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West Country Life Western Daily Press, Saturday October 12

Farrier takes to the open road STEVE ROBERTS’ PICTURE ESSAY

Hairdresser, embalmer and now taxidermist CHRIS RUNDLE MEETS LIZ DAVIS

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magazine


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Inside 2

COLUMNISTS

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PEOPLE

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PICTURE ESSAY

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PEOPLE

Martin Hesp assesses group holidays, while Lizzie Lane ponders chocolate week

A rat in a suit? Yes, it really is. Chris Rundle meets taxidermist Liz Davis

Steve Roberts’s evocative pictures of the farrier who takes to the open road

Little is said about the firemen who documented war in art... until now

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PEOPLE

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FOOD

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ABSOLUTE CORKERS

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SHOPPING

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BOOKS

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TRAVEL

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WALKS

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GARDENING

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ANTIQUES

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TELEVISION

Meet the ‘butterfly man’; plus, how an historic home became the place to party

Chris Rundle on pistachios; baking brioche; making curry; and Marco’s pork

Ned Halley urges readers to try calvados; while he’s also impressed by Lord Poulett

Stylish looks for the office this autumn; plus, giving your home a cosy makeover

Maeve Binchy’s biography; we chat with Rula Lenska; plus writer Shelagh Mazey

Sarah Tucker takes her son to California; while David Clensy opts for Normandy

Sharpness and Gloucester Canal are explored; plus, a walk along the River Barle

Alan Down looks at when and how to harvest your apples. Plus, Monty Don

The violin played as the Titanic sank slowly finally goes under the hammer

Adam Postans delves into Sex Box; while Michael Buerk looks for treasures

TV guide Puzzles & Poem Horoscope Where in the West Cover by Steve Roberts

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Online westerndailypress.co.uk/wcl

Harvesting potatoes at Burtle on the Somerset levels

PICTURE: STEVE ROBERTS

Rural rambles

Roger Evans My contributions have always been honest. I’ve always tried to report what happens and how it has happened. And I’ve always tried to temper it with a sense of my natural modesty and reserve. Not for me, “look at me, look what I’ve done”. But having said all that, something happened to me this week that took me to heights not achieved in my life thus far. When I get, eventually, to that retirement home, it will be something for me to look back on with great pride. Something for me to tell a sympathetic young nurse as she tends my needs, something that she will reflect on later, something that will make her say to herself, “wow, he might be an old man now but boy, has he lived his life to the full.” I’ve told my grandchildren and they are in awe of me. I’m still in two minds whether I should tell you. It’s dark now when I drive to the pub, I’ve started going a bit later. I drink mostly an elderflower cordial. Elderflower cordial is good for you, it creates exercise. If I go a bit later to the pub I have one or two fewer elderflower cordials, which means less exercise. I do not actually need to be walking about in the middle of the night. One of my other bad habits is putting my seat belt on after I’ve got the car moving. So I’ve gone about 40 yards, very slowly, because I’m sitting on the buckle, and I stamp on the brakes. I’ve seen something move in front of me. It’s a hedgehog. I can’t remember the last time I saw a hedgehog on our yard. I’ve seen one on the road, dead, so far this year. I know it’s only one because it’s something I’ve made particular note of. Some 20 or 30 years ago, a dead hedgehog on the road was a common sight. In fact, I’m sure that I can remember a television commercial that featured the concept itself of a dead hedgehog, and that concept would only have been used if the concept itself was commonplace. At about the same time as my encounter with the hedgehog there is an article in our local paper predicting the extinction of hedgehogs by 2015, stating that there has been a 95 per cent decline in the number of hedgehogs in our country. “The brown hare is also endangered,” hey shout. I had a ride on the combine in our spring barley yesterday and in an hour 10 hares came out. There have never been more brown hares about here. “The decline WCL-E01-S2

in hedgehogs, hares and lapwings is all down to intensive farming.” No surprises there, then. But hares, hedgehogs and lapwings all have one thing in common, their young live on the ground. The air is full of predators by day and the ground roamed by predators at night. One of the roamers has a particular liking for hedgehogs; the badger. The badger is particularly adept at rolling a hedgehog over and eating it. So if there are massive numbers more badgers about, doesn’t it stand to reason that they are all eating massive more numbers of hedgehogs, or is that too obvious an explanation? My visit to the TB-restricted market has left a lasting impression. Normal markets are all hustle and bustle. There’s a spring in people’s step, people are striding about with purpose, there’s an undercurrent of excitement. Not so with your TB restricted market. True, it’s a smaller market than normal, but the people about are subdued. There’s a printed catalogue of entries, so very publicly, you are saying that your farm is affected by TB. There’s a feeling of stigma about it – “look at me, I’ve got leprosy” – but none of us has done anything that puts us in this situation. I talk to other farmers who are more experienced than me, only because they’ve been affected longer, and they tell me that the bigger and older cattle that are for sale, the nearer their value gets to the price of unrestricted cattle. It’s the younger stuff, calves and the like, that take the biggest hit. Just to endorse this view, some bunches of black and white weanling cattle go through the ring. They weigh 150 kilos. In a normal market I would guess that even on a bad day they would be worth £300 apiece. They sell for £75 each, a clear loss on what it will have cost to rear them. They were probably only being sold because the vendor needed the space they were taking up and the money. The vendor probably went home heartbroken. Heartbreak and financial difficulties don’t register on any TB statistics that I have ever seen. I suppose I should tell you. Get it out there in the open. Last Monday I became a bingo caller! There, what do you think of that? How many of you can say that? It just shows what highcalibre contributors your editor gets. It’s very serious stuff, bingo, older ladies take it very, very seriously, I was sure that I would get a bollocking but I came through unscathed.

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Columnists

Lizzie Lane Somebody mentioned to me that this week is chocolate week.

Martin Hesp I am not particularly squeamish but it was a detail too far at dinner.

A celebration of chocolate in all its forms. If that is so, why haven’t I seen anything telling me so? Every week or perhaps even day of the year, has some kind of celebration attached to it, but I only ever seem to read about it without seeing any outward sign of celebration. There are the obvious ones of course, those imprinted on this year’s calendar, that is, Easter, Shrove Tuesday and suchlike. They’ve been there for years. These others I’m referring to seem to pop up following some person or organisation suggesting it. As with chocolate week, I find myself expecting some kind of festival, a whole city putting on a big display of chocolate – plus free samples of course. It’s done on the continent, notably in Obidos, Portugal, and Modica in Sicily. The latter actually boasts of being world famous for chocolate, though I’d never heard of it before a recent visit there. I’d certainly never heard of the former, yet both hold chocolate festivals – and we’re not talking about a few bars of Dairy Milk here – we’re talking works of artistic merit. An aeroplane with a 6ft wingspan, a boat, a box of tools, a hairdryer, animals of every description, and even the odd nude – all exhibits made from chocolate. None of your paper wrapped bars tumbling off the conveyor belt in their thousands. This, my friend, is of the standard of Michelangelo or Rodin, only in chocolate. If anyone hears of home-bred chocolate making skills and sculpting to this standard, do let me know. Oh, and while we’re on the subject, does the UK actually have a chocolate heart? A town where chocolate is still made in vast quantities? We used to, but times have changed. Forgot to mention that Modica also produces a chocolate liqueur; yummy! Away from chocolate and on to aliens. Someone of scientific persuasion has brought out a book suggesting that we’re not of this earth but were put here by aliens. Now where have I heard that before? The Bible for a start, in which humanity is given the earth by a super being who decided to run a little experiment in the Garden of Eden. Did he do it just for fun or was it a logical scientific experiment? I haven’t a clue on that one. Nothing new there then. Over the last century or so, the idea of the human race having been created by a race of super beings has been suggested a number of times. So has the idea that there is far more intelligent life out there in the great beyond. These theories depend on nothing being proved. They’re just theories and lights in the sky have been attributed to the mundane rather than men from Mars.

An elderly Scotsman had begun a lurid description of having his ear syringing operation called to a halt by hair growth inside his ancient lobes. I choked on my spaghetti. Take a dozen individuals who have never met before, throw in a few man-and-wife couples for good measure, then make them all live within close proximity for a week. It’s called a group holiday and there are all manner of interests and subject areas that they cover, from watercolour painting to spring-flower spotting, from scuba diving to hiking. I have a penchant for the latter and a couple of times a year find myself thrown into the social experiment test tube or behaviourist pressure cooker that is the specialist group holiday.

There’s no doubt that it is exciting and somehow reassuring to think there might be something out there. H G Wells certainly got pretty good mileage out of it. Not on the reassuring front of course, but exciting that life on Mars – far more advanced than us of course – was watching the earth with envious eyes; a deliciously intriguing opening to War of the Worlds. The human race helpless against clever creatures with three legs and eyes that looked as though they’d swallowed a set of traffic lights; green, amber and red. Oh, and they wore no clothes. Have you noticed that in every film where aliens of indescribable ugliness visit the earth – this includes ET – they are always naked? If they happen to come visiting Planet Earth and are vaguely human in form, they’re wearing clingy Lycra over their perfect bodies. It’s occurred to us down here at Lizzie Lane that as regards aliens and intelligence, the boot might be on the other foot. Perhaps it’s not a case of there being countless more civilisations of greater intelligence than us in the universe but that we’re the first. We’re it, in which case folks, welcome to the Garden of Eden. Please stay off the grass and avoid eating fruit from that tree over there in the corner. Oh! You already have? In that case you have eaten from the Tree of Knowledge and are cleverer than any other creature in the Universe. Oh, and you probably have also inherited a liking for chocolate.

A Christmas Wish, a new title from Lizzie Lane, comes out on October 24

COLUMNISTS ONLINE You can enjoy the best of Lizzie Lane and Martin Hesp’s Saturday essays – and our other writers – on the Western Daily Press website westerndailypress.co.uk/wcl

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One of the most common mistakes people make is to assume that there is one rule for them, and another completely different set of rules for everyone else. And so, for instance, when you are on a group holiday you might be tempted to think, “Everyone here is odd – except for me, of course.” The truth is that all the others will be thinking the same – or, in my own case, they might well be thinking, “He’s stranger than the rest of us put together.” Group holidays are fascinating in that they reflect our vast society in a tiny microcosm made all the more intense by the isolationist sensation of being in some foreign place where everything is different from one’s own snug and homely norm. Such holidays begin with a general assumption that, because we are all Brits thrown together in a foreign land, we must be all more or less the same. After all, we eat marmalade – a habit that seems to have eluded the rest of humankind. However, a third of the way into a group holiday, the cracks begin to appear. The intense heat of the Mediterranean, for example, burns away some of our social niceties. Irritability can become commonplace. A normally polite and demure woman whacked me over the head with a map because she thought I had jumped the queue waiting to board a bus. I cannot imagine she would do this at home – but then, the sun does not burn down here at 36C. Somehow you can overlook what is obviously abnormal behaviour – it is the way people are when you see them close up and personal doing what they normally do that you start to shudder with shock. Here is an example of that – a male member of another group holiday sharing the same hotel has a laugh I imagine might sound like a donkey undergoing castration. We are in Menorca and I swear hikers in neighbouring Majorca can hear it 28 miles away. People creating crazy TV cartoons for kids could not invent such a laugh. It punctuates the air like some insane police siren wheezing its violent last. It is what this bloke does. It is how he is, how he evolved. Without the services of a spouse who years ago would have told him to put a lid on it. “I don’t care how rich and handsome you are – I will leave you if you ever laugh in that way again.” That is what someone should have said to this poor bloke when he was young. Now it is too late. I can imagine him going to one of those lonely hearts club meetings and scoring a degree of success until... Heee-haaaw, heeehaaaw! I can almost hear the deathly silence that would ensue. The kind of silence that must reign supreme after you have allowed your ear hair to grow unabated for 70 years. If there is anything worse than that, it is telling someone all about it over dinner. But if there is no Mrs McTavish to say, “Shut up Jock – no one wants to hear about your earwax problems”, how would Jock know? I am lucky – I have got a highly critical wife who is more than happy to kick me under the table. Goodness knows what faux-pas and other social horrors I would commit without the occasional bruise on the shin or without hearing my name uttered urgently under her breath in the same way she might whisper the name of a poisonous snake. My theory is that, just under the thin veneer, we are all mad – it is just that some are trained or conditioned to hide it better than others.

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SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 3


People Chris Rundle

Liz Davis doesn’t have a skeleton in her cupboard but she soon will. It’s the one she plans to bring down from the attic and install under the stairs. But first she must shift things around to make room. When she has done that, the skeleton will be in good company, what with the skulls on the bookcase and the various bits of wildlife, all preserved and mounted in lifelike poses, which stare down glassily from the shelves and walls of her home. And then there are the mice and the rats. All miniature masterpieces of the taxidermist’s craft and with which Liz is turning a hobby in to a profitable sideline to supplement the income she makes as a freelance embalmer: she was named Embalmer of the Year in the 2013 Good Funeral Guide awards. She shows me a cloaked vampire mouse, a punk mouse, a Van Gogh mouse conspicuously minus one ear. Then there’s a one-armed Lord Nelson mouse standing on a miniature column. There’s also a Roman gladiator mouse and even a ghost mouse, its head tucked under one forepaw while the other holds a candle. If you’ve long since given up the hunt for different and unusual Christmas presents, then take heart: Liz Davis will almost certainly have just the thing for you. But how did a hairdresser manage to make a career shift to embalming before moving seamlessly into taxidermy? “I’ve had an interest in taxidermy ever since I was very small and my dad took me into a shop in Bath and there was a full-sized stuffed bear in the corner, just like in Steptoe,” she said. “He was interested in it and he wanted it and he told my mother but she said ‘Over my dead body’, so that was it. But ever since then I’ve loved things like that.” Liz started learning the embalmer’s art when she reached the age of 35 and realised it might be sensible to have more than one area of expertise listed on her CV. Her training, initially in Bristol and Salisbury, eventually took her to the US to look at specialised reconstruction techniques with her late husband – who had been one of her tutors. But she has collected stuffed animals for years. The stoats, foxes and boxing hares in the sitting room of her Minehead home only represent a fraction of her collection. And it was that passion for collecting which eventually led her to sign up for a taxidermy course. “The chap who was taking it said he could do a jay in 20 minutes but it took us two days, so it is a lengthy process if you don’t know what you are doing. But of course you can stop halfway through and put the bird back in the freezer and wait until you have more time,” she said. “At the moment I really only do small things, really because of a lack of space, but I am going to go on a course and learn how to do large animals like foxes and rabbits. “But I am fascinated by the rats and mice because I can do more with them. It takes me about an hour and a half to skin them and

prepare them and to make a former for them. You put the skin over the former and pose them and it then takes about two weeks for them to dry, slightly longer for the rats. “Years and years ago I used to keep rats. They are such lovely animals and when you have kept them you know how their feet go when they are standing, and I think that’s why mine look so natural. With many of the ones that I have seen for sale, people don’t seem to know what to do with the feet. “Then there’s the mouth. Sometimes the mouths shrink when they dry and they don’t look quite right – so in that case I put a moustache on them.” Embalming and taxidermy both, of course, involve making the dead look lifelike. And her skill in one area has helped her develop expertise in the other, Liz admits. “I think it’s all about attention to detail. Because with my embalming I do pay a great deal of attention to detaiI. I take a lot of time over my work, even down to a person’s eyelashes. “If they’ve been in hospital maybe their eyes haven’t been cleaned so I do that and I even separate the eyelashes. And I will do the nails and repaint them if they’ve had nail varnish on. “It is fiddly, and it is time-consuming but it is worth it in the end. Because when people go to see someone in a chapel of rest those are the things they look at – the nails and the eyes, and the hair.” Liz is unlikely to run out of rodents to fulfil future commissions (previous ones have included a rat dressed as a banker and a Hannibal Lector mouse) because she lives just a few yards from a pet shop which supplies them as frozen food to owners of birds and reptiles. “And when I get round to it I have a freezer full of birds and animals that people have given me, either road kill or pets that have died,” she said. “As soon as I know how to do them I will be starting. I have got guinea pigs, lots of moles, gerbils and various birds, such as parrots. I’ve got a wagtail in there and I’ve got some barn owls that people have found. And my mother’s freezer is absolutely stuffed as well. She’s got a seagull and some pheasants and a roe deer’s head. A friend of hers was driving home and she came across a roe deer that had been run over. So she took it home and had it for her cats and dogs and saved me the head – it’s just that I haven’t had time to get round to doing it yet. “I’m kept busy enough with the mice and rats. And although they are small that doesn’t necessarily make them easy. Because they’ve got no shoulders and their legs are very short it’s difficult to dress them. “People are always requesting things that involve trousers but I tell them I can’t really put trousers on them because they wouldn’t like right. It just makes them look as though they are wearing nappies.”

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Among the many preserved rodents lovingly dressed by Liz Davis are a cloaked vampire mouse, a punk mouse, a Van Gogh mouse conspicuously minus one ear, a one-armed Lord Nelson mouse standing on a miniature column, a Roman gladiator mouse, a musical rat, and a ghost mouse, she says: ‘I am fascinated by the rats and mice because I can do more with them’ PICTURES: FRAN STOTHARD WCL-E01-S2

SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 5


Picture essay Steve Roberts

James Darlington, itinerant farrier, on the road in Somerset James Darlington’s dog, Sam, jumps up on to the yellow-spoked wagon. He knows there is a trip to hand. James has had a great deal of luck while handling horseshoes. A farrier by trade, he has maintained a free spirit while keeping disciplined and running a business in South Somerset. At the age of 13 he paid a visit to the famous Stow Horse Fair in Gloucestershire and its lifestyle, it seems, has rubbed off. In the spring or autumn he takes off to live the life of a Romany, with bow-top wagon, and cooking by a camp fire. He musters the spirit of life on the road, with his cobs, William and Clyde. The bow-top was built on a dray by Hodgson of Halifax in 1930, while the flat cart, which takes the heavy goods, dates from 1899. The bow-top’s iron-rimmed wheels rumble along the Somerset lanes. He prides himself on knowing the common land where he and his son, William, aged 13, gather firewood, and prepare for the evening campfire – which sparks story-telling and laughter. Villagers can inadvertently sustain this “caravan” of the past as James often asks cottage dwellers for fresh water. “They are always pleased to assist,” he says. “No one ever says no.” Sarah Trumper, who drives the rubberwheeled flat cart and also revels in the freedom of the road and contributes to the fireside chat, says: “What a wonderful way of life. On their death-bed no one is going to say ‘I wish I had watched more television’.”

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5

minutes to know David Threlfall David Threlfall was born in Manchester in 1953. As well as decades of stage work, he’s starred in a number of films and TV series, most notably Shameless, and plays a detective in tense crime drama What Remains What attracted you to the role of Len Harper in what remains?

Coky Giedroyc [the director] offered it to me, but clearly the writing was of a very high standard, a wonderful script, and I couldn’t spot what was going to happen as I read it. There’s a lot of other things, other than a straightforward whodunnit. It’s this whole thing about people who are lonely or left alone or not looked after. People don’t look after each other or mind about each other, particularly in the metropolis, but it could really apply to anywhere I suppose.

I like the fact you can almost see the cogs whirring in Len’s head That’s great, and that’s how Coky presented it to me. It took me a little time to understand that. There’s a certain procedural way of thinking, and I did as much research as I could about the way people are interviewed, and I came to the conclusion that he was more of, as you say, a quiet cog-turner, rather than a good cop, bad cop aggressive kind of thing.

The cast isn’t bad either I don’t think there’s a weak spot in the casting. People like Steven Mackintosh, who I’ve admired for a long time and only got to do a couple of scenes with, and Russell Tovey. Wherever you point your finger... “Oh they’re good, they’re good, they’re good.” They’re all fantastic. Interestingly, being the detective, I only got to do one scene with certain people.

How are you finding life after Shameless? Well, very good, if I’m doing things like What Remains. A while ago I finished playing Tommy Cooper for ITV, which I guess will be out some time in the new year. And I’m doing a film at the moment called Black Sea, with [director] Kevin MacDonald, which again will probably be out next year, so it’s nice and varied.

What are your thoughts on William H Macy in the US version of Shameless? I met Bill when I was out there [America], and we talked about it. He’s a lovely guy and I went on the set and met people. I watched an episode or two of the original series, and you could clearly see they were going to go their own way, as they should, and I think he felt the same. He saw a bit of ours and felt, ‘I’m just gonna do my own thing’, which is absolutely as it should be. I have nothing but high praise for what is a fine actor, but I haven’t seen it beyond those couple of episodes. Maybe one day I’ll sit down and look at the American shows, but the fact it’s taken quite a chunk – the last 10 years – of my life is not something I’m ready to get into. I don’t want to dismiss it, because I loved doing it and directing as well, but I do want to move on and do other stuff.

Tell us about your role as Tommy Cooper in that ITV drama It’s his story from 1967 to the night he died, and I guess the back story of what he was doing publicly and some of his private life. What’s nice about it is it’s a period piece, and it nods to the people of a certain age who knew Tommy Cooper and either really liked him or worshipped him because he was a completely special one-off.

What Remains is on DVD by Acorn Media WCL-E01-S2

SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 7


People Eva Jones

Little has been written about a brave, unsung group of Second World War artists who performed duties as firemen during the Blitz and after.

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A new book by writer, researcher and lecturer Anthony Kelly is the first fully illustrated history to introduce the work and life of these artists in a context in which they can be easily understood and appreciated. The Firemen Artist group was highly acclaimed in Britain and in North America during the Second World War but has been largely forgotten ever since. Recent graduates from the finest art schools, professional illustrators and talented amateurs – all were volunteers in the Auxiliary Fire Service and found themselves on the frontline during the Blitz, and they painted their extraordinary experiences, then went on to organise their own exhibitions. Their inspiring story is told in a new book by local author Anthony Kelly, Firemen Artists 1940-45: Heroes with Grimy Faces, a reference to Winston Churchill’s description of the AFS. A former university lecturer, he has an MA and PhD in history of art from UCL. Based on original research, the book shows many paintings not seen since 1945. Although naval bases like Plymouth were heavily bombed during the war, London became the main target and this was reflected in the early Firemen Artist exhibitions. However, the Baedeker raids of 1942 were directed at cathedral cities like Exeter and Bath, which inspired paintings by one of the most talented artists in the group, Leonard

Rosoman, who was later elected to the Royal Academy. He must have wasted no time when he heard of the Exeter Blitz, because he exhibited five watercolours of the city in the Fireman Artist exhibition at the Royal Academy only a few months later, in August 1942. He normally worked in oil, so may have chosen watercolour for more rapid execution. As well as the cathedral, he painted Choristers’ School seen from the Abbot’s Lodge, and both the interior and exterior of St Catherine’s Chapel. Another picture has the enigmatic title Burnt Paper and Charred Beam, Exeter, suggesting that Rosoman may have seen a bombed library or archive. They were all for sale at £20 each (about two month’s wages) but their locations today are unknown. One of the author’s motives in writing Firemen Artists has been to try to track down more of the paintings. All that we have today is a black and white photograph of Exeter Cathedral and Cathedral Close from a book published in 1943, showing what became known as “the great crater”. An impressive painting set in Devon is CJ Pearce’s Crashed Aeroplane, Devon 1943, now in the Imperial War Museum, but displayed in Exeter’s Guildhall last year as part of an exhibition to mark the 70th anniversary of the Exeter Blitz. All that is known about Pearce is that he was a fireman artist based in Devon.

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Understandably, most paintings by this group are set in towns and cities, which was where most fires had to be dealt with. Pearce succeeds in combining a painting of the local landscape with a detailed record of firemen at work in difficult terrain. The crashed aircraft in Pearce’s picture is only indicated by smoke and fire on the horizon. This contrasts with the crashed aircraft shown in dramatic close-up in a painting by FTW Cook, entitled Beaufighter 1. The location is not given, but a Polish night fighter squadron equipped with Beaufighters was based at Exeter airfield, and provided the only effective retaliation when the city was bombed in 1942, shooting down four of the German bombers. While serving as a fireman, Cook exhibited many highly atmospheric paintings of burntout buildings in the London Blitz. When he left the AFS after the war, he moved to Cornwall, which offered more tranquil subjects. Yet whenever he passed through Plymouth, bombdamaged buildings must have reminded him of his wartime firefighting experiences. This is shown in Aftermath: Prudential Building, Plymouth, painted in 1951. It had already been announced in December 1950 that this wellknown landmark was to be demolished to make way for a road. The painting includes a group of workmen with a mechanical digger, showing that de-

molition work has already started. The building dated from 1904, and had been badly damaged by incendiaries in 1941. But attempts to build an air-raid shelter in the basement are said to have shown that the walls were as hard as Dartmoor granite. Firemen had fought to save it, but “progress” meant that it had to be knocked down. At least the city council partially restored the nearby Charles Church, and established it as a war memorial to Plymouth’s 1,200 civilian casualties caused by bombing, which included firemen, some of whom came from Newquay and Exeter. The painting is now in the Imperial War Museum. Firemen Artists contains over 180 illustrations, many in colour. Starting with the development of the AFS as an organisation and the qualities of the artists who joined it, the book follows the evolution of an independent group who combined art with frontline fire fighting. The AFS also recruited the first women in the fire service, some of whom were also artists. Among the remarkable achievements of this group described in the book are two touring exhibitions in North America. These were a spectacular success in terms of propaganda at a time when the USA was neutral, and give fascinating insights into Anglo-American relations. The book shows the remarkable energy and initiative displayed by these firemen artists,

who produced not just paintings and drawings, but also illustrations, book covers, advertisements and humorous drawings. They sold paintings to supplement their wages, but also to support the firemen’s charity in aid of widows and orphans, as well as injured comrades. They can be said to embody all that was best about the spirit of Britain in wartime.

Firemen Artists 1940–45 by Anthony Kelly, is published by Halsgrove, priced £14.99

Competition The Western Daily Press has five copies of Firemen Artists 1940-45 to give away. To be in with a chance of winning one, simply answer this question: in what year were the Baedeker raids? Send your answer on a postcard, together with your name, address and telephone number, and an email address if you have one, to: Firemen Artists Competition, Andy Vallis, Western Daily Press, Temple Way, Bristol BS99 7HD, or email your answer and contact details to andy.vallis@b-nm.co.uk The closing date is noon on Tuesday, October 22. The winners will be selected at random after this date. The normal Western Daily Press terms and conditions apply.

West Country voices heard this week Alan Power Alan Power, head gardener at Stourhead, in Wiltshire, has just returned from a summer on his motorbike, touring the gardens of the United Kingdom. Alan works for the National Trust but the views expressed in this column for West Country Life magazine are his own. Stourhead is a 1,072-hectare estate at the source of the River Stour near Mere. The estate includes a Palladian mansion, the village of Stourton, gardens, farmland, and woodland I covered 7,000 miles on my motorbike this summer. It’s ten years since I started at Stourhead so it seemed like a time to indulge myself in the gardens of the south of England and the South West. I love riding – it’s a more intimate relationship with your surroundings than in a car, you’re more immersed. You can shout “romantic” or whatever but the smell of wild garlic when riding through Wales was magical.

There are so many highlights of my trip. But the one that stands out would have to be the return to Marks Hall, the garden in Essex where I started out aged 18 or 19. I must have planted 3,000 trees back then and it felt like a punishment – I had blisters on my hands from so many long days.

You have to be broken in as a gardener. But returning to where it all started after 24 years was a very moving experience. I was blown away and had quite a few emotional moments. I really got a true understanding of why the curator wanted all those trees planted. The same curator, Jonathan, was still there so I gave it a sense of continuity.

Gardens tickle every sense. It’s all there, down to touching a tree as you walk past. Autumn is one of the best times – and it was perfect to get back to Stourhead last week – the season is so exciting because it’s so unpredictable. Every year is different, and so is every part of the estate.

Head gardener can be a strange job. You give yourself entirely to the garden but get the most amazing sense of contentment from the place. It was great to meet other head gardeners who feel the same thing. I don’t mind one bit giving my life to Stourhead.

My tour also took me home to Ireland. One of the gardens there, Dereen, was really moving – the mountains in the background made the whole place incredibly romantic – you walk there and feel like you’re the first to visit for 40 years.

Getting youngsters outside is vital. On Saturday mornings I have to tell my youngest to get dressed before he goes outside. He loves the outdoors – and especially bonfires. A bit of pruning and then burn the cuttings and he’s happy.

Gardening is much more accessible now. The National Trust and others are doing a grand job getting youngsters involved but the outdoors is more important; gardening is just one part to choose if you teach them to love nature.

Ash dieback is scary.

The Luftwaffe bombing raids on the West Country, targeting towns like Bath, above, prompted some firemen to record their impressions of the effects of those enemy raids. Main picture left: Leonard Rosoman, who was later elected to the Royal Academy, created this vision of Exeter under attack. Right: an impressive painting set in Devon is CJ Pearce’s Crashed Aeroplane. Inset: FTW Cook’s piece, entitled Beaufighter 1 and Aftermath: Prudential Building, Plymouth, painted in 1951

I often pause at a tree, hoping that it’s not the next one to go. It’s complicated, but sourcing locally is one answer and that’s what we do. It’s been a torrid time, what with that and sudden oak death. It’s a price we pay – you can order anything from Amazon and it can come from anywhere. Plants are no different. WCL-E01-S2

SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 9


People Tristan Cork

For his sixth birthday treat, Luke Brown’s parents – for some reason or another – decided it would be nice to take their boy to a butterfly house. That visit changed his life as a child and continues to shape it today. The young Luke met Clive Farrell, the man who was the first to come up with the idea of a walk-through butterfly house. He took the time to talk to Luke and was encouraged by the young lad’s awe and enthusiasm. As the Brown family left, he gave Luke several pinned butterflies and a chrysalis. Six-year-olds are, of course, prone to loving a different new thing every week, but the chrysalis ended up sealing the deal with Luke. He put it in the airing cupboard at home in north Wiltshire, and half-forgot about it until one morning a few days later he was woken by his mother’s piercing scream. “She was literally screaming the house down. I went to see, and there, on the doorframe of the airing cupboard was the biggest moth you’ve ever seen,” he said. “It was literally a foot wide. It was an Atlas Moth and it was just incredible. From that moment, that was me, hooked.” Butterflies and moths became his hobby throughout childhood, and at the age of 17 a local businessman who had a horticulture firm and a garden centre, Jeremy Addington, let Luke set up his own walk-in butterfly house in a corner of the garden centre. “I had a regular job, but I used to go there every morning before work to maintain it, and then at night after work. I dreamed of butterflies being my full-time job.” Then, another, larger garden centre in Wroughton, near Swindon, offered him the chance of a full-time job setting up and running a butterfly house. He loved it, settled down, married, got a mortgage and was living that childhood dream. In early 2007, one phone call changed his life again. “Someone from the Natural History Museum in London called, and said they were setting up a one-off, temporary butterfly house in the garden in front of the museum. They said they had been given my name by someone, I still don’t know who, and was I interested?” he said. “Then I had a choice. My employers weren’t happy at the prospect so I had to choose between leaving and taking up the offer, or staying. I had a mortgage and stuff, so it was a big decision. The offer was effectively a six month contract and then be unemployed. “I just thought it was too good an opportunity. I knew I had to do it, it’s such an iconic building,” he added. The butterfly house was a huge success in 2008. The Natural History Museum were so impressed they asked Luke back the following year, and for the next two years. They had a break in 2012 but this year it returned once again. “It’s been such a great thing. It’s meant I’ve met my absolute hero, David Attenborough, and now I’ve met him many times. I’ve shown around Prime Minister’s sons and princes and it’s just great to be there, showing people around. There’s nothing like it, seeing people’s faces light up when they walk in. There’s something magical about a tropical butterfly house,” he added. Away from the Natural History Museum, Luke threw himself into being a freelance butterfly expert, and this is now his life’s work. He’s the Butterfly Gardener, and on Twitter he’s the ‘Butterfly Bloke’. He’s the go-

to-guy for butterflies. This ranges from TV companies, pop video producers or advert makers who need butterflies to the rich and maybe not so rich people who want to have their own butterfly house, or even just regular folk who want to make their garden more butterfly friendly. “It’s great to help people create new butterfly houses, we do everything from set-up to ongoing maintenance. I could look at a space in a building and know exactly what needs to happen to create a tropical butterfly house environment. It’s all about what plants you have, the temperature, humidity, heat and light balance. It’s about recreating exactly the environment where they will reproduce, so you have a self-sustaining butterfly house. “Often, we’ll have people who call us for the first time when they’ve done it themselves and it’s gone wrong after a year, and they need us to come in and make it work. That’s frustrating sometimes, because we’re like: ‘ah, you should have called us in before you started!’ “But I know exactly why people want to create something for themselves. If you’re a Premiership footballer or a high-flying businessman or something, there is nothing so relaxing as sitting down with a glass of wine at the end of the day in a lovely warm place with beautiful, colourful butterflies flitting around. It’s just relaxation for the soul.” Taking that risk six years ago has taken his career to the next level – and now things are going global. Next year, he’ll be setting up a butterfly house for a millionaire in Kuwait. “The scale of it is amazing. I think when it’s done it’ll be the biggest butterfly house in the world. It’s just such a privilege to be involved in something like that. It’s just on the most colossal scale, it’d be a butterfly garden on a humungous scale. “We’re also trying to give something back. We’ve kind of adopted this guy in Laos who is trying to set up a butterfly house in his backyard. He’s called Doua and he earns a living as a tour guide and there are amazing butterflies living there. He’s set up a rudimentary net, but we’ve sent him some equipment to get started. It’d be great to go over there and see what he’s up to,” added Luke. And finally, one more project is high on Luke’s dream list: his own butterfly house. “It’s still in development stages, but it also could open next year, somewhere on the south coast. I’m working with a silent partner, and it’d be a stand-alone visitor attraction, and it’s something I’ve always wanted to do, to have my own butterfly house,” he added.

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Luke Brown’s top six butterflies 1 – Helaconis Cheratonia: the zebra butterfly When I was eight, it was the first tropical butterfly I was able to hatch out. They are amazing, an incredible butterfly. They are perfect in a butterfly house because they are quite big and they are very visible and they never stop, they flit around all the time, like a butterfly on acid. 2 – Papilio Machaon: The English Swallowtail It’s sometimes known as the Norfolk Swallowtail and it’s the biggest native butterfly in Britain and one of the rarest. It’s also the only native species I’ve never seen in the wild, so I’m going to have to go on holiday to the Broads and try to find it. It’s just stunning. 3 – Hypolimnas bolina: the great egg fly butterfly It’s not very exciting to start with, it’s just black with four white spots, but when it moves, suddenly around the spots you see this amazing vivid blue. All you’re seeing is the refraction of light. This is exactly what they study in the automotive industry to make those cars that are iridescent when they drive past you and change colour. The military also study these butterflies. 4 – Attacus Atlas: The Atlas Moth They are unbelievably big. They are bigger than a dinner plate. They are rubbish at flying, they’ve got no mouth, they just starve to death but they can sense the opposite sex from miles away. 5 – Greta Oto: the glass-winged butterfly For butterflies they are unique, amazing. They have a completely different kind of wing to any other butterfly. There are no scales on it, which give it the colour, so they are the see-through butterfly. If you get a few, maybe ten or 15, in a butterfly house, it’s not that good because you can never see them, but if you get a whole stack of them then it’s just incredible, they are like fairies dancing around you. 6 – Vanessa Cardui: Painted Lady In America they go on about how amazing the Monarch butterfly is, which migrates up into the US every year, but the Painted Lady beats that. Each year, they start off in the Atlas Mountains in north Africa, and then set off when it gets too hot. They fly up through Spain, through France and then reach us here in southern England. It might be the second or third generation of the ones that originally left, and they’ve stopped off in Europe to breed and their children have continued the migration, although they have tracked the same butterfly doing the whole trip. They stay here for the summer, and then disappear. Until recently no one knew where they went, did they go back to north Africa? If not, how does the population replenish itself in north Africa? Then they tracked them and found that, to fly back, they go straight up in the air from England and catch the trade winds south. They fly at 2,000ft up, whereas they fly at low level on the way here. That’s why no one sees them return. Amazing. WCL-E01-S2

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People Lucy Parford

An historic home is returning to its heyday by throwing open its doors as a wedding and events venue. Elmore Court, near Quedgeley, has undergone a multi-million pound renovation and will be open to the public for the first time next month as a new wedding and events venue. The new building has been constructed from earth and timber taken from the estate itself with a state-of-the-art sound system, dance floor, DJ booth and built-in bar, as well as a dramatic new ballroom, The Gillyflower, built out of “rammed earth” with a flat meadow roof. As well as The Gillyflower, the entertaining and banqueting spaces within the main house have also been refurbished, along with eight bedrooms which will be available to guests and private house parties. The 1,000-acre estate with views over the Cotswolds and River Severn has been in the Guise family for more than 750 years. Behind the project is Anselm Guise, who founded the Glade dance music festival, and inherited the property from his uncle in 2007. Anselm and his wife Sarah, who were living in London, appeared on Channel 4’s Country House Rescue when it was suggested they turn Elmore Court into a cookery school. However, the family has decided to go back to the roots of the estate as the Guise family’s party house, throwing it open to private functions such as weddings, launches and corporate events. “It’s very exciting, it’s looking amazing,” says Anselm, who has two young children, Wylder and Lyra. “The house was run very differently, it wasn’t too bad in terms of the state of the house – the structure was good but a lot of painting hadn’t been done and there was a lot of ’70s decor. “Some of the curtains were rotten but a lot of the old furniture was in very good nick and some needed to be restored.” The ground floor and main bedrooms on the first floor have now been fully refurbished, using a combination of contemporary and classic colour schemes and furnishings by Zoffany and Lewis & Wood in North Woodchester. The master bridal suite has a Caesar-sized, 8ft-wide, bed and oak panelling. A further seven en suite bedrooms are full of interesting features such as a 1636 four poster bed and a William Holland copper roll top bath in the Oak Room. The largest bedroom, the Porch Room, features a 12ft-wide “extreme ultra king” bed with hand-carved estate oak bedhead. Within the house the entertaining space includes four distinctive reception rooms; The Dining Room, The Main Hall, with restored Teniers tapestries, The Drawing Room and The Morning Room. Anselm and his family have not been living at the house with all the building work being carried out but hope to return in the future. “When we had our first son we had a flood in the house, there was quite a lot of building work going on and it was pretty hard,” Anselm admits. “We had another baby in October last year – she’s about to be one – and we decided with the building work that we’d rent a cottage near Nailsworth. We plan to move back and we’ve kept an area of the house for us to live in. “The house is really big and has got a lot of very thick walls. There are also other options such as a coach house at the back which we could restore.” WCL-E01-S2

Anselm’s parents live in nearby Kingscote, his aunt still lives in the village and his sister, Ruth, lives nearby in Horsley. When the siblings were growing up the family lived in London and later Wiltshire. “When I was very little I used to come here for long stays,” Anselm says. “If I had been brought up here it would be much more emotional to make the changes that need to be made. I still get caught up with a few things that I can’t possibly change.” Anselm fondly remembers Christmases and celebrations at his uncle’s house. “It has always struck me that when the house hasn’t got many people in it, it doesn’t feel right. It has been designed for parties, gatherings and social events. “I’ve always worried about how to do that because it’s very quiet here. I thought we couldn’t do events but now we’re created a soundproofed permanent ‘marquee’ it means we can. I like the fact we’ve got this oldfashioned theme running through with the history of the house and the fact it’s been here for 750 years, combined with a very contemporary building.” Elmore Court has a license to hold civil ceremonies in the Main Hall or church services can be arranged in the nearby village church. It can cater for 200 people for dinner dances, more for cocktails in The Gillyflower or 40 for private dinners in the main house. Visit www.elmorecourt.com

Elmore Court, in Gloucestershire, will soon be open to the public as a place for a grand party. Owner Anselm Guise inherited the home from his uncle and was once advised to turn it into a cookery school

SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 11


Food Chris Rundle

Do you remember the bad old days before you could get proper ice cream? When all we had to eat were blocks of artificially coloured vegetable fat? Can you bring to mind the days when the only options offered to us by Messrs Walls and Lyons – then the only players in the game – were blocks of slightly slimy vanilla which had to be unwrapped before being inserted either into a square-shaped “cone” or placed between two wafers? Or which – for a real treat – came enrobed in a thin layer of chocolate inside a foil wrapper? Only our sea front ice cream parlour, run by an Italian family who made their own, real ice cream down in the basement, provided any relief from these depressingly limited choices but when the owners shut up shop for the winter roughly midway through October, never to reopen before Easter, that was all we were left with. But what I want to take you back to is the hideous creation that was presented and sold as ‘Neapolitan’ ice cream, a supposedly exotic combination of vanilla, strawberry, and a strange green layer at the end, which I was sent down to Emrys Jones’ sweet shop to buy clandestinely (in defiance of the Sunday trading laws – he always ushered me out of the back door while looking nervously up and down the street) just before lunch on the Sabbath. Well the vanilla was fine, if you liked that sort of thing; the strawberry ok if you liked that sort of thing coloured pink and with a hint of fruit flavour. But the green bit at the end was an abomination. Classically it would have had the delicate, nutty flavour of pistachios, but pistachios just weren’t to be had so the makers resorted rather cruelly to doping it with almond essence, which I never have enjoyed and never will. In vain, did I ask for the green bit to be removed from the piece of the two-shilling ice cream block that was sliced off for me. In vain did I protest that I really didn’t like it. Such considerations were of no account, I was told. I should be grateful there was ice cream available at all. Particularly on a Sunday. So eat it. Things, you see, weren’t necessarily better years ago. Certainly not the ice cream. Certainly not the manufacturers’ attempts to replicate the green hue pistachios would have added because they, uniquely among nuts, are green all the way through, thanks to the presence of chlorophyll. Pistachios are something else for which we have to thank the Romans, who brought them from Asia to Europe in the first century AD. They’re ripe and ready to eat when the shells start to gape open at one end – a condition referred to as khandan, or laughing, in Iran. The nuts are widely cultivated now in California and Australia but remain among the most expensive of all nuts, generally costing three to four times as much as peanuts.

But you can’t make a yummy cake with peanuts; peanuts won’t yield delicious cheesy crisps when mixed with Parmesan; and peanuts won’t impart attractive flecks of green to paté or brawn. So just for once, indulge yourself.

Pistachio Cake Ingredients 110g shelled pistachios, 150g plain flour, two teaspoons baking powder, one teaspoon ground cardamom, quarter teaspoon salt, 120ml full-cream milk, quarter teaspoon vanilla extract, 100g unsalted butter, softened, 200g sugar, three large eggs, finely-grated zest from three medium oranges.

Method

Preheat the oven to 180C, gas mark 4, and butter and line a nine-inch diameter cake tin. Pulse the pistachios in a food processor until finely ground, and add the flour, baking powder, cardamom, and salt and pulse briefly to combine. In a small bowl, combine milk and vanilla and in a separate bowl beat together the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add the eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Reduce beating speed to low and add pistachio and milk mixtures alternately in batches, beginning and ending with pistachio mixture and beating after each addition just until combined. Add the orange zest and beat in. Spread the mix evenly in the tin and bake for 30 to 40 minutes – until a wooden skewer inserted in the centre of the cake comes out clean. Cool in the pan for ten minutes then invert on to a wire rack. Serve warm or at room temperature with vanilla ice cream or whipped cream.

Pistachio and Parmesan Crisps Ingredients 150g freshly grated Parmesan, 25g shelled pistachios, 30g flour.

Method

Place the pistachios in a food blender and whizz for about 15 seconds or until finely ground. Place in a bowl, add the cheese and flour and mix well. Heat a non-stick pan over a moderate flame, take heaped teaspoons of the mix and place around the pan, using a palate knife to press them down into discs. Cook for one minute on each side and place on a wire rack to cool.

Brawn with pistachios Ingredients Half a pig’s head, a pig’s trotter, two onions, two large carrots, two whole cloves of garlic, two sticks of celery, bouquet garni of thyme, parsley and bay leaf, 250ml cider, water, 50g whole pistachios, lightly toasted, double handful of fresh chopped parsley, sea salt, freshly ground black pepper.

Method

Chris Rundle has taken his childhood Neapolitan phobia and turned it in to a positive passion for pistachio recipes

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Have your butcher roughly chop the pig’s head and split the trotter. Place in a large pan with the roughly chopped vegetables, the bouquet garni and the cider and enough cold water to cover. Bring to the boil and skim off any impurities which rise to the surface then lower the heat, cover and simmer gently for two hours. Remove the meat from the pan with a slotted spoon and transfer to a chopping board, strain the cooking liquid into a clean pan and boil briskly until reduced by half. Pull the meat off the bones and chop fairly coarsely. Place in a bowl and mix in the parsley, the pistachios and enough of the cooking liquid to make a fairly sloppy consistency. Pour into two loaf tins until about half an inch from the top, banging them on a hard surface and smoothing the top down with a palette knife to remove any air pockets. Top up with more of the cooking liquid, allow to cool completely, cover with cling film and refrigerate overnight. To serve, immerse the tin briefly in hot water then invert onto a board. Cut the brawn into thick slices and serve with a shallot vinaigrette and crusty bread. WCL-E01-S2


Eating out Helen Blow

You really can’t beat good French regional cuisine – perfectly tasteful, in every sense.

SUSTAINABLE EATING Amanda Heron with produce from Bioaquafarm, in Wedmore, Somerset. Run by Amanda and her partner Antonio Paladino, they aim to champion sustainable fish and veg on their zero waste farm, the first of its kind in the country PICTURE: FRAN STOTHARD PICTURE: FRAN STOTHARD

So it was a good day for Cheltenham foodies when French chef Yves Ogrodzki decided to move his restaurant from Leicestershire to Gloucestershire. Together with his wife, Elisabeth, he has opened L’Artisan in the heart of the town, where it has been an immediate success. Yves serves genuine regional French cuisine, using fresh ingredients sourced either locally or from across the Channel. The intimate restaurant is small but perfectly formed, with a kitchen behind a screen at the back from where Yves’ works of food art appear as if by magic. Originally from Provence, Elisabeth and Yves arrived in the UK a decade ago, wanting to give their children the chance to become bilingual and experience other cultures. After running restaurants in Paris and Nimes, their first British venture was in Leicestershire, where the couple won a dedicated and loyal following for their food and warm welcome. “Now our children are older we wanted to move into a town where there is a bit more happening for them and for us,” Elisabeth told me during our meal. “We visited the town and loved it, it is so beautiful and just the right kind of place for us to be happy in.” And while the couple are passionate about fine food, they want to banish the idea that just because it is good, doesn’t mean it has to be expensive and formal. The atmosphere in L’Artisan is intimate because of its size but also relaxed and friendly. When we arrived on a Saturday evening, it was already almost full, with a lively buzz and tempting aromas coming from the kitchen. Yves also believes the dishes should both taste and look good and, if our experience was anything to go by, he has achieved both aims with distinction. After ordering, we were treated to an amuse-bouche of parsnip puree and hazelnut with salmon, beautifully presented on a ceramic spoon, along with homemade nutty bread and spiced butter. My starter was a delicate filo pastry parcel filled with French garlic sausage and Reblochon cheese (£5.95). Although just a mouthful, the flavours were exquisite and it was just the right size to pique my tastebuds for more to come. My husband’s choice – a risotto with a confit of duck and brie (£6.95) – worked well with the different flavours, with the strong taste of the meat and subtlety of the risotto. Just like any provincial French restaurant, you are not rushed through your courses at L’Artisan, allowing for your appetite to return before the next dish arrives. Although I rarely order chicken in a restaurant as I eat a lot of it at home, I was tempted by the chicken with a Roquefort sauce (£13.95) as I’d had a similar sauce before in Spain with steak and loved it. Yves’ version was more subtle than the previous experience, and probably worked better with the more delicate flavour of the chicken. French farm rabbits are obviously a lot bigger than any rabbit I have seen as my husband’s main course choice of rabbit leg with wholegrain mustard cream sauce (£15.95) was about the same size as my chicken breast and had a delicious, slightly gamey flavour. Accompanying vegetables were imaginative, with a carrot puree and ratatouille, with potatoes in a creamy, cheesy wedge. The only criticism of the entire meal was the

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bowl of French fries our waiter suggested we share. I can’t be sure, but they didn’t taste homemade and were hard and a little on the lukewarm side. I’m not sure why they were recommended as we were perfectly content with our accompanying vegetables. A shared pudding was a freshly-made chocolate fondant with vanilla ice cream (£6.95). We had to wait 10 minutes for it to bake but it was worth every second. The chocolate oozed out of the centre like molten lava and it was just the right sweetness to round off a pretty much perfect meal. After our experience, I have no doubt that Elisabeth and Yves will have no problem wooing Cheltenham diners with their superior cooking and welcoming atmosphere. L’Artisan is a winner all round.

Venue 30, Clarence Street, Cheltenham Contact 01242 571257 Price range Starters from £5.95, mains from £10.95, desserts from £5.95

French chef Yves Ogrodzki, pictured above, has recently opened his restaurant L’Artisan in the centre of Cheltenham – offering a range of honest and attractive regional French dishes

SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 13


Food Andy Welch

Whether it’s colleagues bringing in home-made treats or Mary Berry on TV – baking is in. The British have always loved a piece of cake, while bread is one of our most-eaten foods, with around 12 million loaves being sold in the UK every day. More than five million viewers regularly tune in to watch The Great British Bake Off since it arrived in a puff of icing sugar in 2010. We’re copying what we’re watching, too. Waitrose recently reported that Bake Off had been “whipping up demand” for baking products such as butter, sugar and flour, following an episode which saw contestants tasked with baking biscuits. With National Baking Week next week, it’s the perfect time to join the cake party, if you haven’t already. The idea is to organise a bake sale in your workplace, college or school to help raise money for Great Ormond Street Hospital Charity. “Home baking had a resurgence with the recession,” says Rich Amon who, along with Eddie Lebeau, make up the Tattooed Bakers. The duo are taking part in an elaborate pop-up shop in London to mark National Baking Week, helping to create a 100 per cent edible “Baketopia” – an idea cooked up by Miss Cakehead, famed for her creative, outlandish works of baked art. Lebeau adds that baking can be less daunting for aspiring home cooks due to the scientific nature of the recipes. “If you’re not confident, it’s good knowing there’s an accurate way to follow a recipe, and knowing someone has done the hard work for you and written down all the measurements,” she says. Here is one recipe, devised by Bake Off’s 2012 winner John Whaite for National Baking Week, to get you started.

Brioche galette Ingredients for eight to ten 250g white bread flour; 5g salt; 7g sachet fast action yeast; 30g caster sugar; 150g egg (about three); 20ml milk

Why not have a go at baking John Whaite’s brioche galette as part of National Baking Week, to raise money for Great Ormond Street Hospital Charity?

Comfort food Rosa Mashiter

the top of the list as I almost consider it as my Asian comfort food. I really enjoy making my own curry, and feel it is almost a salute to the time I spent in India and Pakistan which was very exciting to a 21-year-old.

You may well not be aware that the first British curry house opened in London in 1810, but you should know that this week is National Curry Week (to link in with World Food Day which is on October 16). Therefore being a great lover of curry and the cooking thereof, I felt compelled to let you know that we have over 10,000 curry houses in the UK which gives some idea of the popularity of food from Asia. I, personally, always think of curry in relation to the Indian subcontinent, I suppose because I lived there for four years and it was there that I was introduced to the wonders and variety of this delicious cuisine. Dishes from this part of the world vary considerably from region to region. In India you would find dishes from the South very rich and highly spiced, and in the North you would find the use of ghee (clarified butter) and yoghurt in lots of dishes. I suppose if someone asked me to name my favourite food, curry would certainly be near

Murghi korma (chicken korma) Ingredients for four 1tspn poppy seeds; eight small fresh chicken thighs; four medium onions; three cloves garlic; 2.5cm piece root ginger; 2tblspns dessicated coconut; two green chillies; ½tspn turmeric; 1tspn ground coriander; 3tblspns oil; two cloves; two black cardamoms; 4tblspns natural yoghurt; 450ml chicken stock; 1tbspn lemon juice

Method

Soak the poppy seeds in a little hot water and leave to stand for ten minutes, drain well. Peel and thinly slice two of the onions. Peel and roughly chop the remaining onions and put into a food processor, or blender and process until the onions are pureed. Peel and roughly chop the garlic and root ginger. Roughly chop the chillies. Put the prepared garlic, ginger and chillies into the food processor together with the

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For the creme patissiere: 125g butter; 250ml milk; 1tspn vanilla bean paste or extract; three large egg yolks; 75g caster sugar; 30g cornflour

For the fruit topping:

One large apple, Braeburn or Cox are best; 1015 large blackberries; one egg, beaten to glaze; 6tblspns apricot jam; icing sugar to dust

Foodie treat with Mark Taylor

Method

First, make the brioche dough. Place the flour and salt into a bowl and blend together. If you have an electric or stand mixer, use the dough hook. Then add the yeast and caster sugar and blend that through too. Beat the eggs with 20ml of the milk, and add to the bowl. Knead for at least 15 minutes until the dough is extremely stretchy. Slowly add the butter, piece by piece, still mixing. It should take around five minutes to incorporate the butter. When done, carry on mixing until the dough is smooth, silky and very stretchy. Place the dough on to a baking tray, and wrap tightly with cling film. Place into the fridge overnight, or for at least 12 hours. To make the creme patissiere, place the rest of the milk and vanilla into a medium saucepan over a medium heat. Allow to come to the boil. As the milk heats, quickly whisk together the egg yolks and sugar until the sugar dissolves, then whisk in the cornflour. Pour half of the boiling milk on to the egg mixture and whisk immediately and rapidly. Then pour this back into the pan with the remaining half of the milk and place back onto the heat, whisking constantly until the mixture comes to the boil and becomes very thick. When thick enough to coat the back of a wooden spoon – removing the pan from the heat to test – scrape the creme patissiere on to a large plate and immediately cover with cling film. Allow to cool completely and refrigerate until needed. When the brioche dough has rested overnight, flour the worktop and then roll out into a large disk of about 10in in diameter. Remove the creme patissiere from the fridge and with a wooden spoon knock it back, beating it to a smooth custard. Spread or pipe the beaten creme patissiere on to the brioche disk, leaving a good inch around the edge. Peel, core and quarter the apple, then slice it very finely, using a mandolin if you have one. Place this on to the creme patissiere in a spiral pattern then halve the blackberries and dot them around. Gently crimp the edges of the brioche by pulling a little outwards, then sticking it to the edge on the left, continuing the process all the way round. Preheat the oven to 200C. Meanwhile, allow the brioche pizza to rest until the edges have puffed up and almost doubled in size. Egg-wash the edges and bake in the preheated oven for 25-30 minutes, or until the exposed brioche is a deep golden colour. Heat the apricot jam with three tablespoons of water, pass through a sieve then use to glaze the hot, freshly baked brioche. Cool, then finish with a dusting of icing sugar.

coconut, poppy seeds, turmeric and ground coriander and process until the mixture is smooth and paste like. Heat the oil in a sauté pan (or saucepan) and add the cloves and cardamoms, followed by a good seasoning of salt and freshly ground black pepper and stir fry for a couple of minutes before adding the sliced onions and continue frying, stirring all the time, until the onions are a golden brown. Stir in the paste from the food processor, mixing well and cook for a further three minutes. Add the chicken thighs and the yogurt and continue cooking, over a medium heat until all the ingredients are well blended. Add the chicken stock and bring to the boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for one hour, until the sauce has thickened and the chicken is cooked. Stir in the lemon juice and serve with fluffy boiled rice.

On the edge of the Cotswolds and a short drive from Bristol, The Horse & Groom in Charlton, Malmesbury, reopened its doors during the summer with a new celebrity chef owner. It’s the fifth pub under Marco Pierre White’s Wheeler’s of St James’s brand and the village inn is being managed by White’s eldest daughter, Letty. A traditional country pub with five en-suite rooms, The Horse & Groom has undergone an intensive “Marco makeover”, enhancing the pub’s original features whilst creating a variety of eating and drinking areas to suit every occasion, whether it’s a lunchtime pint and bar snack or an evening meal with the family. Head chef Johnny Forbes has worked closely with the celebrity chef owner and he says he will be delivering the exceptional standard and consistency you’d expect from a Marco establishment. The a la carte menu is packed with pub classics including Marco’s famous Governor steak and ale pie, fish and chips and Wheeler’s of St James’s fish pie. The bar menu serves main boards at £8.50 and the steak night menu is available on Sunday and Monday evenings between 6pm and 9pm. One of the most popular main courses on the menu at The Horse & Groom is this slowcooked glazed pork belly, served with butter beans and roasting juices. www.horseandgroomcharlton.com

Honey-glazed pork ‘Marco Polo’ with butter beans and roasting juices Ingredients for ten One medium-sized piece of pork belly; 250ml honey; eight star anise; 2tblspns coriander seeds; sea salt; 800g butter beans (in brine); 250ml chicken stock

Method

Take the pork belly, leaving the ribs in, and score the skin with a sharp knife. Season the skin generously – this will help it to crackle. Place the belly in a large roasting tray on a trivet or rack and roast on 180 degrees until you have lovely soft pork with luscious crisp crackling. This takes around four hours. While this is in the oven, gently warm 250ml of honey and toast the spices in a dry pan to release the flavours. Mix the warm honey with toasted spices to complete your glaze. Once the pork is ready let it rest for an hour or so in a warm place, then gently warm the butterbeans in chicken stock, a little butter and picked fresh thyme. Divide evenly between serving bowls. Portion the pork belly, removing the ribs, then generously cover with the warm honey glaze. Serve with roasting juices and apple sauce.

Honey-glazed pork ‘Marco Polo’ style WCL-E01-S2


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Absolute Corkers Ned Halley

Watering hole Lord Poulett Arms, Hinton St George A noble local with starry cooking and plenty of quirky features

Tasting and blending the maturing calvados at Père Magloire’s cellars in Pont L’Eveque, Normandy

Normandy, like the West Country, is celebrating a terrific apple harvest this year. I’m pleased for our cousins across the Channel, because elsewhere in France, their counterparts in the wine industry have had a miserable time of it in 2013. More about the tribulations of the new vintage will follow in this space shortly. For the moment let’s welcome the better news for the French cider business, and in particular its distilling sideline, which on Monday launches National Calvados Week. It’s a promotional campaign aimed at making the apple brandy of Normandy a lot better known in Great Britain. Calvados has been made in Normandy, so the story goes, since 1553. It was the year a local squire and dedicated diarist of domestic life, Gilles de Gouberville, recorded that he had successfully distilled a quantity of his own cider. The region had been fermenting its indigenous fruits ever since the first Norsemen settled there six centuries earlier and found the land covered in wild apple trees. The origin of the name Calvados is open to doubt. The likeliest derivation is from the description on 17th-century marine charts of a strip of Norman coastline just south-west of Le Havre as “Calva Dorsa”, which in Latin means bare-topped cliffs. Another, more picturesque story dates the name precisely to 1588, the year of the Spanish Armada. The great invasion fleet sent by Spain against England was, as we all enjoy remembering, utterly confounded by Sir Francis Drake’s navy, assisted by some very wild weather in the Channel. One of the Spanish galleons

washed up on the Normandy shore, was called the El Calvador. Either way, the name of the coastal cliffs or that of the wreck was adopted as Calvados – the Norman pronunciation of the original Spanish name – and became adopted as an informal designation for the region as a whole. The term calvados for the apple brandy has certainly been in use since the 1790s, when the revolutionary government officially adopted the name for the new “department” (administrative area) within Normandy. Most of the base cider is distilled by cooperatives of growers, using continuous stills. The first distillation is then redistilled for purity. To fill one 500-litre barrel with finished spirit, you need to start with seven tons of fruit. Newly distilled calvados is colourless and fiery, emerging from the still at or above 70 degrees proof. It is the process of maturing this raw material in oak casks that produces the richly coloured and mellow finished product. There is a quality hierarchy partly based on the length of time calvados is aged before final blending and bottling, defined by descriptions displayed on the label. Bottles designated as “Fine” or as three-star have been matured in casks for at least two years. “Vieux” or “Réserve” signifies a minimum three years, and “VO” or “VSOP” four. Calvados at the luxury end of the hier-

16 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013

archy, aged at least six years, is variously designated “Extra”, “Hors d’Age”, “XO”, or simply “Very Old”. It’s all governed under the Apellation d’Origine Controlée rules that have defined calvados since the 1940s. Only spirit made in three specified zones can be called calvados at all. If it doesn’t say AOC Calvados, Calvados Pays d’Auge or (rarely) Calvados Domfrontais, it isn’t calvados. Even in National Calvados week, you’ll find only a limited choice of calvados brands on sale in wine merchants and supermarkets. I recommend as an introduction to the style the VSOP Calvados from the largest producer in Normandy, Père Magloire. A finely coloured spirit with bright copper-orange hue and a piquant sweet-apple aroma, it contrives to be both smoothly mellow and crisply ardent in flavour, with a clear apple redolence. Waitrose have the 50cl bottle at £20.50. At Wine Rack, you’ll find Château de Breuil Calvados Fine at £22.99 for 70cl. This is a basic calvados with just the minimum two years’ ageing in oak, but it’s nonetheless silky and warming, with lively, pungent apple fruitiness. To me, one of the particular merits of younger calvados is that the good ones leave you in no doubt that this a spirit made from apples. Aged for very long periods, calvados does become smoother, rounder, more mellow and intense. The great merit of calvados is its distinctive and stimulating apple character. It is very well worth discovering.

First things first. The name Poulett is pronounced “Pawlet”. “Pullet” or “Poolet” will simply not do. In the elegant, sequestered village of Hinton St George, just outside Crewkerne, Somerset, I expect you need to get this sort of thing right. If you want to fit in. My daughter Lydia and I, confident of our pronunciation, certainly felt at home in the pub when we popped in last week. Lydia, briefly visiting from London, likes a fine historic building and a nice lunch, and this place is spot-on in both respects. It’s among the best-looking inns in the West, and is the Somerset Dining Pub of the Year in the 2014 Good Pub Guide. The Pouletts were manorial lords here from about 1400 and built most of the village. An earldom was bestowed on them in 1706 but the title died out a century ago. The pub is a worthy monument to their memory. It’s a fine, plain, Hamstone long-house of the 1600s, probably once a farm, with a dodgy roof and the wonderful interior. Entering from the street, you come into a narrow hall painted a colour Lydia identified as crushed raspberry. To your left is a sublime side room in which one wall is entirely taken up by an original inglenook fireplace so big you can sit inside. The room is furnished with superb English oak tables and chairs, perfectly set off by the ancient flagstone floor. On the other side of the hall in the main bar, the decor, woodwork and furnishings are similarly astounding. The curtains are of crewelwork, the light fittings include Dutch brass chandeliers, the walls are hung with ancient wood carvings. The place is stuffed, like some heavenly antique emporium, with old English oak and elm. The bar is pretty inviting too. On tap from the barrel is a choice of ales including Branoc from the Branscombe brewery and Otter from Otter. The cider is Thatchers Gold, soft drinks include the Orchard range and there is a spiffing wine list with plenty of interesting reds and whites by the glass. I won’t dwell on the lunch we had (though we did) except to offer reassurance that the menu seems very fairly priced – typically £5-£7 for starters and around £15 for mains – given the outstanding quality of the cooking. It was quite busy, but service was friendly, goodhumoured and unflappable. Among the quirks of the pub is a magnificent garden and a curious object in the gents. But I don’t wish to spoil the surprise.

The Lord Poulett Arms, High Street, Hinton St George, near Crewkerne, Somerset TA17 8SE. Tel 01460 73149.

Wine of the Week Finest Teroldego Vigneti delle Dolomiti 2011 Down from £7.99 to £5.99 at Tesco until October 22, is an Italian red wine of a thoroughly distinctive kind. The Terlodego is a black grape variety unknown outside the northernmost vineyards of Italy, where it prospers in the lush valleys at the foot of the Dolomite mountains to produce juicy, redcurrantplump, low-tannin reds of dark colour and long savour. This is the third successful vintage in a row, made for Tesco by the redoubtable Anselmo Martini at the giant Italian wine compay Cavit, a deliciously violet-scented, comfortably weighted and ideally balanced pasta red of unique charm.

The Lord Poulett Arms, in Hinton St George, South Somerset, is attractive both inside and out

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SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 17


Shopping Nilima Marshall

Summer may be over, but don’t let the temperature drop in your work wardrobe. Stylist Kelvin Barron explains how you can adapt your existing closet with a few little tweaks, to embrace this season’s key trends. “Set your own rules and stick to what you’re comfortable with,” Barron advises. “Officewear can be quite regimented, so you need to evolve and create your own sense of style. “You can adapt your existing spring/ summer wardrobe by incorporating layering and adding chic trench coats and tights. And instead of the slouchy T-shirt you wore in spring, swap this for a woolly top.”

Tailor made Tailored clothing doesn’t have to be all about drab suits and plain shirts. Barron suggests bringing some life and personality into officewear. “When buying a suit, opt for vibrant colours to stand out from the crowd. Plain shirts can be given life with print pencil skirts and monochrome trousers.” If you wear standard dark suits and skirts, Barron recommends adding statement accessories to make the look more fresh. To achieve the androgynous look, take it a step further with smart shoes and sharp twopiece. “Androgyny can look powerful in the office,” says Barron. “Think pinstripe blazers with short-sleeved shirts and studded brogues.”

Brighten up Metallics have transcended from spring/ summer to the new season, and Barron is gunning for glints of metal in the office. “A metallic blouse has connotations of being powerful and strong, which is great for an office environment,” he says. If you’re a girly girl at heart and prefer the feminine touch, try softening sharp, structured styles with mellow hues. “Baby blues, mint greens, delicate peaches and soft pinks are colours you will be familiar with from your spring/summer wardrobe, but these can easily adapt for the new season”

Perfect pattern If power suits don’t work for you, it’s time to think beyond the office, and Barron advises looking to your animal instincts for inspiration.

“Animal print is great for an office environment – it screams feisty and hard-working,” he says. “But I would advise muted accessories to keep things serious.” Or, for more sophistication, unleash your wild side through the accents of your outfit. Think serpentine clutches, lizard-scale cuffs and exotic heels. Heritage style prints, stripes and tartans are also key pieces to be stored in the autumn/ winter wardrobe. “Tartan blouses can liven up a pair of fitted black trousers, and for the super confident, try clashing prints,” says Barron. Florals are a great way to embrace femininity and diversify your fashion portfolio. “Floral prints are the ultimate when it comes to looking ‘ladylike’ and are also amazing for the autumn/winter season – think pencil skirts with boxy blouses, statement collars and chic courts,” says Barron.

Cover up “The ultimate necessity this season is a fabulous winter coat, so blow the budget on this and bring variation to the look with colourful scarves, brooches and luxe leather gloves,” says Barron. One of the trends that stood out at the London Fashion Week was a belt-cinched waist; Barron suggests embracing the glamorous, grown-up trend in style. “A skinny belt over your winter coat is the ultimate in office chic – particularly bow belts,” he says. Tuxedo jackets, double-breasted trench coats and cardigans are also great investment pieces that will see you through winter. “Instead of looking at light materials, think of heavier fabrics such as velvets and tweed,” advises Barron.

Work those accessories Be your own boss and don’t be afraid to make a statement with accessories. “An oversized clutch is a must-have,” says Barron. “They’re sleek yet practical and have plenty of storage space. “Also, think of an oversized satchel – this carefree bag is durable yet stylish, and will last for years, through all the wear and tear you put it through during winter.” Don’t be afraid of bringing jewellery into your work look, either – providing you keep it appropriate. If you’re looking for something more modern, chunky rings and ornate collars could be the answer to your prayers. “Statement jewellery can bring any outfit to life,” says Barron. “Think oversized collars with emerald greens and lashings of gold, dropped earrings and chunky rings.”

Step up to the mark A job well begun is half done – now to find the perfect shoes. Boots and pumps speak office chic, but if you want a touch of catwalk glamour, dig out those sleek heels. “A cigarette heel gives an outfit edge and adds subtle sex appeal. This is the ultimate in power dressing and can really liven up a simple black trouser suit,” says Barron. “For an effortless vibe, go for luxe gold metallic shoes. Whether you opt for embellished pumps or stilettos, these shoes take you from plain to polished in minutes.”

18 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013

Patterns, animals prints and tailored clothing are all on trend for the workplace this season such as this striking Aztec jacquard dress, £55; bag £25, both from Marisota (www.marisota.co.uk/08719847612); or this classy look from Marks & Spencer, left, Autograph dress £69; bag £39.50, shoes £17.50 (www.marksandspencer.com) WCL-E01-S2


Shopping Gabrielle Fagan emphasis on pared-back design and interesting textures, are essential ingredients for this look. “Nordic Folk is our interpretation and it brings a simple, homespun aesthetic with a timeless Scandinavian influence,” says Pam McDermott, head of home buying at Sainsbury’s. “A clean, crisp palette of milky white, relaxing grey and icy blue is warmed with berry red, evoking the crispness of a wintry day.” TOP TIP: Don’t feel confined to one trend, says McDermott. Embrace elements of others, including the quintessentially British hedgerow style, or indulge in glamour with metallics, like gold and burnished copper. ON TREND DETAILS: Soft Blue Chunky Knitted Throw, £35; Wooden Tripod Floor Lamp with grey or cream shade, £75, Sainsbury’s (www.sainsburys.co.uk/0800 636 262).

Eastern inspiration

Create a cosy mood in your home this autumn. Items from the Linea restoration range are ideal for this such as Westminster leather sofa, £3,229; industrial trunk side table, £749; mini vintage globe, £25; Waltz armchair, £999; industrial coffee tale, £1,159 – all from House of Fraser

Autumn doesn’t just bring a change in temperature, it brings a change of mood. Chilly winds encourage our natural desire to hibernate and cosy-up indoors, but it’s still important for decor to dazzle. This season, designers have taken a stroll through the British countryside and produced one of the most appealing looks – woodland, inspired by our flora and fauna. This versatile trend can be interpreted to evoke a classic hunting lodge, or pared back to embrace an ultra-chic, rustic Scandi retreat. If that’s too tame and you yearn to travel farther afield, there’s a retro-explorer look, evoked by classic mementoes like trunks and globes. Alternatively, go East to embrace the colour, sensuality and pattern of the Orient. “Our big trend this season is woodland,” says Sue Roberts, director of home at House of Fraser.

masculine, gentleman’s club quality,” says Roberts. TOP TIP: If that’s too macho for your taste, Roberts highlights an alternative: laid-back country elegance, featuring faded floral patterns, soft shades and distressed wooden furniture. ON TREND DETAILS: Linea Halo Industrial Trunk side table, £749, and Mini Vintage Globe, £25; for woodland style a Mr Fox or Mrs Squirrel Knitted Cushion, £25 each, all House of Fraser (www.houseoffraser.co.uk/0870 160 7270).

Down to the wire

“Warm and homely, it combines wooden furniture with soft, autumnal patterns, and features owls, hedgehogs and other woodland creatures.” Follow the experts’ guide to the trends so that you can do the same at home and enjoy showing off your own seasonal decor transfor mations.

Armchair traveller We’re inspired by looks from around the world, so it’s no surprise that there’s a trend which reflects our love of travel and exploring. “Restoration is a traditional, antique-esque trend, featuring rich leathers and revivalstyle furniture. It has a relaxed feel and a

We’re celebrating design and increasingly use our rooms to showcase striking pieces which speak volumes about our taste with their style and craftsmanship. “The key trend is the concept of ‘the drawn black line’, with products reflecting their absolute beginnings as hand-drawn sketches on paper,” says Polly Dickens, creative director at Habitat, known for its innovative contemporary looks. TOP TIP: An indigo palette is key for this season and beyond, says Dickens. ON TREND DETAILS: Sura Black Rattan Armchair, from £300; Blot Blue and White Cushion, £25, and Blot Bedspread, £120, Habitat (www.habitat.co.uk/0844 499 1111).

Country cool Our love affair with all things Scandi, from their television dramas to their style, is still going strong. A cool, neutral palette, with

Blot bedspread, above, £120, Habitat; gold embellished cushion, left, £15, Sainsbury’s; Betty Jackson Black lamp, far left, £65, Debenhams WCL-E01-S2

Texture, colour and vivid pattern continue to make an impact as we become braver and more confident with our decor. “One of the key trends this season is inspired by the Far East, with splashes of bright colour and print,” says Alice Duggan, head of home buying at Debenhams. “The Butterfly Home collection, by designer Matthew Williamson, blends Japanese geometrics with authentic chinoiserie florals. “To create this bold and highly decorative style for the home, include vibrant pieces, such as an embroidered fan or printed geisha cushion.” TREND TIPS: Monochrome geometric patterns, a luxe combination of black and gold, and feminine florals with delicate butterfly detail, are also vying for decor attention this season, says Duggan. ON TREND DETAILS: Butterfly Home Designer Coral Geisha Girl Cushion, £22; Floral Antoinette Three-Drawer Chest, reduced from £375 to £270; see things in black and white with a Betty Jackson Black Zig Zag Patterned Lamp, £65, all Debenhams (www.debenhams.com/08445 616 161).

Modern luxe Comfort, sensual textures and unashamed luxury are never going to fall out of favour, and they’re particularly strong this season. Our desire for cosseting rooms which are also glamorous, reflects our desire for homes that act as retreats from the harsh economic reality outside. “Whenever I describe Anthology, our trend story, to people, I talk about the Victorian era and natural history,” says Joanna Bolt, head of trends at Homebase. “It’s a dark, moody look which creates a sense of vintage and nostalgia. Rich reds, deep purples and browns combine with luxurious fabrics such as velvet, leather and heavy knits.” TREND TIPS: Typography’s in fashion and features on fabrics and accessories from prints to cushions, says Bolt. Don’t overlook a feminine approach with subtle, muted florals, and oversized decorative mirrors. ON TREND DETAILS: Gloss White Stag Ornament, £12.99; Butterfly Print Cushion, £12.99; Hartfield Snuggler sofa, can be upholstered in a variety of fabrics, £549, all Homebase (www.homebase.co.uk/0845 600 2420).

Black & Gold Embroidered Bedspread, above, £35, Sainsbury’s; gloss white stag ornament, left, £12.99, Homebase; soft blue chunky knitted throw, right, £35, Sainsbury’s

SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 19


Books Shelagh Mazey

As a schoolgirl I always hated having to think up essays based on suggested titles. The suggested titles never did anything to inspire me. With little experience of life, living in a council house in a small village, I had no experience to draw from. One of the favourite suggested titles was “What did you do in your summer holidays?” My holidays were endless hours of playing in hayfields, or down by the river and hardly constituted an exciting read, pleasurable though it was, and so I was invariably stumped. But I loved to read, starting with my favourite comics and the wonderful stories of Enid Blyton, I graduated to books like the adventures of The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Ammusca Orczy, novels by Georgette Heyer and regional tales such as those of Catherine Cookson and Margaret Dickinson. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell, for me is a book that has everything; strong passionate characters, the historical setting true and believable, an exciting wartime epic to which one can only aspire. Then of course, there are the wonderful classics by Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, The Bronte’s, and Jane Austen. West Country stories like Far from the Madding Crowd and Tess of the D’Urbervilles had a special meaning for me, because they were set in familiar and well-loved places and I longed to be able to create a theatre of characters of my own. The historical aspect of the classics adds another dimension for me. Personally, I have never had any patience with science fiction or fantasy, because I find it too unbelievable and I wanted my readers to feel that my stories really could have happened in the past. For a complete novice Portland, in Dorset, seemed a good place to start and so I set out to write my first novel, which I named Brandy Row after a small row of cottages in Chiswell on Portland. It is a regional historical romance set on the island in the 19th century. I visualised the story as a film and the splendour of the Chesil beach is a powerful image from which to begin. Being an island, the story was quite easily contained and, like all islands, its inhabitants are fiercely proud of their heritage. It is almost like weaving in another strong character, and it was important to try to do it justice. (I think I succeeded because it has been very popular on Portland and I have

recently had to organise a reprint). I wanted the excitement of the battle between the smugglers and the officials and so I made it a love triangle between the heroine, her childhood sweetheart, who is a smuggler, and the new arrival who is the preventive man. My latest novel, Dawn to Deadly Nightshade, is the sequel to Brandy Row. It follows similar subject matter in Brandy Row in that it involves romance, smuggling and superstition, but it has the added ingredient of witchcraft. The image that came into my head and inspired this story was that of a foggy September night and the echoing sound of a crying, abandoned baby, left beneath the clock tower at Alvington Manor (loosely based on Brympton d’Evercy). The search for the true identity of the child’s parents ultimately leads to the discovery of a coven, an opium den, a rapist and murderer and leads to the hangman’s noose. Set in the Yeovil area, it continues on immediately from the end of Brandy Row in the mid19th century, but it goes back and forth to Portland and still involves the family there. It follows the life of Joshua, the young son of Violet and Richard Dryer, as he takes on the ownership and title of Lord of the Manor of Alvington, the duties of a Justice of the Peace and falling in love with a chambermaid. Joshua arrives in Somerset to find the folk on his estate are just as superstitious as those he left behind him on Portland. He is soon to learn that people’s fears are justified when he discovers the existence of a coven in the neighbouring parish and he comes into conflict with their warlock. Joshua’s main adversary is Nathan Meakins, the arrogant son from a neighbouring estate. They first clash over Meakins’ cruel treatment of Joshua’s sister, Rebecca, but this discord and tension is to escalate throughout the story, exposing long held secrets from within his own family. Meakins is a sadistic womaniser, a threat to all women, no one’s sister is safe, even his own. I have a large cast of characters, especially in Dawn to Deadly Nightshade as it involves two stately homes and most of their staff, but there is a cast list at the front of both books and maps of both localities. I have enjoyed working on these two novels so much that I am now working on the third in the series.

Dawn To Deadly Nightshade by Shelagh Mazey, published by Troubador, priced £8.99

Books reviews Solo: A James Bond Novel by William Boyd is published in hardback by Jonathan Cape, priced £18.99 (ebook £7.20)

An Officer And A Spy by Robert Harris is published in hardback by Hutchinson, priced £18.99 (ebook £7.20)

The Abominable by Dan Simmons is published in hardback by Sphere, priced £18.99 (ebook £9.49)

When a writer’s books are taken over by others posthumously, characterisation can prove a problem for the new scribe. Either they risk the wrath of fans by changing much-loved figures, or become mired in cliche as they strain to stay close to original. Boyd is the fourth writer to take on Ian Fleming’s iconic Bond since his death (the others are Kingsley Amis, Sebastian Faulks and Jeffery Deaver), and seems to have fallen into the latter trap.

Robert Harris is the master of the historical thriller and his latest novel finds him in fine form. Previous books have twisted the history of Second World War codebreakers and the politics of ancient Rome into pageturning best-sellers and he has done it again, this time with The Dreyfus Affair. His story of the scandal that shook 19th century France and saw a Jewish army officer framed as a spy, is a tale of dodgy dossiers and an agency gone rogue.

A year after the deaths of George Mallory and Sandy Irvine on Mount Everest, three adventurers are eager to make their own attempt on the summit. Their expedition is funded by Lady Bromley, whose son Percy has also disappeared on the mountain. Refusing to believe he’s dead, she asks the trio to find him and bring him home. But what is pursuing them, and why? It’s a bone-chilling tale of intrigue and mystery, and is thoroughly researched.

20 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013

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Books Hannah Stephenson

There are few famous faces quite as instantly recognisable as the great Rula Lenska. Walking into the hotel bar, I recognise the actress Rula Lenska immediately – the flurry of thick red hair, statuesque frame and sultry tones of that sexy, deep voice, which helped make her a star in the 1970s are unmistakable. Lenska is now 66 but there’s no hint of a pensioner in the skin-tight black leggings she’s wearing below an elegant black and white animal print blouse. Those too young to remember her starring role in the iconic Seventies TV series Rock Follies, about the rise of a female pop group, may well recognise her from the famous cat improvisation she conducted with George Galloway on Celebrity Big Brother in 2006. Galloway, as a cat, pretended to lick milk from her cupped hands, and Lenska stroked his ears and moustache. “It was 16 days of madness,” she recalls. “At first it’s amusing and quite fun. There’s lots of food, drink and fags, but once the screws start to tighten, it’s similar to being in prison. One of the worst things was the boredom.” Her profile was again raised in 2012 when her ex-husband Dennis Waterman admitted in a Piers Morgan TV interview that he hit her during their marriage. Now, after years of being vilified for casting aspersions on Waterman, one of Britain’s best-loved actors, she has decided to set the record straight with her own autobiography, Rula: My Colourful Life. “I wanted to let people know that my life is much more than my life with Mr Waterman and Big Brother and Corrie (she played Claudia Colby, an old friend of Audrey Roberts, until 2011). The catalyst was also Dennis’ very bizarre comments on the Piers Morgan Show, which I found extraordinary. For me, it was a relief because I’d been called a liar for a long time and whatever made him admit it I have no idea. I can’t believe he didn’t realise what he was saying. “Of course I’m pleased to be exonerated after so much time, but it did its harm then, a long time ago. There were a lot of people who chose to believe him and not me.” At several points in our interview, Lenska asks me not to focus solely on Waterman, to whom she was married for 11 years. And it’s true that she has done so many other things in her life, including theatre, TV, a famous advertising campaign for Alberto VO5 hair products in the US, animal conservation and other projects. Yet conversation seems to slip back to Waterman frequently, such was the influence he had on her life for so many years. Lenska, a practising Buddhist, devotes a fair chunk of space in her book to her exhusband, from the time she met him on the set of Minder to their decision to both leave their spouses and indulge in a passionate relationship which was to last more than ten years before it all turned sour. Indeed, she reports that he had affairs, drank too much and resorted to physical violence on occasion. Yet their break-up damaged her career, not his, she says now. “He had a lot of powerful people in the business and a lot of the public and people in the media seemed to be on his side, which I could never quite understand, but I’ve moved on.” Lara, her daughter from her first marriage to actor Brian Deacon, was extremely upset to lose contact with Waterman’s children, Hannah and Julia, and hasn’t seen them since. Lenska stresses that when their relationship was good, it was really great. For while Waterman was a man’s man, preferring the company of the lads down the pub and watching football or cricket to coming home to the

family, he was also an incredibly charismatic character and a romantic, she writes. These days, she relishes her wider family, most notably her grandson (whose name she wants to keep private), her daughter Lara and first husband Deacon, with whom she has remained great friends. “He’s always behaved incredibly gallantly because we have one child between us and now this adored grandson. It’s a wonderful coming together of ends, of broken hearts and sadnesses and now it’s all good.” Does she regret leaving Deacon? “Obviously in hindsight, with the way things finished, a little bit, but I try not to regret anything. Everything that’s happened to me in my life, good and bad, has made me what I am. The majority of the time with Dennis, it was a wonderful relationship. Chalk and cheese it might have been, but it was fantastic.” Lenska has always had a strong sense of family. The daughter of a Polish count and countess who fled to England in 1946, her parents mixed in high-class society in London and the Polish people with whom they socialised became Lenska’s extended family. Her mother was prone to bouts of manic depression, while her father spent long periods working in Munich for the Polish-American immigration unit looking after displaced refugees from behind the Iron Curtain. By then, Rula had two sisters and a brother, and her mother then had an affair which led to her being ostracised by the older members of the Polish community. When she found out she was pregnant by her lover, she split up with Rula’s father and went on to marry again. A rebel at heart, Rula was soon expelled from her local Catholic grammar school in Hammersmith for “doing a war dance on the school roof wearing my gym knickers”. Her extrovert, Bohemian nature was channelled into acting and she went on to the Webber Douglas drama school. From there, her career was launched and she has kept herself busy with theatre work, TV roles and conservation projects. She hopes the book will open doors and revitalise her career. She hasn’t had a major TV role since Coronation Street in 2011, although she’s been asked to put together a onewoman cabaret show next year. “There’s a dearth of good parts for middleaged women unless you happen to be Helen Mirren or Judi Dench. But I’ve decided to be a lot more proactive,” she says. There’s no bitterness that Waterman’s career – which she doesn’t follow – has continued successfully. “I know that he’s still an avid golfer, but we have no contact at all. I don’t have negative feelings. He will always hold something in my heart.” Independent life hasn’t been without its ups and downs, she admits. “Obviously it’s a relief not having to worry who is coming home in what mood, but there are moments of loneliness. You have to learn to like your own company, to occupy yourself. Out of tough lessons came good discoveries.” She remains close to her two sisters and all her cousins, but says that she would like to meet someone to share her life with. “It would be wonderful. However, in reality it’s so rare to meet single men of a suitable age and if they are single at this age, there’s more often than not a pretty good reason. “I never lose hope and I trust in karma. I believe what’s meant to be is meant to be. I’m in a much more stable and emotionally comfortable position now.”

Rula: My Colourful Life by Rula Lenska, published by The Robson Press, priced £20

Rula, pictured inset with former-husband Dennis Waterman, is planning to take to the stage with a one-woman cabaret show, top, but otherwise the work has dried up

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SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 21


Books Sarah Pitt Her uncle was the prominent historian D. A. Binchy. Indeed, at University College Dublin she earned a bachelor’s degree in history, before going on to work as a teacher of French, Latin, and history at various girls’ schools, then as a journalist at the Irish Times. It was only later in life that she turned her pen to writing novels, short stories, and dramatic works. In 1968, her mother died of cancer, aged just 57. After Maeve’s father died three years later, she sold the family house and moved to a bedsit in Dublin. Piers’ exhaustive research took him from his home in North Yorkshire to Dublin, where as well as going through the 30 boxes in the Binchy Archive at Maeve’s alma mater University College Dublin, he also looked up and talked to childhood and student friends. From them, he made the surprise discovery that, as a pupil at the Holy Child convent in Killiney – where the nuns sound a cheery lot – Maeve had been shy and lacking in confidence, being both tall and overweight. As a teenager, she was troubled that no boys asked her to dance, making her doubt her mother Maureen’s assertion that she was beautiful. Then one day, as a student, she decided she was no longer going to let this get to her. From that day on she became, at least outwardly, the gregarious, confident bon viveur of her adult life. “The day she decided to forget what everyone thought about her changed her over night,” says Piers. “Her classmates at university can still remember that change.” Maeve also rejected the Catholic church of her childhood, and, heading to London and the Swinging Sixties, suffered a string of unhappy affairs. Her relatively late marriage to fellow writer Gordon, though, was happy. They wrote side by side every day, and he was always there to pick up the pieces if there was a bad review. “He really understood her and understood how sensitive she really was,” says Piers. “He gave her the support she needed.” In 2002, Maeve suffered a health crisis “related to a heart condition”, which inspired her to write Heart and Soul. The book about (what Maeve terms) “a heart failure clinic” in Dublin and the people involved with it, reflects many of her own experiences and observations in the hospital. Towards the end of her life, Maeve had the following message on her official website: “My health isn’t so good these days and I can’t travel around to meet people the way I used to. But I’m always delighted to hear from readers, even if it takes me a while to reply.” She suffered with severe arthritis, which left her in constant pain. As a result of the arthritis she had a hip operation, and by the time Piers met her to record her memories of her life, her movement was already becoming severely restricted. She died on July 30, 2012. Gordon was by her side when she died in a Dublin hospital. Just ahead of that evening’s Tonight with Vincent Browne and TV3’s late evening news, Browne and then Alan Cantwell, who respectively anchor these shows, announced to Irish television viewers that Maeve Binchy had died earlier that evening. The nation fell into mourning for the teacher turned journalist turned novelist, who had touched the hearts of many with her honest and often funny take on the world.

When biographer Piers Dudgeon writes about Maeve Binchy it’s as if she’s at his elbow. It’s almost as if the late Irish writer is constantly trying to give him a helping hand. Piers, known for his biographies of strong women who also happened to be prolific bestselling authors, has immersed himself in the world of the larger-than-life novelist, in recent months. “She was a great entertainer,” says Piers. “I’ve been doing talks to promote the new book, and I’ve even used recording of Maeve talking for five minutes of the show, telling a very very funny story. “The great trouble with having biographers at festivals is that actually people would prefer to meet the subject, so I decided to bring her along.” The recording that Piers took around the literary festivals will surely appeal to the fans of Maeve’s heart-warming bestsellers, which deal in love, betrayal and the close, often complicated, friendships between women. Indeed, in Maeve’s books the three are often linked. Her first novel, Light A Penny Candle, which evoked the warm community feel of her youth, growing up in a close middle class family near Dublin, shot to the top of the bestseller lists when it was published in 1982. She went on to write many more, including Circle of Friends, Victoria Line, Evening Class and Tara Road. She was still writing at the time of her death, last July, at the age of 73, by this time a

wealthy woman but still as down to earth as ever. Maeve and her husband Gordon Snell, a fellow writer and her tireless champion and support, were by then living back in Maeve’s childhood home town at Dalkey, on the coast south of Dublin. It was here that Piers went to meet Maeve, back in 2000, after writing to her to tell her he was interested in writing her biography. “She had just announced her retirement from writing, which she never took, except from the Irish Times, where she had worked as a journalist for almost 30 years,” recalls Pier. “We had a great day together and discussed the whole thing. She wrote in this little room at the top of the house in Dalkey, up this spiral staircase. “She sat in front of me, legs apart with her hands on her knees and went for it. We talked and talked and talked, wine flowing. She drank like a fish, and it never affected her. “She didn’t want to do a biography in her lifetime, and so I respected her wishes and only wrote it after her death last year. “She said to me that she didn’t think that there was much of a story there, as she was a middle class Irish girl. But what I discovered was that there was a hell of a story, a very personal one.” Maeve was born in 1940 in Dalkey, County Dublin (modern-day Dun Laoghaire Rathdown), the oldest child of four.

22 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013

Maeve Binchy the biography by Piers Dudgeon is published in harback by Robson Press, priced £20

Biographer Piers Dudgeon, pictured above, discovered Maeve Binchy was self-conscious about her size as a teenager, until she made a decision that she would no longer care WCL-E01-S2


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SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 23


Travel Sarah Tucker

Taking a teenager on holiday can be hard work. But surely a road trip across the States should please? The plan was to start in LA, drive the coastal route to San Francisco, then join a bus tour through Nevada and Arizona. “I’ve seen it all on the TV and films anyway,” complained my 14-year-old son Tom when I explained he’d be spending the summer travelling with his mum. There are plenty of pleasing stops en route, including little villages selling art I wish I had enough space for in my luggage. We stop at Half Moon Bay, where we go horse-riding and whale watching. I’m amused to discover this place produces more pumpkins than anywhere else in the world. We stay at Cameron’s Inn (www.cameronsinn.com), which has a London taxi, red pillar box and double-decker in the car park, just in case you feel homesick. The San Francisco that greets us is more interesting, dynamic, gritty, urgent and messy than it appears on the big or small screens. We walk from Fisherman’s Wharf on the harbour, with its fresh fish restaurants (including one themed on Forest Gump), then through the Italian district, which is resolutely al fresco – the gelateria all claiming to sell the best ice cream on the planet. Tom agrees. Our base is the Westin St Francis hotel, which has seen a number of high-profile Hollywood celebrities pass through its doors. Room 1219 is where the first million-dollar star allegedly killed someone. You can still stay in the room if you so wish. Tom loves all this gruesome history. Most teenagers do. But Alcatraz (www.alcatraztickets.com) is his favourite attraction. You need to book a month in advance to go on the island itself, longer if you travel during the summer holidays. Don’t book the cruises around the island – it’s a bit like walking around the sweet shop rather than going in it. The audio tour as you walk between cells – learning about the inmates, what they ate, where they slept, how they spent their time, and the attempted escapes – is fascinating. It sends shivers up my spine as we learn of the prisoners who died attempting to escape.

After the urban adventure, we embark on a four-hour drive to Yosemite. Our van driver and tour guide Brian, a 20-something from Memphis, Tennessee, buzzes with enthusiasm and boundless energy. We camp overnight and take it in turns to play guitar around the campfire. But those flames are nothing compared to the 50C heat of Death Valley, where we head the following morning. The heat haze over the salt plains is hypnotising, and I’m deafened by the silence. Our next stop is Las Vegas. I had worried that with so much out of his reach – gambling, bars, most of the shows, clubbing – Tom might get bored. Not at all. “This is incredible mum,” he shouts. “It’s a city of lights in the middle of a desert.” We watch the jousting show at the Excalibur Hotel, and tour the strip in a white stretch limousine, stopping off at the Vegas sign. A helicopter ride over the Grand Canyon also proves a big hit – even if, at 250 dollars, it’s quite pricey. Overwhelmed by the drama of the scenery, some passengers burst into tears. No film or TV programme has ever done this place justice. Continuing our journey, we briefly stop off at Lake Havasu to camp for the night, then make our way to the Joshua Tree National Park. The long fingers of yucca trees stretch out to visitors, some looking more rude than others, much to Tom’s amusement. There are huge boulders to climb and jump on, many shaped like skulls and eagles. When we finally return home to the UK, Tom can’t wait to tell his friends about the summer he’s had. Now, every time one of these US landmarks appears on TV, he’s proud to say he’s actually been there. Despite the searing heat, my 14-year-old reckons a road trip with his mum was definitely as cool as ice.

Sarah Tucker took her son on the scenic route to San Francisco, pictured right, main image

Travel news Caribbean is fighting back to win winter bookings With bookings for Egypt’s Red Sea coast hit by political unrest, there’s growing optimism that the Caribbean could bounce back into favour as a top long-haul destination for winter sun-seekers this season, despite the hefty tax bills which clobber British visitors. Since Chancellor George Osborne imposed the latest increase in Air Passenger Duty (APD) on April 1, a family of two adults and two children has paid £332 in tax when flying from UK airports to the Caribbean. Barbados, at the top end of the tourism market, blames the tax for a 10 per cent plunge in visitor numbers from Britain in the last year alone. Tourism authorities in the islands argue that the level of APD tax applied to the Caribbean is excessive. But a campaign by tour operators, airlines and hoteliers to make the

region more affordable could win back travellers. Barbados set the campaign rolling, offering vouchers worth £200 to early bookers until December 21. But the real game changer, according to Bob Atkinson at Travelsupermarket.com, is new flights by Thomas Cook Airlines, from Manchester to St Lucia and Barbados from November 10, with an extra Manchester-Antigua-Barbados flight from December 19. These are linked to Flybe connecting flights from regional UK airports. January special offers for Thomas Cook return flights to Caribbean, bookable now, start at £384 for Barbados, £416 for St Lucia and £423 for Antigua. “Until now, what you might call the ‘Classic Caribbean’ has been carved up between BA and Virgin from Gatwick”, says Atkinson. “The new flights by Thomas Cook Airlines hoist a massive signal that this is a market ripe for expansion.”

24 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013

Why not follow Boomtown Rat Sir Bob into space?

Appealing prices for Barbados

With Sir Bob Geldof about to start training for a 2,200mph flight on a commercial space shuttle that will take him more than 60 miles above Earth, a report claims that outer space could soon attract more travellers for “once in a lifetime” experiences. Futurologist Dr Ian Pearson, who worked on The Post Office project looking at the possibilities of leisure travel in 2113, thinks trips to Mars and the moon could become commonplace; some 28 per cent of people surveyed want to be first in line for affordable flights if it happens. “A once-in-a-lifetime holiday could be a visit to a Mars outpost, a trip around Venus or, more likely, a week on the moon or a couple of weeks on a space station,” says Dr Pearson. “Getting into space might use a high-speed WCL-E01-S2


Travel take-off

City breaks Superbreak (0871 700 4384) offers B&B at threestar Jurys Inn, Edinburgh, from £110.65 pp, including top-priced ticket to see award-winning musical The Lion King (Oct 12-Jan 18).

Turkey Exclusive Escapes (020 8605 3500) offers seven nights’ B&B at canyon-top Dionysos Estate, overlooking bay on glorious Lycian Coast of Turkey, from Oct 19, from £800 pp based on two sharing. Includes return flights to Dalaman ex-Stansted or Manchester, transfers and one day sea cruise.

All-inclusive Mark Warner (0844 273 7397) offers seven nights’ all-inclusive at Sea Garden resort near Bodrum, from £729, ex-Manchester Oct 19, with return BA flights. Resort activities include watersports and tennis.

Italy Citalia (0843 770 4443) offers seven nights’ B&B from Oct 15 at four-star hotel in Sorrento from £615, saving up to £400 per couple. Includes 30-min massage, superior balcony room and return Thomson flights ex-Gatwick.

Las Vegas Sarah Tucker with her son Tom at the Grand Canyon in Arizona, top, the tall trees at Yosemite National Park, centre; and the famous Route 66, above – all helped create a fantastic holiday – even for a teenager

Travel facts

USA

■ Sarah Tucker and her son travelled with Intrepid Travel (www.intrepidtravel.com; 0844 4998487) on their eight-day Ultimate California Southbound small group tour, from £815pp. Starting in San Francisco, it visits Yosemite NP, the Sierra Nevada, Death Valley, Las Vegas, Grand Canyon, Lake Havasu and Joshua Tree NP, ending in Los Angeles. The price includes a mix of campsite and hotel accommodation, travel by private van, National Park entry fees, and tour of the strip in Las Vegas. ■ Have Teenager Will Travel by Sarah Tucker is available on eBook from amazon.co.uk

ride up the Space Elevator, essentially a 60,000km-high lift.” A week at a space hotel might be financially equivalent to a £10,000 holiday today – and that’s not the only futuristic tourism the survey envisaged. “Giant airships could house hotels in 2113, similar to a cruise today, with fun on board and trips down to the surface” adds Pearson. “Deep sea hotels will enable guests to hang out in the middle of a coral reef, or take a deep submarine trip to see volcanic activity. Getting around while on holiday will use selfdriving pods, floating inches above the surface.” Meanwhile, with 700 tickets sold for Virgin Galactic space flights, Sir Richard Branson could launch the project within “months”. Ticket sales, reportedly costing £125,000 each, are helping to fund the project’s late stages, though flights will be three hours long to keep costs down.

How self-catering in Britain is much cheaper in autumn

Trips to the Moon could soon be quite normal

Self-catering holidays in many of Britain’s holiday hotspots are more than 40 per cent cheaper in the autumn, compared with peak season weeks, a TripAdvisor survey reveals. Self-catering holidays look great value in the weeks before half-term, with rentals 46 per cent cheaper in Cornwall, 44 per cent cheaper in Devon and 40 per cent cheaper in Dorset, compared with summer prices. Rates are much lower across the UK, with savings from 17 per cent in other popular destinations. The only exception is London, where holiday rentals remain relatively steady (a rise of 3 per cent), reflecting a pattern in other European cities. “Autumn holidays offer hope of good weather, without the crowds and higher summer rates,” says TripAdvisor’s Laurel Greatrix. WCL-E01-S2

Bon Voyage (0800 316 0194) offers four nights’ room-only in five-star hotels in late Nov/early Dec, with flights ex-Heathrow, Glasgow and Manchester from £1,369, including VIP stretch limo transfers on arrival and evening helicopter flight over The Strip.

American Sky (www.americansky.co.uk) offers nine-day action-packed holiday combining Las Vegas with San Francisco from £849 pp (Nov 1-Dec 13), saving £200. Price based on two sharing standard room on room-only basis for four nights at Holiday Civic Centre in San Francisco and Circus Circus in Las Vegas, return transatlantic flights and internal flights between.

Santa in Lapland Arctic specialist Transun (01865 265 200) offer three-night Sleigh Bells Ringing break, including magical meeting with Santa, reindeer sleigh ride and husky sled safari, from £879 per adult and £759 per child (15-or under) exGatwick Nov 19. One child free when three people, including min two adults, book. Includes three nights’ accommodation, return flights ex-regional UK airport (Nov 19-Dec 20), thermal suit and boot hire and souvenir Arctic Circle passport.

Australia Austravel (0800 988 4834) offers six days from £899, saving £370, including five nights’ roomonly at three-star Ibis Melbourne, Great Ocean Road day tour and Phillip Island, return flights ex-Heathrow with Royal Brunei Airlines in Feb, if booked by Oct 17.

Tobago DialAFlight (0844 556 6060) offers seven nights’ room-only at five-star The Villas At Stonehaven from £1,159 (saving £50) through May 2014, if booked by Oct 31, with accommodation in a luxury ocean villa with ocean views.

SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 25


Travel David Clensy

Looking out to sea, while sitting on a pebbly beach in Etretat, gave David and his family some simple quality time together

Once, not so long ago, I was a travel fanatic – forever careering around the globe. But things change when you have children, and then the wonders of the world arrived in our home. They came in two little bundles, two years apart. Our lives have never been quite the same since. For the past couple of years I’ve been lost in a world of nappies and potties, prams and pushchairs, toys – oh so many toys of every conceivable shape and size. In short, it’s been wonderful. Far from yearning after my old frequent flying life, I’ve barely given a second thought to airport terminals and cruise ship gangplanks – once such alluring places charged with all the expectation of travelling into the unknown. With two young boys, every day has been a journey into the unknown. But with parenthood finally settling into second nature, and our boys now two and a half and six months old, it felt as if the time was perhaps right to go abroad as a family once again. With a toddler and a baby in tow, my wife and I were clear we didn’t want to face anything too taxing – neither of us relished the thought of taking the boys on an aeroplane. So we looked out across the sea to our near neighbour, Normandy – it seemed like the ideal place to spend a week with the boys. It would be travelling abroad without being too adventurous. As a long-confirmed Francophile, I was more than enthusiastic about the prospect of spending a week on the other side of the Channel. We made the whole thing as easy for

ourselves as we possibly could. It was a short drive down to Portsmouth to roll on to the back of the DFDS Seaways ferry boat bound for Le Havre. Tiny in comparison to the Brittany Ferries ship anchored beside it – which was bound for Caen – the DFDS ferry seemed like a manageable size with the two boys, and the inevitable mammoth collection of bags they travel with – many of which would be needed in our cabin on the overnight crossing. Our toddler was beside himself with excitement at the prospect of going to sleep in the cabin as the ferry sailed off into the night, while his younger brother slept on oblivious to the first stamp on his passport. As morning broke over Normandy, the streets of Le Havre were a joy to drive through. We only had a short drive to enjoy on our first morning in Normandy, before arriving at our first stopping point – a beautiful family-owned gite, La Chaumiere, just outside Le Havre, near Octeville sur Mer. With chocolate box good looks, a thatched roof and a garden that looked like something out of Country Living, it was like walking into an idyll. Our toddler immediately fell in love with the garden – and as it was gated to the front, we could confidently allow him to explore the apple trees and flower beds, watching only from a relaxed distance. The sound of him practising his two words of French – “bonjour” and “merci” echoed into the cottage.

26 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013

Inside the gite was furnished with antiques, giving the place an abundance of character – there was even an open fire for us to cosy up to once the boys were in bed. There are certainly no shortage of things to do in the Seine Maritime region of Normandy – but one of the highlights for us was a trip up the coast to the seaside town of Etretat. Famed for its white cliffs – which could rival Dover’s – and with needles to take on the Isle of White, it’s a scenic place. An hour sitting on the pebbly beach in the sunshine, with the baby enjoying a seaside bottle, while the toddler was choosing his favourite pebbles, was a simple delight. But then, Normandy is a place of simple delights. After three days we moved on to our second base for the week – a newly built block of holiday apartments just outside the picturesque 19th-century spa town of Bagnoles-deL’Orne. It may have been newly built, but B’O Cottage, as it was deceptively called, has been built in a way that is architecturally sympathetic to the grand designs of 19th-century France. It looks and feels like a true “grand hotel”, and I half expect Christopher Reeve to be time-travelling in the neighbouring bedroom, like in Somewhere In Time. It’s part of the larger B’O Resort – a series of elegant spa and hydrotherapy centres. Both my wife and I were given the opportunity to take an hour away from the joys of parenthood to enjoy a relaxing massage, and to experience the tranquil saunas, swimming pools and “relaxation rooms”. But the highlight of the trip for our two little boys was a rather more action-packed afternoon at the Haras du Pin – France’s national stud, which is home to some of the world’s best horses – next year it is to play host to some of the World Equestrian Games. Set beside a grand 18th-century chateau and stable blocks, every Thursday afternoon during the holiday season, the riders and horses of the Haras du Pin put on a spectacular display – from equestrian acrobats, who seem to think nothing of standing with a foot on two different horses, both travelling at a gallop, to the invigorating rattle and thud of the antique coaches that are driven at speed for our delight. The spectacle certainly brought a smile to the faces of both our boys, who watched wideeyed for more than an hour.

As we headed back to the car, our toddler, clinging lovingly to his new cuddly toy horse, looked up at me and whispered “We like France Daddy, don’t we?” “Yes, we certainly do.”

Travel facts – Normandy ■ David Clensy and his family travelled to Normandy with DFDS Seaways. Crossings from Portsmouth to Le Havre start at £39 each way. For details, www.dfdsseaways.co.uk ■ The family was hosted in Normandy by the Seine Maritime and the Orne region tourist boards, staying at La Chaumiere gite near Octeville sur Mer, and B’O Cottage at the B’O Resort, at Bagnoles-de-L’Or ne ■ For more information about visiting Normandy, log on to www.normandy-tourism.org

David’s toddler fell in love with the garden at La Chaumiere, just outside Le Havre; while the actionpacked Haras du Pin, by a grand 18th-century chateau, was a great way to spend an afternoon

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Anchorage Hotel

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per person per break

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Set in the peaceful Cary Park, a short stroll to the beautiful Babbacombe Downs with views across the bay. Perfect for a relaxing break away from home. 56 En-suite Bedrooms - Ample Parking - Live Entertainment - FREE WIFI - Fully Licensed - Non-smoking Large Gardens - Wide Choice on Menus, Different Everyday - Tea Dance every Tuesday - Lite Lunch Menu

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Aveland Road, Cary Park, Babbacombe, Torquay, Devon, TQ1 3PT

Telephone: 01803 326175 - Email: enquiries@anchoragehotel.co.uk www.anchoragehotel.co.uk WCL-E01-S2

SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 27


Walks Sue Gearing

Sharpness. One of the most interesting walks I have every done, taking in the beautiful Sharpness and Gloucester Canal, the site of the spectacular Severn Rail Bridge which dramatically burnt down one foggy night in 1960, the amazing Purton hulks beached along the estuary. It starts at a beautiful and historic spot – Sharpness picnic area at the pier alongside the Estuary – and then weaves its way along the Severn Way around the interesting Docks, to Sharpness Marina, over bridges and then up the towpath between canal and Severn Estuary to Purton bridge going through an Area of Special Scientific Interest, full of bird life. At Purton, cross the canal, and at the church is a promise of cream teas on Sunday afternoons. A cross-country stretch with good views leads to the welcoming pub, and then it’s across fields down to Newtown and retracing steps back to Sharpness. There are very few stiles and it is a good walk for dogs. Do allow plenty of time to stop and stare.

Start At Sharpness pier in the picnic area (where there is free parking). As you leave the car park over the speed bump turn left down the grassy sward, parallel with the road you came in on. This follows one of the old dock railway lines, now overgrown. Then, at some point, turn right across the railway and eventually go across to the access road. Continue to the roundabout at the Dock entrance. Turn right and a minute later go left on the Severn Way (the sign may be broken). Follow this on, along Tarmac, over a railway and on past a recreation ground to the road in Newtown.

1 Newtown Turn left past houses and past the Pier View Hotel and continue ahead on the No Through Road. Bend left following the Severn Way.

2 Docks The next interesting section of the walk takes you across the old railway system that served the port, over swing bridges and part of the port, and the start of the Gloucester and Sharpness Canal, going round the north side of the docks which still handle large cargo ships. Come down to a T-junction by some of the dock sheds and immediately turn right on the Severn Way heading towards the Lifeboat Station. Turn right following the SW. Pass a monument for the TS Vindicatrix, 1943-66, where there was a National Sea Sailing School where about 70,000 boys were trained for the merchant navy. Over right is the Sharpness Dockers Club. Bend left past a couple of single-storey abandoned houses and leads to the car park for Sharpness Marina. Go ahead down the concrete path to the Marina full of boats of all shapes and sizes.

3 Marina This was the access and entry point for larger ships in and out of the main docks, the huge lock was opened using mechanisms in the large white metal “boxes” along the other side of the canal. Turn left (but not immediately) on the dock between boats and then cross right over the bridge and right again along the canal with the Severn Estuary on your left. Across the estuary is Lydney and along the edge runs the Dean Forest Railway steam train. Now simply follow this beautiful stretch of canal away from the docks heading towards Gloucester. Hidden in the reeds on the left you may see one or two of the Purton Hulks – cargo boats that were beached here in order to provide a protection for the canal against erosion and the high tides of the Severn Estuary. You will see much more later, and close up too.

4 Old rail bridge

7 Farm

9 Pub

Reach two large stone towers each side of the canal, part of the ill-fated docks railway which came across the Estuary bringing coal from South Wales and was destroyed in October 1960, when two lighters collided in fog and strong tides, exploded and a huge fire broke out. It wasn’t economically viable to rebuild the magnificent bridge which had 21 spans. Start to find information boards about the old lighters and barges that were beached along the estuary here.

Continue past the large farm right and go right on the marked public footpath (diverted) into the field. Stay close to the farm and then turn right through a small gate by the farm. Now bear diagonally left up and across this field, leaving through a gate under an ash. Start to climb in the next field, following the right hedge. Bend left along the top edge, through a gate in the corner and on still following the edge. A little way along, go right through a gate. Ignore the footpath arrow straight on and instead turn left along the field edge with hedge on left (this is another public footpath). Go through a marked gate in the corner and straight on as before (not right) all the way to a gate in the corner. Go left round the field edge. Ignore a stile left and carry on – watch your footing along here. Maintain direction through two fields, planted with maize when I came, but a clear path had been cut through. Eventually reach a track.

The pub is named after the Anglo Saxon harvest festival of Lammas Day. (Lammas means loaf). This could be an alternative start for the walk. Take the footpath at the side of the pub. Bend round and go through a kissing gate. Then on to a stile (the first of the walk). Follow the left side of the field, and ahead see some of the Sharpness Dock buildings. Cross another stile and head up the field to the far right corner. Go through a gate and turn left down the edge. Cross a stile into a large field. Go across passing to the left of a large oak tree and then bear up left to a corner by houses. Immediately turn right on a grassy path and at the hedge go on down a path all the way to the road in Newtown. NB: If starting at the Lammastide, continue from 1. Newton, turning right along the roads (or you may like to make the half-mile detour each way to the Sharpness Docks picnic. Or make sure you visit it before or after in the car, well worth it). For those who started at Sharpness retrace your steps: turn left and then right on the Severn Way, past the playing field, over the railway and then out to a road. Turn right to the roundabout and Dock entrance and turn left all the way down to the picnic area.

5 Ships graveyard Come to an information board about the Purton Ships Graveyard. Just past this turn left down steps and bend right along the estuary passing the skeletons of several of the beached hulks, and ketches, all still named and identified, and some of which have completely disappeared under vegetation. It’s quite an emotional experience to see so many working craft, all with histories of their own, now lying rotting. At the end turn up back on to the canal and continue left, soon coming to Purton. Interestingly, there is another part of Purton across the Estuary near Lydney.

6 Purton In Purton, go past the first swing bridge continuing along the canal, and then cross the second coming to the pretty village church. Turn left along the road for a few minutes.

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8 Track Turn right and stay with it all the way through a gate on to a wide grassy sward. Turn left and follow this along, bending right and coming down to the road in Brookend. Turn right to the Lammastide pub, a cosy and welcoming pub with a large garden, open for lunch daily.

Refreshments The Lammastide, Brookend, 01453 811337. Best to book for lunch Sundays or if you are a group

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Walks Martin Hesp

The Barle is the truly impressive contributory of the River Exe. It’s so impressive that one could question why it didn’t win the name game and become ascendant over the mother river. If it had, we’d have Barlemoor, Barleter and Barlemouth on our maps. It has many a fine moment as it passes Simonsbath, flows under lovely arched Landacre Bridge, slips through handsome little Withypool and ducks and dives through deep woods past famous Tarr Steps and beyond. That latter section makes for a particularly excellent river-side walk – one that I did recently in the company of Dr Nigel Stone, chief executive of the Exmoor National Park Authority. This year ENPA’s national park grant is £3,337,000 – in 2010/11 it was £4,177,453 – which represents a 20 per cent reduction. The grant for next year looks likely to be further reduced, resulting in a real-term reduction of around 33 per cent by the end 2015. As a result of the cutbacks the ENPA had, by July 2012, reduced its core staff from 79 fulltime equivalent posts to 58, a dip in capacity of around 26 per cent. As we walked down a much-repaired riverside path I asked Dr Stone if the cutbacks had meant noticeable differences in the work his authority had been able to carry out. “I guess, if it continues the way it has, there may come a point where we begin to struggle in a way that people would notice,” he replied. “At the moment we’ve reduced as much as we can. We now maintain half those we did, but we managed to get other arrangements in place without closing any.” We’d begun our walk in Withypool – a place I can never visit without recalling what the writer Walter Raymond noted a century ago, while describing meetings with various village worthies in a series of articles for The Spectator. What a varied bunch they were... Hurdle-makers, acorn-pickers, stone-crackers, haymakers and, most curious of all, the snail-catcher who collected his prey on behalf of a glass-factory. Alas, I’m ignorant as to how snails can be of any help in the manufacture of glass. This walk leaves the village by climbing the hill towards Winsford a few hundred metres before crossing a stile on the right which will introduce you to the famous river walk which follows the east bank of the Barle four twisting miles down to the famous clapper bridge at Tarr Steps. One thing about following a watercourse is that it is difficult, if not impossible, to lose the way. Rivers do not run in circles, so there’s little danger of that classic hiker’s lament of “I’m sure we passed this bit before...” By the way, being mainly at the bottom of a steep river valley, the path can get pretty muddy so good boots are a must, but certainly worthwhile. This part of the hike is a stunning mix of sloping meadow and deep oak and beech woodland, always with the fast-running Barle just a few feet away. A quarter of a mile after leaving the road you might be tempted to skip across the stepping stones which have been placed to accommodate a footpath from the other side of Withypool. Or at least in the summer you might. I have passed by when they were a good two feet under the torrent. About half-way down the valley the river takes an extravagant sweep and almost curves back on itself as it rounds Pit Wood. There are some old embankments here and close to the path I once found what might be one of Exmoor’s many standing stones. The trouble is that unlike ancient stones in other locations, where they can be as big

as Stonehenge, the dolmens or menhirs of Exmoor are often vertically challenged, as they say nowadays. In other words, many are so small it’s easy to miss them. A problem which faced four-wheeldrive tractor drivers a few years ago as they unwittingly ploughed some of Exmoor’s ancient landmarks into the ground, much to the concern of the national park. Anyway, this little 18in monolith is still at large... It was in these woods that I once met a national park ecologist, who was out on a lichen hunt: “The thing about Exmoor is that it has some of the purest, unpolluted air in Europe,” he told me. “So it’s a great place to find rare lichens which have, in many cases, died out elsewhere. These extraordinary organisms can act as a sort of barometer for pollution as they are the first thing to go in conditions such as acid rain.” And so to Tarr Steps with its often busy picnic meadow, excellent pub and, of course, clapper bridge. No one is sure of the age of this 180ft slab bridge with its 17 spans – it could be medieval or, if named after the ancient Sanskrit word “tara” meaning crossing, it could be much, much earlier still. Tennyson came here in the 1800s and he and his son recalled the “tawny cows” cooling off in the river. The beasts belonged to Ashway Farm where the farmer of the time died of an adder bite, but not before having fathered one George Williams. Sir George, as he became, left the lonely moors and went on to become founder of the YMCA. As one gazes dreamily at the past, it is often the magical names which ring down like the shimmering peels of a distant church. Tarr Steps once belonged to the Rev DS SweetappleHorlock who hunted and fished with great enthusiasm and wore riding boots under his cassock as he preached in Hawkridge Church. Our return journey starts by crossing the clapper-bridge and walking up the drive of the Tarr Steps Hotel, taking a right-hand path to run alongside the wood and on across the fields to Parsonage Farm. Here it’s right again to reach the road up at Westwater Farm. Now there is a stretch of Tarmac up the hill to the cattle grid where you have the choice of the slightly longer, off-road hike around Withypool Hill, or simply carrying on along the lane with its own tremendous views, down to Withypool itself. My opinion is that you’re home near-as-dammit, so turn left and climb to the top of Withypool Hill where you’ll be treated to one of Exmoor’s most impressive vistas with an ancient tumuli and a nearby Bronze Age Stone Circle thrown in for good measure. Either way you’ll have earned a drink by the fireside at the Royal Oak, where you can gaze into your glass and ponder why the local snails were once used in its manufacture.

Factfile Basic Hike: From the village of Withypool south along the River Barle to Tarr Steps, before returning along the hilltops to the west Recommended Map: Ordnance Survey Outdoor Leisure 109 Exmoor Distance and going: nine miles – fairly level with just a couple of steep climbs, but muddy in places

Nothing but ruts on Withypool Common, above; Tarr Steps path, top, known for picnics, a great pub and, of course, Clapper Bridge WCL-E01-S2

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Gardening Alan Down

Most of us are enjoying bumper harvests of tree fruits this year. And, during these financially difficult times; it would be silly not to make the most of it. Harvesting is the easy bit but storage still remains a hit-and-miss affair to many. But harvesting, and particularly knowing when to pick, has a great bearing on how well fruit stores. There are some general pointers to watch out for with apples and starting to see fruit fall off the tree is one of them. But alas, these “fallers” may be giving you the wrong story since often the earliest to fall are those with the codling moth maggots inside. Naturally, these are not worth trying to store and indeed any fruit that has fallen off the tree should be used straight away as bruised fruit will not store well. The codling moth problem can be addressed quite easily in future seasons by using pheromone traps to safely control this pest without sprays. However, the pheromone trap is most often used to indicate the best time to spray and therefore reducing the frequency of spraying since the caterpillars that burrow into the fruits as they develop are only controllable

when still on the outside of a fruit. Plastic tents containing sticky pads and a synthesised pheromone that mimics what the female moth emits to attract a mate, should be hung in trees early May and monitored regularly. Anyway, enough about pest-ridden fruits which we are not interested in storing. How do we know when a fruit is at the optimum stage to pick and will store well? Some apples can actually be shaken and if held close to the ear the pips can be heard to rattle (it’s best do this when the neighbour isn’t looking in your direction”) If the pips rattle it is a good indication that the fruit is almost ripe. By cutting a few apples open you will be able to see the colour of the pips and if they are beginning to go brown then that is a good indicator. Another pointer is that fruits come off the tree easily without having to tug them off. Avoid grasping the fruit with your finger tips and, instead, cup the apple in the palm of your hand and gently lift it. If ripe, the fruit should come away easily. If you grip with your fingertips then bruises made by each tip appear

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30 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013

within a few days. I’m sure that we have all seen this on shop-bought apples and, something that really irritates me on that softest of all fruits, the strawberry. When picking, handle each fruit with care and don’t just toss them into a bucket. Discard any blemished fruit or any that are already showing early signs of rotting. Brown rot is perhaps the worst one but is very easily recognised. One fruit becomes infected and through touching another, passes the disease on to its neighbour and so on until there is a mummified cluster of dry rotting fruit full of spores to carry the disease to other damaged fruit on the tree and even to next year’s crop. So having carefully selected and carefully handled only the best fruit, how can we store them? Well, I have found that I have great success by storing around 1-2kg at a time in clear polythene bags in a cool place. I carefully fill these ordinary freezer bags two thirds full, fold over the top and stand them upside down in trays in my cool, dark, airy garage. Using a pencil, I puncture the base of the bag by putting about a half dozen holes in it. Thin polythene will allow passage of gases but little if any moisture passes through. This creates a good atmosphere inside the bags that slows down the natural ageing process. It is important that the bags are checked every ten days or so and any fruits beginning to rot are promptly removed. Now before we get carried away and start storing every apple, there are varieties that will never store well and some that store much better than others. Those that are early and mid-season ripening varieties will not store. So forget Beauty of Bath, Discovery, Tydemans Early Worcester and even Worcester Pearmain itself. It’s debatable whether you go to the trouble of trying to store Fortune, Grenadier, Greensleeves, James Grieve and Katy. These are all better consumed as soon as ripe in my view. The ones to take the trouble over and will repay that trouble handsomely are Blenheim Orange, Egremont Russet, Cox’s Orange Pippin, Bountiful, Kidd’s Orange Red, Bramleys Seedling, Ashmead’s Kernel, Golden Delicious, Newton Wonder, Lane’s Prince Albert, Falstaff, Fiesta and many, many more. And what of those fruits that don’t make the grade? Well if you tire of apple pie then turn your odd shaped and substandard apples into delicious fruit juice. You may not have your own juice squeezing equipment and pasteuriser but increasingly enterprising individuals are offering the service locally and even personalising the bottle label.

Alan’s gardening tips for the weekend ● Fix grease bands to fruit tree trunks to trap wingless winter moths that will be climbing the trunks to lay their eggs soon. ● If your soil is “heavy” and has a high percentage of clay and/or silt content you can improve its structure and make it easier to work by digging in some Vitax Clay Breaker. This will stick the clay particles together and improve the structure of the soil permanently. Digging in lots of organic matter such as ‘Revive’ helps too. ● Sow sweetpeas for the best and earliest blooms next year. Use extra deep pots or better still “root trainers”. Plants established now can be over-wintered in a cold greenhouse, frame or glazed porch and will tolerate some frost. For the best plants, pinch out the leader when it gets about 10cm high and then select the strongest side shoot that grows and remove all the others. Plant outside in March in well prepared soil. ● Cover tender veg with polytunnels or cloches WCL-E01-S2


Garden talks ● Plant all forms of fruit trees, bushes and canes this month – this is the best time for planting. ● Clean shade material off greenhouses now. Wash the glass to get the maximum light into your plants. Replace any broken glass and block up any draught holes. ● Remove greenhouse crops and plants before burning a sulphur candle to kill most over-wintering pests. ● Sow Rosetta lettuce or Sutton’s Speedy Seed range of salad veg under some frost protection to get fresh veg throughout winter. Both are excellent and relatively easy. For a sheltered place outside sow Vaila which is a little gem type. ● Erect a net over your pond to prevent falling leaves from trees and shrubs getting into the water and increasing the nutrient levels when they breakdown. They may also deprive the fish of oxygen as they decompose. ● Remove dead leaves from pond plants as they die back.

Ask Alan QUESTION I have a Cistus x dansereaui Jenkyn Place bush which is now 5ft tall. Would it be OK to reduce the height and if so how much and when? From J Hunt

ANSWER

Cistus do not respond well to pruning hard and will not shoot from bare woody shoots. They do root from cuttings quite easily so can I suggest that you root some cuttings and grow them on so that you can eventually replace the old plant with the new one?

QUESTION Can I plant out antirrhinums now, grown on from plugs, which are about 4in high and quite bushy, rather than waiting until the spring? From H Wedlake

ANSWER

You can certainly plant them out now provided that they are acclimatised to being without protection (“hardened off ”). If they are not branched, you may wish to pinch the tops out too. Autumn is an excellent time to plant antirrhinum and they are remarkably tough.

Alan’s Plant of the Week – Wallflowers Hardly needing any introduction, this most traditional of autumn planted but spring blooming bedding biennial plant is well worth planting now. They are widely available as bare root plants that look very sad when planted out but soon pick-up and make fresh roots. Don’t ever make the mistake of leaving the roots of these in a bucket of water for more than just a few minutes. If you leave them for days not only will it kill the roots but it creates one of the most unpleasant stinks in the garden. Plant out into well-prepared soil in a sunny spot and add a general balanced fertiliser such as Vitax Q4. Plant tall tulip bulbs between them for a fantastic long springtime display.

What’s On Planting Demonstration of Containers for a Colourful Display Felicity Down shares her vast experience of which varieties of flowering, foliage and bulbs do best, so you can get colour from autumn through ’til late spring, in a talk and demonstration on Monday, October 14, at 7pm. Tickets cost £5 for RHS members, £7 nonmembers. Call 01934 832134.

Two of the country’s most popular gardeners are involved with this year’s Cheltenham Literature Festival. Monty Don and Carol Klein, from BBC’s Gardeners’ World, have books to promote. Just a few days ago Carol entertained and enlightened festival-goers with her knowledge of wildflowers, however Monty will be taking us across the Channel for an exploration of French gardens in his new book. At first glance, Monty’s A French Garden Journey, The Road to Le Tholonet is disappointing as a gardening book. An elegant but subdued cover encloses dense type and infrequent, small, black-andwhite photographs. Yet this worthy but dull appearance is misleading and the book is as much an exploration of French life and Monty himself as a discovering of French gardens, all written in the engaging and humorous style that has endeared him to TV viewers. We see him first as a 14-year-old visiting Paris with an indulgent aunt and uncle who let him smoke, drink and “most importantly of all, feel grown up. This was intoxicating beyond any amount of nicotine or alcohol”. Skip on four years and he is passing through France to Greece with a friend, busking to pay their way. “I was outstandingly, show-stoppingly awful,” he says. Greece was abandoned and Monty’s love of France was rekindled, leading to spending a year in Aix, where he planned to “learn fluent French and paint like Cézanne”. From here the book skits across France and across time from those early journeys as a teenager on a Mobylette to more recent forays. Each chapter focuses on a different garden, some internationally-known, such as Versailles, others less familiar, among them Prieuré Notre-Dame d’Orsan, where “the organisation of space – compressing it, expanding it out again, stretching it – is masterfully done”. Some are not even obviously gardens and include a war cemetery near Séricourt and La Défense in Paris. Not all the gardens meet with Monty’s approval and he does not shy away from criticising the sacred cows of French horticulture: Villandry, despite his sense that as a keen gardener “one surely should be delighted with it”, is judged dull, not least because the majority of the vegetables from the decorative plots end up on the compost heap: “And if a vegetable garden is not directly connected to food – potager to potage and kitchen garden to the kitchen – then it has no soul”. In his introduction, Monty outlines his aim of uncovering the French character through their gardens yet, just as interesting, is the insight the book offers in to Monty himself. ■ Monty Don is at the Sky Arts Garden Theatre, in Cheltenham, today (October 12), from 4pm-5pm

For Good Advice & Excellent Home Grown Plants visit your local nursery!

Picture guide Many of us are enjoying a bumper apple harvest this year and Alan Down has advice on, from left, bagging and storing them; autumn is the ideal time to plant antirrhinum; as well as wallflowers; Russets are good for storing

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Monty Don is at the Cheltenham Literature Festival

Cleeve Nursery

138 Main Road, Cleeve, BS49 4PW 01934 832134 www.cleevenursery.co.uk

SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 31


Antiques Poignant symbol of Titanic Henry Aldridge and Son The world-famous violin played by Titanic bandmaster Wallace Hartley will be auctioned on October 19 by Henry Aldridge and Son, the leading auctioneers of blue chip Titanic memorabilia. The instrument, which was discovered in 2006, was played by second-class passenger Mr Hartley on Titanic’s fateful night, April 14, 1912. It is being sold alongside a leather luggage case initialled W. H. H. (Wallace Henry Hartley), in which he placed the violin before going into the cold North Atlantic on the morning of April 15, 1912. The violin has been on exhibition since May at Titanic Branson and Titanic Pigeon Forge in the United States, the largest Titanic museums in the world, where more than 315,000 people viewed it, and later at Titanic Belfast, the award-winning visitor attraction in Northern Ireland. The violin itself is German, probably of the Berlin or Dresden school, circa 1880, bearing a later label, Giovan Paolo Maggini Brescia. It is a copy of a Maggini with double purfled back and front, the two-piece back of medium curl descending from the joint. The original varnish, now largely absent, is of a dark brown colour with a later golden brown covering. Its eventful life is reflected in the condition, with signs of restoration and large cracks on the body of the instrument. The tail plate fitted to the violin bears a silver hallmark, Chester, 1910, and is engraved “For WALLACE on the occasion of our ENGAGEMENT from MARIA”. It was given to Dewsbury resident Mr Hartley as a gift from his fiancée Maria Robinson on their engagement. Regarded as a hero in Titanic folklore, Hartley is credited with the decision to lead his eight-strong band into the historic hymn, Nearer, My God, to Thee, in an attempt to calm passengers as they boarded lifeboats. All eight men perished in the disaster, and Hartley’s remains were recovered on April 25, 1912 by the crew of the ship, MacKay Bennett. His body was recorded as number 224. Henry Aldridge and Son have great experience in auctioning and handling the rarest memorabilia to be offered and describe the Hartley Violin as “the Holy Grail”. Since its discovery, the violin has been the subject of an extensive scientific and historical investigation by some of the leading experts globally in their respective fields. The provenance of the instrument and associated collection can be traced back to Maria Robinson, Hartley’s fiancée, its discovery in Halifax Nova Scotia, through to the present day, an aspect of the archive that is covered in depth by Dewsbury author, Christian TennysonEkberg in his 400-page biography of Wallace Hartley and Maria Robinson, Nearer Our God to Thee. Henry Aldridge and Son employed the services of the British Government’s Home Office Forensic Science Service, a body providing scientific services to the police and other law enforcement agencies in the UK and overseas, to make scientific tests into the collection. Under the stewardship of Michael Jones, an FSS trace analysis and Crown Prosecution Witness expert with over 29 years’ experience in the field, the violin, music case and items recovered from Hartley’s body were subjected to numerous tests at the FSS Laboratory in Chepstow, Begbroke Nano, Oxford Materials Characterisation Services at the University of Oxford and Ridgeway Clinic in Swindon, where a CT scan of the interior of the instrument was conducted. The results of the trace analysis were found to be compatible with material that had been recovered from other Titanic victims, including Titanic postal worker Oscar Woody and third class passenger Carl Asplund. Mr Jones said: “In my opinion the findings in relation to the corrosion associated with the metal fixtures of the travel case in which the violin was recovered, and also to the portfolio, would be considered compatible with immersion in sea water. The silver fish plate present on the violin visually appears to be an original fixture. The four screw fixtures appear very heavily corroded. There was no evidence observed to suggest that this plate had been recently attached to the violin or had

32 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013

been attached as a replacement for an earlier fixture. Again the corrosion deposits associated with the surfaces of this silver metal fish plate would be considered compatible with immersion in sea water. This may be further supported by the findings in relation to the lining material of the travel case.” Craig Sopin is a world authority on the history of the Titanic, owning one of the largest private collections of Titanic artefacts. He has advised museums and auction rooms and is corporate secretary of the Titanic International Society. “To say I was sceptical at first would be an understatement,” said Mr Sopin. “But, after I conducted an exhaustively detailed investigation into the history and forensics of the instrument, I became convinced beyond doubt that this violin belonged to Wallace Hartley and that it was with him on RMS Titanic.” Richard Slater is a leading silver expert who serves on the Council of the Gemmological Association of Great Britain and is a graduate of Gem-A. London-based Gem-A is the longest established and most highly respected international gem education body. He was also the head of silver and jewellery at a leading London auctioneer for over 12 years. He said: “In my opinion the engraving on the silver panel is contemporary with the hallmarks and all the pieces are in original condition. I have examined the piece using a 10X loupe and it would appear that the silver panel has not been removed from the fish plate.” Andrew Hooker was brought in by the auctioneers for his expertise as a renowned violin expert and author, his impressive CV included seven years as head of musical instruments at Sotheby’s, where he handled violins ranging from modest instruments to Stradivari. “The style of the violin – that is, inexpensive, German, and factory-made, is entirely consistent with the status of a bandsman on a ship,” he said. Stanley Lehrer is founder and former president, publisher and editorial director of USA Today. He is also the world’s foremost collector of Titanic artefacts and memorabilia. Many

of his priceless pieces are showcased by Titanic Museum Attractions in Branson, MI and Pigeon Forge, TN, in the United States. He commented: “By analysing all the facts about the case and the violin, I am convinced that the violin is indeed the one Wallace Hartley played aboard Titanic and valued it enough to safeguard its survival.” Steve Santini has been a collector, historian and researcher of Titanic related relics for over 30 years and is regarded as a world authority on Titanic recovered items. He counts being a consultant on James Cameron’s movie, Titanic, on his impressive CV. He said: “Personally, I am of the opinion that the Hartley violin exhibits exactly the sort of condition issues one could expect to see in an instrument protected in a leather suitcase floating about for a number of days in very cold sea water.” Paul Burns, curator of Titanic Branson and Titanic Pigeon Forge, the world’s leading Titanic museums, said: “I have been profoundly lucky to handle thousands of artefacts from throughout the world’s history for more than 25 years. However, I am truly humbled by this precious violin and its provenance package, which is by far the most extensive in my personal experience.” John Joslyn, expedition leader of the first private exploration dive to Titanic and owner of the Titanic Museum Attractions in Branson MI and Pigeon Forge TN, said: “I’ve explored Titanic and documented my discoveries for television and even built two giant museum attractions in tribute to this iconic ship, but when I came face to face with the actual violin Hartley had played that cold April night, the whole Titanic experience came into focus, bringing an emotional and melancholy close to a catastrophic chapter in the Titanic story.” Steve Turner, is the bestselling author of The Band That Played On, the story of Wallace Hartley and the Titanic’s band. He describes the iconic nature of the instrument: “I first heard about the existence of the Hartley violin while researching my book, that told the stories of the eight musicians. At that time it

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was still undergoing forensic tests but everything I knew about it pointed to it being the real thing and I confidently made this claim in my final chapter. As a piece of the Titanic story I can’t think of another artefact so imbued with poignancy and history as the instrument on which bandleader Hartley played his favourite hymn, Nearer, My God, To Thee, as the great ship tilted beneath the icy sea. It is a great symbol of faith, survival and enduring love.” Alan Aldridge, company principal of Henry Aldridge and Son, said: “Bandleader Hartley was an incredibly brave man whose actions helped to calm passengers during Titanic’s last hours. The authentication process behind the collection has been a long and exhaustive one, with some of the world’s leading experts in their respective fields helping to assemble a conclusive package of independent reports to accompany the archive.” Andrew Aldridge, a chartered valuation surveyor with Henry Aldridge and Son, said: “The Wallace Hartley Titanic violin is one of the most iconic collectables from the 20th century. The violin has attracted interest from collectors all over the world, especially after its recent successful three-month exhibition in the United States, where in excess of 300,000 enthusiasts viewed it. It then moved on to Titanic Belfast for a further three-and-a-halfweek exhibition period.” The violin will have one final poignant stop before being sold. After being approached by Dewsbury Council, it was felt appropriate that the violin should come home to Yorkshire and the town where Wallace Hartley chose to live for one last time before being sold on October 19. Henry Aldridge and Son will also be selling some other highly important items relating to the Titanic in the auction. These include a unique archive of photographs from the recovery ship Mackay Bennett’s Fourth Officer, Westy Legate, one of which shows a number of Titanic victims on the deck of the cable ship prior to their burial. This image is estimated at £3,000 to £5,000. Another fine lot consists of a unique original insurance ledger providing insurance coverage for Titanic’s hull in the amount of

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A unique archive of photographs from the recovery ship Mackay Bennett’s Fourth Officer, Westy Legate, will go under the hammer, including this one, showing a number of Titanic victims on the deck of the cable ship prior to their burial. Main picture: the world-famous violin played by Titanic bandmaster Wallace Hartley as the liner slipped under the waves $100,000, from the archives of the Atlantic Mutual Insurance Company. Atlantic Mutual was founded in America in 1838 and became the largest marine and general insurance firm in North America by the mid-19th century. It was one of the major insurers of Titanic, if not the primary property coverage provider, providing the Oceanic Steam Navigation Company, Limited (Titanic’s parent company) with what is believed to be more coverage for the ship than any of the many other single carriers which were part of Titanic’s insurance consortium. Titanic was insured for $5m (£1m) and this document carries a notation reading: “To include the trip from Belfast to Southampton sailing on or after March 31, 1912 at 7pm and the risk of trials on said trip if any.” It is estimated at £10,000 to £15,000, with a very rare publicity poster for the Titanic by Montague Black estimated at £30,000 to£40,000. Over 250 lots will be going under the hammer, with estimates from £50 up to £200,000.

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SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 33


ANTIQUES, FURNITURE & COLLECTABLES including Selection of Vintage Clothing & Military Aviation Prints

Saturday 19th October at 10am Viewing: Friday 18th October 10am until 8pm & Saturday from 8.30am

Shop Mannequin

Victorian Sofa Table

Oil Portrait

19th C Dining Table (13 ft)

Ash Wardrobe

Two Flintlock Pistols

De Condomy Watercolour

Beswick Horses

Taxidermy Owl

Silver Masonic Medals

German Bayonets

Limited Edition Signed Military Prints

Vintage Clothing

Printing Trays & Letters

Carved Oak Chair

ENTIRES WANTED for our forthcoming auction of

POSTCARD, STAMP & COINS, FILM, MUSIC & EPHEMERA Please contact us for free no obligation advice or Home Visits available

www.wessexauctionrooms.co.uk

tel: 01249

720888

Established Local Auctioneers -One minute off J17 of M4 Westbrook Farm, Draycot Cerne, Chippenham, Wilts. SN15 5LH

34 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013

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NE I NL G O IN E V IDD I L B


Antiques FROM PAGE 33

Rarities and collectables

Collections worth scrutiny

Lawrences

Mendip Auction Rooms

Lawrences’ forthcoming Autumn Fine Art auction in Crewkerne will comprise over 2,200 lots, sold across three days (October 15 to 18). In addition, there will be about 800 lots in the weekly general sale on Wednesday. “It has been a very busy summer for us all,” said Lawrences’ director, Anthony Kilroy. “Since our main summer auction in early July, we have had a successful book auction of 300 lots, an auction of a private collection of 330 pictures by three artists and a run of weekly sales that have seen the salerooms filled to overflowing with goods for sale. This selection for October comprises lots from across the world, with a vast variety of collectable antiques for every pocket. Estimates start at as little as £50. “The first day alone runs to over 830 lots, so we expect to be busy throughout the week. These catalogues have proved to be a very popular format for vendors and buyers alike and already the shelves are filling up for our first auctions of 2014.” Highlights of the October week will be a Victorian silver racing trophy of a knight on horseback, standing nearly 23in high (£5,000 to £7,000,); a rare 18th century German quartz snuff box (£6,000 to £8,000); a magnificent sapphire and diamond pendant with a 17-carat sapphire (£8,000 to £10,000,); an Art Deco jade and diamond ring (£6,000 to £7,000); and a pair of ruby and diamond earrings (£4,000 to £6,000). There is a small Peking glass vase from the Qianlong era (late 18th century), decorated with pink glass overlaying white glass (£500 to £600); a Doucai cup stand from the Chengua era (late 15th century,) at £1,500 to £1,800, and collections of fans and vinaigrettes with estimates from £50 upwards. In the selection of 300 pictures on Friday, there are etchings by Whistler (£200 to £1,200 each) and a rediscovered oil by Edmund Blair Leighton from 1920 (£15,000 to £25,000,). Finishing off

The next sale at the Mendip Auction Rooms will be one of antiques, fine art and collectables on October 19 – and this will be immediately followed by the quarterly sporting sale. A good number of shotguns and firearms have been entered, together with items associated with all sports, including country sports. Entered into the antique, fine arts and collectables sale are a collection of pictures, including an oil on canvas by Sir Frederick Goodall estimated at £1,500 to £2,000, two single early 18th-century portraits, one of a lady in a blue dress, £1,000 to £1,500, and the other a portrait of a gentleman in a yellow waistcoat, £2,000 to £3,000, both in heavy gilt frames. There are also a number of collectable items, including an interesting collection of trench art including a tank shell stamped with Middle Eastern cities, a pestle and mortar and an ash tray, £50 to £80, a Victorian rosewood and Tunbridge Ware tea caddy inlaid with castle decoration, possibly Eridge Castle, and floral bands, with moulded glass sugar liner and two tea compartments with lids – £200 to £300 – and a Japanese ivory puzzle ball, £100 to £150. Again at Mendip Auction Rooms, there is also a good collection of jewellery and silver, including two silver pin cushions, one in the form of a goat, and a very good collection of continental and English silver coins and bank notes. Viewing for the antiques and sporting sales takes place on October 17 and 18. A further general sale of Victorian and later effects will take place on October 29. The auction rooms are open from 10am to 5pm, Monday to Friday, and free valuations can be given. Alternatively, the team are also able to undertake free home visits.

An unusually large Edwardian Goliath pocket watch, top, with a 12cm white enamel dial drew a great deal of interest with Greenslade Taylor Hunt, and bidding began at £180 thanks to pre-sale bids on the piece. This figure was swiftly dwarfed as bidding rose dizzily to £500. Bottom: this Doucai cup stand from the Chengua era features with Lawrences of Crewkerne next week

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the sale, there is a fine stumpwork looking glass from the late 17th century (£2,000 to £3,000), a very decorative pair of Irish card tables (£15,000 to £20,000) and a set of four Louis XV ormolu wall lights (£6,000 to £8,000,). The sale is on view now and can be viewed online at www.lawrences.co.uk

Big hands for small watch Greenslade Taylor Hunt Inclement weather conditions outside did not dampen the enthusiasm of buyers at Greenslade Taylor Hunt’s monthly antiques sale last Thursday. An unusually large Edwardian Goliath pocket watch with a 12-cm white enamel dial drew a great deal of interest and bidding began at £180 thanks to pre-sale bids on the piece. This figure was swiftly dwarfed as bidding rose dizzily to £500. This mighty sum proved enough for the successful bidder in the sale room to secure the watch. The star lot was a French glass Milliefiori paperweight in the manner of Baccarat. This small showstopper measured just nine centimetres in diameter and was expected to make between £300 and £400. Again considerable pre-sale demand had pushed the price up as potential buyers vied for ownership and the bidding opened at £500. There was plenty of determined interest from telephone bidders and those in the Taunton saleroom. The gavel finally came down at a dazzling £2,200 – a victory for a phone bidder. Other highlights included an Italian micro mosaic brooch featuring a charming spaniel. This went for £260, comfortably exceeding its £100 to £150 estimate. An early 20th century Arts and Crafts brass table lamp fetched £200 and was bought by a telephone bidder. This had been guided at between £50 and £80. The next monthly sale, which will feature a special

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SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 35


OUR NEXT TWO DAY AUCTION ON OCTOBER 18TH AND 19TH AT CASTLE COMBE CIRCUIT, SN14 7EY

DAY 1: OVER 1,000 LOTS OF AUTOMOBILIA INCLUDING OVER 100 ENAMEL SIGNS, APPROX. 30 PETROL PUMP GLOBES, PETROL PUMPS, OIL CANS, LITERATURE, BADGES AND MASCOTS, SPARES, ARTWORKS, STATIONARY ENGINES AND LOTS MORE DAY 2: APPROXIMATELY 40 MOTORCYCLES AND 70 VINTAGE AND CLASSIC CARS, COMMERCIALS AND MILITARY VEHICLES INCLUDING

Rare Clevecol glass globe Est: £850-1,000

Pratts double sided enamel sign Est: £550-750

Rare Tipp & Co tinplate petrol pumps Est: £1,500-2,000

Rare double sided bus related enamel sign Est: £1,000-1,500

1960 Triumph TR6 Trophy Est: £8,600-8,800

1997 Metisse Café Racer Est: £7,500-8,000

1970 BSA A75R Rocket III Est: £10,000-12,000

1960 BSA Bantum D1 Est: £1,000-1,500

1959 Jaguar XK150 FHC Est: £35,000-45,000

1971 Morris Minor Traveller Est: £4,000-5,000

1960 MG A 1600 Est: £19,000-20,000

1930 Austin 7 RK Saloon Est: £6,000-8,000

1928 Lagonda 2-Litre Speed Model Est: £35,000-45,000

1962 Bedford Lorry Est: £9,000-10,000

1965 Ausin Gipsy Est: £6,000-7,000

1939 Morris Commercial Breakdown Est: £6,500-7,500

Fully illustrated catalogue at www.richardedmondsauctions.co.uk

Unit H, The Old Laundry, Ivy Road, Chippenham, SN15 1SB Tel: 01249 444544

36 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013

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©LW


Antiques FROM PAGE 35

for taking on five German Focke-Wulf 109 fighter planes in a dogfight near Cherbourg on June 26, 1944. His MBE was awarded for his part in airlifting European evacuees from the Belgian Congo during the bloody revolution there in 1960. Chinese artefacts continued to attract big money, with a 40cm-wide 19th century famille jaune punch bowl with an all-over figural panel decoration in imperial yellow achieving £2,400. And an early tourist trinket – a circa 1800 circular amber box decorated with a scene of a bridge over a river – sold for well in excess of its £300 to £500 estimate, making a very substantial £2,100. For more information about buying and selling at auction, go to www.mooreallen.co.uk

paintings section, takes place at The Octagon Salerooms, East Reach, Taunton, on Thursday, November 7. Free valuation mornings are held each Monday from 9am to 1pm. Home visits can also be arranged by appointment. Call Stuart Triggol, saleroom manager, on 01823 332525 for further details.

Tribute to philanthropist Tamlyns A silver gilt trophy that had been presented to the philanthropist Sir Robert Mayer is to be sold at Tamlyns’ antiques auction in Bridgwater on Tuesday, October 29. Sculpted by David Maude Roxby Montalto di Fragnito, the three silver gilt figures represent youth, philanthropy and music and are mounted on a hardwood base with an engraved silver plaque. Behind this plaque is a compartment holding the original presentation book which contains a description of the piece as well as signatures of the sculptor, trustees, directors and members of the orchestras. It was commissioned by the London Philharmonic and the London Symphony orchestras to be presented in the presence of the Queen on his 100th birthday, the same day as he received his knighthood. The trophy lacks two engraved crystal discs which would have been held by the two side figures, otherwise it is complete. Mayer founded the London Philharmonic in 1932 and helped to found the London Schools Symphony orchestra in 1951. A gala concert for his 100th birthday was held at the Royal Festival Hall London and music was played by the London Philharmonic under Bernard Keeffe. He died in 1985 having acquainted generations of youngsters with classical music through concerts he started in 1923, among whom were the Queen and Prince Charles. Not an easy thing to estimate, auctioneer Claire Rawle hopes it will sell for between £400 and £500. All lots with images will be online at least a week before the sale. For further information contact the auctioneers on 01278 445251 or go to www.tamlyns.co.uk to see other items entered into this sale.

Childhood memories rekindled Charterhouse A child’s tea set, which dates to the end of the 18th century, is being sold by Charterhouse in Sherborne, West Dorset, and expected to sell for over £1,000. “We are fortunate in our business to see a huge variety of items. With beauty in the eye of the beholder, sometimes they are good, sometimes they are bad, and sometimes they are ugly,” said Richard Bromell. “However, we should also have a section for the items which are simply divine, because this is the section where this child’s tea set should be with its wonderful naive charm and appeal.” The child’s, or doll’s house tea set being sold by Charterhouse dates to around 1780. Made by the porcelain manufacturer Caughley, it closely resembles wares made by Worcester at the same time. Produced purely for a child to play with and enjoy, the chances are it was bought as a matching miniature set to the parents’ own set, thus enabling the child to emulate the parents’ tea rituals. The proceeds of this charming miniature tea set, which goes under the Charterhouse hammer in Sherborne on Friday October 25, will benefit the Southampton Hospital Charity. With few such little tea sets surviving in the 21st century, there will be plenty of collectors of early English porcelain and collectors of doll’s house items bidding on the lot, which is estimated at £1,000 to £1,500. Charterhouse are now accepting entries for their forthcoming programme of antiques auctions, with specialist sections of ceramics, pictures and books in October, silver, watches and jewellery in November – and for their next auction of classic cars and motorcycles also in November. For further information regarding these auctions, or to arrange a home visit, contact Richard Bromell, partner at Charterhouse, The Long Street Salerooms, Sherborne, Dorset, telephone 01935 812277, or email the auctioneers on info@charterhouse-auctions.co.uk

A hero remembered Moore Allen & Innocent Bidders were willing to fork out thousands of pounds for silver cutlery sets at an auction of antiques in the Cotswolds last week. Auctioneers were pleased to achieve £5,500 for a 24-piece canteen of 19th century Russian silver cutlery in the fiddle and thread pattern – comfortably within the £5,000 to £7,000 estimate. Sugar tongs, ladles and fish slices complemented the knives, forks and spoons, by Nichols & Pink of St Petersburg, which weighed in at a total of 346.53 ounces of silver. But auctioneers were surprised and delighted in equal measures when a modern canteen, containing an eight-place setting, made exactly the same hammer price. The 82 pieces, which weighed in at 93.5 ounces of silver, were made by Robert Welch of Chipping Campden in 1978. The business, which was founded by the Royal College of Art graduate in 1969, continues trading from the Cotswold market town to this day. “The Robert Welch cutlery was beautifully, ergonomically designed,” said auctioneer Philip Allwood of Moore Allen & Innocent in Cirencester. “These are the antiques of the future.” The cutlery didn’t achieve the highest lot price of the day, however. That was reserved for an oriental-style 18th-century red lacquered and gilt chinoiserie decorated desk, which made £7,000, against an estimate of £3,000 to £5,000. A collection of medals, which had attracted significant media interest thanks to a fascinating provenance, made £5,400. The medals – which included a DFC and an MBE – were awarded to Wing Commander Paul Bingham Elwell, from Highworth, near Swindon. He received his Distinguished Flying Cross

Tamlyns Saleroom Bridgwater 15 October 2013 Tamlyns Saleroom At 10.00 am GENERAL SALE 340 Lots Including costume jewellery, gold & silver items. 3 silver photo frames, ladies & gents watches. Postcards and postage stamps. Large selection of pottery and china ware, ornaments, tea and dinner ware. Pair antique Doulton Lambeth vases, etc. Assorted glassware. Brass and metalware including art noveau adjustable column oil lamp. Silver plated items. Oil paintings, pictures and prints. Furniture including inlaid walnut Davenport, Victorian nursing chair. Inlaid mahogany bureau. Victorian and Edwardian occasional tables. Oak dining table and gateleg table. Sets mahogany and oak dining chairs. Oak desk, pine and mahogany chests of drawers, Edwardian wardrobes. Reproduction safe table, corner cabinet, coffee tables, etc, etc, etc. Various tools and collection of vintage petrol cans. On view Monday 14th 9.30 am – 5.00 pm. Contents list only available on sale morning. Tamlyns Tel. 01278 445251 ©LW

Corsham Court collection Chorley’s

Featured here, from the top, a collection of medals awarded to Wing Commander Paul Bingham Elwell made £5,400 with Moore Allen & Innocent; a tea pot from a late 18th century Caughley tea set is being sold by Charterhouse for £1,000 to £1,500; a Victorian silver ‘castle top’ card case sold for £3,800 with Chorley’s; Moore Allen & Innocent were pleased to achieve £5,500 for a 24-piece canteen of 19th-century Russian silver cutlery; a silver gilt trophy, that had been presented to the philanthropist Sir Robert Mayer, is to be sold by Tamlyns

Chorley’s two-day sale on Wednesday, September 25 and Thursday, September 26 saw strong prices across a number of categories. The selection of items removed from Corsham Court in Wiltshire was well received and achieved a premium-inclusive total in excess of £100,000. The Corsham Court lots were typical country house fare, which continues to perform strongly. Another fresh-to-the-market collection comprised approximately 160 lots of silver and vertu that have spent the last 50 years in a bank vault. Amassed by one Cotswold family through marriage and inheritance since the 1760s, the group contained items that would not have been on the market since their original purchase. The biggest surprise of the day was a small oil on board by Frank H Johnston which was found in a satchel at the back of a store cupboard containing old books and suitcases. Frank Johnston was a founder member of the Canadian “Group of Seven” and on the day it fetched an astonishing £11,500. WCL-E01-S2

SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 37


Television Adam Postans screen shots

You can see how it probably happened. Channel 4 had a late-night brainstorming session to “think outside the box”. Hours of nothing, then suddenly one bright spark pipes up: “Let’s think INSIDE the box. Put couples in one. They could have sex and everything!” So it was that Sex Box entered the world kicking and screaming. It’s Phillip Schofield’s Cube minus the inconvenience of actually being able to see and hear what’s going on inside. A pair of “very brave volunteers” walks in, as if they’re about to be asked by Davina McCall if they’re ready to play The Million Pound Drop, and has nookie. “Immediately afterwards,” said host Mariella Frostrup, “they talk frankly about what they did to a panel of sex experts and our studio audience.” Only in the case of all three couples, right after this commercial break. As for talking frankly, one lot clammed up the moment they were asked for details. So you may be wondering, reasonably, what was the point. Well, apparently, there has “never been a greater need to talk about sex”, a statement disproved instantly by panellist Tracey Cox: “When the internet first came out it was all porn but now there’s tonnes of good information out there.” But don’t accuse C4, the people who gave Keith Allen ecstasy in the name of “science”, of making this purely for Twitter trending, today’s barometer of a show’s success. Oh no. Frostrup had this pre-emptive strike: “A lot of people might think getting our couples to have sex is a TV gimmick,” (surely not), “but there’s a lot of research to say...” Yeah, yeah. Whatever. The truth is this was just a giggle, which explains the box’s hilarious traffic light system indicating when the deed is done. That being the case, they could have had more fun with it. When Dean and Rachel recalled: “We took our clothes off, then a bit of foreplay and then went into it,” to hear expert Phillip Hodson reply: “Into...?” Frostrup should have been there with a whiteboard and permanent marker and said: “Time we had that chat about the birds and the bees, Phil.” Forming part of C4’s Campaign For Real Sex season, I so wanted to see a heavily bearded man in a woolly jumper with a love for cask ale looking lost in the audience after misreading the memo from CAMRA. The couples also ticked so many boxes – straight, gay, lesbian, wheelchair-bound – that I half expected a two-headed dwarf wearing a gimp mask and nipple clamps to emerge. And the host could have followed Cox suggesting: “A simple way to keep things going sexually long term is to change one thing every time,” by asking: “The sheets?” Frostrup did, however, steer events in the humorous manner intended. If nothing else, it teed up one of my favourite TV moments of the year, during the second ad break, moments after gay pair Matt and John exited the box looking flustered. The voice of Rob Brydon: “B&Q can help you say goodbye to your unloved rooms, the stain that has no shame and the love nest that’s lost its allure. “You can do it, Britain. Now is the time to man up your sex cave.” You couldn’t make it up.

■ So here we go then, headlong into X Factor’s live shows with all the expectations and thrill levels of a condemned man on death row. Any chance of a series-salvaging comedy element was snuffed out at Judges’ House when dog-killing flute menace Andrea Magee hit a bum top note and was sent packing. Nothing short of “Devon diva” Shelley Smith showing up tonight in a cow fancy dress costume mooing the Yeo Valley adverts can now raise a smile. There’ve been too many tears, not just from the contestants, and too many acts with a dodgy past. That said, I have absolutely no idea why anyone would be too fussed about whether or not Gary Barlow will be putting a singer with an alleged history of thuggery back into a pop group. It never did Girls Aloud any harm. ■ It’s only taken 11 series. But if I’m not very much mistaken, Len Goodman has finally got the point of Strictly Come Dancing, a milestone moment revealed when he told Dave Myers he looks forward to him most of all. Yet the Hairy Biker’s routine doesn’t even make my podium of top moments from last Saturday night, which speaks volumes about this series’ pedigree. It was eclipsed by Tony Jacklin’s plus fours, Sophie Ellis-Bextor’s celebratory Charleston and Mark Benton, in an hallucinogenic shirt, giving the salsa quite some welly to Bom Bom, by Sam and the Womp. A word of caution, though. BBC1’s ballroom has no place for tears. I’m looking at you, Vanessa Feltz. ■ BBC1’s The Day I Got My Sight Back followed blind Ian Tibbetts whose vision was restored in a radical operation to drill a plastic lens into one of his teeth and implant it into his eye. World’s first case of an eye for an eye, a tooth for an eye. ■ Alex Jones on The One Show: “Take Me Out has produced two engagements and one baby. “But there are even stranger places to meet the love of your life than a TV dating show.” Cleethorpes?

spuduhate... ■ Corrie’s Nick Tilsley grumping his way into a personality transplant, and the absence of Jeremy Kyle to reveal the imminent paternity test results. ■ ITV2 magic show Tricked going about like Derren Brown and Dynamo never happened. ■ Downton Abbey pretending it didn’t deliberately court controversy with the rape storyline, plus everyone on telly debating the stupid thing. ■ The disappointment C5’s Fat For Cash wasn’t a version of The Bachelor featuring 30 enormous women throwing themselves at former Wimbledon champion Pat Cash. ■ And C4 thinking it needed a wordplay panel show, with David Mitchell and Micky Flanagan, Was It Something I Said? Yes. Yes it was. So rearrange these words into the correct order. Off. Clear.

spudulike...

One half of The Wrong Mans, James Cordon, which keeps delivering week after week, says Adam PICTURE: BBC

38 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013

■ The inspirational Pride of Britain Awards (aka Britain’s Got Talent’s open-mic auditions). ■ BBC2’s The Wrong Mans delivering week after week. ■ Claire Danes and Mandy Patinkin in C4’s Homeland, which returned at a slower-thanbreakneck speed of series two but is still the best thing on TV right now. ■ And this rare moment of honesty on C5’s Celebrity Wedding Planner. Bride’s best friend: “Hello, I’m Katie.” Pete Burns: “And I’m your worst nightmare.”

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Television Keeley Bolger

Michael Buerk is stepping into the past in a new series of Britain’s Secret Treasures

Michael Buerk has just had a refreshing dip in the sea and is heading for a glass of wine. Even as he enjoys these luxuries, the broadcaster admits to feeling a little blue. “Me and my wife have got a little boat which we keep in a bay in southern Turkey,” explains Buerk who lives in Guildford, Surrey, with spouse Christine. “We’ve been out here for seven weeks but it’s all coming to an end now, which is rather sad.” The sun may be setting on the Turkish holiday but there are plenty of good things happening back in the UK for the 67-year-old. The docu-series Inside The National Trust, in which he discovers more about our great houses by speaking to the people who work behind the scenes, has just begun. And then there’s the upcoming second series of Britain’s Secret Treasures, which sees Buerk and historian and co-presenter Bettany Hughes reveal the stories behind objects

which ordinary people have found. “These are not things being discovered by professional archaeologists but by the likes or you and me who have that kind of hobby or good fortune to have stumbled on some relic of previous age,” he says. While Buerk admits he doesn’t think he’s “got the patience to look for treasure myself ”, he has been studiously visiting ancient sites rather than lolling around on the beach during his holiday. “I go to museums quite a lot anyway, and in Turkey we sailed around an area that’s particularly rich in the relics of ancient civilisations,” says Buerk, the former BBC journalist and newsreader who is perhaps still best known for his coverage of the Ethiopian famine in 1984 which prompted Bob Geldof to set up Live Aid. “We spent an awful amount of time tramp-

ing around these extraordinary sites on the Turkish coast. I compare notes with Bettany because she actually knows all about them. I’m an amateur in these matters.” Although Buerk is modest about his credentials, he is, by his own admission, fascinated by ships and, as a self-proclaimed “boatee”, tried out his sea legs on a replica of an ancient vessel during the series. “If I’ve got a favourite object in this series it’s the most extraordinary ancient log boat that was discovered on a riverbed in Perthshire, Scotland,” says Buerk, who’s joined by famous guests Kevin Whateley, Mariella Frostrup, Katherine Jenkins and Vic Reeves over the eight weeks. “It was just sticking out of the reeds and no one knew what it was. It’s like the QE2 of canoes – it’s absolutely enormous and it’s thousands of years old. “The opportunity to go paddling around in a boat on Loch Tay and to find out about these people who lived so long ago was a dream.” Boats aside, he has his own rather more humble treasure at home – a watchman’s clock made by his great-great-great grandfather’s patent name, which had been sold to the Pennsylvania State Railway. “He emigrated in the early part of the 19th century from the Black Forest in Germany to America and he and his brother, who remained in Germany, patented this watchman’s clock – a big brass thing that watchmen would take on their rounds,” says Buerk. “There would have been a key that would go into the clock to make a mark on the card, so supervisors would know that the watchman had been at that particular spot at that particular time.” The clock itself is a “wonderful, chunky,

brass, Victorian artefact”, but Buerk is more enchanted by the meaning attached to it than its design. “I suppose the theme of all this is not the object itself but how it connects you to the past,” he says. Discovering his own heritage has proven something of a revelation for Buerk, who has twin sons and four “terrific” grandchildren, as he knew little about his father’s family. “My family history was a voyage of discovery,” says the journalist who presented BBC One disaster series 999 throughout the Nineties. “My father was a Canadian army officer during the war and he had a fairly complicated and turbulent time with my mother. When I was three they split up and my mother came to the UK. “I had no connection to my father afterwards, so I didn’t know anything about the history on that side of the family.” Buerk’s own sons were studying family history at school when their well-known father began delving into the archives and now the presenter hopes they’ll pass on their stories to the next generation of Buerks. “My children were pretty interested in the family history then, and now they’ve got their own children that prompts interest in the past and previous generations,” he says. “Like all these things, one has a personal connection to the past and then the reported one.”

Inside The National Trust is on ITV on Sunday evenings. Britain's Secret Treasures returns to ITV on Thursday. An accompanying book, published by Headline Books, priced £20

PICKS OF THE WEEK

DOCUMENTARY Stephen Fry travels the globe to talk to gay folk about the trauma of ‘coming out’ (Monday, BBC2, 9pm)

DOCUMENTARY Lost Heroes of World War One features archive interviews with eye witnesses (Saturday, Five, 6.30pm)

DRAMA Following the drama of last week’s Downton Abbey, fans will be desperate to see what happens (Sunday, ITV, 9pm)

MUSIC The Rolling Stones Return to Hyde Park: Sweet Summer Sun (Saturday, BBC One, 10.35pm)

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NATURE The Great British Year is a visual feast from the BBC Natural History Unit (Tuesday, BBC One, 9pm)

DRAMA Utterly gripping, Steven Knight’s post-First World War drama, Peaky Blinders, reaches its conclusion, (Thursday, BBC2, 9pm)

SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 39


Saturday television&radio Saturday’s Television Guide TV PICKS

ATLANTIS 8.30pm, BBC1

An argument with a nobleman sees Jason and his friends forced to face a deadly challenge – but as they pull together, dark forces conspire against them.

BBC1 BBC1

7.30 Breakfast (S,HD). 10.00 Saturday Kitchen Live (S). 11.30 Paul Hollywood’s Bread (R,S,HD). 12.00 Football Focus (S,HD). 12.45 Saturday Sportsday (S,HD). 1.00 BBC News; Regional News and Weather (HD). 1.20 Formula 1: Japanese Grand Prix – Qualifying (S,HD). 2.35 MotoGP (S,HD). 3.35 Ronnie’s Animal Crackers (R,S,HD). 4.35 Escape to the Country (R,S,HD). 5.20 BBC News; Regional News and Weather (S,HD). 5.40 Pointless Celebrities (S,HD).

FILM RATINGS ●●●●● Excellent ●●●● Very good ●●● Good ●● Average ● Poor

THE X FACTOR 8pm, ITV

THE JONATHAN ROSS SHOW The chance for the final 12 to shine has arrived 10.15pm, ITV as they take to the stage in the first live studio round, performing hits from the 1980s. Dermot O’Leary then announces the act with the lowest number of votes, who will face the sing-off in the results programme. The results are tomorrow at 8pm.

BBC2 BBC2

6.00 This Is BBC Two (S). 6.55 Film: Lady of Deceit (S) (1947). ●●● 8.25 Film: Two-Way Stretch (S) (1960). ●●●● 9.50 The Sky at Night (R,S,HD). 10.10 Reel History of Britain (R,S). 10.40 The Life of Birds (R,S). 11.30 Fred Dibnah’s Industrial Age (R,S). 12.00 The A to Z of TV Cooking (S). 12.45 Talking Pictures (S). 1.35 Astaire and Rogers Sing the Great American Songbook (R,S). 2.05 Film: Carefree (S) (1938). ●●● 3.30 South Pacific (R,S,HD). 4.30 Urban Jungle (S,HD). 5.00 Flog It! (S,HD).

THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU 9pm, Channel 4

The host returns for a new series, with Tom Hanks and Sandra Bullock talking about their new films, Captain Phillips and Gravity, and Cilla Black reflects on her 50-year career.

ITV1 ITV

6.00 CITV 9.25 Saturday Cookbook (R,S,HD). 10.25 Murder, She Wrote (R,S,HD). 11.25 ITV News and Weather (S). 11.30 Surprise Surprise (R,S,HD). 12.35 The Dales (R,S,HD). 1.00 Doc Martin (R,S). 2.00 The X Factor (R,S,HD). Gary Barlow and Nicole Scherzinger each select their final three. 3.50 Film: Horrid Henry: The Movie (S,HD) (2011). Children’s comedy, starring Theo Stevenson. ●● 5.35 Regional News (S). 5.45 ITV News and Weather (S).

A politician is attracted to a dancer he meets at a pivotal moment in his life, but finds his every effort to get to know her is thwarted by a group of mysterious men. He realises these shadowy figures are manipulating him and moving him toward a predetermined fate. Sci-fi thriller, starring Matt Damon.

Channel Channel 4

6.10 The Hoobs (R,S). 6.35 British GT (S). 7.00 FIM Superbike World Championship (S). 7.30 XTERRA England (S). 8.00 The Morning Line (S,HD). 9.00 The American Football Show (S). 10.00 Frasier (R,S). 10.30 Everybody Loves Raymond (R,S). 11.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,S,HD). 12.00 The Simpsons (R,S). 12.30 Undercover Boss USA (R,S). 1.30 Channel 4 Racing (S,HD). 4.10 Come Dine with Me (R,S,HD).

Channel Channel 5

6.00 Milkshake! 10.10 Power Rangers: Megaforce (S,HD). 10.40 Slugterra (S,HD). 11.05 The Dog Rescuers (R,S,HD). 11.35 Animal Maternity (R,S,HD). 12.35 Film: Columbo: Dead Weight (S) (1971). Crime drama, starring Peter Falk. ●●● 2.10 Film: Mosquito Squadron (S) (1968). Second World War drama, starring David McCallum. ●● 4.00 Film: Battle of Britain (S,HD) (1969). Second World War drama, starring Laurence Olivier. ●●●

War Hero in My Family, 8pm

6.30 Strictly Come Dancing (S,HD). Last week, Tony Jacklin and Aliona Vilani performed their last dance when the judges voted them out. Now Strictly celebrates romance, with the remaining couples performing their routines to some of the greatest love songs of all time. The results are tomorrow at 7.20pm

6.00 Robert Peston Goes Shopping (R,S,HD). 2/3. The BBC News business editor examines the shopping boom of the late 1990s and early 2000s.

6.00 New You’ve Been Framed! (S). Harry Hill narrates. 6.30 Fool Britannia (S,HD). 2/6. A pizza delivery driver gets embroiled in a hostage negotiation. 7.00 The Chase: Celebrity Special (S,HD). 2/11. With Anton Du Beke, Denise Van Outen, Diane Abbott and Matt Le Tissier. Presented by Bradley Walsh.

6.40 News (S).

6.30 Lost Heroes of World War One (R,S). 1/5. See Choices Above.

7.00 Marvel’s Agents of SHIELD (R,S,HD). 3/13. Coulson and the team race to find a kidnapped scientist. Clark Gregg stars in the comic-book drama co-created by Joss Whedon.

7.00 WW1’s Tunnels of Death: The Big Dig (R,S,HD). 1/2. Part one of two. An archaeological team explores First World War battlefields near the village of Messines in Belgium.

8.30 Dad’s Army (R,S). 4/14. The men of Walmington-on-Sea’s Home Guard use up all their ammunition shooting at a passing aircraft, so Captain Mainwaring has to hold a court of inquiry. Comedy first aired in 1969, starring John Le Mesurier.

8.00 Grand Designs (R,S,HD). 6/11. Kevin McCloud follows a couple’s project to transform a 1960s forester’s lodge into a unique Japanese home, complete with a tatami room and sliding paper walls.

8.00 War Hero in My Family (R,S,HD). 1/6. Celebrities trace the stories of relatives who made sacrifices during times of war. Chris Tarrant and Lisa Faulkner learn about the heroes in their families. 8.55 5 News Weekend (S,HD).

9.00 The 70s (R,S). 3/4. The years 1975 to 1977, which saw improved employment rights for women, the rise of punk rock, fighting on the football terraces and a bid to save car manufacturer British Leyland.

10.00 The Sarah Millican Slightly Longer Television Programme (S,HD). 3/6. Extended edition. With guests David Harewood, Matthew Morrison and Diarmuid Gavin. 10.40 Glorious 39 (S,HD) (2009). In 1939, the adopted daughter of a prominent ex-politician becomes suspicious when an MP friend seemingly commits suicide. The aspiring actress discovers members of her family may be connected to a sinister plot to avert war with Hitler’s Germany, and her investigations place her life in danger. Thriller, starring Romola Garai. See Choices Above. ●●●●

10.15 The Jonathan Ross Show (S,HD). 1/10. See Choices Above.

9.00 The Adjustment Bureau (S,HD) (2011). Premiere. A politician is attracted to a dancer he meets at a pivotal moment in his life, but finds his every effort to get to know her is thwarted by a group of mysterious men. He realises these shadowy figures are manipulating him and moving him toward a predetermined fate, which he resolves to fight. Sci-fi thriller, starring Matt Damon and Emily Blunt. See Choices Above. ●●●●

9.00 A Fistful of Dollars (S,HD) (1964). A mysterious gunslinger rides into a town on the Mexican border divided by two warring families. After killing the henchmen of one clan, he seems to have made it clear where his loyalties lie and is hired by their rivals. However, he is secretly planning to play them off against each other to his own advantage. Sergio Leone’s Western, with Clint Eastwood making his first appearance as The Man with No Name alongside Gian Maria Volonte and Marianne Koch. See Choices Above. ●●●●●

11.20 ITV News and Weather (S); Weather. 11.35 The Eiger Sanction (S) (1975). Action adventure, directed by and starring Clint Eastwood. With George Kennedy and Vonetta McGee. ●●

11.05 The Hole (S,HD) (2009). Premiere. Three kids discover a mysterious hole in a basement, which leads to a strange world where they must face their worst fears. Horror, with Chris Massoglia. ●●●●

11.05 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (R,S). 9/23. Greg, Nick and Hodges surprise Henry on his birthday by taking him for dinner at a remote restaurant. Crime drama, starring Jon Wellner.

12.45 Film: X The Unknown (S) (1956). A series of unexplained deaths occurs around a crevice in Scotland, with victims suffering severe burns or having the flesh melted from their bodies. Hammer sci-fi horror, starring Dean Jagger, Edward Chapman and Leo McKern. ●●● 2.00 This Is BBC Two (S). Preview of upcoming programmes from BBC Two.

1.45 Jackpot247 Viewers are offered the chance to participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort of their sofas, with an entertaining mix of roulette-wheel spins and lively chat from the presenting team. Featuring a variety of prizes and promotions. 3.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show USA (R,S). 3.45 ITV Nightscreen (HD). Text-based information service.

12.55 Film: 13 Assassins (HD) (2010). A ruthless feudal lord rises to power in 19th-century Japan, so 13 samurai warriors are recruited to assassinate him. Action adventure, starring Koji Yakusho and Takayuki Yamada. ●●●● 3.00 Hollyoaks (R,S,HD). 5.05 Deal or No Deal (R,S,HD). High-stakes game show, with Noel Edmonds.

12.00 SuperCasino Live interactive gaming. 4.00 Michaela’s Wild Challenge (R,S). Michaela Strachan meets a tamarin. 4.25 Make It Big (R,S). 4.50 Roary the Racing Car (R,S). 5.00 Angels of Jarm (R,S). 5.10 Hana’s Helpline (R,S). 5.20 Angels of Jarm (R,S). 5.25 The Funky Valley Show (R,S). 5.40 Roary the Racing Car (R,S). 5.50 Hana’s Helpline (R,S).

12

Marvel’s Agents of SHIELD, 7pm

8.30 Atlantis (S,HD). 3/13. See Choices Above.

after

Fool Britannia, 6.30pm

9.15 The National Lottery Live (S,HD). Chris Evans reveals the results of the Lotto draw. 9.25 Casualty (S,HD). Ash and Tess work to discover why a mother and daughter are so at odds about how far the team should go to save a loved one’s life.

11

The Sarah Millican … 10pm

10.15 BBC News; Weather (S,HD). 10.35 The Rolling Stones Return to Hyde Park: Sweet Summer Sun (S,HD). See Choices Above. Followed by National Lottery Update.

10

Pointless Celebrities, 5.40pm

11.50 The Man Without a Face (S) (1993). A disfigured former teacher living in seclusion tutors a lonely boy, and the pair learn to support each other during life’s ups and downs. Drama, starring Mel Gibson and Nick Stahl. ●●●

6 7 8 9

(R) repeat (S) subtitles (HD) highdefinition

1.40 Weatherview (S). 1.45 BBC News (S,HD).

7.00 Count Arthur Strong (R,S,HD). 5/6. Michael is bitten by a dog. 7.30 Meerkats: Secrets of an Animal Superstar – Natural World (R,S,HD).

40 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013

8.00 The X Factor (S,HD). 13/22. The chance for the final 12 to shine has arrived as they take to the stage in the first live studio round, hoping to prove to the panel and the nation they have what it takes to be pop stars. With the contestants tackling hits from the 1980s, major confrontations and fierce differences of opinion are inevitable as the judges critique each performance and support the acts in their categories. See Choices Above.

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LOST HEROES OF WORLD WAR ONE 6.30pm, Channel 5

THE ROLLING STONES RETURN TO HYDE PARK: SWEET SUMMER SUN 10.35pm, BBC1

The course of the conflict through archived interviews with those who lived through it. As war is declared, a patriotic fervour sweeps through the nation. Narrated by Dougray Scott.

ITV2 ITV2

6.00 Keith Lemon: The Hot Desk (R,HD). 6.10 Coronation Street (HD). 7.25 Emmerdale (HD). 10.40 The X Factor USA (R,HD). 11.35 The X Factor USA (R,HD). 1.35 Film: The Little Vampire (2000). Adventure, starring Richard E Grant. ●●● 3.30 Peter Andre: My Life (R,HD). 4.30 You’ve Been Framed! (R). 5.00 You’ve Been Framed! & Famous (R).

The veteran band returned to Hyde Park as part of their 50th anniversary celebrations. Here Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and the others treat 100,000 fans to their greatest hits, including Gimme Shelter, Jumpin’ Jack Flash and You Can’t Always Get What You Want.

E4 E4

6.00 Being Erica (R,HD). 6.45 Make It or Break It (R,HD). 7.35 Ugly Betty (R,HD). 8.30 Charmed (R). 9.25 Glee (R,HD). 10.25 90210 (R,HD). 11.20 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 1.50 The Mindy Project (R,HD). 2.20 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 3.15 2 Broke Girls (R,HD). 4.10 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 5.05 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD).

Sky1 Sky1

6.00 Glee (R,S,HD). 8.00 Fantasy Football Club (R). 9.00 Game Changers. 10.00 Soccer AM. 12.00 WWE Superstars (HD). 1.00 Ashley Banjo’s Secret Street Crew (R,S,HD). 2.00 Harrow: A Very British School (R,HD). 3.00 David Attenborough’s Kingdom of Plants (R,S). 4.00 Modern Family (R,S,HD). 5.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD).

FILM PICKS

Saturday television&radio GLORIOUS 39 10.40pm, BBC2

A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS 9pm, Channel 5

An actress becomes suspicious of a friend’s suicide and uncovers a government plot to avert war with Germany at all costs. Thriller, with Romola Garai.

Gold GOLD

6.00 2point4 Children 6.30 Sykes 7.20 Goodnight Sweetheart 8.40 Ever Decreasing Circles 10.00 As Time Goes By 10.40 Last of the Summer Wine 12.00 Yes, Prime Minister 12.40 Open All Hours 1.20 Jeeves and Wooster 2.30 Jeeves and Wooster 3.40 The Good Life 4.15 The Good Life 4.55 The Good Life 5.35 Only Fools and Horses

A nameless gunslinger rides into a town split by feuding families, and plays them off against each other. Western, starring Clint Eastwood.

SkySports1 Sky Sports 1

6.00 FIFA Futbol Mundial (S). 6.30 International Football (HD). Azerbaijan v Northern Ireland and Wales v Macedonia. 8.00 The Fantasy Football Club (HD). 9.00 Game Changers (HD). 10.00 Soccer AM (HD). 12.00 FL72 Live (HD). Plymouth Argyle v Portsmouth (kick-off 12.15pm). 2.30 Soccer Saturday (HD). Up-to-the-minute scores. 5.30 Sporting Greats (HD).

The Mummy: Tomb ... 8pm

GI Joe: The Rise of ... 9pm

An Idiot Abroad, 9pm

Little Britain, 9pm

FL72 Live, 12pm

6.00 Step Up 2: The Streets (HD) (2008). A rebellious street dancer gets the chance to hone her skills at a prestigious school for the performing arts, but she struggles to fit into her new environment and is ostracised by her old friends. Drama, starring Briana Evigan and Robert Hoffman. ●●●

6.05 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 6.35 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). Penny appears in a musical.

6.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). Part two of two. The agents target a Russian arms dealer. Chris O’Donnell and LL Cool J star.

6.50 The Two Ronnies Spectacle The double act’s musical numbers and serial sketches. Last in the series.

6.00 Ringside (HD). Boxing magazine, including highlights of recent bouts and interviews with the stars.

7.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD). Barney must get Robin’s father to approve their engagement. 7.30 Suburgatory (R,HD).

7.00 The Simpsons (R,S). Homer gets trapped in a cave. 7.30 The Simpsons (R,S). Homer plays matchmaker for Marge’s sister.

8.00 The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor (HD) (2008). Daredevil explorers Rick and Evelyn O’Connell are called into action when their son accidentally resurrects the evil Chinese Emperor Han from his ancient tomb. The family now faces a race against time to prevent the merciless leader from awakening his vast terracotta army in a plot to take over the world. Fantasy, with Brendan Fraser. ●●

8.00 New Girl (R,HD). Jess fills in for Cece on a modelling assignment at a car show. 8.30 New Girl (R,HD). Nick prepares for a visit from a girl he had a crush on at college.

8.00 A League of Their Own (R,S,HD). With Alan Shearer, Jason Manford and Frankie Sandford. Last in the series.

7.50 Only Fools and Horses Rodney ties the knot with Cassandra, but Del has more on his mind than best man duties as the dreaded Driscoll brothers arrive at the Nag’s Head baying for his blood over some stolen mobile phones. Comedy, starring David Jason, Nicholas Lyndhurst and Gwyneth Strong.

10.15 The Xtra Factor (HD). Caroline Flack and Matt Richardson go behind the scenes of the first live show to find out what the judges thought of the night’s performances.

7.00 Great Movie Mistakes 2: The Sequel (R,S). Presented by Robert Webb. 7.15 Doctor Who (R,S). The Doctor’s greatest secret is revealed. Last in the series. 8.00 Top Gear (R,S). The presenters shop for secondhand convertibles. 9.00 Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End (S) (2007). Fantasy adventure sequel, with Johnny Depp and Geoffrey Rush. ●●● 11.40 Family Guy (R,S). Peter’s mother and father get a divorce.

12.05 Family Guy (R,S). 12.25 American Dad! 7.00 Live Darts (HD). The (R,S). 12.50 American World Grand Prix. Dad! (R,S). 1.10 Sex, Stags Coverage of the semi& Prague: Stacey Dooley finals at the Citywest Investigates (R,S). 2.05 Hotel Convention Centre Bad Education (R,S). 2.35 in Dublin, where Michael Some Girls (R,S). 3.05 van Gerwen is the Staying In with Greg and reigning champion. The Russell (R,S). 3.35 Kerry Dutchman defeated Wes (R,S).

Newton, who was the only remaining seed, 5-1 at this stage last year, to set up a final against Mervyn King, conqueror of Brendan Dolan.

BBC4 BBC4

7.00 Africa (R). David Attenborough describes the wildlife spectacles of southern Africa. 8.00 Lost Kingdoms of Africa (R). The Berber kings of Morocco. 9.00 The Young Montalbano. Vigata is shaken by the murder of a rich old man. In Italian. Last in the series. 10.55 Wellington Bomber (R). A factory in North Wales that assembled a bomber in a day. 11.55 Otis Redding: Soul Ambassador (R). Profile of the soul singer.

12.55 The Sky at Night (R). The team goes camping at the Brecon Beacons AstroCamp star party to answer viewers’ queries about what to see in the night skies and how to use a telescope. 1.25 Africa (R). 2.25 Lost Kingdoms of Africa (R).

9.00 GI Joe: The Rise of 9.00 Little Britain Emily 9.00 An Idiot Abroad Cobra (HD) (2009). Howard is joined by a (R,S,HD). Karl Pilkington’s When a powerful new friend, and journey continues in experimental weapon is Sebastian continues to Egypt, where he tastes snatched by a mysterious lust after the Prime local delicacies including terrorist organisation, Minister. rabbit meat, and takes a two of the soldiers boat ride down the Nile, 9.40 Little Britain Bubbles guarding it are recruited before visiting the spends too much time into a top-secret military pyramids. under the sunbed. strike force. As they go in search of the stolen 10.20 The Catherine Tate 10.00 FL72 Highlights (HD). technology, they uncover 10.00 Road Wars (R,S). A Show Comedy sketches, desperate drug dealer Plymouth Argyle v a plot by its creator to including Bernie the Irish bites a policeman’s hand Portsmouth. take over the world. nurse, who is feeling in an attempt to escape 10.30 Football Gold (S). Action adventure, with romantic. being searched, and a Blackburn Rovers v Channing Tatum, Sienna man gives an unusual Chelsea from the 1998/99 Miller and Christopher reason why he should season. Eccleston. ●●● not be arrested when he 10.45 Football Gold (S). claims to be the King of Chelsea v Tottenham Jamaica. Hotspur.

11.15 Celebrity Juice (R,HD). Comedy quiz hosted by Keith Lemon, with contestants joining captains Holly Willoughby and Fearne Cotton.

11.20 Planes, Trains and Automobiles (HD) (1987). Comedy road movie, starring Steve Martin, John Candy, Laila Robins, Kevin Bacon and Michael McKean. ●●●●

11.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R,S,HD). 11.00 Bottom Comedy, starring Rik Mayell and Part one of two. Adrian Edmondson. Crossover episode with NCIS: Los Angeles. 11.40 The Smell of Reeves and Mortimer The dangers of spilling muesli.

11.00 Football Gold (S). Action from Arsenal v Leeds United in the 2002/03 season. 11.15 Football Gold (S). 11.30 FL72 Highlights (HD).

12.00 The Magaluf Weekender (R,HD). Two new groups of holidaymakers arrive at the party resort and waste no time getting to know each other. 1.00 Crazy Beaches (R,HD). Hedonism and drunken fun in the Greek resort of Malia. 1.30 The X Factor (R). 3.30 Teleshopping

1.10 The Cleveland Show (R,HD). 1.40 Hollyoaks Later (R,HD). The spin-off show following the exploits of Hollyoaks residents away from home returns. 2.40 Hollyoaks Later (R,HD). Tony pursues his rebellious son Harry. 3.30 Hollyoaks Later (R,HD). 4.20 Being Erica (R,HD).

12.00 Ross Kemp: Battle for the Amazon (R,S,HD). 1.00 Road Wars (R,S). Police officers combat vehicle crime. 2.00 Brit Cops: War on Crime (R,S). 3.00 Brit Cops: War on Crime (R,S). 4.00 Crash Test Dummies (R,S,HD). 5.00 Crash Test Dummies (R,S,HD). 5.30 Crash Test Dummies (R,S,HD).

12.00 Ringside (HD). Boxing magazine. 1.00 FL72 Highlights (HD). 1.30 Live International Fight Night (HD). Timothy Bradley v Juan Manuel Marquez. 5.00 Champions League Weekly (HD). 5.30 Football Gold (S). Manchester United v Manchester City from 1994/95. 5.45 Football Gold (S).

RADIO

BBC3 BBC3

Radio 1 5.00am Rob da Bank 7.00 Dev 10.00 Matt Edmondson 1.00pm Huw Stephens 4.00 Radio 1’s Dance Anthems with Danny Howard 7.00 MistaJam 9.00 Charlie Sloth 11.00 DJ Target 1.00am Diplo and Friends 3.00 Friction Radio 2 6.00am Anneka Rice 8.00 Sounds of the 60s 10.00 Graham Norton 1.00pm Pick of the Pops 3.00 Dermot O’Leary 6.00 Liza Tarbuck. Featuring a personal playlist and the host’s take on the world. 8.00 Paul Gambaccini with America’s Greatest Hits 10.00 Sounds of the 80s. With Dave Stewart. Midnight Bob Harris Sunday 3.00 Richard Allinson

Radio 3 7.00am Breakfast 9.00 News 9.03 CD Review 12.15pm Verdi 200: Verdi The “Opera Director”: The Composer’s Other Artistic Side 1.00 News 1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert 2.00 Saturday Classics: Verdi 200 4.00 Sound of Cinema 5.00 Jazz Record Requests 6.00 Jazz Line-Up 7.30 Opera on 3: Verdi 200. Verdi’s Il trovatore, recorded earlier this year in Munich, with tenor Jonas Kaufmann as Manrico and soprano Anja Harteros as Leonora. Paolo Carignani conducts. 10.30 Between the Ears at 20: Shadowplay 11.00 Hear and Now Midnight Geoffrey Smith’s Jazz 1.00 Through the Night

Radio 4 5.30am News Briefing 5.43 Prayer for the Day 5.45 iPM 6.00 News and Papers 6.07 Ramblings 6.30 Farming Today This Week 6.57 Weather 7.00 Today 9.00 Saturday Live 10.30 Crikey DM! David Jason’s Tribute to Cosgrove Hall 11.00 The Week in Westminster 11.30 From Our Own Correspondent Noon News 12.01 (LW) Shipping Forecast 12.04 Money Box 12.30 The Now Show 12.57 Weather 1.00 News 1.10 Any Questions? 2.00 Any Answers? 2.30 Saturday Drama: The Confessions of Caminada 3.30 Julie Fowlis’ Heritage Well 4.00 Weekend Woman’s Hour 5.00 Saturday PM 5.30 The Bottom

12.20 Big Train A unique method of teaching history captivates students, and knights discover the problem of wearing Hawaiian shirts into battle. 1.00 Little Britain Emily Howard gets a new friend. 1.30 Little Britain 2.00 Bottom 2.30 The Smell of Reeves and Mortimer 3.00 Home Shopping Line 5.54 Shipping Forecast 5.57 Weather 6.00 Six O’Clock News 6.15 Loose Ends. With guests Jim Broadbent, Tayo Aluko, Patrick McCabe, Lindsay Duncan and Femi Oyeniran. 7.00 Profile 7.15 Saturday Review 8.00 The World Turned Upside Down 9.00 Classic Serial: Sword of Honour – Men at Arms. By Evelyn Waugh. D10.00 News and Weather 10.15 The Moral Maze. With Claire Fox, Melanie Phillips, Anne McElvoy and Giles Fraser. 11.00 Round Britain Quiz 11.30 Poetry Please Midnight News and Weather 12.30 Tales from the Casino 12.48 Shipping Forecast 1.00 As BBC World Service 5.20 Shipping Forecast

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Radio 5 Live 5.00am Morning Reports 6.00 Saturday Breakfast 9.00 The Danny Baker Show 11.00 Fighting Talk Noon 5 Live Sport 1.35 5 Live Sport: 5 Live Rugby 3.40 5 Live Sport: 5 Live Rugby 5.15 Sports Report 6.06 6-0-6. Darren Fletcher and Jason Roberts take calls on the day’s football action. 8.00 Saturday Edition 10.00 Stephen Nolan 1.00am Up All Night Classic FM 6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 Alan Titchmarsh Noon Nicholas Owen 3.00 Nick Bailey 5.00 Saturday Night at the Movies 7.00 Alex James’s Magical Musical Tour 9.00 The New Releases Show 10.00 Smooth Classics Midnight Bob Jones

SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 41


TV PICKS

Sunday television&radio Sunday’s Television Guide STRICTLY COME DANCING: THE RESULTS 7.20pm, BBC1

Tess Daly and Claudia Winkleman announce which two couples are in the dance-off, and Andrea Bocelli sings a classic love song.

BBC1 BBC1

6.00 Live Formula 1: Japanese Grand Prix (S,HD). 9.15 The Andrew Marr Show (S,HD). 10.15 Sunday Morning Live 2013 (S,HD). 11.15 Sunday Politics (S). 12.30 Escape to the Country (S,HD). 1.00 BBC News (S,HD). 1.15 Bargain Hunt (R,S). 2.00 Formula 1: Japanese Grand Prix Replay (S,HD). 4.00 Points of View (S,HD). 4.15 Songs of Praise (S,HD). 4.50 The Great British Year (R,S,HD). 5.50 BBC News; Regional News and Weather (S,HD).

FILM RATINGS ●●●●● Excellent ●●●● Very good ●●● Good ●● Average ● Poor

THE GINGE, THE GEORDIE AND THE GEEK DOWNTON ABBEY 7.30pm, BBC2 9pm, ITV Ventriloquist Bob causes heartbreak for his puppet, the Codebreakers discover an important date while trying to solve the mystery of women, a lollipop man gets angry and a pizza dances in the show’s big finale. Comedy sketches starring Graeme Rooney, Paul Charlton and Kevin O’Loughlin.

BBC2 BBC2

6.00 This Is BBC Two (S). 6.05 Film: Great Day (S) (1945). Drama, starring Flora Robson. ●● 7.25 Gardeners’ World (R,S,HD). 7.55 The Beechgrove Garden (S). 8.25 Live MotoGP (S,HD). The Malaysian Grand Prix (Start-time 9.00am). 10.00 Saturday Kitchen Best Bites (S). 11.30 What to Eat Now (R,S). 12.00 What to Eat Now (R,S). 12.30 MotoGP (S,HD). 2.05 EastEnders (S,HD). 4.00 The House That £100K Built (R,S,HD). 5.00 Flog It! (S,HD).

In the aftermath of the eventful party, Mary is forced to answer a pressing question about her future. Meanwhile, Carson reveals surprisingly intimate details about his former life.

ITV1 ITV

6.00 CITV 9.25 ITV News (S). 9.30 Ade in Britain (R,S,HD). 10.30 Film: Columbo: Negative Reaction (S) (1974). Crime drama, with Peter Falk, Dick Van Dyke, Don Gordon and Antoinette Bower. ●●● 12.30 ITV News and Weather (S). 12.40 Inside the National Trust (S,HD). 1.45 The X Factor (R,S). 4.00 Fool Britannia (R,S,HD). 4.25 Big Star’s Little Star (R,S,HD). 5.30 Downton Abbey (R,S,HD). The Crawleys throw an extravagant party.

ANGELS & DEMONS 9pm, Channel 5

Premiere. Academic adventurer Robert Langdon is called in by the Vatican to deal with a crisis. The Pope has died and the four cardinals in line to be his successor have all been abducted by a mysterious sect that is threatening to murder them. Thriller sequel to The Da Vinci Code, with Tom Hanks.

Channel Channel 4

6.00 The Treacle People (R,S). 6.10 The Hoobs (R,S). 6.35 The American Football Show (R,S). 7.30 The Hever Castle Triathlon (S). 8.30 Everybody Loves Raymond (R,S). 9.00 Frasier (R,S). 9.30 Sunday Brunch (S). 12.30 The Big Bang Theory (R,S,HD). 1.30 The Simpsons (R,S). 2.30 Film: Mighty Joe Young (S,HD) (1998). ●●● 4.40 Film: Furry Vengeance (S,HD) (2010). Family comedy, starring Brendan Fraser. ●●

Channel Channel 5

6.00 Milkshake! 10.00 Power Rangers: Super Samurai (R,S,HD). 10.30 Slugterra (S,HD). 11.00 Jungle Babies: Tarsier Tails (R,S,HD). 11.30 Film: Superman II (S,HD) (1980). ●●●● 1.55 Film: Mannequin (S,HD) (1987). Fantasy comedy, starring Andrew McCarthy. ●● 3.40 Film: Hercules (S,HD) (1997). Disney animated adventure, with the voice of Tate Donovan. ●●● 5.35 Film: Superman III (S,HD) (1983). See Choices Above. ●●

6.30 News (S).

7.20 Strictly Come Dancing: The Results (S,HD). See Choices Above.

6.00 Great British Railway Journeys (R,S,HD). 16/25. The cross-border history of Berwickupon-Tweed. 6.30 The Great British Bake Off (R,S,HD). 8/16. 7.30 The Ginge, the Geordie and the Geek (S,HD). 3/6. See Choices Above.

6.35 Regional News (S); Weather. 6.45 ITV News and Weather (S).

12

6.20 Countryfile (S,HD). John Craven harvests wild fruit in Somerset and presents archive items.

7.00 Coronation Street (S,HD). Hour-long episode. David receives the results of Lily’s DNA test and tries to summon up the courage to open the envelope.

7.00 World’s Weirdest Weather (R,S,HD). 3/3. Strange waterrelated climatic events. Last in the series.

7.55 5 News Weekend (S,HD).

after

Kevin McCloud’s Man … 8pm

8.00 Antiques Roadshow (S,HD). 9/26. Fiona Bruce and the experts arrive at Towneley Hall near Burnley in Lancashire, where heavy rain doesn’t deter thousands of people eager to know how much their collectibles are worth.

8.00 How to Build: A Super Car (R,S,HD). 2/3. How the McLaren racing team used Formula One technology to design and construct the MP4-12C road car. Featuring contributions by Ron Dennis, Lewis Hamilton and Jenson Button.

8.00 The X Factor Results (S,HD). 13/22. Dermot O’Leary reveals the names of the acts who are safe, and the two least popular have to sing for survival, before one of them leaves. Cher and Ellie Goulding perform live.

8.00 Kevin McCloud’s Man Made Home (S). 4/4. With the main structure in place, Kevin looks to add a few final touches to his coastal retreat, installing a solar-powered shower and a floating beach bar. Last in the series.

8.00 The Da Vinci Code: The True Story (R,S,HD). 2/5. Exploring the claims made in Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code, including an intimate relationship between Jesus and Mary Magdalene and the final resting place of the Holy Grail.

11

Coronation Street, 7pm

9.00 By Any Means (S,HD). 4/6. Former bank finance director Sally Walker and her retired MP husband Laurence have been cleared of stealing £3million from their children’s charity fund, but Helen is convinced they are guilty.

9.00 The Ottomans: Europe’s Muslim Emperors (S,HD). 2/3. Rageh Omaar compares the golden age of Suleiman the Magnificent in the 16th century with the troubled reign of Abdul Hamid II in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

9.00 Downton Abbey (S,HD). 4/8. See Choices Above.

9.00 Homeland (S,HD). 2/12. See Choices Above.

10.00 BBC News; Regional News and Weather (S,HD). 10.25 Armageddon (S,HD) (1998). Nasa discovers an asteroid the size of Texas is on a collision course with Earth, so a drilling expert is recruited to train a team of misfits to transport a nuclear device into outer space to destroy it – but having had no experience of space travel, the reluctant astronauts find themselves seriously out of their depth. Sci-fi thriller, with Bruce Willis, Ben Affleck, Liv Tyler, Michael Clarke Duncan, Billy Bob Thornton and Steve Buscemi. See Choices Above. ●●●

10.00 The Wrong Mans (R,S,HD). 3/6. Sam negotiates the exchange of Mrs Stevens for Mr Lau’s nephew Jason, but Phil almost scuppers the plan. Comedy, starring James Corden. 10.30 QI XL (S,HD). 6/16. Extended edition. With Sandi Toksvig, Trevor Noah and Jason Manford.

10.05 ITV News and Weather (S); Weather. 10.20 Senna (S,HD) (2010). Premiere. Documentary about the life of Brazilian Formula One driver Ayrton Senna, examining his achievements on the track over a 10-year period that saw him crowned world champion three times, until his death in a crash during the 1994 San Marino Grand Prix. Featuring previously unseen footage from the F1 archives and contributions from fellow racing stars including Alain Prost and Jackie Stewart. ●●●●

9.00 Angels & Demons (S,HD) (2009). Premiere. Academic adventurer Robert Langdon is called in by the Vatican to deal with a crisis. The Pope has died and the four cardinals in line to be his successor have all been abducted by a mysterious sect that is threatening to murder them. As he searches for the kidnapped clerics, Langdon discovers the cult has an even more horrific plan in mind. Thriller sequel to The Da Vinci Code, with Tom Hanks and Ewan McGregor. See Choices Above. ●●●

12.45 Weatherview (S). 12.50 BBC News (S,HD).

12.15 Film: Awaydays (S) (2009). A disaffected man turns to football hooliganism as a release for his pent-up aggression. Drama set in the 1980s based on Kevin Sampson’s novel, with Nicky Bell. ●● 1.55 Sign Zone: Countryfile (R,S). Julia Bradbury visits the Abergavenny food festival. 2.50 Sign Zone: Holby City (R,S). 3.50 This Is BBC Two (S).

10

The Ottomans: Europe’s … 9pm

6 7 8 9

Antiques Roadshow, 8pm

(R) repeat (S) subtitles (HD) highdefinition

11.15 Never Mind the Buzzcocks (R,S,HD). 3/13. Peter Andre hosts, with Jason Gardiner, Ana Matronic, Charles Cave and Tony Law. 11.45 Mock the Week (R,S,HD). 12/12.

42 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013

12.20 The Store 2.25 British Superbike Championship Highlights (S,HD). Action from both races in the 11th and penultimate round of the season from Silverstone, which was also the second meeting of The Showdown part of the campaign. 3.15 Motorsport UK (HD). 4.05 ITV Nightscreen (HD). 5.05 The Jeremy Kyle Show (R,S).

10.00 Was It Something I Said? (S,HD). 2/8. See Choices Above. 10.35 Alan Carr: Chatty Man (R,S). 7/18. With Nicole Scherzinger, Johnny Knoxville and Gok Wan.

The Da Vinci Code … 8pm

11.40 Gogglebox (R,S). 3/13. Some of Britain’s most opinionated and avid viewers comment on recent programmes, including Sex Box, The X Factor and Educating Yorkshire, as well as breaking news stories.

11.45 Vantage Point (S,HD) (2008). The aftermath of an assassination attempt against the US president is followed from several different perspectives. Thriller, starring Dennis Quaid. ●●

12.25 Paddy’s TV Guide (R,S,HD). Paddy McGuinness takes a comic look at love and romance. 1.10 American Football Live (S,HD). Dallas Cowboys v Washington Redskins (kick-off 1.30am). Coverage of the NFC East clash at the AT&T Stadium. 4.45 British GT (R,S). 5.15 Countdown (R,S,HD). 5.55 River Cottage Bites (R,S,HD).

1.35 SuperCasino 3.55 Michaela’s Wild Challenge (R,S). Michaela Strachan tracks down the Vancouver Island marmot. 4.20 Make It Big (R,S). 4.50 Roary the Racing Car (R,S). 5.00 Angels of Jarm (R,S). 5.05 Hana’s Helpline (R,S). 5.20 Angels of Jarm (R,S). 5.25 The Funky Valley Show (R,S). 5.40 Roary the Racing Car (R,S). 5.50 Hana’s Helpline (R,S).

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HOMELAND 9pm, Channel 4

WAS IT SOMETHING I SAID? 10pm, Channel 4

David Mitchell hosts the panel show, with team captains Micky Flanagan and Richard Ayoade joined by guests Ed Byrne and Gabby Logan in a battle of words, answering questions based on quotes, tweets and autobiographies. Phil Daniels is tonight’s narrator.

Saul tries to track down those responsible for the attack on Langley and recruits an unlikely expert to follow the money trail, while Carrie (Claire Danes) learns who she can really trust.

ITV2 ITV2

6.00 Emmerdale (R,HD). 9.00 Coronation Street (R,HD). 10.30 The X Factor (R,HD). 12.45 The Xtra Factor (R,HD). 1.45 You’ve Been Framed! Kids Special (R). 2.30 Film: The Little Vampire (2000). Adventure, starring Richard E Grant. ●●● 4.25 Film: ScoobyDoo 2: Monsters Unleashed (HD) (2004). Comedy adventure sequel, with Sarah Michelle Gellar. ●●

E4 E4

6.00 Switched (R). 6.20 Make It or Break It (R,HD). 7.05 Ugly Betty (R,HD). 7.45 Charmed (R). 8.45 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD). 9.45 Hollyoaks (R,HD). 12.20 2 Broke Girls (R,HD). 1.15 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 2.15 Mindy Project (R,HD). 2.45 Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 3.45 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD). 5.40 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD).

Sky1 Sky1

6.00 Hour of Power (HD). 7.00 Glee (R,S,HD). 8.00 Glee (R,S,HD). 9.00 Ashley Banjo’s Secret Street Crew (R,S,HD). 10.00 WWE Superstars (R,HD). 11.00 WWE: Experience (HD). 12.00 Harrow: A Very British School (R,S,HD). 1.00 Road Wars (R,S). 2.00 Modern Family (R,S,HD). 3.00 John Bishop’s Only Joking (R,S,HD). 3.30 Futurama (R,S,HD).

FILM PICKS

Sunday television&radio ARMAGEDDON 10.25pm, BBC1

SUPERMAN II 11.30am, Channel 5

A team transports a nuclear device into outer space to destroy an asteroid on a collision course with Earth. Sci-fi thriller, with Bruce Willis and Ben Affleck.

Gold GOLD

6.00 2point4 Children 6.30 Sykes 7.00 2point4 Children 7.40 As Time Goes By 8.20 Sykes 9.00 The Good Life 9.35 The Good Life 10.55 Jo Brand’s Great Wall of Comedy 11.35 Last of the Summer Wine 12.20 Keeping Up Appearances 1.35 Only Fools and Horses 4.00 The Two Ronnies Spectacle 5.00 Jeeves and Wooster

Comic-strip adventure sequel, with Christopher Reeve, Gene Hackman, Terence Stamp and Margot Kidder. Edited for violence and language.

SkySports1 Sky Sports 1

6.00 Football Gold (S). 6.30 FL72 Highlights (HD). 7.00 Champions League Weekly (HD). 7.30 Game Changers (HD). 8.30 Football Gold (S). 8.45 Football Gold (S). 9.00 FL72 Highlights (HD). 9.30 The Sunday Supplement (HD). 11.00 Goals on Sunday (HD). 12.30 International Fight Night (HD). 2.30 What’s the Story? (HD). 3.30 FL72 Live (HD).

The Xtra Factor, 9pm

Rules of Engagement, 7.10pm

Trollied, 9pm

The Office, 9pm

FL72 Live, 3.30pm

6.15 Hulk (HD) (2003). Scientist Dr Bruce Banner turns into the rampaging green Hulk after exposure to a huge dose of gamma radiation, prompting the military to embark on a no-holds-barred mission to destroy the monster. Meanwhile, Banner’s unstable father resurfaces, holding the secret to his transformation. Comicstrip adventure from director Ang Lee, starring Eric Bana, Jennifer Connelly, Sam Elliott and Nick Nolte. Including FYI Daily. ●●

6.10 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). Leonard decides to change his ways. 6.40 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD).

6.00 The Simpsons (R,S). Homer discovers a hairrestorative. 6.30 The Simpsons (R,S).

6.10 Jeeves and Wooster Bertie’s cousin arrives in New York. Adaptation of PG Wodehouse’s comic tale, starring Hugh Laurie.

6.30 Football League Gold (S,HD). Blackpool v Cardiff City and Peterborough United v Southampton.

7.10 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 7.35 Ever After: A Cinderella Story (HD) (1998). A girl grows up in 16th-century Europe under the iron fist of her stepmother, until the love of handsome Prince Henry offers a glimmer of hope. Unfortunately, the royal gent has worries of his own in the shape of an arranged marriage. Luckily, Renaissance genius Leonardo da Vinci is on hand to play fairy godfather and bring the pair together. Romantic drama, starring Drew Barrymore, Anjelica Huston, Dougray Scott and Timothy West. ●●●●

7.00 The Simpsons (R,S). Bart becomes convinced he is a faith healer. 7.30 The Simpsons (R,S). Maude Flanders is killed in a tragic accident.

7.20 Bring Me Morecambe & Wise A compilation of the comedy duo’s sketches.

8.00 Harrow: A Very British School (R,HD). As the inter-house army-drill competition approaches, sixth-form student Hugh tries to get West Acre’s bungling band of brothers to march in step.

8.20 Porridge Godber is feeling dejected after his romantic fortunes take a turn for the worse, so Fletch tries to revive his friend’s flagging spirits. Comedy, starring Ronnie Barker.

7.00 Live Darts (HD). The World Grand Prix. Coverage of the final at the Citywest Hotel Convention Centre in Dublin, where Michael van Gerwen is the reigning champion.

9.00 Trollied (R,S,HD). Julie misconstrues a conversation between Richard and Anna. 9.30 A League of Their Own (R,HD). With Alan Shearer, Jason Manford and Frankie Sandford. Last in the series.

9.00 FL72 Highlights (HD). 9.00 The Office The new Coventry City v Sheffield members of staff arrive United. from Swindon. Ricky Gervais stars. 9.30 Football League Gold (HD). Bolton Wanderers v 9.40 Knowing Me, Knowing Watford and Bolton You – With Alan Wanderers v Preston Partridge Guests include North End. Europe’s sexiest dance act.

9.00 The Xtra Factor (HD). Caroline Flack and Matt Richardson go behind the scenes after the first results show to find out the judges and contestants’ thoughts on the first elimination.

BBC3 BBC3

BBC4 BBC4

12.00 Bad Education (R,S). 12.30 Russell Howard’s Good News (R,S). 1.00 Staying In with Greg and Russell (R,S). 1.30 Unsafe Sex in the City (R,S). 2.30 Some Girls (R,S). Holli falls out with the group. 3.00 Him & Her (R,S). 3.30 Him & Her (R,S).

1.55 Tubular Bells: The Mike Oldfield Story (R). An insight into the musician’s life and the making of his most famous album. 2.55 Tubular Bells: Mike Oldfield (R).

7.00 Formula 1: Japanese Grand Prix Highlights (S). Action from the 15th round of the campaign. 8.00 Chicken Run (S) (2000). Animated comedy, with the voice of Mel Gibson. ●●●● 9.20 Great TV Mistakes (R,S). On-screen mishaps and continuity errors. 9.30 Russell Howard’s Good News (R,S). An edition from 2011. 10.00 Family Guy (S) 10.25 Family Guy (R,S). 10.45 Some Girls (R,S). 11.15 American Dad! (R,S). 11.40 American Dad! (R,S).

7.00 Miss Marple (R). 7.50 Britain’s Wild Places: The Sheep Beside the Seaside (R). 8.00 The Review Show Special: Man Booker Award. Kirsty Wark discusses the works shortlisted for the 2013 Booker Prize. 9.00 Frost on Interviews (R). David Frost charts the development of the TV interview. 10.00 Comedy Connections (R). 10.40 Medieval Lives: Birth, Marriage, Death (R). 11.40 La Vie en Rose (2007). Biopic of Edith Piaf, with Marion Cotillard and Gerard Depardieu. ●●●

10.20 The Thick of It Nicola 10.30 John Bishop’s Only 10.00 Live PGA Tour Golf accepts an invitation to Joking (R,S,HD). The (HD). The Frys.com Open. debate with her popular stand-up hosts Coverage of the fourth opposite number on a the laugh-a-minute and final day of the Radio 5 Live late-night comedy entertainment opening event of the phone-in, but breaking show, joined in the 2013/14 season, held at news ruins her PR team’s studio by Jason Byrne, the CordeValle Golf Club well-made plans. Jimmy Cricket and Roger in San Martin, California. Political comedy, with Monkhouse. Sweden’s Jonas Blixt Rebecca Front. claimed his maiden title on the tour here last year, finishing one stroke 11.00 The Thick of It The 11.00 NCIS: Los Angeles 11.50 Tricked (R,HD). Hidden- 11.00 How I Met Your clear of Americans Jason media suggests Nicola as Mother (R,HD). The pals (R,S,HD). Part two of camera magic show, in Kokrak and Tim Petrovic. a potential leadership become addicted to two. The teams fly to Los which unsuspecting candidate. Comedy, cigarettes again. Angeles from Hawaii in celebrities and members starring Rebecca Front. pursuit of Jarrod Taylor, of the public are 11.30 Don’t Trust the B**** who claims he is being subjected to Ben 11.40 Nighty Night Cath in Apartment 23 paid by an Hanlin’s tricks and finally stands up to Jill. (R,HD). immunologist. illusions. 10.00 New Rude Tube. Alex Zane presents a top 50 countdown of “internet incredibles”, in order of their online popularity. Hits featured include a loud belcher, a human encyclopedia and a swimming baby.

12.50 The Vampire Diaries (R,HD). Damon and Sage meet again a century after their first encounter, and she devises an unusual method to help him figure out what Rebekah is up to. 1.45 The Vampire Diaries (R,HD). 2.25 Teleshopping 5.55 ITV2 Nightscreen (HD).

12.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). The arrival of Sheldon’s twin sister causes a stir. Comedy, starring Johnny Galecki. 12.30 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 12.55 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 1.25 Hollyoaks Later (R,HD). 2.25 Hollyoaks Later (R,HD). 3.15 Hollyoaks (R,HD).

RADIO

10.00 The Only Way Is Essex (HD). The gang returns from Las Vegas. 10.50 Utterly Outrageous Celebrity Frock Ups (R). Denise Van Outen’s favourite fashion slipups.

Radio 1 5.00am Seani B 7.00 Dev 10.00 Matt Edmondson 1.00pm Huw Stephens 4.00 The Official Chart Show 7.00 Dan & Phil 9.00 The Surgery with Aled & Dr Radha 10.00 Annie Mac Midnight BBC Introducing with Jen and Ally 2.00 Monki 4.00 Dev Radio 2 6.00am The Sunday Hour 7.00 Hardeep Singh Kohli with Good Morning Sunday 9.00 Steve Wright 11.00 Weekend Wogan 1.00pm Elaine Paige on Sunday 3.00 Johnnie Walker’s Sounds of the 70s 5.00 Paul O’Grady 7.00 Sunday Night with Michael Ball 9.00 Clare Teal 11.00 Don Black Midnight Janice Long 2.00 Alex Lester

12.00 Ross Kemp: Battle for the Amazon (R,S,HD). 1.00 Brit Cops: War on Crime (R,S,HD). 2.00 Brit Cops: War on Crime (R,S). 3.00 Brit Cops: War on Crime (R,S). 4.00 Crash Test Dummies (R,S,HD). 5.00 Crash Test Dummies (R,S,HD). 5.30 Luton Airport (R,S).

Radio 3 7.00am Breakfast 9.00 News 9.03 Sunday Morning: Verdi 200 Noon Private Passions 1.00 News 1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert 2.00 The Early Music Show 3.00 Choral Evensong 4.00 The Choir 5.30 Words and Music 6.30 Sunday Feature: Verdi 200 7.30 Radio 3 Live in Concert 10.00 Drama on 3: Verdi 200: Sunday at Sant’ Agata 11.30 David Matthews Symphonies 12.30am Through the Night Radio 4 5.30am News Briefing 5.43 Bells on Sunday 5.45 Profile 6.00 News Headlines 6.05 Something Understood 6.35 On Your Farm 6.57 Weather 7.00 News 7.07 Sunday Papers 7.10 Sunday 7.55 (LW) Radio 4

Appeal 7.55 (FM) Radio 4 Appeal 7.57 Weather 8.00 News 8.07 Sunday Papers 8.10 Sunday Worship 8.50 A Point of View 8.58 Tweet of the Day 9.00 Broadcasting House 10.00 The Archers 11.15 Desert Island Discs Noon News 12.01 (LW) Shipping 12.04 The Museum of Curiosity 12.30 The Food Programme 12.57 Weather 1.00 The World This Weekend 1.30 The Road to the National Theatre 2.00 Gardeners’ Question Time 2.45 The Listening Project 3.00 Classic Serial: Sword of Honour – Officers and Gentlemen 4.00 Open Book 4.30 Poetry Please 5.00 File on 4 5.40 Profile 5.54 Shipping 5.57 Weather

12.20 The Office The Swindon merger has finally gone through and the new staff members arrive in Slough for their first day. Ricky Gervais stars. 1.00 Knowing Me, Knowing You – With Alan Partridge 1.30 The Thick of It 2.00 The Thick of It 2.30 Nighty Night 3.00 Home Shopping 6.00 News 6.15 Pick of the Week 7.00 The Archers 7.15 Alex Horne Presents the Horne Section 7.45 Stories from the South Downs 8.00 Feedback 8.30 Last Word 9.00 Money Box 9.26 (LW) Radio 4 Appeal 9.26 (FM) Radio 4 Appeal 9.30 Analysis 9.59 Weather 10.00 The Westminster Hour 11.00 The Film Programme 11.30 Something Understood Midnight News 12.15 Thinking Allowed 12.45 Bells on Sunday 12.48 Shipping 1.00 As BBC World Service 5.20 Shipping Radio 5 Live 5.00am Morning Reports 5.30 The Non League Football Show 6.00 Sunday Breakfast 6.55 5 Live Formula 1 9.00 SportsWeek 10.00 Pienaar’s

WCL-E01-S2

1.00 European Tour Golf (HD). The Portugal Masters. Highlights of the fourth and final day from the Oceanico Victoria Golf Course in Vilamoura, where Shane Lowry won the title last year. 2.00 Darts (HD). 3.30 FL72 Highlights (HD). 4.00 Champions League Weekly (HD). 4.30 Darts (HD). Politics 11.00 5 Live Investigates Noon 5 Live Sport 12.45 5 Live Sport: 5 Live Rugby 3.00 5 live Sport: Usain Bolt 4.00 5 Live Formula 1: Murray Walker at 90 5.00 5 Live Sport: What Germany Did Next 6.06 6-0-6 7.30 On the Money 8.30 5 Live News 9.00 The Abuser’s Tale 10.00 Stephen Nolan 1.00am Up All Night Classic FM 6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 Aled Jones Noon Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen 3.00 Charlotte Green’s Culture Club 5.00 The Classic FM Chart 7.00 David Mellor 9.00 Wynne Evans’ Guide to Verdi 10.00 Smooth Classics Midnight Bob Jones

SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 43


Monday’s Television Guide Monday television&radio TV PICKS

EASTENDERS 8pm, BBC1

Michael is furious when Alice inadvertently spoils his plan to ruin Janine, while Jack throws a flat-warming party for Ronnie and insists on inviting the family.

BBC1 BBC1

6.00 Breakfast (S,HD). 9.15 Fake Britain (R,S). 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer (R,S). 11.00 Real Rescues (S,HD). 11.45 Britain’s Empty Homes (S). 12.15 Bargain Hunt (S,HD). 1.00 BBC News; Weather (S,HD). 1.30 Regional News (S); Weather. 1.45 Doctors (S,HD). 2.15 Keeping Up Appearances (R,S). 3.15 Perfection (S,HD). 4.00 Escape to the Country (R,S,HD). 4.30 Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is (S,HD). 5.15 Pointless (R,S,HD).

FILM RATINGS ●●●●● Excellent ●●●● Very good ●●● Good ●● Average ● Poor

THE GADGET SHOW 8pm, Channel 5

Rachel Riley and Jason Bradbury try out the Google Glass wearable computer before going on a road trip to find out whether 4G is really all it is cracked up to be. Pollyanna Woodward tests a Quadski, which is a combination of a jetski and a quadbike and Jon Bentley puts three DSLR cameras through their paces.

BBC2 BBC2

6.00 This Is BBC Two 6.05 Homes Under the Hammer 7.05 Real Rescues (R,S,HD). 7.50 Claimed and Shamed (R,S,HD). 8.20 Sign Zone 10.35 Click (R,S,HD). 11.00 BBC News (HD). 11.30 BBC World News (HD). 12.00 Daily Politics 1.00 Classic Mastermind 1.30 Weakest Link 2.15 Great British Menu (R,S,HD). 2.45 Floyd on Food (R,S,HD). 3.15 Are You Being Served? (R,S). 3.45 ’Allo ’Allo! (R,S). 4.15 Cagney & Lacey (HD). 5.00 Flog It! (R,S).

STEPHEN FRY: OUT THERE 9pm, BBC2

DIARY OF A TEENAGE VIRGIN 10pm, Channel 4

Part one of two. The broadcaster travels to various parts of the world to learn about the lives of gay people, beginning by talking to Elton John and David Furnish.

ITV1 ITV

6.00 Daybreak (S,HD). 8.30 Lorraine (S). 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show (S,HD). 10.30 This Morning (S). 12.30 Loose Women (S,HD). 1.30 ITV News and Weather (S). 1.55 Regional News (S). 2.00 Dickinson’s Real Deal (S,HD). From Gloucester. 3.00 The Alan Titchmarsh Show (S,HD). Features, music and conversation. 3.59 Regional Weather (S). 4.00 Tipping Point (S,HD). 5.00 The Chase (S,HD). Quiz show, hosted by Bradley Walsh.

Young people provide a candid insight into how it feels to be a virgin at a time when social networking and easily accessible pornography have transformed the sexual landscape. They include a 15-year-old girl considering sleeping with a boy she met online. Part of the Campaign for Real Sex season.

Channel 4 Channel

6.10 The Hoobs (R,S). 7.05 According to Jim (R,S,HD). 7.30 Will & Grace (R,S). 7.55 Frasier 8.55 Everybody Loves Raymond (R,S). 10.00 Four Rooms (R,S,HD). 11.00 A Place in the Sun: Home or Away (R,S,HD). 12.00 News Summary 12.05 Gordon Ramsay’s Home Cooking (S). 12.35 River Cottage Bites (S,HD). 12.50 Film: Shane (1953). See Choices Above. ●●●●● 3.10 Countdown (S,HD). 4.00 Deal or No Deal (S,HD). 5.00 Four in a Bed 5.30 Come Dine with Me (HD).

Channel 5 Channel

6.00 Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff (HD). 11.10 Cowboy Builders (R,S,HD). 12.10 5 News Lunchtime (S,HD). 12.15 Beat the Ancestors (R,S,HD). 1.15 Home and Away (S,HD). 1.45 Neighbours (S,HD). 2.20 Castle (R,S,HD). 3.15 Film: Torn Apart (S) (2004). Thriller, starring Tia Carrere, Dale Midkiff and Richard Burgi. ●●● 5.00 5 News at 5 (S,HD). 5.30 Neighbours (R,S,HD). Paul pays Marty to leave town and learns Jack is dying.

Never Mind the Buzzcocks, 10pm

Emmerdale, 7pm

Dogs: Their Secret Lives, 8pm

Under the Dome, 10pm

6.00 BBC News (S,HD); Weather. 6.30 Regional News (S); Weather.

6.00 Regional News (S); Weather. 6.30 ITV News and Weather (S).

6.00 The Simpsons (R,S). 18/20. Lisa makes a revealing documentary about life with her family for a school project. 6.30 Hollyoaks (S,HD).

6.00 Home and Away (R,S,HD). Bianca tells Heath she is postponing the wedding. 6.30 NewsTalk Live (S,HD).

7.00 The One Show (S,HD). Hosted by Alex Jones and Matt Baker. 7.30 Regional Programme (S). Followed by BBC News; Regional News.

6.00 Eggheads (S,HD). 75/140. Quiz show. 6.30 Strictly Come Dancing – It Takes Two (S,HD). Zoe Ball chats to the second couple to be eliminated. 7.00 Rick Stein’s India (R,S,HD). 1/6. The chef explores the country’s food, beginning by looking at the cuisine found in Kolkata and Chennai, cooking dishes including prawns in coconut milk.

7.00 Emmerdale (S,HD). Debbie fears the worst when Sarah goes missing. 7.30 Coronation Street (S,HD). A suspicious Kylie confronts Tina about David.

7.00 News (S). 7.55 Sex Box (S,HD). 5/6. A couple talk to agony aunt and journalist Mariella Frostrup about what sex means to them. Part of the Campaign for Real Sex season.

7.00 Beat the Ancestors (S,HD). Dick Strawbridge challenges a team of engineers to re-create a crane from the Gothic era. Followed by 5 News Update.

8.00 EastEnders (S,HD). See Choices Above. 8.30 Britain’s New Banking Scandal – Panorama (S,HD). Adam Shaw investigates the mis-selling of interest-rate swaps.

8.00 University Challenge (S,HD). 14/37. Aberystwyth takes on Bangor. 8.30 Tom Kerridge’s Proper Pub Food (S,HD). 4/6. Classic pub fare, including Caesar salad, fish and chips and pork scratchings.

8.00 Countrywise (S,HD). 7/8. Making charcoal in the Lake District. 8.30 Coronation Street (S,HD). Kylie discovers Lily’s DNA results and goes to see Nick for answers. Will he reveal the truth about David?

8.00 Dogs: Their Secret Lives (S). Using hidden cameras and a ground-breaking new scientific study, this documentary reveals what dogs get up to when their owners are not at home.

8.00 The Gadget Show (S,HD). See Choices Above. Followed by 5 News at 9.

9.00 Crimewatch (S). Kirsty Young presents the latest findings in the search for Madeleine McCann, the then-three-yearold abducted from her family’s holiday apartment in Praia da Luz, Portugal in May 2007.

9.00 Stephen Fry: Out There (S,HD). 1/2. See Choices Above.

9.00 Doc Martin (S,HD). 7/8. See Choices Above.

9.00 999: What’s Your Emergency? (S,HD). 2/6. Paramedics attend alcoholrelated incidents involving a man who has become incontinent through excessive drinking, and a woman who has passed out after a day at the races.

9.00 On Benefits & Proud (S,HD). Documentary examining the lifestyles of some of those living on benefits who are not currently seeking employment, including a Gloucestershire mother-of-11 who receives benefits equivalent to three times the typical UK family income.

6 7 8 9

Crimewatch, 9pm

10.00 BBC News (S,HD). 10.25 Regional News (S); Weather. 10.35 Crimewatch Update (S). An update on viewers’ responses to the programme shown earlier. 10.45 Have I Got a Bit More News for You (R,S,HD). 2/11. An extended version of the satirical current-affairs quiz.

10.00 Never Mind the Buzzcocks (S,HD). 4/13. Radio One DJ Sara Cox hosts the comedy music quiz, with Iggy Azalea, Eliza Doolittle, Jake Humphrey and Matt Richardson joining team captains Phill Jupitus and Noel Fielding. 10.30 Newsnight (S,HD). Followed by Weather.

10.00 ITV News at Ten (S). 10.30 Regional News (S); Weather. 10.35 The Agenda (S,HD). 2/8. ITV’s political editor Tom Bradby presents a discussion on the week’s main talking points, with guests from the worlds of politics and popular culture.

10.00 Diary of a Teenage Virgin (S). See Choices Above.

10.00 Under the Dome (S,HD). 9/13. Big Jim asks the townsfolk to hand in their weapons after Ted Utley accidentally shoots his neighbour while trying to scare off a drug addict, who reveals he got the narcotic from the late Reverend Coggins.

(R) repeat (S) subtitles (HD) highdefinition

11.30 Citizen Khan (R,S,HD). 2/6. Mr Khan is eager to get himself onto the mosque committee, but when he visits the manager to enrol his mother-in-law on an activity course, things do not go as planned. Adil Ray, Shobu Kapoor and Adlyn Ross star.

11.20 The Ottomans: Europe’s Muslim Emperors (R,S,HD). 2/3. Rageh Omaar compares the golden age of Suleiman the Magnificent in the 16th century with the troubled reign of Abdul Hamid II.

11.05 Piers Morgan’s Life Stories: Gordon Brown Special (R,S). In a one-hour interview filmed during his time as Prime Minister, Piers tries to get to the heart of what makes Gordon Brown tick.

11.05 Educating Yorkshire (R,S). Exams are approaching at Thornhill Community Academy and everyone is feeling the pressure, from students to experienced staff and newly qualified teachers.

11.00 Constantine (S) (2005). See Choices Above. ●●●

12.00 The Graham Norton Show (R,S,HD). The host returns with more lighthearted chat, talking to Hollywood star Harrison Ford about his new sci-fi adventure Ender’s Game, and Sherlock actor Benedict Cumberbatch, currently appearing as WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in The Fifth Estate. 12.45 Weatherview (S). 12.50 BBC News (S,HD).

12.20 Sign Zone: The Culture Show at Edinburgh: Leonardo da Vinci – The Anatomist (R,S). Alastair Sooke views The Mechanics of Man, a new exhibition of Leonardo da Vinci’s anatomical drawings at the Queen’s Gallery in the Palace of Holyroodhouse. 12.50 Sign Zone: The Story of the Jews (R,S). 1.50 This Is BBC Two (S). 4.00 BBC Learning Zone

12.05 Jackpot247 Viewers get the chance to participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort of their sofas, with a mix of roulette-wheel spins and lively chat from the presenting team. 3.00 Champions League Weekly (S,HD). Highlights of recent games. 3.25 ITV Nightscreen (HD). Text-based information service. 5.05 The Jeremy Kyle Show (R,S).

12.05 First Time Farmers (R,S,HD). Young people determined to get into the farming business. 1.00 Random Acts (S). 1.05 Film: Diamond Queen (1940). Drama, starring Fearless Nadia and John Cawas. ●●● 3.25 Nashville (S,HD). 4.05 Deal or No Deal (R,S,HD). 5.00 Countdown (R,S,HD). 5.45 Baking Mad with Eric Lanlard (R,S,HD).

1.10 SuperCasino Viewers get the chance to take part in live interactive gaming, with an entertaining mix of roulette-wheel spins and lively chat from the presenting team. Featuring a variety of prizes and promotions. 3.55 Nick’s Quest (R,S). 4.20 Michaela’s Wild Challenge (R,S). 4.45 House Doctor (R,S). 5.10 Divine Designs (R,S). 5.35 Wildlife SOS (R,S).

10 11

after

12

44 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013

WCL-E01-S2


The doctor becomes convinced that something is wrong with him following a conversation with his mother, and Louisa’s attempts at getting him to open up about the loss of his father prove futile.

ITV2 ITV2

6.00 Emmerdale 6.25 Coronation Street 7.25 You’ve Been Framed! 7.55 Jeremy Kyle Show USA 8.40 Dinner Date 9.40 Real Housewives of New York City 10.35 Real Housewives of Vancouver 11.30 Millionaire Matchmaker 12.30 Emmerdale 1.00 Coronation Street 2.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show (R). 4.10 The Real Housewives of Orange County (R,HD). 5.05 Millionaire Matchmaker (R,HD).

MADE IN CHELSEA 10pm, E4

The return of the reality show following the social activities of a group of people in their twenties. In the first episode, Spencer and Lucy begin to talk following the revelation that he cheated, but he seems more interested in her attitude towards his ex-girlfriend Louise.

E4 E4

6.00 Switched 6.25 90210 7.10 Ugly Betty 8.00 Charmed (R). 9.00 Glee (R,HD). 10.00 New Girl (R,HD). 10.30 The Mindy Project (R,HD). 11.00 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 11.30 Charmed 12.30 Hollyoaks (R,HD). 1.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD). 2.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 3.00 New Girl (R,HD). 3.30 The Mindy Project (R,HD). 4.00 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 5.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD).

Sky1 Sky1

6.00 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,S). 7.00 The Middle (R,S,HD). 8.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 9.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 10.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 11.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 1.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 2.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R,S,HD). 3.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 5.00 Futurama (R,S,HD). 5.30 The Middle (R,S,HD).

FILM PICKS

DOC MARTIN 9pm, ITV

SHANE 12.50pm, Channel 4

Monday television&radio CONSTANTINE 11pm, Channel 5

A mysterious gunfighter defends a family of homesteaders intimidated by a cattle baron and his henchmen. Western, starring Alan Ladd.

GOLD Gold

6.05 2point4 Children 6.35 Sykes 7.05 2point4 Children 7.45 Sykes 8.20 Last of the Summer Wine 9.00 Keeping Up Appearances 10.20 Just a Minute 11.00 The Borrowers 11.40 Open All Hours 12.20 dinnerladies 1.40 Porridge 2.20 As Time Goes By 3.00 Goodnight Sweetheart 4.20 Last of the Summer Wine 5.40 One Foot in the Grave

An exorcist with the ability to see evil spirits engages in a battle to save the world, and his own soul. Thriller, with Keanu Reeves and Rachel Weisz.

Sky Sports 1 SkySports1

6.00 Good Morning Sports Fans (HD). 8.00 Good Morning Sports Fans (HD). 9.00 Darts (HD). 10.30 FL72 Highlights (HD). 11.00 FL72 Highlights (HD). 11.30 International Fight Night (HD). 1.30 European Rugby Special (HD). 2.30 Darts (HD). 4.00 The Fantasy Football Club (HD). 4.30 Game Changers (HD). 5.30 Soccer AM: The Best Bits (HD).

Peter Andre: My Life, 9pm

90210, 9pm

Spartacus: Vengeance, 10pm

dinnerladies, 7.40pm

The Footballers’ ... 10pm

6.00 Dinner Date (R,HD). Russell from Essex takes part in the dating show. Charlotte Hudson narrates.

6.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). Sheldon gets a job at a diner. 6.30 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD).

6.00 The Middle (R,S,HD). Axl inadvertently invites the wrong girl to the prom. 6.30 The Simpsons (R,S,HD).

6.20 Yes, Prime Minister Jim must choose the next governor of the Bank of England. Political comedy, starring Paul Eddington.

6.30 FL72 Review A roundup of recent matches, featuring all the goals from League One and League Two.

7.00 You’ve Been Framed! (R). 7.30 You’ve Been Framed! (R). Featuring sports day disasters and bowling mishaps.

7.00 Hollyoaks (HD). 7.30 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD). Marshall tells Ted anecdotes about his colleague Jenkins.

7.00 The Simpsons (R,S). 7.30 The Simpsons (R,S). Homer and Bart transform the fortunes of a losing racehorse.

7.00 Open All Hours Granville tries to impress a local beauty. 7.40 dinnerladies A new table-clearing system leaves Bren cold.

8.00 You’ve Been Framed! & Famous (R). Harry Hill narrates a selection of comical mishaps filmed by viewers, featuring a range of celebrity lookalikes, from Simon Cowell to Ryan Giggs.

8.00 New Girl (R,HD). The boys tell Jess to get a job. Comedy, starring Zooey Deschanel. 8.30 New Girl (R,HD). Jess tries to trick her divorced parents into a reconciliation.

8.00 A League of Their Own (R,S,HD). With Alan Shearer, Jason Manford and Frankie Sandford. Last in the series.

8.20 dinnerladies Tony worries Bren will be distracted during her TV debut. Stan hopes for a proposal and Dolly gets in a flap about the new uniforms. Comedy, starring Victoria Wood.

7.30 Live Irish Football (HD). Portadown v Glenavon (kick-off 7.45pm). All the action from the NIFL Premiership encounter at Shamrock Park. Even at this early stage of the season, this match could have an important bearing on the destination of the title, with both clubs having started their campaigns in fine style.

9.00 Peter Andre: My Life (HD). Pete continues his charity bike ride in Zanzibar, and pays a visit to the hospital he is raising funds for. Back in the UK, the singer decides to confirm some life-changing news.

9.00 90210 (HD). Liam and Navid try to convince pro-surfer Cassie to become their company’s first sponsored athlete, but to do so they must ask her favourite singer, Olly Murs, to give her a special performa nce.

9.00 Modern Family (R,S,HD). Mitch and Cam join the campaign to save an old tree in the park. 9.30 Modern Family (R,S,HD). Claire and Cameron build a baseball pitch.

9.00 Not Going Out First episode of the sitcom about mismatched flatmates, starring Lee Mack and Megan Dodds. 9.40 Not Going Out A death in the family brings Tim and Kate closer.

BBC3 BBC3

BBC4 BBC4

12.10 American Dad! (R,S). 12.30 Some Girls (R,S). 1.00 Crime, Carnage & Cancun: Stacey Dooley Investigates (R,S). 2.00 Sex, Stags & Prague: Stacey Dooley Investigates (R,S). 3.00 Crime, Carnage & Cancun: Stacey Dooley Investigates (R,S).

12.00 Lost Kingdoms of Africa (R). 1.00 Only Connect (R). 1.30 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads? (R). 2.00 Timothy Spall: All at Sea (R). 2.30 Impact! A Horizon Guide to Plane Crashes (R).

7.00 Don’t Tell the Bride (R,S). 8.00 Hotel of Mum and Dad (R,S). 9.00 Crime, Carnage & Cancun: Stacey Dooley Investigates (S). The presenter discovers the darker side to Cancun. 10.00 Some Girls (S). Viva’s group clashes with Charlie’s gang over the affections of Tyler Blaine. 10.30 EastEnders (R,S). Jack throws a flatwarming party for Ronnie. 11.00 Family Guy (R,S). 11.25 Family Guy (R,S). 11.45 American Dad! (R,S).

7.00 World News Today; Weather. 7.30 Timothy Spall: All at Sea (R). The Princess Matilda sails around northeast England. 8.00 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads? (R). 8.30 Only Connect Three members of a press gang take on a trio of bakers. 9.00 Impact! A Horizon Guide to Plane Crashes How deadly disasters have been used to prevent future tragedies. 10.00 Horizon: 40 Years on the Moon (R). 11.00 Africa (R).

10.00 The Footballers’ 10.00 The Bourne Identity 10.00 Made in Chelsea (HD). 10.00 Spartacus: Vengeance 10.20 Outnumbered The Brockmans have a (R,S,HD). A gladiator Football Show (HD). (HD) (2002). A fishing See Choices Above. restless night when a from the House of Dave Jones is joined by boat crew plucks a man thunderstorm breaks Batiatus stops Spartacus guests including out of the sea with two over the house – and in in his tracks as he tries to footballers, managers bullet wounds in his the morning a rescue Crixus from and club chairmen to back and a safe-deposit policeman comes Roman captivity, and discuss all the major number sewn into his knocking at the door. Ilithyia’s scheming puts stories in the week’s skin – but absolutely no Domestic comedy, her marriage to Glaber football news. memory of who he is or starring Hugh Dennis. at risk. how he got there. In the search for his true identity, he is pursued 11.00 Men Behaving Badly 11.00 Come Dine with Me: 11.15 Brit Cops: War on 11.00 FL72 Review A roundby assassins – but his Tony and Gary’s gleeful Made in Chelsea Crime (R,S). up of recent matches, attempts to escape anticipation of Christmas Special (R,HD). Four Documentary series featuring all the goals them suggest his own soon gives way to stars from the realityfollowing the work of from League One and past is far from disappointment and style drama compete in police officers in League Two. straightforward. comatose oblivion in the culinary challenge Lincolnshire as they Thriller, starring Matt front of the telly. Martin show. tackle crime. Damon. ●●●● Clunes stars.

RADIO

12.20 The Only Way Is Essex (R,HD). The gang returns from Las Vegas. 1.10 The Vampire Diaries (R,HD). Elena and Damon set off to make sure Jeremy is safe in Denver. 1.50 All Star Family Fortunes (R). Liz McClarnon and Uri Geller compete. 2.25 Teleshopping 5.55 ITV2 Nightscreen (HD).

12.00 Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 1.00 Don’t Trust the B**** in Apartment 23 (R,HD). 1.30 Suburgatory (R,HD). 2.00 Happy Endings (R,HD). 2.20 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 2.45 Come Dine with Me: Made in Chelsea Special (R,HD). 3.35 Glee (R,HD). 4.20 Ugly Betty (R,HD).

Radio 1 6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Fearne Cotton 12.45pm Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James 7.00 Zane Lowe 9.00 Radio 1’s Stories 10.00 Phil Taggart and Alice Levine Midnight Rock Show with Daniel P Carter 2.00 B.Traits 4.00 Dev Radio 2 5.00am Vanessa Feltz 6.30 Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce Noon Paddy O’Connell 2.00 Steve Wright in the Afternoon 5.00 Simon Mayo 7.00 Paul Jones 8.00 Jo Whiley. Including reviews of new albums. 10.00 Hugh Laurie’s Blues Changes 11.00 Jools Holland Midnight Janice Long 2.00 Alex Lester

12.15 Road Wars (R,S,HD). Police officers combat vehicle crime. 1.15 Road Wars (R,S). 2.10 Hawaii Five-0 (R,HD). 3.00 Ross Kemp in Search of Pirates (R,S,HD). 4.00 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,S). 4.30 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,S). 5.00 Airline (R,S). 5.30 Airline (R,S).

Radio 3 6.30am Breakfast 9.00 Essential Classics Noon Composers of the Week: Chaminade & Holmès 1.00 News 1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert 2.00 Afternoon on 3 4.30 In Tune 6.30 Composers of the Week: Chaminade & Holmès 7.30 Radio 3 Live in Concert 10.00 Night Waves 10.45 The Essay: If Walls Could Talk 11.00 Jazz on 3 12.30am Through the Night Radio 4 5.30am News Briefing 5.43 Prayer for the Day 5.45 Farming Today 5.58 Tweet of the Day 6.00 Today 9.00 Start the Week 9.45 (LW) Daily Service 9.45 (FM) Book of the Week: Historic Heston 10.00 Woman’s Hour 11.00 Selling British Luxury 11.30

Dilemma Noon News 12.01 (LW) Shipping Forecast 12.04 You and Yours 12.57 Weather 1.00 The World at One 1.45 Terror Through Time: The Story of Terrorism from The Assassins to Al Qaeda 2.00 The Archers 2.15 Afternoon Drama: The Organist’s Daughter 3.00 Round Britain Quiz 3.30 The Food Programme 4.00 Bingo, Barbie and Barthes: 50 Years of Cultural Studies 4.30 The Digital Human 5.00 PM 5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast 5.57 Weather 6.00 Six O’Clock News 6.30 The Museum of Curiosity 7.00 The Archers. Jamie takes the initiative. 7.15 Front Row 7.45 Gillespie and I 8.00 The Invention of

12.05 Not Going Out First episode of the sitcom, starring Lee Mack. 12.45 Not Going Out 1.25 The Comic Strip Presents: Mr Jolly Lives Next Door Two would-be male escorts are mistaken for hitmen. 2.15 Men Behaving Badly 3.00 Home Shopping Armchair buys. Italy 8.30 Analysis 9.00 Shared Planet. Monty Don investigates common threats to shark species, and talks to natural history writer Kelvin Boot. 9.30 Start the Week. Tom Sutcliffe chairs a discussion between artist Grayson Perry, Tate Britain director Penelope Curtis, academic Philip Davis and games blogger and author Nicholas Lovell. 9.59 Weather 10.00 The World Tonight 10.45 Book at Bedtime: Algernon Blackwood’s Ghost Stories 11.00 Verse Illustrated 11.15 Warhorses of Letters 11.30 Today in Parliament Midnight News and Weather 12.30 Book of the Week: Historic Heston 12.48 Shipping

WCL-E01-S2

12.00 Soccer AM: The Best Bits (HD). Highlights of Saturday’s show. 1.00 Irish Football (HD). Portadown v Glenavon. 2.00 The Footballers’ Football Show (HD). The major stories in the week’s football news. 3.00 FL72 Review 4.00 Soccer AM: The Best Bits (HD). 5.00 Irish Football (HD). Forecast 1.00 As BBC World Service 5.20 Shipping Forecast Radio 5 Live 5.00am Morning Reports 5.30 Wake Up to Money 6.00 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 Victoria Derbyshire Noon Shelagh Fogarty 2.00 Richard Bacon 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport: The Monday Night Club 9.00 5 Live Sport: 5 Live Cricket 10.00 5 Live Sport: 5 Live Rugby 10.30 Phil Williams 1.00am Up All Night Classic FM 6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John Suchet 1.00pm Nick Bailey 5.00 Classic FM Drive 8.00 The Full Works Concert. Beethoven, Bach, Tolga Kashif, Schumann. 10.00 Smooth Classics 2.00am Bob Jones

SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 45


Tuesday television&radio Tuesday’s Television Guide TV PICKS

DIY SOS: THE BIG BUILD 9pm, BBC1

Nick Knowles enlists local tradespeople in Maidstone, to help adapt the home of Mo Morris, a former Royal Engineer who struggles to walk unaided.

BBC1 BBC1

6.00 Breakfast (S,HD). 9.15 Fake Britain (R,S). 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer (S,HD). 11.00 Real Rescues (S,HD). 11.45 Britain’s Empty Homes (S). 12.15 Bargain Hunt (R,S,HD). 1.00 BBC News; Weather (S,HD). 1.30 Regional News (S); Weather. 1.45 Doctors (S,HD). 2.15 Keeping Up Appearances (R,S). 3.15 Perfection (S,HD). 4.00 Escape to the Country (R,S,HD). 4.30 Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is (S,HD). 5.15 Pointless (R,S,HD).

FILM RATINGS ●●●●● Excellent ●●●● Very good ●●● Good ●● Average ● Poor

EMMERDALE 7pm, ITV

Andy and Moira are relieved to find Sarah alone and unharmed, but their happiness is short-lived when they discover Cameron was involved in her disappearance. In the Woolpack, Debbie learns of her murderous ex’s return. Meanwhile, Ruby decides to stay with a friend, but Sean tries to prevent her from leaving.

BBC2 BBC2

6.00 This Is BBC Two 6.05 Homes Under the Hammer 7.05 Real Rescues (R,S,HD). 7.50 Britain’s Empty Homes (R,S). 8.20 Sign Zone 10.35 HARDtalk (R,S,HD). 11.00 News (HD). 11.30 World News (HD). 12.00 Daily Politics 1.00 Classic Mastermind (R,S). 1.30 Weakest Link (R,S). 2.15 Great British Menu (R,S,HD). 2.45 Floyd on Fish (R,S,HD). 3.15 Are You Being Served? (R,S). 3.45 ’Allo ’Allo! (R,S). 4.15 Cagney & Lacey (R,S,HD). 5.00 Flog It! (R,S).

LIVE INTERNATIONAL FOOTBALL 7.30pm, ITV

MASTERS OF SEX 9pm, Channel 4

England v Poland (kick-off 8.00pm). Coverage of the concluding Group H World Cup qualifier from Wembley Stadium, where England’s hopes of making it to Brazil could be decided.

ITV1 ITV

6.00 Daybreak (S,HD). 8.30 Lorraine (S). 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show (S,HD). 10.30 This Morning (S). 12.30 Loose Women (S,HD). 1.30 ITV News and Weather (S). 1.55 Regional News (S). 2.00 Dickinson’s Real Deal (S,HD). David Dickinson and the team head to Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire. 3.00 The Alan Titchmarsh Show (S,HD). 3.59 Regional Weather (S). 4.00 Tipping Point (S,HD). 5.00 The Chase (S,HD). Quiz show, hosted by Bradley Walsh.

The sexual response study is banned from the hospital, so Masters is forced to move it to a brothel, but soon receives unwelcome visitors. Finding herself held responsible for the project’s removal, Johnson is left fighting to save her job while struggling to care for her children.

Channel Channel 4

6.10 The Hoobs 7.00 According to Jim 7.30 Will & Grace (R,S). 7.55 Frasier (R,S). 9.00 Everybody Loves Raymond 10.00 Four Rooms 11.00 A Place in the Sun: Home or Away 12.00 News Summary 12.05 Gordon Ramsay’s Home Cooking 12.35 River Cottage Bites (S,HD). 12.50 Film: Earthquake (S,HD) (1974). See Choices Above. ●●●● 3.10 Countdown (S,HD). 4.00 Deal or No Deal (S,HD). 5.00 Four in a Bed (S,HD). 5.30 Come Dine with Me (S,HD).

Channel Channel 5

6.00 Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff (HD). 11.10 Cowboy Builders (R,S,HD). 12.10 5 News Lunchtime (S,HD). 12.15 Animal Maternity (R,S,HD). 1.15 Home and Away (S,HD). 1.45 Neighbours (S,HD). 2.15 Law & Order: Criminal Intent (R,S,HD). 3.10 Film: Let Me Call You Sweetheart (S) (1997). Mystery, starring Meredith Baxter, Victor Garber, Tony Lo Bianco and Sophie Lang. ●●● 5.00 5 News at 5 (S,HD). 5.30 Neighbours (R,S,HD).

(R) repeat (S) subtitles (HD) highdefinition

6.00 Eggheads (S,HD). 76/140. 6.30 Strictly Come Dancing – It Takes Two (S,HD). Zoe Ball is joined by the couple who narrowly avoided elimination on Sunday. 7.00 Rick Stein’s India (R,S,HD). 2/6. The chef enjoys Parsee hospitality in Mumbai and learns about their contribution to Indian cuisine.

6.00 Regional News (S); Weather. 6.30 ITV News and Weather (S).

6.00 The Simpsons (R,S). 19/20. 6.30 Hollyoaks (S,HD). Sinead’s mistake has devastating consequences at the council flat.

6.00 Home and Away (R,S,HD). Brax reassures Heath and enlists Ricky’s help to get the wedding back on track. 6.30 NewsTalk Live (S,HD).

7.00 Emmerdale (S,HD). See Choices Above. 7.30 Live International Football (S,HD). England v Poland (kickoff 8.00pm). Coverage of the concluding Group H World Cup qualifier from Wembley Stadium, where England’s hopes of making it to Brazil could be decided. Roy Hodgson’s men may need to produce a better performance than they gave in the reverse fixture at Warsaw’s National Stadium last October, which finished in a 1-1 draw. Presented by Adrian Chiles, with commentary by Clive Tyldesley and Andy Townsend, and analysis from Roy Keane, Terry Butcher and Lee Dixon. See Choices Above.

7.00 News (S). 7.55 Sex Box (S,HD). 6/6. A couple talk to agony aunt and journalist Mariella Frostrup about what sex means to them. Last in the series.

7.00 Jungle Babies: Tarsier Tails (S,HD). 2/25. 7.30 The Dog Rescuers (S,HD). Two Norwich RSPCA officers rescue a dog trapped on a small island. Followed by 5 News Update.

8.00 Double Your House for Half the Money (S,HD). 9/10. Sarah Beeny meets a Hertfordshire couple who plan to add three bedrooms to their tiny home, and follows a project in south London to dig out a basement.

8.00 CSI: Vegas Meets New York – Part One (R,S,HD). Mac Taylor travels to Nevada to surprise his girlfriend, but discovers she is missing and asks his Las Vegas colleagues for help. First of a two-part crossover episode. Followed by 5 News at 9.

9.00 Masters of Sex (S,HD). 2/12. See Choices Above.

9.00 CSI: Vegas Meets New York – Part Two (R,S,HD). 15/17. DB Russell heads to New York to help Mac search for his kidnapped girlfriend Christine, and James Boyd arranges to meet up with the gang to drop off the diamonds and release the hostages.

Jungle Babies: Tarsier Tails, 7pm

8 Out of 10 Cats, 10.40pm

7.00 The One Show (S,HD). Live chat and topical reports. 7.30 EastEnders (S,HD). Jack and Ronnie are reminded of the life they could have had. Followed by BBC News; Regional News.

Tipping Point, 4pm

6.00 BBC News (S,HD); Weather. 6.30 Regional News (S); Weather.

8.00 Holby City (S,HD). 1/52. Malick struggles to accept he is now a patient, Elliot realises his new protegee Zosia is going to be a handful, and Sacha comes clean to Chrissie about his secret kiss with Mo.

8.00 The Great British Bake Off (S,HD). 9/16. The four semifinalists face three French challenges, having to prepare three types of savoury canapes, Charlotte Royale desserts and opera cakes. Mel Giedroyc and Sue Perkins present.

9.00 DIY SOS: The Big Build (S,HD). See Choices Above.

9.00 The Wrong Mans (S,HD). 4/6. See Choices Above. 9.30 The Sarah Millican Television Programme (S,HD). 4/6. With Dr Christian Jessen and Game of Thrones stars John Bradley, Finn Jones and Kristian Nairn.

10.00 BBC News (S,HD). 10.25 Regional News (S). Followed by National Lottery Update. 10.35 The Prison Restaurant (R,S,HD). Behind the scenes at the Clink, a restaurant staffed by convicted criminals at HMP High Down in Surrey that is providing inmates with a chance to learn a trade.

10.00 Later Live – with Jools Holland (S,HD). 5/8. Featuring performances by English singersongwriters John Newman, Lloyd Cole and Passenger, American indie band MGMT and Spanish jazz and soul singer Buika. 10.30 Newsnight (S,HD). Followed by Weather.

10.25 ITV News and Weather (S). 10.50 Regional News (S); Weather.

10.10 London Irish (S). 4/6. Conor introduces the gang to his new wife. 10.40 8 Out of 10 Cats (R,S). 2/9. Jimmy Carr hosts the irreverent panel show, with team captains Sean Lock and Jon Richardson joined by Richard Hammond, Carol Vorderman, Paul Foot and Matt Forde.

10.00 Castle (S,HD). 4/24. See Choices Above. 10.55 Body of Proof (R,S,HD). 4/9. Megan tries to identify a murder victim from body parts found by a homeless man – a gruesome task made worse by Lacey’s filming of her in action for a school project.

10 11

The Great British Bake Off, 8pm

6 7 8 9

Holby City, 8pm

11.25 The Girl in the Park (S) (2007). See Choices Above. ●●●

11.20 Stephen Fry: Out There (R,S,HD). 1/2. Part one of two. The broadcaster travels to various parts of the world to learn about the lives of gay people, beginning by talking to Elton John and David Furnish.

11.00 International Football Highlights (S,HD). England v Poland. Highlights of the Group H World Cup qualifier from Wembley Stadium, where both sides played their final match of the campaign.

11.30 The Simpsons (R,S). 2/22. Bart goes on the run. 11.55 The Simpsons (R,S). 12/22. Bart lands a job on the Krusty the Clown Show and becomes an instant celebrity, complete with his own catchphrase.

11.55 Law & Order: Criminal Intent (R,S,HD). 6/16. A man involved in a bank heist is killed six months later in a deliberate explosion. Crime drama, starring Jeff Goldblum and Julianne Nicholson.

1.10 Weatherview (S). 1.15 BBC News (S,HD).

12.20 Sign Zone: Mum and Dad Are Splitting Up (R,S). Olly Lambert’s film examines five young people’s experiences of their parents’ divorces and separations, with both the children and the adults talking about how they were affected. 1.20 This Is BBC Two (S). Preview of upcoming programmes from BBC Two. 3.50 BBC Learning Zone

12.00 Jackpot247 Viewers get the chance to participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort of their sofas, with a mix of roulette-wheel spins and lively chat from the presenting team. 3.00 Loose Women (R,HD). Topical debate from a female perspective. 3.45 ITV Nightscreen (HD). Text-based information service. 5.05 The Jeremy Kyle Show (R,S).

12.25 Random Acts (S). 12.30 Poker (S). 1.30 KOTV Boxing Weekly (S). Billy Dib v Mike Oliver. 1.55 Beach Volleyball (S). 2.50 FIM Superbike World Championship (R,S). 3.20 XTERRA England (R,S). 3.50 British GT (R,S). 4.15 The Hever Castle Triathlon (R,S). 5.10 Brief Encounters of the Sporting Mind (R,S). 5.15 Deal or No Deal (R,S,HD).

12.40 True Crimes: The First 72 Hours (R,S). The murder of a homeless man whom people referred to as Santa Claus is solved due to the determination of police and scientists. 1.10 SuperCasino 3.55 Nick’s Quest (R,S). 4.20 Michaela’s Wild Challenge (R,S). 4.45 House Doctor (R,S). 5.10 Divine Designs (R,S). 5.35 Wildlife SOS (R,S).

after

12

46 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013

WCL-E01-S2


CASTLE 10pm, Channel 5

A mathematical genius working in investment banking is shot and killed with a 200-year-old bullet, and Castle suspects that time travel is involved. Crime drama, starring Nathan Fillion.

THE WRONG MANS 9pm, BBC2

The devious Scarlett sends Sam and Phil on a mission to retrieve a music box, which has fallen into the hands of eccentric Russian millionaire Marat Milankovic. With the vengeful Lau still seeking payback, the duo find themselves at a drug-fuelled house party and stumble upon an assassination plot.

ITV2 ITV2

E4 E4

6.00 Emmerdale 6.25 Coronation Street 7.25 You’ve Been Framed! 7.55 Jeremy Kyle Show USA 8.40 Dinner Date 9.40 Real Housewives of New York City 10.35 Real Housewives of Orange County 11.30 Millionaire Matchmaker 12.30 Emmerdale 1.00 Coronation Street (R,HD). 2.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show (R). 4.10 Real Housewives of Orange County (R,HD). 5.05 Millionaire Matchmaker (R,HD).

6.00 Switched 6.25 90210 (R,HD). 7.10 Ugly Betty 8.00 Charmed (R). 9.00 Glee (R,HD). 10.00 New Girl (R,HD). 10.30 Mindy Project (R,HD). 11.00 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 11.30 Charmed (R). 12.30 Hollyoaks (R,HD). 1.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD). 2.00 Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 3.00 New Girl (R,HD). 3.30 Mindy Project (R,HD). 4.00 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 5.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD).

Sky1 Sky1 6.00 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,S). 7.00 The Middle (R,S,HD). 8.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 10.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 1.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 2.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R,S,HD). 3.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 5.00 Futurama (R,S,HD). 5.30 The Middle (R,S,HD).

FILM PICKS

Tuesday television&radio THE GIRL IN THE PARK 11.25pm, BBC1

EARTHQUAKE 12.50pm, Channel 4

Residents of Los Angeles face a fight for survival after the city is struck by a devastating earthquake. Disaster movie, starring Charlton Heston.

A grieving woman becomes convinced an 18-year-old con-woman is her daughter. Drama, with Sigourney Weaver and Kate Bosworth.

Gold GOLD 6.05 2point4 Children 6.40 Sykes 7.10 2point4 Children 7.50 Sykes 8.30 As Time Goes By 9.10 Goodnight Sweetheart 10.30 Last of the Summer Wine 11.50 One Foot in the Grave 12.30 Yes, Prime Minister 1.10 The Green Green Grass 1.50 The Good Life 2.30 As Time Goes By 3.10 Jeeves and Wooster 4.20 Last of the Summer Wine

SkySports1 Sky Sports 1 6.00 Good Morning Sports Fans (HD). 9.00 Irish Football (HD). 10.00 The Footballers’ Football Show (HD). 11.00 FL72 Review 12.00 Soccer AM: The Best Bits (HD). 1.00 Irish Football (HD). 2.00 The Footballers’ Football Show (HD). 3.00 FL72 Review 4.00 Soccer AM: The Best Bits (HD). 5.00 Football Gold (S). 5.30 Irish Football (HD).

You’ve Been Framed!, 7pm

Happy Endings, 9.30pm

NCIS: Los Angeles, 10pm

Bring Me Morecambe ... 9pm

Live Football, 7.30pm

6.00 Dinner Date (R,HD). Londoner Midge chooses three blind dates. Narrated by Charlotte Hudson.

6.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 6.30 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD).

6.00 The Middle (R,S,HD). 6.30 The Simpsons (R,S). Homer tackles a biker gang. Featuring the voice of John Goodman.

6.20 Yes, Prime Minister Jim tries to inject radical new ideas into local government, but meets with spirited resistance. Paul Eddington stars.

6.30 Sportswomen (HD). The biggest talkingpoints in the world of women’s sport, including interviews and features.

7.00 You’ve Been Framed! (R). Naughty animals and crazy teenagers. 7.30 You’ve Been Framed! (R). A driver reverses his car into a river.

7.00 Hollyoaks (HD). The villagers try to rescue the survivors of the explosion at the flats. 7.30 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD).

7.00 The Simpsons (R,S,HD). Homer receives marital advice from a movie star. 7.30 The Simpsons (R,S). Bart is placed on medication.

7.00 Open All Hours Nurse Gladys poses as a customer. 7.40 Outnumbered The family has a restless night.

8.00 Peter Andre: My Life (R,HD). Pete continues his charity bike ride in Zanzibar, and pays a visit to the hospital he is raising funds for.

8.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD). Barney must get Robin’s father to approve their engagement. 8.30 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD).

8.00 Glee (R,S,HD). Tina receives an unexpected nomination for prom queen, while Rachel and Santana take jobs at a Broadway diner as they try to make ends meet in New York.

8.20 Only Fools and Horses Del and Rodney reluctantly agree to let Grandad accompany them on their holiday abroad – a decision they come to regret. Comedy, starring David Jason.

9.00 The Magaluf Weekender (HD). Two more groups of revellers arrive in the party resort for three days of holiday fun, greeted by hotel reps Jamie-Leigh, Imogen, Jordan and Tobi.

9.00 Rules of Engagement (HD). Liz decides she wants a baby. 9.30 Happy Endings (HD). The friends worry about Penny after her break-up with Pete, and their concern grows when she writes a dark play.

9.00 An Idiot Abroad (R,S,HD). Karl Pilkington heads for Christ the Redeemer in Rio de Janeiro, taking in the culture of Brazil along the way – as well as visiting a nudist beach and experiencing a back wax.

9.00 Bring Me Morecambe & Wise A celebration of the comedy duo’s series of sketches based around the plays that Ernie wrote. Plus, a look at the movies the duo appeared in and the actors who guest-starred on their television show.

7.00 Football Gold (S). 7.15 Football Gold (S). 7.30 Live International Football (HD). Scotland v Croatia (kick-off 8.00pm). Coverage of the final World Cup Group A qualifier for both sides, staged at Hampden Park. The visitors have spent much of the campaign in second place behind Belgium in the standings, and their cause was damaged greatly in June when they lost 1-0 to the Scots. Robert Snodgrass was on the scoresheet that day, and Gordon Strachan will be looking to at least avoid finishing bottom of the group after improved performances of late.

BBC3 BBC3

BBC4 BBC4

12.10 American Dad! (R,S). 12.30 Sweat the Small Stuff (R,S). 1.00 Don’t Tell the Bride (R,S). 2.00 Some Girls (R,S). 2.30 Staying In with Greg and Russell (R,S). 3.00 Don’t Tell the Bride (R,S).

12.30 The Joy of Stats (R). 1.30 Britain on Film: Country Living (R). 2.00 Timothy Spall: All at Sea (R). 2.30 Secret Knowledge: Hidden Jewels of the Cheapside Hoard (R). 3.00 The Art of Australia (R).

7.00 Top Gear (R,S). 8.00 Gavin & Stacey (R,S). 8.30 Gavin & Stacey (R,S). The Shipmans drive to Wales for the wedding fayre. 9.00 Don’t Tell the Bride (S). A professional boxer plans every detail of his wedding. 10.00 Sweat the Small Stuff (S). New series. Return of the panel show, hosted by Nick Grimshaw. 10.30 EastEnders (R,S). Jack and Ronnie are reminded of the life they could have had. 11.00 Family Guy (R,S). 11.25 Family Guy (R,S). 11.45 American Dad! (R,S).

7.00 World News Today; Weather. 7.30 Timothy Spall: All at Sea (R). The actor explores the Yorkshire coast. 8.00 Britain on Film: Country Living (R). 8.30 Secret Knowledge: Hidden Jewels of the Cheapside Hoard 9.00 The Art of Australia 10.00 Kirsty Wark Meets Donna Tartt: A Review Show Special 10.30 Pain, Pus & Poison: The Search for Modern Medicines (R). 11.30 Destination Titan (R).

10.00 The Two Ronnies 10.00 NCIS: Los Angeles 10.15 International Football 10.00 Celebrity Juice (R,HD). 10.00 Planes, Trains and Spectacle The three(R,S,HD). Part one of (HD). Highlights from Comedy quiz. Automobiles (HD) part documentary two. Deeks and Kensi go the final round of World (1987). A stressed 10.50 Tricked (R,HD). Hiddenconcludes with a look at undercover at a dog Cup qualifiers, which businessman just wants camera magic show, in the duo’s musical show – complete with included Belgium v to make it home to which unsuspecting numbers and the prized poodle – to Wales and Scotland v spend Thanksgiving celebrities and members ongoing serial sketches investigate a breeder Croatia. with his family. Comedy, of the public are that became a hallmark involved in the death of starring Steve Martin, subjected to Ben of the series. Last in the Hanna’s former CIA John Candy and Michael Hanlin’s tricks and series. colleague. McKean. ●●●● illusions. 11.50 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). Sheldon misses an opportunity to meet Stan Lee.

11.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). Part two of two. The agents make their way through Frank’s list, tracking down the remaining sleeper agents.

11.00 Only Fools and Horses. 11.15 Football Gold (S). The Trotters journey to Manchester United v Holland to dabble in the Manchester City from diamond import 1994/95. business – with old foe 11.30 Football Gold (S). Inspector Slater hot on their trail. Guest starring 11.45 Football Asia (S). Soccer news from the Far East. Jim Broadbent.

12.50 The Vampire Diaries (R,HD). Alaric finds an unexpected ally to guide him on his dangerous new path, while a spell at the school’s 1920s Decade Dance could prove devastating for everyone. 1.45 The Vampire Diaries (R,HD). Klaus tries to leave town with Elena. 2.30 Teleshopping

12.20 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). The friends fight over a ring they believe was used in The Lord of the Rings. 12.50 The Cleveland Show (R,HD). 1.20 90210 (R,HD). 2.10 Bob’s Burgers (R,HD). 2.35 Being Erica (R,HD). 3.20 Glee (R,HD). 4.00 Ugly Betty (R,HD). 4.45 Life Unexpected (R,HD).

12.00 Brit Cops: War on Crime (R,S). Following police officers in Lincolnshire. 1.00 Road Wars (R,S). 2.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R,S,HD). 3.00 Ross Kemp in Search of Pirates (R,S,HD). 4.00 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,S). 4.30 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,S). 5.00 Airline (R,S). 5.30 Airline (R,S).

1.00 The Comic Strip Presents: More Bad News A heavy metal band reunite for a one-off gig, but all does not go according to plan. Comedy, starring Adrian Edmondson, Rik Mayall and Nigel Planer. 1.55 The Comic Strip Presents: The Yob 3.00 Home Shopping Armchair buys.

RADIO

11.50 Utterly Outrageous Celebrity Frock Ups (R). Denise Van Outen’s favourite fashion slipups.

Radio 1 6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Fearne Cotton 12.45pm Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James 7.00 Zane Lowe 9.00 The Review Show with Edith Bowman 10.00 Phil Taggart and Alice Levine Midnight Punk Show with Mike Davies 2.00 Nihal 4.00 Dev Radio 2 5.00am Vanessa Feltz 6.30 Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce Noon Paddy O’Connell 2.00 Steve Wright in the Afternoon 5.00 Simon Mayo 7.00 Jamie Cullum 8.00 Jo Whiley 10.00 King Biscuit Time Blues 11.00 Mark Radcliffe’s Music Club Midnight Janice Long 2.00 Alex Lester

Radio 3 6.30am Breakfast 9.00 Essential Classics Noon Composers of the Week: Chaminade & Holmès 1.00 News 1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert 2.00 Afternoon on 3 4.30 In Tune 6.30 Composers of the Week: Chaminade & Holmès. Donald Macleod considers how for both Chaminade and Holmès, the French culture of the artistic ‘salon’ proved useful as a vehicle to bring their music to wider attention. 7.30 Radio 3 Live in Concert 10.00 Night Waves. Historian Catherine Merridale talks about her new book. 10.45 The Essay: If Walls Could Talk 11.00 Late Junction 12.30am Through the Night

Radio 4 5.30am News Briefing 5.43 Prayer for the Day 5.45 Farming Today 5.58 Tweet of the Day 6.00 Today 8.31 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament 9.00 The Reith Lectures 2013 9.45 (LW) Daily Service 9.45 (FM) Book of the Week: Historic Heston 10.00 Woman’s Hour 11.00 Shared Planet 11.30 Who Sold the Soul? Noon News 12.01 (LW) Shipping Forecast 12.04 Call You and Yours 12.57 Weather 1.00 The World at One 1.45 Terror Through Time: The Story of Terrorism from The Assassins to Al Qaeda 2.00 The Archers 2.15 Afternoon Drama: The Kingsnorth Six 3.00 Short Cuts 3.30 Costing the Earth 4.00 Law in

Action 4.30 A Good Read 5.00 PM 5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast 5.57 Weather 6.00 Six O’Clock News 6.30 It’s Your Round. New series. Comedy panel show. 7.00 The Archers 7.15 Front Row 7.45 (LW) Gillespie and I 7.45 (FM) Gillespie and I 8.00 File on 4 8.40 In Touch 9.00 Inside Health 9.30 The Human Zoo 9.59 Weather 10.00 The World Tonight 10.45 Book at Bedtime: Algernon Blackwood’s Ghost Stories 11.00 He Died with His Eyes Open 11.30 Today in Parliament Midnight News and Weather 12.30 Book of the Week: Historic Heston 12.48 Shipping Forecast 1.00 As BBC World Service 5.20 Shipping Forecast

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12.15 International Football (HD). 1.15 Football Gold (S). 1.30 Football Asia (S). 2.00 International Football (HD). 3.00 Football Gold (S). 3.15 Football Gold (S). 3.30 Football Asia (S). 4.00 International Football (HD). 5.00 Football Gold (S). 5.30 Football Asia (S). Radio 5 Live 5.00am Morning Reports 5.30 Wake Up to Money 6.00 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 Victoria Derbyshire Noon Shelagh Fogarty 2.00 Richard Bacon 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport 8.00 5 Live Sport: International Football 2013-14. England v Poland (kick-off 8.00pm). 10.00 6-0-6. Football phone-in, featuring reaction to tonight’s World Cup qualifiers. 11.00 Phil Williams 1.00am Up All Night Classic FM 6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John Suchet 1.00pm Nick Bailey 5.00 Classic FM Drive 8.00 The Full Works Concert 10.00 Smooth Classics 2.00am Bob Jones

SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 47


Wednesday television&radio Wednesday’s Television Guide TV PICKS

THE HOUSE THAT £100K BUILT 8pm, BBC2

Kieran Long and Piers Taylor follow the progress of a couple who have bought a plot in an eco community in west Wales.

BBC1 BBC1

6.00 Breakfast (S,HD). 9.15 Fake Britain (R,S). 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer (R,S). 11.00 Real Rescues (S,HD). 11.45 Britain’s Empty Homes (S). 12.15 Bargain Hunt (R,S,HD). 1.00 BBC News; Weather (S,HD). 1.30 Regional News (S); Weather. 1.45 Doctors (S,HD). 2.15 Keeping Up Appearances (R,S). 3.15 Perfection (S,HD). 4.00 Escape to the Country (R,S,HD). 4.30 Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is (S,HD). 5.15 Pointless (R,S,HD).

FILM RATINGS ●●●●● Excellent ●●●● Very good ●●● Good ●● Average ● Poor

WHEN GASTRIC BANDS GO WRONG 9pm, Channel 5

The stories of three people whose weight-loss surgery did not go to plan. David, 38, lost 24st, but his skin failed to tighten, Rachel had the same procedure, but her intestine ruptured and poisoned her insides, and Samantha shed almost 15st in 12 months before her gastric band caused an infection in her stomach.

BBC2 BBC2

6.00 Homes Under the Hammer 7.00 Real Rescues 7.45 Britain’s Empty Homes 8.15 Sign Zone: Wanted Down Under 9.00 Orangutans: The Great Ape Escape – Natural World 10.00 Plan It, Build It 10.30 See Hear 11.00 BBC News 11.30 Daily Politics 1.00 Classic Mastermind 1.30 Weakest Link 2.15 Great British Menu 2.45 Floyd on Fish 3.15 Are You Being Served? 3.45 ‘Allo ‘Allo! 4.20 Cagney & Lacey 5.05 Flog It!

THE ONE AND ONLY CILLA BLACK 9pm, ITV

THE GREAT BRITISH YEAR 9pm, BBC1

Paul O’Grady celebrates the showbiz legend’s 50-year career, featuring a Blind Date revival and performances by Alison Moyet, Katie Melua and Cilla herself.

ITV1 ITV

6.00 Daybreak (S,HD). 8.30 Lorraine (S). 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show (S,HD). 10.30 This Morning (S). 12.30 Loose Women (S,HD). 1.30 ITV News and Weather (S). 1.55 Regional News (S). 2.00 Dickinson’s Real Deal (S,HD). From Oswestry, Shropshire. 3.00 The Alan Titchmarsh Show (S,HD). Features, music and conversation. 3.59 Regional Weather (S). 4.00 Tipping Point (S,HD). 5.00 The Chase (S,HD). Quiz show, hosted by Bradley Walsh.

The documentary follows British wildlife throughout summer, when animals flock from afar and competition for food is high. Hunters time their arrival from Africa to feast on flying insects, falcons chase after dragonflies, and sea urchins are forced to protect themselves from harmful UV rays.

Channel Channel 4

6.10 The Hoobs 7.00 According to Jim 7.30 Will & Grace 7.55 Frasier 9.00 Everybody Loves Raymond 10.00 Four Rooms 11.00 A Place in the Sun: Home or Away 12.00 News Summary 12.05 Gordon Ramsay’s Home Cooking 12.35 River Cottage Bites 12.45 Film: Chariots of Fire (S,HD) (1981). See Choices Above. ●●●●● 3.10 Countdown (S,HD). 4.00 Deal or No Deal (S,HD). 5.00 Four in a Bed (S,HD). 5.30 Come Dine with Me

Channel Channel 5

6.00 Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff (HD). 11.10 Cowboy Builders (R,S). 12.10 5 News Lunchtime (S,HD). 12.15 The Railway: First Great Western (R,S,HD). 1.15 Home and Away (S,HD). 1.45 Neighbours (S,HD). 2.15 CSI: NY (R,S). 3.05 Film: The Long Shot (S) (2004). Drama, starring Julie Benz, Marsha Mason, Paul Le Mat and Gage Golightly. Edited for violence and language. ●●● 5.00 5 News at 5 (S,HD). 5.30 Neighbours (R,S,HD).

The Culture Show … 10pm

Coronation Street, 8pm

My Tattoo Addiction, 10.45pm

Wentworth Prison, 10pm

6.00 BBC News (S,HD); Weather. 6.30 Regional News (S); Weather.

6.00 Regional News (S); Weather. 6.30 ITV News and Weather (S).

6.00 The Simpsons (R,S). 20/20. Lisa gets her own TV show. 6.30 Hollyoaks (S,HD). The villagers try to rescue the survivors of the explosion at the flats.

6.00 Home and Away (R,S,HD). Brax decides to cut short the stag weekend when he finds out Heath had a one-night stand. 6.30 NewsTalk Live (S,HD).

7.00 The One Show (S,HD). Hosted by Matt Baker and Alex Jones. Followed by BBC News; Regional News.

6.00 Eggheads (S,HD). 77/140. Quiz show, hosted by Dermot Murnaghan. 6.30 Strictly Come Dancing – It Takes Two (S,HD). Ian Waite analyses the couples’ training. 7.00 Rick Stein’s India (R,S,HD). 3/6. The chef visits the town of Madurai in Tamil Nadu, where he learns the art of temple cooking and samples south Indian dish sambar.

7.00 Emmerdale (S,HD). Hour-long episode. A hostage situation unfolds at the Woolpack and the locals are told they will have to seek accommodation elsewhere.

7.00 News (S).

7.00 Robson’s Extreme Fishing Challenge (R,S,HD). Robson Green visits Canada to take on the country’s most experienced fishermen. Followed by 5 News Update.

6 7 8 9

Father Figure, 10.35pm

8.00 Watchdog (S,HD). 5/8. Anne Robinson, Matt Allwright and Chris Hollins present the consumer investigation show, inviting senior representatives from major energy companies to answer viewers’ questions on why prices look set to rise again.

8.00 The House That £100K Built (S,HD). 5/6. See Choices Above.

8.00 Coronation Street (S,HD). Hour-long episode. Kylie realises David knows that she slept with Nick, putting Lily’s christening in jeopardy. Hayley visits a clairvoyant, and Dennis is rocked by a tax bill.

8.00 River Cottage to the Core (S). 1/4. See Choices Above.

8.00 Animal Maternity (S,HD). A rare Sumatran tiger is under round-the-clock surveillance as her due date approaches, and a joey has to be hand-reared after being rejected by its mother. Followed by 5 News at 9.

(R) repeat (S) subtitles (HD) highdefinition

9.00 The Great British Year (S,HD). 3/4. See Choices Above.

9.00 Stephen Fry: Out There (S,HD). 2/2. Part two of two. The broadcaster learns about a backlash against the gay community in Brazil and the erosion of equality in Russia, but finds a more positive outlook in India.

9.00 The One and Only Cilla Black (S,HD). See Choices Above.

9.00 Grand Designs (S,HD). 7/11. Kevin McCloud follows a London couple’s project to transform an inefficient and uninspiring 1950s house into a sleek, modernist masterpiece.

9.00 When Gastric Bands Go Wrong (S,HD). See Choices Above.

11

10.00 The Culture Show: A Night at the London Film Festival (S,HD). 17/32. Mark Kermode explores the real-life stories that have inspired movies and documentaries being showcased at the London Film Festival. 10.30 Newsnight (S,HD). Followed by Weather.

10.30 ITV News and Weather (S). 10.55 Regional News (S); Weather.

10.00 Gogglebox (S). 4/13. Weekly TV review programme. 10.45 My Tattoo Addiction (R,S). 3/3. A woman gets her first tattoo to celebrate the most important person in her life, while a man hopes his new design will help him cope with a failed relationship. Last in the series.

10.00 Wentworth Prison (S,HD). 8/10. The guards carry out regular cell searches and observe the women closely as they wait for reprisals, while Jacs decides to make a final move to deal with Bea once and for all.

10

10.00 BBC News (S,HD). 10.25 Regional News (S). Followed by National Lottery Update. 10.35 Father Figure (S,HD). 5/6. Tom decides to hide the family’s gadgets and enforce some good old-fashioned fun, but his decision proves unpopular and his sons struggle to adapt to a world without computer games. 11.05 Room 101 – Extra Storage (R,S,HD). 7/8. With Larry Lamb, David O’Doherty and Lauren Laverne. 11.45 No Way Out (S) (1987). See Choices Above. ●●●●●

11.20 David Attenborough’s Rise of Animals: Triumph of the Vertebrates (R,S,HD). 1/2. Part one of two. The naturalist explores the evolution of vertebrates.

11.05 Exposure: Britain’s Booming Cannabis Business (S,HD). 3/8. Conor Woodman gains access to marijuana growers and dealers around Britain as he delves into the criminal underworld of the drug.

11.35 Don’t Blame Facebook (R,S,HD). Documentary looking at a selection of people from across the UK who ended up in trouble when they underestimated the power and reach of social media websites.

11.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (R,S). 10/23. A murder is linked to a gun store shoot-out. Crime drama, starring Laurence Fishburne. 11.55 Inside Hollywood. Magazine show.

1.35 Weatherview (S). 1.40 BBC News (S,HD).

12.20 Sign Zone: See Hear (R,S,HD). A look at some of the latest film releases, including Dummy Jim – the story of a deaf cyclist in the 1950s. With voiceover. 12.50 Sign Zone: Saving Syria’s Children – Panorama (R,S). The impact of the civil war on children. 1.35 This Is BBC Two (S). Preview of upcoming programmes. 4.00 BBC Learning Zone

12.05 Jackpot247.Viewers are offered the chance to participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort of their sofas, with an entertaining mix of roulette-wheel spins and lively chat from the presenting team. 3.00 British Touring Car Championship (HD). 4.10 ITV Nightscreen (HD). 5.05 The Jeremy Kyle Show (R,S).

12.35 Random Acts (S). 12.40 Film: Devdas (1936). Musical drama, starring KL Saigal and Jamuna. In Hindi. ●●●● 2.50 Film: The Red Pony (S) (1949). A boy seeks solace from his feuding family through his friendships with a ranch hand and a pony. Drama, with Robert Mitchum and Myrna Loy.●● 4.20 SuperScrimpers (R,S,HD). 5.15 Deal or No Deal (R,S,HD).

12.00 The Big Game (S,HD). Highlights of a recent poker tournament from around the world, as a table of card-sharps aimed to scoop the big-money first prize. 12.55 SuperCasino. Live interactive gaming. 3.55 Nick’s Quest (R,S). 4.20 Michaela’s Wild Challenge (R,S). 4.45 House Doctor (R,S). 5.10 Divine Designs (R,S). 5.35 Wildlife SOS (R,S).

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48 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013

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RIVER COTTAGE TO THE CORE 8pm, Channel 4

FRESHERS 9pm, ITV2

In this new series, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall uses fruit in a wide range of dishes and drinks, including roast pork with gooseberries, and aromatic mojitos with blackberry leaves.

Six students embark on their first year at the University of Bedfordshire, beginning by waving goodbye to their families and meeting their new housemates. After settling into their surroundings, the undergraduates head to Luton for a night out together.

ITV2 ITV2

E4 E4

6.00 Emmerdale 6.25 Holiday Airport: Lanzarote 7.25 You’ve Been Framed! 7.55 Jeremy Kyle Show USA 8.40 Dinner Date 9.40 Real Housewives of New York City 10.35 Real Housewives of Orange County 11.30 Millionaire Matchmaker 12.30 Emmerdale 1.00 Holiday Airport: Lanzarote 2.00 Jeremy Kyle Show 4.10 Real Housewives of Orange County 5.05 Millionaire Matchmaker

6.00 Switched 6.25 90210 7.10 Ugly Betty 8.00 Charmed 9.00 Glee 10.00 New Girl 10.30 The Mindy Project 11.00 Rules of Engagement 11.30 Charmed (R). 12.30 Hollyoaks 1.00 How I Met Your Mother 2.00 The Big Bang Theory 3.00 New Girl 3.30 The Mindy Project (R,HD). 4.00 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 5.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD).

Sky1 Sky1 6.00 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,S). 7.00 The Middle (R,S,HD). 8.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 9.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 10.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 1.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 2.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R,S,HD). 3.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 5.00 Futurama (R,S,HD). 5.30 The Middle (R,S,HD).

FILM PICKS

Wednesday television&radio NO WAY OUT 11.45pm, BBC1

CHARIOTS OF FIRE 12.45pm, Channel 4

A navy officer has an affair with a politician’s mistress, and ends up both investigator and suspect when she is murdered. Thriller, with Kevin Costner.

Gold GOLD 6.00 2point4 Children 6.30 Sykes 7.10 2point4 Children 7.50 Sykes 8.30 As Time Goes By 9.10 Green Green Grass 9.50 Good Life 10.30 Last of the Summer Wine 11.50 Open All Hours 12.30 Yes, Prime Minister 1.10 Green Green Grass 1.50 Good Life 2.30 As Time Goes By 3.05 Jeeves and Wooster 4.20 Last of the Summer Wine 5.40 Yes, Prime Minister

Oscar-winning factbased drama, starring Ian Charleson, Ben Cross, Nigel Havers, John Gielgud and Ian Holm. Vangelis provides the soundtrack.

SkySports1 Sky Sports 1 6.00 Good Morning Sports Fans (HD). 7.00 Good Morning Sports Fans (HD). 8.00 Good Morning Sports Fans (HD). 9.00 International Football (HD). 10.00 Live International OneDay Cricket (HD). India v Australia. Coverage of the second fixture in the seven-match series, which takes place at the Sawai Mansingh Stadium in Jaipur.

The Break-Up, 10.50pm

Rude Tube, 9.50pm

Harrow: A Very … 8pm

Blackadder the Third, 9.40pm

Live Cricket, 10am

6.00 Dinner Date (R,HD). Matt from Guildford chooses three blind dates. Narrated by Charlotte Hudson.

6.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). Sheldon receives a prestigious prize. 6.30 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD).

6.30 The Simpsons (R,S). Moe decides to change his down-at-heel image by undergoing plastic surgery.

6.20 Only Fools and Horses. The Trotters go on holiday. Comedy, starring David Jason, Nicholas Lyndhurst and Lennard Pearce.

6.30 Football Gold (S). 6.45 Football Gold (S). West Ham United v Tottenham Hotspur from the 2006/07 season.

7.00 You’ve Been Framed! (R). Crazy cats and daft dogs. 7.30 You’ve Been Framed! (R). Featuring a springcleaning dog.

7.00 Hollyoaks (HD). The village grieves as the dust settles on the site of the explosion. 7.30 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD).

7.00 The Simpsons (R,S). With the voice of Frances McDormand. 7.30 The Simpsons (R,S). The family goes on the run.

7.00 FIFA Futbol Mundial (S). 7.30 Football Gold (S). Manchester City v Tottenham Hotspur. 7.45 Football Gold (S).

8.00 You’ve Been Framed! Forever (R). Comedian Harry Hill narrates a selection of surreal camcorder calamities and viewers’ mobilephone footage.

8.00 Ice Age: The Meltdown (HD) (2006). Animated adventure sequel, with the voices of Ray Romano, John Leguizamo and Denis Leary. ●●

8.00 Harrow: A Very British School (S,HD). The summer term begins and, alongside exams and ancient tradition Speech Day, the boys prepare for the interhouse relay race.

7.00 Only Fools and Horses. Del-Boy enters the import trade after striking a deal with Boycie to fetch a consignment of dodgy diamonds across from Holland, and ropes in Rodney and Uncle Albert to help. Their plans are jeopardised when old foe Chief Inspector Slater picks up the Trotters’ trail.

9.00 Freshers (HD). See Choices Above.

9.50 Rude Tube (R). Alex Zane presents a top 50 countdown of “internet incredibles”, in order of their online popularity. Hits featured include a loud belcher, a human Wikipedia and a swimming baby.

9.00 An Idiot Abroad (R,S,HD). Reluctant explorer Karl Pilkington visits Peru, where he is unhappy with the Amazon jungle’s toilet arrangements and fails to impress a local tribe with his hunting skills.

9.00 Only Fools and Horses. Rodney joins the residents’ committee. 9.40 Blackadder the Third. Edmund discovers Prince George is broke and decides he will have to find him a bride with a large dowry.

9.00 Live Golf (HD). The PGA Grand Slam of Golf. Coverage of the second day’s play of the 36-hole stroke play competition at Port Royal Golf Course in Southampton, Bermuda, which is open to the year’s four Major winners. Adam Scott, Justin Rose and Jason Dufner have all accepted their invites this year, while defending champion Padraig Harrington replaces Open winner Phil Mickelson to complete the field.

10.20 Blackadder the Third. 10.00 A League of Their 10.00 The Only Way Is Essex 10.55 Made in Chelsea The Duke of Wellington Own (R,HD). Sports(HD). Reality (R,HD). The return of challenges Prince based comedy quiz, programme following a the reality show George to a duel, so hosted by James Corden, group of people in following the social Edmund plots to have with football pundit Essex, with each episode activities of a group of his Scottish cousin take Alan Shearer, comedian filmed just a few days people in their twenties, up the challenge Jason Manford and the before transmission. who live in and around instead. Comedy, guest Saturdays’ Frankie the most exclusive 10.50 The Break-Up (HD) starring Stephen Fry, Sandford. Last in the postcodes in London. In (2006). A couple’s with Rowan Atkinson. series. the first episode, relationship comes to an Spencer and Lucy begin end, but neither wants to talk following the to give up their home, 11.00 Road Wars (R,S). Police 11.00 The Black Adder. revelation that he forcing them to carry on Edmund meets an officers use unmarked cheated, but he seems living together. Comedy eligible princess. cars fitted with on-board more interested in her drama, starring Jennifer video cameras, offering 11.45 The Black Adder. attitude toward his Aniston, Vince Vaughn, an insight into vehicle Edmund is appointed ex-girlfriend Louise. Jon Favreau and Joey crime and how it can be Archbishop of Lauren Adams. prevented. Canterbury. Including FYI Daily. ●●

RADIO

12.55 Up All Night (R,HD). Reagan becomes jealous of Chris’s new female friend, and Ava’s rival Shayna is suspected of stealing ideas from her talk show. 1.25 Up All Night (R,HD). 1.50 All Star Family Fortunes (R). 2.25 Teleshopping. 5.55 ITV2 Nightscreen (HD).

12.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 12.30 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 1.00 Suburgatory (R,HD). 1.30 Don’t Trust the B**** in Apartment 23 (R,HD). 2.00 The Cleveland Show (R,HD). 2.25 Bob’s Burgers (R,HD). 2.45 Being Erica (R,HD). 3.30 Glee (R,HD). 4.15 Ugly Betty (R,HD).

Radio 1 6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Fearne Cotton 12.45pm Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 3.30 The Official Chart Update 4.00 Greg James 7.00 Zane Lowe 9.00 My Playlist 10.00 Phil Taggart and Alice Levine Midnight Huw Stephens 2.00 Benji B 4.00 Dev Radio 2 5.00am Vanessa Feltz 6.30 Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce Noon Jeremy Vine 2.00 Steve Wright in the Afternoon 5.00 Simon Mayo 7.00 The Folk Show with Mark Radcliffe 8.00 Radio 2 in Concert – Paul McCartney 10.00 The People’s Songs 11.00 Trevor Nelson’s Soul Show Midnight Janice Long 2.00 Alex Lester

12.00 Road Wars (R,S). 1.00 Brit Cops: War on Crime (R,S). 2.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R,S,HD). 3.00 Ross Kemp in Search of Pirates (R,S,HD). 4.00 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,S). Tracking fugitives. 4.30 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,S). 5.00 Airline (R,S). 5.30 Airline (R,S).

Radio 3 6.30am Breakfast 9.00 Essential Classics Noon Composers of the Week: Chaminade & Holmès 1.00 News 1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert 2.00 Afternoon on 3 3.30 Choral Evensong. Live from Blackburn Cathedral. 4.30 In Tune 6.30 Composers of the Week: Chaminade & Holmès 7.30 Radio 3 Live in Concert. The Scottish Chamber Orchestra, with Sharon Robinson and Jaime Laredo, plays Saint-Saëns’ The Muse and the Poet, Mendelssohn’s Scottish Symphony and two pieces by Dvorák. 10.00 Night Waves: Landmarks 10.45 The Essay: If Walls Could Talk 11.00 Late Junction 12.30am Through the Night

12.35 The Comic Strip Presents: The Yob. An illegal psychic teleportation experiment goes horribly wrong, and a pretentious music video director gets his genes mixed with those of a football hooligan. Keith Allen stars. 1.40 The Black Adder 2.15 The Black Adder 3.00 Home Shopping

Radio 4 5.30am News Briefing 5.43 Prayer for the Day 5.45 Farming Today 5.58 Tweet of the Day 6.00 Today 8.31 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament 9.00 Midweek 9.45 (LW) Daily Service 9.45 (FM) Book of the Week: Historic Heston 10.00 Woman’s Hour 11.00 Hugh Cudlipp – The Sinking of a Tabloid Dream 11.30 Hard to Tell Noon News 12.01 (LW) Shipping Forecast 12.04 You and Yours 12.57 News 1.00 The World at One 1.45 Terror Through Time: The Story of Terrorism from The Assassins to Al Qaeda 2.00 The Archers 2.15 Afternoon Drama: Democracy for Beginners 3.00 Money Box Live 3.30 Inside Health 4.00 Thinking Allowed

4.30 The Media Show 5.00 PM 5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast 5.57 Weather 6.00 Six O’Clock News 6.30 Bridget Christie Minds the Gap 7.00 The Archers 7.15 Front Row 7.45 Gillespie and I 8.00 The Moral Maze 8.45 Four Thought 9.00 Costing the Earth 9.30 Midweek 9.59 Weather 10.00 The World Tonight 10.45 Book at Bedtime: Algernon Blackwood’s Ghost Stories 11.00 Before They Were Famous 11.15 It Is Rocket Science 11.30 Today in Parliament Midnight News and Weather 12.30 Book of the Week: Historic Heston 12.48 Shipping Forecast 1.00 As BBC World Service 5.20 Shipping Forecast

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8.00 International One-Day Cricket (HD). India v Australia. Highlights of the second fixture in the seven-match series, which took place at the Sawai Mansingh Stadium in Jaipur.

BBC3 BBC3

BBC4 BBC4

12.10 American Dad! (R,S). 12.30 Unsafe Sex in the City (R,S). 1.30 Staying In with Greg and Russell (R,S). 2.00 Crime, Carnage & Cancun: Stacey Dooley Investigates (R,S). 3.00 Unsafe Sex in the City (R,S).

12.00 Too Much, Too Young: Children of the Middle Ages (R). 1.00 Heritage! The Battle for Britain’s Past (R). 2.00 Timothy Spall: All at Sea (R). 2.30 Medieval Lives: Birth, Marriage, Death (R).

7.00 Total Wipeout (R,S). 8.00 Don’t Tell the Bride (R,S). A professional boxer plans every detail of his wedding. 9.00 Unsafe Sex in the City (S). An 18-year-old receives a stark warning ahead of a holiday to Magaluf. 10.00 Staying In with Greg and Russell (S). 10.30 Russell Howard’s Good News (R,S). Stories including aliens and Wayne Rooney. 11.00 Family Guy (R,S). 11.25 Family Guy (R,S). 11.45 American Dad! (R,S).

7.00 World News Today; Weather. 7.30 Timothy Spall: All at Sea (R). The Spalls run into serious trouble on the River Medway. Last in the series. 8.00 Heritage! The Battle for Britain’s Past (R). The battle to preserve Britain’s ruins. 9.00 Medieval Lives: Birth, Marriage, Death. Matrimony in the Middle Ages. 10.00 The First Master Chef: Michel Roux on Escoffier (R). 11.00 Balmoral (R). The history of the royal family’s most private residence.

1.00 What’s the Story? (HD). Discussion show focusing on recent sports developments. 2.00 Football Gold (S). 2.15 Football Gold (S). 2.30 FIFA Futbol Mundial (S). 3.00 International One-Day Cricket (HD). India v Australia. 4.00 Live European Tour Golf (HD). The Perth International. Radio 5 Live 5.00am Morning Reports 5.30 Wake Up to Money 6.00 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 Victoria Derbyshire Noon Shelagh Fogarty 2.00 Richard Bacon 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport 8.00 5 live Sport: Harry Redknapp. An interview with the Queens Park Rangers manager. 9.00 5 Live Sport: 5 Live Racing. An interview with race horse owner and former footballer Michael Owen. 10.30 Phil Williams 1.00am Up All Night Classic FM 6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John Suchet 1.00pm Jamie Crick 5.00 Classic FM Drive 8.00 The Full Works Concert 10.00 Smooth Classics 2.00am Bob Jones

SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 49


Thursday television&radio Thursday’s Television Guide TV PICKS

TRUCKERS 9pm, BBC1

Martin tries to establish himself as the boss when he is handed the haulage company in his father’s will, but his changes fail to go down well with the truckers.

BBC1 BBC1

6.00 Breakfast (S,HD). 9.15 Fake Britain (R,S). 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer (S,HD). 11.00 Real Rescues (S,HD). 11.45 Britain’s Empty Homes (S). 12.15 Bargain Hunt (R,S,HD). 1.00 BBC News; Weather (S,HD). 1.30 Regional News (S); Weather. 1.45 Doctors (S,HD). 2.15 Keeping Up Appearances (R,S). 3.15 Perfection (S,HD). 4.00 Escape to the Country (R,S,HD). 4.30 Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is (S,HD). 5.15 Pointless (R,S,HD).

FILM RATINGS ●●●●● Excellent ●●●● Very good ●●● Good ●● Average ● Poor

BRITAIN’S SECRET TREASURES 8.30pm, ITV

Michael Buerk and Bettany Hughes are joined by guest presenters to unveil important artefacts found by members of the public. James Purefoy tells the tale of an ancient sword at the heart of Northumberland’s history, and Mary-Ann Ochota uncovers the story of a discovery in Lincolnshire.

BBC2 BBC2

6.00 This Is BBC Two 6.05 Homes Under the Hammer 7.05 Real Rescues 7.50 Britain’s Empty Homes 8.20 Sign Zone: Wanted Down Under 9.05 Robert Peston Goes Shopping 10.05 Plan It, Build It (R,S). 10.35 HARDtalk (R,S,HD). 11.00 BBC News (S,HD). 11.30 BBC World News 12.00 Daily Politics (S). 1.00 Classic Mastermind 1.30 Weakest Link (R,S). 2.15 Great British Menu (R,S,HD). 2.45 Floyd on Fish (R,S,HD). 3.15 Are You Being Served? 3.45 ‘Allo ‘Allo! (R,S). 4.15 Cagney & Lacey (R,S,HD). 5.00 Flog It! (R,S).

PEAKY BLINDERS 9pm, BBC2

BREATHLESS 9pm, ITV

Thomas (Cillian Murphy) prepares to oust Billy Kimber at Worcester Racecourse, but secrets are revealed that force the Shelbys to face up to the problems that have divided them.

ITV1 ITV

6.00 Daybreak (S,HD). 8.30 Lorraine (S). 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show (S,HD). 10.30 This Morning (S). 12.30 Loose Women (S,HD). 1.30 ITV News and Weather (S). 1.55 Regional News (S). 2.00 Dickinson’s Real Deal (S,HD). Valuing antiques in Loughborough, Leicestershire. 3.00 The Alan Titchmarsh Show (S,HD). Features, music and conversation. 3.59 Regional Weather (S). 4.00 Tipping Point (S,HD). 5.00 The Chase (S,HD).

Elizabeth receives a chilling visit from Chief Inspector Mulligan, who reveals he has information that could turn her life upside down. Meanwhile, Otto continues to fuel his obsession with Angela by paying her a visit. Starring Jack Davenport, Natasha Little, Shaun Dingwall and Zoe Boyle.

Channel Channel 4

6.10 The Hoobs 7.00 According to Jim 7.30 Will & Grace 7.55 Frasier 8.55 Everybody Loves Raymond 10.00 Four Rooms 11.00 A Place in the Sun: Home or Away 12.00 News Summary (S). 12.05 Gordon Ramsay’s Home Cooking (S). 12.35 Jamie’s 15 Minute Meals 1.05 River Cottage Bites 1.10 Film: Damn the Defiant! (S,HD) (1962). See Choices Above. ●●●● 3.10 Countdown 4.00 Deal or No Deal 5.00 Four in a Bed 5.30 Come Dine with Me

Channel Channel 5

6.00 Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff (HD). 11.10 Cowboy Builders (R,S,HD). 12.10 5 News Lunchtime (S,HD). 12.15 Robson’s Extreme Fishing Challenge (R,S,HD). 1.15 Home and Away (S,HD). 1.45 Neighbours (S,HD). 2.15 Ring of Fire (S,HD). Sci-fi thriller, starring Michael Vartan, Lauren Lee Smith and Terry O’Quinn. 5.00 5 News at 5 (S,HD). 5.30 Neighbours (R,S,HD). Chris is left feeling hurt when Hudson shuts him out.

Trust Me I’m a Doctor, 8pm

The Chase, 5pm

Educating Yorkshire, 9pm

CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, 11pm

6.00 BBC News (S,HD); Weather. 6.30 Regional News (S); Weather.

6.00 Regional News (S); Weather. 6.30 ITV News and Weather (S).

6.00 The Simpsons (R,S). 2/21. 6.30 Hollyoaks (S,HD). The village grieves as the dust settles on the site of the explosion.

6.00 Home and Away (R,S,HD). Sally anxiously waits for the proceeds from the sale of the yacht. 6.30 NewsTalk Live (S,HD).

7.00 The One Show (S,HD). Topical stories from around the UK. 7.30 EastEnders (S,HD). Carl puts pressure on Ronnie to accept a business proposal. Followed by BBC News; Regional News.

6.00 Eggheads (S,HD). 78/140. Quiz show, hosted by Dermot Murnaghan. 6.30 Strictly Come Dancing – It Takes Two (S,HD). A look ahead to the weekend’s action. 7.00 Rick Stein’s India (R,S,HD). 4/6. Rick goes in search of the perfect chicken korma in Lucknow and is recruited as a judge to find Punjab’s new “Star Chef”.

7.00 Emmerdale (S,HD). The police continue their negotiations with Cameron, but to no avail. 7.30 Dying to Get High: Tonight (S,HD). Fiona Foster investigates the world of legal drugs.

7.00 News (S).

7.00 Police Interceptors (R,S,HD). The return of the documentary following the work of highspeed interception teams. Followed by 5 News Update.

6 7 8 9

Question Time, 10.35pm

8.00 Waterloo Road (S,HD). 7/30. Nikki has a tough decision to make when her estranged daughter shows up, while the staff and pupils mourn Grantly’s death and the school’s sponsored clean goes awry.

8.00 Trust Me I’m a Doctor (S,HD). 2/3. Michael Mosley learns about an experiment to find out whether standing up a few more hours each day could have health benefits. Plus, Gabriel Weston witnesses a womb transplant.

8.00 Emmerdale (S,HD). The remaining hostages fight for their lives. 8.30 Britain’s Secret Treasures (S,HD). 1/8. See Choices Above.

8.00 Location, Location, Location (S,HD). 9/9. Kirstie Allsopp revisits Kelly Price and Emma Wilcox on the Berkshire and Hampshire borders, and Liverpool student Kate Harland, who had grown out of her flat. Last in the series.

8.00 The Railway: First Great Western (S,HD). Exploring the Royal Albert Bridge that spans the River Tamar. Last in the series. Followed by 5 News at 9.

(R) repeat (S) subtitles (HD) highdefinition

9.00 Truckers (S,HD). 2/5. See Choices Above.

9.00 Peaky Blinders (S,HD). 6/6. See Choices Above.

9.00 Breathless (S,HD). 2/6. See Choices Above.

9.00 Educating Yorkshire (S). 7/8. A disruptive 13-year-old is hoping to take history as a GCSE, but the staff are concerned he could end up being permanently excluded from the school if he does not change his ways.

9.00 Dennis Nilsen’s First Kill: Countdown to Murder (S,HD). 2/6. Docu-drama using witness testimony, crime reports, forensic evidence and expert commentary to examine the events that led Dennis Nilsen to become a serial killer.

11

10.00 Mock the Week – Again (R,S). Another chance to see an edition of the comedy show. Hosted by Dara O Briain, with guests joining Hugh Dennis on the panel to poke fun at the news. 10.30 Newsnight (S,HD). Followed by Weather.

10.00 ITV News at Ten (S). 10.30 Regional News (S); Weather. 10.35 The Jonathan Ross Show (R,S,HD). 1/10. Tom Hanks and Sandra Bullock talk about their new films, Captain Phillips and Gravity, and Cilla Black reflects on her 50-year career in showbiz. James Arthur performs.

10.00 Up All Night: The Nightclub Toilet (S). 1/4. See Choices Above.

10.00 Law & Order: Criminal Intent (S,HD). 5/8. See Choices Above.

10

10.00 BBC News (S,HD). 10.25 Regional News (S); Weather. 10.35 Question Time (S,HD). 6/38. David Dimbleby chairs a debate from Basingstoke, Hampshire, as a panel of guests faces topical questions from the audience.

11.35 This Week (S). Andrew Neil introduces a round-table chat, in which he, Michael Portillo and other guests take a lighthearted romp through the political and parliamentary developments of the past seven days.

11.20 Stephen Fry: Out There (R,S,HD). 2/2. The broadcaster concludes his examination of the lives of gay people across the globe.

11.40 Wild Britain with Ray Mears (R,S,HD). 2/10. The survival expert explores the ancient forests of the Isle of Wight.

11.05 999: What’s Your Emergency? (R,S,HD). 2/6. More insights into the work of ambulance staff across the nation.

11.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (R,S). 12/23. A former professional golfer is found dead in a cart after being shot in the neck. 11.55 Inside Hollywood (R). Magazine show.

12.20 Holiday Weatherview (S). 12.25 BBC News (S,HD).

12.20 Sign Zone: Britain’s New Banking Scandal – Panorama (R,S). Adam Shaw investigates the latest financial scandal to hit British banks – the mis-selling of interest-rate swaps, leaving thousands of businesses struggling to stay afloat. 12.50 This Is BBC Two (S). Preview of upcoming programmes from BBC Two. 4.00 BBC Learning Zone

12.10 Jackpot247. Viewers are offered the chance to participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort of their sofas, with an entertaining mix of roulette-wheel spins and lively chat from the presenting team. Featuring a variety of prizes and promotions. 3.00 Dying to Get High: Tonight (R,HD). 3.25 ITV Nightscreen (HD). 5.05 The Jeremy Kyle Show (R,S).

12.10 Random Acts (S). An animated romantic comedy set in a feline life class. 12.15 Diary of a Teenage Virgin (R,S). 1.10 Embarrassing Bodies: Live from the Clinic (R,S,HD). 2.05 Dogs: Their Secret Lives (R,S). 3.00 Unreported World (R,S). 3.25 SuperScrimpers (R,S,HD). 4.20 Deal or No Deal (R,S,HD). 5.15 Countdown (R,S,HD).

12.00 SuperCasino. Viewers get the chance to take part in live interactive gaming, with an entertaining mix of roulette-wheel spins and lively chat from the presenting team. 3.55 Nick’s Quest (R,S). 4.20 Michaela’s Wild Challenge (R,S). 4.45 House Doctor (R,S). 5.10 Divine Designs (R,S). 5.35 Wildlife SOS (R,S).

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50 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013

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UP ALL NIGHT: THE NIGHTCLUB TOILET 10pm, Channel 4

LAW & ORDER: CRIMINAL INTENT 10pm, Channel 5

The first of four documentaries following life after dark across Britain. Cameras capture the conversations and dramas unfolding in a busy nightclub in West Sussex.

Bing Cullman suffers a heart attack and dies in his cellar shortly after hosting a wine tasting to sell rare vintages he unearthed in a basement. It seems like a straightforward case, but Goren and Eames find traces of a drug that would have reacted with the victim’s medication and resulted in his death.

ITV2 ITV2

E4 E4

6.00 Emmerdale 7.00 Coronation Street 8.00 You’ve Been Framed! Kids Special 8.40 Dinner Date 9.40 Real Housewives of New York City 10.35 Real Housewives of Orange County 11.30 You’ve Been Framed! 12.00 Emmerdale 1.00 Coronation Street 2.00 Jeremy Kyle Show 4.10 Real Housewives of Orange County 5.05 Big Rich Texas

6.00 Switched 6.25 90210 7.05 Ugly Betty 8.00 Charmed 9.00 Glee 10.00 New Girl 10.30 The Mindy Project 11.00 Rules of Engagement 11.30 Charmed (R). 12.30 Hollyoaks 1.00 How I Met Your Mother 2.00 The Big Bang Theory 3.00 New Girl 3.30 The Mindy Project (R,HD). 4.00 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 5.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD).

Sky1 Sky1 6.00 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,S). 7.00 The Middle (R,S,HD). 7.30 The Middle (R,S,HD). 8.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 10.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 1.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 2.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R,S,HD). 3.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 5.00 Futurama (R,S). 5.30 The Middle (R,S,HD).

FILM PICKS

Thursday television&radio DAMN THE DEFIANT! 1.10pm, Channel 4

The commander of a British warship fighting in the Napoleonic campaign faces bitter opposition from his right-hand man, a cruel and sadistic officer hated by the crew. In a battle of wills between the pair, the captain’s second-in-command tries to provoke his leader’s wrath by tormenting his son, an officer on the vessel. Drama, starring Alec Guinness, Dirk Bogarde and Anthony Quayle. Edited for violence.

Gold GOLD 6.00 2point4 Children 6.30 Sykes 7.00 2point4 Children 7.40 Sykes 8.20 As Time Goes By 9.00 The Green Green Grass 9.40 The Good Life 10.20 Last of the Summer Wine 11.40 One Foot in the Grave 12.20 Yes, Prime Minister 1.00 The Green Green Grass 1.40 The Good Life 2.20 As Time Goes By 3.00 Goodnight Sweetheart 4.20 Last of the Summer Wine 5.40 Only Fools and Horses

SkySports1 Sky Sports 1 6.00 Live European Tour Golf (HD). The Perth International. 8.00 Golf (HD). 9.30 Inside the PGA Tour (HD). 10.00 European Tour Golf (HD). 2.00 Golf (HD). 3.00 Golf (HD). 4.30 Golf (HD). The Korea Open. 5.30 Premier League World (S,HD). A round-up of the latest news surrounding the Premier League, featuring interviews with managers and players.

Celebrity Juice ... 10pm

Don’t Trust the ... 9pm

Modern Family, 8pm

Only Fools and Horses, 9pm

Live European ... 7pm

6.00 Dinner Date (R,HD). Potential suitors woo a single man from London. Narrated by Charlotte Hudson.

6.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 6.30 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). Guest starring Judy Greer.

6.00 The Middle (R,S,HD). Frankie is humiliated by a member of her family. 6.30 The Simpsons (R,S,HD).

6.20 Yes, Prime Minister. Jim decides to save money by getting rid of the Department of Education, much to the disgust of Sir Humphrey.

6.00 FL72 Preview

7.00 You’ve Been Framed! (R). A practical joker scares a bungee jumper. 7.30 You’ve Been Framed! (R). A boy falls through floorboards.

7.00 Hollyoaks (HD). A surprising discovery threatens to throw Sam’s life into disarray. 7.30 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD).

7.00 The Simpsons (R,S). 7.30 The Simpsons (R,S,HD). Homer becomes the new voice of American politics.

7.00 Open All Hours. Arkwright plots to get into Gladys’s bedroom. 7.40 Blackadder the Third. Edmund tries to find a bride for Prince George.

8.00 The X Factor USA (HD). The second round of the four-chair challenge.

8.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). Leonard is offered a job opportunity. 8.30 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD). Ted dates a younger woman.

8.00 Modern Family (R,S,HD). Jay and his mother-in-law come to blows. 8.30 Modern Family (R,S,HD). Manny and Luke compete for an acting role.

8.20 Blackadder the Third. The Duke of Wellington challenges Prince George to a duel, so Edmund plots to have his Scottish cousin take up the challenge instead.

9.00 Tricked (HD). Magician Ben Hanlin messes with Robbie Savage’s mind in his hidden-camera show. Plus, Joe Swash experiences possibly the world’s scariest spa treatment.

9.00 Don’t Trust the B**** in Apartment 23 (HD). Chloe becomes uncharacteristically jealous. 9.30 Suburgatory (HD). George helps Dallas coach a t-ball team.

9.00 Trollied (S,HD). Richard employs Kelly Brook to help with the reopening. 9.30 An Idiot Abroad (R,S,HD). Karl Pilkington visits Egypt.

9.00 Only Fools and Horses. Rodney goes it alone. 9.40 Gavin & Stacey. Nessa goes into labour a month early in Barry, and the newlyweds must forget their differences to track down Smithy in time for the birth of his child.

7.00 Live European Challenge Cup Rugby Union (HD). London Wasps v Bayonne (Kickoff 7.45pm). All the action from the Pool Four fixture at Adams Park, as both clubs play their second match of the campaign. Grenoble and Viadana are the other sides in the group, and with just the winners progressing to the quarter-finals, this encounter is likely to prove pivotal.

10.30 Road Wars (R,S). Police 10.20 Gavin & Stacey – 10.00 FL72 Preview. A look 10.00 The IT Crowd (R). Christmas Special. On officers use unmarked ahead to the latest Douglas becomes tired Christmas Eve, the Wests cars fitted with on-board round of fixtures in the of married life after two join the Shipmans for video cameras, offering Championship, League weeks, and then has to one of Mick’s famous an insight into vehicle One and League Two. attend court. Last in the turkey dinners. Festive crime and how it can be series. edition of the comedy prevented. The 10.30 Rude Tube (R). A parrot from 2008, starring programme also with a foul mouth and Mathew Horne and features footage of the victim of a goose Joanna Page. dangerous drivers. attack.

11.50 Crazy Beaches (HD). A group of naked cowboys parties in Malia, Crete, and Chubby White decides to go on his first night out in three years.

11.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). Sheldon tries to conceal his friendship with Penny from Leonard. 11.30 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD).

11.00 Brit Cops: War on Crime (R,S). Documentary series following the work of police officers in Lincolnshire as they tackle crime.

11.40 The Black Adder. Edmund is accused of witchcraft. Frank Finlay guest stars.

11.00 Premier League World. A round-up of the latest news surrounding the Premier League. 11.30 Football Gold. 11.45 Football Gold. .

12.20 The Only Way Is Essex (R,HD). Reality programme following a group of people in Essex, with each episode filmed just a few days before transmission. 1.05 Tricked (R,HD). 2.00 Life’s Funniest Moments (R). 2.20 Teleshopping 5.50 ITV2 Nightscreen (HD).

12.00 New Rude Tube (R). Alex Zane presents a top 50 countdown of quirky online hits. 1.00 The IT Crowd (R). 1.35 Rude Tube (R). 2.00 Happy Endings (R,HD). 2.20 The Cleveland Show (R,HD). 2.40 Friday Night Dinner (R,HD). 3.10 Full English (R,HD). 3.35 Glee (R,HD). 4.20 Ugly Betty (R,HD).

12.00 Road Wars (R,S). Police officers combat vehicle crime. 1.00 Brit Cops: War on Crime (R,S). 2.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R,S,HD). 3.00 Ross Kemp: Battle for the Amazon (R,S,HD). 4.00 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,S). 4.30 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,S). 5.00 Airline (R,S). 5.30 Airline (R,S).

12.25 The Comic Strip Presents: Didn’t You Kill My Brother? An ex-convict seeks revenge. Comedy, starring Alexei Sayle. 1.30 The Black Adder 2.00 The Comic Strip Presents: Didn’t You Kill My Brother? 3.00 Home Shopping A chance to purchase goods from the comfort of home.

12.00 NFL – A Football Life (HD) 1.00 Live NFL (HD). Arizona Cardinals v Seattle Seahawks (Kickoff 1.25am). Coverage of the NFC West encounter at the University of Phoenix Stadium. 4.30 Premier League World (S,HD). A round-up of the latest news. 5.00 FL72 Preview

RADIO

10.00 Celebrity Juice: X Factor Special (HD). With guests Dermot O’Leary, Caroline Flack, Louis Walsh and Nicole Scherzinger. 10.50 The Magaluf Weekender (R,HD). Two more groups of revellers arrive.

Radio 1 6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Fearne Cotton 12.45pm Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James 7.00 Zane Lowe 9.00 In New DJs We Trust 10.00 Phil Taggart and Alice Levine Midnight The Residency: Mosca 2.00 Toddla T 4.00 Dev Radio 2 5.00am Vanessa Feltz 6.30 Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce Noon Jeremy Vine 2.00 Steve Wright in the Afternoon 5.00 Simon Mayo 7.00 Bob Harris Country 8.00 Jo Whiley 10.00 Bill Kenwright’s Golden Years 11.00 Nigel Ogden: The Organist Entertains 11.30 Listen to the Band Midnight Janice Long 2.00 Alex Lester

Radio 3 6.30am Breakfast 9.00 Essential Classics Noon Composers of the Week: Chaminade & Holmès 1.00 News 1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert 2.00 Afternoon on 3: Verdi 200 4.30 In Tune 6.30 Composers of the Week: Chaminade & Holmès 7.30 Radio 3 Live in Concert. Vladimir Ashkenazy conducts the Philharmonia Orchestra in a Russian programme of music by Stravinsky and Tchaikovsky’s Manfred Symphony, live from London’s Royal Festival Hall. 10.00 Night Waves. Eric Schlosser talks to Anne McElvoy about his new book. 10.45 The Essay: If Walls Could Talk 11.00 Late Junction 12.30am Through the Night

Radio 4 5.30am News Briefing 5.43 Prayer for the Day 5.45 Farming Today 5.58 Tweet of the Day 6.00 Today 8.31 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament 9.00 In Our Time 9.45 (LW) Daily Service 9.45 (FM) Book of the Week: Historic Heston 10.00 Woman’s Hour 11.00 From Our Own Correspondent 11.30 The British Mosque Noon News 12.01 (LW) Shipping Forecast 12.04 You and Yours 12.57 Weather 1.00 The World at One 1.45 Terror Through Time: The Story of Terrorism from The Assassins to Al Qaeda 2.00 The Archers 2.15 Afternoon Drama: Corrinne Come Back and Gone. By Lenny Henry. 3.00 Ramblings 3.27 (LW) Radio 4 Appeal

3.27 (FM) Radio 4 Appeal 3.30 Open Book 4.00 The Film Programme 4.30 Inside Science 5.00 PM 5.54 (LW) Shipping 5.57 Weather 6.00 Six O’Clock News 6.30 Clare in the Community 7.00 The Archers 7.15 Front Row 7.45 Gillespie and I 8.00 Law in Action 8.30 The Bottom Line 9.00 Inside Science 9.30 In Our Time 9.59 Weather 10.00 The World Tonight 10.45 Book at Bedtime: Algernon Blackwood’s Ghost Stories 11.00 Seekers 11.30 Today in Parliament Midnight News and Weather 12.30 Book of the Week: Historic Heston 12.48 Shipping 1.00 As BBC World Service 5.20 Shipping

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BBC3 BBC3

BBC4 BBC4

12.10 American Dad! (R,S). 12.30 Staying In with Greg and Russell (R,S). 1.00 Sweat the Small Stuff (R,S). 1.30 Hotel of Mum and Dad (R,S). 2.30 Unsafe Sex in the City (R,S). 3.30 Some Girls (R,S).

12.00 Beautiful Thing: A Passion for Porcelain (R). 1.00 Top of the Pops: 1978 (R). 1.40 The Horizon Guide to Mars (R). 2.40 Pain, Pus & Poison: The Search for Modern Medicines (R).

7.00 Doctor Who’s Greatest Moments: The Enemies (R,S). 8.00 Motorway Cops (R,S). Officers go beyond the call of duty to help a 91-year-old war veteran. 9.00 Hotel of Mum and Dad (S). Two couples from Norwich move into their own homes. 10.00 Live at the Apollo (R,S). With Lee Mack, Rich Hall and Danny Bhoy. 10.30 EastEnders (R,S). 11.00 Family Guy (R,S). 11.25 Family Guy (R,S). Peter is forced to return to third grade. 11.45 American Dad! (R,S).

7.00 World News Today; Weather. 7.30 Top of the Pops: 1978 (R). 8.00 The Horizon Guide to Mars (R). Archive footage of scientific missions to the red planet. 9.00 Pain, Pus & Poison: The Search for Modern Medicines. How scientists exploited the natural world to make medicines. Last in the series. 10.00 Impact! A Horizon Guide to Plane Crashes (R). How deadly disasters have been used to prevent future tragedies. 11.00 The Art of Australia (R)

Radio 5 Live 5.00am Morning Reports 5.30 Wake Up to Money 6.00 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 Victoria Derbyshire Noon Shelagh Fogarty 2.00 Richard Bacon 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport 9.00 5 Live Sport: 5 Live Rugby League. A look ahead to the World Cup, which commences on 26 November and takes place at various venues in England, Wales, Ireland and France. 10.00 Question Time Extra Time 1.00am Up All Night Classic FM 6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John Suchet 1.00pm Jamie Crick 5.00 Classic FM Drive 8.00 The Full Works Concert 10.00 Smooth Classics 2.00am Bob Jones

SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 51


Fr iday Television television&radio Friday’s Guide TV PICKS

CITIZEN KHAN 9.30pm, BBC1

A local MP visits the mosque to endorse its mobile health-check unit and Mr Khan takes future son-in-law Amjad as his guinea pig – but things do not quite go to plan.

BBC1 BBC1

6.00 Breakfast (S,HD). 9.15 Fake Britain (R,S). 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer (R,S). 11.00 Real Rescues (S,HD). 11.45 Britain’s Empty Homes (S). 12.15 Bargain Hunt (S,HD). 1.00 BBC News; Weather (S,HD). 1.30 Regional News (S); Weather. 1.45 Doctors (S,HD). 2.15 Keeping Up Appearances (R,S). 3.15 Perfection (S,HD). 4.00 Escape to the Country (R,S,HD). 4.30 Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is (S,HD). 5.15 Pointless (R,S,HD).

FILM RATINGS ●●●●● Excellent ●●●● Very good ●●● Good ●● Average ● Poor

HENS BEHAVING BADLY 9pm, Channel 5

Roxanne has turned her hen party into the prom night she missed because she was pregnant, but her friends look set to derail the evening at an early stage. In Leicester, Lyndsie’s future husband is drunk before she and her group have set off and she has to call on her ex-boyfriend to babysit her five children.

BBC2 BBC2

6.00 Homes Under the Hammer 7.00 Real Rescues 7.45 Britain’s Empty Homes 8.15 Sign Zone: Wanted Down Under 9.00 Flog It! Trade Secrets 10.00 Question Time 11.00 BBC News 11.30 BBC World News 12.00 Daily Politics (S). 1.00 Classic Mastermind 1.30 Weakest Link 2.15 Great British Menu 2.45 Floyd on Fish 3.15 Are You Being Served? (R,S). 3.45 ‘Allo ‘Allo! (R,S). 4.15 Cagney & Lacey (R,S,HD). 5.00 Flog It! (R,S).

WALRUS: TWO TONNE TUSKER – NATURAL WORLD 9pm, BBC2

Marine mammal reproduction expert Holley Muraco heads to the wilds of northern Alaska to learn more about walruses’ behaviour.

ITV1 ITV

6.00 Daybreak (S,HD). 8.30 Lorraine (S). 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show (R,S). 10.30 This Morning (S). 12.30 Loose Women (S,HD). 1.30 ITV News and Weather (S). 1.55 Regional News (S). 2.00 Dickinson’s Real Deal (S,HD). From Ormskirk in Lancashire. 3.00 The Alan Titchmarsh Show (S,HD). Features, music and conversation. 3.59 Regional Weather (S). 4.00 Tipping Point (S,HD). 5.00 The Chase (S,HD). Quiz show, hosted by Bradley Walsh.

MAN DOWN 9.30pm, Channel 4

Comedy, written by and starring Greg Davies, following the life of a teacher who hates his job. Dan has lost his trousers and is in danger of losing his girlfriend Naomi, who is running out of patience with his inability to complete even the simplest of tasks. Rik Mayall also stars.

Channel Channel 4

6.00 The Treacle People 6.10 The Hoobs 7.00 According to Jim 7.30 Will & Grace 7.55 Frasier 8.55 Everybody Loves Raymond 10.00 Four Rooms 11.00 A Place in the Sun: Home or Away 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary 12.05 Gordon Ramsay’s Home Cooking 12.35 Jamie’s 15 Minute Meals 1.05 Film: Murphy’s War (S) (1971). ●●● 3.10 Countdown (S,HD). 4.00 Deal or No Deal 5.00 Four in a Bed 5.30 Come Dine with Me (S,HD).

Channel Channel 5

6.00 Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff (HD). 11.10 Cowboy Builders (R,S,HD). 12.10 5 News Lunchtime (S,HD). 12.15 Police Interceptors (R,S,HD). 1.15 Home and Away (S,HD). 1.45 Neighbours (S,HD). 2.15 The Mentalist (R,S,HD). 3.15 Film: Gracie’s Choice (S) (2004). Drama, starring Kristen Bell, Anne Heche, Diane Ladd and Shedrack Anderson. ●●●● 5.00 5 News at 5 (S,HD). 5.30 Neighbours (R,S,HD). Matt falls out with Mason and Amber.

Mastermind, 8pm

Gino’s Italian Escape, 8pm

Alan Carr: Chatty Man, 10pm

Criminals: Caught on Camera, 8pm

6.00 BBC News (S,HD). Followed by Weather. 6.30 Regional News (S); Weather.

6.00 Regional News (S); Weather. 6.30 ITV News and Weather (S).

6.00 The Simpsons (R,S). 3/21. Bart steals a mobile phone. 6.30 Hollyoaks (S,HD). A surprising discovery threatens to throw Sam’s life into disarray.

6.00 Home and Away (R,S,HD). Marilyn and Jett sort out their differences. 6.30 NewsTalk Live (S,HD).

7.00 The One Show (S,HD). Hosted by Chris Evans and Alex Jones. 7.30 Ronnie’s Animal Crackers (S,HD). The world of alternative therapy for pets. Followed by BBC News; Regional News.

6.00 Eggheads (S,HD). 79/140. Quiz show, hosted by Dermot Murnaghan. 6.30 Strictly Come Dancing – It Takes Two (S,HD). A look ahead to tomorrow’s live show. 7.00 Rick Stein’s India (R,S,HD). 5/6. The chef arrives in the state of Rajasthan, a land of palaces and hilltop forts where he cooks a biryani fit for a royal banquet.

7.00 Emmerdale (S,HD). Joanie dashes Amy’s hopes of getting Kyle back. 7.30 Coronation Street (S,HD). Barry tells Michelle the real reason his marriage is in trouble.

7.00 News (S). 7.30 Unreported World (S). 3/8. Marcel Theroux meets two people who represent the contrasting paths to love in modern China.

7.00 World’s Strongest Man 2012 (R,S,HD). Action from the fifth of five qualifying heats in Los Angeles, California. Followed by 5 News Update.

8.00 EastEnders (S,HD). Alice hatches a cunning plan to demonstrate where her loyalties lie. 8.30 Miranda (R,S,HD). 5/6. Penny and Miranda are forced to see a therapist. Comedy, starring Miranda Hart.

8.00 Mastermind (S,HD). 10/31. The specialist subjects are Asterix, General Robert E Lee, Puccini and George IV. 8.30 Gardeners’ World (S,HD). 27/31. Monty Don gives advice on protecting plants from the first frosts of the season.

8.00 Gino’s Italian Escape (S,HD). 5/6. Gino D’Acampo returns to his native Campania – the region in which he grew up and where his family still lives. 8.30 Coronation Street (S,HD). Roy listens in utter disbelief as Hayley reveals her plans.

8.00 Marvel’s Agents of SHIELD (S,HD). 4/13. The team tries to track down a mysterious woman who has singlehandedly committed numerous high-stakes robberies, but her true identity spells trouble for Coulson.

8.00 Criminals: Caught on Camera (S,HD). New series. Journalist Nick Wallis joins police forces across the nation to discover how CCTV and other technological advances are helping to bring criminals to justice. Followed by 5 News at 9.

9.00 Have I Got News for You (S,HD). 3/11. Comedy news quiz. 9.30 Citizen Khan (S,HD). 3/6. See Choices Above.

9.00 Walrus: Two Tonne Tusker – Natural World (S,HD). See Choices Above.

9.00 Piers Morgan’s Life Stories: Julian Clary (S,HD). 4/6. See Choices Above.

9.00 8 Out of 10 Cats (S). 3/9. With Helen Flanagan, Henning Wehn and Miles Jupp. 9.30 Man Down (S,HD). 1/6. See Choices Above.

9.00 Hens Behaving Badly (S,HD). 2/2. See Choices Above.

6 7 8 9

Have I Got News for You, 9pm

10.00 BBC News (S,HD). 10.25 Regional News (S). Followed by National Lottery Update. 10.35 The Graham Norton Show (S,HD). 2/20. With Paul McCartney, Natalie Portman, James Corden and Katy Perry.

10.00 QI (S,HD). 7/18. Jo Brand, Graham Linehan and Jimmy Carr join regular panellist Alan Davies as host Stephen Fry asks a range of unusual questions on the topic of knowledge. 10.30 Newsnight (S,HD).

10.00 Celebrity Wedding Planner (S,HD). 2/2. Charlotte Crosby and Gaz Beadle from reality TV show Geordie Shore organise a Gloucestershire couple’s wedding, arranging everything from the dress to the stag and hen parties.

11.20 Bluestone 42 (S,HD). 2/8. Nick is desperate to find decent food to use in an attempt to seduce Mary. 11.50 Poltergeist (S) (1982). Horror, with JoBeth Williams and Craig T Nelson. ●●●●

11.00 Weather (S). 11.05 Later with Jools Holland (S,HD). 5/8. Extended edition. With John Newman, Lloyd Cole, MGMT, Passenger and Buika.

10.00 ITV News at Ten (S). 10.30 Regional News (S); Weather. 10.35 Bowfinger (S,HD) (1999). A struggling Hollywood producer comes up with a cunning plan to splice secretly filmed footage of a famous action star into his latest low-budget sci-fi movie to give it a veneer of quality. However, his efforts drive the bewildered actor into having paranoid delusions that aliens really have invaded the Earth. Comedy, starring Steve Martin, Eddie Murphy, Heather Graham, Robert Downey Jr and Terence Stamp. See Choices Above. ●●●●

10.00 Alan Carr: Chatty Man (S). 8/18. Britney Spears talks about life in the music industry and her new single, London 2012 double gold medallist Mo Farah discusses his autobiography Twin Ambitions, and Joseph Gordon-Levitt is in the studio to promote his latest film Don Jon.

(R) repeat (S) subtitles (HD) highdefinition

11.05 Was It Something I Said? (S,HD). 2/8. Extended edition, with guests Ed Byrne and Gabby Logan. 11.55 Gogglebox (R,S). 4/13. Weekly TV review programme, narrated by Caroline Aherne.

11.00 Angels & Demons (S,HD) (2009). See Choices Above. ●●●

1.40 Weatherview (S). 1.45 BBC News (S,HD).

12.10 Film: Point Blank (S) (1967). A gangster meets up with his wife and his partner-in-crime to divide the spoils of a robbery, only for them to shoot him and take all the money, leaving him for dead. Crime thriller, starring Lee Marvin, John Vernon, Angie Dickinson and Keenan Wynn.●●●● 1.40 Sign Zone: Question Time (R,S). 2.40 This Is BBC Two (S).

12.20 Jackpot247. Viewers are offered the chance to participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort of their sofas, with an entertaining mix of roulette-wheel spins and lively chat from the presenting team. 3.00 Film: Murder, She Wrote: South by Southwest (S) (1997). Mystery, starring Angela Lansbury. ●● 4.30 ITV Nightscreen (HD).

12.40 London Irish (R,S). 1.05 Film: The Runaways (S,HD) (2010). Biopic of the 1970s rock band, starring Kristen Stewart and Dakota Fanning. ●●● 2.55 Random Acts (S). 3.00 The Big C (S,HD). 3.25 2 Broke Girls (S,HD). 3.50 2 Broke Girls (S,HD). 4.10 Don’t Trust the B**** in Apartment 23 (S,HD). 4.35 Deal or No Deal (R,S,HD). 5.30 Countdown (R,S,HD).

1.30 SuperCasino. Viewers get the chance to take part in live interactive gaming, with an entertaining mix of roulette-wheel spins and lively chat from the presenting team. 3.55 Motorsport Mundial (HD). A roundup of motorsport news. 4.20 Michaela’s Wild Challenge (R,S). 4.45 House Doctor (R,S). 5.10 Divine Designs (R,S). 5.35 Wildlife SOS (R,S).

10 11

after

12

52 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013

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PIERS MORGAN’S LIFE STORIES: JULIAN CLARY 9pm, ITV

GLEE 8pm, Sky1

The comedian talks about his life and career, revealing that he once considered committing suicide and discussing how he juggled work with caring for his dying boyfriend.

Tribute episode to actor Cory Monteith, who died in July. New Directions are united in grief after hearing of the sudden death of Finn. Mr Schue encourages them to remember their friend through song, and former members of the group return to the school to help pay their respects.

FILM PICKS

Friday television&radio BOWFINGER 10.35pm, ITV

ANGELS & DEMONS 11.00pm, Channel 5

A producer splices secretly filmed footage of a major star into his latest low-budget movie – driving the actor out of his mind. Comedy, starring Eddie Murphy.

Academic adventurer Robert Langdon is called in by the Vatican to deal with a crisis. Thriller sequel to The Da Vinci Code, with Tom Hanks.

ITV2 ITV2

E4 E4

6.00 Emmerdale 6.55 You’ve Been Framed! 7.55 The Jeremy Kyle Show USA 8.40 Dinner Date 9.40 The Real Housewives of New York City 10.35 The Real Housewives of Orange County 11.30 Big Rich Texas 12.30 Emmerdale 1.30 You’ve Been Framed! 2.00 Jeremy Kyle Show 4.10 Real Housewives of Orange County 5.05 Big Rich Texas

6.00 Switched 6.25 90210 7.10 Ugly Betty 8.00 Charmed (R). 9.00 Glee 10.00 New Girl 10.30 Suburgatory 11.00 Rules of Engagement 11.30 Charmed (R). 12.30 Hollyoaks 1.00 How I Met Your Mother 2.00 The Big Bang Theory 3.00 New Girl (R,HD). 3.30 Suburgatory (R,HD). 4.00 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 5.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD).

6.00 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,S). 7.00 The Middle (R,S,HD). 8.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 9.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 10.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 1.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 2.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R,S,HD). 3.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 5.00 Futurama (R,S). 5.30 The Middle (R,S,HD).

The Bourne Identity, 10pm

How I Met Your … 7.30pm

A League of Their … 9pm

Gavin & Stacey, 7pm

Live Rugby Union, 7pm

6.00 Dinner Date (R,HD). A man from the West Midlands takes part in the dating show. Narrated by Charlotte Hudson.

6.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 6.30 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). Penny gets drunk and seduces Leonard.

6.00 The Middle (R,S,HD). 6.30 The Simpsons (R,S,HD). Bart’s graffiti impresses a group of professional artists.

6.20 Yes, Prime Minister. Jim is horrified at allegations of phonetapping. Political comedy, starring Paul Eddington.

6.00 The Fantasy Football Club (HD). A discussion on key fantasy football issues.

7.00 You’ve Been Framed! (R). Harry Hill narrates camcorder calamities. 7.30 You’ve Been Framed! (R). Clumsy kids and sporting slip-ups.

7.00 Hollyoaks (HD). The Osbornes consider asking Nancy to help search for Tom. 7.30 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD).

7.00 The Simpsons (R,S). Marge buys a tandem. 7.30 The Simpsons (R,S). Mr Burns brands Homer insane. With the voice of Michael Jackson.

8.00 The X Factor USA (HD). The remaining contestants set out to impress during the third round of the four-chair challenge, in which they compete for four spots on each mentor’s team. Judges Simon Cowell, Demi Lovato, Kelly Rowland and Paulina Rubio keep a close eye on proceedings to separate the wheat from the chaff.

8.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). Leonard is offered a job opportunity. 8.30 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD). Ted dates a younger woman.

8.00 Glee (S,HD). See Choices Above.

7.00 Gavin & Stacey. Nessa goes into labour a month early. 7.40 Gavin & Stacey – Christmas Special. The Wests join the Shipmans on Christmas Eve for one of Mick’s famous turkey dinners, but Gavin and Stacey’s announcement dampens the mood. Festive edition of the comedy from 2008, starring Mathew Horne and Joanna Page.

7.00 Live European Cup Rugby Union (HD). Saracens v Toulouse (Kick-off 7.45pm). Coverage of the opening match in the second round of pool fixtures, as the Pool Three rivals meet at Wembley Stadium. Zebre and Connacht are the other two teams in this pool, leaving Sarries and the four-time champions as favourites to battle it out for a place in the quarter-finals.

Sky1 Sky1

Gold GOLD 6.00 2point4 Children 6.30 Sykes 7.00 Goodnight Sweetheart 8.20 As Time Goes By 9.00 Green Green Grass 9.40 Good Life 10.20 Last of the Summer Wine 11.40 Open All Hours 12.20 Yes, Prime Minister 1.00 Ever Decreasing Circles 2.20 As Time Goes By 3.00 Goodnight Sweetheart 4.20 Last of the Summer Wine 5.40 Only Fools and Horses

RADIO

BBC3 BBC3

BBC4 BBC4

12.05 American Dad! (R,S). Roger makes a new friend. 12.30 American Dad! (R,S). Steve uncovers a conspiracy. 12.50 Sweat the Small Stuff (R,S). 1.20 Staying In with Greg and Russell XL (R,S). 2.05 Some Girls (R,S). 2.35 C-Bomb (R,S). 2.55 Unsafe Sex in the City (R,S).

12.00 Big in America: British Hits in the USA (R). 1.00 Paul McCartney at the Electric Proms (R). 2.00 Mark Knopfler: A Life in Songs (R). 3.00 Big in America: British Hits in the USA (R).

7.00 Great Movie Mistakes 2: The Sequel (R,S). 7.15 Atlantis (R,S). 8.00 Extreme OCD Camp (R,S). Part two of two. The group treks deep into the American wilderness. 9.00 Orphan Black (S). Alison’s paranoia puts all of the Orphans at risk. 9.45 Staying In with Greg and Russell XL (S). With Jack Whitehall and Katy B. 10.30 EastEnders (R,S). 11.00 Family Guy (R,S). Lois is forced to find a job. 11.25 Family Guy (R,S). 11.45 C-Bomb (S).

7.00 World News Today; Weather. 7.30 Symphony (R). The history of classical symphonies. 8.30 Transatlantic Sessions. With Phil Cunningham and Mike McGoldrick. 9.00 How the Brits Rocked America: Go West (R). British bands’ attempts to find success in the USA. 10.00 How the Brits Rocked America: Go West (R). How bands including Led Zeppelin rose to fame during the 1970s. 11.00 How the Brits Rocked America: Go West (R).

9.00 GI Joe: The Rise of 9.00 A League of Their 9.00 The Royle Family. Cobra (HD) (2009). Own: Unseen (S,HD). Denise has an accident When a powerful James Corden introduces while out shopping and experimental weapon is out-takes from series learns the true value of snatched by a mysterious seven of the sports-based nipple pads, while Jim terrorist organisation, comedy quiz, featuring struggles with baby two of the soldiers regulars Jamie David’s dirty nappy. guarding it are recruited Redknapp, Andrew 9.40 The Royle Family. Jim into a top-secret military Flintoff and Jack embarks on a spot of DIY. strike force. As they go Whitehall. in search of the stolen 10.15 Royle Exclusive: 10.30 The Fantasy Football technology, they uncover 10.00 Trollied (R,S,HD). Behind the Sofa. The Richard employs Kelly Club (HD). John Fendley a plot by its creator to story behind The Royle Brook to help with the and Paul Merson present take over the world. Family, featuring big reopening, and a discussion on key Action adventure, with outtakes and exclusive Gavin refuses to buy into fantasy football issues, as Channing Tatum, Sienna interviews with the the Valco Better well as the weekend’s Miller and Christopher sitcom’s cast and crew, experience. Premier League matches. Eccleston. ●●● plus the views of famous Also featuring guests 10.30 Road Wars (R,S). Police fans of the show. from the worlds of sport officers combat vehicle and showbiz. crime.

10.00 The Bourne Identity (HD) (2002). A fishing boat crew plucks a man out of the sea with two bullet wounds in his back and a safe-deposit number sewn into his skin – but absolutely no memory of who he is or how he got there. In the search for his true identity, he is pursued 11.20 New Rude Tube (R). 11.30 Road Wars (R,S). by assassins – but his Alex Zane presents a top attempts to escape 50 countdown of them suggest his own “internet incredibles”, past is far from in order of their online straightforward. popularity. Thriller, starring Matt Damon. ●●●● 12.20 Film: Forgetting Sarah Marshall (HD) (2008). A jilted man takes a trip to Hawaii, only to find his ex and her new boyfriend are staying at the same resort. Romantic comedy, with Jason Segel, Kristen Bell and Russell Brand. Including FYI Daily. ●●● 2.30 Teleshopping

SkySports1 Sky Sports 1 6.00 Good Morning Sports Fans (HD). 7.00 Good Morning Sports Fans (HD). 8.00 Good Morning Sports Fans (HD). 9.00 Premier League World (S,HD). 9.30 Inside the PGA Tour (HD). 10.00 European Tour Golf (HD). 2.00 Golf (HD). 3.00 Ringside (HD). 4.00 Champions League Weekly (HD). 4.30 Total Rugby. 5.00 Golf (HD). The Korea Open.

12.25 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 12.55 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 1.25 Friday Night Dinner (R,HD). 1.55 Full English (R,HD). 2.20 The Cleveland Show (R,HD). 2.45 Chris Moyles’ Quiz Night (R,HD). 3.25 Show and Tell (R). 4.05 Glee (R,HD). 4.50 Ugly Betty (R,HD).

Radio 1 6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Fearne Cotton 12.45pm Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James 6.00 Radio 1’s Dance Anthems with Greg James 7.00 Annie Mac 9.00 Pete Tong 11.00 Skream and Benga 1.00am Radio 1’s Essential Mix 3.00 Annie Nightingale Radio 2 5.00am Vanessa Feltz 6.30 Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce Noon Jeremy Vine 2.00 Steve Wright in the Afternoon 5.00 Simon Mayo 7.00 Desmond Carrington: The Music Goes Round 8.00 Friday Night Is Music Night 10.00 The Radio 2 Arts Show with Claudia Winkleman Midnight Huey Morgan 3.00 Richard Allinson

12.00 Film: SWAT (S) (2003). Action thriller, starring Samuel L Jackson and Colin Farrell. ●● 2.15 Hawaii Five-0 (R,S,HD). 3.10 Ross Kemp: Battle for the Amazon (R,S,HD). 4.00 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,S). 4.30 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,S). 5.00 Airline (R,S). 5.30 Airline (R,S).

Radio 3 6.30am Breakfast 9.00 Essential Classics Noon Composers of the Week: Chaminade & Holmès 1.00 News 1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert 2.00 Afternoon on 3 4.30 In Tune 6.30 Composers of the Week: Chaminade & Holmès 7.30 Radio 3 Live in Concert. James Galway and the Ulster Orchestra with ‘A Taste of Spain’, live from Belfast’s Waterfront Hall, including music by Tchaikovsky, Rodrigo and Borne. 10.00 The Verb. Writing and performance showcase. 10.45 The Essay: If Walls Could Talk. Novelist Glenn Patterson reveals the impact that DerryLondonderry has had on him. 11.00 World on 3 1.00am Through the Night

11.30 Premier League Preview (HD). A look ahead to the weekend’s fixtures.

12.25 The Black Adder. Edmund sets out to recruit the seven most evil men in the land as part of a dastardly plan to steal the throne. 1.00 Porridge. Mackay takes a well-earned holiday. 1.30 The Royle Family 2.00 The Royle Family 2.30 The Black Adder 3.00 Home Shopping

Radio 4 5.30am News 5.43 Prayer 5.45 Farming Today 5.58 Tweet of the Day 6.00 Today 8.31 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament 9.00 Desert Island Discs 9.45 (LW) Act of Worship 9.45 (FM) Book of the Week: Historic Heston 10.00 Woman’s Hour 11.00 Jugaad: The Rise of Frugal Innovation 11.30 The Gobetweenies Noon News 12.01 (LW) Shipping Forecast 12.04 You and Yours 12.52 The Listening Project 1.00 The World at One 1.45 Terror Through Time: The Story of Terrorism from The Assassins to Al Qaeda 2.00 The Archers 2.15 Afternoon Drama: The Man in the Lift 3.00 Gardeners’ Question Time 3.45 Brazilian Bonanza 4.00 Last Word

4.30 Feedback 4.56 The Listening Project 5.00 PM 5.54 (LW) Shipping 6.00 Six O’Clock News 6.30 The Now Show 7.00 The Archers 7.15 Front Row 7.45 (LW) Gillespie and I 7.45 (FM) Gillespie and I 8.00 Any Questions? 8.50 A Point of View 9.00 Terror Through Time: The Story of Terrorism from The Assassins to Al Qaeda 9.59 Weather 10.00 The World Tonight 10.45 Book at Bedtime: Algernon Blackwood’s Ghost Stories 11.00 A Good Read 11.30 Today in Parliament 11.55 The Listening Project Midnight News 12.30 Book of the Week: Historic Heston 12.48 Shipping 1.00 As BBC World Service 5.20 Shipping

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12.00 European Cup Rugby Union (HD). Saracens v Toulouse. 3.30 Premier League Preview (HD). 4.00 The Fantasy Football Club (HD). 5.00 Champions League Weekly (HD). A look ahead to matchday three. 5.30 Football Gold (S). Manchester United v Chelsea. 5.45 Football Gold (S). Radio 5 Live 5.00am Morning Reports 5.30 Wake Up to Money 6.00 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 Victoria Derbyshire Noon Shelagh Fogarty 2.00 Kermode and Mayo’s Film Review 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport. Dan Walker presents a look ahead to the weekend’s sporting action, which includes Premier League and Scottish Premiership football, plus the latest European Cup rugby union matches. 10.00 Stephen Nolan 1.00am Up All Night Classic FM 6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John Suchet 1.00pm Jamie Crick 5.00 Classic FM Drive 8.00 The Full Works Concert 10.00 Smooth Classics 2.00am Bob Jones

SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 53


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‘Pictures of passengers from decades west crossword ago hold a special curiosity ’

Puzzles and poetry

poem David Prowse

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THE ONE WHO DIDN'T WAVE

A wheelchair, I discovered, was no barrier to fun For humour carries keys upon its chain, It grants invited entry to the person 'neath the skin While acting as an antidote to pain. So as I hoed and shovelled, as I planted and I pruned, So friendships, too, emerged among the weeds, Blossoming from empathy and nurtured by respect, Like nature's other newly-planted seeds. But there was one, a lady who would rarely venture out With whom approaches always seemed to fail, I'd wave outside her window but she'd treat me with disdain Until I felt obliged to share the tale. I mentioned it to someone who attended to her needs, Her attitude was scathingly inclined, 'Did you never stop to think,' she said, 'Did it never cross your brain That Sarah, there, might possibly be blind ?' I walked away deflated, disappointed with myself, Author PaulmyAtterbury carryingand out shame, some To swallow embarrassment detailed researchthough, for his various Next morning, I went railway along and knocked on Sarah's door, publications Belatedly, to try to clear my name.

laneous stuff that doesn’t fit into any category,” says Paul. “I can spend a day going through these. I might look through 1,000 images and buy things that are interesting and that hopefully will one day get used.” And it is not always the perfect shot by the professional photographer In 2001catches I co-wrote and published that Paul’s eye. the biography of Cecil De Vere who became the first official “The amateur takes interesting British champion when he won, in 1866, the images, Cup, theyawarded may not comChallenge forbe thatgreat express puror technically perfect beppositions ose. He wasthey 21 at the time, butprofessionals. was not destined cause are not for a longare life, amateurs as he contracted spent They withTBaandbasic his final six weeks in a best convalescent home camera doing their – but they alongside Torquay harbour. He was buried in often show things that other pictures Torquay Cemetery. dHis on’t,” says Paul, adding thatobscure, with origins had always been most photoshop sharpened and it was notthey untilcan the be recent advent ofand easy genealogical that more light could be brightenedsoftware or darkened.

chess Bob Jones

thrown on who he actually was. His unmarried mother was Catherine, born in 1825 to John and Mary Mathews, who ran a baker’s business in Marshall Street, London,

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designer, looks after the technical

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'Oh, I know who you are,' she said, 'They keep me well-informed, 9 I wondered why you never came before, So what you thought of me reflects the way I thought of you, What fools weHis are wife and isn't pride a bore Chrissie, who?'was a book

11 We sharedsia de.laugh together and she then devised a scheme, ul’s books attract dedicA code whichPa only werailway would understand, but alsoasthose 'Three tapsated on theenthusiasts, window,' she suggested she with smiled, warm memories and a genuine nos'I'll know it's you and wave myBut hand.' talgia for then the I'll subject. nostalgia

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has its limitations – and Paul knows And so she did and, through the years, what there is a cut-off point. 16 17 differences it made “I that havetook learnt you cannot go On dreary days an agethat to pass, back too far. If you back beyond We'd see our separate pictures but,go whatever 18 19 20 they portrayed, living memory people lose interest,” We knew we a friend beyond the glass. hehad says. “Victorian pictures are like the And often I'd remember how I'd thought of her as cold Stone Age because people have no I tend not 22 23 And what connection. a fool assumption made of me, to go back21 the 1920s.” One of us before had blindness to explain how they behaved, It is ironic that everyday moments, The other, merely couldn't see. almosteyes toothat mundane to record at the time, have all the trappings of fascinFor book enquiries, ring 01752 600366 25 ation when viewed as a piece of social24 history. And so past pictures of passengers and station staff from decades ago ACROSS DOWN hold a special curiosity. 1 On Thursday my son, a top 1 You can get lost in this judge, is off to a place near sprawling place in the Paul has a little poetic licence with Torpoint (2,4) Blackmore Vale (6) some of the captions – is the woman ACROSS DOWN of my friends are hoping to 2 Jack needed to go to a central waiting at the Welsh halt with her 4 Two get away at the end of spring, supermarket to sprawling get place an in 1 On Thursday my son,aavisit top judge, off to a 1 You can get lost in this wicker basket really going shopping and arrange to myisvillage ingredient to make me a Devon Torpoint (2,4) the Blackmore Vale (6) in Aberystwyth? It would be nice place to near near Grosmont (6) cream tea (3) think she was, but even if she wasn’t 9 The same sedimentary rock 32 Jack Three motorists from supermarket Stathe 4 Two of my friends are hoping to get away needed to go to a central that Plymouth is built on can be it is the sort of every day reason she involved toinmake an me accident at the end of spring, and arrange a visit to to were get an ingredient a Devon found dotted around in caused by excessive speed (5) might have caught the train. my village near Grosmont (6) cream tea (3) Lynmouth and Etsome (9) 5 Last night four flats in Brea “The railways were very much at 10 same Backpackers whothatvisit this were motorists broken into two men are 9 The sedimentary rock Plymouth 3 Three from –Stathe were involved the heart of our lives and the images the in West heldcaused and bythey are speed still (5) is builtleading on can beattraction found dotted in around inbeing an accident excessive reflect that,” says Paul. of England get searching for another Lynmouth and Etsome (9) a great view of “Travelling today by train will, in the ocean (3) accomplice 5 Last night four (7) flats in Brea were broken 40 years time, be interesting for all This item, is just oneat-of a 6into We– two initially lived a street 10 11 Backpackers whothat visit this leading men are beinginheld and theyin are was bygetAsh from the same reasons. It is an on-going Weymouth before to (7) a tractionset, in the Westbought of England a great still searching for anothermoving accomplice – he’s got three tiny place near Axminster (9) process.” view ofEdmondsham the ocean (3) of the set now, but 76 We I really upset initially lived my in a last streetboyfriend in Weymouth Favourite Railway Journeys is a adjacent tobook the better-known Carnaby 11 Thisunfortunately item, that is justthe one fourth of a set, item was is before to a tiny place near whomoving was from Draynes, heAxminstill that is easy to dipStreet. in and out missing (7) He was registered in 1846 as Valentine John boughtstill by Ash from Edmondsham – he’s got ster (9) an intense feeling of loss has of. 13 ofThis quay-side town is about Cecil De Vere, born February 14, and his three the set now, but unfortunately the and longing for me (6) And, rapidly changing 1.5 miles from Rhyl father was listed as adespite surgeonthe but no name was fourth item is still missing (7) (5) reallyweekend upset my last who was 87 ILast my boyfriend son left Frieth scenes chronicled within its14 There’s a pair of trees in the given. Therailway 1861 census sees him at 10, Lower from he still intensejust feeling andDraynes, travelled to has my an village St isMichael Penkevil Calthorpe pages, Street, near King’s Cross, where his totally 13 Thismiddle quay-sideoftown about 1.5 miles of outside loss and longing for me(11) (6) some things haven’t of Devizes that their bottom 12 Sue lives on a small road in a mother has changed her name to Katherine from Rhyl (5) need changed. While Paul reflects on his De Vere and he has become De Vere. 8 Last weekend my two son leftmiles Frieth and travbranches cutting off to town about from favourite lines CinV their heyday, they The 15-year-old Cecil is working as clerk for 14 There’s a pair of them trees intothe middle of St elled to my village just (9) outside of Devizes stimulate grow (11) Blandford Forum are all still here to be enjoyed today. a merchant based at the West India Docks, Michael that need their bottom 18 InPenkevil Weston-super-Mare a special 15(11) A leading novelist lives in this “None ofathem arehouse. lost. You while his mother runs boarding Two can do branches cutting off toconnects stimulate them bus service all to parts terribly posh area of Cardiff anyare of Thomas them – Burden, because they are still of her tenants a 30-year12(7) Sue lives on a small road in a town about grow (11) of the town (5) quiet hazy day inteacher the summer of 1962 at Penzance, top, and a modern train operating on the sce old civil engineer Blandford doable.”from Ireland, and Albert 19 AThis head from 16two A miles gale from at the start Forum of the(9)year Lane, a 41-year-old landscape painter of note. 18 In Weston-super-Mare bus serLangtree had a special building work left behind a devastated village That these are the correct people, is con15near A leading novelist(6) lives in this terribly vice connects the town done all to parts his ofplace to (5) make it Wedmore firmed by the contemporary observations of posh area of Cardiff (7) bigger (7) 17 This place near Penzance has a the Rev George MacDonnell who wrote in his 19 21 ThisTo head teacher had visit thisfrom partLangtree of St Clether, top zoo that hasoftwo bears and book Chess Life-Pictures that De Vere had 16 A gale at the start the year left behind a building work done to his place to make it you need a permit (3) four lions – it also has three been first taught the moves by Messrs Burden bigger devastated village near Wedmore (6) 22 (7) I had to pick up my dad and five cinemas and a sports centre and Lane. of his friends who had got They took their where he This place near has a top of zooCivil 21 To visit this part of St Clether, needofainrail- 17(6) Athim thedown timetoof its club creation, Brunel’s fascinating look at thisyou slice obtained fromPenzance the Institution drunk in the Nag’s Head 20 You these country was keen to take on all the top players “at the hasfind two bears andnarrow four lions – it also permit Liskeard (3) (9)When it comes to captur- that atmospheric railway was hailed as an way history. Engineers, and a large format layout roads and correct odds”, and within a short time he had has three throughout cinemas and aCornwall, sports centre (6) 24 Over there is a winding road in Engollan especially (5) icon of innovation – yet it was to be ing the flavour of the line, B ru n e l ’s to do justice to the fine detail, the full beaten the great Steinitz in a match, receiving 22 I had to pick up my dad and five of his which goes to the job centre in 2320Ron leaving Burton and consigned Railway featuring set find ofis25these sheets is published together odds of pawn and move.to history as an expensive You narrow country roads friendsAtmospheric who had got drunk in the–Nag’s Head the Nye (9) (6) moving Bath (3) He clearly had thewrites potential to reach the top, in Liskeard Cornwall, and Each in Engollan esfailure, Roger Malone. Contemporary Watercolours of Willi- throughout for theto first time. includes a 25 At the beginning of autumn, but things turned badbook for him. Katherinecontempordied pecially (5) A new featuring am Dawson, edited by Paul Garnsstrip plan of a mile and a quarter of three from aged 39 and he watercolour became a depressed alcoholic, by tal24 Overworthy, there is is ameteorologists winding whichtogoes ary illustrations a into closeroad second turning railway, a longitudinal section and a Bristol dying at the age of 29. to the job centregot in Nye (6) trouble having 23 Ron is leaving Burton and moving to ented land surveyor William Dawson, the back to 1847 and sketch view of either side of the line left clock out an important line experienon a They also appeared to have had a lightBath (3) weather map (6) fever who lived in Cathedral cing atmospheric first hand. and detailed descriptions. hearted attitude to filling in thoseYard, early Exeter, 25 At the beginning of autumn, three metbrings thenames South changing Devon Atmospheric Published bygot The Broad Gauge SoHis watercolours are talented comcensus forms, their from eorologists from Bristol into trouble year to year. Strangest of all, his havingciety left out important line onThe a weathRailway vividly todeath life. certificinan association with Friends positions and meticulously observed ate gives his For name as Cecil Valentine er mapof (6)Devon’s Archives, it is a thoroughly Brunel this broad Brown. gauge curiosstudies packed with almost serene Now whereity did–that come from – and why? Andcliffs at clinging to the sandstone researched and excellently illuslineside detail from the 1840s. will we ever get to know who his father was? Dawlish en route from Exeter to trated labour of love. William Dawson Available at most bookshops at £20, In last week’s minimalist position White’s Exe Newton Abbot Totnestwo– was far made a complete record of the atmoit is distributed on behalf of the quickest win was 1.Qf5! Hereand is a similar co.u from finest legacy. spheric railway under construction Friends of Devon Archives, Stevensmover. How doeshis White avoid possible staleSolutions on Page 56 mate and winHowever, in two moves? The a new comprehensive from Exeter to Totnes. books, Taddyforde House South, tion publication provides a refreshing and Now, with high resolution images Taddyforde Estate, New North Road,

54 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013

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As a gardener at the Cheshire Home, among disabled folk, I had to learn the secrets of the place, The names of all the residents, their individual ways And the means by which a smile could light a face.

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Fascinating look at railway history evokes atmospheri

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chart This week’s bestseller list comes from Michele Laouenan of The Book Shop, Liskeard, PL14 6AD. 01579 342112.

Cryptic Crossword cryptic crossword

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1 Around Liskeard DOWN – John Neale9 This book of more than 9 Incarcerating the law1 Getting hitched, hav- depicts the scenes, people 200 photos ACROSS breaker, beginning to ing an affection for and events of everyday life in and around be firm (8) (10) Liskeard from 12a period of more than 100 9 Incarcerating the lawbreaker, 10 Save soap (3) 2 Having dressed, years, he’d including images of many of the beginning to be firm (8) 11 Made a fuss, but gone after the fool (4) town’s shops. History Press, £12.99. 10 Save soap (3)

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(4,2)but hired (4,2) 3 I’m leaving food and 11 Made hired a fuss, Firemen Artists: 1940-4516 12 clatter The clatter does water (8)2(6) 15 12 The does prove disconcerting prove disconcerting 4 Post the stop- Kelly 13 Focused on, when one taught (7) one–atAnthony ping place (7) unique, beautifully illustrated and 14 For a (6) start can’t remember, which isThis irritating 13 (4) Focused on, when 5 Wakensdocumented up and takes book tells us about the 15 Investigated (7,3) 18 one taughtwhen (7) one had leftwith, to call on (6,5) brave, and little-known Second World 17 Seeing sun, putting seedlings 14 Forthere’s a start can’t 6 theDoes it allow the TV War Firemen Artist Group, which was in their containers (8)is remember, which producers to work in the war effort both as engaged 18 “The lawyer is crooked,” I interposed irritating (4) from home? (6,4) and artists. Their job was to fight firemen tiredly (7) 25 24 15 seen Investigated when time in 7 round Tried to, when one 19 He’s time after after fires which they then depicted through one had left (7,3) looked for (6) round (4) their paintings. Halsgrove, £24.99. 17 Seeing sun, 8 Go(6)on24 cue, 21 Making thethere’s R in “beer” bigger Onrattling which the opened up case is lying putting the seedlings the(3,9,5) tin going in (8) in a Surname? A Journey from 3 What’s 28 27 Says tastes vary (6) (8) in their containers 10 It’s an explosion, darn 27 Abercrombie to Zwicker – David McKie 29 In18the“The restaurant, without lawyer is is it served it! (5) Surnames are windows into our families’ accompaniments? (4) crooked,” I interposed 16 Having electricity, for 30 Elastic band you see is around it (7)past. This is an entertaining wander tiredly (7) the present (7) the path of the nation’s history and along 33 What the kids are tugging at like mad? (8) 33 34 19 He’s seen after a top20seat Drink havingCornerstone, £14.99. culture. 35 Successful in time getting on alone, the time in round after dismissed one and all double-decker bus? (6,4) 4 To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee (5) 36 Normround is a (4) skinflint (4) A timeless classic set in the 1930s the Rout, in there22 Just 37 If21 I cutMaking the core willNonsense! be a hole (7) 36 37 38 Not too latebigger for “One Fine Day” (2,4)(7) “beer” (6) refuse! American South, Harper Lee’s skilfully 40 Fruit and ice-cream will be a crafted pound 24 On which the opened 23about Is it the result of gettale of prejudice and ignorance is for two (6) up case is lying ting the beautifully needle? (5-6) written, with characters who 41 Rod will give the signal (3)25 Ignored the outmoded (3,9,5) will live on. Cornerstone, £6.99. 40 42 Awful anger that consuming drink is 27 Says tastes vary (6) port (6,4) inflaming (8) Maddaddam – Margaret Atwood 29 In the restaurant, is it 26 Fight for5which a ring A (10) mad scientist working for an evil is needed DOWNserved without releases a virus that wipes accompaniments? (4) 28 Activatedcorporation when out 30 Elastic band you see an affection attackedfor (6,2)most of humanity and the survivors 1 Getting hitched, having (10) is around it (7) 31 Point themust Persianscrape out, a living from the ruins of an 2 Having dressed, the fool 33 What the kidshe’d are gone aftercarrying the (4) baskets civilisation industrial A moving and ACROSS 3 I’m leaving water (8) (8) tuggingfood at likeand mad? dramatic conclusion to her trilogy. 4 Post one (8) at the stopping place 32 (7) He has a terrible 9£18.99. Pasta tubes (8) 5 Wakens up and takes with, to call on Bloomsbury, (6,5) 35 Successful in getting about getting 10 Body of water (3) 6 Does it allow the TV producersdread to work Jonathan Coe(6) Make known a top (6,4) seat on the stuck (7)6 Expo 58 – 11 from home? 12 atRegain (6) Set in Belgium the time of the 1958 double-decker bus? 34 Titbit from a tin, you ACROSS 7 Tried to, when one looked for (6) 13 Contorted (7) World (6,4) rattling the tin going doin the(8) same withFair, (6) a place of fakery with hints of 8 Go on cue, 14 Naked (4) espionage, good-looking 915Pasta (8) and 10 It’s explosion, darn (5) Are massing 36anNorm is a skinflint (4) it! 35 round Bird tubes (10) girls 10 of water 16 Having electricity, for the present (7) sinister spies. will make 37 If I cut the core out, one’s rear (5) 17ItBody Waiting in line you (8)(3)laugh. 11 known(7) (6) 20 Drinkthere alone, having one will be a hole dismissed 39 The vessels will be £16.99. 18 Make Self-confident Penguin, 12 and all (5) 19 Regain Operatic(6) song (4) (7) refitted in the end of 13 (7) Belles 22 Nonsense! Just refuse! (7) 7 Diving 21 Contorted Utterly hopeless (6) 38 Not too late for “One August (4) 14 Naked (4) 23 Is it the result of getting the needle? (5-6) 24 Type of building (4-8,5) – Lucy Wood Finethe Day”outmoded (2,4) 15 (10) 25 Ignored port (6,4) 27 Bird Ruins (6) In a debut collection, 40 Fruit and ice-cream 17 in (4) line (8) 26 Fight for which a ring is needed (10) 29 Waiting Unit of land Lucy Wood very will bewhen about aattacked pound 18 28 Activated (6,2) 30 Self-confident Slaughter (7) (7) cleverly anchors her (6) 33 Operatic Incendiary device (8) 19 song (4) 31 Point for thetwo Persian out, carrying the basstories, which 35 Utterly Study ofhopeless the heart (10) 21 (6) are set kets 41 (8) Rod will give the sig36 Type Sediment (4)the coastlines 24 of building (4-8,5) 32 He has terrible dread about getting along nala(3) 37 Great joy (7) 27 Ruins (6) stuck (7) of the native 42 Awful anger that con38 Unit Injuryof(6)land (4) 29 34 Titbitsuming from drink a tin,is you do the same with (6) Cornwall, in the rich 40 Slaughter Recognise as 30 (7)true (6) 35 Are massing round one’s rear (5) inflaming (8) Cornish tradition 41 Recede (3) 33 Incendiary device (8) of 39 The vessels will be refitted in the end of and folklore. 35 Studymyth of the heart (10) August (4) Bloomsbury, £7.99. 36 Sediment (4) 37 Great joy (7) 8 A Death in38the Family Injury (6) – Karl Ove Knausgaard 40 Recognise as true (6) Liskeard to Looe line 41 Recede (3) early death of The book starts with the 42 Expressive Karl Ove’s morose father, (8) a teacher who

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Stars Claire Petulengro

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You may find yourself having to do the work of others in order to prove yourself to those in power. You can afford to aim higher and ask for more in love, so try to remember you’re worth more than you’ve recently believed. Ring me to hear why.

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Things are not going to be going smoothly this week, so make sure you have a back-up plan. It’s the only way you’ll feel as if you still have some kind of control to your life. It can also give you the chance to show others how good you are in a crisis.

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Venus makes it impossible for you not to wear your heart on your sleeve and say how you feel. This could see some of you Geminis taking your relationships to deeper levels and some of you could even find yourselves parting company.

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Your close ones need your help more than ever this week so try to be there for them and listen when they speak. Mercury makes mix ups in business easy so make sure you back up any important work on computer. Ring to hear which signs will be leaving.

32 35

38

You can’t seem to get a certain person off your mind, but is this because they’re good for you or bad for you Leo? Only you can answer this question honestly. What is clear is that you need some time and space to work out who you are and where you’re going.

39

42

41

Quick Crossword

quick crossword

he scenic

eric fever

scribble pad

Education is well starred and if you were thinking of getting more involved in the learning system then this would be the perfect time to do so. Money spent on the home is a good investment. Call now to make the most of your element of earth.

DOWN 42 Expressive (8) 1 Depots (10) 2 Filled tortilla (4) 3 Absolute (8) 4 DOWN Error (7) 5 Seismic events (11) 1 Depots (10) for horse riding (6,4) 6 Track suitable tortilla (4) 7 2 Filled Street (6) (8) 8 3 Absolute Disdainful (8) (7) 104 Error Winter sportsman (5) events 165 Seismic Percussionist (7) (11) 206 Track Happensuitable again (5) for horse riding (6,4) (6)(7) 227 Street Periodical (8) 238 Disdainful Type of hat (5,6) Winter sportsman (5) 2510 Lack of integrity (10) 2616 Betrothal (10) Percussionist (7) 2820 Testimony Happen (8) again (5) 3122 Flying (8) Periodical (7) 3223 Suntanned (7) (5,6) Type of hat 3425 Christian (6) (10) Lack offestival integrity 3526 Ascend (5) (10) Betrothal 3928 Malarial fever (4) Testimony (8) 31 Flying (8) 32 Suntanned (7) 34 Christian festival (6) 35 Ascend (5) 39 Malarial fever (4)

left his wife, took to drink and dies at his mother’s seaside home. Vintage, £8.99.

Don’t get roped into telling lies for your close ones or you could be accused of starting rumours. Some sort of a contract or agreement you’ve made needs to be changed as circumstances have changed. Ring me so we can take a peek at what’s to come in your life. Although you know a lot about your career you don’t or can’t know everything. That’s why you must not rule out learning more about your colleagues. A little research in this direction will pay dividends later on. Call me now to hear more for this week. Your energy levels aren’t what they should be which has to tell you that you’ve been taking on too much. Use this weekend to work out not only what you need, but what you don’t need Sagittarius. Ring now for the finer details. Forced changes and expense in the home could see you telling white lies about what you can or can’t afford. You know it wasn’t so long ago you nearly lost all that is dear to you, so make sure you remember this week what the important basics are.

Solutions on Page 56

9 Demon Dentist – David Walliams Make your appointment if you dare! Evil is at work. But who or what is behind it… Another funny novel! 7+ Harpercollins, £12.99. 10 Extra Special Treats (...Not) – Liz Pichon. The latest from Liz Pichon’s Tom Gates popular series, for 7+. Scholastic, £9.99.

Your element of air is making it hard for you to keep others’ secrets. Just remember what they say about people in glass houses Aquarius. You’d be far better to finish working on the solo project you were thinking of. Give me a ring for details. Jealousy is never a nice trait and it can also be quite a painful one can’t it Pisces? It would be a good idea to sit down and write a list of what you really want out of life. Time to stop looking at things from others’ perspectives. Ring now for insight.

Bookseller’s choice

Exeter, EX4 4AT (stevensbooks. co.uk). It is also available through The Broad Gauge Society (publications@broadgauge.org.uk).

Ben Kingdom: The Feast of Ravens – Andrew Beasley From a great local author, this second book in the series is set in Victorian London. High up on the rooftops lives a ragtag band of orphans and spies. How do the children survive against all the odds? 10+ Usborne, £6.99. WCL-E01-S2

SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 55


56 WCL-E01-S2

Puzzles

1 Where in the West? Can you name and locate these five well-known West Country landmarks, as seen by Fran Stothard and Clare Green? Solutions below.

4

Crossword solutions West

Across: 1 St John, 4 Garway, 9 Limestone, 10 Sea, 11 Oddment, 13 Towyn, 14 Proliferate, 18 Areas, 19 Enlarge, 21 Let, 22 Addington, 24 Yonder, 25 Isobar. Down 1 Silton, 2 Jam, 3 Haste, 5 Abetter, 6 Westwater, 7 Yearns, 8 Northfields, 12 Durweston, 15 Lisvane, 16 Bagley, 17 Zennor, 20 Lanes, 23 Tub. 56 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY OCTOBER 5 2013

1 Bath Abbey. 2 Cary Grant statue, Millennium Square, Bristol. 3 Tewkesbury Abbey. 4 Trowbridge Town Hall. 5 Cheltenham Town Hall.

3

2

5

Cryptic

Across: 9, St-alw-art 10, Bar 11, Took on 12, Rattle 13, Trained 14, (for)Gets 15, Checked out 17, S-potting 18, Wear-I-ly 19, O-t-t-O 21, La-R-ger 24, The operating table 27, States 29, Sole 30, Sp-ring-y 33, Crackers 35, Riding high 36, Mean 37, Or-if-I-ce 38, In time 40, Coup-L-e 41, Cue 42, Enra-gin-g Down: 1, Attachment 2, Clot(he’d) 3, Fare-well 4, Station 5, Brings round 6, Studio flat 7, Sought 8, Con-tin-ue 10, Blast 16, Current 20, Tot-al(one) 22, Rubbish 23, Cross-stitch 25, Passe-D-over 26, Engagement 28, Turned on 31, Pan-N-iers 32, Ad-he-red 34, Can-ape 35, Ra-I’s-e 39, Tugs

Quick

Across: 9, Macaroni 10, Sea 11, Reveal 12, Recoup 13, Twisted 14, Nude 15, Woodpecker 17, Queueing 18, Assured 19, Aria 21, Abject 24, Semi-detached house 27, Debris 29, Acre 30, Carnage 33, Firebomb 35, Cardiology 36, Lees 37, Elation 38, Trauma 40, Accept 41, Ebb 42, Eloquent Down: 1, Warehouses 2, Taco 3, Complete 4, Mistake 5, Earthquakes 6, Bridle path 7, Avenue 8, Sardonic 10, Skier 16, Drummer 20, Recur 22, Journal 23, Straw boater 25, Dishonesty 26, Engagement 28, Evidence 31, Aviation 32, Bronzed 34, Easter 35, Climb 39, Ague

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Easter Compton Farm Shop


West Country Life Magazine 12 October 2013