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VOLUME 4

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ISSUE 2 | SUMMER 2008

And the Award Goes To... Local 3888 hosts annual Media Awards

Who Helps Children Who Set Fires? A look at the TAPP-C Program Publications Agreement No: 41203011

FIREHALL SHOWCASE: Fire Station 224


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THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE TORONTO PROFESSIONAL FIRE FIGHTERS’ ASSOCIATION

VOLUME 4

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ISSUE 2

SUMMER 2008

IN THIS ISSUE 28

18

32

54

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FIRE WATCH (ISSN 1715-5134) is published quarterly by the TORONTO PROFESSIONAL FIRE FIGHTERS’ ASSOCIATION 39 Commissioners Street, Toronto, ON Canada M5A 1A6 Tel: 416.466.1167 www.torontofirefighters.org E-mail: firewatch@torontofirefighters.org FIRE WATCH is published quarterly by Xentel DM Incorporated on behalf of the Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association CHIEF EDITOR Scott Marks

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President’s Message

9

Secretary Treasurer’s Message

11

Vice President’s Message

13

Chaplain’s Corner

14

Letters to the Editor

16

Who Helps Children Who Set Fires?

18

Member Profile on Bruce Campbell

20

2008 Off-Duty Awards

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Etobicoke Fire Fighters’ Association and Department History

28

2008 Media Awards

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Fire Fighter Survival & Rescue

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Firehall Showcase–Station 224

36

Ceremonial and Bereavement Committee

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Collective Agreement–Modified Work Policy

42

We All Need to Contribute to the 3888 FIREPAC

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Two Hatters and Secondary Employment

MANAGING EDITORS Frank Ramagnano & James Coones Tel.: 416.466.1167 Fax: 416.466.6632 E-mail: firewatch@torontofirefighters.org

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Send Off to Local 3888 Retirees

54

3888 Recent Happenings

ASSISTANT EDITORS Rayanne Dubkov, Marla Friebe, Rodney Johnston, Seonaid Lennox, Neil McKinnon

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Fit to Survive

ASSISTANT COPY EDITORS Alyssa Petrillo & Marcel Ramagnano

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Never Shall We Forget/Rest in Peace

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Harassment or Personal (Non-code) Harassment?

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Ad Index

DESIGN AND ART DIRECTION Xentel DM Incorporated FIRE WATCH PHOTOGRAPHER Keith Hamilton CANADIAN PUBLICATIONS MAIL Agreement No: 41203011 PRINTED IN CANADA Copyright © 2008 Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association ADVERTISING Latoya Davis, Project Manager Tel: 416.646.3128 Ext. 104 Fax: 416.646.3135 Email: latoyad@xentel.com

Merchant Card Acceptance

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, or otherwise without prior written permission from the publisher. FIRE WATCH is an official communication tool of the Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association. The Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association (TPFFA) does not assume responsibility for statements of fact or opinion made by any contributor. Comments made by individuals may not reflect the official position of the TPFFA. Acceptance and publication of articles, advertisements, 3 products and services does not indicate endorsement of same by the TPFFA, and the TPFFA assumes no responsibility for their accuracy.

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On The Cover Local 3888’s 2008 Media Awards Best Photograph in a publication with a circulation of less than 100,000. Story on page 28.

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PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

W

e all know what hindsight is; the ability to review a situation after the fact and determine how things could have been done differently to avoid mistakes or improve what was done. We all do it; either formally through debriefing, or informally, mulling something over in our heads. Hindsight can bring the smug satisfaction of having your point of view validated, or the grief of sleepless nights wishing you had an opportunity to do it all over again. But do we understand the true value of hindsight? Hindsight serves us well in the fire service. At a major incident it gets called de-briefing, but the intent is the same; an opportunity to review the facts on what took place for the purpose of identifying things that could be improved at the next incident. The value of hindsight is its ability to teach us ways to minimize future errors and to maximize ways to do our jobs properly. Hindsight is part of the planning process for the next occurrence. Fire fighters have to develop the skill of critical thinking and hindsight is an integral part. At an emergency scene there is often little time to stop and contemplate. Instead, we rely on our training, experience and planning to make the right decisions to get things done safely. If we lack the training, planning, or are not properly prepared, the chance of something going wrong increases. There is a direct application of hindsight in the business world and all of the particulars that flow from a business relationship. As fire fighters, we are not exempt from this type of relationship. It affects each one of you through your contractual relationship with the city and it affects your association in both the day-to-day business of running the association and the association’s negotiations and relationship with the city.

The association has to develop the same type of critical thinking to constantly assess what we are doing. We run a business. It is a service oriented business that provides services to you as fire fighters. We have to ensure that we are providing what you need in a cost efficient manner and also be assessing your future needs so that these items are there when you need them. We have to assess what we have done in the past,

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Scott Marks

have the ability to use hindsight effectively by reciting and reflecting on any errors you may have made in the previous two years, or at least mistakes they believe you have made. As we get ready for this reassessment via our elections in the fall, it is a time to apply a little hindsight in evaluating the critical thinking that has gone into running this association over the past two years. We have the luxury of being

THE VALUE OF HINDSIGHT IS ITS ABILITY TO TEACH US WAYS TO MINIMIZE FUTURE ERRORS AND TO MAXIMIZE WAYS TO DO OUR JOBS PROPERLY. HINDSIGHT IS PART OF THE PLANNING PROCESS FOR THE NEXT OCCURRENCE.

what we have that works, how we achieved it and how to get you what you need in the future. A prime example of this is the joint Benefits Utilization Committee that has been struck to look at what we have in benefits, their related costs and how those benefits serve us. If there are ways to improve benefits by reformulating and applying more money where it is needed and less elsewhere, it will serve our members better and be cost neutral. That is the goal of this committee. Our membership gets the opportunity to assess the Executive Board every two years at election time. As anyone running for re-election to a union executive board can tell you, members

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half way through a three year contract. We can look back at what was negotiated and how it has stood up through this period of time. We can also look ahead to the final year of the contract and ask, “If this contract was negotiated today would the situation be better or worse?” Many fire locals are locked in arbitrations that have lasted for years. Ottawa, Pickering and London amongst others have just received or are awaiting awards. Some date back three to four years. This is not the fault of the locals, it is the problem with the current arbitration system. Whereas we believed our Teplitsky arbitration was delayed due to the number of issues because of amalgamation, we now realize that SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH

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President’s Message ... Continued from page 5

delays have become commonplace and this is the new norm. Arbitration is not the preferred method of resolving contracts today. We can see the difficulties the TTC and the Toronto Police are currently experiencing at the bargaining table and we start to get a picture of where we might be had we not settled or ratified our contract last year. Hindsight is 20/20 and looking back now, it seems that the issues that some had about the last contract pale in comparison to the situation we would be in had we not ratified it. The Bargaining Committee unanimously recommended ratification as did the majority of the Executive Board. That sentiment was based on looking ahead and the plan-

ning that had gone into negotiating the contract. The ability to look ahead and plan was based in a large part on critically analysing what had transpired in the past; hindsight. There is always an element of luck in settling at the right time, but the more you plan, the more you minimize the unknown variables. Hindsight is a part of critical thinking that is extremely useful when we use it to review our past and plot our future. If we use it to point fingers and lay blame we have missed the point and we are destined to repeat our mistakes. P.S. It was enormously satisfying to have our complaint against the Toronto Sun and Sue-Ann Levy upheld by the Ontario Press Council. The column written by Ms. Levy on October 25, 2007,

describing our last negotiations as “secret” was false and the OPC upheld the complaint. Ms. Levy did not apply due diligence and simply missed our contract when it was ratified by council in June 2007. It was on the public agenda and in emails to me she admitted she had been too busy to read the agenda. She tried to lay the blame elsewhere and we called her on it. It is a small but enormously satisfying victory for Toronto’s fire fighters.

Scott Marks President, Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association, I.A.F.F. Local 3888

SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH

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SECRETARY TREASURER’S MESSAGE

R

ecently, a member sent me an e-mail in regards to the 2007 Ontario Budget and the 2008 Federal Budget. The member was asking about new governments’ flexibility for Locked-in Pensions and how it affects fire fighters. I thought it was a very good question and the answer should be shared with the membership as a whole. Here is what was contained in the Ontario Budget 2007; the government is introducing a new life income fund (LIF). The new LIF, and other modifications to the rules governing locked-in accounts, would give seniors who hold locked-in retirement savings transferred from employment pension plan, increased flexibility in managing their retirement income. The new LIF would replace all existing LIFs and locked-in retirement income funds (LRIFs). This would eliminate mandatory annuity purchase requirements and introducing: • The right to an optional one-time unlocking of up to 25 per cent of locked-in funds no earlier than the early-retirement date under the pension plan from which the money was transferred. • An amended annual payment schedule that would increase retirement income and permit withdrawal of the entire remaining account balance when the LIF holder reaches age 90. • The opportunity to withdraw additional income based on investment returns in the previous year. Additional changes would allow direct transfers of unlocked small amounts to non-locked-in accounts and unlocking for non-residents of Canada. The changes would also introduce consistent rules for the waiver of spousal entitlements to locked-in funds. The Federal 2008 Budget; LIFs hold investments stemming from federally regulated registered pension plans. LIFs provide seniors with the ability to withdraw these investments, but withdraw-

als are currently subject to strict annual withdrawal limits. Budget 2008 proposes to significantly enhance the flexibility to withdraw funds from LIFs through three provisions: Individuals 55 or older with small holdings of up to $22,450 will be able to wind up their accounts with the option to convert to a tax-deferred savings vehicle. The threshold for small holdings will increase with the average industrial wage, Individuals 55 or older will be entitled to a one-time conversion of up to 50 per cent of LIF holdings into a tax-deferred savings vehicle with no maximum withdrawal limits, All individuals facing financial hardship (e.g. low income, high disability or medical-related costs) will be entitled to unlock up to $22,450. This maximum will also increase with the average industrial wage. So you must be thinking “Okay, flexibly is good but what is the catch?” If you recall, I laid out exactly what were your options in regards to your money that is invested with OMERS in the (Fall 2007 issue of Fire Watch Pages 38 to 41 and still available on our web site). The changes affect all members of registered pension plans in Ontario, so yes; they apply to members of OMERS as well. The Regulation under the Pension Benefits Act was amended to permit owners of Life Income Funds (LIFs) a time-limited opportunity to withdraw up to 25% of the amount transferred into the LIF. The individual has 60 days from the date the money was transferred to the new LIF to apply to withdraw the money in question. In terms

Frank Ramagnano

of the impact specifically on members of the OMERS plan, there really isn’t any impact on OMERS. Remember, when a member terminates and is less than age 50, they can withdraw the Commuted Vale of their pension from OMERS and transfer the CV to a lockedin savings account (like a LIRA) (Option #6 of the article). Once the individual is old enough to start to draw an annuity, they then transfer the money in their LIRA to a LIF and the LIF will start to pay them an annuity. It’s at this point in time in which the individual can take advantage of withdrawing the 25% of the monies transferred to the LIF. An active member of OMERS can’t utilize this unlocking opportunity (nor can active members of any other registered pension plans). A member who has terminated and has left their pension with OMERS (a deferred member) also can’t utilize this opportunity. Also, remember in OMERS, once you are over age 50 you no longer have the option to transfer your pension out of OMERS—you must either defer your pension or commence an immediate pension upon termination. In any case, a LIF is something separate and apart from the OMERS pension plan and OMERS wouldn’t play any role in the LIF. Anyone who is utilizing a LIF

SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH

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Secretary Treasurer’s Message ... Continued from page 9

would not be a member of OMERS. They may be former members who transferred their monies out, but their ties with OMERS no longer exist. The LIF would be managed and administered by some financial institution. Knowing how fire fighters think and the fact I discussed option #7 (Fall 2007) on Individual Pension Plans (IPP’s) I know your next question. An IPP, if it’s done as per the rules, is a registered pension plan (just like OMERS), so the same logic and rules should apply (ie, as long as the monies sit in the IPP the option isn’t available). However, could an individual transfer their monies out of the IPP to a LIRA? It depends on the terms and conditions of the IPP. Remember, the problems with an IPP. The IPP exists because of a bona fide employment relationship. The individual can’t simply withdraw the monies unless there has been an event that triggers it (ie, a termination of employment, a wind up of the plan). The person can’t set up the IPP simply for the purpose of getting

the money moved to a LIRA and LIF to unlock monies. As you may be aware of I was recently named as the replacement representative on behalf of the Ontario Professional Fire Fighters Association to sit on the OMERS Administration corporation. This appointment with take effect in the new year. The current representative Rick Miller was appointed to the OMERS Board of Directors on November 1, 1997. (On July 1, 2006 the new OMERS Act continued the Ontario Municipal Employees Retirement Board as the OMERS Administration Corporation, responsible for pension services and administration, investments, and plan valuation.) Rick served as Chair of the OMERS Board in 2002 and a member of the Executive Committee from 2000 through 2003. He currently is the Vice Chair of the Investment Committee and a member of the Governance Committee. Rick is a Captain with the Windsor Fire and Rescue Service. We all owe Rick a great deal of gratitude for the manner in which he

has represented Ontario Fire Fighters during his 10 year tenure, and how he continues to represent us. He has been able to accomplish much and will be leaving OMERS knowing that for the last three years the Fund has ranked in the top quartile of all Canadian pension funds. I am humbled to be named his replacement and I hope to continue down the path that he has created. I have also updated our cost of retirement chart for 2008. It is a rough estimation, as I am not an accountant, but I did my best to try and make it as accurate as possible. I used the actual salaries paid and placed them in the OMERS formula to figure out the pension. To get a true reflection of your true pension, you should contact OMERS. You were recently sent your personalized report and you should review it for accuracy.

Frank Ramagnano Secretary - Treasurer, Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association I.A.F.F. Local 3888

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VICE PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE New Fire Master Plan Calls for Four New Stations

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n 2007 KPMG, an independent research firm completed a Fire Master Plan for the City of Toronto Fire Services which built on a previous Fire Plan from the year 1999. In that year six stations were recommended, one was completed in 2002 (St. #212) and another opened in 2007 (St. #116). The final four were to go into service from 2002 to 2005. They are still on the drawing board and the Toronto Fire Services wants them to open in one year intervals from 2008 to 2011. The reasons given for being unable to meet the KPMG guidelines range from the lack of suitable and available land in the areas concerned and Capital Budget pressures for other competing high priority City projects. Using current Capital Budget projections, they will be opened starting in 2012 and will not be completed until 2015. These four new stations would be built throughout the City of Toronto and I have listed the proposed locations below:

1

Station 221—Midland and Eglinton. (This location was outlined on an earlier Scarborough Master Fire Plan).

2 3 4

Station 124—Sunnybrook Hospital Area. Station 144—Downsview—Keele between Wilson and Sheppard

Station 414—Northwest Etobicoke. West of Highway #27, and south of Rexdale Blvd. (Woodbine Racetrack). Both the Fire Underwriters and the NFPA agree that there should be one fire station for every 25,000 residents and that consideration for construction should begin when 40% of that total is reached. Adequate staffing and coverage is not only a safety issue for the public but also the Fire Fighters we repre-

sent. Local 3888 intends to lobby City Council, and work, as much as possible, in a co-operative manner with the Toronto Fire Services administration, to not only ensure that these guidelines are met but also that a firm time frame is established for their implementation. What we are seeking is a real commitment from City Council and TFS administration to get on with this project and set firm guidelines for its completion. Fire protection must also be considered for other developing areas of the City. These include York University, the expected growth of the Toronto waterfront, especially along the Eastern Avenue section, the downtown core as well as many other developing sections of the City. In their study, KPMG not only analyzed apparatus and company placement, they also recommended that response should comply with the NFPA 1710 guidelines to deliver a sufficient number of fire fighters to conduct all the necessary tasks in a safe manner. This means that the first responding truck should have a minimum of 4 fire fighters and arrive within four minutes. KPMG also notes that, in addition to response time guidelines, NFPA identifies that the minimum staffing for front line vehicles (pumpers and aerials) should be not less than four personnel. This is important and we certainly agree that sufficient staffing is a critical component of effective fire fighting. In 2002, the Toronto Fire Services began servicing its own fleet of vehicles

Ed Kennedy

and shortly thereafter moved into a new mechanical facility. It is now obvious that the department has outgrown this garage and needs to look for new and larger quarters. In order to use extra space more efficiently and institute an effective preventative maintenance program, where smaller repairs can be done before they become larger ones, five more mechanics should be hired. This staff increase has been identified in the Toronto Fire Services operating budget request and will be a priority item in our upcoming lobbying efforts with the City. Within the various levels of government in Canada, we are famous for setting up committees, parliamentary enquiries and judicial reviews which all issue reports and recommendations then gather dust on some shelf somewhere after a few days of media interest, never to be heard of again. The 2007 Fire Master Plan contains some extremely positive ideas, many of which should be implemented as soon as possible. The Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association intends to ensure that this report does stay on the front burner and that its many positive recommendations come to fruition in a timely manner.

Ed Kennedy Vice-President, Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association I.A.F.F. Local 3888

SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 11


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LOCAL 3888 REMINDS ALL OF ITS MEMBERS TO ALWAYS BUCKLE UP!

ALWAYS! 12


CHAPLAIN’S CORNER

Remember, it’s all about balance... BY DAVID KING, NORTH COMMAND CHAPLAIN

M

y teenage son, Cameron, is an avid ‘sk8border’ and according to his friends, a pretty good one too. As it happens, I decided a week or so ago that it was time for me to ‘board up’ and show my lad that I could still keep up with him. Now, as much as it pains me to admit this... that was a mistake!

It was a mistake for at least two reasons (I suspect there are more, but the concussion has left me a little dazed and confused—just kidding!). The first reason that it was unwise has to do with me being a 46 year old, 200 + pound guy who now prefers reading to running. And the second reason relates to agility, or as I found out the hard way, the lack of it. My family’s home sits atop a fairly steep hill. This location is great for young kids on bikes, go-carts, and skateboards. It isn’t quite so ideal for not-so-young folks who are pushing 50, who haven’t been on a skateboard for twenty-five years, who now have only a passing acquaintance with a gym, and are quite simply too foolish to admit that they’re way out of their league. Notwithstanding those risks, I decided to test fate. Initially, the ride went well. But then, chaos ensued. After no more than 10 seconds, the skateboard began to wobble from one side to the other. To steady myself, I assumed the ‘cool guy on a surf board’ stance. With Beach Boys music reverberating in my head, I leaned forward, crouched everso-slightly, and thrust my arms out to the side—exactly like I was riding a wave in Waikiki. And just like all waves, this one eventually came crashing to shore, or to be more specific, into a chestnut tree. Fortunately a bruised ego was all I had to contend with! In an attempt to bolster

my somewhat deflated spirits, my son called out, “Hey, Dad, that was totally ‘sic’ (a contemporary term for excellent). Next time though, remember it’s all about balance.” That comment brings to mind another occasion where I lost my footing. It was 10 years ago. With a pretty solid background in stained glass design and creation, I was approached by an entrepreneur, inviting me to go into business with him. The deal involved me crafting the pieces of art and him marketing them. In total, our efforts lasted a mere 6 months. After too many hours of labour, too little sleep, and too few interactions with our significant others, one day my partner turned to me and said, “I gotta tell you, I think we’re way out of sync with what’s really important here.” And, he was right! Years later, I’ve come to appreciate that instance as central to my understanding of what a well-lived life should be about. To quote my son again, “It’s all about balance.” I say that because at some time or another, each of us will find it necessary to wrestle with (and make choices among) conflicting desires or competing obligations. Our ability to make such wise and informed decisions can only happen as a by-product of living intentionally and thoughtfully. I name intentionality and thoughtfulness as necessary components because, it seems to me, that without them you

Rev. G. David King

NORTH COMMAND Rev. G. David King 416.723.8375 dking@united-church.ca and I are not so much participants in life as we are prisoners of life. Now to be sure, while some decisions are relatively easy to make, others are the source of much angst and anxiety. Even though family, friends, and coworkers are frequent sources of support in difficult times, there may be other occasions where a more independent and objective resource is needed. Helping another to see the big picture, to make sense out of the confusion, is often what chaplains are called on to assist with. Indeed, my colleagues—Barry Parker (South Command), Hugh Donnelly (East Command), Todd Riley (West Command), and Ron Nickle (Chaplain Emeritus)—believe that chaplaincy is, in part, about meaning-making. That is, the act of assisting another to find clarity, commitment, and confidence in a decision that needs be made, a change that requires implementation, or an action that will make a situation better, or at least bearable. Chaplaincy Services is available to you 24/7. Consultations are easy to arrange and are confidential. Be assured, if you need us, we’ll be there. And remember, in life, as with skateboarding, it’s all about balance. I wish you a steady ride!

SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 13


 e  Le TO THE EDITOR

TREASURED MEMORY

HONOURING FIRE FIGHTERS

BEAUTIFUL CEREMONY

I would like to express my many thanks for all the work you and the association did, to organize and host such a wonderful evening for all of us retirees! My wife and I had a great time, everything was perfect. I will treasure the memories and the many gifts that you lavished upon us, very thoughtful of you indeed. It was good to see many people from the past, that I have known for so many many years, and exchange lots of old stories (some of which might have even been true!! Ha). Thanks again for all your efforts, it certainly was a warm and enjoyable evening for us.

My daughters and I would like to thank you for the lovely evening honoring the firefighters. The presentation and service was done with respect and honor. Oddly enough the family in front of us were my middle daughters neighbors whose father had past away last year whom we didn’t know were attending. The box and contents given to his wife was something they will have for years to come. Again thank you for the lovely evening makes me feel even prouder of my father, Lester A Bangay.

Just a short note to thank you once again for the beautiful, solemn ceremony which we attended last evening. The ceremony, with all the flags, pipers, prayers, and pictures, brought tears to our eyes. It was very touching and I personally thank you for all the hard work which you put into it. Once again, may I as well as the entire Greg Fecteau family thank you, much beyond what these mere few words can say.

David and Joanne Baird

SINCERE APPRECIATION I would like to express my sincere appreciation to all those who are involved in a very special event hosted by TPFFA; namely the Retirees Dinner and Dance. From the moment my wife Debbie and I arrived we were made to feel welcome and at ease, as were my son and his girlfriend. Everywhere you turned there was someone asking how you were, directing the evening or pointing the way to the bar. Dinner was great, as was the music and conversation. Most importantly of all, the feeling of brotherhood prevailed. The common bond we all share was never more evident than that night. Local 3888 is to be commended for their efforts in making us all feel that we had contributed and sacrificed in our dedication to our job. To all those who missed the night; I can only say this—you missed having a lot of people make you feel special! Dennis Buck

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June Paradis

Kaza


Ken Magill 2008-2220 Marine Dr. Oakville, ON L6L 5H1 TEL. 905 847 6694

June 2008

Greetings to my firefighter friends and their families; This year’s Rob Penney slo-pitch tournament for firefighter’s cancer research will not take place due to difficulty of procuring the usual facility on time. Dave Pineau and the other organizers have put in a tremendous amount of time and effort for many years and are extremely disappointed and frustrated with this year’s turn of events. They are also very weary and fatigued and in need of a year off to recharge their energy. The fund raising to keep the firefighter cancer research on the fast track will go ahead as usual and more than 400 letters have been prepared and mailed out to both active and retired firefighters. Princess Margaret Hospital and the Ont. Professional Firefighters’ Assn., using the data that one in three Canadians will develop some form of cancer in their lifetime, estimate double that amount for firefighters, which is a shocking 66% increase. It is only logical that we shouldn’t be believing that it can’t happen to me but rather if and at what stage in our life, we might possibly be the next cancer patient. Firefighters are very fortunate that Princess Margaret Hospital has placed our profession in a special category and are committed to discover the reasons why we are in such a high risk group. This hospital has many firsts in cancer research. It has the largest radiation centre under one roof in the western world, one of the world’s largest bone marrow transplant facilities, discovered the stem cell and T-cell receptor, invented the cobalt machine and pioneered digital mammography. It also has one of the world’s highest percentage of cancer patients and has more than one thousand scientific staff on hand. 2008 is a special year at PMH as it is their 50th anniversary. To celebrate their accomplishments they have chosen the motto “In Our Lifetime” PMH reminds us that not long ago cancer was a death sentence and the treatment was dreaded almost as much as the disease. We have seen that change “In our lifetime.” PMH has told us that we won’t be fighting this fight forever. We are closing in. We have the momentum, talent and the passion. Together we are cancer’s warriors and we will find more cures “In Our Lifetime” Please make cheques out to Rob Penney Cancer Research or to P.M.H. Firefighter Cancer Research. (We ask that you please seriously consider our appeal to keep this cancer research operating. What better cause can a firefighter support than the one that will benefit himself, his co-workers and his family?) Princess Margaret Hospital will mail out receipts for income tax purposes for donations of $20 or more in time for the 2008 filing. Thank you and best wishes, Ken Magill

FIRE WATCH accepts Letters to the Editor, articles, essays, and photographs from Local 3888 Members, active and retired. We will also accept fire related submissions from outside authors or photographers. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR MAY BE FORWARDED TO: Letter to the Editor FIRE WATCH 39 Commissioners Street Toronto, Ontario Canada M5A 1A6 LETTERS POLICY You may email your letter to: firewatch@torontofirefighters.org FIRE WATCH welcomes letters to the editor to give you – Local 3888 members – an opportunity to express your views, concerns, ideas, or gripes. We can’t print every letter and in some instances letters will have to be edited due to space limitations.

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We do not accept attachments. Please paste your letter into the body of your email and use the subject line “Letter to the Editor.”

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ARTICLES Before sending a full article submission, we suggest that you forward an outline or suggestion for an article to the Editor. FIRE WATCH is your magazine, and as such, we will accept articles on any subject related to Local 3888 and the fire community. Subjects could include but are not limited to: health issues, history, sporting events, equipment, training issues, personal essays, etc. ARTICLE SUBMISSIONS/QUERIES MAY BE FORWARDED TO: Articles FIRE WATCH 39 Commissioners Street Toronto, Ontario Canada M5A 1A6

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You may email your submission/query to firewatch@torontofirefighters.org We do not accept attachments. Forward your suggestion in the body of an email and use the subject line “Article submission or query”. PHOTOGRAPHY Please contact the Editors before forwarding your photographic work for consideration. FIRE WATCH does not offer payment for submissions.

SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 15


Who HELPS Children Who Set FIRES? BY MARLA FRIEBE, SOUTH COMMAND, PUBLIC EDUCATION

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he first fire that Jason was known to have set was at his group foster home where he had been living for the past year, ever since he had been taken by Children’s Aid from his grandparent’s home where he had previously lived. His mother had abandoned him years earlier; his father was not regularly or positively involved in his life. Jason’s behaviour continued to deteriorate while living in the group home. One evening while angry with his foster mother, Sarah, he screamed that he hated her, went upstairs to the room he shared with his teenage brother, took out a book of matches that he had confiscated from his grandparent’s home, and ignited some newsprint. He opened his bedroom window and tossed the burning paper outside where it drifted into a bush below. Inevitably, a significant fire developed that caused extensive damage to the exterior of the house. Even after the fire, Jason continued with threats to burn the house down whenever he disagreed with Sarah. Worried that one day he would truly act on his impulsivity, she readily enrolled Jason into a program that was recommended by Children’s Aid, ‘The Arson

Prevention Program for Children,’ otherwise known as TAPP-C. The story above is true, with the names of the clients changed. Jason is very much like all other children we see involved with fire setting, and statistics show that children who set fires fall into a very consistent pattern—they are primarily male (although females account for approximately 10% of hardened fire setters), ages four—17 years, predominantly reside in homes where

the annual income is less than $20,000, predominantly live outside the parental home, set fires on multiple occasions, set fires with matches or lighters, and are at increased risk for non-fire related offending. Juvenile firesetting is normally indicative of broader, antisocial behaviour, and its presence in children normally conveys a 4-5 fold increase in risk for juvenile offending 10 years later. Fire involvement is described as any unsanctioned or dangerous fire related behaviour that is threatened, planned, or carried out. ¹Childhood fire setting is also the strongest predictor known of adult firesetting. If there was a way to reach youthful fire setters, to intervene and educate them, to change their behaviour, to provide parent management to caregivers, and to prevent further injuries and property damage sustained from fire, imagine the difference we could make in the lives of these children right now! Ontario’s Arson Prevention Program for Children addresses all of these areas, and is being facilitated throughout the city by Toronto firefighter/public educators in conjunction with the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.

TAPP-C was created as an empirically-based assessment and intervention program to address youthful firesetting 16

CAM-H, “What does the Treatment Component of TAPP-C Involte, www.ca mh.net

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The program aims to provide children with strategies to recognize and control their fire-related impulses and behaviours Developed in 1990 by firefighters with the City of Toronto Fire Department, along with the Ontario Fire Marshal’s Office and the Clarke Institute of Psychiatry (CAM-H), TAPP-C was created as an empirically-based assessment and intervention program to address youthful firesetting. It is a program that combines the fire service and mental health professionals to work with families in an attempt to eradicate fire related behaviours. Toronto Firefighter/ Educators provide families with home fire safety checks and education while mental health professionals conduct risk assessments and parent-child focused treatment within a mental health framework. The program aims to provide children with strategies to recognize and control their fire-related impulses and behaviours. The treatment focuses on three principles; that fire involvement by children usually indicates an absence of fire-safe behaviours, that fire-related behaviours are learned, and that the family home (or alternative care environment) is an important setting for learning fire safe behaviours. TAPP-C treatment will include education on the importance of fire safe attitudes, the role of fire-safe behaviours for the family, understanding and eliminating firestarting materials and other fire related materials, and improving supervision and monitoring habits. ² The success rate of TAPP-C is clear— the recidivism rate is almost at zero in most cases. Perhaps the reason why TAPP-C is so successful as an intervention program is due to the co-operative role of Firefighters and Clinicians. Fire-

fighters are linked with children who have traditionally been lost in the shuffle of families living with challenges, and have the opportunity to bond with individuals who they typically regard as ‘important community helpers.’ Caregivers are also involved in the educational sessions with Firefighters, and are encouraged to model fire safe behaviours in the home. In the story above, when a home safety check was done by Firefighters at Jason’s father’s home (whom he lived with only on weekends) we found matches left openly on a living room coffee table. Jason’s father was embarrassed when he realized what a mistake it was to leave these articles in open view, and had previously felt that his 8-year old son was ‘rehabilitated,’ and had learned from the fire that he had set. Through discussions with the Firefighters involved with his son’s case, he came to under-

CAM-H, “What does the Treatment Component of TAPP-C Involve, www.ca mh.net

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stand that leaving matches out was still too much of a temptation for Jason at this time. In the end it is a simple lesson for many caregivers to learn; if children don’t have access to matches and lighters, they can’t set fires. Children and teens are frequently referred to TAPP-C by police when they have evidence that a child has been involved with fire setting, by youth and family courts, schools, and by the Children’s Aid Society. Individuals can also be referred to TAPP-C by contacting one of the program’s clinicians directly at (416) 535-8501 ext. 6208. For further information on the program, interested parties can contact the TFS public education section at the numbers listed below: • South Command 338-9418 • North Command 338-9185 • West Command 338-9470 • East Command 338-9272

SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 17


Member Profile BY TONY MACDONALD, TORONTO FIRE CAPTAIN, STATION 445A

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n 1974, Bruce Campbell applied to four of the Fire Departments that now make up the Toronto Fire Services. In those days, an applicant had to weigh at least 160 pounds. The comment Bruce remembers most is, “Too bad kid! Call us when ya gain some weight.”

Bruce and his wife Ingrid, had a friend visit them in 1976. She brought one of her students named Maria, who was a little girl with Downs Syndrome. They learned that Maria was a ward of the Catholic Children’s Aid Society. It was still common at that time for parents to give custody of such children to the Catholic Children’s Aid, and some Doctors even recommended this action. Attitudes were changing and the group home where Maria lived was clos-

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ing, and she needed a place to live. That was the beginning of Bruce and Ingrid’s life as foster parents. In 1977, they were asked to care for a five year old boy for a few days. Bobby was a “human perpetual motion machine”, rolling up the stairs and talking non-stop. “Yes, he’s rather busy” conceded the social worker as she left. They discovered that the best way to use up Bobby’s energy was to pay him to catch grasshoppers since they had hundreds of them eating their way through the garden. Bobby was fascinated with the grasshoppers and spent hours watching insects. When Bobby discovered that the Praying Mantis ate grasshoppers, he developed a group of some of the fattest specimens around. The Praying Mantis family had a steady diet of grasshoppers and took care of the grasshopper crowding problem. Bobby lived with the Campbell family until he was eighteen. By the time the eighties arrived, Bruce and Ingrid and their two children, Nathan and Bart, were sharing their home with five long term foster kids. Most of these kids were developmentally delayed. In addition to this load,

they took in a variety of other temporary foster kids! On January 7th, 1985, Bruce was hired by the Toronto Fire Department and began his recruit training. He remembers some very cold weeks outdoors learning to lay and reload hose. When he was finished his training, he was stationed at Runnymede on an aerial that ran less than 200 calls per year. To escape the “semi-retired” aerial, Bruce volunteered to relieve out constantly and spent much of his time at what are now known as, Station 426 and Station 423. One strong memory for Bruce from his time at Station 423 was meeting Tim. Bruce came to the kitchen table to have a coffee with the guys. One guy named Tim looked a little odd due to his coke bottle glasses, but he was wearing his dress uniform as was the custom at that time. Tim had gone to a nearby school to take classes for what they called back then, “The trainable mentally retarded.” After his school had visited the fire hall a few times Tim had developed an interest in the station. He was now working in a sheltered workshop, and would visit the hall for an hour or so, on his way home each day. Over time, the fire fighters had given him various bits of uniform, so that he looked like a fire fighter. Tim had also learned how to behave in the fire hall. Just like Bruce, many guys coming in to relieve were fooled into thinking that Tim was one of the crew. When the alarm sounded, Tim would stand aside until the crew was on the truck. Then he would go to the apparatus floor and put on his old discarded helmet, petch coat, and boots, and by the time the truck was leaving the station, Tim was dressed. He would then sweep and mop the floor where the truck had been. If the private phone rang, Tim


on Bruce Campbell would take messages, but he knew not to answer the department phone. Tim also impressed everyone by remembering their badge numbers. Tim’s greatest moment was when the pumper was sent to a nearby grass fire. He was in his fire gear on the platform when a lady came over to speak with him about the fire. Robby, the aerial driver came over to help the lady, but she waved her hand in his face and said “Quiet, I’m talking to the fireman.” Tim was so happy. Late in 1989, Bruce had fewer foster children because all of the original ones had grown up and left home. Instead, they often took in kids for short terms. They got a call from their social worker

who told them about a baby who was born prematurely and would probably suffer from cerebral palsy, as well as physical, and developmental delays. The mother had just become a single parent and had two other children. The social worker asked if they could take care of the baby until the mother was able to take care of him. Ingrid was very excited when she came back from the Neo-Natal unit. She said “Andre’s very alert, gives

eye contact, and relates to people. He may have physical challenges, but he’s bright and intelligent.” By the time that the mother decided that she had her hands full with her other two children, Andre had been with the Campbells for a year! They adopted him and as Ingrid had predicted, Andre was a bright child. He uses a wheelchair, and is now doing well at high school. The Catholic Children’s Aid kept sending them cute, special needs babies. It was a devious ploy and after they adopted Andre, they then adopted Patrick, Allyne, and then Mathew. With this large ongoing commitment, they stopped fostering. They still keep in touch with most of their earlier foster kids who come back to visit a few times each year. Bruce says “being a foster parent isn’t always pleasant, but there are plenty of good times and I recommend that people consider it.” In 1993, Bruce accepted a temporary assignment at the Fire Academy on Knox Street. He was asked to be the technical illustrator for the Rope Rescue manual. It was supposed to be for less than a year, but soon he was serving as a rope rescue instructor. Then he began helping to train the new recruits. Working with a group of eager recruits was exciting so he applied for a position as a Training Officer and was accepted. The years that followed were busy, challenging, and satisfying. They developed and delivered a recruit pro-

gram based on the OFM curriculum to Vaughan Fire recruits. They also delivered a recruit program for fire fighters from Dubai. During this time, Bruce and Ingrid received Local 113’s Al Pearsall Award for their work with foster children and an award from the Credit Union of a similar nature. After amalgamation, Bruce helped with training fire fighters on the IMS system, then the selection process for SCBA, then more IMS training. Working with training officers from other departments, and a whole new group of senior officers was very interesting. Finally, in late 2001, it became apparent that shift work would give Ingrid and Bruce more time to attend all of the various appointments that the kids needed, so Bruce requested a transfer back to the trucks. Bruce got his transfer but had to complete SCBA, plus Search and Rescue practical training with the next class of recruits. Ironically, the class started on January 7th, which was exactly seventeen years from when he had started, and one of his students was the son of one of his oiginal classmates! S U M M E R 2 0 0 8 | F I R E WATCH 19


2008

Awards OFF-DUTY

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ne of Local 3888’s major fundraising activities is our Fire Fighters Ball. This years’ ball took place on Friday, May 2, 2008 at the Sheraton Hotel. In conjunction with the ball, the Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association hosts the pre-ball luncheon. The pre-ball luncheon is an opportunity to not only bring focus to our fundraising efforts, but also to give special recognition to our members for their off-duty activities. In attendance were the award recipients and their families, Jack Layton, leader of the New Democratic Party of Canada, Local 3888 Executive Board, senior TFS management staff and members of the media. The Local 3888 off-duty awards program consists of four separate and distinct categories which recognize the exceptional efforts and achievements of our members while off-duty. The first award is the Bernard “Ben” Bonser award which is awarded to a Toronto fire fighter who, while off-duty, made a rescue or was involved in saving the life of a citizen in a hazardous or life threatening situation. The second award is the Al Pearsall award. This award is presented to the Toronto Fire Fighter who best contributed their time and abilities while off-duty toward the improvement of his or her community. And the final 20

Local 3888 award is the Roy Silver Award. This Award is presented to the Toronto Fire Fighter who, during the past year, best distinguished himself/ herself by performing first aid and/or CPR while off-duty. The Box 12 award is

presented in recognition of outstanding volunteer service for the direct benefit of Toronto fire fighters. The five individuals receiving awards and all the others we received nominations for, certainly have gone above the

Fire Fighter Jeff Pos accepts the Roy Silver Award from (l to r) Deputy Chief, Frank Lamie, 3888 Executive Board Member, Kevin Ashfield, and 3888 Secretary-Treasurer, Frank Ramagnano.


truck; they delivered a shock to the victim and continued CPR until the arrival of an Ambulance. Andy and his colleague assisted the paramedics enroute to the hospital where the victims vital signs were re-established.

Al Pearsall Award

Jack Layton, Leader of Canada’s NDP, addresses the attendees at Local 3888’s Annual Off-Duty Awards Luncheon which was held on May 2nd at the Sheraton Hotel in downtown Toronto.

call of duty. Without the selfless acts that our members are involved in each year, it would impossible to continue our Off Duty Awards program.

Box 12 Award This year’s winners are Acting Captain Geoff Boisseau from North Command and Fire Fighter John McGill from South Command. They are being recognized for their contributions related to fire fighter survival and Rapid Intervention Team training. Geoff and John were instrumental in bringing both the union and management together to formulate a standard response when fire fighters get in a Mayday trouble at a fire.

The Al Pearsall award for community service is being awarded to Fire Captain Bill Hawley. Bill has been a volunteer and active member of the Toronto Fire Fighters’ War Veterans Association since 1990 and has risen to the job as 1st Vice President which is the position he currently holds today. He has also volunteered many hours of service at the Timmy Tyke Hockey Tournaments, Muscular Dystrophy boot drives and Ronald McDonald House to name a few.

Roy Silver Award The Roy Silver Award for First Aid is being awarded to fire fighter Jeff Pos. Jeff stopped by station 114 to pick up per-

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sonnel items and was speaking to the driver of Command 10 when he heard some construction workers across the street yelling that one of their colleagues had collapsed. Jeff asked the fire fighter to get some equipment and went across the street to assist with the collapsed man. Jeff found the victim without vital signs, and with help, moved the worker off the branches he was laying on to solid ground where he started doing CPR. The fire fighter from the station brought over medical equipment and helped with CPR. They attached the defibrillator pads and delivered a shock before any other help arrived; after approx 20 minutes a pulse was regained and the worker was transported to North York General Hospital. Nomination forms are distributed in early January of each year to solicit entries for the TPFFA off-duty awards. All members of Local 3888 are encouraged to submit an entry for consideration on behalf of a fellow deserving member.

GEOFF AND JOHN WERE INSTRUMENTAL IN BRINGING BOTH THE UNION AND MANAGEMENT TOGETHER TO FORMULATE A STANDARD RESPONSE WHEN FIRE FIGHTERS GET IN A MAYDAY TROUBLE AT A FIRE.

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The Bernard “Ben” Bonser Award This year’s Ben Bonser Award goes to Fire Captain Andrew Blair. Andy was returning from Canadian Forces Base Petawawa with three other GTA fire fighters when they came upon a car accident. They stopped their vehicle and quickly took control of the accident scene; they used the tools they had in their truck to extricate the victim who had no vital signs. After removal, Andy and a Halton Hills fire fighter started CPR and proceeded to hook up the defibrillator they were carrying in their

Toronto Acting Captain, Geoff Boisseau and Fire Fighter, John McGill are presented with this year’s Box 12 Award for their efforts and contributions related to fire fighter survival and Rapid Intervention Team training.

SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 21


ETOBICOKE FIRE FIGHTERS’

ASSOCIATION AND DEPARTMENT HISTORY BY ERNIE THORNE, MEMBER OF THE FORMER ETOBICOKE LOCAL 1137

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n June 15, 1953, the first full time Fire Station was opened in the Queensway area at 615 Royal York Road with the hiring of 15 full time Professional Fire Fighters to create a Fire Department establishment of 18 personnel. The Fire Chief was Frederick N. Mitchell. On October 15th of that same year, the Etobicoke Township Fire Fighters’ Association formed and were chartered as Local 1137, I.A.F.F. The first President of Local 1137 was Jim Britton. The first Collective Agreement (CA) was signed on November 28, taking effect January 1, 1954, which included the two platoon system (a 56-hour work week), a first class salary of $3750, a Fire Prevention Officer rate of $3600, promotional language, a grievance procedure and recognition of the Union as the bargaining agent. In 1954, Hurricane Hazel struck Etobicoke with grave consequences. In addition to more than 50 citizens killed by the Hurricane, five volunteer Fire Fighters from the Kingsway-Lambton brigade were killed. The year 1955 saw the opening of two more full-time stations (Station 2 at 2120 Kipling Avenue in Rexdale and Station 3 in Islington Village at 5000 Dundas Street West), the renewal of the CA with an increase in the first class rate to $3900 and the accumulation of sick leave credits to a maximum of 180 days. Chief Howard A. Flanagan succeeded Chief F. N. Mitchell. Negotiated changes in 1956 included a check-off system for Union dues and an increase in the first class rate and the Fire Prevention Officer rate to $4100.

The Fire Department continued to grow with the opening of more full time stations. Station 4, at 3 Lunness Road in Alderwood, opened in 1957, replacing the Volunteer Fire Brigade that operated in that area of Etobicoke Township for many years, followed by the opening of Station 5 at 1750 Islington Ave. A two year agreement was negotiated to include a 50% co-share for Extended Health Care benefits, provisions for WCB coverage, a possible pension plan with retirement at age 60, and an increase in the rate of a first class fire fighter to $4305 in 1957 and $4605 in 1958. In 1959, the Township of Etobicoke opened Station 6, located at 308 Prince Edward Drive, resulting in the disbandment of the Kingsway-Lambton and Humber Bay Volunteer Brigade. Station 3 was relocated to larger facilities at 280 Burnhamthorpe Road and became the new Headquarters of the Etobicoke Fire Department. Membership in the Association was now at 130. Another two year agreement was reached, taking the rate to $5030 in 1960. The thought of earning $100 a week, a salary once considered as impossible for a ‘Fireman’, was now the talk among the membership. The first Board of Arbitration in Etobicoke’s history, covering 1961 and 1962, resulted in the reduction to the work week from 56 hours to 48 hours. Because the Association had not asked for an increase in salary in their unsuccessful quest to reduce the work week to 42 hours, their salary remained the same at $5030. The reduction in the work week necessitated the hiring of

20 additional fire fighters, resulting in the Township Reeve threatening the removal of TV sets and beds from fire stations. In 1963, Station 7 is erected at 947 Martin Grove Road. A two year CA was negotiated, bringing the first class rate to $5600 in 1964. On January 7, 1963, an Etobicoke landmark, the Palace Pier Dance Station was completely destroyed after a $500,000 fire. Fire crews from New Toronto joined over forty fire fighters from Etobicoke to fight this blaze that was visible from Buffalo. In 1964, Roy Weech was appointed Fire Chief. The Association filed for Arbitration in 1965 in another attempt to attain the 42hour work week, which the Township refuses to negotiate. The arbitration award included a 42-hour work week (eliminated the 24-hour Sunday shift) and increased the first class rate to $5900. The victory of the reduced work week was short lived however because the Ontario Government passed legislation less than two months later establishing a 42-hour work week for fire fighters. Station 8, located at 666 Renforth Drive, was opened on the west side of Highway 427 to serve the growing population in the Township. The Association filed two grievances. The first grievance charged that the department’s promotional policy, in place since 1964, permitted favouritism in the selection of candidates for promotion. This grievance was resolved during the process and prior to going to arbitration with some modifications to the promotional policy. The second grievance involved the members’ pension plan and

The thought of EARNING $100 A WEEK, a salary once considered as IMPOSSIBLE for a ‘FIREMAN’, was now the TALK AMONG the MEMBERSHIP. 22


the CPP. The Arbitrator ruled in favour of the Association. A two year CA was reached, raising the rate of a first class fire fighter salary to $6255 in 1966 and $6630 in 1967. On January 1, 1967, the Township of Etobicoke achieved Borough status and was amalgamated with the three Lakeshore municipalities of Mimico, New Toronto, and Long Branch and the Association membership reached 308. The Mimico and Long Branch Stations were closed with a corresponding increase in fire fighters to the New Toronto Station, located at 130 Eighth Street, now known as Station 9. A two year CA was once again negotiated, resulting in the first class rate of $7725 in 1968 and $8190 in 1969. In 1970, Station 10 was opened at 1549 Albion Road, which resulted in the closing of the Thistletown Volunteers’ Station on Irwin Road. The CA was negotiated, resulting in a first class salary of $9600 effective January 1st and $9800 effective July 1st. Improvements to benefits resulted in the Corporation paying 75% of the premium cost for OHIP and Extended Health Care. The Fire Chief placed another rescue vehicle in service and stripped the aerials of fire fighters and officers to provide staffing. The Department Deputy, Brian Mitchell, insisted on calling the rescue vehicles his “SCAT wagons;” the term SCAT to represent “Self Contained Attack Team”. However, to almost everyone else in the Department, the term SCAT meant “Scenic Cruises And Tours,” as they were given considerable latitude as far as their travels were concerned. A negotiated CA for 1971 raised the rate of a first class fire fighter to $10, 585, increased vacation entitlements, and required the Corporation to pay 100% of the cost of OHIP and Extended Health Care premiums. A two year CA was negotiated which established the first class rate of $11,455 in 1972 and $12,100 in 1973. Brian Mitchell was appointed Fire Chief in September 1972, following the death of Chief Roy

Weech. Captain Ross Bissell was appointed as Deputy Fire Chief—labour relations were never the same again. The year 1973 saw the start of the grievance parade as the Association was forced to defend their Collective Agreement and the rights of their members on a regular basis. The newly appointed Fire Chief’s unilateral decision to post a department notice to require all Acting Officers to submit a written request to be re-qualified, by participating in new examinations, was viewed by the Association as a violation of the promotional policy and a grievance was filed on behalf of all Acting Officers (this from a Fire Chief that rose through the ranks without ever writing an exam!) The Arbitrator ruled in favour of the Association and the new exams were scrapped. This grievance, the first of many to come, was viewed by Administration as a threat to the Chief’s authority. Many verbal threats were issued to Association members indicating that, since the Borough had more funds than the Association, the Etobicoke Fire Department Administration would bankrupt the Association with grievances. Later that same year, in his wisdom, the Chief decided to resurrect a set of grooming rules that a previous administration had formulated, yet set aside. The grooming rules were considered to be more stringent that those of the Metro Toronto Police at that time. Member

Maurice Neville decided that he wasn’t going to comply with these new grooming rules and was subsequently transferred to Fire Prevention. The Arbitrator ruled in favour of the Association and Mr. Neville was returned to the Fire Fighting Division. The Fire Chief then decided that the grievance only applied to Mr. Neville and that all others would have to comply. After receiving a letter from the Association indicating that the Association would take further action should he not reconsider, the Chief abandoned his position. Jeffrey Sack was the Association solicitor (of Levinson, Sack & Dunn) during these proceedings, which was the start of a very long friendship. In 1974, the first class rate was increased to $13,340 on January 1 and to $14,010 July 1. Station 11 was opened in 1975, located at 267 Humberline Drive. The Collective Agreement is amended to include a reference to a “Joint Promotional Policy” incorporating ability plus seniority for promotion, survivor benefits for line-of-duty deaths, and a Captain or qualified Acting Captain in charge of every fire fighting vehicle. The rate of a first class Fire Fighter was increased 15% to $16,115. A two year CA included improvements to the dental plan and raises the first class rate to $17,550 in 1975 and to $18,550 in 1976. Two more grievances were filed and the

Etobicoke Fire Fighters battle a two alarm fire at a welding school in 1990. Photo by Bill Sandford of the Toronto Sun-Canada Wide. SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 23


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Etobicoke Fire Fighters’Association and Department History ... Continued from page 23 Etobicoke Fire Fighters at three alarm fire at Polish Embassy on the Lakeshore. Photo by Warren Toda of the Toronto Sun was Local 1137’s Photo of the Year 1990.

Association was successful in both of them. In 1977, the Association filed grievances protesting three day suspensions for each of nine members for “gross insubordination.” The members refused to participate in a non-scheduled examination and were unable to ascertain the reason for the exam. The grievance is denied by the Board of Arbitration and the suspensions are upheld. However, the Arbitrator rules that the Fire Chief is restricted from conducting examinations beyond regular classification or promotional exams, except to determine the effectiveness of the training program. The grievance process also got the Chief to indicate that he had planned on using the examinations to promote, demote, or fire an individual. The year 1977 was also the year in which two members registered complaints with the Ontario Human Rights Commission against the Borough and the Association on the basis of age discrimination (CA age 60 compulsory retirement). The Association was unable to negotiate a renewal of the CA for 1978 and filed for arbitration in May—an Award handed down 8 months later increases the first class rate 5.8% to $19,625. June 15, 1978, was the 25th Anniversary of Etobicoke’s full-time Department, growing from 18 in 1953 to 372 in 1978. In November, the

Association filed a grievance on behalf of a member who is fired for an alleged assault on a Captain, claiming the punishment is too severe. The Arbitrator reinstated the fired member in May 1979, however, the member is returned without compensation for lost wages. The Fire Chief reassigns the reinstated member to the crew of the Grievance Chair (Bud Exton). On December 4, 1978, three members, Fire Fighter John Clark, Captain Donald Kerr, and District Chief Lloyd Janes are crushed to death under tons of falling paper while fighting a fire in the Kimberley-Clark Warehouse—the first line-of-duty deaths in the history of the Association. More than two thousand fire fighters from across North America attend the funeral services. A two year CA was negotiated, increasing the first class rate by 5% on January 1, 1979 to $20,625, and by a further 4.9% on July 1, 1979 to $21,430, with wages still to be negotiated for 1980. In February of 1980, the Association voted 180 to 8 to request an inquest into the Kimberly-Clark deaths. The inquest begins in April with Deputy Chief Bissell’s lawyer telling the press that the Union is out to get his client. Chief Mitchell’s testimony at the inquest is extremely critical of his department’s actions during the initial stages of the fire (the three fire fighters were killed some five hours after the alarm was sounded). With only wages to be negotiated, talks break down in July and the Association files for Arbitration—an Arbitrator Awards a first class rate of $23,914. Station 12 opened at 155 The East Mall. In 1980, a special assessment is levied on each member as the Association funds are

exhausted defending their members and their Collective Agreement at Grievance Arbitrations. In 1981, the Association again filed for Arbitration when negotiations broke off— the Corporation refused to drop their demand that fire fighters work 8 hour shifts. The Association initiated legal proceedings in the Ontario Supreme Court, charging the Corporation with failure to comply with the Arbitrator’s Award for 1980 (the Association subsequently won that case and the Borough had to pay the Association members a total of $85,000 in back pay). The Association filed a grievance when the Fire Chief refused to place a qualified candidate on the promotional list. This brought the number of grievances filed by the Association to more than thirty during the Mitchell/Bissell Administration of the Fire Department. The grievance was resolved to the satisfaction of the Association when Council overturned the Chief’s decision. The Arbitrator’s Award granted a 12.5% increase, in stages, to a first class end rate in 1981 of $26,980. The Association again filed for Arbitration in 1982—the fourth time in five years. The Association also filed suit against the Borough for failure to pay interest on the back pay from the 1980 Award (the Association won this suit also.) Arbitration was avoided when a settlement was reached— an increase of 12.5 % to $30,350. In 1983, the OPFFA split from the IAFF. The Etobicoke Local and many others remained in the IAFF. Etobicoke hosted the founding convention and the new organization reverted to the original name—The Provincial Federation of Ontario Fire Fighters (PFOFF). Etobicoke was given City status by the Province. The first class rate was now $31,868. The first class rate was negotiated to $33,143 for 1984. In October of 1985, the Association finds itself once again having to resort to

On December 4, 1978, three members, Fire Fighter John CLARK, Captain Donald KERR, and District Chief Lloyd JANES are crushed to death under falling paper... SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 25


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Etobicoke Fire Fighters’Association and Department History ... Continued from page 25

Arbitration. To increase the Association’s profile, through the efforts of Public Relation’s Chair, Robin Sanders, the Association enters into a community fund-raising effort for Queensway General Hospital, in partnership with Great West Entertainment, by hosting our first Christmas Magic Show. An Arbitration Award was handed down covering two years, which takes the first class end rate in 1986 to $37,625 and includes a number of benefit and language improvements. In 1986, after being advised that his services were no longer required, Chief Mitchell opted for “early retirement.” Deputy Chief Bissell assumed the position of Acting Fire Chief. In 1987, a consulting firm, brought in by the City, recommended sweeping changes to the Etobicoke Fire Department, including closing fire stations and hiring a new Fire Chief. Action by the Association to combat the station closings was initiated by President Exton, with the assistance of the IAFF, which resulted in all fire stations remaining open. In 1988, Acting Chief Bissell retired when he was bypassed by City Council and they decided to hire a Fire Chief from the “outside.” Jim Hancock was hired as the next Fire Chief and Bob Barker as the new Deputy. Labour Relations between the Association and Fire Department Management improved significantly with the hiring of Chief Hancock and the promotion of Deputy Barker, however, each of these men moved on two years later to the disappointment of many members. Arbitration was required again in 1989 and 1990—an Interim Award raised the first class rate by 6% and 1% to $44,823 for 1989. The Award is finalized in 1990 with an end rate of $47,987. A number of benefits were also realized, however, the Arbitrator removed our WCB top-up provision. Deputy Chief Robert Barker retires, and at the Association’s Annual Awards Luncheon, his membership in the Association is restored (Bob was overwhelmed with emotion and extremely grateful for the gesture). Donald Ramsey is appointed Fire

Chief when Chief Hancock is appointed uary 1, 1998. The amalgamations of the six Fire Chief in Kitchener. Associations followed on December 1, The Association applied once again for 1998. Arbitration in 1991. Past President Exton is I was hired in 1980, so I wasn’t around presented with a well deserved gift by the to witness the beginnings of the full-time Association at their Annual Award’s LunEtobicoke Fire Department or that of the cheon in recognition of his service to the Etobicoke Professional Fire Fighters’ AssoAssociation and on behalf of the members ciation, Local 1137, I.A.F.F. I was, however, for 18 years—10 as President of the Local around for 18 of those years so I did get the 1137. opportunity to work with or talk to many In 1992, the Arbitrator’s Award infire fighters, including those dating back to creased the rate for a first class fire fighter many of the originals hired in 1953. I was to $53,434 for 1992. The Association took also an Executive Board member of the a huge leap forward in the area of Public Etobicoke Local for 11 years, so my experiRelations when it took receipt of a 1945 ence with the fire department also includAmerican LaFrance ladder truck donated ed labour relations (or the lack thereof) by Mr. Bruce Cole. “Aerial 1137,” as it with Management. Many of the comments would come to be known, would be taken expressed in the above article are mine, to fun fairs, charity events, our Magic and as such, will contain my particular Shows, etc.—almost always driven by offpoint of view of an incident or event and for duty Fire Fighter, Peter Minns, who was that, I make no apology. believed to have never turned down a reNo history of Local 1137 would be comquest for the antique Fire Truck. plete without the recognition of three In 1993, municipal workers in Ontario people. First, I would like to acknowledge were hit with legislation known as “The a good friend, Bud Exton. In addition to a Social Contract.” This Ontario Statute, written record that he compiled, Bud and I which went from April 1, 1993 to March have spoken many times for hours where 31, 1996, basically froze wages ($53,434) he would indulge me with my many quesand benefits for three years. The Associations about the earlier days. The second tion negotiated “Rae Days” to ensure that and third persons that require recognition members with less than three years would are Mr. Jeffrey Sack and Mr. Howard Goldnot have their wages frozen, but instead blatt, the Association attorneys since the would proceed through their increments early 1970’s. The firm of Sack, Goldblatt & with respective increases in wages. Mitchell, whether they know it or not, are Effective April 1, 1996, CA negotiations as much a part of our history as anyone were once again permitted by municipal is—a sincere thank you—not only for your workers. With the economy in a down turn, expert service, but also for your friendship and following the Etobicoke CUPE and the over the years. Nurses Union in negotiations, who had earlier accepted a two year freeze in wages, the Association also accepted a renewal of the CA for two years with no increase in wages. The amalgamation of the six Metropolitan Aerial #12’s water tower silhouetted against the flames and night Toronto Fire Departsky from this three alarm fire at Dot Plastics. Photo by Bill Sandford ments occurred on Janof the Toronto Sun was Local 1137’s Photo of the Year 1991. SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 27


AND THE

AWARD

GOES TO... BY ALYSSA PETRILLO– FIRE WATCH ASSISTANT COPY EDITOR

A

lone fire fighter suspended on a ridgepole attacks a roof with an axe, a gripping picture that speaks a thousand words. A dramatic account of a fire that killed two children and rescue efforts of fire fighters to save them, a riveting published story that touched more than a 100,000 Toronto Sun readers. It was the mere poignancy and transfixing elements of these pieces of journalism that earned them recognition by Toronto fire fighters. On May 20, the Toronto Professional Fire Fighter’s Association held their annual Media Awards to celebrate and honour those in the media who have

produced excellence in journalism pertaining to issues that have specifically affected Toronto fire fighters. The undeniable sophisticated ambience of the evening reflected the professionalism and dedication that journalists and fire fighters continually exemplify through their careers. The gala, held at Palais Royale, proved to be a night that exuded pride, hard work, determination and excellence in the world of current events and news coverage.

The gala, held at Palais Royale, proved to be a night that exuded pride, hard work, determination and excellence in the world of current events and news coverage.

Toronto Fire Fighter, Jon Lasiuk accepts an award for his many valued contributions to the Toronto Fire Watch magazine. (l to r) President Scott Marks, Mayor David Miller, Toronto Fire Fighter Jon Lasiuk, Seretary-Treasurer Frank Ramagnano and Toronto Fire Fighter James Coones.

28

Among the distinguished guests and award recipients was Toronto Mayor David Miller who spoke about his respect and admiration for journalists, with emphasis on the responsibility they have to the city of Toronto in delivering the news that affects their daily lives. Indisputably, City Hall reporting contains qualities of hard-hitting journalism that hits the ground running. Since politics and

journalism go hand-in-hand, Mayor Miller commented on the ubiquitous love-hate relationship that city hall has with the media. The judges for the 2008 annual Toronto Fire Fighters media awards selected a handful of recipients this year who produced impeccable journalism, which covered issues that pertained to the danger, safety and rescue efforts of Toronto fire fighters. The award for the best story in a publication with a circulation of less than 100,000 was presented to Keith Hanley for his in-depth examination of specialized fire-fighting training and how it saved the lived of three fire fighters in danger. The best picture in a publication with a circulation of more than 100,000 was awarded to John Hanley for his photo of


fire fighters facing flames at a roaring rooming house fire. Rob Lamberti and Don Peat of the Toronto Sun were presented the award for best story in a publication with a circulation of more than 100,000. The piece covered a fire that killed two children and the efforts of the fire fighters who tried to save them. Lori Paris of CFRB was awarded the Jim Morris Award for her radio story on a dangerous fire in an auto wrecking yard that involved 90 cars and 300 tires. The Glen Cole award for best feature TV story was awarded to Christina Stevens for her five-part series on the fire fighters Christmas drive to supply toys for children who need them. Reporter MairiAnna Bachynsky, along with cameraman Keith Hanley, were awarded for their spot news TV story on how intensive training saved three fire fighters caught in a sudden crisis in a house fire. John Riddell accepted the award for best picture in a publication with a circulation of less than 100,000 for his image of a lone fire fighter on a rooftop using his axe. In addition, John was presented an award for his unpublished picture of a dramatic shot of four fire fighters on two ladders facing smoke and flames. Toronto Fire Fighter, Jon Lasiuk was presented with the Best Toronto Fire Watch Article award. Jon has been involved with Fire Watch since its inception and has contributed not only the text of each and every “Hall Showcase” article published, but has also contributed other articles such as, “20th Anniversary of Haz 1” and several of the “Never Shall We Forget” pieces. Congratulations to all of the award recipients.

Holding their awards, Keith Hanley, Marianna Bachynsky, and Brian Weatherhead from CTV pose with President Marks, Mayor Miller, Mark Ashcroft, Mark Fitzsimmons and Geoff Mortimer.

This John Riddell photo of crews from Station 341 working to ventilate through the roof of a house fire won “Best Unpublished Photo” of the year.

Members of Global Television accept the Glen Cole award for Best Feature TV Story (l to r) Doug McLellan (editor), Mark Winterton (editor), Tyna Poulin (camera person), Christina Stevens (reporter), Scott Marks, Doug Sargent, Mayor David Miller, Farshid Shabafroozen (editor).”

SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 29


&

FIRE FIGHTER

SURVIVAL & RESCUE &

Why should I wear my SCBA? BY TORONTO FIRE FIGHTERS GEOFF BOISSEAU and JOHN MCGILL

DESPITE EDUCATION, TRAINING, CLOSE CALLS AND FATALITIES, FIRE FIGHTERS ACROSS NORTH AMERICA ARE STILL NOT WEARING THEIR SELF-CONTAINED BREATHING APPARATUS (SCBA) WHEN IT IS NEEDED. WHETHER IT IS COMPLACENCY, TRADITION, PEER PRESSURE, OR JUST PLAIN IGNORANCE, IT CONTINUES TO BE ONE OF THE MOST COMMON THINGS SEEN ON A FIREGROUND. WITH EACH GENERATION OF FIRE FIGHTER, IT WOULD BE EXPECTED THAT ANY UNSAFE HABITS THAT MIGHT BE USED ON THE FIREGROUND BY OTHER FIRE FIGHTERS ARE MINIMIZED, BUT THAT DOESN’T SEEM TO BE THE CASE. IN FACT, IT APPEARS THAT JUST THE OPPOSITE IS HAPPENING. THE UNSAFE PRACTICES OF SOME ARE BEING PICKED UP BY OTHERS.

T

here are countless photographs and case studies on the internet that illustrate these issues, and despite the IAFF back to basics initiatives and the Canadian Fallen Fire Fighters programs relating to increasing fire fighter safety, we are still seeing examples of this every day. So in an attempt to figure out just why it is that, even after knowing all that they do about the hazards of not wearing SCBA, fire fighters still refuse to put them on. We have come up with our own top ten reasons of why it is that they don’t:

TOP TEN REASONS NOT TO WEAR YOUR SCBA 10 No one else is. I don’t want to be embarrassed. 9 It will mess up my hair. 8 It makes me hot. 7 It slows me down. I can work faster without it. 6 I would have to check it, if I was going to wear it! 5 It will only let me work hard for 30

10 minutes. 4 The smoke isn’t that heavy…I can see Billy’s cigarette. 3 I won’t get cancer, I only go to a few fires a year. 2 I cannot see out of the face piece it’s so scratched. 1 We have a seniority based promotional system…I don’t want the senior fire fighters wearing their masks, that way I can get promoted faster! There are dozens of excuses we have all heard that didn’t make the list. Crews should sit down together and make their own top 10 list of why they don’t wear SCBA or any other PPE and why. Then weigh the RISK with the RESULT. Is it worth it? Now consider the following.

TOP TEN REASONS YOU SHOULD WEAR YOUR SCBA 10 You do not have to hold your breath. 9 Face it, people love to sound like Darth Vader when they talk. 8 You look pretty cool wearing it.

7 Provides eye protection during overhaul. 6 Gives you much better visibility. 5 You can fight a fire for your full work cycle. 4 You are responsible for your own health and safety. 3 Allows you to do your job. 2 CANCER is not a good alternative. 1 YOUR FAMILY expects you to come home at the end of your shift.


[

REMEMBER THE ADAGE, “RISK A LOT TO SAVE A LOT, RISK A LITTLE TO SAVE A LITTLE?” THIS IS THE CORNER STONE FOR ALL FIRE DEPARTMENTS. IT APPLIES TO ALL LEVELS OF THE FIRE SERVICE.

After reading this article take a moment to really think about the reasons why we do the things we do on the fireground. Why do we continually expose ourselves to unnecessary hazards? Is it just because everyone else is, or because it’s the way we have always done things? These reasons do not seem to make much sense when you really think about it. Remember the adage, “Risk a lot to save a lot, risk a little to save a little?”

This is the corner stone for all fire departments. It applies to all levels of the fire service. This statement is the first thing that we should think of when determining how we do things. From individual health and safety, such as checking your SCBA and wearing the appropriate PPE, to incident commanders choosing between an offensive or defensive fire attack. If you choose to risk your own health and safety or that of your crew by continually

]

not wearing an SCBA when it is necessary then you are ‘risking a lot to save little’, and that just doesn’t make sense. Not wearing your SCBA is one of the most selfish things a fire fighter can do. By doing this you are risking your health, your family, and the health and safety of the other fire fighters on the fire ground, and for what? REMEMBER…CHANGE STARTS WITH YOU!

SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 31


STATION 224 BY JON LASIUK, TORONTO FIRE FIGHTER

O

f the thousands of commuters who travel up and down Woodbine Avenue every day, few probably give a second thought to the fire hall that stands at the corner of Holborne Avenue. Known today as Toronto Fire Station 224, the hall at 1313 Woodbine Avenue—and the one that came before it—have had a storied and colourful history in the protection of the community of East York. Originally a separate part of the Township of York, East York was itself incorporated as a township on December 31st, 1923. Fire protection in the new Township of East York was originally provided by three sections of volunteers, with the Woodbine area being protected from a converted garage on Holborne Avenue just east of Cedarvale Avenue. Although mostly developed by the 1920’s, East York struggled financially during its first few years. Many streets had not yet had street lights installed

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and paving had yet to be completed on some side streets. Half the township’s eight-man police force was assigned to motorcycles as they were cheaper than automobiles and easier to negotiate along the less than perfect street system. By the end of the decade, the township had made repeated requests to its big brother to the south, the City of Toronto, for annexation as a means to improve public services. With Toronto denying East York’s requests for annexation, the township

needed to improve upon its volunteer fire brigade. By 1928, township council had realized the need for a full-time professional fire department in East York. On October 8th of that year, council gave Fire Chief Tom Paveling the go ahead to hire the first four full-time firefighters. These men were stationed at the original Holborne Avenue fire hall, and were soon followed by four more firefighters hired to staff the second station on Gowan Avenue at Pape Avenue.


While perhaps adequate to store a single pumper, the original Holborne Avenue fire hall, basically a single-bay garage, had never been constructed to house full-time firefighters. The firefighters made do with makeshift quarters that had been dug out of the earth below the garage to form a partial basement. One of the full-time firefighters stationed at the Holborne Avenue hall was Edward Guppy. Living with his wife Sarah and four children on nearby Virginia Avenue, “Ted” was one of the original volunteer firefighters in the township. Well-regarded by the other men on the job, he was one of the first eight men to be offered full-time employment on the new professional fire department in 1928. On the afternoon of Friday, August 16th, 1935, Guppy was dispatched with his crew from Holborne Avenue to a reported grass fire. The weather was hot and humid as the crew knocked down the flames. Upon returning to the hall, Firefighter Guppy complained of chest pains following which he collapsed. A nearby doctor was brought from his office, but to no avail. Edward Guppy was pronounced dead two hours later. He was forty-six years old. Guppy was given a full fire department funeral followed by interment at St. John’s Norway Cemetery on Kingston Road. His grieving brother firefighters later paid for a tombstone to be placed over his grave. (Those visiting his grave will notice the typo listing the wrong month of death that remains to this day.) The firefighters on Holborne Avenue continued to endure their less than adequate quarters for nearly two more de-

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cades. After being invited by the firefighters to view the “dugout” in 1952, Alderman C. Howard Chandler called the living conditions at the hall “primitive” at best. Land was secured at the north-east corner of Woodbine Avenue and Holborne Avenue for a new fire hall and on June 23rd, 1952, the J.S. Laxton Co. was given the tender to build the new hall. The building, which cost $94, 898.00, would double as the fire department’s headquarters. Less than one year later, in October 1953, the new two-floor, two and a half bay hall would open for business. It boasted many of the latest conveniences, including an electric hose drier. A brand new 1953 LaFrance pumper was purchased for the hall and was placed in service beside a secondhand 1942 International pumper that had been acquired from the Royal Canadian Air Force as war surplus. After enduring decades living below their truck, the thirty-five officers and men of the East York Fire Department were justifiably proud of having the most modern fire hall in Metropolitan Toronto. East York would at the same time during the 1950’s be praised for having the lowest per capita fire loss of any Canadian municipality with a population of over 10,000. Regardless of that proud achievement, the firefighters from Woodbine Avenue have nonetheless had their fair share of large and tragic fires. Perhaps none is remembered as being more tragic than the

ON THE AFTERNOON OF FRIDAY, AUGUST 16TH, 1935, GUPPY WAS DISPATCHED WITH HIS CREW FROM HOLBORNE AVENUE TO A REPORTED GRASS FIRE. THE WEATHER WAS HOT AND HUMID AS THE CREW KNOCKED DOWN THE FLAMES.

]

Christmas season fire of December 18th, 1965. Just before 4 P.M. on that Saturday afternoon, East York Fire Control received a telephone call reporting a house fire at 26 Aldwych Avenue. Both stations were dispatched and upon arrival firefighters were told that a number of children were trapped in the well-involved, two storey semi-detached house. The mother, Beverley Wilkins had fallen asleep on the living room sofa after sending her two oldest boys to play in the basement rec-room. Her two other toddlers were asleep on the second floor when she was awoken by smoke pouring up the basement stairs. Neigh-

bours could hear the boys screaming from the basement but could not reach them. Captain Will Porter and Firefighter Norm Grey made the punishing trip into the basement to bring out the two boys, while Acting Captain George Kerfoot (who would become Fire Chief in 1980) and Firefighter Gord Madden rescued the two toddlers from the top floor via ground ladders. The heroic actions were fruitless, though, as all four boys later died at East General Hospital. It would be the worst loss of life ever at an East York fire. The 1960’s would also be a period of great change in East York. January 1st, SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 33


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34


Station 224... Continued from page 33

1967 saw the amalgamation of the Township of East York and the Town of Leaside. Both municipalities had fulltime fire departments, and they were consolidated. Ernest Bell, who had commanded the forty-four man Leaside Fire Department, became the new Fire Chief in the newly minted Borough of East York. With three stations in the “new” department, the fire halls were renumbered, with the Woodbine station becoming #3. In order to alleviate the overcrowding that was occurring at Woodbine, the fire department’s headquarters, as well as its radio room, were soon moved to bigger offices at the Leaside fire station. The Woodbine fire hall remained an important part of the E.Y.F.D. throughout the 1980’s and 1990’s, with three of the department’s seven in-service apparatus responding from behind the hall’s famous bright green garage doors. On January 1st, 1998, the E.Y.F.D. was amalgamated into the new Toronto Fire Services and the Woodbine fire hall became T.F.S. Station 224. Even though the previous East York fire stations have been divided among two separate commands within the T.F.S., the staff at “Woodbine” have been justifiably proud of the esprit de corps that has remained. Its firefighters, both retired and active, can look back with pride at the contributions they have made to their community over the last eighty years.

APPARATUS ASSIGNED TO STATION 224 Rescue 224 operates with a 1996 Spartan/ Almonte 5000 l.p.m. rescue-pumper originally purchased by the North York Fire Dept. It carries shop # 24074. Pumper 224 operates with a 2007 Spartan/Seagrave 6000 l.p.m. triple combination pumper assigned shop # 24131.

SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 35


Ceremonial and

Bereavement Committee

BY RAYANNE DUBKOV, CHAIR, LOCAL 3888 CEREMONIAL AND BEREAVEMENT COMMITTEE

LODD—3888 MEMBER In the case of a fire fighter killed whilst in the performance of their duties or who dies as a result of injuries which were received during such performance of duty, they are entitled to a funeral with full department honours. What does this means for the Committee? As soon as the Committee is notified that there has been a LODD, the following happens in a short span of time: 1 We meet with the family, explain who we are, what they are entitled to, what a full department funeral consists of, and find out what the families’ wishes are. 2 We start looking for a funeral home, church, and a suitable place to hold the wake, ensuring they are all available on the same day. We have to take into account the large number of people who will be attending the funeral, which we have to explain to the family as their original choice of location may not be suitable. 36

3 Notifications are sent to the IAFF, OPFFA, 3888 Members, Website, Councillors, Executive Board Members, Stewards, Fire Chief, Management, Fire Marshall, Mayor, and Press. 4 Organizing the funeral includes: issuing a press release, securing two aerials and the Canadian flag, padre, pipe band, bugler, colour party, parade marshal, bell for the last alarm, pall bearers, ushers, photographer, police for road closures, flag for the casket, flag folders, white gloves, black bands for caps, visitations, flowers, trucks for the day of the funeral, parade route, transport and anything else that is necessary to make the day run smoothly. 5 We also organize the wake afterwards. 6 The Committee members attend the visitations, which are usually held over two days with two visitations per day. This gives the Committee the opportunity to meet the members of the family, friends, co-workers and also to get to-

gether and check and double check to ensure we have everything covered for the day of the funeral. 7 The day of the funeral, the Committee members arrive early at the funeral home, church or the hall where the fire fighter used to work. This gives us a chance to go over last minute details and clarify what our responsibilities are for the day. At this point, the entire Executive Board are helping out, ushering, directing parking, setting up the aerials and handing out services. Unfortunately, we organize far too many of these funerals, so everyone knows what is expected of them on the day of the funeral and all of the organization and preparations from the previous days fall into place to make the funeral a memorable and fitting occasion for the fallen fire fighter and their family. At this point, I would like to thank the following whose assistance helps bring all of this to fruition: Toronto Fire Pipes and Drum Band, Toronto Fire Pa-


dres, Nigel Soper (Bugler), Adrian Olley (Bell Ringer), Andrew Berg and Dave Connor (Parade Marshals), Toronto Fire Colour Party, Public Information Section of Toronto Fire Services (Mike Strapko, Randy Piercey, Dave Eckerman, Karen Reid and Adrian Ratushniak, Bill Radcliffe (Staff at the union office), City of Toronto Protocol Office (Nancy Mcsween) and the Fire Chief and Management. From notification of a death to the actual funeral service is usually about five days—two of those days being visitation days. So, the Committee has three days in order to complete all of the above tasks. As you can well imagine, this amount of preparation requires working every day and late nights putting everything else on hold including our home life. With a Line of Duty Death, all reasonable costs are covered by WSIB. The funeral home will send all bills directly to WSIB and they pay the funeral home so the family doesn’t have to worry about any costs. The bills for the wake are paid for by the Association and then sent to WSIB to recover the costs. If an active member dies off duty, the only differences between a full line of duty funeral and their funeral are: • The use of a department vehicle to carry the casket. • The Large Canadian Flag and the aerials. • The service is scaled down a little bit, we don’t usually have the full band or the bugler, just a single piper. • The Association pays $5000.00 towards the cost of the funeral which is paid directly to the funeral home and the association also pays the cost of the wake. At the end of the day, we try to honour the families’ wishes. Again, we work very closely with the family from start to finish and most people don’t realize we have this much involvement.

OTHER RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE COMMITTEE When we receive timely notification of the death of a relative of one of our members or of a retired member, we send flowers or provide a donation. However, we rely on members to phone us to provide this notification. We would rather be told 6 times about a death than not at all, so please call with the details and we will do the rest. We arrange transportation, where possible, to LODD funerals and police funerals within a reasonable distance of Toronto. Information regarding these arrangements is sent via printers to the halls, placed on the 3888 website and emailed to registered members of the website. If you are not on the email list for notifications, visit the website at www.torontofirefighters.org, register to get the details, and attend some of the funerals. You will be surprised how appreciative the other Locals, family members and members of the public are when we attend the funerals. If you wish to be added to my mailing list for notifications, email me at dubkov@torontofir efighters.org. For any local within the boundaries of the IAFF 13th district or a local within 1000km of Toronto, the President or designate and Committee Chair or designate will attend. Again, if there is enough time and interest, we will ar-

range transportation and hotels and hopefully members will attend with us. For any other Canadian Local, the President has the discretion to send representation from Local 3888. In extenuating circumstances, such as multiple deaths, the President or designate, Committee Chair or designate shall attend. In all circumstances, when not attending, a letter of condolence is sent to the Local. MEMORIALS AND CEREMONIES We attend and assist in organizing various memorials and ceremonies, such as the annual City of Toronto Fallen Fire Fighter Memorial at Stn 334, the annual Provincial Fallen Fire Fighter Memorial at Queen’s Park, the Canadian Fallen Fire Fighter Memorial in Ottawa, and the IAFF Fallen Fire Fighter Memorial in Colorado. PARADES We attend and organize numerous parades in the city, including the St. Patrick’s Day Parade, Easter Beaches Parade, Warriors Day Parade, Remembrance Day Parade, Santa Claus Parade in Etobicoke, and for the first time last year, the Santa Claus Parade in Toronto. UPCOMING EVENTS IN 2008 The following list details a number of events that the Ceremonial and Bereavement Committee will be involved in this year. So, why not come out and join us? We are always looking for volunteers, or just come out and have some fun and spread the word. • CNE Parade—August 2008 • Warriors Day Parade—August 2008 • Fallen FF Memorial in Ottawa— Weekend of September 13th and 14th 2008. The Union will provide transportation to Ottawa on Saturday. We have negotiated discounted room rates with the Radisson Hotel for the Saturday night. The memorial is held on the Sunday Morning. More and more members are attending this SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 37


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Ceremonial Committee and their Role ... Continued from page 37

memorial. This year we have three active members being recognized— Gary Wilson, John Chappelle and Richard Mann. The hotel rooms are pre-booked so email the Committee if you want to attend. • Fallen FF Memorial in Colorado— September 2008 • Fallen FF Memorial Queens Park —October 5th 2008. Service at Queen’s Park Memorial with barbecue and refreshments back at the Union hall on Commissioners Street. • Remembrance Day Ceremonies— November 2008. There are ceremonies held throughout the city with most 3888 members attending the East York ceremony and then going back to the legion for food and refreshments afterwards. • Santa Claus Parade—both Toronto and Etobicoke • Plaque Ceremonies—This is a LODD plaque that is put in the hall where the fire fighter last worked. It is a short, informal ceremony held in the hall when the shift of the fallen fire fighter is working. A Toronto Fire Padre attends and conducts a short service with the family and friends of the fire fighter in attendance. Afterwards, we have coffee and refreshments and share stories of the fire fighter.

Due to new legislation there are more and more fire fighters now being recognized as Line of Duty Deaths which means the following: • Line of Duty Death plaque at the hall. • Name added to the Memorial wall at Station 334. • Name added to the Queen’s Park Memorial. • Name added to the Colorado Memorial. With the large number of our members now recognized since the passing of the new legislation, the Committee decided to hold one ceremony on April 17th at the TFS Training Academy, honouring 35 fire fighters. We would like to thank everyone that made that night a success. We had a volunteer from each hall accept the plaque and take it back to their hall to ensure it was placed in a prominent setting within the station. All the Toronto Fire Services Padres took part in the service as they felt they had to be a part of this very important evening. The Fire Chief and President Scott Marks presented the plaques to the 35 fire fighters from the various halls. Toronto City Councillors were also in attendance and the Public Information Section attended and took photographs and video of the ceremony.

Dave Archer put together a wonderful power point presentation, which played while the plaque was being presented, to show the fire fighter who was being recognized. Cathy McNamara—the daughter of Carl Quinn, who was recognized that evening—spoke on behalf of the families and explained how much it meant to the families to have their loved ones finally recognized and what each ceremony means to them. The one thing I have realized since working on this Committee is the necessity to ensure that your family is aware of your wishes should anything happen to you. Make sure they know who to call at the Union office or at the fire department, and finally, please make sure your beneficiary information is up to date and correct. It only takes 5 minutes out of your day to make the calls to check that the information is correct. That phone call now could save your loved ones a lot of trouble in the future when they least need it. So make that phone call now. If you need more information on what the Ceremonial and Bereavement Committee does, or how you can help out, just give one of us a call. We look forward to seeing more and more members out at the events that we attend.

SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 39


40


COLLECTIVE AGREEMENT REVIEW Modified Work Program Policy–Appendix B THE MODIFIED WORK PROGRAM (MWP) IS AN IMPORTANT AND ESSENTIAL ELEMENT OF OUR COLLECTIVE AGREEMENT BOTH FROM OUR PERSPECTIVE AND FROM THAT OF THE CITY. MWP’S HAVE SLOWLY AND STEADILY MADE THEIR WAY INTO CONTRACTS OVER THE LAST FIFTEEN YEARS. THIS HAS BEEN A SIDE EFFECT, BUT NECESSARY REQUIREMENT OF THE LEGISLATION REQUIRING EMPLOYERS TO ACCOMMODATE EMPLOYEES WITH DISABILITIES, BOTH LONG AND SHORT TERM. When looking at MWP’s it is worthwhile to note how arbitrators have ruled and created these policies since their inception. Although other arbitrators have made earlier rulings, Ken Swan’s award on the matter with the Cornwall Fire Fighters in 2002 succinctly clarifies some of the questions we have raised most often. They include whether it is voluntary or mandatory and right to medical information. The MWP in our contract was awarded in the first round of negotiations with Martin Teplitsky. It has had some minor tweaking of language but for the most part it remains intact on its intent. This policy ensures that a member who is injured, sick or disabled by a non-job related accident or illness and can no longer do their job as a fire fighter, has an opportunity to be retrained and/or accommodated in another position with the TFS. Members should understand that the MWP deals with short-term, long-term and permanent accommodations. It is not a program you only enter at some point in time during an illness; you are in it from the moment you book off on sickness. Therefore, the rules apply from that time on. The recent FCC reminds members that if they are absent for a full tour of

duty and will not be returning in the following tour they are required to submit a Return to Work (RTW) form within fifteen (15) days following the first day of absence. This is a requirement for anyone booking sick. Failure to submit that RTW is a breach of the collective agreement. There is also a requirement to answer the question of the PC on whether you are coming back in the 2nd tour. Whose responsibility it is to contact who is still an outstanding issue and one we are continuing to discuss with administration. The requirement of the RTW is in the MWP and it is not contingent on communication between the parties. Everyone is required to submit the RTW within 15 days. Modified work is mandatory on both sides. Arbitrators have upheld this position time and time again. Unions have argued that sick banks are a negotiated benefit that members should have access to instead of working in modified positions. Arbitrators have not agreed. Their position is simply that if an employer provides modified work in a manner consistent with the restrictions determined by a doctor, then the employee cannot be considered sick or injured, because they are able to do the work. By the same token an

employer must provide available work unless they can show undue hardship which is not an easy thing for them to prove. You are entitled to use your own doctor and have him/her complete the RTW. The employer is allowed to contact your doctor and discuss the restrictions and available modified work, but not the underlying medical conditions. If there is a disagreement in whether the employee can participate in the modified work, there is a dispute process which utilizes an independent third party doctor who renders a ruling. This doctor can only look at medical issues on the matter in dispute. The MWP is a benefit and offers members a form of employment insurance that was unheard of thirty years ago. Like with any benefit or improvement there is a corresponding change to the employee’s responsibilities. What we have in our MWP is a culmination of what is legally required and accepted by legislation and arbitrators. The level of job protection if you are injured in a car accident or other mishap ensures that every available attempt is made to allow you to continue working within the fire service and maintain your wage and your job. This is the real benefit of the MWP. SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 41


WE ALL NEED TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE

3888 FIREPAC

BY RICK BERENZ – GOVERNMENT RELATIONS COMMITTEE CHAIR, TPFFA, L3888

I

t should be quite evident to all of us by now that a strong political presence, at all three levels of Government is necessary. The success of a strong political presence generally parallels the success of a local and its respective provincial governing organization—in our case the OPFFA. Your Political Action Committee, known as Toronto FIREPAC, has been directed to develop and maintain a consistent and effective political action fund raising program for our Local. The primary objective of Toronto FIREPAC, through direction from the Executive Board Government Relations Committee, is to affect the outcome of elections by electing candidates that are strongly committed to improving the lives and safety of Fire Fighters and the citizens that we protect. In order for this to happen we need to communicate with and educate the Members of the TPFFA about the benefits of greater political involvement and to create and effective organization with structure to coordinate the Association’s involvement in election campaigns. Results usually speak volumes and we only need to reflect back to the fall 2007 Provincial election in which the Liberals successfully secured another majority government with the help of Fire Fighter local’s right across this Province. In the 10 campaigns Local 3888 participated in we were successful in either securing the election or re-election of the candidates we supported. As Professional Fire Fighters in the Province of Ontario the accomplishments we have collectively made with the McGuinty Liberals will allow us to enjoy greater security as we proceed through our careers. Our lobby efforts coupled with the willingness of this Government to cooperate and

[ 42

OUR LOBBY EFFORTS COUPLED WITH THE WILLINGNESS OF THIS GOVERNMENT TO COOPERATE AND LISTEN HAS AFFORDED US ENHANCED PRESUMPTIVE CANCER LEGISLATION AND THE ABILITY TO IMPROVE OUR OMERS PENSION SUPPLEMENTS...

]

2007 DONOR LISTING PLATINUM Algar, Tim Allister, Phillip Beer, Don Bennett, Ron Berenz, Rick Bizzell, Eric Black, Keith Boisseau, Geoff Brandstetter, Joe Brown, Mitch Buckingham, Steve Bull, Chris Burtenshaw, Adrian Cartwright, Brian Chow, Peter Christensen, Gary Cooney, Bill Cooper, Jack Creed, John Dancy, John Dillon, Jim Dion, John Doherty, Hugh Domenegato, Mike Downey, Leo Draper, Mike Dubkov, Rayanne Edgerton, Mike Emerson, Darryl Enslen, James Eyers, Scott Falkner, Alan Fletcher, Jim Gayman, Tim Giffin, Colin Graba, Dennis Green, Jim

Grimwood, Rob Guy, Charles Haigh, Kirk Halls, Paul Hals, Dan Hamilton, Ian Hamilton, Keith Harvey, Peter Hastings, Gary Hayes, Peter Hickey, Kiron Hickson, Duane Hill, Kevin Hoefel, Karl Imray, Tom Innes, Michael Johnson, Karrie Kaufman, Adina Kennedy, Ed Lamb, Tracey Lambert, Will Langford, Mike Latour, Mike Lauzis, Alfred LeBlanc, Fred Lee, Jim Leslie, Ian Macina, Paul Maidment, Keith Mair, Kevin Manning, Paul E Manson, Murray Marjama, Milda Marks, Scott Mathews, Travis McCarthy, Kevin McEachern, Doug McFater, John McIllmoyle, Tom

McKee, Bill McKinnon, Neil Mclean, Andrew McMannus, Pat Morache, Jim Nearing, Michael Neely, Michael Nester, Jeff Ogle, Michael Olley, Adrian Osadca, Tom Payne, David Peritore, Gerlando Pett, Andrew Piperidis, Dennis Powell, Stephan Ramagnano, Frank Reid, Karen Reynolds, Neil Robinson, Jonathon Ruller, Nick Seifried, Paul Sherwood, Brian Smith, Randy Snellings, Gord St. Thomas, Brian Stairs, Peter Walker, Alexander Walker, Alf Walker, Michael Walsh, Damien Weeks, Tim Welch, Bruce Werginz, Mathias White, Dean Wilson, Mark Woodbury, John Young, Tim


GOLD Ahola, Pekka Anderson, Greg Archer, Tim Barrington, Mike Baxter, Dan Beames, Paul Bills, Mark Blake, John Clark, Norman Condran, Cliff Cossitt, Dave Cullen, Liam Downes, Matthew Downes, Ralph Dyer, John Eldon, Richard Ellement, Darrell Falconer, Dave Fitzsimmons, Mark Flemming, Stewart Gaudet, Paul Geekie, Tim Graziano, John Haley, Greg Harrison, Colin Hickey, Tony Jansen, Craig Knaggs, Chris Kreposter, Alex Krigos, Jim Lenard, John Loibl, Ron Luty, Tim Manley, Mark Martin, Natalie McCannell, Ross McCormack, Don McCrae, Ian Morgan, Rick Motton, Eric Norlock, Bill O’Connell, Dennis Pace, Herc Peck, Don Pos, Jeff Ptasiuk, Igor Ratushniak, Adrian Rivard, Robert Robb, Steve Romard, Ron Roynon, Dave

Sabino, Al Salvitori, Dan Sametz, Glen Shapiera, Kevin Sheppard, Joseph Sinclair, Michael Sousa, Gary Stark, Graham Stroud, Robert Swiderski, Ed Swift, Michael Turnbull, Mike Versace, Paul Walker, Ivor Walker, Johnnie C. Watson, Alan R Welsh, John Woodroy, Brad Wright, John Yacynuk, Steve SILVER Alston, Dan Altieri, Roger Atkinson, Paul Awender, Ken Barnes, Jon Barrett, Don Bertram, Dieter Bigham, Jeff Bince, Glenn Black, Brian R Bond, Lana Boyd, Kerr Bray, Don Brown, Gordon Bryan, Steve Buchmayer, Stewart Buckley, Bertram Carter, Graham Cater, Robert Charlebois, Paul Citter, Rob Clark, Steve Cloer, Stefan Close, Ken Coleman, Don Coleman, James Comolli, Danielle Compton, Mark Craig, Mark Crummey, Jim

Csepreghi, Janos Cunningham, Paul Danks, James David, Jeff Dennison, Craig Dennison, Garry Dixon, Traci Dorman, Dave Dunbar, Bruce Ellery, Drew Erwin, Doug Evans, Mike A Fairlie, Ryan Falcioni, Bill Flockhart, Tom Fogarty, Brian Foster, Mark Fraser, Dan Gaboury, Richard Galand, Tom Gambier, Steve Gigilo, Rosario Giles, Nicholas Gillespie, William G Graley, Trevor Gutenburg, Peter Haggitt, Murray Hanley, John Harknett, Phillip Heggie, Duncan Hennessy, Peter Hewson, Rob Hudson, Eric Hurd, Bryan Infuso, Barry Ireland, Shawn Irvine, Brian Ivins, Darren Jackson, Kenneth Jakopcevic, Goran Jessop, John Jesty, Bill Johnstone, Douglas Jones, Ron Kelly, Brian Keogh, Gary Keogh, Glenn Killen, Shane Kilpatrick, Ron King, Mark Kralik, George Kramer, Josh

[

THE GREATER PORTION OF THE FUNDS RAISED ARE USED FOR POLITICAL ACTION DURING ELECTION CAMPAIGNS THROUGH DIRECT CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS OR BY PURCHASING TICKETS TO VARIOUS POLITICAL FUND RAISING EVENTS.

]

listen has afforded us enhanced presumptive cancer legislation and the ability to improve our OMERS pension supplements through collective bargaining. Now that another majority term has been secured by the Liberals, the OPFFA can aggressively pursue even more improvements, through legislative reform, to our future in this province as Professional Fire Fighters. Rest assured that we are working on new lobby initiatives that will benefit us all. In the interim we are continuing to build strong relations with those we assisted and at the same time trying to build new relations with those not so familiar to us. In order for this Local to continue this relationship building process money is required. Money donated (union dues money is NOT used) by our Members to Toronto FIREPAC may be used in one of two principle ways. The greater portion of the funds raised are used for political action during election campaigns through direct campaign contributions or by purchasing tickets to various political fund raising events. Our attendance at these functions allows Fire Fighter representatives to continue building relationships with the various influential decision makers who are in attendance.

SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 43


HELP EXTINGUISH THE FL AMES OF ALS! The Ontario Professional Fire Fighters Association (OPFFA) has partnered with the ALS Society of Ontario to present Golf 4 ALS.

ALS normally strikes two to three people per 100,000. For unknown reasons the incidence is higher among Ontario’s 10,500 full-time firefighters. ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a rapidly progressing and fatal neuromuscular disease affecting close to 3,000 Canadians. There is no cure or effective treatment. Eighty per cent of those affected die within two to five years of diagnosis. You can help fight ALS by purchasing a golf card for only $24.95 + GST. You’ll receive one free round of golf for every five rounds you play at a participating course and be entered in a draw to win a DREAM GOLF GETAWAY FOR TWO TO IRELAND! To purchase a card, visit www.rcga.org/als or call 1-800-263-0009 and reference promotional code 08alsopffa01. Volunteers are needed to sell cards on 80 to 100 golf courses over the summer. If you’re interested in volunteering for the Par-3 Challenge, please contact Karen Baldwin, Manager, Events for the ALS Society of Ontario, at 416-497-8545 x220 or karen@alsont.ca.

“As firefighters, we have a special interest in ALS. I urge you to support this cause in honour of your fellow firefighters who have been stricken with this devastating disease.” - Fred Leblanc, President of the OPFFA

For more information about Golf 4 ALS, visit www.alsont.ca.


We all need to contribute to the 3888 FIREPAC ... Continued from page 43

[

WITHOUT YOUR INVOLVEMENT AND CONTRIBUTIONS THE FIREPAC COMMITTEE AND LOCAL 3888 WOULD NOT BE NEARLY AS EFFECTIVE IN INSURING FIRE FIGHTER ISSUES AND CONCERNS WERE PROPERLY UNDERSTOOD BY THE POLITICAL DECISION MAKERS...

]

Secondly funds are required for the day to day operations of the FIREPAC Committee. This covers items such as the incentive packages given to FIREPAC Members, operation of the web site, purchase of materials used at community events in support of Fire Fighter friendly candidates, along with numerous other miscellaneous expenses. All of these expenditures are overseen by the Government Relations Committee of your Executive Board. The monetary contribution, from the Membership, is the life blood of the FIREPAC Committee. Without your involvement and contributions the FIREPAC Committee and Local 3888 would not be nearly as effective in insuring Fire Fighter issues and concerns were properly understood by the political decision makers—at all levels of government. By working together we can and have made a positive influence by having access to those in power making political decisions that affect your career as a Professional Fire Fighters.

Kular, Ted Kwiatkowski, Paul Laffey, Nick L’Archeveque, Jean Franc LaRochelle, Wayne Law, Greg Lewandowski, Mike Li, Hoi Lokstein, Chris Lummiss, Steve MacDonald, Rick Macken, Murray Maitland, Bill Mandarano, Antonio Manderla, Allan Markham, Dale Matheson, Paul McCarron, Joe McDonald, Kevin McEachern, Cam McIntyre, Bill McLean, Bill Mechanno, Jim Meredith, Phil Miles, Jeff

Missons, John Mogford, Steve Morris, Terrence Mullin, David Myles, Scott Nearing, John Neary, Peter Nicoll, Lawrence Noakes, Robert Orrett, Mark Patterson, Wayne Peckford, Don Peters, Ian Plugowsky, Jason Poirier, John Pole, Brent Powell, Tracey Price, Craig Quibell, Mike Ratushniak, Bryan Ronson, Brian Rowland, Michael Ruth, Richard Sabino, Tom Salvatore, Nunzio Sanders, Robin

Shaw, Kevin Sheppard, Bill Sherwood, Neil Skerratt, Ted Slobodian, Jim Smith, Kent Smith, Stuart Sorokos, Ted Speiran, Ian Stefan, Steve Steffler, Greg Steffler, Jonathan Stewart, Terry Sykes, Stephen Tewnion, Gordon Tinker, Ian Trempe, Les Tullett, Neil Tustin, Domenic VanGoethem, John Vanstone, Bruce Veraeghe, Tom Von Der Heide, Sabina Wagner, John Wallace, Tony

SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 45


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We all need to contribute to the 3888 FIREPAC ... Continued from page 45

Way, Brian Weir, Brent White, Greg Wright, Sonny Zak, Jeff

3888 FIREPAC

[

THE CONTINUING SUCCESS AND GROWTH OF TORONTO FIREPAC IS ONLY POSSIBLE THROUGH YOUR SUPPORT. SUCCESSFUL POLITICAL INVOLVEMENT TAKES COMMITMENT, TIME, ENERGY AND MONEY BUT IT CONTINUES TO PRODUCE POSITIVE RESULTS FOR FIRE FIGHTERS.

]

If you want to contribute to Toronto FIREPAC contact the union office and ask for information on the various ways in which you can contribute. You can donate all or part of a union sub, Fire Department Employees Credit Union Members can contribute through payroll check off, a lump sum contribution by way of a personal cheque to TPFFA, etc. Call 416-466-1167 for all the details. In summary, the continuing success and growth of Toronto FIREPAC is only possible through your support. Successful political involvement takes commitment, time, energy and money but it continues to produce positive results for Fire Fighters. None of this is possible without the volunteer hours and money that you have given. Thank you and let’s see how we can grow for 2008!

Divalentin, Richard Doherty, Kevin Dooreleyers, John Dowdell, Andrew Duff, Devon Dzuba, Paul BRONZE Erwin, Trevor Anderson, Al Filippidis, Danny Andrew, Peter Fitzgerald, Mike Antonucci, Michael Flindall, John Aprile, Steve Fluge, Gerald Archer, Dave Foley, William M Babcock, Doug Foote, Drew Bader, Peter Fowler, Kenneth Bailey, Scott Frebie, Marla Baldwin, Andrew Fulford, Bob Barben, Ron Fyfe, Blake Baricevic, Nick Gagnon, Lee Barry, Robert Ganguly, Andrew Beacock, Lee George, Chris Bertrand, Len Giannios, Chris Beveridge, Neil Gibbs, Gary Bishop, Scott Gloazzo, Claudio Black, Brian A Graves, Todd Blake, Bob Green, Bruce Boyd, Bill Gunns, Richard Bradley, Kevin Hannah, Glen Brown, Lee Harms, Chris Burkitt, Michael Hasson, Mike Burton, Cameron Hauerbach, Andrew Cairns, Mike Hayter, Patrick Cameron, David Horn, Jeff Carter, Dennis Jacklin, William Carter, Doug Janusas, Al Casarin, Tony Jardine, Russell Cassidy, Michael Johansen, Glen Caswell, Jeff Kalliokoski, John Chambers, Bill Kassen, Tom Chapman, Kerry Kelly, Ryan Chatland, Dave Kirk, Adam Cherun, Derrick Kitsco, John Clarke, Danny Kozachenko, Moris Clazie, Michael Krolow, Ed Codell, Jason Krushelnicki, Aaron Cook, Thomas Kurmey, Dave Culleton, Christopher Labuda, Kris Czulinski, Peter Langill, Chuck Davidson, Rob Law, Ian Dawson, Bruce Layman, Chris DeAmicis, Gino Leeson, Larry DeBruyn, Mike Legge, Mark Dejong, Ken Leslie, Brett

Loukides, William Low, Bill MacAskill, James MacDonald, Don MacLachlan, Tom MacRae, Doug MacSween, Andrew Madden, Mike Maitland, Joel Manderson, Scott Marr, John Masters, Scott McNamara, Rob Melvin, Chris Millar, Bill Jr Monday, Glen Morrey, James Muir, Derek Nardi, Silvio Nepotiuk, Terry Newbigging, Jim Norris, Glenn O’Dacre, Tim Patel, Kanji Pelayo, Bernie Richardson, Jeff Robinson, Dave Ross, Glen Safian, George Salb, Mike Scallion, Don Silverthorn, James Sinclair, Norm Smalley, Kevin Soares, Mario Staeuble, Urs Statkiewicz, Mariusz Stevens, Terry Straub, Rick Trudeau, Ryan Verlaan, Jason Voss, Graham Walsh, Dave Warden, Matt Watterson, Allen Weston, Mark Williams, Glen Wilson, Glen Wittemeir, Jurgen Zanussi, Craig Zelmer, Sandy Zicovitz, Carl

SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 47


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present

Photo by Ted Amsden

One Small Town One BIG Weekend

August 2-3, 2008 Port Hope, Ontario www.PortHopeEstival.ca 1-888-767-8467

48

One Small Town, One BIG Weekend Port Hope’s most spectacular arts and cultural arts event ever! � Parade of Colour, Dance & Music

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� Contest, prizes & more!


TWO HATTERS and Secondary Employment BY SCOTT MARKS, PRESIDENT, LOCAL 3888

Few items create as much disagreement amongst professional fire fighters as the secondary employment article of the IAFF constitution. This article is significant enough that it is repeated in our own constitution as follows:

ARTICLE IX—MISCONDUCT, TRIALS AND APPEALS SECTION 2 - SECONDARY EMPLOYMENT

A

ny IAFF member found working a secondary job as a paid on-call fire fighter or an employee of a public employer, non-profit corporation, or a private contracting firm providing fire protection or emergency medical services to a city, county, municipality, or a fire protection district as a volunteer, reserve, part-time, part paid, or public safety officer may be subject to charges being filed against that member. Members have strong feelings regarding this issue, one way or the other, and this piece is not intended to fuel the debate, but it is intended to give some background on this article of the constitution and changes that are before the IAFF members at the 2008 Convention.

Arguments have been made that this is an infringement on a members’ civil liberties based on freedom of association. Our legal council does not agree. A member has a choice to be a member of Local 3888 or not, and if s/he does, they are required to meet the obligations of our constitution. Therefore, there is no infringement on who they can associate with. If they wish to work as a volunteer fire fighter the constitution does not say they cannot—it simply states that if they do they are subject to charges being filed, which may affect their membership within the IAFF; and we do have the right to determine who is a member within our organization. The changes being contemplated to this article of the constitution at the upcoming convention make a lot of sense. In a jurisdiction that has no IAFF local, but has volunteer fire fighters, you would have to show that the existence of volunteer fire fighters is having an effect on the IAFF. This certainly has been the case and can be

SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 49


Robert B. Salter

C.C., O.Ont., F.R.S.C., M.D., M.S.(Tor), F.R.C.S.C., F.A.C.S. PROFESSOR EMERITUS OF ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY AND SENIOR SCIENTIST EMERITUS

416.813.6435

Fax: 416.813.6846 Email: rbsalter@sickkids.ca THE RESEARCH INSTITUTE THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN 555, UNIVERSITY AVE., TORONTO, ON CANADA M5G 1X8

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Two Hatters and Secondary Employment ... Continued from page 49

shown in a number of situations, but there are some communities which cannot sustain fulltime fire service and they need to be looked at differently. Fire fighters working as part-time EMS providers would be viewed in the same manner. You would have to show that these fire fighters were impacting an IAFF local. Of greater concern are our IAFF members working as part-time fire fighters in other IAFF jurisdictions or IAFF members providing our services on a contract basis within communities serviced by IAFF locals. Members doing this will argue that they are not having a negative impact on those IAFF locals, but speaking to those locals will tell you a different story. Most of these locals face significant difficulties in getting their municipalities to make the increases required to their full-time contingents when IAFF members are readily available as part-timers. Private companies providing specialties as Hazmat, confined space rescue etc. are impacting smaller locals in getting the training required for their members to provide this service. How does this impact these fire fighters? Think of

yourself responding to a rescue with people around and how you would tell someone that you have to wait for a private company to respond. You would likely undertake the rescue and due to lack of training put yourself at risk. More importantly these are jobs that should be provided by these jurisdictions. If we accept that private companies can provide it in these smaller cities, what is the difference in Toronto. These firms are already knocking at the door. Members that work in this capacity affect us all as full-time professionals. It weakens our position at the bargaining table when we discuss our hours of work and safety issues and proper remuneration. We understand the need for some members to be involved in their communities, but there are other ways of doing it without affecting other IAFF members. This is a matter that is not prepared to go away anytime soon, but the position of the IAFF is one that is based on protecting our members in their jobs, their remuneration and their health and safety. The other side cannot make that claim.

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SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 51


o t f f O Send 888 Retirees Local 3

BY FRANK RAMAGNANO, LOCAL 3888 SECRETARY–TREASURER

O

n Friday May 30, 2008, Local 3888 said goodbye and a job well done to sixty seven of our own who had retired during the past year. We also took time to recognize and remember a number of members who answered their final alarm during the years 2007 and 2008. Vice-President Ed Kennedy and Fire Chief William Stewart, began the evening with some welcoming remarks and congratulated all on their well deserved retirement. Retired Padre, Ron Nickle offered grace and then dinner was served to commence the event held at Q’ssis Place in the old City of Scarborough. I had the pleasure of serving as the Master of Ceremonies for the evening. Neil McKinnon the Entertainment Committee Chair, committee members, Vice-President Kennedy and Fire Chief Stewart made presentations to the retiring members. Chair McKinnon remembers the occasion with mixed emotions: “I felt congratulations were in order. These guys deserve praise for their achievements and on their retirement. Also, it was kind of sad to see so many of my friends and colleagues leaving, I wish them all the best in their retirement years.” The fire fighters being honoured served their community for many, many years. Their combined service totalled an astounding 2189 years of dedicated service. Ours is an occupation pitted with stress and danger that comes with a great sense of serving the community. Many of those being recog-

52

nized were accompanied by family members who were welcomed to this special occasion. I wished the family members a special thank-you, a thank-you for understanding when birthdays were missed, when Christmas holidays, and other special occasions were missed, and a special thank-you for enduring the stress we routinely bring home with us. In a very real way they have retired from the fire department as well. I conveyed to them that we consider them as a part of our extended fire fighting family.

Vice President, Ed Kennedy and Fire Chief, Bill Stewart stand with retiree Keith Norris after being presented with some gifts.


Much knowledge and experience was gained during the years of service that these members worked on the job and thus will be missed. However, it is also encouraging knowing that, like all Fire Fighters, these older members would have taken great pains to pass along their knowledge and caring for the community and each other, to their younger brothers and sisters. This was our 10th Local 3888 Retirement Dinner & Dance and we were pleased to have the Toronto Fire Service Pipes

and Drums perform. They were exceptional as always and many of the retirees and their families asked me to pass their appreciation for their efforts and to extend their thank you to the membership for a respectful and well done send-off. We will miss our retiring members and do wish them a very long and healthy retirement. You may see the pictures of this event on-line at the Local 3888 website and read some letters of thanks from the retirees and families under letters to the editor in this edition.

FIRST NAME

SURNAME

YRS SERVICE

FIRST NAME

SURNAME

YRS SERVICE

Paul

Andrew

35

John

McCormick

29

Colin

Ash

30

Frank

McCourt

33

David

Baird

35

John

McIntosh

27

Robert

Blake

32

Douglas

McKay

34

Robert

Bolitho

32

Wesley

Moffatt

36

Dennis

Buck

34

Thomas

Mulholland

29

Delmer

Calvert

36

Keith

Norris

32

William

Campbell

34

Edward

Paget

34

John

Crawford

30

James

Parton

29

Steven

Croft

32

Alexander

Paterson

29

Jerry

Degen

31

Robert

Patterson

32

John

Delory

31

Paul

Pritchard

32

Robert

Evely

30

James

Reid

33

John

Fabino

33

Stephen

Roat

33

Richard

Ferris

33

John

Sehn

31

Bernard

Gervais

36

Norman

Sinclair

33

Ronald

Hampton

31

James

Small

36

Bill

Harcourt

33

Bruce

Smith

34

Douglas

Harris

33

Douglas

Sullivan

37

Neil

Harrison

31

Robert

Sutton

33

Ronald

Harvey

27

Mark

Thomson

26

William

Hawley

35

William

Voegtle

33

Paul

Haynes

34

Ron

Walders

35

Raymond

Hurlihey

38

Donald

Wallace

33

Gregory

Keele

31

William

Wattie

34

Douglas

Keeler

31

Richard

Webster

34

David

Kelterborn

33

Ralph

Wedekind

24

John

Kemp

38

Ed

Werenich

33

Eugene

Ladoucer

32

James

Westwood

35

John

Lyons

33

Michael

Whitehouse

32

Donald

Marsden

30

Noel

Winders

31

David

Martin

35

Jeffrey

Wood

33

John

Mayock

41

Russell

Wray

36

David

McBrien

31

Farewell Retirees! SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 53


3888 RECENT HAPPENINGS

The following picture was presented to the TFS at “Salute to the Emergency Service Personnel from the Highway of Heroes” May 29, 2008 at the Canadian Forces College

TFS Awards and Promotions Ceremony May 13 & 15, 2008

June 23, 2008–4 Bicyclists riding across Canada to raise funds for cancer research assisted by a London Fire Captain Al Braatz (father of Kyle Braatz). Riders: Kyle Braatz, Alex Gray, Andrew Hopkins and Steve Coleman met at Queen’s Park by MPP and Solictor General, The Honourable Chris Bentley and retired Senator Marian Maloney. Toronto Fire Fighters: Frank Ramagnano, Rob Lethbridge, Janet Smith, Rob Tadeson. Local 3888 donated $5,000 on behalf of the ride. 54


Lever Brothers employees at Don Roadway and Lakeshore are on strike and have not had a raise in 6 years. On June 25th, members of Local 3888 Executive prepared lunch and stood with our fellow Brothers and Sisters in their time of need.

New suppression recruits class was sworn in on April 11. Local 3888 was given a full day with the recruits. The Fire Chief and Deputy Fire Chief of Operations were present for a portion to do a joint presentation with Local 3888 President.

Wayne Reidt’s retirement golf event.

Plaque Ceremony for John Chappelle April 18, 2008 and Gary Wilson April 14, 2008

SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 55


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106-2300 SHEPPARD AVE W

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Fit to SURVIVE

The fire fighter’s guide to health and nutrition Fit to Survive is your source for a healthier life, brought to you by the IAFF’s Fire Service Joint Labour Management Wellness/ Fitness Initiative. You’ll find expert advice and practical information on staying fit and healthy, as well as recipes and nutrition tips to make your next firehouse meal wholesome and delicious. Articles reprinted in FireWatch have been taken from the IAFF’s Fit To Survive web site, which we encourage all members to visit regularly. It can be found at www.foodfit.com/iaff/.

Assessing Body Composition USING ANTHROPOMETRY

Anthropometry refers to the measurement of the size and proportion of the human body, such as skeletal breaths, body segment lengths and circumference measures. It is also used to describe both regional and total body composition in terms of fat mass and fat-free mass. Three popular anthropometric methods used to identify individuals at risk of disease secondary to being overweight or obese are body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR). Although equations have been derived to estimate body composition from these measures, they also are population specific and are subject to substantial error if they are not applied appropriately. These anthropometric measures are not widely used to actually estimate body composition per se. They are more commonly used in epidemiological studies as a more crude index of obesity than other field methods and to assess risk of cardiovascular disease due to overweight or obesity.

UNDERSTANDING BMI

BMI is simply a product of weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared. The relationship between BMI and cardiovascular disease was originally observed in the Framingham Heart Study. Associations were also established between high BMI and hypertension, type II diabetes, and total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio. Based on BMI, an individual is classified as normal weight (<25), overweight (25-29.9) or obese (>29.9). BMI is predicated on the assumption that a high value is the result of a preponderance of fat in relation to height. BMI does not factor a high index due to a preponderance of muscle mass, nor does it take into account that a low BMI could occur in an overweight individual due to excess loss of muscle mass—such as is common in geriatric populations. Some research has demonstrated an increased risk of cardiovascular disease associated with a BMI of less than 18.5. Therefore, BMI does not provide any real insight regarding the regional distribution of body fat.

Regional fat distribution is described in two ways. Excess body fat in the abdominal region is referred to as android obesity, and is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. It is for this reason that the regional distribution of body fat is important. Excess fat distributed throughout the buttocks, hips and thighs is referred to as gynoid obesity and does not have the same increased association with cardiovascular disease as android obesity. So, while BMI does provide useful information regarding the characteristics of a population, it does have its weaknesses. In large epidemiological studies, these weaknesses might not be as significant. However, in special populations (such as fire fighters) where a significant portion of the population is athletic, it is likely that a good percentage of those individuals would have a high BMI when they may not be over fat at all. A study conducted on 109 male body builders found that the correlation between BMI and percent body fat was very weak—a vivid example of the limitations of the sole use BMI to assess relative risk due to overweight or obesity. Measurement of waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio better distinguishes between gynoid and android obesity. Most individuals who carry excess fat do not typically have small waists. An international study, the International Day for the Evaluation of Abdominal Obesity (IDEA), of more than 170,000 people from across 63 countries showed that waist circumference is a stronger independent predictor of cardiovascular outcomes than BMI. This data was presented at the American College of Cardiology Annual Scientific Session in March 2006. Other studies have revealed similar findings. According to the American College of Sports Medicine, waist circumference should not exceed 102cm (40 inches) for men or 88cm (35 inches) for women. The Expert Panel on the Identification, Evaluation and Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults has provided a classification of disease risk based on both BMI and waist circumference.

SPICEY

Barbequed Spare Ribs INGREDIENTS 3 lbs. Spare ribs 1 ½ cups ketchup 1 tbsp. Prepared mustard 1 ½cups water ¾ cup vinegar 3 tbsp. Worcestershire Sauce 3 tbsp. Brown sugar 3 tsp. Chilli powder 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped Cut spare ribs to desired size and place in open roasting pan or casserole dish. Combine remaining ingredients. Pour over spare ribs and bake in 350F oven for 1 ¾ hours, basting at least 3 times. Serve with hot Minute Rice and a tangy salad. Garnish with chopped parsley. Serves 4. The following recipe is from the Ottawa Firehouse Recipes & Stories. It is a fundraiser by the Ottawa Fire Fighters Community Foundation 2008. All monies received will go towards a permanent memorial to be built at Ottawa City Hall. You may purchase a book for $20 by contacting Foundation. www.offcf.ca, SUITE 101, 865 GLADSTONE AVE, OTTAWA, ONTARIO, K1R 7T4, (613) 567-2970, info@offcf.ca

SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 57


2008 UPCOMING EVENTS LOCATION

Friday, July 18, 2008, 1400 HRS

Recruit Graduation

TFS Fire Academy

Wednesday, July 30, 2008

Stewards Meeting

3888 Union Office

August 10-15, 2008

IAFF Convention

Las Vegas, Nevada

Sunday, September 14, 2008, 1100 HRS

Candian Fallen FF Memorial

Ottawa, Ontario

Saturday, September 20, 2008

Fallen Fire Fighter Memorial

Colorado Springs, CA

September 16, Tuesday, Night meeting 1900 HRS

3888 General Union Meeting

RCL Br. 527 948 Sheppard Ave. W.

September 17, Wednesday, Day meeting 1000 HRS

3888 General Union Meeting

RCL Br. 527 948 Sheppard Ave. W.

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

Stewards Meeting

3888 Union office

TORONTO FIREPAC POLITICAL ACTION WORKING TOGETHER TO MAKE US STRONGER

JOIN THE PAC!

w w w. t o r o n t o f i r e p a c . c a C O N TAC T U S :

58

f i re p a c @ t o ro n t o f i re f i g h t e r s . o r g O R ( 4 1 6 ) 4 6 6 - 1 1 6 7 ex t 3 5 6

AND TIMES SUBJECT TO CHANGE

EVENT

*DATES

Sept

Aug

July

DATE*


BY JON LASIUK

Thomas Deacon d. Friday April 1st, 1898 In the later part of the 19th century, the former Town of Yorkville had grown from a sleepy suburb to a dynamic part of Toronto. On what were just farms a decade previous, factories and businesses were sprouting up along Avenue Rd. and Davenport Rd. One of these commercial establishments was the George Hees Cloth Factory at 276280 Davenport Rd. At 16:25 hours the TFD Alarm Office received a report of a fire in the 250 foot by 40 foot factory, the site of

Dennis Nolan d. Sunday June 8th, 1902 The Toronto Fire Department had been extremely lucky over the previous four years as they responded to hundreds of fires in that time without the aid of modern breathing apparatus or protective equipment. In that time not a single fireman had been lost since Thomas Deacon had been killed on Davenport Rd. in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;98. As with all good luck, though, theirâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s was about to come to an end. On March 15th, 1902 the Toronto Fire Alarm Office dispatched a first alarm for a building fire at Linden and Sherbourne Streets. Dennis Nolan was one of the firemen dispatched. Crews were met with a working fire and the District Chief ordered lines advanced. Nolan, assigned to #3 Hose, raced to take the hydrant. While dragging the line, he tripped and struck his head on the ground. He was taken from the scene for medical aid where it was determined his condition was quite serious. His condition deteriorated over time until, on June 8th, he passed away at 5:45 P.M. in his home at 98 Front St. East. He left a widow and 3 children. Nolan had recently been transferred to Station 3 from #6 Hose, and was 33 years old. The official cause of death was listed as apoplexy.

previous fires. Crews from Yorkville were 1st-in and were met with heavy fire conditions being fed from a ruptured benzene tanks. With 23 Station not yet built, the men from #10 were all alone as they waited for help from Yonge St. and College St. As they stretched on the factory, the fire quickly outpaced them, spreading to a row of frame dwellings at 258 through 270 Davenport Rd. Just when it looked like things couldn1t get worse, they did. Several men from #10 Hose were advancing a large line up the side of the factory when a second benzene explosion occurred. The

entire west wall of the factory came down on the six men stretching the line. Other firemen rushed in to dig their brothers out from under the rubble. It was too late for one, though. Thomas Deacon died of his injuries at the scene. His was the second line of duty death to befall the men at Yorkville. Thomas Everest had also been killed while operating out of their in 1890. Many of the men injured on Davenport Rd. that day James Jones, Daniel Bailey, Billy Beathe, John McCormack, and Sam McGowan had worked with Everest the day he died in a smokey basement at 2 Maitland St.

Rest in Peace In Loving Memory Terri Mullen

Paul Kelly

1961 - 2008

1955 - 2008

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years contemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning. We will remember them. SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 59


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Harassment or Personal (Non-code) Harassment? BY HUGH DOHERTY, CHAIR, LOCAL 3888 HUMAN RELATIONS COMMITTEE

B

efore speaking about personal non-code harassment and poor supervision we should begin with a definition. The City of Toronto defines Personal (Non-code) harassment as: “Personal (non-Code) harassment is harassment that is not related to a prohibited ground identified in the Ontario Human Rights Code. Personal (non-Code) harassment is improper comment and/or conduct, not related to a legitimate work purpose, directed at and offensive to another person or persons in the workplace and that the individual knows or ought to reasonably know would offend, harm or is derogatory, demeaning or causes humiliation or embarrassment. Personal (non Code) harassment often involves a course or grouping of behaviours. However a single serious incident of such behaviour that has a lasting harmful effect on an employee may also constitute personal (non Code) harassment.”. Until recently, many arbitrators and tribunals had taken the position that more than a single case of Personal (Non-code) Harassment must occur in the workplace before a finding and/or a discipline was determined. However, recent awards are indicating that single acts can lead to discipline. In a recent example the government of Nunavut was fined $14,000 for failure to protect employees from personal Harassment. In another case, “Workplace Gossip Nets Office Busybody Fivemonth Suspension” which involved CUPE vs. the Atlantic Health Services Corp. The penalties faced by many corporations for employees conduct in the workplace are increasing. This shift in assessing punitive damages leads to the initial discipline of an employee being more severe as many cities

will not tolerate personal (non-code) harassment. Many employers take the position that it is better to set a very high standard and if the penalties for the conduct are too severe then they let an arbitrator decide on the reduction of that penalty. Many cities have implemented a “Zero Tolerance policy” for all types of harassment. Previously, in many of these cases, the arbitrators ruled and assessed a lesser level of discipline than was outlined in the “Zero Tolerance” policy. Now, however, a shift appears to be taking place where the “Zero Tolerance Policies” penalties are being upheld at arbitration. Increasingly, panels, arbitrators and tribunals have been assessing greater monetary penalties to ensure that employers have a workplace free of Personal (noncode) Harassment. The recent changes to the Ontario Human Rights code clearly outline a significant increase in penalties for any breaches of the Code. It’s important to clarify what personal harassment is exactly. Here are some examples of personal harassment for your reference: • frequent angry shouting/yelling, blow-ups (often we get “this is just the way Harry is”) • regular use of profanity and abusive or violent language • physical, verbal and, or e-mail threats, intimidation • violent behaviours—slamming doors, throwing objects • targeting individual(s) in humiliating practical jokes • excluding, shunning, impeding, negative blogging, cyber-bullying • retaliation, bullying, sabotaging • unsubstantiated criticism, unreasonable demands • insults, name calling • communication that is demeaning, insulting, humiliating, mocking • public humiliation

There are many examples that this occurs to individuals in the workplace. We are often asked how this conduct will be addressed in the workplace. In many instances, an employee is informed of a meeting with management and an investigation is conducted (with union representation present). If during, or at the conclusion of the investigation it is found that a member has engaged in this type of conduct, the penalties vary depending on the City’s findings. Discipline has ranged from letters of apology to suspensions. If you have any questions regarding this list please contact a member of the committee. Given the above list, it begs the question of what personal harassment isn’t. Examples are: • legitimate performance/probation management • appropriate exercise and delegation of managerial authority • operational directives • a disagreement or misunderstanding • conflict between co-workers • change of work location, co-workers, job assignment(s) • appropriate discipline • less than optimal management (poor management style) • a single comment or action unless it is serious and has a lasting harmful effect • rudeness unless it is extreme and repetitive If a situation occurs in your workplace that you think may be grounds for Personal (Non-code) Harassment we encourage you to speak with a member of your Executive Board for further clarification and/or recourse. We have spent many hours discussing cases, their merit and their legitimacy under the Act. It is important to maintain healthy workplaces free of harassment. SUMMER 2008 | FIRE WATCH 61


ADVERTISERS INDEX BOOSTER JUICE ............................ 50

CENTRE HONDA ........................... 38

HUDSON COLLEGE ....................... 60

OWASCO VOLKSWAGEN............... 46

3 DISTRICT TOWING .................... 48

CITY PONTIAC BUICK CADILLAC ....................................... 4

INVESTORS GROUP ...................... 51

RAM IRON & METAL..................... 60

J & R CAR CARE ............................. 38

ROSE JEWELLERY .......................... 50

JACK M. STRAITMAN ................... 34

ROSEHAVEN HOMES .................... 24

JIFFY LUBE ....................Outside Back

ROYAL BANK ................................. 24

KEN WEINBERG ............................ 38

SEAGHER MEDICAL GROUP ......... 40

LA FEMME SALON........................ 38

SHIBLEY RIGHTON LLP ................. 60

EYES ON AVENUE OPTICAL ......... 46

LIUNA TRAINING CENTRE LOCAL 183 .................................... 24

LIFESTYLE REAL ESTATE ............. 60

GARY KENT GOLF ........................... 6

MAPLE TREE PRESS ........................ 6

FIRE DEPT. CREDIT UNION .............. ........................................ Inside Front

GEORGE BROWN COLLEGE ............ 8

MERKLE CAMERA......................... 24

THOMAS PONTIAC BUICK ........... 26

GRAFIKOM .................................... 60

MORTGAGE CENTRE ...................... 7

TORONTO DODGE CHRYSLER...... 38

GREENWAY THERAPY CLINIC ...... 48

N. CITY GEN. INS. BROKERS ........ 34

TUSHEENA FABRICATING ............ 34

CARLOT CANADA ......................... 38

GTA TRUCK ................................... 34

ONTARIO HYUNDAI ..................... 46

WILLOWDALE SUBARU ................ 12

CARTRIDGE CITY ......................... 60

HARDING FIRE PROTECTION....... 60

ONTARIO KITCHENS .................... 50

YONGE LAWRENCE TOYOTA ........ 40

A.J. STONE COMPANY ................. 60 A1 FAST LUBE DRIVE CLEAN........ 50 ALARMFORCE ............................... 12 APPLICANCE CANADA.................. 50 ARCTIC SPAS ................................... 6 BEAUTY CAFÉ ............................... 26 BIOPED ............................Inside Back C.A.W. LOCAL 112 ........................ 50 CANCO HARDWOOD FLOOR. ...... 60 CANDACE PAUL R.E. REALTY EXECUTIVE ................................... 58

DEN BOSCH & FINCHELEY .......... 38 DR ROBERT SALTER....................... 50 SEATBELT SAFETY ........................ 12 ESTONIAN HOUSE CAFÉ .............. 62 EXECUTIVE REALTY SERVICES .... 24

Classified Advertising in the Toronto Fire Watch Magazine Name

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# of issues

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Price: $25/issue + GST=

Ads run one issue free of charge. Home phone or pager numbers will be used. Ads MUST be submitted in writing. Phoned ads are not accepted. Submit before the second Tuesday of the month. Send to Toronto Fire Watch, 80 Bloor Street West, Suite 601 Toronto, ON M5S 2V1 or email: LatoyaD@xentel.com

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Thank You for supporting our advertisers! 62


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Oakville - Oakville Place Mall 240 Leighland Ave. 905 339-3678 (Lower Level)

Thornhill 7700 Bathurst Street 905 882-CARE (2273)

Beach 1684 Danforth Avenue 416 778-8853

Markham 4981 Hwy 7 E. 905 479-1211

Richmond Hill 1480 Major MacKenzie Dr. E. 905 737-8788

Toronto - Downtown 726 Bloor St. W. 416 234-0481

Brampton 164 Queen Street E. 905 450-1272

Mississauga Central 1170 Burnhamthorpe Rd W. 905 896-4825

Scarborough North 3245 Finch Avenue East 416 756-2800

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es on er Expir This Off

2008 ber 30, Septem

Fire Watch (Summer 2008)  

Local 3888’s 2008 Media AwardsBest Photograph in a publication witha circulation of less than 100,000.Story on page 28.

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