Page 1

HALL SHOWCASE ON STATION 226 VOLUME 8 | ISSUE 2 | SUMMER 2012

Local 3888’s Annual Media Awards See all of the winners!

Publications Agreement No: 41203011


THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE TORONTO PROFESSIONAL FIRE FIGHTERS’ ASSOCIATION

VOLUME 8

|

|

ISSUE 2

SUMMER 2012

IN THIS ISSUE 16

20

26

45 44

32 FIRE WATCH (ISSN 1715-5134) is published quarterly by the TORONTO PROFESSIONAL FIRE FIGHTERS’ ASSOCIATION 39 Commissioners Street, Toronto, ON Canada M5A 1A6 Tel: 416.466.1167 www.torontofirefighters.org E-mail: firewatch@torontofirefighters.org FIRE WATCH is published quarterly by iMarketing Solutions Group on behalf of the Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association. CHIEF EDITOR Ed Kennedy MANAGING EDITORS Frank Ramagnano & James Coones Tel.: 416.466.1167 Fax: 416.466.6632 E-mail: firewatch@torontofirefighters.org ASSISTANT EDITORS Marla Friebe, Rodney Johnston, Janos Csepreghi, Bill McKee, Damien Walsh

5

President’s Message

7

Secretary-Treasurer’s Message

9

Vice President’s Message

11

Chaplain’s Corner

12

Letters to the Editor

14

Fire Fighter Survival & Rescue

16

Local 3888’s Third Annual Charity Golf Classic

18

Global Fire Cambodia 2012

20

3888 Awards & Galas

26

Local 3888 Annual Picnic on Centre Island

28

The Power of Negative Thinking

32

Toronto Fire Fighters Help Mike Holmes Make It Right in High Park

34

The Last of the TFD Tillermen?

38

Firehall Showcase - Station 226

42

Good Luck to Local 3888 Retirees

44

RIP Brother Richard Eldon

47

Never Shall We Forget

48

FIREPAC

52

Fit to Survive

55

Behind the Mask

59

2012 Rob Penney Charity Slo-Pitch Tournament

60

3888 Recent Happenings

62

2012 Upcoming Events

62

Ad Index HA LL SH OW CA SE ON STATIO N 22 6

ASSISTANT COPY EDITORS Alyssa Petrillo

FIRE WATCH PHOTOGRAPHER Keith Hamilton CANADIAN PUBLICATIONS MAIL Agreement No: 41203011 PRINTED IN CANADA Copyright © 2012 Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association ADVERTISING Debra Cheeseman, Project Manager Tel: 1-800-366-3113 Ext. 7806 Fax: 1-866-764-2452 Email: debbie.cheeseman@imkgp.com

VOLUME 8 | ISSUE 2 | SUMMER 2012

On The Cover

DESIGN AND ART DIRECTION iMarketing Solutions Group

Merchant Card Acceptance

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, or otherwise without prior written permission from the publisher. FIRE WATCH is an official communication tool of the Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association. The Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association (TPFFA) does not assume responsibility for statements of fact or opinion made by any contributor. Comments made by individuals may not reflect the official position of the TPFFA. Acceptance and publication of articles, advertisements, 3 products and services does not indicate endorsement of same by the TPFFA, and the TPFFA assumes no responsibility for their accuracy.

This Keith Hamilton photo won “Best Unpublished Photo by a Local 3888 Member” at the 2011 TPFFA Media Awards. This photo of hundreds of Toronto Fire Fighters in full uniform was taken while marching at the funeral of Toronto Police Lo ca l 38 88 ’s Officer, Ryan Russell, on An nu al M ed ia January 18, 2011. Aw ar ds Se e all of th e wi nn er s!

Publications Agreem

ent No: 412030

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH

11

3


4

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH

4


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

KEEPING THE MEMBERSHIP INFORMED

F

or the past two issues of Fire Watch, I have decided to concentrate on a number of issues that I get a lot of enquiries about. I intend to continue with this practice again this time. Accordingly, I will deal with: Bargaining/Arbitration, staffing, filling of vacancies, new Fire Chief applications, Fire/EMS efficiency studies and finally, a significant threat to our present independent arbitration system. Bargaining/Arbitration As I recently informed the membership, your Bargaining Committee held its final arbitration date before Kevin Burkett on May 28, 2012. The City questioned the presentation of our financial expert, Hugh Mackenzie, and your advocate, Jeff Nester asked for and was given seven days to produce a written response to the City’s concerns. We did indeed respond seven days later, arguing that our ‘expert’ was correct with regard to his ‘ability to pay’ submissions and benefit costing issues. I believe the formal stage of the process is now finished and we will all anxiously await the Arbitrator’s final award. Staffing Your Association has been working in conjunction with a public relations firm for some time, in an effort to get City Council to address the serious and ongoing shortfall of staffing levels and I have appeared before Council to reinforce the fact that we need to have this situation addressed. I stressed that understaffing puts not only the citizens of Toronto at risk, it also endangers you, the fire fighters who have to deal with dangerous situations on the fire ground and other emergencies. I pointed out that presently, the Fire Chief does not have the ability to call in fire fighters to overcome shortages in staffing. Thus, his only option is to shut down fire vehicles. THIS IS NOT ACCEPTABLE TO LOCAL 3888. Driving longer distances to attend largescale incidents puts a significant strain on resources. It is unfortunate to hear the City Manager state that fire fighters will ‘make do’ with fewer resources than last year. I noted that we currently have 126 fewer staff on the street and this number would continue to grow. If this continues, it would result in ten to fifteen percent of our fleet out of service and sitting idle on a daily basis. I stressed that we want the City to act at once, and not wait for efficiency reports, which will take many months to surface.

This excerpt is from my deputation to the Community Development and Recreation Committee on June 26th: “I am here today with a simple request – give the Fire Chief the same tools and resources that already exist for the other emergency services in the City; to ensure the safety of its citizens and the fire fighters who safeguard their lives and property. I ask that you give this due consideration and take action TODAY”. As a result, the committee put forward motions to address our issue: • They directed city staff to meet with the Fire Chief and your Association to develop a framework for a policy to call back staff in Operations to address staffing shortages and report back to the Committee on September 19th. • Also, that a class of recruits would be initiated in the summer and a further class in the fall if the present attrition rate is maintained. • We were also advised that the City had given immediate approval to fill a number of vacancies in support divisions, i.e. Fire Prevention, Mechanical and Communications. These actions will address some of our immediate needs but further work will have to be done to ensure ongoing staffing needs are met. Filling of Vacancies The final date for this important grievance arbitration was on May 7, 2012, before Arbitrator Russell Goodfellow. As I wrote in the last Fire Watch issue, it involves the wording in Article 49.01 of our Collective Agreement. We are hopeful that the wording is as clear to Arbitrator Goodfellow as it is to us. I want to reiterate the clause here: A recruit class would be initiated when vacancies in the present work force created by death, retirement, resignation or discharge reaches forty (40). We are awaiting this grievance award, which is now in the arbitrator’s hands. New Fire Chief Applications Applications for Fire Chief closed on May 21, 2012. There were a large number of applicants from across the country. On July 12th, City Council announced that Jim Sales, a former Fire Chief in Markham and current General Manager in Barrie, was the successful candidate. Mr. Sales will assume his new role as Fire Chief of Toronto Fire Services on August 20th. I would like to congratulate Jim and I certainly hope that part of his new

Ed Kennedy

mandate will be to ensure a continued, positive working relationship with your Association. While we had concerns with some initial comments by the new Chief, as reported in the media, your Association will always be committed to excellent service and will never compromise when it comes to the safety of our members and the citizens of Toronto that we protect. Fire/EMS Efficiency Studies These studies are well underway and you may have had representatives already visit your workplace. The study is part of a larger Service Review Program, which was initiated by Council, as part of their deliberations for the 2012 budget. Your Association was only invited to one meeting with the Committee, which took place on May 17th, and it is our understanding that the final report is due to come out in late September or early October, 2012. We intend to monitor this process closely. Our Arbitration System It seems that Tim Hudak and the Ontario Conservatives are once again taking a hard right wing stance regarding our Arbitration system - which we have seen work well for Ontario’s fire fighters. Our present system would be altered significantly if they are ever elected as the government of the Province of Ontario. Their model undoubtedly mirrors similar legislation in a number of States south of the border. Make no mistake, this is a serious threat to the fair and independent system in place in our province and could undermine many of the hard earned benefits in our Collective Agreement. We should be ready for a fight should Tim Hudak ever become the Premier of this Province.

Ed Kennedy President, Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association, I.A.F.F. Local 3888 S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH

5


6

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH

6


SECRETARY-TREASURER’S MESSAGE IS THE NRA 60 PENSION GLASS HALF FULL OR HALF EMPTY?

O

ver the years, there have been many discussions surrounding the value of the OMERS NRA 60 pension plan versus the OMERS NRA 65 pension plan, as it pertains to fire fighters. Members have questioned if it is worth the additional expense to belong to the NRA 60 plan, given the number of members that utilize the NRA 60 early retirement provisions. We, as fire fighters, should evaluate our pension plan on an ongoing basis, as it truly is one of our greatest benefits. It is a benefit that we equally contribute to, with the city matching our contributions. We pay a substantial portion of our salary, nearly 12 percent or $11,000 annually on a gross basis, to the OMERS plan. The plan provides a pension, that in respect to contributions, is well worth the investment. It provides us the necessary benefits, so that one can live in retirement with financial security. It is also important to note that the pension benefits that we accrue also reduce our RRSP limits. This is another reason that we must ensure that the OMERS pension plan is run as efficiently as it can be. We have a lot invested in regard to our contributions, as well as for what we will eventually draw from the plan. It is for these reasons, as I mentioned earlier, that we must be vigilant and continue to evaluate and monitor our pension plan. In 2011, the OPFFA released a report looking at NRA 60 in comparison to NRA 65. The report illustrated first that there was an issue with how the NRA 60 rate was being calculated. Being the OPFFA representative on the OMERS Sponsorship Corporation, I raised this issue last year. My fellow board members agreed to freeze the projected increases for NRA 60 and to study the matter going forward. The approved methodology for establishing future contribution rates received unanimous support and will be reflected in the OMERS SC Statement of Plan Design Objectives and Strategy. Under the adopted approach, NRA 60 members would pay the cost of their NRA 60 benefits, as well as any cost difference due to the actuarial assumption used for future salary increases (including “3/6/9”). Additional costs associated with experience and demographics are partially pooled

and shared with all plan participants. The approach offers partial pooling and strikes a balance between known and unknown costs for different groups of participants. The principles which guided deliberations are transparency, limited volatility, value for money, pooling, limited complexity, cost effectiveness and controllable versus uncontrollable experience. As an interim measure, the SC has approved the allocation for the 2013 contribution rates as follows:

Frank Ramagnano

Contribution Rates for 2013 (per side) Normal Normal Retirement Age 60 Retirement Age 65 Up to CPP earnings limit* 9.3% 9.0% Over CPP earnings limit* 15.9% 14.6% Blended contribution rate 12.3% 10.3% * The CPP earnings limit in 2012 is $50,100; the limit in 2013 will be higher

In the future, contributions will be allocated between the NRA 65 and NRA 60 groups by setting the differential in the blended contribution rates equal to the sum of the following: • The additional cost associated with differences in the NRA 65 and NRA 60 pension provisions; • The difference in cost associated with the actuarial assumption for future salary increases (including “3/6/9”) used for the NRA 65 group versus that used for the NRA 60 group; and • 50% of any remaining difference in the blended normal cost rates of the two groups which is not explained by the factors above. The contribution rates above and below the CPP earnings limit will be determined on an actuarial equivalent basis, for each of the NRA groups independently. Deficit funding and surplus sharing will be split equally by using one deficit funding or surplus sharing rate for both NRA groups. This was an important first step, as it would be difficult to evaluate whether or not NRA 60 is worth the premium, if you disagree with the methodology being used to calculate the NRA 60 rate. The past method had NRA 60 being charged normal cost. Normal cost is basically paying for what you are using. They were charging us as though we were our own pension plan, yet we did not have our own governance.

There was no polling and the deficit was not split equally, but rather on a pro-rata basis. This would have increased our rate to 4.3% higher contribution rate than NRA 65. We now know how the NRA 60 formula will be calculated going forward and we can determine if we believe it is a worthwhile expense. There is no difference between the type of pension you accrue under NRA 60 or NRA 65. The difference between the two is when you can retire early without a penalty. Under NRA 60, you can retire as early as age 50 – only if you have 30 years of service or you meet an 85 factor. You would also be allowed to retire at age 60, regardless of your service. Under NRA 65, you can retire as early as age 55 – only if you have 30 years of service or you meet a 90 factor. You would also be allowed to retire at age 65, regardless of your service. Going forward, we can evaluate the NRA 60 costs versus its benefits. We have had, and will continue to have, discussions with our pension partners on this matter. I would encourage members to review the report; it is on our website under the Benefits Committee tab. In closing, if you are viewing our NRA 60 based on normal costs and what we are using, then the pension glass is half full. If you are viewing the glass based on full pooling and paying for only the benefit we are using, then the glass is half empty. S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH

7


8

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH

8


VICE PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE A TIME FOR ALL THINGS

“And breathe…just breathe…” – Anna Nalick

A

s an Association, it seems we have been under siege for some time now. Budget battles, “Not Gravy” campaigns, staffing cuts, media attacks and on and on it has gone these past couple of years. We have been heavily involved in the political scene at all levels because we had to preserve the reputation and place of our profession in the public realm. We have engaged our members and you have responded with greater participation and effort than we have ever seen before. But as many a wise man before us has said, “There is a time for all things.” By the time you read this, we will be well into summer; a time for family, vacation and leisure. I hope that every one of our members has the opportunity for some rest, time away from your everyday routine and a chance to recharge and renew. It’s too easy to be drawn into the unrelenting daily churn of events and forget to look around and see things from a new vantage point. Downtime can help provide that change of perspective and we all need that. A fresh perspective is vital for the success of any organization. We will have many challenges ahead in the coming year and as David Bowie once said, there will be “ch-ch-ch-changes…” • A new Fire Chief will be in place soon and a new administration will no doubt want to put its own identity on the leadership of Toronto’s fire services. We will need to be ready to address any change of course. • We have the Fire Underwriters Survey and the report on the potential of a Fire/EMS merger to come to Council in the fall. These will have an impact on future service delivery models. • While there may be no election pending in the near future, we are definitely in some politically unstable times with war drums of a rightleaning agenda beating louder each day. We must be prepared for new political challenges. • It’s an age-old strategy to vilify one’s opponent before going after them. A quick search will find many examples of mainstream media, which seek

to demonize all unions – calling them outdated and irrelevant, as part of this recent movement to gut organized labour in a furious race to the bottom. Organized labour has been a convenient scapegoat for all of the economic troubles, not just here in our city but around the world. It will take renewed energy and strategy to combat these latest dynamics that will have an influence on the future of our Association. I am confident that we have the resources and resolve to move forward with your support. That is our strength and our advantage in having our issues addressed at a higher level. Those who would seek to attack and tear us down don’t understand that every one of our members has a personal, vested stake in the future of our Association. I recently overheard a comment that unions are, “like the CAA – members only call them when they go in the ditch.” While it’s a cute analogy, I disagree with its premise. While some unions may view their members in this light, I believe our Association is much more than a tow service for its members. Our members are better informed and more engaged than at any time in our history. While we have relied heavily on a core group of supporters for the heavy lifting over the last few years, we have seen a new generation of members become engaged and active at many recent events that we have looked to the membership for assistance with. This was never more evident than at the recent Jamie Bell Playground rebuild in High Park, where many of our members stepped up and brought their skills, time and commitment to help rebuild an important community asset that was damaged by a fire set by vandals. It was gratifying to see so many of our members, some I hadn’t met before, volunteer their time on such a worthwhile project. This was just another example of our members’ dedication, of which we can all be proud. Moving forward, we will need this new group to help us address the coming challenges, as their potential impacts will affect the next generation of fire fighters. We will not stand still and let others

Damien Walsh

determine our future path. We will fight with every resource at our disposal in order to maintain and preserve the rich history of our profession. There is too much at stake to consider anything less. But let’s not get ahead of the game. There will be time to get ready. As I mentioned previously, I hope all of our members take the opportunity to enjoy the summer months, spend time with family and friends and take part in some of the social events that have become such a big part of the vibrancy of our city. This includes those hosted by your Association such as the Annual Summer Picnic, back by popular demand on Centre Island. It’s a great opportunity to spend time with co-workers on a social basis, strengthen friendships and have your family enjoy this aspect of your Association. It has been an honour to serve you these past two years. No matter where I go, as your representative, I am always proud to say that I am a Toronto Fire Fighter and a member of this esteemed Association, humbled by the glowing praise that people have for fire fighters and grateful for the respect that other organizations and our political masters have for this Association. It comes at the hands of previous members and leaders of this organization. It comes at the hands of your dedication and sacrifice, as well as that of your families. I wish every one of our members a restful and enjoyable summer and I look forward to meeting our challenges with a renewed sense of purpose and energy this fall. Stay safe!

Damien Walsh, Vice President, Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association I.A.F.F. Local 3888

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH

9


10

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 10


CHAPLAIN’S CORNER BY HUGH DONNELLY, EAST COMMAND CHAPLAIN

Stress:

Don’t Just Suck It Up and Deal With It!

S

ometimes my job is very stressful. I work full-time at a church in Scarborough, dealing day-to-day with people who have a wide variety of needs, difficulties and concerns. I find myself in the midst of (sometimes intense) emotional energy, and every once in a while it can cause me to become quite tired. I can tell when the stress is taking a toll: I become irritable, yell at the kids more often, and feel generally out of sorts. Job-related stress is perfectly normal. Some stress is actually a good thing: it keeps us motivated and ready for action. However, it is possible for stress to accumulate – sometimes even go unnoticed – to the point at which it begins to affect us negatively (our moods, character, behaviour, and even our bodies).

This is of particular concern to those in the firefighting world because of the types of trauma with which emergency service personnel are confronted. A few years ago, I visited a crew that had just returned to the hall after dealing with a particularly violent and traumatic call. Some of the fire fighters wanted to talk about what happened, so I listened. For two days following, I was not myself; I was grumpy and agitated and could not seem to settle myself down. “What’s going on with me? I’m not usually like this?” I said to my wife (who had just referred to me as a “bear.”) “Well,” she replied, “think about where you were two days ago.” Then it hit me. I was experiencing vicarious stress. If I could experience stress in my life from simply listening to fire fighters talk about their difficult calls, imagine what it must be like for the fire fighters themselves to experience it firsthand. It used to be that fire fighters were supposed to “suck it up” and “just deal with it” when it came to job-related stress. Some fire fighters have had more success than others using this method of coping. I think many fire fighters attempt to repress the trauma associated with a hard call, only to discover that a similar call (sometimes much later in time) will trigger a stress response. A fire fighter once shared with me the difficulty he had dealing with a call involving a child. The child made it safely to hospital, but the fire fighter couldn’t understand why the call had made him so uneasy. After some conversation, it turned out that the call reminded him powerfully of another situation many years earlier, one in which a child had not been so fortunate. If you find yourself wondering if you’ve

Rev. Hugh Donnelly

East Command Rev. Hugh Donnelly 416-450-8372 hughdonnelly@rogers.com

crossed the threshold from healthy stress to dis-tress, you are not alone. It affects many of us. And if that stress is beginning to affect you negatively (e.g. your behaviour, ability to sleep, enjoyment of life), then rest assured that you are not abnormal. In fact, such stress responses are often the normal physiological response to an abnormal situation. Most often, it is not the best course of action to attempt to “suck it up” and carry on as if nothing is the matter. In fact, it is not a sign of weakness to ask for help; it is a sign of great strength. Resources are available to you. Toronto Fire’s Employee Assistance Program (EAP) has posted some helpful information on your torontofirefighters.org website, with contact information on peers who are being trained in how to help. As well, your chaplains are on call 24/7 to assist when asked. While our experiences of traumatic stress are often not firsthand, we do understand the stresses of your job. Sometimes fire fighters find simple conversations with us to be helpful; other times we refer fire fighters to other professionals who are specifically trained in the areas of your need. Whatever our course of action, our goal remains the same: to help fire fighters find greater health in their lives. We chaplains serve fire fighters because we appreciate the work you do, and more importantly, we care for your well being. S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 11


s r e t t e L TO THE EDITOR

CONDOLENCES FROM COLORADO SPRINGS PFFA LOCAL 5

The Colorado Springs Professional Fire Fighters Local 5 would like to extend our thoughts and deepest sympathy to the family of Fire Fighter Richard Eldon and to your Local. We are always saddened when we hear of a fellow Brother or Sister that has fallen in the line of duty. As the host Local of the Fallen Firefighters Memorial, we want you to know that as their name will be etched in the Wail of Honor, they will always be watched over by the members of Local 5. We understand the sorrow and pain that comes with the loss of one of our own. We are sure that Fire Fighter Richard Eldon will be deeply missed, yet remain a source of pride to the members of your Local, the department, and most of all his family.

GILDA’S CLUB GREATER TORONTO DONATION

are grateful that his service will always be remembered. On behalf of the Stockman family, I would like to thank you for the invitation, your efforts to advance the cause of firefighters who have lost their lives in the line of duty, and your commitment to honour fallen firefighters. Sincerely, Erin Stockman-Murphy

On behalf of the members, board and staff of Gilda’s Club Greater Toronto, thank you for Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association’s 13/01/2012 donation of $2,500.00, for your ongoing support of Gilda’s Club Greater Toronto. Support of organizations like yours makes such a difference to those facing the challenges of a cancer diagnosis, treatment and the process of rebuilding their lives.

Fraternally, Jeremy Kroto President Colorado Springs Professional Fire Fighters Local 5

COUNCILLOR CRAWFORD’S ANNUAL CANADA DAY CELEBRATION I want to express my appreciation for your continued support and generous contribution to my 2nd Annual Canada Day Celebration held at Scarborough Bluffs Park on July 1, 2012. The event brought together members of the Scarborough Southwest community for an evening of entertainment and fun as we celebrated Canada’s birthday. Thank you for helping to make this occasion a success and I look forward to working with you again in the future. Sincerely, Gary Crawford Councillor, Ward 36 Scarborough Southwest

TORONTO FALLEN FIREFIGHTER MEMORIAL My family and I attended the Toronto Fallen Firefighter Memorial on Sunday, June 3, 2012. The ceremony was very moving and we were honoured to attend. My Dad was proud to be a firefighter. We 12

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 12


The Gilda’s Club Program has proven its effectiveness. With your help, we are able to provide a home-like environment and the much-needed support for children, teens, parents and individuals – the whole family, the whole time. Thank you for your help in providing critical social and emotional support to people living with cancer, so that no one faces cancer alone.

gramming. This year’s spring fair brought out many more people from both the school and the community and the spirit was amazing! We sincerely thank you and hope that The Toronto Firefighters’ Association and James W. Hill will continue to have a strong partnership for years to come. Sincerely, Denise O’Connell and Maureen Grice James W. Hill Spring Fair Co-Chairs

Yours truly, Frances M. Walsh Executive Director

ROUGE VALLEY CENTENARY DONATION FOR NEW BEDS

JAMES W. HILL SCHOOL FAIR On behalf of the James W. Hill School Council and Spring Fair Committee, I would like to extend a very special thank you for your generous contribution of the Cotton Candy machine and supplies to our school’s spring fair on May 26th. Because of your donation, our school was able to raise over $16,000 towards a playground, new computers and school pro-

Restoring comfort and health, one bed at a time – your generous contribution will help Rouge Valley Centenary to purchase new beds in almost every department of the hospital. The new beds are a vital part of every stay, for so many patients in our hospital. A safe and comfortable hospital stay aids in the healing process, enabling our patients to leave the hospital and return home sooner and will enhance our community’s healthcare right in our backyard. Your support shows a special sense of generosity and commitment to help others. Your donation will help Rouge Valley Centenary reach its goal of purchasing 100 new beds. On behalf of the families we serve and will serve, the volunteers, physicians, and staff at Rouge Valley Centenary thank you for your support and making a difference. Sincerely, Chad Hana President & CEO

CONDOLENCES FROM NEW ORLEANS PFFA LOCAL 632 The Executive Board and members of the New Orleans Fire Fighters Association Local 632 would like to express our deepest sympathy and thoughts to the family of Brother Richard Eldon and to the members of your Local. It is always a sad time for all of us when we hear of a fellow Brother or Sister that has fallen in the line of duty. Fire Fighters are proud professionals and we all know and understand the sense of duty, dedication and loyalty,

not only to the people and communities we serve, but to each other. When the alarm bell sounds once again, we put aside our grieving and answer that call with such dedication and pride. Yet, the memory of our fallen Brothers and Sisters will always be with us. Their memory will never die. They have given that ultimate sacrifice. They will always be true heroes. May you all find peace and comfort in knowing that Fire Fighters from around the Country mourn with you and will forever hold Brother Eldon in our hearts and in our thoughts. Please know that our thoughts and prayers are with each of you and the Eldon family. Fraternally, Nicholas G. Felton, Jr. President

CARALYN’S BENEFIT 11.11.11 The Ross family would like to express our very sincere thanks to the Toronto Professional Firefighters Association for the generous donation made to the benefit honouring our daughter/sister, Caralyn Ross. November 11th was Caralyn’s birthday and we thought it fitting to gather, celebrate Caralyn and raise money for the cause. Ten years have passed since we lost Caralyn to leukemia. We hope our fundraising efforts will help find a cure for blood diseases. The generosity of our community was overwhelming through donations of prizes, time volunteered and event tickets purchased. The event: Caralyn’s Benefit 11.11.11 was a tremendous success. Not only did we gather family & friends to celebrate Caralyn, we were entertained by Valdi and shared memories, but we also, collectively, rose close to $17,000. This amount raised was divided and donated to The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society of Canada and The Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation. It was great to have the members of the Toronto Fire Services attend in uniform and have a few drop by in their bunker gear, which made for some pleasant smiles! We are very grateful for your varied support. Thank you so much. With our sincere gratitude, Glen & Sandy Ross Candace Ross-St.Croix & Jordan St. Croix

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 13


&

FIRE FIGHTER

SURVIVAL RESCUE &

RIT? SERIOUSLY? (Part 2) BY GEOFF BOISSEAU AND JOHN MCGILL, TORONTO FIRE FIGHTERS

“EVACUATE, EVACUATE, EVACUATE,” comes from Command… “MAYDAY, MAYDAY, MAYDAY,” echoes across the radio in response…

W

hen you hear those words come across your radio, you feel your stomach drop. You are RIT – seriously. You look at your Acting Captain (AC) and he has a look on his face that you are sure you have on yours; the best way to describe it is a mixture of panic and fear. It comes with the emotions that you are wrestling with – the panic comes from the initial feeling of helplessness, your brain is craving information, it needs to address the feelings it is experiencing. You can feel yourself instantly going through your own mental ‘rolodex’ – who, what, where, why? You know that the best way to deal with this primal need is to focus on the things you can control, at 14

least until you get more information. The cortisol is running through your body now and you can feel the changes starting to happen. It’s taking everything that you have in you to resist that urge to run to the area of the emergency. You know that everyone is better served if you just take a second and find out as much information as you can. Be part of the solution, not part of the problem, you tell yourself. If you just react and ‘go’ then you will not be very effective, and possibly – well, you think probably – just become a part of the problem. You turn and focus on getting your gear ready. Your AC has gone to talk with the Incident Commander (IC) and the newly designated RIT Safety Officer

(RITSO). You can see he is focused on the task at hand…good…you will need that in your leader. The rookie has wandered off and is standing halfway between your RIT cache and the building, just staring at all of the frantic activity going on. You hope that fireground discipline is not being lost, and to the credit of some Officers, they are trying to get a handle on things and get everyone focused. You have heard of this loss of fireground discipline in a MAYDAY situation, really it is no one’s fault, it’s a natural human reaction. Hell, the personality of a fire fighter could even contribute to the problem; we all want to help, after all, that is what we do…that is who we are, and these emotions are amplified when S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 14


one of our own is in trouble. You hope that the IC has a rescue plan ready and that the on-scene crews have confidence in the abilities of the RIT – seriously…no pressure. Turning back to the task at hand, you see your driver and she is double-checking the RIT Kit, rescue air and search line. You are grabbing an extra hand light and your tool of choice – the sledgehammer. Peter Gabriel’s cheesy 80s song runs through your head. In a few seconds, your AC goes over what he has found out; partial collapse on Bravo side, two fire fighters fell though the floor on the second story. Remaining crewmember is separated and disoriented on what remains of the second floor. The IC is just about to start a PAR to make sure all the crews on the first floor are accounted for. RITSO has requested another crew to assume RIT; good – you have back up on the exterior if something goes bad…and statistically you know there is a good chance of that happening. Push that out of your head… time to focus. You try to organize what you know into something you can use: • Two firefighters down on first floor, possibly basement • Partial structural collapse • Still heavy fire in the structure • Given the age of the structure, probably traditional wood…but with the number of renovations in this area, really, who knows? • RIT crew – solid AC and driver (she is reaching for the search line clip) and a newbie who is thinking RIT – seriously? • Crews are on TAC 2 in the building and radio silence has been requested You have been standing for what seems a lifetime getting ready, but you know it has been less than two minutes, while the AC finalizes a rescue plan. The image of those two fire fighters starts to creep into your mind; are they pinned under debris, trapped or surrounded by fire? The fire fighter on the second floor, is he disoriented? How do they feel? You wonder then…quickly, you push that out of your mind…don’t even think about it...we need to keep the emotions in check…need to stay focused. We will have to wait and see what we actually have, then deal with

it – seriously. Your AC comes back and you all huddle around him. “OK, RITSO has made radio contact with the guy on the second floor. He is in good shape, a crew on the exterior had put a ladder up to a window and are assisting him out.” You feel a quick sense of relief; one down, two to go. Now we focus on the two missing fire fighters. One interior crew can hear a pass alarm on the first floor, not too far from their location and have asked the IC for permission to proceed with a hoseline to search. This crew will be on the channel the MAYDAY came in on with us, the back up RIT teams and RITSO. Your AC has determined that your best point of entry to get as close to the area of the collapse as possible will be a side door that he had located during the 360. “Excellent,” you think…“this guy is solid.” Talk about being ‘squared away’. You can feel your confidence grow and your adrenaline start to pump as he speaks. Leadership is important, especially at a time like this. Poor leadership could result in a poor outcome – seriously. It is good that we have a solid strategy, but it is a relief that you are actually going to get started. “Whether we get ’em or not, we will do what we can, but we all come out. Remember our (expletive) training!” Hot damn, he swore, he must be jacked up, but he did take the words right out of your mouth. “Now, lets grab our stuff and go get these guys…be safe – seriously!” The RIT number two spot is filled by the driver and she looks ready. She turns to the newbie and calmly says, “Kid, stay close, stay on the line.” As you walk right up to the side door, you start to feel fear creep back into your head. Only it’s different this time, it’s not the fear that you may be getting yourself into a jackpot; it’s a greater fear. As you walk forward you notice something, everyone on the fireground is looking at YOU, at the RIT – seriously. They EXPECT you to go save these guys. Then

it hits you…the fear you are facing now is the fear that you will not be able to make the rescue. These guys, who are counting on you the most, have families at home. Damn…get this stuff out of your head. Remember our (expletive) training. Fight the tunnel vision, the dry mouth. You know that your adrenal glands are pumping cortisol like crazy, but you must keep your emotions under control. You can only do your best –that’s it. You have a family that depends on you waiting at home. You have always (expletive) trained, and tried to keep your skill sets up. It won’t be lack of ability that lets these guys down, you think. But then you wonder, how would a crew who doesn’t practice this stuff, who doesn’t take it seriously, ever expect to be able to deal with this – seriously?? May their God help them. You get to the door and the driver gives you the thumbs up. She looks you in the eyes as you take the line, you can tell she is wrestling with the same emotions that you are. You take the line and secure it, unclip the search line ID tag, and clip it to your crew’s PIT passes, which are hanging from the RITSO’s Entry Control board. You are number four in the line and have newbie in front of you. You chuckle, he’s quiet now, looks like he’s about to crap himself. He is looking up at where the second floor had been and says, “We are going in there – seriously?” “No one else is going in for those guys,” you reply. “So you’re damn right we are going in there – seriously.” Regulators in, a quick air check, turn on flashlight, quick double check of your PPE, of your newbie and open the door… “Holy… (to be continued – seriously) S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 15


Local 3888’s

Third Annual

Charity Golf Classic BY BILL MCKEE, CHAIR, LOCAL 3888 ERSS COMMITTEE

O

ur third Annual Charity Golf Classic was held on June 21, 2012 at Rolling Hills Bethesda Grange, a new Club Link course. Each year, a charity is selected and the proceeds from this tournament are donated to the chosen charity. This year, we selected the much deserving Luso Canadian Charitable Society. This is a community-based organization in West Toronto that supports diverse families and adults that are living with physical and/or developmental disabilities and helps them to reach their full potential. Funds raised help to provide access to information, resources and programs that facilitate independence, growth and integration. For more information, please visit their website at www.lusoccs.org Our success was mainly a result of our corporate sponsors and their generosity. I would like to acknowledge and thank the Fire Services Credit Union, MSA, Sack, Goldblatt, Mitchell as well as Sussex Strategies and the Personal Insurance Group for their dedication and support. With their support and generosity, we were able to raise over $3,000 for this worthy community-based charity. The weather was perfect for an enjoyable round of golf on the newly renovated course at Bethesda Grange. Although our participation numbers were down significantly, with less than fifty percent of the 88 golfers being TPFFA members, this did not damper the mood. After registration and receiving door prizes, the outdoor BBQ was fired up, where participants enjoyed a nice lunch. Unfortunately, due to the decreased numbers this year, we lost our $10,000.00 hole-in-one sponsorship. However, the buzz was around our “Beat the Executive” competition hole, where participants tested their skill against Executive Board Officer, James Reed, for their chance to enter a draw to win the NFPA 1410 Traditional Helmet with Local 3888 logo, donated by MSA. The Fire Services Credit Union sponsored “In The Zone,” which offered a challenge to both male and female participants to land the perfect drive on a challenging hole. This was an

16

accuracy drive competition that a few participants were able to successfully negotiate. Sack, Goldblatt, Mitchell sponsored an equally challenging competition hole. On the first hole, participants attempted to get their shots closest to a 20-yard line set in the middle of the fairway. The Personal Insurance Group sponsored a putting competition between holes 9 and 10, where members tested their skills. Both participants and volunteers were enjoying the day but while many were finishing their last few holes, the beautiful sky began to turn to black, accompanied by lightning in the far distance, approaching quickly. Most were able to finish their round, but others like myself made a mad dash for the clubhouse in a torrential downpour. The skies did clear and a few dedicated and brave souls returned to their respective holes to finish out the round. Dinner was promptly served and enjoyed by everyone; the menu was a buffet and included a choice of succulent roast beef, plus salads, potatoes, vegetables and a variety of desserts. The evening wound down with all participants asked to come forward and claim a prize from our sponsors. The prizes ranged from golf shirts to gift certificates to bars, restaurants and shopping centers, golf bags, tools, etc. We also had numerous donations provided for our silent auction, such as passes to Wonderland, a Timex watch, a Ryobi tool set, luggage and a Mark Messier jersey, just to name a few. Although we did not reach capacity this year, the evening was an immense success because of the sponsors and our participants’ generosity. All of the proceeds raised will go towards building stronger communities. I would like to say a special thanks to Doug Erwin, James Reed, Janos Csepreghi, Mike Ogle, Geoff Boisseau and a special thanks to member Brent Weaver who donated his time. Thank you for your assistance in this event.

16


S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 17


G lo b a l F i re

Cambodia 2012 David McAntony Gibson Foundation

“The basic concept behind GlobalFire is to allow fire fighters in the developed world, help fire fighters in the developing world, perform the world’s most dangerous job.”

M

embers of Toronto PFFA Local 3888 (Craig Lester, Geoff Boisseau and Chris Pallister) along with London PFFA Local 142 member, Patrick Bradley, have recently returned from a two-week fire service-based humanitarian aid operation in Siem Reap, Cambodia. This type of aid mission is called a “Capacity Building Operation (CBO). These fire fighters volunteer with a Canadian fire service charity called “GlobalFire”. Cambodia was chosen for this GlobalFire operation because it is one of the poorest countries in the world, slowly returning from the brink of destruction, brought about by years of war, which only ended as recently as 1999. It is difficult to find a person or a family that has not been affected by this war. GlobalFire (www.globalfire.ca) is a new Toronto-based charity that focuses on international aid from a fire fighter’s point of view. Local 3888 member, Craig Lester (Station 445, D platoon), created the charity after having identified a need for fire service assistance, while volunteering with GlobalFire’s sister charity, GlobalMedic. GlobalFire is an operational arm of the David McAntony Gibson Foundation (DMGF), a registered Canadian charity, based in Toronto. Toronto paramedic Rahul Singh, to honour his friend David McAntony Gibson (who tragically lost his life on February 7, 1998), created DMGF in the spring of 1998. The charity deploys Police Officers, Paramedics and Fire Fighters, who volunteer their time and skills, to render aid after natural disasters and/or launch programs designed to strengthen the delivery of emergency services in the Third World. GlobalFire is organized and equipped to undertake several different types of operations in the developing world. The basic 18

concept behind a GlobalFire CBO is to gather the protective equipment and tools needed by an impoverished fire department, and donate that equipment free of charge. Understanding that fire fighting is an inherently dangerous job, and the equipment designed to tackle that threat is technologically advanced, GlobalFire also provides training on how to properly use the donated equipment. The majority of the fire service equipment that GlobalFire donates is collected from stock being decommissioned by First World fire departments. In addition to the training they receive on the equipment being donated by GlobalFire, the Third World fire department can request specific fire service training, or as is more often the case, they can ask GlobalFire to conduct one of its basic fire fighting courses.

GlobalFire is a “zero overhead” charity. That means that every penny raised goes to the fire fighters in the developing world. GlobalFire has no paid staff. The charity relies on its dedicated members, who are willing to donate their time and effort because they believe in helping fire fighters in developing countries. As such, each member of the recent Cambodian mission arranged their own time off; paid their own airfare, accommodations and meals, and


taught the local fire fighters for free. This is the best way to maximize the positive impact that GlobalFire can have with the funds it raises. During this latest GlobalFire operation in Cambodia, funds from Local 3888 were used to buy tires and batteries, in order to repair two of the five city of Siem Reap’s fire trucks. It is often cheaper and easier to buy or repair equipment in the developing world than it is here at home. The team also brought enough PPE, donated by London Fire and Local 142, to outfit the city’s entire fire department with bunker gear, helmets, flash hoods and gloves. Forcible entry tools purchased in Canada were also donated, due to the extremely difficult access issues commonly encountered in the developing world. The team, with the aid of translators, taught a basic fire fighting and fireground survival course to members of several Cambodian fire departments. Topics included: Fire 101, size-up, smoke reading, fire control, ventilation, pumping, fire streams, search and rescue techniques, search-line operations, drags and carries, low and reduced SCBA profile maneuvers, wire disentanglement procedures, ground ladder operations and rescues, forcible entry, fire fighter rescue, CPR, defibrillation and more. Fifty-five fire fighters were trained during the weeklong program.

The end of the course was marked by a real-time fire scenario requiring forcible entry and multiple victim rescues. The receipt of course certificates followed a graduation ceremony. This is an important part of the GlobalFire program as many of the fire fighters that attend GlobalFire training in the Third World have never had a day of schooling in their lives. The GlobalFire team also spent time at the Angkor Children’s Hospital, inspecting and servicing the facility’s fire protection equipment and instructing facility staff on the proper use and maintenance of that equipment. The mission was a huge success. The Cambodian fire fighters received needed training at no cost, and with the help of Local 3888 and Local 142, they received enough PPE to outfit each member of their department and were also able to put several apparatus back in service. None of this could have been accomplished without the hard work and long hours that the GlobalFire team put in before and during the operation. Good work, brothers! If you are interested in volunteering with GlobalFire, go to the website and register. “Fire fighters helping fire fighters” S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 19


3888

AwardsGalas & A Rewarding Experience for All!

BY JULIE FROST, LOCAL 3888 OFFICE SERVICES ADMINISTRATOR

T

he 83rd Pre-Gala and Off-Duty/ Media Awards reception and luncheon was held on April 20, 2012, at the Sheraton Centre Toronto in the Osgoode Ballroom. This year we were delighted to have Carolyn Mackenzie – Weekend Anchor/Feature Reporter for Global News as the Master of Ceremonies (pictured above). Carolyn is an award-winning journalist who has spent more than a decade covering some of the biggest stories in the GTA and across Canada. Carolyn is not only a member of the Global Toronto family, but also a member of “our” family. Her husband is Chris Stark, a fire fighter who works at station 431 in Etobicoke 20

and has been on the job for 15 years. Of the many things Carolyn is proud of, she is most proud of being a fire fighter’s wife. Due to her personal connection to Toronto Fire, she has been more than willing to support us when needed. Last fall, Carolyn welcomed our newest fire fighters to the department when she emceed the 2011/2012 recruitment ceremony. We were thrilled to have Carolyn help us honour the outstanding work provided by our media friends and our fire fighters over this past year, at this year’s Off Duty and Media Awards Ceremony. On behalf of the Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association, Thank you! Later that evening, the Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association hosted our annual Fire Fighter’s Gala, featuring the George Lake Big Band. Their finely tuned repertoire (20-piece band) drew on the timeless appeal of the greats – such as Glenn Miller and Duke Ellington. This band has the capability to win fans over from every generation. Their unique style had everyone swinging on the dance floor. Look for their new music CD called “Small Step.” The money raised from the ticket sales for the Gala goes toward numerous Toronto Charities, including Camp

Bucko. Camp Bucko is a Burn Camp for kids in Ontario. It provides an opportunity for children recovering from burn injuries to meet other children who have endured similar experiences in a camp environment. Camp Bucko gives these children temporary freedom from the everyday frustration of being burned, as well as a chance to share their stories and to bond with each other. Raffle tickets were purchased at the door. Throughout the evening, numerous door prizes were drawn with winners receiving everything from gift certificates to The Keg and Canadian Tire (watch out, handy men at work!) to our grand prize of a keg of Heineken. Cheers! Later on, a silent auction was held that entertained all. A bidding war erupted for the famous “Johnny Bower” merchandise, signed way back in his glory days as a Toronto Maple Leaf. On a serious note, this was a day to take pride and recognize our members who have gone well beyond the call of duty on and off the job to render help as needed. It reaffirms that being a fire fighter is a way of life and that we always look out for our communities. Awards or no awards, a job well done. Congratulations to ALL!


LOCAL 3888’s 2011 OFF-DUTY AWARDS BOX 12 ASSOCIATION AWARD

THE AL PEARSALL AWARD

This award will be presented annually to an individual who has gone above and beyond the call of duty in a voluntary capacity for the direct betterment of Local 3888 members. This may be exemplified by a single significant contribution or by continued extraordinary work by an individual that reflects positively, both on the winning candidate and Local 3888. The spirit of this award is to recognize outstanding service and volunteerism as demonstrated by the Box 12 Association. Winner: John Channing (Station 325, B Platoon) John has spent countless hours of his own time learning AUTOCAD and then measuring and mapping Toronto’s underground PATH system, making it safer for members of Local 3888 to function in an emergency situation.

Awarded to the Local 3888 member(s) who contributed time and ability toward the improvement of his/her/ their Community and Fellow Man, while “off-duty”. Winner: Craig Lester (Station 445, D Platoon) Craig started his service with Toronto Fire Services in 1999 and is a Shift Training Instructor. He is also a member of HUSAR (Heavy Urban Search and Rescue). Craig has been a member of the Canadian Military since 1995 and in 2008, was deployed to Afghanistan as an infantryman with 3RCR. Craig has served with Global Medic and was involved in the mission to Haiti in 2012 to assist victims of the earthquake. While in Haiti, Craig started working on the concept of GlobalFire, due to the need for technical rescue training and equipment. Later that same year, Craig was part of the inaugural GlobalFire mission to Cambodia, where he trained and equipped local fire teams.

BARRY WHITE AWARD New for 2012, the Barry White Award will be presented annually to the Volunteers on Box12/ Support 7 for their outstanding and dedicated service toToronto Professional Fire Fighters at emergency calls. Winner: Charlie Croft Charlie is the inaugural recipient of the Barry White Award. Charlie has been a member of the Greater Toronto Multiple Alarm Association for 35 years, responding to close to 1,000 alarms and providing rehab to on scene fire fighters. Charlie has served two terms as president of the GTMAA and was editor of the club magazine (The Trumpet) for five years. Charlie is an Executive with the Scarborough Fire Fighters Retirees Club and has been a member for 20 years, although he was never a member of the fire department. Charlie also served on the Colour Guard for seven years, participating in many fire department functions.

Off-Duty Awards continued on page 22 S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 21


Off-Duty Awards...Continued from page 21

THE BERNARD “BEN” BONSER AWARD Awarded to the Local 3888 member(s) who, during the past year while “off-duty”, have distinguished himself/herself/themselves by making a rescue or being involved in saving the life of a fellow citizen in a hazardous or threatening situation. Winner: John Martin (Haz 145, A Platoon) On Wednesday, September 29, 2011, John was returning home from a trip to Italy. While waiting to board the plane, a passenger (Mario) experienced a medical emergency. John tended to Mario, monitoring his level of consciousness and heart rate until paramedics came on scene.The paramedics cleared Mario for the flight home, citing an allergic reaction. John was suspicious of the evaluation, citing that the signs and symptoms pointed to a heart condition. Once on the aircraft, John informed the head steward of Mario’s episode and confided that he felt there was potential for a reoccurrence. Three hours into the flight, Mario did suffer another attack and lost consciousness. John immediately tended to Mario by taking his blood pressure, monitoring his pulse and respirations, and as Mario regained consciousness, administered ASA. John continued to monitor Mario throughout the flight, with instructions from a Medi-link doctor through the cockpit radio. The flight was going to reroute to an emergency landing in France, but continued to cross the Atlantic upon Mario’s stabilization. The flight received a priority landing at Pearson. Mario was taken from the flight, under paramedic care. Mario has made a full recovery and credits John with getting him through his heart attack.

THE ROY SILVER AWARD Awarded to the Local 3888 member(s) who, during the past year, while “off-duty”, have distinguished himself/herself/themselves by performing first aid or CPR on (or for) a fellow citizen. Winner: Phillip Barnes (Pumper 422, D Platoon) While playing badminton at a local high school, Phil noticed a commotion at an adjacent court. As Phil approached, he witnessed Charles Barton bleeding from the head and seemingly taking his last breath, while lying prone on the court. When Phil checked his pulse it was decided that Charles was now VSA (Vital Signs Absent). As Phil initiated CPR, he instructed a bystander to call 9-1-1 and another to fetch the AED from the foyer. Once the AED was applied, one shock was administered, along with two minutes of CPR, upon which Charles came back to life by grabbing Phil’s arm and stating, “Get off my chest!”

2011 MEDIA AWARDS The Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association has sponsored the annual TPFFA Media Awards since 1949. The purpose of these awards is to honour journalists who produce unusual and dramatic coverage of the exceptional work that Toronto Fire Fighters perform on a daily basis. The judges for the competition this year were: • Ken Mallett, a veteran print and television journalist and the former news director of Global TV News; (kenmallett@bell.net) • Norm Betts, a distinguished news photographer with decades of experience and himself the winner of several Firefighters Awards; (normbetts@canadianphotographer.com) • Bill Dampier, a former police reporter for the Toronto Telegram and the winner of National Newspaper Award as writer for the Toronto Star. (dampier@sympatico.ca) • Judge Emeritus: Bob Johnstone, retired national reporter for CBC radio and television, and a former police reporter for the Toronto Star. Here are the winners of the 2011 Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’Association Media Awards: 22


Best News Story – Circulation over 100,000

Best Photo Newsprint – Circulation over 100,000

Randy Starkman, Toronto Daily Star, awarded posthumously for an unusual feature published July 7, 2011, tracing the lives of at least half a dozen Olympic athletes who became fire fighters after the end of their athletic careers. “The article showed the athleticism required of fire fighters,” the judges said, “and it told us things we didn’t know, which is what every feature should do.” Denise Hynes, Randy’s sister-in-law, accepts the award on Randy’s behalf.

John Hanley, the Toronto Sun, for a dramatic photograph of fire fighters at a fire at the old Empress Hotel on January 3, 2011. “A dramatic, well-composed and well-executed photograph that captures the intensity of the moment,” the judges said.

Best News Story – Circulation under 100,000 or Online Cynthia Reason, InsideToronto.com, for an article published July 22, 2011, on the death of Toronto Fire Fighter, Sylvester Maj at the age of 60, from cancer, after 20 years of service. The article drew attention to job-related illnesses among fire fighters, and the disturbing increase in the incidence of cancer among serving fire fighters.

Best Television News Coverage The CTV newsroom and on-scene reporters for their coverage of the six-alarm fire on January 3 at the abandoned Empress Hotel located at Yonge and Gould Streets. Four fire fighters were injured at the scene and two had to be rescued after they fell into the blaze, as they fought the fire from the roof of a nearby building. “CTV’s coverage was dramatic, complete, and electrifying,” the judges said. “Their broadcast of the audio of the Mayday call, after the fire fighters fell, and their footage of the partial collapse of the building helped illustrate the bravery and expertise of the fire fighters at the scene.”

More awards continued on page 24 S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 23


Media Awards...Continued from page 23

Best Photography – Circulation under 100,000

Best Unpublished Photograph by a Local 3888 member

Philip Lameira, the Beaches Metro News, for a touching photograph, published on June 14, 2011, of fire fighters using an oxygen mask to resuscitate an injured kitten. “A beautiful photograph,” the judges commented. “It got great front page play and it certainly deserved it.

Keith Hamilton, for a photograph of hundreds of fire fighters in full uniform, marching at the funeral of Police Officer Ryan Russell on January 18, 2011. The photograph “captured the solemnity and importance of the occasion,” the judges said, “and demonstrated the solidarity of fire fighters in the face of tragedy.”

Firefighters from station 225 attempt to revive a cat at the scene of a fire on Kingston Road on June 9, 2011. Photo by Phil Lameira/Beach Metro News

24


Best Photography – Online Media John Hanley, InsideToronto.com, for an eerily evocative photograph, published January 24, 2011, of fire fighters battling a pre-dawn blaze at a house under construction in EastYork. “The photographer got there before sunrise, in the dead of winter, and captured a shot that gives a different, almost mystical, view of the work fire fighters do,” the judges said.

Best Fire Watch Magazine Article Charlene Rathgeb for “Where Are Your Guys?” Charlene received this award for her strongly worded article challenging Toronto Fire Fighters to get more involved in our memorial celebrations.

Best News Story Published on a Website Kelli Korducki, Torontoist. com – “Fire Fighters Are Not Gravy” In a time when the Toronto Fire Services were facing some difficult times in the media, Kelli brought attention to a YouTube video that delivered some hardhitting facts and cast fire fighters in a more positive light.

Glen Cole Award Global News –Ward Smith/Susan Hay, Global has partnered with the Toronto Fire Fighters Toy Drive for the last six years. In recent years, Global has launched a strong campaign for the Toy Drive, including live broadcasts from the Shops at Don Mills and features from fire halls and our toy warehouse. The Toy Drive’s partnership with Global has brought a happy holiday to many disadvantaged children throughout the city.

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 25


LOCAL 3888 ANNUAL

BY BILL MCKEE, CHAIR, LOCAL 3888 ERSS COMMITTEE

T

he Annual Local 3888 Picnic was resurrected and held at Centre Island on July 10th this year. We had over 900 attendees, with hundreds of parents and children coming to enjoy a fun day of games and entertainment. The day started with the sun high in the sky and the temperature extremely warm, and it would only get warmer as the day progressed. The Toronto Islands are a nice place in the summertime because of the moderate temperatures provided by Lake Ontario. The registration on the island went smoothly and every child received their annual picnic T-shirt with the “Play Structure Fire” logo on the front. Families attending the picnic that travelled over to the Island on the eleven o’clock ferry were treated to a water display by the fireboat. The ferry ride is always a highlight for the children and once on the island, there was plenty to do for kids and adults alike. The majestic view of the city skyline and the fireboat display is always memorable. Once on the island, registered participants found a wide range of activities to participate in. There were four large bouncers for the kids to play on. Bouncers were age appropriate, so that children of all ages could play, and they were well used throughout the day. We had face painters on hand and craft tables for smaller children. Of course, nothing beats the summer heat like getting a nice cold water and jumbo freeze from Box 12, or some cotton candy or popcorn (always popular). At two o’clock, the children’s races were held; all children four years old and younger received a prize at the end of their race. For children over the age of four and up to the

26

age of sixteen, medals were awarded for the first three places of each race and youth hats were given to all participants. Parents and children also had the opportunity to play together in wheelbarrow races. After the races, the adults and older teens entertained the children with shoe kicking, frisbee tossing and tug-o-war. The highlight was the watermelon eating contests. The women and men who participated provided great entertainment during their contest. Although I have to hand it to the women; not only did they have better times but as well, the techniques used were certainly interesting. For those families with older kids, or for those times before and after the scheduled events, there were discounted tickets available for the rides at Centerville. For members that did not plan for a picnic lunch, meal tickets were available at the registration tent to get food in Centerville, as well. At the end of the scheduled events, once the games were complete and the air was let out of the bouncers, the members and kids had enjoyed a warm summer’s day. Most families did not leave at the end of the games, but stayed to enjoy the many opportunities for fun on the islands. For those that attended, they know what a good time was had; for those that didn’t or couldn’t attend this year, make sure you prepare to attend next year’s picnic. Thank you to Julie Frost, Sandy Hoeflich, Jim Dillon, Henry Mommo, our student volunteers and the entire Local 3888 Executive Board for your assistance in making this event a huge success. We hope to see you next year!


S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 27


The POWER of Negative Thinking Negative pressure (-) has a much greater (>) impact on fire spread than positive pressure (+) BY KRISS GARCIA, RETIRED BATTALION CHIEF, SALT LAKE CITY F.D.

I

f positive pressure attack (PPA) were invented today, it would evolve around the negative pressure aspects, rather than the positive pressure aspects, of structural fires. Fire instructors explaining PPA would talk not about the volumes of pressure PPA introduces into a building, but rather the importance of enhancing the negative pressure areas to prevent fire extension, while improving interior tenability and safety for advancing crews. I sometimes wish I could turn back the hands of time and reach into a box, pull out this relatively new and obviously controversial tactic, and start teaching it afresh. In this article, I’ll demonstrate why changing the way you think about PPA can increase the effectiveness of the tactic. I’ve also included a shortened sample standard operating procedure for PPA.

FIRE BEHAVIOUR

As we look at PPA with a fresh mind, let’s talk for a moment about basic fire behaviour. Fire naturally moves from areas of higher, or positive, pressure to areas of comparatively lower, or negative, pressure. The largest area of negative pressure during a fire is outside the structure. The positive pressure area inside and the negative pressure area outside are separated by the walls and roof of the structure. Specifically, PPA entails making an exhaust opening to the outside or improving an existing opening where the fire is already exhausting, then using a blower to add slightly to the already higher interior pressure. Now that we’ve identified the areas of high and low pressure, we must ask: 28

What creates the substantial increase in pressure when a structure is on fire? There are two causes. The first is the fire itself. As molecules heat and expand, they substantially increase the interior pressure within a building or within a fire area. This increase has been measured at approximately 7 percent overall. The second substantial increase in interior pressure is caused by water application. This increase, due to steam production, is less dependent on stream selection than on extremely hot interior temperature, the hot surfaces our water strikes and the volume of the fire space relative to the negative area where pressure could exhaust. The pressure created inside a structure by fire and the steam generated by water application is actually much higher than a positive pressure blower can create. When tested separately without a fire to interfere with the results, a blower increases the interior pressure within a test chamber only a fraction of 1 percent. Given this, why then do we talk so much about the blower used in fire attack

as creating the pressure? The reason: It doesn’t take much of a difference in pressure to cause the fire to actively seek a path of less resistance or an area of less pressure. Luckily for us, most of the time this is out a window.

PROBLEMS WITH PPA

When PPA goes wrong, it’s usually attributable to one or two conditions, or their combination. First, mistakes result from a lack of coordination and control on the fire ground, including a lack of department wide training and education in the use of PPA. Second, problems may arise from insufficient or no forward exhaust. When products of combustion are emitted under pressure ahead of the attack crews, substantial exhaust is needed. Two to three large windows in a dwelling are generally sufficient exhaust as you begin your attack. As fire seeks the lower pressure on the exterior, fire spread throughout the structure, where pressure is higher, is decreased. If heavy smoke and/or fire is returning to the

As fire develops, it moves from areas of high pressure to areas of lower pressure. In the first photo on top, we see fire burning within the structure. Next, we see the fire exhaust out the window shortly after PPA is initiated and the fire environment controlled.


A single exhaust fan ensures fire and lethal products of combustion escape to the area of greatest negative pressure. This simple action will greatly assist advancing crews.

attack entrance exhausting above the blower, do not enter! In these situations you don’t have enough forward exhaust, suggesting rapid interior fire growth or a flashover is a possibility. In this situation, firefighters must create additional exhaust or change tactics. Again, fire moves from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure, and the larger the exhaust opening, the more products of combustion will exit ahead of advancing crews. This irrefutable gas law does not change just because our fires are on the East Coast or the West Coast or anywhere in between. It’s a law as absolute as gravity. What does this mean to us in the fire service? When we see fire and smoke coming out windows with pressure, the fire has found an area where it wants to go and, generally speaking, all we have to do is to make sure it continues to exit the building where it’s already exhausting as we make a rapid interior attack. Oftentimes, this calls for increasing the size of the exhaust opening while we place our firefighters in an area of slightly higher pressure created by the initialattack fan.

WHERE VENTING FITS IN

Why then, would we want to increase or add an additional negative pressure area by opening the roof? This tactic, while proven to be effective at times, should also be thought of as a means of adding to or increasing negative pressure areas within the structure (not outside). Built-in ventilation elements, such as gable or soffit vents, haven’t been shown to increase the negative pressure space into the attic area substantially enough to cause rapid fire spread.

Remember: Fire and the products of combustion will go to the largest negative area; most of the time, this is through a failed exterior window. Test after test shows an increase in viability of the structure within seconds after PPA is initiated as long as windows are used for an exhaust. For victims who cannot self-rescue, this means their chance of survival increases because the lethal products of combustion, the colloid of toxic elements we call heavy or thick smoke are safely exhausted over the top of the victim. Generally speaking, venting the roof takes longer than deploying an interior hoseline (increasing positive pressure); therefore, interrupting the thermal balance prior to exhausting actually worsens conditions for victims. Remember: Without PPE, we often would not survive the conditions our tactics create; we can’t expect more from our victims.

BEFORE YOU VENT – INITIAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR USING PPA

For PPA to work as a tactical option, the entire fire department must commit to it. Before your department is ready to use PPA at incidents, you must: • Ensure first-arriving crews have highvolume positive pressure blowers readily available on all apparatus. • Establish a protocol or procedure for putting blowers in operation as part of a coordinated attack. • Thoroughly train and educate all personnel in PPA, including theory, application and precautions. • Ensure all personnel understand that PPA is a fire-attack option. • Define when you will use PPA. Consider an incremental approach initially.

THINK NEGATIVE

All departments should seek fire professionals with proven PPA experience prior to implementation. You need education first, then training. Having Crews train at a building designed to represent realistic fire done that, at your next behaviour at an advanced PPA course. fire, identify the largest amount of negative area. Allow Example: Authorize the use of the fire to safely rise off the floor level PPA on single-family dwellings or by using windows as exhausts, rather commercial buildings less than 5,000 than doors, and attack the fire from square feet, where crews can readily a safe area of slightly higher pressure attack from the unburned side of the created by your attack fan. A bonus structure, and/or situations where of using this tactic: The area you’re crews are able to create ample exhaust attacking from remains relatively clear, in the immediate area of the fire in so you can see hazards in your interior coordination with an interior attack. environment. As the PPA quickly clears the area, the structure is protected THE POSITIVES OF without interrupting the thermal balPOSITIVE PRESSURE ance and forcing the lethal products of PPA benefits to fire operations include: combustion onto the floor or bed level, • Heat and smoke are rapidly cleared where victims who can no longer rescue from the fire structure early in the themselves are located. operation; Remember: Negative pressure (–) has • The chances for victim survival are a much greater (>) impact on fire spread increased; than positive pressure (+). Or as we like • Improved visibility aids firefighters in to put it: – > +. search and rescue; • Clean, cool air replaces the toxic interior atmosphere, so victims S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 29


30


The Power of Negative Thinking...Continued from page 29

and firefighters face less exposure to heat and dangerous products of combustion; • Damage to property from heat and products of combustion is decreased; • Crews that would normally be assigned to roof ventilation operations are available for search and rescue and fire control; • Attack lines can be rapidly advanced to the seat of the fire; • Fire spread is decreased due to cooling and rapid confinement; and • Post-knockdown ventilation is controllable by using simple measures such as opening or closing doors or turning off the blower.

Kriss Garcia

Kriss Garcia has served in the fire service for 25 years and recently retired as a battalion chief from the Salt Lake City (UT) Fire Department. He is chief of the American Fork Fire Department. He has a bachelor’s degree in public administration, is a licensed engineering contractor and a paramedic, and is an NFA instructor. He serves on the NFPA 1021 committee as a voting member of The Air Movement Control Association. He is the co-author of Positive Pressure Attack for Ventilation and Firefighting and numerous magazine articles on the subject.

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 31


TORONTO FIR T

he Jamie Bell Adventure Playground in High Park was built in 1998, as a result of a community effort, in which local volunteers collaborated on the design and construction of the castle-themed park. It was named after a local community activist, who was instrumental in gathering support for the park, who passed away in 2002. In the early morning of March 17, vandals set the park ablaze, causing extensive damage to this cherished part of the community. Families who had watched their kids spend many hours playing there were devastated. Very quickly, offers of financial assistance and volunteer labour to rebuild the park began to pour in. Among those offers for help was your Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association. As the community met to begin plans for a new park, Association representatives, as well as TFS Administration, were there to pledge our assistance with whatever we could provide. Corporate partners pledged funding for materials and volunteer groups in the community signed up to lend their skills and labour to get the project done. When renowned contractor, Mike Holmes and his “Holmes on Homes” crew got involved, everyone knew that something special was going to happen. City staff, with encouragement from Ward 13 Councillor, Sarah Doucette, ensured that whatever administrative obstacles stood in the way would not delay the implementation of the construction plan. Beginning in late June, community volunteers, under the expert direction of the Mike Holmes crew, began the rebuild of this important landmark in High Park. Your Association put out a call for volunteers and our members responded with the great dedication and skills that Toronto’s fire fighters are known for. Over many consecutive days, Executive members, stewards and you, our dedicated members, worked side by side with professionals and volunteers to get the job done and “make it right!” Every one of Mike Holmes’ crew were consummate professionals and it was evident they were committed to ensuring the park would be built to the highest possible standard. Even when faced with an impending deadline, they were always approachable and Mike Holmes led by example, never saying no to a photo or autograph request. Despite extremely difficult conditions, something our members are accustomed to dealing with, hundreds of community members came out to see the park begin to take shape. An

32

extreme weather alert, with high heat and humidity, took its toll on workers, which did slow down the construction schedule. This was truly a team effort, as TFS administration provided any necessary equipment to ensure everyone on the job site was able to work safely and efficiently. On Saturday, July 7th, on what was hoped to be the final day of the build, hundreds of people came out to the park to see the final touches put on this incredible new structure. Members of Box 12 came out and spent the entire day at the park, providing comfort and relief to all those on the work site. In-service crews set up an impromptu waterpark to keep kids cool, while your Association provided our always popular fire truck bouncer. Many of the corporate sponsors also set up tents and trailers with family-friendly activities and TFS Fire Prevention was there with giveaways and safety tips for everyone. Late in the day, it became apparent that, despite superhuman efforts on everyone’s part, the park would not be completed on time. The weather, extreme heat, humidity and torrential rain had taken its toll, but would not dampen the spirits of the huge crowd looking for a celebration. So, everyone made the best of the situation and gathered to acknowledge the efforts of the entire community throughout the rebuild. Local politicians and community leaders thanked everyone for coming together to ensure this community treasure would live on. The efforts of your Association and so many of its members were recognized by everyone in attendance. Mike Holmes thanked all community volunteers and those fire fighters who had come out to make this project a huge success, and for doing whatever was necessary to make it right. Many photo opportunities and a great big cake later, everyone vowed that they would be back in the coming days to see this project through to completion. Mike Holmes and his crew were as good as their word, as a few days later, on July 13th, the park had its formal grand opening; much to the delight of the hundreds of kids, eagerly waiting to try out the new playground. It must be said, that the commitment and dedication of so many of our members was instrumental to the success of this project. It truly embodied everything that our members bring to the community we serve. With so many members on the ground and for fear of leaving someone out, we won’t mention any names, but you know who you are and you are no doubt standing a little taller today, with a great warm feeling inside. Thank you to every one of our members for making the Jamie Bell Adventure Playground Rebuild a truly memorable moment for our Association and our city. Great job!


RE FIGHTERS

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 33


The L ast of the BY PATRICK HAYTER, TORONTO FIRE FIGHTER

I

magine a small, white, cottagestyle house with towering mature trees all around it. It is lined with pristine flowerbeds, bursting with bright reds, whites, pinks and yellows; immaculate evergreen shrubs trimmed to perfection, with not one branch out of place; a lawn that is full, dark green and freshly cut. All this, encased by a two-foot high white picket fence that brings the whole “English cottage-like” homestead together. Not to mention the backyard that backs on to a forest, while in the near distance, The Trent-Severn waterway meanders by. This is the home of who may be, “The Last of the Tillermen!” As I approached the Archway that lead to the walkway, I was greeted with a red and white sign that said, “Fire Fighter Parking Only” and then a sign near the laneway that said, “Fire Fighter’s Lane.” At that point, I knew I was at the right house and that a very noble and proud retired Toronto Fire Fighter lived here. We knocked on the screen door and a 34

little elderly lady came to the door and greeted us with a huge, welcoming smile. “Come in, Come in,” she said and walked right to the fridge and asked if I would like a drink, since it was a sweltering day. “I have lemonade, iced tea…oh wait, you’re a fire fighter aren’t you…ummmm, I have Coors light or Canadian.” We all laughed and I said I would take whatever retired Toronto Fire Department Captain Murray Fenton was having. She promptly brought over two cold, delicious beers for us! Sitting in a comfy looking reclining, rocking chair, was an elderly man with a cane hanging over the armrest. I introduced myself and he extended his hand and shook mine with more force and vigor than I would have otherwise thought possible. He gave me a smile and a look like, stronger than you thought eh? I was excited to sit down and have a chat with him about his life and his experiences and tribulations through a long career with the Toronto Fire Department.

Keep in mind that retired Captain Fenton retired when I was four years old; I am in my late 30s now! That’s right, he retired in 1979 from the original Toronto Fire Department! The war was over and on May 1, 1946, Murray, who was employed on a D.E.M.S (Defensively Equipped Merchant Ship) named “Stadacona” as a naval gunner, was discharged. He returned to Toronto and applied to the Toronto Fire Department. At that time, any men who were involved in the Second World War were given first chance at becoming a Toronto Fireman; to the point where you HAD to be an overseas vet in order to get the job - no ifs, ands or buts! Murray went to the old Adelaide Station, where he had an interview with then Fire Chief, George Sinclair. There were several other candidates there for the exact same reason. With no references on the application, it helped tremendously if you knew someone already on the department, S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 34


TFD Tillermen? to help ensure your employment. After the interview, Chief Sinclair instructed Murray to wait in the hall. After a while, the Chief came back out and asked Murray if he was married or single. Murray replied, “Married” and the Chief responded, “I will take you on!” Murray thanked him and within the next three weeks, he had been given a medical and a physical, followed by two weeks of fire fighter training in a classroom at the old Adelaide Station. Murray remembers his starting yearly salary – a meager $1,700! Wow, we’ve come a long way, considering that according to the inflation calculator, $1,700 in 1946 was equivalent to only $18,774.80 in 2010. Murray did His “In-station” training at the Runnymede Station (424), which at the time had a pump and a hook and ladder – or a modern “tiller truck,” as we know it. He was there until 1949, when he went to work at Balmoral (311), where he was assigned to the hook and ladder truck under Captain Mooney. The Captain asked Murray if he had any previous tiller experience. Murray replied, “I messed around with the one at Runnymede.” The Captain paused and stated that they didn’t get too many runs, so, Murray would be fine at being the lone tillerman. Murray remembers the Captain’s number one rule was to always steer the tiller the opposite way of the cab driver. The joke was that when the cab driver of the hook and ladder truck looked out his window and saw the tiller driver, it was time to bale! Only thirty minutes after starting his shift at 5:00 p.m., a call came in to an alarm down Yonge Street. The Captain looked him in the eye before mounting the cab and said, “Sink or swim kid!” Murray told me a funny story about Balmoral. One dark summer evening, they had the back door open, which looked over a cemetery, and a bat flew in the hall on the apparatus floor. So, the guys decided to put their helmets on

and were chasing this bat with brooms all over the hall. After about 15 minutes of running and yelling, they realized that all of the neighbours were watching them with stunned looks on their faces, thinking that all of the firemen had completely lost their minds! After five years at Balmoral, Murray moved to the busy Berkley Street station, where there was only a pump (#4 pump). It was during the time that he was in this station that radios were introduced into the department. In theory the radios were great, however, at the time, they were no real use, so the rule was that you always had to have a dime on you, so that when you actually had fire showing, you would have to find the nearest pay phone and call 2-1-33 to the switch board and state the following: “This is Fenton from 4 Pumps. We need help at a working fire,” and then give the address and proceed back to the fire scene to get to work! One day at Berkley Street, a fellow came in and asked where the station’s furthest alarm box was located (alarm boxes were located at several points throughout the city, where you would pull a small arm to send a signal to the switchboard, who would respond a truck to the location of the alarm box if a pedestrian S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 35


36

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 36


The Last of the TFD Tillermen...Continued from page 35

saw smoke or fire). Murray told the gentleman that it was at the intersection of Queen Street and Lee. They responded to an alarm at that location a short while later. During that time, this same fellow started a fire at Sherbourne and Gerrard. By the time they returned, the fire was huge. The arson squad, lead by “Arson Carson” and with help from Lorne Buckingham Sr., caught the arsonist a short while later. Murray was promoted in 1965, to Captain of the High Pressure Truck, which boosted hydrant pressure in the core of the city – This truck was put into service in 1906, following the Great Fire of 1904. Then, after spending a few years there, it was on to assuming the role of Captain on 3 pump (Grosvenor). At that time, the Dundas Street station (325) had over 500

runs a year and everyone was astounded at how busy it was. Next stop for Murray was to be the Captain on the Fire Boat, where he had approximately 12 runs per year, but was kept busy with breaking ice for the ferries and ensuring that all of the brass was polished and clean on the William Lyon Mackenzie. Murray retired in 1979 and a party was held in his honour at the Fireman’s Club in Markham. He received six months pay and a certificate, along with a golden helmet and a firm handshake. When I asked him what he wore as personal protective equipment over his career, he chuckled and said, “A petch coat, hip boots, leather helmet, no gloves, no air pack and we had to buy our own station work boots, but we were

provided uniforms and fatigue clothes.” I had a great day talking to Murray and after leaving his house, I thought to myself, “Look how far we have come in the last 50 years!” This retired Captain had only a small fraction of the benefits we currently enjoy today and yet he is prouder of his fire fighting career than many others I know in our line of work today. Is he the last of the tillermen? I’m not entirely sure, but I do know that he was one of the fire fighters who helped to evolve our profession into what it is today. The public respect we garner, our PPE, our working conditions and our wages and benefits have all come on the backs of all those who have come before us. Thank you to the last of the tillermen. You made us who we are today!

Picture it... YOUR ad right here! Call Debbie Cheeseman at 1-800-366-3113 Ext. 7806 or Fax to 1-866-764-2452 to assure your spot for the next issue.

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 37


STATION 226 BY MATT DUNN, TORONTO FIRE FIGHTER

T

he intersection of Main Street and Lake View Avenue (now Gerrard St. E) in Toronto’s East end, is the heart of what was formerly the vibrant, independent Village of East Toronto. As the developing community grew throughout the late 19th century, it was served by not only a number of local businesses, but also its very own East Toronto Fire Brigade. Even though East Toronto was not a large community, its town council had been quite proactive with regard to fire protection and the East Toronto Fire Brigade occupied three separate fire stations. Station 1 was located on Sprucehill Road north of Queen St. East, Station 2 on the east side of Main St. between Swanwick Ave. and Lyall Ave., and Station 3 on the east side of Dawes Rd., north of Danforth Avenue. From 1888 till 1908, when the decision was made for East Toronto to be annexed by the City of Toronto, the majority of East Toronto Council meetings were held upstairs in the original wooden two storey structure that served as East Toronto Fire Station 2. Fortunately, for the East Toronto Fire Brigade, the City of Toronto Fire Committee recommended in 1909, that their services be continued until a permanent solution for fire protection in the area of East Toronto could be established. Toronto’s Fire Chief arranged for four men and one Captain to continue to work out of two of the former East Toronto Fire 38

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 38


Stations, on Main St. and Dawes Rd., at a total cost of $550 per year. By late 1909, the City of Toronto had allocated a substantial $262,000 for various police and fire station construction projects throughout the city. One of the many projects on the agenda was the creation of both a fire station to replace the original East Toronto Station 2, as well as a new police station nearby. In order to supplement the city owned lot of land at the southeast corner of Swanwick Ave. and Main St., the city was required to purchase the adjoining 50 x 160 ft. lot to the south from Mr. and Mrs. Richard M. Smythe, in order to accommodate the new buildings. This land purchase came with a price tag of $2,500 and the city would officially take possession of the property on May 1, 1910. This was a particularly busy time for construction of new fire stations in Toronto, as the city would build six new stations in a matter of three years. When tenders were received for the construction of the new fire station at 87 Main St., there were a total of eight different contractors employed to complete various aspects of the new station. Surprisingly, while the City of Toronto also requested tenders for the construction of the new police station in the same area, only two of the eight contractors working on the fire station were also involved with the police station. The total expenses incurred in the construction of the new fire station amounted to $25,288 between the eight contractors. An additional $1,098.60 was spent on various hardware, stable fittings, and paving services for the station. While the new station was being diligently worked on, the original East Toronto Station 2 briefly co-existed with the new station, before being removed by Messrs. McMillan & Costain, at a cost of $80. The three-storey Toronto Fire Station 22 was eventually completed with a brick exterior and two apparatus bays. It also came well equipped to handle the presence of horses, with a large hayloft at the rear of the second storey. During this time period, horses were still commonplace in the Toronto Fire Department, as is evident from their annual expense reports. In 1910, when construction of

the station began, total disbursements for the Toronto Fire Department’s new horses and keeping of horses totaled $18,923.10. Meanwhile, the cost of apparatus, supplies and repairs was only $5,481.35. This would soon shift as the City of Toronto began purchasing several motor-

ized fire apparatus that went into service beginning in 1911. New vehicles made fire fighters much faster and more efficient in the coming years, as they provided the ability to combine various fire fighting tasks and made them available from one unit, as well as the additional speed they provided when responding to calls. Shortly after opening, Toronto’s Station 22 received one of the earliest motorized fire apparatus used in the city, a Seagrave Hook & Ladder, identical to the one that was used at Station 24 on Balmoral Avenue. With the restrictions of horses no longer impeding the ability to quickly arrive at calls, fire fighter S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 39


Station 226...Continued from page 39

response times were also improved by a 1913 Bylaw, predating the Highway Traffic Act, that gave them the right of way on the city’s streets. At the time, a driver obstructing a fire truck could incur a $50 fine per offense, and if necessary, the sale of their possessions or hard labour if the payment was not made. Another change to Station 22 after opening was the addition of pole-hole coverings that were purchased at a cost of $288. At the time, not all pole-holes throughout Toronto had covers, which resulted in numerous injuries over the years. Even at stations such as 87 Main St., that had the covers, there were accidents when they were not being used properly. In 1941, a fire fighter at the Main St. Station suffered serious back injuries and was rushed to hospital after slipping on the floor and falling through one of the holes that did not have the cover down. With the Main St. Station now over 100 years old, its fire fighters have also faced danger at several major fires throughout the years. In the summer of 1961, more than 10,000 citizens looked on for more than three hours, as fire fighters faced a massive fire at two lumberyards at Victoria Park Avenue and Musgrave Street. It took 18 trucks and 40

over 90 fire fighters to quell the blaze and that caused nearly $300,000 in damage and sent four fire fighters to the hospital with injuries. More recently, the 1990s brought a wave of large, memorable fires to the area. On November 24, 1996, over 65 fire fighters were called to a million dollar Main St. fire that lasted over for hours. In the post amalgamation era, the large fires continued to be a regular occurrence in the area that Main St. fire fighters now responded to on the newly

designated Pump and Aerial ‘226’. In January of 1999, a Queen St. East fire at a four-story building required 110 fire fighters, claimed the lives of two civilians, and caused nearly $1 million in damage. The blizzard-like conditions left the Beaches apartment building covered with ice by the time fire fighting operations were completed. Only two months later, less than 500 meters west, there was another fire on Queen St. East that left 40 people homeless and caused hundreds of thousands of dollars S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 40


Apparatus A s Fire Station signed to 226

P226 2006 Spartan A Seagrave (Can dvantage FF ada) #3330 1250/500/20 A 24123 A226      2002 Spartan G Smeal #2080 ladiator FF 50 75’ 1500/500 x-A215

in damage. Both Pump and Aerial 226 were among the first on scene at the fire and acted quickly, raising ladders to rescue the numerous occupants leaning out of the upper windows. One victim in the fire was found without vital signs but revived on scene. In 2008, not far from the location of former East Toronto Fire Station 3, was a large explosion and fire at 2 Secord Avenue that forced the evacuation of nearly 900 tenants. Although this incident would become overshadowed by the Sunrise Propane explosion that occurred in North Toronto one month

later, it was significant as six fire fighters were sent to hospital and over 130 pets were rescued for residents. Two years later, on a cold winter night, the area again had a major fire when a home at 161 Wheeler Avenue caught fire and brought over 25 trucks to the scene and over $1.5 million in damage. Both Pumper and Aerial 226 were dispatched to the fire on the first alarm. Though much has changed in the ways of fire fighting operations in the last hundred years, the same cannot be said for the old fire station at 87 Main Street. The station was designated as

Station 226 at the time of amalgamation and has had some interior renovations completed, including the lowering and reinforcement of the apparatus floor, but otherwise remains largely unchanged. Much of the old fire fighting equipment and photos can still be found among the walls and throughout the rear hayloft. A walk through the bay doors will have you quickly notice the original alarm mounted on the wall. Even as East Toronto and its fire stations became swallowed up and joined the City of Toronto, ‘Main Street’ has always remained in the city’s east end.

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 41


Good Luck

to Local 3888 Retirees

O

n Friday May 4, 2012, Local 3888 said goodbye and a job well done to eighty-three of our own who had retired during the past year. Local 3888 also recognized and remembered a number of members who answered their final alarm during the years 2011 and 2012. The Toronto Fire Services Pipes and Drums Band opened the evening by playing several numbers, and by the reaction of those in attendance, they were a complete hit. President Ed Kennedy and Fire Chief William Stewart began the evening with some general remarks and congratulated all on their well-deserved retirement. Grace was said and dinner was served to begin this event, which was held at a long-time supporter of Local 3888’s, Q’ssis Place in the

42

old City of Scarborough. After dinner, Entertainment Committee Chair, Bill McKee, along with Committee members, President Kennedy and Fire Chief Stewart, made presentations to the retiring members. Many of the fire fighters honoured had over 30 years of service with one of the former six cities and the current City of Toronto. This is an occupation pitted with stress and danger, as well as a great sense of serving the community. Many of those being recognized were accompanied by family members and it was nice to be able to thank them for sharing in the journey. Good luck to all our retirees and may they live full and prosperous lives knowing that they made a difference.


Name Spencer Aitken Edward Allen Thomas Ansell Ron Bennett Barton Bowerman Michael Brewer Robert Buchan Douglas Carter Richard Cay Edward Chamot Norman Clapham Keith Clifford Colin Clive Gregg Corden Kevin Cullen Scott Cunningham Thomas Davies Stephen Doran Michael Dougan William Egan Thomas Flockhart James Franks Bruce Gallinger William Gibson Bob Gilbert Alan Gouk Beatrice Grant Jeffrey Hamill David Hamilton Stephen Harder James Hart Mark Hayes William Hill Alfons Janusas Reginald Jones Michael Keeler James Kelly James Kirby Grant Krueger Hans Leppik Earl Lisowick William Loukides

Years of Service 29 30 33 32 37 31 33 36 34 30 32 34 42 25 32 31 35 30 22 35 35 35 31 34 37 30 20 31 31 30 32 29 31 29 30 30 30 31 32 37 41 27

Name William Low Stephen Lubker Bruce MacFarlane Timothy MacMenamin Craig Manderson Roger Martin Kevin McGahon Patrick McGrath Rick McMurray William Millar, Jr. Terry Nepotiuk Gordon Parker Wayne Parsons Bruno Peruzza Peter Phillips Steven Pocock John Poirier James Price Robert Reid Norman Rempel Doug Rogers Don Scallion Brian Sherwood Peter Sisson Martin Sowden Craig Stewart Peter Szlapak James Todd Arvi Truumann Kenneth Turner Christopher Walkington Daniel Walsh Patrick Walton Gordon Warburton Bruce Warden David Watts Richard White David Winkley Robert Woolfenden William Wright Daryl Wright Robert Yule

Years of Service 32 27 31 22 43 27 33 34 33 28 30 36 30 31 32 35 29 32 35 36 31 34 33 29 30 31 32 30 33 35 30 30 33 32 32 34 28 35 31 35 29 38

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 43


Rest in Peace Brother Richard Eldon

March 13, 1966 - May 21, 2012

R

ichard Eldon passed away after a long and difficult battle with work-related cancer at the Juravinski Hospital in the early hours of Monday May 21, 2012, at the age of 46. Soul mate to Shari Roberts and loving father to their three beautiful boys, Justin (9), Christian (7) and Cole (2). Pre-deceased to his mother Terry, as well as his father Anthony, his wife Francis, his Grandmother Winnifred Demaray and Grandparents Dick and Joan Eldon. He will be deeply missed by his siblings Mike, Paul and Katie and sister-in-laws Clair and Tanya and

mother-in-law, Marge. Richard will be missed by many aunts, uncles, dear cousins, nieces and nephews. He was an amazing friend and his family loved him dearly. Richard was a 1st Class Firefighter for the Toronto Fire Services. He served on the department for over 18 years. He was loved and respected by so many of the guys in the department and he will be missed so very much. Much thanks goes out to the doctors at the Juravinski Cancer Centre who treated Richard throughout his diagnosis.

“I was so surprised and sad to hear of Richards passing. I First met Richard while volunteering at Goodlife Fitness about 6 years ago. He was always alot of fun to have around and continually kept us all laughing. He was an amazing man who cherished Sheri and their three boys. They were his world. Richard will be missed by many. My heart and prayers go out to you, Sheri, Justin, Christian and Cole that you will find a sense of peace in the days to come.” –Kris C.

44


“When I heard the news of Richard passing on Tuesday I had a very heavy heart. I only recently came to know Richard but was continually amazed at his diversity as a person. We had many great chats in which it was very obvious how much he loved and cherished his family. He often spoke of how he wanted his boys to grow to be good men with respect for women and strong morals…I can’t imagine they will turn out any other way! My thoughts and condolences for all of his family and friends.” –Elaine “Shari, Tony, Fran, Terry, Justin, Christian and Cole, Our deepest and heartfelt sympathies to you and your family. Our thoughts are with you all at this difficult time. Whether it was time spent camping, snowmobiling, working together or listening to Rich sing, these are all great memories that I will value forever.” –Grant and Deborah M. “Shari, Justin, Christian, Cole and Terry, we will miss Richard here at Zoom Zoom’s Indoor Playground, so much. Richard often came in to spend the afternoon or morning with Cole and Christian, when he was not in school, and on a couple of occasions with Terry. We had the privilege of getting to know a little of your family. Richard promised to email my husband and I the next time he had a gig and I am so sorry we will not have that opportunity. We are truly feeling the loss of a friend. He was so funny and interesting and open and just easy to be around. I admired him so much for his enormously open and obvious love for his family. It wasn’t unusual to find Cole snuggled up on his dad’s lap. On one occasion I found the two of them snuggled up together and asleep. I hope that Richard was able to finish his guitar and I hope that someone that loves him will have the opportunity to play it for him. My deepest sympathies go out to your family. Please give Cole a hug from me.” –Tracy A. “Shari, Justin, Christian, Cole and Terry, No words can express what we feel at this moment. Richard was a longtime friend of mine, the type of friendship that could pick up where it left off even though we hadn’t seen each other in years. Growing up its rare to have good friends, Richard was exactly that. The older you get you realize more and

more how important those types of friends are. Richard was the closest I have ever come to a brother. I am proud to say he was a big part of my earlier years and I truly feel I have lost something extremely rare. Shari, Justin, Christian, Cole and Terry my heart goes out to you during this most difficult time. But most of all you have some wonderful memories that you can share to help you through it.” –Wayne S. “Dear Terry, I am very sorry that you are forced to bury your son. Richard was my idol growing up! I loved him; I wanted to be like him in every way! I don’t have many memories of Chippawa that do not include Richard to some degree. Whether that be Richard scuba-diving in the creek, doing a beautiful swan dive off the bridge or collecting old and antique bottles for his collection. I have a thousand memories of Richard running through my mind at the moment. Wow! Richard was an amazing person and I will never forget him. Thank you Terry and Richard for the great memories! R.I.P.” –Danny M.

“Dear Shari, Terry, Justin, Christian and Cole, I feel very privileged that I knew Richard. He was an inspiration to many. He will be remembered as honest, hardworking and generous man. I wish patience to all to cope with such a great loss. I miss him already.” –Elif L.

“Dear Shari, I am deeply saddened at the loss of Richard. Richard was a very happy and delightful and talented person to be around. He always lit up a room with his smile and humour. I use to snowmobile with Ritchie years back, I think our last trip was winter 2003, and the group would snowmobile from Six Mile Lake up to Elliot Lake and back. Ritchie was always the first to assist if your snowmobile broke down or you needed some extra gas or offer you a chocolate bar. His gracious offers to have dinner with his family in Elliot Lake always turned into a fun and memorable time. I will remember Ritchie with great fondness and I am truly sorry for your loss.” –Chris H. “Rich was a good man with a big heart. He shared with all of us that knew him the meaning of goodness and

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 45


RIP Brother Richard Eldon...Continued from page 45

hope that he had in life. My deepest sympathies to you and your family Shari.” –Kevin W. “Terry, my heart goes out to you. For so many years I watched Richard grow up. I always admired you as a mother and what an amazing son and person he became. Such joy he brought to so many people. I am thinking of you and Richard’s family.” –Dona H. “Dear Shari, Justin, Christian and Cole, Please accept our deepest sympathy for your loss. Richard was an amazing person. His kindness and love for his family were obvious in everything he said and did. My thoughts and prayers are with you and your family in this difficult time.” –Yelena, Justin and Samantha P. “Shari, what a journey you and your family have been on. We will miss Richard’s smile, guitar knowledge, love of family! He will be missed but as so many have said will live on in your memoires and your beautiful boys. Hang in there kiddo, lots of love.” –Ruth H. “Shari and the boys, we are so sorry for your loss. Life isn’t always fair or easy, and no one knows that better than you. You have been given a difficult situation, but I know you’ll make it through this with the same grace and dignity that I admire about you. Your Richard was a very special, caring person and will be missed by everyone who knew him. He fought his illness with courage and dignity and now he has found peace. Take care and know that you and the boys are in our thoughts. XO” –Bill, Helen, Beth S. “I met Rich this year through our interest in metal detecting and relic hunting. He was the absolute best in the field and was kind enough to teach me. Then he played guitar on guitars he built. I soon learned that he was not just good but excellent at everything he did. Even two weeks ago we went out at his request (with no complaints I might add) he found War of 1812 buttons and an 1808 coin…still the best of the day! I watched him with his family; he was a great Father, Husband and son. I am so blessed to have known Rich, he made me look at life differently. Rich, thank you so much for being my friend!” –Steve Z. 46

“Shari, I am so sorry for your loss. Richard was a great man and throughout his fight his courage and optimism continued to inspire and give hope to everyone he touched. May he rest in peace and my prayers and thoughts go out to you and your family in this time of grief.” –Amanda M. “Shari, It broke my heart to hear of the sad news. Our thoughts and prayers will be with you and your whole family. He was a good man and his memories will never be lost. He has touched a lot of people. John and Becky P. XOXOXO” –John P. “This is a shame, a devastating loss this world has suffered. Richards’s legacy of love, strength, courage and friendship will live on in the hearts of those who knew him. We will never forget the light you brought to the lives of those who were privileged to know you.” –Erin M. “Met Richard at the 2003 Retired Air Force Police Reunion in Pincher Creek. He accompanied his folks Tony and Fran. Lots of fun, great spirit, full of the love of life. Our condolences to family and friends.” –Darlene, Bob D. “Shari, Justin, Christian and Cole, Our deepest sympathies for your loss. Our hearts go out to your families. Richard will always be remembered as a great guy, talented musician and friend. Rest in peace Richard. Until we meet again.” –Kerri, Jay, Jack R. “Richard, you will be missed. You touched the lives of so many and we’re all saddened by your passing. I know you (an angel now) will always be with Shari and your boys and you will live on through them. May you go in peace on your new journey and remember you were loved by all. God Bless. XX” –Sandi R. “May your music continue to fill the air with the love that was felt by all. You will always live on through your music – we miss you.” –Tanya R.


Cecil Lowry February 13, 1952

Captain Cecil Lowry was one of many Toronto Fire Fighters who served the community for more than three decades before dying in the line of duty. The 32-year veteran of the Toronto Fire Department and lifelong resident of Toronto had fought many fires over his lengthy career. The toll of the numerous years serving the city that he loved finally caught up to him when he suffered from heart complications and collapsed while at his Runnymede Station on Sunday, February 10, 1952. The 56-year-old Captain died three days later at Western Hospital. A member of the Temple Lodge, AF & AM, St. Paul’s Anglican Church, and the Toronto Fire

Department Bowling League, the former resident of 121 Evans Avenue was survived by his wife, Gladys, and one daughter. His funeral services were held at the Yorke Bros. Chapel on Bloor St. West and internment at Park Lawn Cemetery.

Robert E. Gaston April 17, 1952

Born and raised in Toronto, Robert Ernest Gaston held ranks from Firefighter to District Chief over the course of his 33-year career with the Toronto Fire Department. Like many fire fighters before him, Gaston often risked his life at fire calls over the years and was fortunate enough to remain unscathed, despite the dangers of the career.

His good fortune also saved his life in an incident he was involved in when at the Keele St. Station. A fire fighter who had become disgruntled over promotions attempted to shoot Gaston twice in 1949, but luckily the gun misfired twice and he escaped the situation without injury. It was perhaps one of the most unlikely scenarios that ultimately became the setting for Gaston’s death when he attended the Fort York Armouries to deliver a lecture on fire prevention. While attending the civil defense meeting, he suffered a sudden and fatal heart attack. A member of Occident Lodge and AF & AM, Gaston was interred at Mt. Pleasant Cemetery and left behind his wife Elizabeth, daughter Florence, as well as one brother and six sisters.

Rest in Peace Peter Czulinski

November 5, 1966 - May 3, 2012

Wayne Boden

May 24, 1955 - Februaury 8, 2012

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old; age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them. S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 47


Thanks to all of our 2011

Toronto FIREPAC Contributors! Without question, 2011 was the most politically active year ever for Toronto Fire Fighters. We started the year with a newly elected City Council. This Council would forge a new direction and begin making decisions that would shake the very core of our profession. We will continue to face significant challenges in the coming year, as we ensure the city of Toronto has proper fire protection and its fire fighters have the appropriate resources to do their job. Spring brought about a federal election, which saw key contributions from our members resulting in some radical changes in the make up of the House of Commons in Ottawa, ensuring that fire fighters would have a strong voice on Parliament Hill. And finally, fall’s provincial election would be a pivotal time for firefighters as we successfully supported the return of a fire fighter-friendly Liberal government in the face of threats to our pensions and arbitration system from the opposition Conservatives. We had record numbers of our members working in every riding across the city. At the very same time, we waged our very successful “Not Gravy” campaign to ward off threatened cuts to the fire service at the municipal level. That’s a full year by any standard! Our volunteers numbered in the hundreds, with outstanding leadership from your Association Stewards and Toronto FIREPAC Committee members. As has been stated many times, successful political action

48

requires two important factors: volunteers and money. While the membership of Local 3888 has made significant contributions in both of those areas, we will need to continue to raise the bar regarding membership involvement if we are to successfully meet the challenges that lie ahead for our Association. After careful deliberation, the Toronto FIREPAC Committee has decided to suspend the incentive program for 2012 in order to replenish the finances that will be necessary for the coming year. It was a difficult decision as the program has been successful in promoting the brand name of Toronto FIREPAC and encouraged many new members to join. The incentive program will be reviewed on a year-to-year basis. We hope that our members understand the need to focus our finances and energies in the coming year. Each year at this time, the Toronto FIREPAC Committee publishes a list of all those members whose financial contributions enabled fire fighters to have a voice and pursue our political agenda. Please take a minute to recognize these individuals and thank them for their contribution. While we strive to ensure the list is complete, please let us know of any omission. On behalf of your Toronto FIREPAC Committee, thank you for doing your part and we look forward to an even more successful 2012! Please continue to support Toronto FIREPAC!

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 48


2010DONOR DONOR LLISTING 2011 ISTING PLATINUM AHOLA, PEKKA ALGAR, TIMOTHY ASHFIELD, KEVIN BEER, DON BLACK, KEITH BOISSEAU, GEOFF BUCKINGHAM, STEVE BURTENSHAW, ADRIAN CARTWRIGHT, BRIAN CHOW, PETER COONES, JAMES COONEY, BILL COOPER, JOHN CSEPREGHI, JANOS DICKINSON, CHRIS DILLON, JIM DOHERTY, HUGH DOMENEGATO, MICHAEL EDGERTON, MICHAEL ENSLEN, JAMES ERWIN, DOUG FAIRLIE, RYAN FLETCHER, JAMES FUDGE, KIRK GIFFIN, COLIN GRABA, DENNIS HALLS, PAUL HALS, DANIEL HAMILTON, IAN HAMILTON, KEITH HARVEY, PETER HASTINGS, GARY HAYES, PETER HOEFEL, KARL HOLWELL, DAVE IMRAY, TOM INNES, MICHAEL KAUFMAN, ADINA KENNEDY, ED KREPOSTER, ALEX LAMB, TRACEY LANGFORD, MIKE LATOUR, MIKE LOIBL, RON LUKACHKO, ED MACLACHLAN, JOHN MANSON, MURRAY MARKS, SCOTT MATHEWS, TRAVIS MCCARTHY, KEVIN MCINTYRE, WILLIAM MCKEE, BILL

MCKINNON, NEIL MCLEAN, ANDREW MCMANUS, PATRICK MORGAN, RICHARD NEELY, MICHAEL NESTER, JEFF OGLE, MICHAEL OLLEY, ADRIAN PERITORE, GERLANDO PETT, ANDREW PIPERIDIS, DENIS RAMAGNANO, FRANK REED, JAMES REYNOLDS, NEIL RIVARD, ROB ROBINSON, JONATHON SINCLAIR, MICHAEL SMITH, MARTIN ST. THOMAS, BRIAN STATHER, CARY THORNE, ERNIE WALKER, AL WALSH, DAMIEN WERGINZ, MATHIAS WHISKIN, JEFF WOJNARSKI, ROMAN WOODBURY, JOHN WRIGHT, JOHN YUILL, IAN

GOLD ANDERSON, GREG ATKINSON, PAUL BARR, JIM BARRETT, DON BAXTER, DAN BILLS, MARK BORSA, DAVID BOYD, KERR BRANDSTETTER, JOE BRUCE, JEFFREY CARSON, JOHN CASSIDY, EAMON CLARK, NORM COLEMAN, DON COOPER, JOHN (JACK) CULLEN, LIAM DAVIDSON, DON DION, JOHN DOORELEYERS, JOHN W. DOUMA, DARA DOWNES, MATT DOWNEY, LEO

DOYLE, MAURICE DYER, JOHN ELDON, RICHARD ELLEMENT, DARRELL ELLERY, DREW FALCONER, DAVE FITZSIMMONS, MARK GEEKIE, TIM GREEN, JAMES HALEY, GREG HICKEY, ANTHONY HUGHES, KEVIN JANSEN, CRAIG KNAGGS, CHRIS LAKEMAN, MORRIS LANDMAN, ERIC LINDMEIER, TROY LLOYD, TOM MACCORMICK, MATTHEW MAYOR, JIM MCCANNELL, ROSS MCCARTHY, KEVIN MEAGHER, CAROL MOCKFORD, RON MOONLIGHT, RYAN MORACHE, JOHN MORGAN, RICHARD MUNDAY, BRUCE NORRIS, GLENN ORRETT, MARK PACE, ERCOLE PAGE, BRAD PTASIUK, IGOR ROMARD, JOHN ROWLAND, CHRIS ROYNON, DAVE RUSNAK, PATRICK SALVATORI, DAN SCHMITT, MIKE SHEPHERD, JOSEPH SMITH, JANET SNELLINGS, GORD STROUD, ROB TUFFNER, JOHN TURNBULL, MICHAEL WALSH, DAVID WATSON, AL WATTERSON, STEVE WEEKS, TIM WHITTAKER, BRIAN WILLIAMS, GLEN WONG, BOB K.

SILVER ALLEN, JIM ALSTON, DAN

ALTIERI, ROGER ANNIS, RICHARD L. BARNES, JONATHAN BARRETT, COLIN BEDFORD, RANDY BELLAMY, CHARLES BISSETT, GORD BODDEN, JEREMY BOYD, BILL BOYD, JONATHAN BUCKLEY, BERTRAM BURTENSHAW, KENT CHALK, RICK CHISHOLM, JOSHUA CHURCHMACK, RICK CITTER, ROBERT CLAZIE, MICHAEL COLEMAN, DON COLEMAN, JAMES COLLINS, SHAWN CORDINGLEY, RONALD COX, MICHAEL CRANSWICK, DAVID CROWDER, RICK CUNNINGHAM, PAUL DAVIS, CANDACE DENNISON, CRAIG DIXON, T. MORGAN DIXON, TRACI DOYLE, PATRICK DRIMMIE, JOHN DUHAMEL, PETER EVANS, JOHN EVELY, PAUL FRIAS, ADERITO GAMBIER, STEVE GAUDET, PAUL J. GLOAZZO, CLAUDIO GOERTZEN, GREG GOLD, AXEL GRAY, JASON HAUERBACH, ANDREW HAYTER, PATRICK HEWSON, ROB HICKEY, KIERON HILL, MICHAEL HOPKINS, SEAMUS IMRAY, TOM IRVINE, BRIAN IVINS, DARREN JACIW, DAN JACKSON, ROB JAKOPCEVIC, GORAN JEISEL, PERRY JOHNSTON, GLEN JOHNSTON, RODNEY

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 49


FIREPAC...Continued from page 49

2011 DONOR L ISTING CONTINUED... JONES, DOUG JUNEAU, JUSTIN KASSEN, THOMAS KESKIKYLA, ALAN KOINIS, CHRIS KURTZ, JOHN LAI, KAR-WING LASIUK, JONATHAN D. LEUFKENS, BERNARD LEWANDOWSKI, MICHAEL LYNCH, DAVID MACDONALD, RICHARD MACINA, PAUL MACKEN, MURRAY MACSWEEN, ANDREW MARKHAM, DALE MARKHAM, DALE MARTIN, NATALIE MATCHETT, IAN MCCABE, STEVE MCCANN, MIKE MCDONALD, BRUCE MCEACHERN, CAMERON MCEACHERN, RON MCFARLANE, PETER MCINTYRE, DAVIS MCKINNON, MARK MCLAREN, DONALD MCMANAMAN, JIM MECHANO, JIM MILES, JEFFREY MOGFORD, STEPHEN MULLIN, DAVID NASTAMAGOS, SAM NEU, MICHAEL NORTH, BILL NYSTROM, DANNY O’CONNELL, DENNIS OBIE, RANDY PAGNELLO, FRANK PATTERSON, ROB R. PATTERSON, WAYNE PATTON, ROBERT PEAK, JOHN PETERS, IAN PHILLIPS, RYAN PINEAU, DAVE PLUGOWSKY, JASON POOLE, GARY POS, JEFF POWELL, TRACEY PRATCHETT, VINCENT PRATT, MARK PRICE, CRAIG

50

PRIMEAU, STEVE PTOLEMY, ROB RANDALL, JOHN RATHGEB, MICHAEL REED, JAMES REILLY, JAMES REYNOLDS, MARK ROGER, STEPHEN RUSSELL, MIKE SALTER, DANIEL SANGSTER, BRIAN SARTA, JOE SAUNDERS, BRUCE SELL, DIRK SHAW, KEVIN SIDDALL, JAMES SMALLEY, KEVIN SMITH, MICHAEL ST. PIERRE, AARON L. STEFFLER, GREG STOREY, GLEN STRAUB, RICK STREET, KEVIN SWIDERSKI, ED TAYLOR, DOUGLAS TAYLOR, KENNETH TEWNION, GORD TOTH, MATTHEW TRZASKALSKI, TED TULLETT, NEIL VALK, STEVE VANDENHEUVEL, GREG VANGOETHEM, JOHN VERHAEGHE, TOM VOSPER, GREG WARNER, ERIC WEAVER, BRENT WEEKS, GREG WELCH, STEVE WESTLAKE, RYAN WHITE, DEAN WHYTE, BRIAN WILSON, MARK WONG, LU WRIGHT, DOUG WRIGHT, SONNY YATES, ADAM ZAVITZ, STEVE

BRONZE ALLABY, KEN ANDERSON, ALAN ANDREW, PETER ASPDEN, COLIN

ASSAF, PAUL BAILEY, SCOTT BALDWIN, ANDREW BARBEN, RONALD BARTELL, ROY BIGHAM, JEFF BLACK, BRIAN R. BODI, JASON BOGARDIS, ROBERT BOOTH, HARVEY BOOTH, LES BOUDEW YN, KEVIN BOURKE, DIGBY BROWN, WILLIAM BURTON, GEOFF CAMERON, DAVID CAMLEY, DAVE CANNING, DANNY CANO, RAUL CASARIN, ANTHONY CAUCHON, CHRIS CHAUMONT, GERRY CHENG, THEDORE CHRISTENSEN, ERIC CLOSE, KEN COCHRANE, STEVE COSSARINI, JACK CRUMMEY, ROBERT CRUMMY, TREVOR CZULINSKI, PETER DAVIS, TOM DE BRUYN, MICHAEL DENTON, ANDRE DIVALENTIN, RICHARD DOBROWOLSKI, KYLE DOLAN, GARY DRENTERS, MATHEW DUHAMEL, PAUL EYERS, SCOTT FARREN, PETER FILIPPIDIS, DANNY FITZGERALD, MIKE FLAMMIA, BRUNO FLUGE, GERALD FOSTER, BRIAN FRANCHETTO, PHILLIP-LEE FUNK, MURRAY GALLO, PETER GALLO, RICK GANGULY, ANDREW GARCIA, MICHAEL GARRETT, MEAGHAN GASPINI, JUSTIN GIBSON, GLENN GOORTS, GERRY GRALEY, TREVOR GRAVELLE, JOHN

GUNNS, RICHARD HALSBAND, BERNICE HAMPSON, ROBERT HASSON, MICHAEL HECKING, STEVE HENNESSY, PETER HILL, KEVIN HOEY, JAMES HORNER, JASON IRELAND, SHAWN JACKLIN, BILL JANUSAS, ALFONS JEFFRIES, CRAIG JOHNSTONE, DOUGLAS JORGENSEN, CHRISTIAN JUDGE, KEVIN KALIC, MIKE KALLIOKOSKI, JOHN KAMIN, SAM KASSEN, TOM KELLY, BRIAN KEOGH, GARY KEOV, TAI KERR, GLENN KING, MARK KOZACHENKO, MORIS KROLOW, EDMUNDO KULAR, ROBERT KURMEY, DAVID KWIATKOWSKI, PAUL LEESON, LARRY LESCHAK, DAVID LOUKIDES, BILL MACINTRYRE, BARRY MACPHERSON, IAN MARSHALL, ANDREW MARTIN, KEN MASCHKE, MORGAN MASTERS, SCOTT MAZUR, ROB MCALINDEN, BRIAN MCARDEL, ROBERT MCGEE, MARK MCGOWAN, JAMES MCINTYRE, ROGER MCKINNON, DOUGLAS MCREELIS, CHRIS MEARS, BRETT METCALFE, TIMOTHY MOMMO, HENRY MOORE, BRYAN MORRIS, STEPHEN MOUNTNEY, SCOTT MYERS, AL NAGLE, DAVE NANDKISHUR, MICHAEL NEARING, MICHAEL S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 50


2011 DONOR L ISTING CONTINUED... NICHOLLS, KEVIN NIECE, LARRY NOAKES, ROBERT O’DACRE, TIM OUTTRIM, TIMOTHY PANZINI, JOE PEARSON, GORDON PHILLIP-LEE, FRANCHETTO PILKINGTON, MIKE PITTARELLI-BUCKS, JOSH POLLA, MARK POPE, CHRISTOPHER QUAN, IRVING RAPPOS, PETER REEVES, GEOFF

RICHARDSON, JEFF ROBERTSON, CATHERINE ROY, CATLIN RUTHERFORD, ROBIN SAFIAN, GEORGE SCHUELER, DAVID SIMM, PRISCILLA SIMMONDS, JASON SMALLDON, DEAN SMITH, TOM SNELLINGS, GORDON K. SO, JAMES SOARES, MARIO SULLIVAN, JOE THEAKER, KELLY

THOMPSON, DRYW THORNHILL, MARK TRAYES, PAUL TURNER, SCOTT UNDERWOOD, FRANK VENKATARAMAIAH, RAM VIEIRA, DANY WALLACE, SHANE WARNOCK, SAM WATKINSON, ADAM WEBB, KEN WESTON, MARK WHITLOCK, GREG WIECLAWEK, MARK WIGHT, JONATHAN W YZYNSKI, STEVE ZAORSKI, MARK

OTHER ADAMS, TREVOR BERTRAND, MARK G. CHRISTENSEN, GARY COMPTON, MARK DRAPER, MICHAEL GASPINI, JUSTIN HARFIELD, STEVE HARGRAVE, WILLIAM LOGIACCO, LEO MOGAVERO, JOHN MONTGOMERY, DAVE PATEL, KANJI SWEENEY, GRAEME WILSON, DON

Picture it...YOUR ad right here! Call Debbie Cheeseman at 1-800-366-3113 Ext. 7806 or Fax to 1-866-764-2452 to assure your spot for the next issue.

YOUR PENSION

OPTIONS VOLUME 3

|

ISSUE 3 | FALL 2007

Captain John A. Chappelle

1954 - 2007 VOLUME 4

|

2008 ISSUE 1 | SPRING

FIRE HALL SHO

Publications Agreement

No: 41203011

WCASE: Fire Station

TFS Demographics Where do you fit in?

VOLUME 4

|

315

Due to popular demand, we will be offering a subscription service to all those who do not currently receive a copy of Toronto Fire Watch or would like more than one copy of each issue.

ISSUE 2 | SUMMER 2008

Would You Escape a Fire in An d rthHom e?ard e Aw You

The total cost of the subscription will be $20.00 per year to cover shipping and handling. You will receive, to the address specified on the card below, 4 issues of Toronto Fire Watch (Spring, Summer, Fall, and Winter).

Goes To...

Publications Agreement No: 41203011

Local 388 Station 116 Fire 8 hos FIREHALL SHOWCASE: ts annual Media Awards

You MUST fill out the accompanying card and return it, along with a cheque.

Publications Agreement

No: 41203011

Who Helps Chi ldren Who Set Fires? A look at the TAPP -C Program

FIRE HALL SHO

WCASE: Fire Station

224

First Name

Last

Phone

Email

Street Number

Street

Apt. #

City

P.O.

Mail to: 39 Commissioners Street, Toronto, M5A 1A6 Make cheques payable to the T.P.F.F.A.

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 51


Fit to SURVIVE

The fire fighter’s guide to health and nutrition

Sunburn

(Excess Sun, Solar Erythema) The Facts

S

unburn is a kind of radiation damage done by the sun. It’s by far the most common form of radiation damage. While most people know that radiation is dangerous, they voluntarily expose themselves to the harmful ultraviolet (UV) light of the sun on a regular basis. Radiation can provoke cancer, and the popularity of sunbathing has brought a steady climb in new cases of skin cancer and actinic keratosis, a precursor to skin cancer. Actinic keratosis and all types of skin cancer, particularly non-melanoma types (basal and squamous cell cancer), are directly linked to sun exposure. Exposure in early life is especially relevant. Many people get the bulk of their sun exposure during childhood, and it has been shown that even one childhood sunburn increases the risk of developing skin cancer later in life. However, sunburn is not required to damage skin. A tan is also clear evidence of UV skin damage. Sun exposure and sunburn in particular also contribute to photo aging, or the appearance of aging and wrinkled skin. Most of the wrinkles and pigmentation problems seen in the elderly are a direct result of cumulative sun exposure. Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in Canada. If it weren’t for skin cancer, sunburn would 52

be a minor health problem, with only the most extreme cases requiring hospital treatment. As it is, any sun or other UV exposure, including a gentle tan, increases the risk of skin cancer.

Causes

The Sun, like any star, emits vast quantities of energy across a range of wavelengths. The light that’s visible to us is only a small fraction of this energy. The human eye can only perceive electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths between 400 and 700 nanometres (nm), which is called visible light. Violet light, at 400 nm wavelength, and red light, at 700 nm, are the upper and lower boundaries of our ability to see radiation. The smaller the wavelength, the higher the frequency, resulting in greater power and damage. Long-wavelength, low-frequency emissions that are beyond the visible spectrum, such as radio waves, are felt to be harmless, although longer wavelengths generally have greater penetrating power (for instance, radio waves pass through things light can’t pass through). This is the same as with sound waves: you can hear the low, rumbling and thumping parts of the sound from your neighbour’s stereo, and not the high notes, but it’s the high, shrill notes that can hurt your ears.

Much of the energy emitted by the Sun is shorter-wave, more powerful radiation, most of it in the form of ultraviolet (UV) light. UV light’s place on the electromagnetic spectrum is immediately above the most energetic form of visible light, which is violet. UV is classified into 3 degrees of energy: UVA, UVB, and UVC. UVC has the shortest wavelength and the most energy, but it doesn’t reach the Earth’s surface because it’s stopped by ozone in the Earth’s atmosphere. UVA has the longest wavelength, the least energy, and the most penetrating power of the 3 types. UVB light is between the UVA and UVC in wavelength and energy. Of all the UV light that reaches the Earth, about 95% of it is UVA. Because it has the least energy, it’s less likely to burn skin than UVB, but because there’s so much UVA, it plays a part in most sunburns. Just as UVA penetrates the atmosphere better than more potent UVB and UVC, it also penetrates deeper into the skin. On a microscopic scale, UVA light is more likely than UVB to penetrate the upper skin layers and be absorbed by the basal skin layer. Although it’s 1,000 times less potent than UVB, UVA exposure is believed by many experts to be more relevant to wrinkling and aging of the skin, and possibly to skin cancer.


Symptoms and Complications

When UV radiation strikes the body, the skin cells react immediately. Specialized cells produce melanin, the body’s defence against UV radiation. People with naturally dark skin have more melanin and more melanin-producing cells. When light-skinned people are damaged by UV radiation, these cells produce more of this dark substance, creating a tan. Since they have fewer pigment-producing cells, the total amount of pigment (melanin) is low and thus the protection against further UV light is poor. So further exposure leads to sunburn and sun damage even if there is some tanning. With higher levels of exposure, there’s also an inflammatory reaction. Histamine, the chemical involved in most allergic reactions, is released in the skin, along with other inflammatory substances. Blood flow is increased and the skin turns red and warm to the touch. This occurs during sun exposure, but rapidly fades. It then comes back 2 to 6 hours later, with pain, as a sunburn. Typically, it’s at its worst about 12 to 24 hours after sun exposure, and the soreness lasts about 3 days. After 4 to 7 days, the outer layers of skin peel off and the redness fades. Any sunburn is a real burn caused by real heat, delivered over time in tiny packets too small to notice. With extremely high doses, sunburn can result in second-degree burns, with severe blistering of the skin, dehydration, fever, and nausea. Actinic keratosis (AK) is a rough, scaly skin lesion that appears on sun-exposed areas of the skin. AKs are caused by exposure to UV light. They are not cancerous, but may lead to skin cancer if not treated. AKs are usually pink and scaly.

Making the Diagnosis

People experiencing sunburn often have skin that is red, swollen, or sore to touch. Have a doctor or health care professional look at the sunburn if you notice a rash, itching, or fever, or if blisters appear. Darker skin tones may not appear red; however, people with dark skin can still get a sunburn.

Margarita-Braised Chicken Thighs

INGREDIENTS 1 /2 Cup Dried Tropical Fruit 1 /2 Cup Orange Juice 1 /4 Cup Tequila 8 Boneless, Skinless (about 1.5 Pounds) Chicken Thighs 1 /2 Teaspoon Salt 1 /2 Cup All Purpose Flour 1 Tablespoon (s) Paprika 2 Teaspoons Garlic Powder 1 Tablespoon Olive Oil Cooking Spray 1 Cup Onions Thinly Sliced 5 Garlic Cloves Minced 1 Lime, Thinly Sliced SERVING SUGGESTION Serving Size: 2 chicken thighs with 1 /3 cup fruit sauce Number of Servings: 8 NUTRITION FACTS Calories 350 Total Fat 10 g Saturated Fat N/A Sodium 416 mg Total Carbohydrates 38 g Fiber 3 g Protein 25 g

DIRECTIONS • Preheat oven to 400ºF. • Combine dried fruit, orange juice, and tequila in microwave safe dish. Cover with plastic wrap and microwave on high for 2 minutes. • Remove from microwave and let cool to room temperature. • Remove fat from chicken, sprinkle with salt. • Mix flour, paprika and garlic powder together in shallow dish. • Heat oil in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. • Dredge chicken in flour mixture and sauté chicken for 4 minutes on each side or until lightly browned. • Transfer chicken to 11x7” baking dish coated with cooking spray. • Add onion to hot skillet and cook for 3 minutes. • Add garlic and sauté 1 minute. • Pour fruit mixture into skillet. Scrape up any browned bits on bottom and bring to a boil. • Cook 1 minute. • Pour onion and fruit mixture over chicken. • Top with lime slices and bake for 20 minutes or until chicken registers 165ºF internal temperature.

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 53


Fit to Survive...Continued from page 53

Treatment and Prevention

There’s no quick fix for sunburn. Like any burn, it takes time to heal. ASA*, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), cold water compresses, and cool baths can help with symptoms. Skin hydrating and moisturizing creams may also temporarily relieve pain. Many people believe these can also reduce eventual peeling, but this isn’t proven. Butter, an old sunburn remedy, is inappropriate, as it increases the risk of infection. Soap should be kept clear of burned areas, as it’s an irritant. Anaesthetic sprays or creams should also be avoided unless recommended by a doctor. In extreme cases, with blistering and large areas of second-degree burns, the sunburn victim is admitted to a burn unit at the hospital. Treatment is identical to that received by other burn patients, including steroids and fluid replacement. The best advice for sunburn is to avoid

54

it completely. The recommendations given by public health experts on sun exposure generally consist of this: • Avoid the sun completely between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when the sun’s rays are most intense (you know the sun’s rays are most intense when your shadow is shorter than you are). • Wear sunblock with sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or higher whenever you are outdoors, and reapply every 2 hours. • Don’t rely just on sunblock – clothes and hats provide even better protection. • Don’t just worry about the sun in summer – UV exposure is a yearround problem. Snow reflects 80% of UV light, compared to only 20% by sand – that’s why

skiers get sunburn. If you notice any skin changes, including new growths or moles, see your doctor. In spite of what is known about the risks of sunburn, many Canadians still prefer the look of a “healthy” tan. As an alternative, many self-tanning products are available today that produce the appearance of a tan without the damaging effects of UV rays.

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 54


Letter from the Editor… C

h-ch-ch-changes! If you grew up during the rock and roll decade of the 1970s, you may be familiar with the popular song by the famous music icon, David Bowie. I am certain that many of the younger fire fighter generation have heard this catchy tune as well. Those who grew up (from teenager to their 20s) in the last decade have grown up with constant change; the largest, most universal change being in the area of technology.

Some welcome change, viewing it as an opportunity, while others prefer status quo. There are a few things I think of most when I think of change. The first is cereal. When I was a kid, there were Rice Krispies, Corn Flakes or Corn Pops. Now there’s strawberry or vanilla Rice Krispies, wheat and fibre cereals, gluten free cereals, cereals with fruit, etc. Next is cell phone technology, and lastly, banking. I know several people who prefer not to upgrade their cell phone because they are so familiar with their current one and find it simple to use. They would rather not learn the new technology, i.e.) touch screen, navigating through new menus, etc. Others want the latest and greatest – iPhone or Android perhaps, what’s your preference? All of this, along with new apps that can do almost everything except wash your laundry. Generally speaking, the older generation does not mind standing in a line at the bank; besides being able to socialize with a teller, they prefer to see their bill payment stamped paid – afait accompli. Standing at an ATM, no sound, font not large enough to read, instructions, etc., only increases stress and anxiety for some. Not everything is simple, though with a focused mindset, we can work through them.

In 2012, we have heard about and experienced a number of changes within the TFS. Several long serving Toronto Fire Services staff, including our Fire Chief, as well as other senior management and support staff, retired in the first quarter. With a new Fire Chief on board, and with changes occurring within the Corporation, the TFS is not immune. Change IS in our midst. With the Corporation concentrating on fiscal accountability, decreasing budgets, workforce realignment and corporate restructuring, it is likely to become a different workplace. Change is not only happening in our public service; the private sector is also encountering the same. Companies are now increasing responsibilities among a smaller number of staff, demanding accountability to ensure customer service and managing budgets in a way to make the workplace function even more efficiently and effectively. It is common for change to produce a lot of stress in people. Think about the positive and the less than positive changes you may have encountered in your life: a new job/career, job loss, a birth, a death, a new relationship, or a divorce. Certainly, many of us can relate to one or more of these occurrences. What do you remember most from these changes? What helped you get through your period of change? Last year, I spoke with a Captain who was preparing to retire and was having a difficult time with it. We met and spoke several times about his concerns, the successes, and the legacy he was leaving

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 55

1


Picture it...YOUR ad right here! Call Debbie Cheeseman at 1-800-366-3113 Ext. 7806 or Fax to 1-866-764-2452 to assure your spot for the next issue.

56

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 56


behind. We moved on to his plans for retirement and I suggested that he think about his retirement as the new normal – it may be a challenge at first but we are adaptable. This concept was something he was able to walk away with easily. Change Stressor • Fear of the unknown/uncertainty • Feeling out of control/letting go • Lack of direction • Unwelcome change/change not self-directed • Increased commitments/responsibility Remember change can be an opportunity, a challenge and may surface the best in people. • Opportunity for creativity/growth and success • New and improved ways of doing things • Professional or personal performance improvements/development • Make things happen, optimize • Strive for success and excellence, as opposed to maintenance Ways to Manage Stress and Change • Exercise, eat well, keep healthy • Accept change as a positive opportunity and challenge • Talk it out with a trusted person • Accept, be a change agent, be responsible for your actions and reaction(s) • Be optimistic, think positive • Put things in perspective, foster a good attitude

2

• Live the change! On the road ahead, whether it be in your continued career with the TFS, your retirement, or your personal life, I wish you success in adapting to your change environment – your happiness depends on it!

TORONTO FIRE SERVICES EAP/CIS NEWSLETTER - SUMMER EDITION 2012


CLASSIFIEDS RENT: House to share in the Weston Rd and hwy 401 area; nice neighborhood; all utilities, parking, laundry and Internet...$800/mth...please text me at 416-576-5118 if interested SALE: 4 season family cottage for sale on Paudash Lake, near Bancroft. Level lot, sandy beach, wade-in shoreline with deep weed-free swimming. 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom cottage comes fully furnished and includes watercraft. MLS# 125800001526500. Asking $289,900. Contact Julie Boyce 705-749-9292.

MISC: Seeking Part Time Drivers Turner & Porter Funeral Directors Ltd., is seeking “on call” drivers for our fleet of professional cars. Our five chapels serve client families in West Toronto and Mississauga. Hourly rate of $16- $19/hour, company clothing and training provided. If you are interested in joining our team, kindly contact Bill Nixon at 416-767-3153 or John Whittingstall at 905279-7663 for more information.

Classified Advertising in the Toronto Fire Watch Magazine Name Work Phone

Division _Home Phone

Ad (20 words max – please print clearly) # of issues Signature

Payment: Cheque

Credit Card #

Price: $25/issue + GST=

Ads run one issue free of charge. Home phone or pager numbers will be used. Ads MUST be submitted in writing. Phoned ads are not accepted. Submit before the 1st of the month. Send to Toronto Fire Watch, #600, 20 Hughson St. S., Hamilton, ON L8N 2A1 or email: publications@xentel.com

58

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 58


2012

R B Penney Charity

Slo-Pitch Tournament

S

BY MIKE OGLE AND DAVE PINEAU, TORONTO FIRE FIGHTER

ometimes, to gain a better understanding of where we are today, we need to reflect back on our history. Rob Penney was a Toronto Fire Fighter (Local 113) who started his firefighting career with the Toronto Fire Department on June 27, 1983. By reading his history and the background of this tournament, you will see that Rob could have been any one of us. Rob worked most of his career in TFD station 11 (now known as Station 313), which was a Foam and Hazardous Materials pumper back then. While Rob was on that vehicle, it responded to several HazMat calls during the early 80s. In 1989, Rob was diagnosed with kidney cancer and had his kidney removed. In early 1990, after he completed cancer treatment at Princess Margaret Hospital, Rob returned as a productive member of Pumper 24 (now Station 311). After a fire in the late summer of 1990, Rob returned to the fire station not feeling well, and soon after, started throwing up blood. The cancer had returned with devastating effect; it was now in his lungs. After a courageous battle, Rob succumbed to cancer at the age of 38, leaving behind his wife, Nancy and three daughters: Lisa, Ashley and Erica, ages 6, 4 and 2, respectively. We must remember that this tragedy took place before fire fighter occupational diseases were being recognized. The Rob Penney tournament was started for this very reason. As Brother Dave Pineau remembers, “We started the very first Rob Penney Slo-Pitch Tournament the following spring at McCleary Park. We wanted to keep Rob’s memory alive, as well as to raise funds for an education trust for his daughters. The second year, as the tournament grew, we moved to L’Amourieux. After the second successful fun event, Nancy approached me and asked me if I would continue the tournament, but make it a charity event for cancer. I agreed and approached Princess

Margaret Hospital, which was then beginning to fundraise for a move into their present facility on University Avenue. Over the next several years, the tournament grew in size and had a huge participation from the old Toronto Fire Department, with close to 50 teams competing in an event that spanned an entire week in June at the Downsview Military base. The tournaments had live bands performing in the evening and a military kitchen serving four meals a day. During this time, we completed three pledges to the PMH building fund for a research laboratory, a special imaging room (state of the art for early detection of cancer) and a leukemia patient room. These pledges signified to us the three important reasons we were supporting Princess Margaret: first, for their incredible history of research; second, for helping patients uncover the cancer problem early; and finally, for the hospital’s tremendous treatment of patients battling this disease. We feel very fortunate to have developed our friendship with this hospital, which is ranked in the top five cancer facilities in the world. After the new PMH was opened, Toronto Fire and Rob Penney’s name were inscribed on plaques in the three areas that the tournament had pledged a total of close to $200,000. I was proud to be able to write Rob’s name and his family’s (both his wife and kids, as well as his TFFA family) on the top beam at the opening ceremony of the hospital. The huge success of the tournament then allowed me to offer our continued support toward research but I wanted it to be recognized in a way that paid tribute to fire fighters battling cancer, and especially those who had lost the battle. The Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation

agreed, and so the Fire Fighters’ Cancer Research Fund was originated. This tournament was started by, and continues to run, through the dedicated volunteer efforts of our members, both past and present, as well as some of our very best associates and friends. To thank them all would probably fill an entire magazine, but on behalf of Nancy Penney and her family, we would like to thank them and to welcome you all to participate in next year’s event. Dave took the opportunity to call Nancy Penney a couple of days before this year’s tournament to let her know that the tournament was back up and running. Her reply to Dave was something that, quite frankly, choked him up: “It is a wonderful Father’s Day present for me and our three daughters.” On June 18th and 19th, the 19th Annual Rob Penney Slow Pitch Tournament returned with over 500 members attending and enjoying the festivities. With a very short period of time to prepare and contact all those that had contributed in the past, the tournament raised approximately $15,000.00. All proceeds will be forwarded to the Fire Fighters’ Cancer Research Fund at PMH in memory of Rob. We look forward to next year, which will be the 20th anniversary of the tournament. Look for notices to be released early in the New Year.

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 59


3888 RECENT HAPPENINGS

se League Team “Dundas” won the Hou were also and hip ons Hockey playoff champi . the league champions

ers Hockey Team “Berkley” won the Old Tim also the League playoff champions and league champions. oon District 31 repeated as B Plat in aga ons mpi Cha District Challenge ed, rais was 00 in 2012. A total of $3,7 r with $1,700 being donated to Pete 00 $2,0 and Czulinski Fundraiser going toward cancer research.

against District 42. exciting game, 2-1 in overtime, very a in ge llen Cha t tric Dis District 11 won the C Platoon champs. District 41 were the consolation

60

S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 60


On May 27th, members and friends help at a water station sponsored by Local 3888 in Sunnyb rook Park. The event is a charity fundraiser for the Ped iatric Oncology Group of Ontario (POGO).

Their Royal Highnesses, the Prin ce of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall, visited Can ada from May 20 to 23, 2012. A special invitation was exte nded to First Responders from across Ontario and mem bers of their families, to participate in an intimate Victoria Day Fireworks Display with Their Royal Highnesses on Monday May 21st at Ashbridge’s Bay in Toronto. Ove r 20 members and their families represented the TPFFA.

President Kennedy, along with two of our most recent TFS graduates, pre sent MDC with a cheque for $24,000, which was raised at a series of Boot Drives.

Paul Fiset and Mike Ogle at the Fire fighters Combating Cancer Golf Tournamen t, held on May 29th. The tournament rais ed $3,500 for The Firefighters Cancer Researc h Fund at PMH.

Local 3888 members participate in the Heart and Stroke Big Bike event held at Morningside plaza on May 24th. Local 3888 made a donation to this charity as well.

Toronto Police Constable, Rob Cullen, visited the TPFFA Office to accept his 2011 I.A.F.F. Med ia Award for an editorial he wro te regarding a call he responded to which involved a retired Toront o Fire Fighter who had passed awa y. S U M M E R 2 0 1 2 | F I R E WAT CH 61


2012 UPCOMING EVENTS

DEC

October, 1 - 4, 2012

LOCATION Ottawa, Ontario Colorado Springs, CO RCL Br.527 948 Sheppard Ave. W. 3888 General Union Meeting RCL Br.527 948 Sheppard Ave. W. Ontario Fallen Fighters Memorial Queens Park, Toronto Tribute OPFFA Fall Education Seminar Niagara Falls, Ontario

November, 26 - 29, 2012

OPFFA Legislative Conference

Toronto, Ontario

Saturday, December 15, 2012

3888 Children's X-mas Party

Varity Village, Toronto, Ontario

Tuesday, December 18, 2012 Night meeting 1830 HRS Wednesday, December 19, 2012 Day meeting 0930 HRS

3888 General Union Meeting

RCL Br.527 948 Sheppard Ave. W.

3888 General Union Meeting

RCL Br.527 948 Sheppard Ave. W.

Picture it...YOUR ad right here! Call Debbie Cheeseman at 1-800-366-3113 Ext. 7806 or Fax to 1-866-764-2452 to assure your spot for the next issue.

We would like to thank the following for their support: PANTHEON RESTAURANT

ADVERTISERS INDEX ALARM FORCE INDUSTRIES INC...........................30

DECARO FABRICATING INC...................................36

APPLIANCE CANADA............................................. 62

DIVORCE WEALTH INC............................................8

BEAVER VALLEY STONE.......................................... 56

DOC’S MOTORCYCLE GEAR...................................36

CACHE METALS...................................................... 31

EVENSON BUNDGARD FLYNN............................... 58

ROYAL LEPAGE/IAN MCCRAE & LIZ BAY MCCRAE................................................. 56

CANADIAN MORTGAGE TRAIN...............................4

FIRE SERVICES CREDIT UNION................................6

SARABJIT SINGH/RBC............................................ 56

CATHY WOODS MORTGAGES................................36

FOSTER KIA............................................................. 10

SCARSVIEW CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP.....................30

CITY SAVINGS FINANCIAL SERVICES CREDIT UNION................................................................... IFC

FRASER FORD......................................................... 58

SUNSET KITCHENS LTD.......................................... 31

HYDROPOOL HOT TUBS.........................................54

SUTTON GROUP CLASSIC.................................... IBC

KEYSTONE EVERYTHING SPORTS MEDICAL.........54

THE SOCIETY OF ENERGY PROFESSIONALS.......... 56

MR. JACK RILEY...................................................... 56

YONGE STREET ANIMAL HOSPITAL...................... 56

CONSUMERS CHOICE..........................................OBC CORNERSTONE MEDIATION..................................36

62

NORTH CITY GENERAL INSURANCE BROKERS LTD.......................................................... 10 PAUL LOVE/CENTURY 21 REAL ESTATE..................4

SUBJECT TO CHANGE

OCT NOV

EVENT Canadian Fallen FF Memorial Fallen Fire Fighter Memorial 3888 General Union Meeting

*DATES AND TIMES

SEPT

*DATE/TIME Sunday, September 9, 2012 Sunday, September 16, 2012 Tuesday, September 18, 2012 Night meeting 1830 HRS Thursday, September 20, 2012 Day meeting 0930 HRS Sunday, September 30, 2012


Fire Watch (Summer 2012)  

This Keith Hamilton photo won “Best Unpublished Photo by a Local 3888 Member” at the 2011 TPFFA Media Awards. This photo of hundreds of Toro...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you