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Interview with the Fire Chief VOLUME 2

y p p Ha Influenza Pandemic Facts You Need To Know

Toronto War Vets Association & Colour Guard Publications Agreement No: 41203011

Publications Agreement No: 41203011

FIREHALL SHOWCASE: Fire Station 421

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ISSUE 4 | WINTER 2006

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THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE TORONTO PROFESSIONAL FIRE FIGHTERS’ ASSOCIATION

VOLUME 2

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ISSUE 4

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WINTER 2006

IN THIS ISSUE 32

19

5.

President’s Message

9.

Secretary Treasurer’s Message

13. Vice President’s Message 15. Chaplain’s Corner 16. Letters to the Editor

41

19. Interview with the Fire Chief 21. Municipal Elections 2006 25. Influenza Pandemic 28. Firehall Showcase – Station 421 31. One-Day Illness: Can a Medical Note be Required

39

52

FIRE WATCH (ISSN 1715-5134) is published quarterly by the TORONTO PROFESSIONAL FIRE FIGHTERS’ ASSOCIATION 39 Commissioners Street, Toronto, ON Canada M5A 1A6 Tel.: 416.466.1167 www.torontofirefighters.org E-mail: firewatch@torontofirefighters.org

32. Local 3888’s Annual Christmas Party 35. Fire Fighter Survival and Rescue – Part VI 39. Remembering Flanders Fields 41. Line of Duty Death Profiles 45. Collective Agreement Review

FIRE WATCH is published quarterly by Xentel DM Incorporated on behalf of the Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association

49. Fit to Survive – A Guide to Health and Nutrition

CHIEF EDITOR Scott Marks

50. In Memorium

MANAGING EDITORS Frank Ramagnano & James Coones Tel.: 416.466.1167 Fax: 416.466.6632 E-mail: firewatch@torontofirefighters.org

52. A History of the Toronto Firefighters War Veterns’ Association and Colour Guard

ASSISTANT EDITORS Kevin Ashfield, Keith Hamilton, Marla Friebe, Seonaid Lennox, Rodney Johnston

53. Local 3888 Staff Profile – Marylin Trunks

ASSISTANT COPY EDITORS Alyssa Petrillo & Marcel Ramagnano

56. 3888 Recent Happenings

DESIGN AND ART DIRECTION Xentel DM Incorporated

61. Upcoming Events

CANADIAN PUBLICATIONS MAIL Agreement No: 41203011

62. Ad Index/Classifieds

PRINTED IN CANADA Copyright © 2006 Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association ADVERTISING: Naderia Bookram Tel.: 416.646.3128 Fax: 416.646.3134 Email: naderiab@xentel.com

Merchant Card Acceptance

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On The Cover

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Photo taken at the Local 3888’s Annual Christmas Party, 2006 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, or otherwise without prior written permission from the publisher. FIRE WATCH is an official communication tool of the Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association. The Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association (TPFFA) does not assume responsibility for statements of fact or opinion made by any contributor. Comments made by individuals may not reflect the official position of the TPFFA. Acceptance and publication of articles, advertisements, 33 products and services does not indicate endorsement of same by the TPFFA, and the TPFFA assumes no responsibility for their accuracy.

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PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

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nother year has slid past and here it is 2007 as the winter issue of Toronto Fire Watch arrives. Traditionally it is a time to look back on the successes of the previous year and look ahead to the goals and objectives of the coming year. Scott Marks

We have maintained and expanded on the goals that we set for the TPFFA. Communications with our members continues to be a high priority and I believe we are providing more timely and efficient reporting of the information that you need. Our work this year on the IAFF Convention and FireOps were a major coup. Not only was the convention a great success, but FireOps attracted our Prime Minister, Stephen Harper. The media coverage and public relations received from this was invaluable. I cannot thank enough, the Convention Committee, Stewards, and members that assisted the Executive Board. Without your help we could never have pulled this off. This year we face the task of negotiating the contract and working with other provincial fire fighters (through the OPFFA) in pushing for WSIB Presumptive Legislation. While we hope to have a contract back to you for ratification early in the New Year, the wheels of government turn slowly and the presumptive legislation, although on the horizon, continues to be a challenge. The OPFFA has shown what we can do when fire fighters work together on the provincial level. Despite a campaign of misinformation from CUPE Ontario and AMO, the OPFFA, under President Fred LeBlanc, carried the day by sticking with the facts and taking the high road in getting our message through. The high road is the difficult road to take, it requires more work and research, but you maintain your

integrity by not lowering yourself to name calling and rhetoric. Fire fighters have always chosen that path and we will continue to do so. The recent announcement of the new Fire Marshal for the Province of Ontario bodes well for professional fire fighters as well. Patrick Burke worked as a Windsor Fire Fighter, was part of the OPFFA, and was the President of the Ontario Fire Chiefs Association. As a fire fighter Pat went back to school and achieved his law degree. Pat is respected by both the fire fighter associations and the fire chiefs. He has a difficult task ahead in rebuilding the

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government that not only listens but works with us to make the changes. I cannot ignore the support and help we have had from the provincial NDP. They have been instrumental on the WSIB presumptive legislation. Andrea Horwath, the MPP out of Hamilton, has brought this forward as a private members bill and it has been supported by all parties. Due to the reality of private member’s bills dying when governments are dissolved, we are aware that it may not make it through the spring session. The Liberals have

THE HIGH ROAD IS THE DIFFICULT ROAD TO TAKE, IT REQUIRES MORE WORK AND RESEARCH, BUT YOU MAINTAIN YOUR INTEGRITY BY NOT LOWERING YOURSELF TO NAME CALLING AND RHETORIC. FIRE FIGHTERS HAVE ALWAYS CHOSEN THAT PATH AND WE WILL CONTINUE TO DO SO.

Ontario Fire Marshal’s office as a credible organization that fire fighters can turn to and believe in. Pat Burke is the person that can do this however and we wish him well. The achievement of the OMERS changes, the announcement of such a progressive fire marshal, and the presumptive WSIB legislation on the horizon can all be attributed to the successful relationship between the Dalton McGuinty Liberal Government and Ontario’s fire fighters. At our recent Provincial legislative conference the change was palpable. After dealing with the Harris/Eves government, which paid lip service to our issues and delivered on none of their promises to us, it is a welcome change to have a

]

committed themselves to WSIB presumptive legislation, so we expect it back in the next session of government. But our gratitude is with MPP Horwath for moving this up on everyone’s radar screen. I want to be clear to our members that the current provincial government has lived up to their promises to fire fighters. They continue to be a government that listens to us and works with us to deal with our issues. This is a marked departure from the previous government. I realize everyone has the right to vote as they see fit, but I feel I would be remiss if I did not let you know that the current government has provided us with access to explain our issues and have lived up to our expectations. WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH

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M-TRICKS AUTOSPORTS 1409 BLOOR ST W TORONTO (416) 531-8609 MICHAEL BLUGERMAN ASSOC 100 ST CLAIR AVE W TORONTO (416) 923-7771

NADIA WALTER 10 FERNDALE AVE TORONTO (416) 924-1627 NAZARETH MOTORS 1861 O’CONNOR DR NORTH YORK (416) 751-7811 NEW LIFE AUTO BODY 32 CAWTHRA TORONTO (416) 769-8200 ONTARIO INCOME TAX CENTRE LTD 1376 ST CLAIR AVE W TORONTO (416) 787-2343 RENISSANCE RESPIRATORY HOME CARE 397 HUMBERLINE DRIVE TORONTO (416) 679-1400 RUSHWORTH TRANSPORTATION INC 88 BRIDLE GROVE SCARBOROUGH (416) 261-3212 SAGEMEDICA INC 2848 BLOOR ST W TORONTO (416) 503-1471 SBT FINANCIAL CORP 4455 SHEPPARD AVE E SCARBOROUGH (416) 297-8300 THE COMPUTER EDGE 3369 LAKE SHORE BLVD W ETOBICOKE (416) 252-4868


President’s Message ... Continued from page 5

We will continue to monitor the progress of the 24 hour shift schedule. Despite the insistence of some members that it is a “done deal”, I can assure you that it is anything but that. Anomalies in a variety of statistics make it very difficult for the committee to arrive at any firm conclusion. It will be up to the members and what their personal health patterns convey to determine if this is indeed a health-

ier shift for fire fighters to be working. I would advise everyone to read the Fire Chief’s comments in this issue of Fire Watch before making determinations of what is a “done deal”. It was a great honour to be acclaimed into the position of president for another term. I would like to thank the members for this honour, it indicates to me that most members have faith in the way we do business

and have trust in our abilities. We will continue to do our best to ensure that Local 3888 remain leaders in the province and the country.

Scott Marks President, Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association I.A.F.F. Local 3888

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SECRETARY TREASURER’S MESSAGE

W

ith the start of the New Year, the only thing that comes to my mind is “Where did the year go?” A memorable family vacation comes to mind, and the IAFF convention, but the rest is a blur.

I’m not sure if that is the result of the busy year or the fact that I am getting older. The New Year, like birthdays, seems to be here before you know it. I think at times we all need to slow down and smell the roses. In preparing to write this article, I sat back and thought about all of the interesting information that I believed the members would want to read. The feedback that I have received to date has been very helpful. Many members have told me that they enjoy reading an article that gives them information they were not aware of, or that they thought that they knew, only to find out that they were wrong. Members have also expressed an interest in facts that help to initiate discussion and debate. To date, I believe our statistics article received the most positive feedback. I witnessed first hand as members looked over the figures and tried to determine how ������������ ������� they related to them. We also received many suggestions from ���� members for further statistics articles. ������������ ��� So, as I ponder what to write, I always keep my ears open to ���� ������ �������� ideas on what the membership would find interesting. The ���� ������ �������� focus of this article came to me as a fellow Executive Board ���� ������ �������� ���� ������ �������� Officer was cleaning out some old files. He came across an old ���� ������ �������� spread sheet of what GTA fire fighters were earning in years ���� ������� �������� past. We looked at it together and expressed our thoughts that ���� ������� �������� we felt we had come a long way over the years. Then we ���� ������� �������� thought, “How do we know that we’ve come a long way?” ���� ������� �������� I took the figures and tried to compare them to other known ���� ������� �������� information from the same period. As a result, I have developed ���� ������� �������� ���� ������� �������� a chart which looks at Toronto fire fighters for the past 40 years. ���� ������� ������� Prior to amalgamation, GTA fire fighters’ salaries were within ���� ������� ������� a few hundred dollars of each other, making this chart relevant ���� ������� ������� for all. The Maximum Canadian Pension Plan amount is a figure ���� ������� ������� that goes back 40 years and increases as the average Canadian ���� ������� ������� salary increases. I then took the fire fighters salary and figured ���� ������� ������� out a relation to the maximum CPP. I also used an inflation ���� ������� ������� calculator to determine what the salary paid would be in ���� ������� ������� ���� ������� ������� comparison to today. ���� ������� ������� I think the chart shows a few interesting things. The first ���� ������� ������� thing it shows is that with inflation factored in, our present ���� ������� ������� salary is the highest. Also, in comparison to the Maximum CPP ���� ������� ������� average salary, the years 1971 to 1980 had us with the largest ���� ������� ������� spread between our salary and the Maximum CPP. ���� ������� ������� As I am not sure exactly when this issue of Fire Watch will ���� ������� ������� ���� ������� ������� reach you, I will cover all of the bases; I wish you a Merry ���� ������� ������� Christmas, I hope all of you, and your families had/have a safe ���� ������� ������� and joyous holiday season, and I wish you all a healthy and ���� ������� ������� prosperous 2007. ���� ������� ������� Please remember to slow down and smell the roses…it will ���� ������� ������� be 2008 before we know it! ���� ������� �������

Frank Ramagnano Secretary - Treasurer, Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association I.A.F.F. Local 3888

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Frank Ramagnano

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WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH

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This photo was taken in 1980 in Canada. A lot has changed since then, but job hazards – especially during investigations – are sometimes still not treated with the caution they deserve. Photo: Carlo Hindian/Masterfile

YOUR SCBA THE FIRST LINE OF DEFENSE

AGAINST TOXIC EXPOSURE.

Toxic fumes from smouldering debris are just as harmful as those from an active fire. So until you’re sure the danger’s really over, wear your SCBA. Originally developed by: Office of the Fire Marshal, Ontario Association of Fire Chiefs, Ontario Professional Fire Fighters Association, International Association of Fire Fighters, The Fire Fighters’ Association of Ontario, Association of Municipalities of Ontario, Municipal Health and Safety Association, Ontario Section 21 Committee, Ontario Ministry of Labour, Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB). © 2006, WSIB – all rights reserved. Printed in Canada. #5065C (07/06). To order posters, contact WSIB: 1-800-663-6639, or WSIB Marketing: 1-800-387-0750 / 5540 (Outside Ontario / Canada).


Due to popular demand, we will be offering a subscription service to all those who do not currently receive a copy of Toronto Fire Watch or would like more than one copy of each issue. The total cost of the subscription will be $20.00 per year to cover shipping and handling. You will receive, to the address specified on the card below, 4 issues of Toronto Fire Watch (Spring, Summer, Fall, and Winter).

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You MUST fill out the accompanying card and return it, along with a cheque no later than January 31, 2007. We will only be accepting subscription requests once per year before our Spring issue is mailed out.

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2006 TPFFA Media Awards

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VICE PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE FIREOPS 101/MUNICIPAL POLITICS IN TORONTO 2006

O

From November 11th to 14th, 2006 I was fortunate enough to take part in an Affiliate Leadership Training Program (ALTS) which was sponsored by the I.A.F.F.

I assisted in this ALTS conference as an instructor and also sat as one of the participants on a panel which highlighted the two FireOps 101 programs that have taken place in the City of Toronto. The first one being in June of 2004, and the most recent on August 25th, 2006, to correspond with the opening of the I.A.F.F. Biennial Convention that was sponsored by Local 3888. The I.A.F.F. has decided that FireOps 101 is important enough to include it as one of the courses at their highly regarded ALTS conference. Thus, FireOps 101 now takes its place along with other issues such as ‘political action’ and ‘working with the media’. Planning is the key ingredient in a successful FireOps 101 event. If it is done right it allows politicians, community leaders and media, in a very personal way, to learn about the risks and challenges involved in our profession. As you are all aware, we suit up these people in protective gear and they actually put out fires, rescue victims, and perform other duties that fire fighters do on a regular basis. They also learn the critical role that response time, staffing, and proper safety equipment play at the scene of an emergency. As well, we found that if some key politicians agree to take part, this has the effect of making sure that others will want to come, and leads to a strong media presence. In 2004, when Mayor David Miller participated, and again in 2006 when we were able to entice Prime Minister Stephen Harper to attend, involvement by others who also wanted to take part soared. We quickly realized that FireOps 101 was a very effective way to build a positive relationship with elected officials, the media, and fire department management. During the ALTS conference, we learned how to customize FireOps 101

to our own particular Local and community. For instance, in Toronto, we quickly realized that medical testing was needed before the chosen day. We also initiated a blood pressure and heart rate regimen on the day of the function and ensured that fire department EMS were on hand. With regards to proper planning, we found that it was crucial to confirm that we were going to have a good turnout before going ahead. It would not be helpful if we publicized FireOps 101 and very few participants actually showed up. Due to proper advanced planning, our two FireOps events have been a huge success and I look forward to a continuation of this very effective tool for public, media, and political relations.

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Ed Kennedy

cerns during the next four year term. We had a good response for assistance from the Executive Committee, Firepac Committee, our Stewards, and of course, from the general membership. At the provincial government level, Local 3888 had ten members attend the Ontario Professional Fire Fighters Legislative Conference, where we stressed two items that are important to fire fighters in Ontario. First and foremost, we are hoping to win presumptive legislation for a number of occupational diseases afflicting fire fighters. Secondly, we are once again stressing how critical

WE QUICKLY REALIZED THAT FIREOPS 101 WAS A VERY EFFECTIVE WAY TO BUILD A POSITIVE RELATIONSHIP WITH ELECTED OFFICIALS, THE MEDIA, AND FIRE DEPARTMENT MANAGEMENT.

A significant amount of time at the ALTS seminar was devoted to political action, an issue that your Local has been involved in for some time now, especially during the very recent municipal elections held across the Province of Ontario. We are all very aware that local government officials are responsible for making decisions that affect the wages, safety, and working conditions of Local 3888 members, and I want to sincerely thank everyone who came out and assisted in our efforts to support fire fighter friendly candidates in the election. Of the 36 candidates that we supported, 30 were elected, including Mayor David Miller. Even within the ranks of the 15 candidates that we did not actively support, there are still five possible votes in favour of many of our positions. This should bode well for fire fighter con-

]

staffing levels are, for effective emergency response and fire fighter safety. We are elated with the announcement of the new Fire Marshall for the Province of Ontario. He is Mr. Patrick Burke, who was formerly the Fire Chief in Niagara Falls, and also the Deputy Fire Chief in Windsor prior to that. Pat also has a considerable background within the O.P.F.F.A. and was the President for a number of years. In closing, I wish the best of the season to all Toronto Fire Fighters and I am looking forward to 2007.

Ed Kennedy Vice-President, Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association I.A.F.F. Local 3888

WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 13


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CHAPLAIN’S CORNER By Hugh Donnelly – East Command Chaplain

T

his is the season for New Year’s resolutions. Personally, I have a poor track record of keeping resolutions I have made in January, so I don’t bother making one when the clock strikes twelve on New Year’s Eve. Instead, I make a resolution in May or October, when there’s less on my mind and on my calendar, and hopefully a better chance that I’ll keep faithful to the decision I have made. My latest resolution is to get back in shape. For years I did nothing more than think about exercise. Finally, I decided it was important enough to do something about. I ran a 5k fun-run in September and have kept up my exercise regimen since then, running for an hour a couple of times a week. I’m amazed by how much better I feel all around. I have more energy, my anxiety level is lower, I am more patient with my colleagues and with my kids. Physical and mental health are strongly connected. Making life-changing decisions is hard. If we find ourselves in a rut of some kind, we are sometimes brilliant at convincing ourselves why we can’t do anything about it — wrong time, no money, not a priority. Often these are nothing more than mere excuses. And so we stick to the comfortable old routines, even if, deep down inside we know we’re still in an unhealthy rut. But then, every once in a while, we make a decision. We take the risk of breaking out of an old routine in order to bring a greater degree of health into our lives. We decide to begin an exercise routine, or eat better, or spend more time with the kids, or curb our

excess drinking, or do some repair work on a failing marriage. It’s not easy to effect real, lasting change in one’s life, but it is possible if we’re willing to invest in it. Healthy change takes time, hard work, and (sometimes) money. But health in body, spirit, and relationship is worth the cost. The two thousand dollars my wife and I spent on counseling a few years ago was the best money I’ve ever parted with — it saved our marriage. Sometimes breaking out of old routines means asking for help. There’s only so much momentum we can muster on our own; we need other people to assist us. It’s terribly unfortunate that so many of us believe that asking for help is a sign of weakness. I believe, instead, it is a sign of great strength when someone makes the decision to live a healthier life and reaches out for the resources that he or she needs in order to be faithful to that decision. Fire fighters in Toronto are fortunate to have an Employee Assistance Program, a group made up of active and retired fire fighters who are committed to helping their brothers and sisters who need the resources to help them in their personal and

Rev. Hugh Donnelly

EAST COMMAND Rev. Hugh Donnelly 122 Hannaford Street Toronto, Ontario M4E 3H1

416.450.8372 (cell) hughdonnelly@rogers.com professional lives. You also have a team of Chaplains who are available to those who need a listening ear, referrals to professionals, or spiritual guidance. One of the strengths of Chaplaincy Services is that Chaplains are not active fire fighters. While we’re a part of the TFS team and understand the work and stresses of the career, we are one step removed from the sometimes tight network of the TFS community. Some fire fighters appreciate the Chaplains’ objective viewpoint when they need help. As I stated previously, this is the season for New Year’s resolutions. If you decide to make a resolution to foster greater health in body, spirit, and relationship, remember that you are not alone. May you be blessed by the new vision and hard work required to make real, lasting change in your life.

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WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 15 �������������������������������������


 e  Le TO THE EDITOR

THE CYCLE FOR LIFE

The Cycle for Life bicycle ride across Canada came to a conclusion in St. John’s Newfoundland on July 23rd, 2006. This would not have been possible without the support received from Fire Services across Canada. I know how blessed I am to belong to such an amazing brotherhood. Your support, whether housing my support crew and me for the night, feeding us, entertaining us, giving financially, and/or offering words of support and prayers was greatly appreciated and was a HUGE part of helping me to complete my ride. My reasons for Cycle for Life were threefold: 1st, I felt a need to make others, especially my brothers in the fire service, more aware about prostate cancer and the need for early detection with annual testing starting at the age of 30. 2nd, I wanted to raise funds to go to the agencies that offered me support when I was diagnosed with terminal prostate cancer. 3rd, I had a need to fulfill a longtime dream – a bicycle ride across Canada. I am happy to say that I was able to fulfill all three. I was able to talk to many fire fighters across the country and in doing so I was able to convince some to at least think about early testing. My only hope is that they follow through. To date, Cycle for Life has collected just over $26,000. I was able to live my dream! The bike ride was an incredible adventure for me. Meeting and talking to people along the way has changed my life for the better. I will cherish the memories! I am so thankful to everyone who helped make this dream a reality. Prostate cancer is a killer of men. Prostate cancer is 95% curable if caught early enough. My dream is that no man has to go through a diagnosis like mine. Through early testing it can be prevented. I urge all men to be tested annually starting at the age of 30. Please don’t let this message die! Fire Fighter John Wagontall Lethbridge Fire and Emergency Medical Service – IAFF Local 237

SUPPORT PROVIDED FOR MERCY SHIPS CANADA I want to take this opportunity to thank you and your staff for the tremendous help you 16

have provided Mercy Ships Canada and myself by supporting our mission of procuring used fire fighting equipment and supplies from across Canada. Your personal character compounds this generosity, and by telling other people and companies, it has opened more avenues for making a difference in 3rd world countries. There are many members of our association who have also supported me, and continue by donating their time and supplies. Without their help, my work would not have made such a huge impact. I’ve just returned from Sierra Leone where I presented our Fire Fighter and Medical Project to various Government Ministers. It was a huge success and the National Security Coordinator has approved the project. I toured hospitals and Fire Force facilities to observe their needs and will be pleased to work with you in the future to utilize replaced equipment from your facility. Last week, 6 pallets and 14 ground ladders were sent to Kabul, Afghanistan to help the fire fighters protect lives and property. I have partnered with the City of Langford Fire/Rescue in Langford, BC and look forward to another avenue to share information, equipment and technology to those brothers in Afghanistan. I have also sent equipment to another project starting up in South Africa with Sean Mitchell from Central York Fire Services (Newmarket Fire). Please know that you have joined over 40 other companies and individuals from across Canada to facilitate this dream, and to turn a vision into a reality. Ron Kyle, Procurement Officer Mercy Ships Canada

GENEROUS DONATION APPRECIATED Please allow us to express our appreciation for your very generous donation of $500.00. Your support of our organization and of Rod McNamara is truly amazing. It is because of Associations like yours that we are able to progress as an organization, continue to offer the best training and support to our volunteers and ensure that all our students enjoy their lessons and time on the hill As you know, Ontario Track 3 Ski Association teaches children and youth with various disabilities how to downhill ski and snowboard at 16 different locations. Our programs promote a healthy and active lifestyle while

encouraging self confidence and the feeling of equality among peers. Support such as yours will go a long way in continuing to provide these children with this opportunity. Enclosed, please find a tax receipt in the amount of your donation. Thank you from all of us associated with Ontario Track 3, and from the students who will benefit directly from this donation. Henk Engels, O.M.C. Executive Director

LENDING A HELPING HAND

I’m not sure these are the types of EMS stories that you were asking for. However in lieu of the fact that an email sent out a while back from Chief Farr alluded to tensions among the Toronto Fire Services and EMS, I thought that this story would be nice to share with everyone. On Sunday, September 3rd I was placed at 25 station for my 0700 to 1900 day shift with Ashley Davis. The day started off as usual with the exception that my safety glasses broke and so we stopped at a Canadian Tire store to purchase another pair (since there is a specific type that I like that I get there). Now I didn’t have enough cash on me, and my bank card has the unfortunate characteristic of refusing to work on interac machines, but for some reason or another is still fully functional at all ATMs. Therefore my partner was gracious enough to lend me her last ten dollars so that I could purchase them. As lunch rolled around and we were on our way back to 25 station from a standby I stopped at a TD Canada Trust bank to take out some money and repay my partner. It turns out that the card slot that I chose to use was pushed back from the machine face plate – I attempted to insert my card without realizing that instead of inserting it into the card slot, I inserted it past the hollow face plate and into the machinery behind. The card dropped off out of sight and needless to say I couldn’t retrieve it. When we finally were authorized to go to lunch (as we got another call after this and I was forced to abandon my attempts at retrieving my card at that time) we returned to the bank to try in futility to retrieve the card. My partner knew that there was a fire station at the TD bank near Markham and Sheppard


FIRE WATCH accepts Letters to the Editor, articles, essays, and photographs from Local 3888 Members, active and retired. We will also accept fire related submissions from outside authors or photographers. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR MAY BE FORWARDED TO: Letter to the Editor FIRE WATCH 39 Commissioners Street Toronto, Ontario Canada M5A 1A6 LETTERS POLICY You may email your letter to: firewatch@torontofirefighters.org FIRE WATCH welcomes letters to the editor to give you – Local 3888 members – an opportunity to express your views, concerns, ideas, or gripes. We can’t print every letter and in some instances letters will have to be edited due to space limitations.

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We do not accept attachments. Please paste your letter into the body of your email and use the subject line “Letter to the Editor.”

which is where the bank was and so she called them to see if they had any ideas as to how we might retrieve it. The firefighters there were more than willing to help. In fact the entire crew arrived at the bank in their vehicle in order to inspect the machine and see if they could retrieve it. By this time there was a small group of people gathered in the bank as I was not the only victim of the infamous ATM. The firefighters attempted to see if there was any way to retrieve the bank cards, but to no avail. While I’m sitting here in 25 station with no bank card or money (and feeling terrible for the fact that I could not repay my partner promptly), I’m still happy at the fact that amidst the perceived tension amidst some members of the various emergency services, a fire crew was more than willing to lend a helping hand to a medic and locality in need – even though it was for something considered minor for all intents and purposes when compared to the types of calls these services respond to. While not a classic success story, it is one that nonetheless demonstrates the comraderie between the various services when someone requires assistance. I would like to extend my thanks to the firefighters who came to my aid, as well as dispatch for being understanding to our situation, and my partner for showing me generosity. Jordan Dumont, Level 1 Paramedic TEMS, Southeast wing

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT Just a short note of thanks for your support over the past year. As many of you know, I have been off the truck recovering from illness, but have beat it and am looking forward to getting back to my truck in short order. Specifically I wish to thank FF Ron Weltmen (A426-D) and C Rick Annis (A-324-D) for arranging and co-coordinating fellow members to cover many shifts for me. The following members stepped up to the plate and gave-up their days off to work for me: FF Mark Riley (P426-D), FF Bruce Green (A426-C), FF Phil Barnes (A426-D), FF Mark Sargent (P426-C), FF Dave Quinn (C42-D), FF Gary Dutchak (426-B), FF Paul Charlebois(R434-C), FF Jeff Clark (P426-A), FF Glenn Book, FF Daryl McBay (R435-C), A/C Rob Citter (P426-D), FF Urs Staeble (R426-C), FF Tom Vincovic (426-B), A/C Steve Clark (426-A). A sincere and heartfelt thank you to all. Thank you to the following who made special accommodations to assist me: All the shifts at Station 426, Specifically D shift; Local 3888 Executive, Committee Members and Stewards; P/C Nigel Soper (C40-D). Your experience, efforts and assistance was invaluable. FF Dirk Sell (P426-D)

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ARTICLES Before sending a full article submission, we suggest that you forward an outline or suggestion for an article to the Editor. FIRE WATCH is your magazine, and as such, we will accept articles on any subject related to Local 3888 and the fire community. Subjects could include but are not limited to: health issues, history, sporting events, equipment, training issues, personal essays, etc. ARTICLE SUBMISSIONS/QUERIES MAY BE FORWARDED TO: Articles FIRE WATCH 39 Commissioners Street Toronto, Ontario Canada M5A 1A6

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You may email your submission/query to firewatch@torontofirefighters.org We do not accept attachments. Forward your suggestion in the body of an email and use the subject line “Article submission or query”. PHOTOGRAPHY Please contact the Editors before forwarding your photographic work for consideration. FIRE WATCH does not offer payment for submissions.

WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 17


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INTERVIEW with the FIRE CHIEF William A. Stewart

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hief Stewart is a 34 year fire service veteran having served in the former City of North York Fire Department for 26 years prior to the amalgamation of the new City of Toronto on January 1, 1998. He has served as an operations fire fighter, senior officer and the Fire Chief since May 1, 2003. Bill has served as a member of the Professional Standards Setting Body, Ontario Fire College, in the review of all standards for fire fighter training in Ontario. He is also the Chairman, Fire Apparatus and Equipment Committee, Underwriters’ Laboratories of Canada; President, Institution of Fire Engineers (Canada Branch) as well as an Advisory Board Member of Humber College, Fire Services Program and Durham College, Fire Services Program. He also serves as an alternate Board Member, Metropolitan Fire Chiefs Section, International Association of Fire Chiefs and is a Director of the Institution of Fire Engineers. Bill is a graduate of the Ontario Fire College, Technology Diploma Programs, general and advanced levels, Executive Development Program and the Canadian Emergency Preparedness College. He also holds professional designations from the Institution of Fire Engineers M.I.Fire.E; Ontario Municipal Management Institute, Certified Municipal Manager CMMIII, and the Canadian Association of Fire Chiefs, Chief Fire Officer, CFO designation. Bill is committed to life long learning, and is currently serving as a Board member for Public Administration and Governance, Ryerson University. FW What do you believe is your, or the TFS’s biggest accomplishment to date? CHIEF Our collective accomplishment, that being the Association and the TFS Management team, is the move to interest based negotiations. This move has enabled the Service to move forward in a positive and professional manner. FW What is your biggest disappointment to date? CHIEF During the past fours years I have not had any significant disappointments as the Fire Chief. My concern focuses on discredible conduct that impacts the name of all Toronto Fire Service members. We strive to ensure our public image is maintained in a positive and professional manner for

the citizens we serve. At times we are let down by members of the Service. FW What do you see as the future goals for the Toronto Fire Service? CHIEF The Fire Service is changing rapidly to meet the needs and threats we face now and in the future on a broad and diverse scale. We must be prepared and flexible to deal with the challenges we face to serve the citizens of the City of Toronto. Our challenge in the future will be dealing with the increasing population density issues across the city and our ability to respond within our response time criteria. FW How do you view the Associations’ role in offering input into the running the Toronto Fire Service?

CHIEF Both positive and negative input is essential to ensure that the TFS moves forward. The Association has a key role in providing input on behalf of the membership. The ideas and suggestions are considered by my office as we implement new programs. FW What do you view as the most difficult task in running the Country’s largest Fire Service? CHIEF The time commitment to the job and not having the opportunity to interact with a broad cross section of the members of the Service. I enjoy the opportunity to visit the stations and divisions to speak with members of the Service. However, given my meeting schedule, I am finding it difficult to see as many members as I would like.

WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 19


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Interview with the Fire Chief ... Continued from page 19

FW The membership is aware that the department seems to like the progress made under the 24 hour shift schedule. Do you foresee the TFS going back to the old schedule or are you satisfied with the 24 hour shift? CHIEF In discussion with my Operations officers I would say that they see benefits over the last year, but how much of that is directly attributable to the 24 hour shift schedule is uncertain. For instance, the focus on the delivery of training that was done when we went to the 24 has helped us isolate and deliver training to the specific personnel that required it. The daily agendas have allowed for more accountability. These are things that we put attention to in going to the new shift. If we go back to the days and nights we would just put the same focus into applying these things into the old shift. So although we have seen improvements in these areas in

the last year, these improvements are achievable under the old shift as well. From my perspective whether the TFS decides to stay with the 24 hour shift schedule really hinges on the health and wellness of the fire fighters working it. To date the statistics are very difficult to draw conclusions from. There is a lot of attention on the shift from Corporate Health and Safety and some members of council as well. Unless we are able to show a definitive improvement I do not believe we will stay with the shift. As Fire Chief I have to be able to show a definitive improvement. As it stands now, I think things are no worse in regards to health and wellness, but I do not believe there is a definitive improvement. Without that improvement I would not be able to justify staying with the 24 hour shift. Use of sick time is still the greatest indicator of an employee’s health and well being. Therefore, if things remain the same and the statistics do not reflect improvement then

I believe we will be returning to the former shift schedule. Maybe that is not what your members want to hear, but it is the truth. FW If the budget was not an issue, what would you change or add to the Toronto Fire Service? CHIEF Now, that is a loaded question for me to answer, however my greatest change would be in staffing to ensure the vehicles were not impacted with reduced staffing. FW Once you retire what kind of Fire Chief would you like to be remembered as? CHIEF I would like to be remembered as a fair and progressive Fire Chief who moved the Toronto Fire Services forward through technology and education along with the senior staff of the Service through consultation with the Toronto Professional Fire Fighters Association.

Fire Chief William Stewart serves lunch at a charity event held at Toronto Sick Kid’s Hospital. WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 21


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22


Municipal Elections 2006

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ow that we have all had an opportunity to review the results of the recent municipal elections, this article will serve to highlight our association’s involvement and provide insight into the overall makeup and impact of this new council on the TPFFA. It has been a long standing Government Relations/FirePac policy of this association to approach political affiliation and support in a non-partisan manner. The decision to support a candidate running for office is based on several fac-

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RICK BERENZ – Local 3888 Executive Board Officer

The association was instrumental in the election of two new councilors — Anthony Peruzza in Ward 8 and Paul Ainslie in Ward 43. Our strong level of involvement in these successful campaigns will hopefully further develop a strong working relationship with these new councilors who will listen and act on our concerns. Admittedly the association was also involved in some very close races that unfortunately were not successful. While on the surface we may want to hang our heads in disappointment, the

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OF THE 44 COUNCILORS ELECTED, THE TPFFA SUPPORTED 30 WITH MANPOWER AND/OR FINANCIAL SUPPORT DONATED TO THEIR CAMPAIGNS

tors, including the individual’s past history in supporting our issues (if they are already or have previously held office), and/or a candidate interview process with the association that asks key questions of concern for the fire fighters. In addition, factors such as the candidate’s ability to fund and manage a proper campaign, their ability to win, along with the potential political consequences of not supporting a candidate who may win are all put into the mix. This is quite a complex process that is based on sound data, coupled with a little speculation. The association’s affiliation with the Toronto and York Region Labour Council (TYLC) provides us with another level of insight to further develop election strategies and candidate endorsement. Of the 44 councilors elected, the TPFFA supported 30 with manpower and/or financial support donated to their campaigns. This financial support is made possible by the association members’ ongoing contributions to FirePac.

tireless efforts and personal sacrifices of our volunteers has not gone unnoticed by senior members of elected council. It is also important to remember that many of these candidates will once again run in either municipal, provincial

X

or even federal elections. Political action is about long term relationship building, and the above examples clearly highlight how the association can succeed, even if our candidate is not elected. What does all this mean for the TPFFA now that the elections are over? The majority of councilors elected are incumbents that have supported our issues and concerns, as was shown through the ratification of our last contract. The association believes that our level of support within this new council should be the same or better. I would like to take this opportunity, on behalf of the association, to thank every member that donated their time for this municipal election. The hours were long for some of us but even a few hours from individuals add up and contribute to our overall success. The association feels confident in being able to approach this council with our issues and concerns, and have them heard and addressed by these decision makers.

Local 3888 members volunteer their time and support to Councillor Shelley Carroll during the recent municipal elections.

WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 23


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Pandemic Influenza T

his article is an overview of information about influenza pandemic. Toronto Public Health and the Office of Emergency Management have been working with Toronto Fire Services and other divisions to strengthen pandemic planning and preparedness. Pandemic planning is essential to ensure that all parts of the health care and emergency response system have in place, systems and procedures that will allow early identification of a pandemic, contain its spread, and minimize its impact.

What is an influenza pandemic? A pandemic is an epidemic, spreading worldwide, or over a very large area, crossing international boundaries and usually affecting a large number of people. Influenza pandemics typically occur every thirty-five to forty years. The last pandemic was 38 years ago in 1968. Over ten influenza pandemics have been documented over the past 300 years. They have ranged in severity from mild to severe and there is no way to predict how severe a pandemic will be until the pandemic strain of the flu

emerges. It is believed that it will be a complex, rapidly evolving emergency and will spread quickly around the world with global air travel.

Planning for an influenza pandemic The first version of the Toronto Pandemic Influenza Plan (TPIP) was released in November 2005 at the Toronto Board of Health. Toronto Public Health (TPH) used a stakeholder model of planning which included representatives from the health, emergency planning, volunteer, social and community sectors. Toronto Fire Services was involved in the development of this first plan. Since the launch of TPIP, TPH has continued planning and preparedness activities in primarily four core areas:

exercises, working with Occupational Health and Safety, etc.

1

3

Toronto Public Health — continued enhancement of TPH’s ability to respond to an influenza pandemic as the lead health agency.

2

City of Toronto — supporting the preparedness of the City of Toronto through the development of continuity of operation plans, table top training

Differences between Seasonal Influenza and Pandemic Influenza The following chart summarizes the main differences between seasonal influenza and pandemic influenza.

Seasonal flu

Pandemic flu

Occurs every year (October to April)

Occurred 3 times in the 20th century

Occurs during the winter

Occurs at any time of the year

For most people it is an unpleasant but not lifethreatening infection

It is typically a more serious infection for everyone

Most people recover within one or two weeks without requiring medical treatment

Some people will not recover even with medical treatment. Due to the higher severity of illness, there is a greater risk of death

The very young, the very old and people with chronic illness are most at risk of serious illness

People of every age may be at risk of serious illness

Vaccine is available in advance

Vaccine will not be available in advance

Annual vaccination is recommended especially for those at risk of serious illness

The who population will be vaccinated when vaccine becomes available

Antiviral drugs are available to treat those at special risk

Antiviral drugs are likely to be in limited supply and will be used to best effect according to how the disease develops

Linkages with the health care sector — supporting hospitals, long term care homes, community health centres, community care access centres, etc, in developing plans to respond to an influenza pandemic.

4

Working with the community — sharing information about an influenza pandemic through planning guides posted on the TPH website, community presentations and consultations with TPH. Role of Toronto Public Health during an influenza pandemic As the lead agency for a health emergency, TPH will be responsible for certain activities. This will include tracking the appearance and spread of influenza in our city and sharing this information with our stakeholders. Information is currently posted on the TPH website at www.toronto.ca/health In the early stage of the pandemic, TPH will investigate people diag-

Adopted from: Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care

WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 25


26


Pandemic Influenza ... Continued from page 23

ESTIMATED DIRECT HEALTH IMPACT OF PANDEMIC INFLUENZA ON THE CITY OF TORONTO Description

Based on 15% attack rate

Based on 15% attack rate

Clinically Ill Require outpatient care Require hospitalization Deaths

392,000 individuals 161,000 individuals 1,600 individuals 630 individuals

914,000 individuals 701,000 individuals 14,000 individuals 4,300 individuals

Based on FLUAID 2.0 – A CDC software designed to provide a range of estimates of the impact of Pandemic influenza available at http:/www2a.cdc.gov/od/fluaid/ and Toronto population estimates of 2,611,661 based on the 2001 Census data

nosed with the flu and their contacts. As the flu begins to spread in our community during a pandemic, TPH will share messages with the general community. These messages will focus on the symptoms of the flu, how to care for yourself and others and where to seek medical attention. TPH will provide updated information to the general public and stakeholders through an extended hotline, as well as the TPH internet site. Providing infection control advice will be important. TPH will also be responsible for connecting with health care agencies in Toronto. Other roles include planning for community-based strategies to slow the transmission of the flu in our community. For example, considering the closure of schools, restricting of large gatherings, etc. TPH will also be responsible for conducting mass vaccination clinics in order to vaccinate 2.6 million people in the City of Toronto, when a vaccine is available. TPH will also have a role in the administration and distribution of antiviral medication. TPH continues to work with the Ministry of Health Long Term Care, other public health units, and stakeholders to enhance our preparedness to respond to an influenza pandemic.

Stop the Spread of Germs TPH has recently launched a health promotion campaign to stop the spread of germs during cold and flu season. Torontonians are being asked to do the “sleeve sneeze”. If you have no tissue, cough or sneeze into your sleeve to prevent the spread of germs on your hands. Germs on your hands can

be easily spread to your eyes, nose and mouth. Other ways to stop the spread of germs include washing your hands or using hand sanitizer. TPH has recently updated the yellow hand washing signs and developed a hand sanitizer and cover your cough sign. These can be found on the TPH website at www. toronto.ca/health.

World Health Organization Pandemic Influenza Alert Phases A key to pandemic planning is the WHO Classification System, developed in 1999 and revised in April 2005. The WHO phases are meant to guide planning efforts and are incorporated into the federal, Ontario and Toronto plans. The WHO will identify which phase is occurring internationally and will declare the beginning of a pandemic. The Public Health Agency of Canada and the Ministry of Health Long Term Care will declare the beginning of the pandemic period in Canada and Ontario, respectively.

Interpandemic Period*

Phase 1 No new influenza virus subtypes have been detected in humans. An influenza virus subtype that has caused human infection may be present in animals. If present in animals, the risk of human infection or disease is considered to be low. Phase 2 No new influenza virus subtypes have been detected in humans. However, a circulating animal influenza virus subtype poses a substantial risk of human disease. Phase 3 Human infection(s) with a new subtype, but no human-to-human spread, or at most rare instances of spread to a close contact.

Pandemic Alert Period**

Pandemic Period Postpandemic Period

Phase 4 Small cluster(s) with limited human-to-human transmission but spread is highly localized, suggesting that the virus is not well adapted to humans. Phase 5 Larger cluster(s) but human-to-human spread still localized, suggesting that the virus is becoming increasingly better adapted to humans, but may not yet be fully transmissible (substantial pandemic risk). Phase 6 Pandemic phase: increased and sustained transmission in general population. Return to interpandemic period.

* The distintion between phase 1 and phase 2 is based on the risk of infection or disease from circulating strains in animals. ** The distinction between phase 3, phase 4 and phase 5 is based on the risk of a pandemic.

Thank You for supporting our advertisers! WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 27


STATION 421 Toronto Fire Fighter JON LASIUK

L

ocated at 6 Lambton Avenue in the community of Mount Dennis, Toronto Fire Station 421 protects the heart of the original Township of York. Organized ďŹ re protection in the area began almost 90 years ago, in 1917, when hose reel sheds were constructed at Weston Road and Hollis Avenue, as well as at Lambton Avenue and Rockcliffe Boulevard.

28


Construction began on the first real fire station in the area in 1921 when ground was broken at 2 Hollis Avenue for a two bay fire station to be used by volunteer firefighters. It would be another four years however until the township got around to purchasing a proper motorized pumper for the men. During the 1920’s, the Mount Dennis station (#4) protected one of eleven fire areas in a township that extended into what would later become East York, Swansea, and Forest Hill. By the 1930’s, annexations and incorporations had reduced the Township of York to the area familiar to most of us today. Citizens had been demanding a full-time professional fire department after several fires had taxed the limits of the volunteers. In answer to these complaints, a full-time department was organized in 1935

larger, modern apparatus. A search was undertaken for land to house a replacement station, and in 1956, the ribbon was cut on a new two-bay fire station at 6 Lambton Avenue. Staff and prevention offices, not to mention a new radio and communications room soon used up every inch of space in the new hall. Two more bays were constructed in 1970 to answer the needs of the expanding department. This extension gave the department the room to house their newly organized rescue truck. Rescue 10, a 1971 Dodge van, would run every full response in the borough. As a point of pride, the men that staffed this rig would go on to win countless extrication trophies in competition with crews from other larger cities. The 1980’s saw the construction of a brand-new communications room on the

fire hall. The heavy rescue was disbanded, with extrication equipment transferred to a newly purchased rescue-pumper. The district chief was also disbanded due to downsizing. Renum-

with stations on Vaughan Road, Hollis Avenue and Jane Street. The 37 firefighters became members of Local 411 of the I.A.F.F. Renumbered as Station #2, the Hollis Avenue station’s centralized location meant that its units would take part in almost all fire calls in the township. Built as a volunteer hall, though, its small size soon became a limitation to training and the accommodation of

second floor. The original 1956 switchboard dispatched its last call in 1982, replaced by a modern, 2-postion console. Civilian dispatchers were first hired during this period and quickly became wellknown for their professionalism on the air. Who can forget their famous catchphrase “XJF-89 City of York Fire Control announcing a fire response…”? The amalgamation of 1998 brought around many changes to the Lambton

bered as Station 421 in the Toronto Fire Services, crews stationed here display the pride they have in their hall and their community with a new station shoulder patch, now available for sale. To commemorate the history of the Lambton fire hall, as well as the rest of the York Fire Department, Captain Jon Jones maintains an interesting website full of historical facts and photos. You can visit it at www.yorkfire.org.

W I N T E R 2 0 0 6 | F I R E WATCH 29


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FROM THE LAWYERS ONE-DAY ILLNESS: CAN A MEDICAL NOTE BE REQUIRED? BY MARK WRIGHT – SACK, GOLDBLATT, MITCHELL LLP

L

ast summer, just like the summer before, John “I-have-a-really-greatcottage” Smith called in sick on each of the Tuesdays following Victoria Day, Canada Day, the August Civic Holiday, and Labour Day. When John called in sick on the Tuesday following Thanksgiving (i.e., closing-up-the-cottage weekend), his supervisor was naturally suspicious and asked John to provide a doctor’s note. John refused to provide the note. After all, he was only absent for one day, and the collective agreement, Article 14.09(a), states: Each employee who is absent due to non-work related illness or injury shall contact the City to advise that he or she has such an illness or injury and the estimated date of return. Once the employee has been absent for more than three shifts, he or she shall, upon request of the employer, have a qualified medical practitioner complete the City’s medical form and he/she shall deliver it to the employer as soon as possible. Right? Wrong. While the collective agreement states that employees absent for more than three shifts may be required to provide a completed medical form, labour arbitrators have generally held that such a provision does not restrict an employer’s right to request a medical note or

[

Such reasonable and probable grounds may include sickness absences shouldering a long weekend or vacation, or a pattern of sickness absenteeism which is suspicious, including frequently occurring one-day absences, tending to occur on either a Monday or a Friday. Similarly, where a request for a vacation day has been made and denied, calling in sick on that day may give rise to reasonable doubts as to the validity of the absence. Such absences, claimed coincidentally to other forms of time off, may on their own be the subject of scrutiny, but will attract particular attention when coupled with a poor attendance record overall (i.e. a significant number of absences). In one case, as an example, an arbitrator found that “suspicious circumstances” existed where an employee called in sick for a shift which fell between a number of days off and a scheduled vacation. The collective agreement allowed the employer to request a medical certificate for sick leave in excess of three working days. Nonetheless, the arbitrator concluded that the language of the provision could not be seen as “depriving the Employer of the right to compel additional information, including medical certification, in appropriate circumstances.” There, the arbitrator concluded that the employer’s request for a doctor’s note was justified since “the claim for sick leave was made in circumstances that invite[d] further inquiry with respect to the legitimacy of

]

LABOUR ARBITRATORS HAVE LONG RECOGNIZED SUBSTANCE ABUSE AS AN ILLNESS, WHICH LIKE ANY OTHER DISABILITY, FALLS WITHIN THE PROTECTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS LEGISLATION AND REQUIRES ACCOMMODATION UP TO THE POINT OF UNDUE HARDSHIP.

form where there are reasonable and probable grounds to suspect that the employee is not in fact absent for reasons of illness or injury. In appropriate circumstances, such as suspected abuse of sick leave, employers retain the right to request a medical note, even for a one-day absence.

the illness giving rise to the claim.” (Union of Northern Workers, Alan Hope, (2002) 70 C.L.A.S. 320). Failure to provide a medical note, when requested by the employer, may have serious consequences. It could lead to the employer’s refusal to pay out sick pay benefits, even where the em-

ployee has accumulated sufficient sick pay credits to cover the absence. Moreover, such refusal could lead to disciplinary action for insubordination (i.e., refusing to comply with a supervisor’s order to provide a medical note). Disciplinary action for the refusal might be upheld, even if it turns out, in the end, that the reason for the absence was legitimate. Ultimately, disciplinary action for abuse of sick leave could ensue, following an employer investigation into the suspicious absence or pattern of absences. It should be noted that, in some cases, a pattern of absences which shoulder an employee’s days off may be linked to alcoholism or drug addiction. Labour arbitrators have long recognized substance abuse as an illness, which like any other disability, falls within the protection of human rights legislation and requires accommodation up to the point of undue hardship. Nonetheless, the employer has the right to request a doctor’s note for sick leave, and the employee remains under an obligation to produce a note as requested. Of course, in some circumstances, legitimate illness requiring absence from work may in fact fall adjacent to a vacation or day off. (Remember the time when the whole family came back sick from Mexico? Or the food poisoning you have always suspected came from your mother-in-law’s Thanksgiving dinner?) If this happens, make sure to call in your absence and provide an estimated date of return. Moreover, if requested, provide a medical note. If you cannot, for whatever reason get the note, be sure to talk to a Union Executive Officer.

WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 31


CHRISTMAS

BRINGS IN HOL

BY ALYSSA PETRILLO

T

he traditional Local 3888 Children’s Christmas party was held on Dec. 9th at Variety Village, and once again, it was an immense success. New attractions and old traditions helped make this event such a special day for everyone to enjoy, and with over 1, 000 children in attendance, Christmas cheer filled the air and the joyous spirit could be felt everywhere.

32


S PARTY

LIDAY SPIRIT The Children’s Christmas party, which is an integral part Local 3888’s social calendar, has grown bigger and better with each consecutive year. There are more than 3000 fire fighters who make up Local 3888, and the Christmas party is always an important social event to plan every year. Frank Ramagnano, chairman of the Children’s Christmas party stated, “Once again I am extremely pleased with this year’s turn-out. Every child had a smile on their face and everyone truly got into the Christmas spirit. This is a special time of year, and it’s a great opportunity for everyone to see each other’s families and spend some quality time together.” Those who attended the Christmas party enjoyed great food, wonderful prizes and the warm presence of others throughout the day. Activities that the children enjoyed included the ever-popular inflatable rides, the climbing wall, extreme obstacle course, a children’s activity center, and of course, the arts and crafts. New attractions added this year proved to entertain the children as well. They included a bumper car ride, soccer

shot activity and air brush tattoos. Undeniably, the main attraction of the day was the long-awaited visit from Santa himself, who made a very special appearance, well equipped with presents for everyone. Children were filled with glee at the sight of the jolly old man in the bright red suit, and were thrilled to have their chance to meet him. Santa spent individual time with the kids to take pictures and to find out what is on their Christmas list this year. Local 3888’s Children’s Christmas party is always a huge success among families and this year was no exception. As one of the Toronto Fire Fighters’ many events, the Christmas party holds a special place in everyone’s hearts as it brings people together to celebrate the holidays. “It was a great day and everyone enjoyed themselves,” said Frank Ramagnano. “There was a lot of effort put into making this day a success and many thanks go out to everyone involved. I can say without a doubt that all of the preparation paid off in the end. The excitement and joy on every child’s face makes all the hard work worthwhile.”

Rob Frasier from Station 325-D picks up the inflatable climbing wall, valued at $700.00, from the Association office on Commissioners Street. His niece Samantha won it in the draw held for all those who donated an unwrapped toy.

WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 33




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FIRE FIGHTER

SURVIVAL & RESCUE &

DEALING WITH WIRE ENTRAPMENT By fire fighters GEOFF BOISSEAU, JOHN MCGILL, and BRIAN MCALINDEN, along with the technical expertise of FRANCIS HARDY and STEVE SMITH, Safety Specialists, Electrical Safety Authority

SINCE THERE IS ALWAYS THE POSSIBILITY THAT ELECTRICAL WIRES MAY BE ENERGIZED ON A FIREGROUND, ANY FIRE FIGHTER THAT BECOMES ENTANGLED IN ELECTRICAL WIRE SHOULD CONSIDER CUTTING THESE WIRES ONLY AS A LAST RESORT — WHERE DEATH IS IMMINENT. CUTTING LIVE WIRES IS NOT A RECOMMENDED PRACTISE AND COULD RESULT IN ELECTRICAL SHOCK CAUSING DEATH!

F

ire fighters should always be aware of potential entanglement hazards such as drop ceilings, grow-op paraphernalia, and light weight construction materials. Where possible, fire fighters should try to avoid going through any area that contains an entanglement hazard and find another way in or out. If a fire fighter has no other option, they must create a defendable space which will aide in their navigation through the hazard. If a fire fighter does become entangled, they must be able to recognize and identify what has caused the snag. Any entanglement should be considered a fire ground emergency and, therefore, the firefighter should call a MAYDAY. Any fire fighter that finds themselves in an entanglement situation has two important factors that they must consider before determining a course of action these include:

1

Any prolonged entrapment will result in a significant consumption of air which may substantially reduce the ability of others to affect a successful rescue and may result in asphyxiation and death.

2

Cutting into potentially energized wires could result in electric shock and may be fatal.

***Be aware, there are ALWAYS CONSEQUENCES if you cut into live wires! Shock and electrocution are very real consequences when dealing with the cutting of live wires*** Fire fighters must also be aware of other consequences when cutting electrical wires, such as:

1 2

Conductivity hazards that exist in the presence of water.

A cut wire may drop or whip and energize other conductive material such as t-bars, rebar or steel beams — resulting in electrocution.

3

An electrical flash may ignite other combustible material.

DISENTANGLEMENT PROCEDURES There are various methods of disentanglement fire fighters may attempt when faced with a fire ground emergency involving entanglement with electrical wires. They include:

1

SWIM TECHNIQUE A fire fighter should announce a MAYDAY upon entanglement. Once the fire fighter recognizes that they are entangled, they should maintain tension on the entanglement. This will

enable the fire fighter to recognize the type of entanglement and its location:

1. Helmet 2. Top of SCBA 3. SCBA valve, bell or bottom 4. Other The fire fighter will reach down and bring their arm forward in a swimming motion until it comes into contact with the tensioned wire. With a grip on the entangled wire, the fire fighter will back up while lowering their body position to try to remove the problem. If the entanglement is removed, update command and exit the immediate area.

2

PARTIAL SCBA HARNESS REMOVAL Once the fire fighter recognizes that they are entangled and has tried the swim technique with no success, they may have to partially remove their SCBA to escape. To do so they must: 1. Undo the chest strap, loosen the waist belt, and remove their right arm from the right shoulder strap. 2. Protect the regulator hose and face piece by gripping the left shoulder strap and regulator hose.

WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 35


“IT IS AN INTERESTING WORLD” W

ell, the Bank of Canada met after the Labour Day weekend and decided to leave the benchmark prime — lending rate alone for the autumn. Apparently, even though Western Canada is experiencing unbelievable growth, the rest of the Canadian economy is just muddling along. I recently heard one economist remark that Canada should have two prime rates: one for Alberta and one for the rest of Canada! Yes, I am a little bitter…

Only a fool can predict the future… All kidding aside, a quick look at the graph tells us an interesting story. Over the past 10 years, the average five-year rate has been 7.08%, with the average variable rate lower. Today’s interest rates, even with the recent run-up, are significantly lower than our historical averages. This is a trend worth watching. When the variable rate was first introduced in the mid-1980s, “prime” was the norm. Consumers now can expect rates as low as prime minus .90% or 5.10% today. With all the volatility in the past year, many clients have “locked” in their rates in the low to mid 5% range for as long as ten years. Isn’t it interesting the way gasoline companies increase their prices every morning by 5 to 7 cents when most people need/purchase gas, only to decrease them each evening? Well, banks are clever as well. Over the past three years, rates have increased in the spring/summer months, only to decline in the “fall”. It is also interesting to note that the majority of people close their purchases or come up for renewal during this same time frame. So, my prediction is that interest rates will remain the same, or decrease, in the next six months. I will only remind you if I am right.

36


FF Survival & Rescue ... Continued from page 35

3. Turn their body towards the left shoulder strap and face the SCBA. Attempt to sweep their free arm around the cylinder and harness to find the entanglement and work to remove the entanglement. If the entanglement is removed, update command and exit the immediate area.

3

COMPLETE SCBA HARNESS REMOVAL Once the fire fighter recognizes that they are entangled and has tried the swim technique and partial SCBA removal with no success, they may have to completely remove their SCBA to escape. To do so they must: 1. Undo the chest strap, undo the waist belt, and remove their right arm from the right shoulder strap. 2. Protect the regulator hose and face piece by gripping the left shoulder strap and regulator hose. 3. Turn their body towards the left shoulder strap and face the SCBA. While turning, slip their left arm out of the left shoulder strap. The fire fighter will now be completely free of their SCBA and facing the back frame. Fire fighters should always maintain a firm grasp of the SCBA’s left shoulder strap and regulator hose to avoid problems with the face piece connection. Once the SCBA is removed and fire fighter has rotated it so that they are facing the harness, they should work to remove any entanglement by sweeping an arm around the cylinder and harness to find the hazard (keeping a grasp of the left shoulder strap). Once the entanglement has been identified, they should attempt to remove the entanglement hazard. If the entanglement is removed, update command and prepare to exit the immediate area.

Prior to moving, package the waist belt and shoulder straps on the back plate. Move away from the hazard area by pushing the SCBA in front with the cylinder valve first, cylinder down, back plate up and with a firm grip on the low pressure (regulator) hose. When exiting, the fire fighter must ensure that they take the same route as their removed SCBA. Remember that they are attached to the harness by the regulator hose and if that regulator hose is compromised, it may result in the loss of breathing air to their face piece, leading to serious injury or even death.

4

THE LAST RESORT – CUTTING ENTANGLEMENTS A fire fighter should first attempt to become disentangled from a wire using the steps listed above. When the situation is at the point where there are no other options and life is at risk, a fire fighter should try to cut the wires with an axe rather than wire cutters. The reason for this is to maximize the distance between the wires and the fire fighter’s body when cutting. If this is not a viable option and time and air supply are becoming factors, then cutting the wires using wire cutters may be the only option (THE LAST RESORT). When cutting wires, it is recommended that you follow these steps: 1. Free yourself from touching any grounded surface (i.e. metallic or conductive surface) if possible.

2. Ensure your bunker suit collar is done up with your flash hood in place and on air. 3. While cutting, (if possible) keep any other part of your body from contacting any object that could return the path to ground (i.e. any metal). If possible, cut the cable with both hands on the cutter for additional leverage. This will also reduce the possibility of touching a grounded surface. If the cable jacket is of a conductive type (i.e. BX cable), do not hold the conductive jacket while cutting as the possibility of shock is increased. If the cable has a plastic insulation jacket or covering (i.e. Romex), one hand can be used to cut while the other can hold the insulated jacket of the wire to prevent any whipping action, since there is no return path. 4. When cutting, ensure your face piece is in place; completely covering exposed areas, and close your eyes to eliminate potential temporary “arc flash blindness”. If your face piece is not completely protecting you, turn your head away from the wires. 5. Remember to consider water as a conductor in this equation. Either directly, such as standing or laying in it, or through contamination such as soak REMEMBER – all electrical wires should be considered energized at all times. Choosing to cut an electrical wire should be done as a last resort only. It should only be done after attempting other disentanglement methods first.

WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 37


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Remembering A

s another Remembrance Day passes, many fire fighters have again participated in ceremonies to help remember those who died in the many wars of the past and honour those veterans still with us today. Remembrance Day this year received much more attention than normal from the media and public with the ongoing Iraq War and our brave troops serving in Afghanistan. This year had special meaning for me also, not because of the current war, but because of a trip my family took this summer. Most Canadians have heard of Flanders Fields, but not many have been fortunate enough to travel there. We did, and I will attempt to share some of our Flanders experience. The landscape was mostly flat farmland with the occasional small town until we arrived in a place with a name familiar from history books, Ypres. Today the town strives as a lively tourist destination, as you also find the meaning to other nations that lost thousands of soldiers during the battles here. Many active soldiers were here including Canadians, some stationed in Europe or from home, as this area is hollowed ground for soldiers. They also participate in the sunset service at Menin Gate. Menin Gate is a massive stone memorial and archway over the road entering Ypres. Each day at sunset traffic is stopped both ways through Menin Gate, and the Last Post is played by 2 buglers, 4 buglers during special occasions. This has been done everyday since 1928 by a volunteer group that receives no govern-

ment funding. The gate has 55,000 names of allied soldiers that died during the battles here engraved on it, including the names of 6,940 Canadians. It is alive with activity as tourists and soldiers search for names, leaving behind flags, flowers, pictures and poems.

On the main road from Ypres to Bruges stands the St Julien Memorial. This impressive structure of a Canadian soldier with a bowed head stands about 40 feet high and can be seen for several miles. This memorial is to the Canadians that died during the battle to stop the advancing German army from April 22 – 24, 1915. During the opening battle on April 22 the Germans used poison gas for the first time, killing over 2,000 Canadians in first few hours. The allied armies held this position, but the cost was high. The Canadians alone lost 6,035 out of their total 18,000 in those 3 days. Not far from here was the last stop we made at a Canadian memorial. This site was a tribute to the poem “In Flanders Fields”, written by a field hospital

BY PAUL MOGAVERO - LOCAL 3888 STEWARD

Flanders Fields surgeon from Guelph, Ontario – Lt Col John McCrea. This location had the poem engraved into a stone monument, along with a Canadian flag, a relatively small cemetery and an original World War I bunker. This eerie structure was dig into the side of a small hill and consisted of 3 concrete rooms. There was no written information at the bunker, but none was needed. We walked through the gravesite, reading countless names and ages, some as young as my 17 year old. The gravesites in this area are everywhere, some massive, some very small. They are well marked and meticulously maintained, with funding from local and foreign governments. You may be wondering about poppies, yes they are a very common wildflower here, and yes we liberated one and brought it to Canada. Anyone planning a trip to France in the future should try to leave a day for a trip up to Flanders Fields, it will be worth the effort. The whole family enjoyed and learned from it. As I walked up to lay the wreath on behalf of the Toronto Professional Fire Fighters Association this year, I did with a greater respect for our veterans and an increased sense of pride in being Canadian.

WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 39


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April 8, 1858 Toronto Fire Department

When Tavern keeper John Hayes left his small brick Adelaide St. bakehouse on Wednesday, April 7, 1858, every thing seemed normal. But at two the next morning, things were different. The oven had been accidentally left on. It overheated and malfunctioned, starting a fire. The Hayes and neighbouring Brown families had barely enough time to escape with their lives

[

from the rapidly spreading fire. Due to the time of night, the alarm of fire was not turned on until the building was beyond saving. The fire bell was rung and members of the volunteer brigade came from their homes to get the fire engine. In 1858 the volunteer brigade consisted of six hand pumps — called engine companies- a hook and ladder company, and a hose company. Each company basically acted independently and was made up of about thirty men who were volunteers, except for

]

THE OVEN HAD BEEN ACCIDENTALLY LEFT ON. IT OVERHEATED AND MALFUNCTIONED, STARTING A FIRE. THE HAYES AND NEIGHBOURING BROWN FAMILIES HAD BARELY ENOUGH TIME TO ESCAPE WITH THEIR LIFES...

the chief engineer. The population in Toronto at the time was around 40,000 people and most of the buildings were constructed of wood. Engine Company 6, also known as the “Provincial” engine company, after the Provincial Insurance Company, which donated the hand pumper to the city, responded with other volunteer companies. Engine Co. 6 had formed in 1853, replacing Hook and Ladder Co. 2 at the Bay and Temperance Street hall. From the Bay Street hall, firefighters pulled the hand pumper to the fire on Adelaide Street in good time to assist the Court Street crews already there, but the block of four large and several small buildings was beyond Photo by Karen Reid, TFS photographer

Fredrick Lepper

WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 41


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Never Shall We Forget ... Continued from page 41

saving. Fire crews, under the command of Chief Engineer James Ashfield, concentrated their efforts on preventing the spread of fire to the next block. As the fire was brought under control, firefighters John Davis, Joseph Beatty, William Thompson and Fredick Lepper of Engine Co. 6 were standing on the sidewalk directing hose streams when, without warning, the chimney fell. Firefighter Lepper was hit by bricks from the falling chimney and was seriously injured. A Dr. Cotter was called to give aid but despite the best

Terance Meehan April 9, 1858 Toronto Fire Department

While the station flags were still at half-mast for Frederick Lepper, the volunteert brigade was called out at ten-thirty on a Friday night to a reported fire at a Peter Street home. As this was a time before the heavy steam engine and horses, the hand pumpers were pulled by the men. Engine Company 3, including firefighters Terance Meehan and Andrew Rowell, took hold of the wooden tongue and left the Bay Street station.

[

medical care available, Lepper succumbed to his injuries at six a.m. The other firefighters had minor injuries and went home after having their wounds dressed. Fredrick Hamilton Lepper had been born in Ireland forty-one years earlier, and was survived by his wife Elizabeth and several young children. The coroner’s jury recommended at the inquest that the city take some action to provide for firefighter’s family, as he had lost his life while in the discharge of his duty. It is unclear what this action was to be, or if anything was actually done.

Flags at the Toronto fire stations remained at half-mast until the funeral on Saturday, April 10, at three p.m. The service took place at Frederick Lepper’s residence on Drummer Street and the entire brigade escorted the remains of the second Toronto firefighter to be killed in the line of duty to the cemetery. Today the Lepper grave marker stands prominently in St. James Cemetery, very close to the grave of the first Ontario firefighter known to have died in the line of duty, William Thornton.

posite sidewalk. With springtime in Toronto came muddy roads, and the poor condition of the street induced the fire companies to use the sidewalks, although it was prohibited by a brigade bylaw. After some banter between the two companies, a trial of speed was agreed upon and they began to race back to the hall. The companies continued at a furious speed along the sidewalks until the engine company passed over some steps and an accident occurred. While trying to slow the engine as it went over the steps the tongue was thrown violently up and firefighter Meehan

He was then transferred to his house where he died just before midnight from an unknown internal injury. Not much is known about Terance Meehan except that he was twentyone years old and now rests in St. Michael’s Cemetery. Chief Engineer James Ashfield was very angered by the accident because the bylaw against running an engine on a sidewalk had been broken, and they had been going at an excessive speed. After this incident he implemented a five-pound penalty for returning to station faster than walking speed. Terance Meehan was the first On-

CHIEF ENGINEER JAMES ASHFIELD WAS VERY ANGERED BY THE ACCIDENT BECAUSE THE BYLAW AGAINST RUNNING AN ENGINE ON A SIDEWALK HAD BEEN BROKEN, AND THEY HAD BEEN GOING AT AN EXCESSIVE SPEED.

A small fire originating in a kitchen stove was extinguished before the hand pumpers were needed and they started to return to their quarters. Engine Company 3 was returning to their station by way of the sidewalk on Queen Street. The hose company from the same hall was also returning by way of Queen Street, but on the op-

along with others lost their grip. The hand pumper’s “brake”, the large arm that the crew pumps up and down to produce a water stream, somehow knocked Meehan down. The force of the blow knocked him against a post and inflicted a severe chest injury. Meehan was carried into a store, where doctors provided medical care.

]

tario firefighter to be killed in a fire apparatus accident. It is ironic that he was a horse farrier, as horses would soon replace men to pull the heavier apparatus to fires.

* Re-printed with permission from the book Their Last Alarm by Robert B. Kirkpatrick.

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COLLECTIVE AGREEMENT REVIEW Group Life Insurance We receive many questions in regards to group insurance and related benefits. The Association encourages all members to do estate planning and investigate the amount of life insurance that they require. If you have not done this then make it a New Year’s resolution and protect your family financially. What you require should be based on your family situation and your age. It is also worthwhile to note that life insurance payments are tax free. Our contract language provides the following coverage. Basic Coverage – Minimum coverage for all Article 16.04(a) The City shall provide group life insurance, an amount equivalent to two (2) times such employee’s annual salary rate taken to the nearest one thousand dollars, subject to a $100,000.00 group life minimum. Example: 2006 1st class FF $71,513 multiply by two to nearest $1000 = $143,000. Accidental Death Benefit Article 16.04(b) The group life insurance referred to in sub-clause (a) hereof shall be supplemented by an “Accidental Death Benefit” in an amount equal to two (2) times the employee’s annual salary taken to the nearest one thousand dollars, subject to a $100,000.00 minimum. This will apply only to nonoccupational related accidental death. Example: You die in a car accident off the job; you are a 1st class FF. Your estate would receive $143,000 Basic and an additional $143,000 Accidental for a total to your estate of $286,000.

Line of Duty Article 16.04(c) The group life insurance referred to in sub-clause (a) above shall be supplemented by an additional four (4) times the employee’s annual salary taken to the nearest one thousand dollars, subject to a $200,000.00 minimum, in the event a member of Local 3888 is killed in the line of duty, or dies as a result of occupational illness or injury as recognized by W.S.I.B. Example: You die in a vehicle accident on the job; you are a 1st class FF. Your estate would receive $143,000 Basic and an additional $286,000 Line of Duty for a total to your estate of $429,000. It is an accident but Article B only pertains to non-occupational accidents therefore article B and C are never factored together. Our contract also provides optional group life insurance for employee,

[

spouse and dependent children. It is important to note that these insurances are paid 100% by the employee. The insurance you may purchase is as follows; Employee and Spouse optional group life Insurance up to a maximum of two hundred thousand ($200,000.00) dollars for the employee and/or the employee’s spouse, with evidence of insurability, Dependent Children, Optional Group Life insurance up to a maximum of twenty thousand dollars ($20,000.00) for each child of the employee, with evidence of insurability. We often get asked if your estate would also receive the continuation of the salary in the case of a line of duty death. Under some former associations this was the case in lieu of the 6 times LODD premium. Our current contract does not have an

]

OUR CONTRACT ALSO PROVIDES OPTIONAL GROUP LIFE INSURANCE FOR EMPLOYEE SPOUSE AND DEPENDENT CHILDREN. IT IS IMPORTANT TO NOTE THAT THESE INSURANCES ARE PAID 100% BY THE EMPLOYEE.

WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 45


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Collective Agreement Review ... Continued from page 45

Optional Life Premium Rates per $10,000 of coverage, per month Age Bands

Smoker

Non-Smoker

Male

Female

Male

Female

Under 30

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$0.54

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30-34

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$0.76

$0.76

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$1.08

$0.97

$0.76

45-49

$3.46

$2.16

$1.73

$1.30

50-54

$5.40

$3.24

$3.02

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55-59

$9.29

$5.94

$5.62

$4.00

60-64

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Dependent’s Life ($20,000) LODD salary continuation provision. It is worthwhile to note that the salary continuation would be the difference between your salary at death and all other payments that your estate is entitled to. In the vast majority of circumstances the 6 times is a superior benefit as the amount is a lump sum with no tax implications. Your estate would also be entitled to any vacation, lieu days owing, and sick bank buyout owing. Also, there are OMERS, CPP and Local 3888 considerations, and in the case of a Line of Duty Death there is the Workers Safety Insurance Act. Omers The eligible spouse’s options are: (a) Survivor pension Survivor pension of 66 2/3% of the lifetime pension the member earned to the date of death or the date they left their OMERS employer; Plus: a further 10% for each eligible child up to a total of 100% of the member’s earned pension (to whoever has legal custody of the children). This pension: is indexed to inflation; guaranteed for life; it does not stop if the surviving spouse remarries; does not include the OMERS bridge benefits.

$3.84 per month - or (b) Cash refund or transfer option The cash refund (minus income tax) or transfer to a non-locked-in Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) is paid in a lump sum and equals: the commuted value (present-day value) of the pension earned since Jan. 1, 1987; plus any contributions the member made before 1987, plus interest to the date of their death; minus any benefits previously paid to, or on behalf of, the member. Note: There are provisions if there is no spouse but dependants or no spouse/dependants.

Canada Pension Plan Benefit

Death benefit A one-time lump-sum payment of up to $2,500 is available to help with funeral expenses.

Survivor’s pension A monthly pension is available to people whose spouse or common-law partner has died. Payment amounts and eligibility for survivors take into account age, disability and dependent children.

Children’s benefit

or between 18 and 25 and in school full time. Local 3888 Death benefit — one-time lump-sum payment of $3,500 is available to help with funeral expenses of an active member.

Line of Duty Death Workplace Safety and Insurance Board Provide four types of benefits to survivors of workers who die as a result of workplace illness or injury:

Survivor Payments The WSIB pays a lump sum and monthly payments to survivors and/or dependant children of workers who die from work-related illness or injury. Detailed information on these benefits can be obtained by going to the WSIB web-site at (www.wsib.on,ca)

Funeral and Transport Costs The WSIB will pay reasonable burial and funeral expenses. These may include transport costs if the survivors live a considerable distance from the place of death.

Bereavement Counselling Both the surviving spouse and children are entitled to bereavement counselling, but must request this counselling within one year of the worker’s death.

Help in Joining the Workforce If you are a surviving spouse, you may apply for assistance in returning to the workforce by requesting a Labour Market Re-entry Assessment within one year of your spouse’s death. Contact the Occupational Disease and Survivor Benefits Program at (416) 344-1010 or 1-800-465-9646 to determine if you are eligible.

A monthly benefit is available for dependent children under the age of 18

WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 47


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Fit to SURVIVE

The fire fighter’s guide to health and nutrition Fit to Survive is your source for a healthier life, brought to you by the IAFF’s Fire Service Joint Labour Management Wellness/Fitness Initiative. You’ll find expert advice and practical information on staying fit and healthy, as well as recipes and nutrition tips to make your next firehouse meal wholesome and delicious. Articles reprinted in FireWatch have been taken from the IAFF’s Fit To Survive web site, which we encourage all members to visit regularly. It can be found at www.foodfit.com/iaff/.

SIMPLY ROASTED TURKEY BREAST

How to use the Nutrition Facts Label

1. Preheat the oven to 400°F. Rinse the turkey breast under cold running water and pat it dry with paper towels. Place it in a baking dish and set it aside. 2. Rub the turkey breast with the olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Then place the turkey breast in the warm oven. 3. After 15 minutes, lower the heat to 350°F. Roast the turkey breast in the oven for about 2 hours total. Let the turkey rest at room temperature for about 15 minutes before carving. Store leftover turkey in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

Wondering how to keep track of trans fats? Watching your cholesterol? Counting calories? The easiest way to determine if a processed food or beverage fits into a healthy diet is to read the Nutrition Facts label on the package, where you find the serving size, calorie count, and other key nutrition information. Serving size is really important, because it can help keep you from overeating. Calories are a measure of how much energy a food or beverage contains. Many Canadians consume more calories than they need each day, and this has been linked to the surge in obesity. The government is considering ways to change the label to make the information about calories clearer. Always look for foods that are low in saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol to reduce your risk of heart disease. Likewise, choose foods that are low in sodium and high in potassium (also listed on the label), which lessens some of sodium’s effects on blood pressure. Be mindful of the sugar content of the foods and beverages you consume. While there are no set recommendations on the total amount of sugar to have in a day, sugar contributes calories and few, if any, nutrients. In addition, look for foods that are rich in dietary fibre, vitamins A and C, calcium and iron. These healthful nu-

trients can help prevent heart disease, cancer and other illnesses. The Nutrition Facts panel lists them all. Finally, scan the Daily Values (DVs) to determine if a food or drink is a wholesome addition to your diet. DVs are the recommended amount of nutrients based on a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet. If you’re not sure how many calories you consume daily, still use the DVs as a reference point. Five percent or less is considered low for nutrients and 20 percent is considered high.

This recipe serves: 8 1⁄ 2 1⁄ 2

1 1

Serving Size: 2 slices Number of Servings: 8 Per Serving Calories 295 Carbohydrate 0 g Fat 9 g Fibre 0 g Protein 50 g Saturated Fat 3 g Sodium 264 mg

CINNAMON-APPLE CAKE This recipe serves: 8 2 2⁄ 3

1

1⁄ 3 1⁄ 3 1⁄ 2

3 1 1

Some labels also include DVs for a 2,500-calorie a day diet in a footnote at the bottom. So, when you go grocery shopping, build in some extra time for label reading — it’s a key step in maintaining a healthy diet.

teaspoon salt teaspoon freshly ground black pepper teaspoon olive oil whole, fresh turkey breast, about 3 pounds

large golden delicious apples, peeled, cored and coarsely chopped cup sugar teaspoon cinnamon cup plain, low fat yogurt cup all-purpose flour teaspoon baking soda tablespoons vegetable oil egg, beaten egg white

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. 2. Spray one 8-inch cake pan with non-stick cooking spray. 3. Spray a medium non-stick sauté pan with nonstick cooking spray. Sauté the apples, tossing occasionally until golden brown, 5 to 7 minutes. Stir in the cinnamon and 1 tablespoon of the sugar. Remove from heat and set aside. 4. Whisk together the yogurt and remaining sugar in a large bowl until very smooth, about 2 minutes. Combine the flour and baking soda, add it to the yogurt mixture, then add the oil, egg and egg white to this batter, whisking well after each addition. Stir the apple pieces into the batter. 5. Pour the batter into the prepared pan, spreading it evenly. Set on a baking sheet and bake for 40-45 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Serving Size: 1 slice Number of Servings: 8 Per Serving Calories 159 Carbohydrate 26 g Fat 6 g Fibre 1 g Protein 2 g Saturated Fat 1 g Sodium 99 mg

WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 49


Line of Duty Deaths Recognized in 2006

Local

Date of Death

Age

Jeff Laishes

3888

3-Feb-06

44

Gord Thatcher

411

31-Jul-91

53

Ken Burfield

1137

15-Oct-89

50

Doran Collins

1137

10-Jun-88

51

George Muir

752

24-Jun-91

47

Roger Holmes

626

10-Aug-99

56

Fred Bartley

3888

16-May-06

58

Active Members Andrew Lau

John McCormick

Retirees

DC Walter Hurn

Capt. Donald Boehler

Capt. Clyde Hetherington Capt. William Coxhead Capt. Charles Renwick Donald Richardson DC Gary Lang

FF Gerald McCutcheon Capt. John Colley FF Lloyd Swire

FF Kenneth Campbell FF Robert Gray

FF Daniel Donnelly FF Ron Mitchell

Capt. Ernest William Johnston William George Hunter Patrick Joseph Dineen Capt. Bernard Cullen

A/DC Roy Earnest Head Gabriel Beuchesne DC Earl Strong

Capt. Earl Gordon

Assist. Deputy Ronald McDonald Captain John Rodick Capt. Allan Sinclair

50

Local 3888 3888

Local 1137 113

1137 1137 113 113

1137 113

1137 113 113 113

626 113 113 113 113 113 113

626 626 113 113 113 113

Date of Death 26-Jul-06 Oct-06

Date of Death 16-Jan-06 26-Jan-06 29-Jan-06 31-Jan-06 11-Feb-06

Age 51 56

Age 81 82 74 81

3-Mar-06

12-Mar-06 18-Mar-06

74

31-Mar-06

81

10-Apr-06

84

27-Mar-06 3-Apr-06 5-Apr-06

26-Apr-06

12-May-06 17-May-06 18-May-06 20-May-06

61 75 70 81 74 65

14-Jun-06

84

22-Jun-06

81

14-Jun-06 28-Jun-06 30-Jun-06 2-Jul-06

16-Jul-06

81 74 71 63 71


DC John Mangotic

626

14-Aug-06

82

Capt. Alex Channing

113

18-Sep-06

80

Capt. Kenneth John Hook Capt. Tommy Knox

Capt. James Bruce McLeish

Dir. of App. George Bowering Capt. Norman Boom

113

626 113 113 113

29-Aug-06 5-Oct-06 6-Oct-06

24-Oct-86 24-Oct-06

Horace McMillan

113

27-Oct-06

James Hards

113

8-Nov-06

86 72 65 87 77 84

WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 51


A History of the TORONTO FIREFIGHTERS WAR VETERANS’ ASSOCIATION and COLOUR GUARD BY MARLA FRIEBE, PUBLIC EDUCATION SOUTH COMMAND

T

he Toronto Fire Fighters War Veterans’ Association has a rich and colourful history dating back to the years just prior to World War II. Eight men, both Toronto Fire Fighters and World War I veterans, met at the Prisoner of War Club on Shuter and Mutual Streets in downtown Toronto in 1935. The intent of the organization was to provide a social outlet and promote the welfare of Toronto Fire Fighter ex-servicemen and their families. When World War II ended, membership grew rapidly as the Association welcomed returning fire fighter war veterans of both the Toronto Fire Department and neighbouring fire departments.Later on, non-veteran fire fighters were permitted to join as associate members. Fire Chief George Sinclair presented the colours to the Association just prior to November 11, 1936.

ONE OF THE TORONTO FIRE FIGHTERS WAR VETERANS’ ASSOCIATION’S MANY CHARITABLE PROJECTS WAS HELPING TO FUND A SPECIAL SUMMER CAMP FOR NEEDY CHILDREN AS A PART OF A CANADIAN WAR VETERANS’ ASSOCIATION EFFORT.

had raised over $46 thousand dollars. In conjunction with the War Vets, the TFFA Local 113 contributed money, equipment, and volunteers who worked tirelessly at the camp, helping with repairs, renovations, and the construction of new buildings for the children.

The Colour Guard

] Photo by Karen Reid, TFS photographer

[

One of the Toronto Fire Fighters War Veterans’ Association’s many charitable projects was helping to fund a special summer camp for needy children as a part of a Canadian War Veterans’ Association effort. Camp Maple Leaf on Pigeon Lake was a 104-acre island in the Kawartha region that was purchased by many local War Veteran Associations, and it allowed underprivileged children to experience a free 14-day holiday. The Toronto Fire Fighters War Veterans’ Association also purchased a cabin at the cost of $1800.00 for the children to use while at camp. This cabin was officially dedicated by our Association Padre, Reverend Kerr, and was opened by Toronto Fire Chief Leonard Leigh on June 20, 1959. The Veterans’ main source of charitable income was the monies collected by the sale of draw tickets, and by 1959 they

52

It wasn’t until the early 1950’s that a Colour Guard was formed to carry the following Colours: Canada, Union Jack, U.S.A., Ontario, City of Toronto, Toronto Fire Department, Toronto Fire Fighters War Veterans’ Association, Navy, Army (Red Ensign), and Air Force. Much to the delight of audiences, members of the War Veterans’ Association marched in many local Toronto parades, including the annual Warriors’ Day Parade and Labour Day Parade. As many of the former Veterans were now getting older and were physically unable to march in the parades, the Association encouraged younger members of the Toronto Fire Department to join. Many of the TFD’s War Veterans were active in the Toronto Fire Fighters’ Association, Local 113, ‘Silver Band’, which formed in 1931 and disbanded in 1943.

Recent History After amalgamation in 1998, the Fire Chief at that time, Alan Speed, assisted the Colour Guard with the supply of equipment and uniforms. The current Fire Chief, Bill Stewart, continues to carry on this past tradition of support. The War Veterans’ Association is very grateful for the support they have received over the years, as well as for the dedicated assistance of the TPFFA, Local 3888.


Today the Colour Guard is as strong as ever, with an agenda of events indicative of their passion for their organization. They can be seen at many Toronto area parades such as the Warriors’ Day Parade, Labour Day Parade, the Beaches Easter Parade and the St. Patrick’s Day Parade. At the request of the Fire Chief, they assist the Toronto Fire Services immensely through their attendance at numerous fire fighter recruit graduation ceremonies, the Toronto Fallen Firefighter Memorial ceremony, the opening ceremonies for the Toronto Haz-Mat Conference, and the annual Toronto Fire Fighter Rescue & Merit, and Long Service Medal Award ceremonies. They can also be seen supporting other local events such as the opening ceremonies for the Ontario Fire Chief’s Convention, the Canadian Fallen Fire Fighter Ceremony, the Sunrise Remembrance Service, the City of Toronto Remembrance Service, and an annual trip to Buffalo, New York to participate in the Pearl Harbour Remembrance Service. Current Members are:

Brian Bertram (Commander) Michael Ante Thomas Arthur Gerry Burton Michael Carroll John Channing Peter Chow Warren de Borst John Graziano William Hawley Charles Jennings (#2 I .C.) Alfred Lauzis John Lemieux Kenneth Magill Donald Marsden Henry Mezzabotta Wes Massey Warren Riddell Jerry Walterhouse Kenneth Wilcock Dean White

The Association is currently recruiting new fire fighter members, especially those interested in marching with the Colour Guard. Two members of the Colour Guard, Warren Riddell and Gerry Burton, have been with the organization for over 30 years! If you are interested in joining, contact Charles Jennings at chj27@rogers.com

Historical Toronto Fire Fighter War Veteran Information for World Wars I and II

Many Toronto Fire Fighters enlisted to serve England during World War I, with many volunteering their services during 1915. One Toronto Fire Fighter, Captain Charles O. Ardagh of the Rose Avenue Hall, enlisted in 1916 despite the fact that he was eligible for his pension and retirement. Captain Ardagh, it is noted, volunteered not just to serve his country but because he was ‘lonesome for his own two boys who had enlisted as well.’ Fire fighters who died overseas are commemorated in a plaque which was erected by the Toronto Fire Fighters’ Association, Local 113, at ‘Old City Hall’, 60 Queen Street West. Department records show that five fire fighters were killed in France sometime between 1914 and 1918. They were: F.D. Fisher, Clarence Kerrigan, Walter Parker, A. Caskie* and Ed Blake.* (* These men do not appear on the memorial plaque but are referenced in the 1960 Toronto Fire Department History Book written by Melville Hodgson as having died in France during 1914-18). Twenty-three Toronto Fire Fighters enlisted overseas during World War II to assist England during the Blitz. Their mandate was to extinguish fires and to protect both life and property in case of fire in Great Britain, Isle of Man, and Northern Ireland, on land, ships and vessels at sea. It also included both rescue and salvage. These men, serving in companies 1 to 8, upon arriving in the UK partook in a 4-week training

course in various aspects of fire fighting. After training was completed, Britain’s National Fire Service withdrew from their stations and they were staffed entirely by Canadians (143 professional fire fighters from across Canada enlisted). Canadian Fire Fighters then attended all lull-time fires, as well as any blitz fires. They participated in normal life in England, complete with social and sporting events. Canadian Fire Fighters were regarded very highly on the fireground as well, and it was noticed by one Fire Chief that the Canadians were always ready to volunteer for any sticky, dirty job, and they were never happier than when they were on the fireground. While in England, there were a few casualties to the Corps members and many injuries. When the war ended, most fire fighters returned home to their previous departments. Prior to their departure, a farewell party was thrown for them in Trafalgar Square and they were paid tribute for saving British lives and property. By February 1945 the men were back in Canada, along with 20 British brides. It is interesting to note that while these Toronto Fire Fighters were in England, Auxiliary Firefighters took their place back in Toronto; after the war the Auxiliary Fire Service was disbanded.

WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 53


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LOCAL 3888 STAFF PROFILE

MARYLIN TRUNKS OFFICE SECRETARY BY MARCEL RAMAGNANO

Local 3888 employes three full-time staff members to help run the day-to-day business at 39 Commissioners Street. We would like to introduce them to you individually over the next couple of issues of Fire Watch.

M

arylin has been married for 40 years and has three beautiful grandchildren. She is also the mother of two wonderful dogs. Born in Kingston, Marylin went to school in Ottawa where she met her husband. They have been spending the last 20 years building a home outside of Port Perry where they plan to retire. Summers are spent enjoying trips on their pontoon boat through the Rideau and Trent Canal systems. In the winter, they like to take cruises to warmer climates. Some of the things that Marylin enjoys are working with her hands doing stained glass, knitting, sewing and gardening. She was elected to the position of 2nd Vice President of her gardening club. Before coming to the Toronto Professional Fire Fighters Association, Marylin worked for the Bank of Commerce, the Royal Bank and AOCO Optical Company. WHAT IS YOUR BACKGROUND AND HOW DID YOU START WORKING FOR LOCAL 3888? Actually, I originally started with the former Local 113 and have been here in this position for fifteen years now. How did I start here? Well, there was a parttime job advertised in the local paper, so I put in an application and was hired by the President at that time, Mark Fitzsimmons and Vice President, Jeff Nestor. I had been teaching computers at night school at the time and they were looking for someone with a computer background.

WHAT DOES YOUR JOB ENTAIL ON A DAY-TO-DAY BASIS? Although there is no official job description, I primarily answer the phone, open the mail, and deal with visitors to the office. After that, I do anything else that needs doing. For example, I make up the invitations and programs for our different events, I handle the scheduling of space for the various committee meetings that occur at the office, and I also assist with the mailing of notices to the membership, to name a few. I’ve done everything from shovel snow to wash windows. WHAT WOULD YOU SAY IS THE BEST THING ABOUT WORKING FOR LOCAL 3888? The people I’ve worked for have been absolutely fantastic. You couldn’t have asked for better bosses, better working conditions, better anything. Everybody treats you like family. I wish I had got this job when I was fresh out of school. I remember back to when I was here for two weeks and I thought, “Oh my, two weeks have passed!”, and now I think, “Oh my, fifteen years have passed!” It just seems like the entire fifteen years has passed as quickly as those first two weeks. What would you say is the most challenging thing about working for Local 3888? Were there any obstacles that you’ve had to overcome? I just deal with every situation as it happens. Going from MS-DOS to Win-

dows was probably the biggest challenge I had. I was fighting it all the way, but eventually I did change. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR IMPACT ON LOCAL 3888? Well, I am probably the first person that anyone who walks through the door sees or talks to. I also answer the phone, so again I am a person’s first point of contact into the office. If you don’t have somebody on the phones or at the desk that knows a lot about what’s going on you could be in a lot of trouble. I think, not particularly only my job, but all of the positions here are an important part of the whole organization. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR MOST MEMORABLE MOMENT WORKING FOR LOCAL 3888? Oh my, I’ve had so many memorable moments! I was saying earlier about shovelling snow. Well, I came in one day and there was snow in the back hall because the doors didn’t fit tight, and so I shovelled it out. I have shovelled my way in and out of this office! Also, all the picnics, the balls, and those types of things have all been beyond belief really. The convention we had earlier this year was fantastic and truly memorable for me. There is always something happening here. Every year you can say there is a moment that you wouldn’t forget.

WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 55


3888 RECENT HAPPENINGS

Scott Eyers, Paul Atkinson, Kevin AshďŹ eld, and Kevin Doherty await their turn to present the memorial IAFF ag to family members at the International Fallen Fire Fighter Memorial held in Colorado Springs on September 16th.

Ian Hamilton and Frank Ramagnano present Bob Komsic of CFRB 1010 with a second place award from the 2006 IAFF Media Awards contest.

President Scott Marks and Secretary Treasurer Frank Ramagnano are on hand to welcome and speak with the latest group of Fire Prevention recruits to be hired by the TFS.

56


Local 3888 Executive and Members present a cheque for $50,000 to the Ross Tilley Burn Centre during one of the ten “Annual Christmas Magic Shows” which were held in late November and early December.

OPFFA President Fred LeBlanc shows Ontario Premiere Dalton McGuinty a copy of the Fall 2006 issue of Fire Watch during the recent Provincial Legislative Conference held from November 14th to 16th.

Local 3888 Members and Executive take over Union Station in downtown Toronto during our annual MD Boot Drive on September 18th.

Local 3888 Executive Board Officers and FIREPAC Members pose during the Wednesday night reception at the Provincial Legislative Conference held on November 15th at Queen’s Park.

Toronto Fire Fighters entertain some of the participants at the 2006 Toddle for Tots event held at the Toronto Zoo on September 30th.

WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 57


Congratulations To The Toronto Professional Fire Fighters For Your Outstanding Accomplishments, We are honored to be on Your List of Supporters 6643299 CANADA INC AIRDATE TRAFFIC SERVICES AJP DOORS & WINDOWS INC APPLIED INTERNET SOLUTIONS ARMADILLO TEXAS GRILL ATLANTIC LIQUID METERS BANK OF VALLETTA BENIE’S CAFE INC BRIAN FOSTER LTD BROTHERHOOD OF CHRISTIAN CENTRE CAJAS INTERNATIONAL CANADIAN CHROME PLATING & CRANKSHAFT CLOTHES OUT TRADING DAVID’S FRAMING LTD DECO LABELS & TAGS DESA ROOFING DUFFERIN GATE TAVERN EASTOWN RESTAURANT & BANQUET HALLS

EDP CONSULTING FORTINOS GEORGIA BOWEN GLEBE MANOR RETIREMENT RESIDENCE HOLY CROSS PARISH JEYA TRANSPORT LTD KENPIK BULK SHOP MAC’S CONVENIENCE STORES MAIN DRUG MART MASTER IRON STAIRS MECCA HALAL MEAT & SEAFOOD NAZ CONVENIENCE STORE OARBIC INC Q.N.H INC QUICKTRANS TRUCK & TRAILER REPAIRS SRI NAGAA ELECTRIC LTD TACO BELL OF CANADA THE INFINITY FUNDING GROUP VENUS LASER HAIR REMOVAL


WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 59


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2485 QUEEN ST E TORONTO, ON M4E 1H9

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TELEPHONE: (416) 686-5688

DESIGNERS CHOICE

EXIT REALTY PRESTIGE

MARBLE & GRANITE

1121 CASTLEFIELD AVE TORONTO, ON M6B 1E8

TELEPHONE: (416) 787-5600 60

VIVETHA BISTRO

598 ST CLAIR AVE W TORONTO, ON M6C 1A6

TELEPHONE: (416) 652-1040


2007 UPCOMING EVENTS LOCATION

January 16, Tuesday Day meeting only (1000 Hrs)

3888 General Union Meeting

RCL Br. 527 948 Sheppard Ave. W.

January 17, Wednesday Night meeting only (1000 Hrs)

3888 General Union Meeting

RCL Br. 527 948 Sheppard Ave. W.

January 29-Feb. 1, 2007

OPFFA H&S Conference

Toronto, Marriott Courtyard

February 21, Wednesday Night (1900 hrs)

3888 General Union Meeting

RCL Br. 527 948 Sheppard Ave. W.

February 26 to March 2, 2007

SOFFHL Tournament

Etobicoke, Ontario

March 20, Tuesday Day meeting only (1000 Hrs)

3888 General Union Meeting

RCL Br. 527 948 Sheppard Ave. W.

March 21, Wednesday Night meeting only (1900 Hrs)

3888 General Union Meeting

RCL Br. 527 948 Sheppard Ave. W.

Friday, March 30, 2007

FF Ball

Toronto

April 1-5 2007

OPFFA Spring Seminar

Niagara Falls, Renaissance Fallsview

April 17, Tuesday Night (1900 Hrs)

3888 General Union Meeting

RCL Br. 527 948 Sheppard Ave. W.

April 23- 26 2007

IAFF Leg Conference

Ottawa

TORONTO FIRE FIGHTERS BREAKFAST CLUBS WHO: Firefighters Past & Present WHEN: 10:00 am Wednesday of the month. Remember N.E.W.S. NORTH EAST WEST SOUTH

Jan. 3, Feb 7, Mar. 7, Apr. 4, Jan. 10, Feb. 14, Mar. 14, Apr. 11 Jan. 17, Feb. 21, Mar. 21, Apr. 18, Jan. 24, Feb. 28, Mar. 28, Apr. 25

NORTH Buttery Restaurant 17565 Yonge St. N Newmarket, ON

EAST Carousel Restaurant & Tavern 116 Lansdowne St. E. Peterborough, ON

WEST Fifth Wheel Truck Stop 40 Chisholme Drive Milton, ON

SOUTH Golden Griddle Rest. 2044 Sheppard Ave. E Toronto, ON

WHY: The camaraderie was and still is the best part of the job of firefighter. Touch base with the people you worked with. You never know who might show up. Spread the word. Call your friends or co workers. If further information is required call Mike Jansen at 705 292-0114 or Cell 705 927-2224 WINTER 2006 | FIRE WATCH 61

SUBJECT TO CHANGE

EVENT

*DATES AND TIMES

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

DATE*


ADVERTISERS INDEX A& B Uniforms ................................... 42 Alarm Force ....................................... 12 Alta Nissan ......................................... 20 Appliance Canada............................... 30 Atlas Roofing ...................................... 42 Bayshore Home Health ....................... 52 Bodnaruk & Capone ........................... 12 Cartridge City Inc .............................. 38 Clarion President Hotel ...................... 10 Cosmetics Warehouse ........................ 28 Cosmic ............................................... 60 Cruise Holidays of Lindsey ................. 24 C&S Auto Part Ltc .............................. 58 Da Vinci Hair Styling ......................... 62 Designer’s Choice ............................. 60 Doreen’s Beauty Salon........................ 62 Dr R. Salter ........................................ 62 Dufferin Mazda.................................. 56 Durham Orthopedic ............................. 8 Elephant & Castle ............................... 20 Erin Mills Volvo ................................. 22

Evans Ford Lincoln ............................. 16 Exit Realty Prestige ............................ 60 Fastway Couriers ............................... 40 Fenmar Auto Service .......................... 40 FF Credit Union .............. Inside Ft Cover Firehall Online .................................. 30 Fox & Fiddle Restaurant ..................... 42 Funeral Sanitation ............................. 30 Geometra Design Ltd ........................... 8 George Brown College ......................... 4 George Richards ................................... 1 G&K Services ....................................... 8 Good Time Auto Service .................... 46 Heron Group of Companies Inc .......... 56 Ho-Lee Chow ..................................... 13 Homelife Ultimage ............................. 42 Iberrowine Canada Inc ....................... 58 Investors Group ................................. 44 International Chimney ....................... 62 Itt Industries ...................................... 46 Jack M. Straitman .............................. 52

JE Landscaping ................................... 42 Jiffy Lube ................ Outside Back Cover Kay’s West Indian Take Out ............... 42 Laurentian Univresity ........................ 28 Liberty Tax Service .............................. 6 Masters Plumbing .............................. 12 MC Logistics Inc ................................ 46 Mohawk College .................................. 8 Mondiale Wines ................................. 42 Mortgage Intelligence .......................... 8 Mr Big & Tall ...................................... 24 Mr Rustproof ..................................... 56 National Car & Truck ......................... 42 Ned’s Auto Repair .............................. 46 NMI Tax Consultants ......................... 60 North City ................. Inside Back Cover Owasco Volkswagen Inc..................... 44 Pain Perdu .......................................... 42 Paul O’Conner Funeral....................... 30 Physio FX ........................................... 20 Pinkofskys .......................................... 16

Prime Hardwood Flooring .................... 8 Quincy Mack Entertainment.............. 42 Rabbit’s Choice .................................. 60 Raceway Plymouth Chrysler ............... 60 Remax, Spirit Inc ............................... 30 Rosehaven Homes .............................. 38 Rose Jewellery Inc .............................. 30 Royal Bank Kelly Guglick ................... 30 Scarborough Lexus Toyota ................. 52 Sheridan Ford Lincoln Sales ............... 22 Sherman Motek ................................. 58 Son’s of Scotland ................................ 58 The Source ......................................... 56 Thompson Rivers University .............. 18 Toronto FC Marketing........................ 22 Tri-Cell Communications ..................... 6 Vivetha Bistro .................................... 58 Uni-Tri Masonry ................................. 38 Zoocheck.canada ................................ 38 Zuka ................................................... 58

Classified Advertising in the Toronto Fire Watch Magazine Name:

Division:

Work Phone:

Home Phone:

Ad (20 words max – please print clearly):

# of issues:

Payment: Cheque:

Signature:

Credit Card #

Price: $25/issue + GST=

Ads run one issue free of charge. Home phone or pager numbers will be used. Ads MUST be submitted in writing. Phoned ads are not accepted. Submit before the second Tuesday of the month. Send to Toronto Fire Watch, Box 157, 253 College St., Toronto ON M5T1R5 or email: naderiab@xentel.com

International Chimney Ltd.

520 Coronation Dr, Unit 9, West Hill, ON M1E 5C7 Canada

416.284.0211

Fax. 416.284.6407 Toll Free. 877.939.9989 Email. internationalchimney@bellnet.ca Structural Repairs, Detailed Inspections, Non Destructive Testing, Demolition, Fabrication, Installation. Video Reports, Confined Space Specialists, Engineering, Painting, Access (Rigging) Solutions.

Doreen’s Beauty Salon

Robert B. Salter

C.C., O.Ont., F.R.S.C., M.D., M.S.(Tor), F.R.C.S.C., F.A.C.S. PROFESSOR EMERITUS OF ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY AND SENIOR SCIENTIST EMERITUS

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62

416.813.6435

Fax: 416.813.6846 Email: rbsalter@sickkids.ca THE RESEARCH INSTITUTE THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN 555, UNIVERSITY AVE., TORONTO, ON CANADA M5G 1X8


 

    



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Fire Watch (Winter 2006)