaiming the master’s influence. What brings them together, today and over time, is a willingness to create while living in worlds apart, with a rebellious ability to emancipate themselves by bypassing paths previously traced. Worlds apart, both men are much like the high-perched Lacoste castle: A chiseled stone punctuation erected by the legendary Marquis de Sade, both a refuge and an eagle’s nest over the vast domain, dominating the scenery with breathtaking views of the Lubéron massif. Cardin purchased the property, along with a large part of the precipitous village clinging to the hillside. Today, when coming to greet us, he exited his lair driven by his chauffeur, as if crossing the corridors of time in a carriage: travelling from a medieval dungeon to the ultra-contemporary realm. The confinement obliges, in these times of uncertainty, barrier gestures and distance; the men’s presence, almost side by side, literally demonstrates the link between the golden age of couture and the flickering torch of the future. PAMELA GOLBIN: It’s rare to be with both the eldest and the youngest of fashion designers together conversing over a summer lunch.. PIERRE CARDIN: I used to be young too! I wasn’t born old. Let’s salut youth! And to new creativity! SIMON PORTE JACQUEMUS: Cheers to you!

It’s unusual in Paris: you’re both independent, at the head of your own fashion houses. PC: I always was. I never had a boss. I had the money to do it. I didn’t need help. SPJ: For me, it was by choice. I maybe didn’t have the money but I didn’t want to be a part of a big corporation. Checks don’t interest me. I said no to all brands and financial proposals. PG:

For now? No, it’s a conscious choice. I love my freedom, I’m great like this. The biggest challenge for a designer is to stay free. I’ve always PG:

SPJ:

STYLE DEVELOPS into a BRAND, FASHION is FLEETING! —PIERRE CARDIN

want to. I think about my team and the sustainability of what I do. How would you define success? I consider my team to be my biggest success. Being copied is also a modern form of success. When you are imitated by all the ‘fast fashion’ brands it means that you have a signature style people want to buy and wear. PG:

SPJ:

PG: When you both started, did you think of a specific woman, or more of a universe? PC: Neither to a woman nor a universe. Rather a shape, a volume. An idea, a silhouette. Wearable, mostly wearable. SPJ: I often prefer to think of a general idea, a narrative or a story with a title, like Jean-Luc Godard with his film Le Mépris. It’s very French to tell a story and stay close to very real characters. I had an obsession with women since my youth, but it was linked to one woman in particular: my mom, who kept her maiden name, Jacquemus, and is at the heart of my brand.

You recently launched menswear? Yes, because I also wanted to tell stories about men. At the beginning, women’s design came very easily, almost spontaneously. But for menswear, I needed more time to understand what story I wanted to tell. PG:

SPJ:

Would you say you are competitive? Do you have a favorite activity or sport? PC: I don’t. For me it’s work, work, work. SPJ: It’s very modern to say that in English: work, work, work! We always say it within my team. PG:


conceived by the Hugarian architect Antii Lovag, in Théoule-sur-Mer (in the South of France)… SPJ: It was amazing, a dream come true. In fact, I’ve been a fan of it for years. In my aesthetic, I don’t know how to explain it...this is one of my absolute favorite references. PC: Oh yes, it’s a living sculpture. It’s quite magical. Were you surprised by its unique architectural volumes? It was absolutely perfect. There were even ceramics by Picasso. I’m obsessed with the work of Matisse and Picasso. It was furnished with so many iconic design pieces including a lamp that I really love. So many objects that I’m really fond of, and that also makes you feel good there. PG:

SPJ:

Mr. Cardin, you just had a retrospective exhibition of your work at the Brooklyn Museum. What do you think about your designs being shown in museums? PC: Well, firstly, it’s the recognition of my work, and also it showed the how and the why behind becoming Pierre Cardin. It didn’t happen by chance, you know. It’s endless hours of work, stressful responsibility, and a strong personality. You have to create your own personal identity. PG:

As for you, Simon, I know that you’re carefully keeping your collections. Yes, I have kept a duplicate of everything, plus the archives. It’s important, but much too soon to do an exhibition. I’m only 30. I don’t really think about it even if keeping them is, in a way, having it in mind. When I was younger, I dreamt of being a big couture designer, but today I just want to do things in a beautiful, simple way, to be aware of what’s going on around me while remaining loyal and close to my clients. It’s my biggest goal and also my biggest satisfaction. I design my collections from A to Z, from a simple belt to a constructed dress or a coat. It is me who is behind everything in a sincere and honest way. That’s what makes me happy in my life. PG:

SPJ:

PG:

PG: Can you tell us about the famous post-war dressmakers with whom you spent time? PC: I knew Dior before he founded his Haute Couture house, when he was still an antique dealer. He was rather shy. PG: PC:

Contrary to Balmain, who was... He was a playboy!

And Cristobal Balenciaga? Yes, I knew him but he was always very discreet, almost too much so. SPJ: Mr. Cardin, If I remember well you told me that Mr. Dior dreamt all his life of being Balenciaga. PC: Exactly. He once told me, “I would have liked to be Balenciaga, always.” PG: PC:

And Chanel... Oh…I would prefer not to talk about her. She was jealous of me. I was extremely handsome, young, and talented. And she was, well of a certain age... SPJ: Ah, jealousy in fashion, it’s very hard. PG: PC:

You stayed at one of Mr. Cardin’s famous homes, the Palais Bulles,

ON THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: A

portrait of Simon Porte Jacquemus; the designer backstage at his spring-summer 2019 show; two moments from the Marseille show in 2017; a look from the 2019 show in Provence; an outfit from the 2018 “La Bomba” show; the finale of the spring-summer 2016 show.


ON THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: A Pierre Cardin look from 1992; the designer at work in his atelier during the ‘70s; a portrait from the ‘60s; a group of models wearing the 1968 collection; a couture creation from 1971; a high fashion outfit from 1966; a 1968 ensemble.

PC: She would always say, “Who is this young man? What’s his name?” Even if I met her more than 20 times and we sat next to each other at every dinner party. Anyway, she would only say terrible things about people. Jealous and mean... SPJ: Everything I never want to be. PC:...but she did have a great sense of humor. SPJ: When I was 20 and starting out, I often got nasty looks at parties and cocktails from the older generations. I always told myself that I would do the exact opposite and reach out to the younger designers and support them, as I do with Ludovic [de Saint Sernin]. I refuse to spend my energy thinking that they will take my place. If I lose my edge, I only have myself to blame and not a new designer who is hungry for success. PC: What’s the situation in Paris? Are there any young people like you right now? SPJ: I feel there have been a lot more interesting young designers recently. When I began ten years ago, we were very few. Paris was a little asleep, but the situation has changed for the better and things are moving.

Is a sense of camaraderie difficult in this industry? There has always been jealousy. André Courrèges and I were friends. He was really talented. Really talented! SPJ: Yes, his drawings are beautiful! I love Courrèges too. He’s one of my biggest inspirations. Courrèges and you. PG: PC:

What about his work inspired you? The ingenuity of his colors and shapes. His work was really primitive, kind of like Picasso. There is something naïve that spoke to me right away. PC: He had style. PC:

SPJ:

For you, is it better to be fashionable or to have style? Having style, obviously! Style develops into a brand. Fashion is fleeting!

PG: PC:

PG: PC:

Mr. Cardin, what advice would you give to Simon? To work in silence, and not to listen to others. Listen to your

I DESIGN MY COLLECTIONS from A to Z... IT IS ME WHO IS BEHIND EVERYTHING in a SINCERE and HONEST WAY. That’s WHAT MAKES ME HAPPY in MY LIFE. —SIMON PORTE JACQUEMUS

own conscience. If you count on others, you won’t succeed. Simon seems to have already achieved all of that. Yes, of course! But he has to keep going. Starting is the easy part. SPJ: It’s been only ten years! PG: PC:

Simon, what question would you like to ask Mr. Cardin? Looking back, is there anything you would change? PC: (singing Edith Piaf, “No Regrets”) No! No regrets! SPJ: (laughing) I didn’t expect anything less from you, Mr. Cardin! PC: (singing) No! I will have no regrets! PG:

SPJ:


Farida Khelfa was a fixture at the famous French club Le Palace, and an inspiration for Jean-Paul Gaultier and Azzedine Alaïa. She looks back on the ‘80s, a magnificent decade of creativity and self-expression. Can you tell us about when you first arrived in Paris? I didn’t know where to go. I wandered everywhere, but I soon met Le Palace’s crew in Les Halles. It was the trendiest neighborhood, with ‘50s vintage shops... it was where everything happened.

L’OFFICIEL:

FARIDA KHELFA:

L’O: You talk about Le Palace as a place of initiation for you. What did you discover there? FK: Homosexuality. I had a lot of gay friends when I was very young but it was taboo; nobody would say anything. At Le Palace no one hid. Everybody was so nice to me and I felt safe with them. They welcomed me with open arms. Fabrice Emaer let us in even though we had no money. We weren’t there for that! He understood that letting us in would attract the Parisian golden youth. I loved the lack of judgment and the anonymity, something that’s just not possible today. We were allowed to be whoever we wanted. L’O: You lived here and there, from Pierre & Gilles’ studio to the apartment of the Le Palace bouncer, Edwige. Were you scared of anything?

FK: No, but I knew how to recognize danger. I always had a pair of jeans ready on the floor next to my bed, in case I had to run away.

What were your days and nights like? There were no days! Only nights. Most of the time I would wake up around 4pm, or Edwige and I would leave the club early in the morning and go to Les Halles to eat some fresh ground beef at the butcher shop.

L’O: FK:

L’O: You met the fashion world on the dance floor of Le Palace and Les Bain Douches: Yves Saint Laurent, Kenzo, Claude Montana, Thierry Mugler, and Jean-Paul Gaultier. Did they make you love fashion? FK: Yes. They appreciated my unexpected style. I dressed how I wanted: Very tight Levis or stirrup pants, a black turtleneck, and some rocker shoes from the ‘50s. It was all very masculine, unless I was wearing my red high heels that Christian [Louboutin] brought me from London. These close friends are the ones who made me discover fashion and brought me to the catwalk, even though I wasn’t really interested in the big brands at the time.


Illustrations by JEAN-PAUL GOUDE


You were the “Queen of the Door” at Les Bains Douches. Did it sharpen your style sense? FK: A lot, since I was judging people only on that. Usually the ones with great style have no money so I was only letting in people who weren’t buying drinks…the rich ones were badly dressed and that was not acceptable. A bad pair of earrings could kill a look. L’O:

What did you consider to be great style? Nobody was buying expensive brands because they couldn’t afford it. It forced you to use your imagination—that’s how people stood out. L’O: FK:

L’O: The first time you walked the runway for Jean-Paul Gaultier he let you choose your clothes. What do you remember of working with him? FK: I remember the first time I met Jean-Paul. It was in Trinité, a neighborhood in Paris. He had dark hair and was very shy. I came to do a fitting even though I didn’t have the body of a model: I was voluptuous and curvy. I had large breasts and never thought I could fit in those clothes, but I did! I also walked pretty early for Mugler. Both were visionaries.

I loved the lack of judgment and the anonymity ...we were allowed to be whoever we wanted L’O: In 1982 you met your partner for several years, the photographer Jean-Paul Goude, who was 20 years older than you. Was he the one who influenced your passion for images? FK: I loved what Jean-Paul did with Grace Jones. It was the first time we could see a black woman with almost a crewcut, dressed in a suit jacket with nothing underneath. Her skin was so beautiful. Jean-Paul taught me to appreciate so many things, like the Bauhaus, Stravinsky, the Russian ballets. I was very into literature, but he brought images into my life. I still appreciate visuals today because of him. L’O: You worked with a lot of singular designers. What did they share that made them so influential, inspired, and respected? FK: Jean-Paul Gaultier, Azzedine Alaïa, Thierry Mugler, and Christian Lacroix all created their own fashion houses. They had strong personalities. That’s the game changer. Today most designers have to follow and respect a brand’s history when they become creative director. It’s more of a challenge to lead. L’O: You still have your friends from the ‘80s: Naomi Cambell, Carla Bruni-Sarkozy, Victoire de Castellane, Christian Louboutin. What keeps your friendships going over so much time?

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FK: I’m very loyal in friendship and love. It’s really hard for me to make friends. It takes time, so I do everything to keep them. I try to avoid conflicts. They are good people, so over the years I’m rarely disappointed.

Do you prefer acting or directing? You’ve done both. I love the freedom of acting. But I also feel freedom when I make documentaries. When you start one, you never know where the story will end up, and most of the time it’s somewhere unexpected. I’ve made documentaries on Jean-Paul Gaultier, then about Tunisian youth during the Arab Spring, and most recently one about women in the Middle East. L’O: FK:

You were Azzedine Alaïa’s studio director from 1996 to 2003, then couture director for Jean-Paul Gaultier. Is it easy to work with friends? FK: Not at all. I discourage people from working with friends. I prefer to keep my friends rather than work with them. L’O:

L’O: You are widely known as a muse and style icon. What does that mean to you ? FK: Nothing really, I’m very flattered about it but I don’t wake up in the morning thinking about it. I say thank you but it doesn’t define me.

So how do you define yourself ? As a woman of the 21st century. Especially as a mother who is trying to be herself, without any bitter feelings. I try to stay positive. —Delphine Valloire L’O: FK:


Images from Farida Khelfa’s personal archive

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Fétiche.

For a century, this magazine has predicted runway trends, heralded eras of restrained and extravagant fashion, and above all else, has recommended the chicest items to invest in each season. This year, it’s your turn to choose. As we usher in the next 100 years of L’Officiel, we decided it was time to ask you to take the reins as fashion editors and select the most desirable of the accessories making their way down the Fall 2020 runways. And you graciously obliged! Our Instagram Stories polls were flooded with responses—totalling more than 600,000 votes from around the world. Of course, each country’s style devotees have their own distinct take on fall fashion. But the following items are universally the most coveted accessories of the season, and combine the desire of the new with the hertiage of the brand. Though you voted overwhelmingly for practical boots à la Dior, and new classics, like Gucci’s reissued Jackie bag, you also voted for the manifesto of each of these labels, knowing that something special lies just on the other side of that tissue paper. The ceremony of unwrapping a new accessory fresh from the store is one of the things we look forward to most each Fall. .

Happy unboxing

Photography JENNIFER LIVINGSTON


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RETOUCHING:

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In December 1964, René Gruau cleverly used fringe to look forward. When putting together issues of L’Officiel, Andrée Castanié and Georges Jalou saw everything, represented everything, and predicted everything. They often asked René Gruau to illustrate the covers. The self-taught artist would perfectly frame fashion’s latest trends in his captivating ink drawings, inspired variously by Toulouse-Lautrec and Japanese calligraphy. In the ‘60s, the fashion world was not into fringe. It had made its last serious appearances on the flapper skirts of the roaring ‘20s. However, for the December 1964 cover, Gruau chose to depict a scarlet outfit adorned with fringe. In doing so,

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he was at once referencing Jean Patou’s knitted jackets of the contemporary moment, while also nodding to the comeback of intricate trimming from the ‘50s. Gruau even predicted what was to come, as fringe enjoyed a renaissance in the late ‘60s and ‘70s, as demonstrated in the above pages from the December 1969 and September 1971 issues of L’Officiel. The textile trim eventually took on a life of its own, in different fabrics, shapes, sizes, and colors. All at once, Gruau’s red fringe looked to the revered past, celebrated the present, and foresaw an unknown future. —Hervé Dewintre

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L'Officiel USA Fall 2020  

L'Officiel USA Fall 2020 - Digital Edition

L'Officiel USA Fall 2020  

L'Officiel USA Fall 2020 - Digital Edition