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HALL SHOWCASE ON STATION 222 VOLUME 9 | ISSUE 2 | SUMMER 2013

Publications Agreement No: 41203011


THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE TORONTO PROFESSIONAL FIRE FIGHTERS’ ASSOCIATION

VOLUME 9

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ISSUE 2

SUMMER 2013

IN THIS ISSUE 5 President’s Message 7 Secretary-Treasurer’s Message

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16

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Vice President’s Message

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Chaplain’s Corner

12

Letters to the Editor

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Change Your Attitude, Change Your Life

16 Fire Fighter Survival & Rescue

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36

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FIRE WATCH (ISSN 1715-5134) is published quarterly by the TORONTO PROFESSIONAL FIRE FIGHTERS’ ASSOCIATION 39 Commissioners Street, Toronto, ON Canada M5A 1A6 Tel: 416.466.1167 www.torontofirefighters.org E-mail: firewatch@torontofirefighters.org CHIEF EDITOR Ed Kennedy MANAGING EDITORS Frank Ramagnano & James Coones Tel.: 416.466.1167 Fax: 416.466.6632 E-mail: firewatch@torontofirefighters.org ASSISTANT EDITORS Marla Friebe, Rodney Johnston, Janos Csepreghi, Bill McKee, Damien Walsh

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FIREPAC 2012

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DEVO Committee Reminders and Refreshers

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Standing Up for Workers Rights

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Retirement Dinner

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Hall Showcase on Station 222

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Behind the Mask

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Never Shall We Forget

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2013 TPFFA Island Picnic

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TPFFA Off-Duty Awards and Gala

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TPFFA Media Awards

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Insanity at Toronto Fire Halls

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Fit to Survive

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3888 Recent Happenings

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2012 Upcoming Events - Ad Index

DESIGN AND ART DIRECTION Bryan Middleton FIRE WATCH PHOTOGRAPHER Keith Hamilton CANADIAN PUBLICATIONS MAIL Agreement No: 41203011 PRINTED IN CANADA Copyright © 2013 Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association ADVERTISING Please contact Bill Monson at 416-466-9180 ext. 322 or e-mail monson@torontofirefighters.org Merchant Card Acceptance

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, or otherwise without FIRE WATCH is an official communication tool of the Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association. The Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association (TPFFA) does not assume responsibility for statements of fact or opinion made by any contributor. Comments made by individuals may not reflect the official position of the TPFFA. Acceptance and publication of articles, advertisements, products and services does not indicate endorsement of same by the TPFFA, and the TPFFA assumes no responsibility for their accuracy.

On The Cover

HA LL SH OW CA SE ON STATIO N 22 2 VOLUME 9 | ISSUE 2 | SUMMER 2013

This photo won the 2012 TPFFA Media Award for “Best Photo, Circulation over 100K, Rescue” category. It was taken by photojournalist, Victor Biro, on June 2, 2012, during the Eaton Centre shooting incident, which killed one person and injured seven others. See page 38 for details Publications Agreem

ent No: 41203011

S U M M E R 2 0 1 3 | F I R E WAT CH

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PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE THE POMAX REPORT - LESS SERVICE TO THE CITIZENS OF TORONTO

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n June 4, 2012, the emergency response criterion governing the type of medical responses that Toronto Fire Services attends was altered dramatically. The tiered response protocol was changed to remove the Fire Service from a large number of calls, including all chest pains to seven types of stroke, as well as many other situations requiring medical attention. I have always strongly believed that fire fighters play a vital role during medical responses, as long as we are dispatched at the same time as Emergency Medical Services. I also believe that the public expects that fire fighters will attend these types of calls, as we have for many years. Indeed, most of Toronto’s citizens value our attendance and know that, historically, we are often the first emergency crews on the scene. Even in retirement, Bill Stewart, our former Fire Chief questions the wisdom of removing fire fighters from these responses. He advised that at the very least, a ‘Risk Assessment’ of the delivery of emergency services should be undertaken, and I agree wholeheartedly. The POMAX Consultants report, which was issued in June of this year, opposes the integration of Emergency Medical Services with the Fire Service. We were told in May of 2012, that any form of integration was off the table, even though Pomax had merely begun their assigned task of investigating the roles of the two services. The reasons have become quite evident regarding Fire Services involvement in medical responses. It has been very clear that the City Manager’s Office has been given a mandate to find ways to reduce the City’s Fire Services. The rationale seems to be, that reducing the number and type of calls that fire fighters respond to provides justification for downsizing the size of Toronto’s Fire Service. Using TEMS data, the Tiered Response Committee decided to remove fire fighters from responses in

which there was a difference in patient outcomes of less than 1%. Neither Toronto Fire Services nor this Association was asked to provide input or to participate in this committee, which has a significant impact on the delivery of emergency services to the citizens of Toronto. While the committee may stand by their data, clearly there are additional factors that demonstrate the difference that fire fighters make at many emergency scenes, which should have been given consideration. The size and scope of Toronto’s Fire Service has always been established based on fire response capability. Our ability to respond to other types of calls - rescues, hazardous materials, industrial accidents, automobile and medical responses - has always been a value added service for public safety. There can be little doubt that City Council will once again attempt to hold the line on the 2014 budget, by trying to shut down apparatus or close fire stations. The last two budgets, for 2012 and 2013, have shown that this is the case, and your Association is now well prepared to do battle again if necessary. We will be able to show the citizens of Toronto that we are indeed understaffed when compared to most other large municipalities. In fact, the data shows that Toronto should be hiring people to deal with the burgeoning density of the city, especially with regard to highrise responses. Highrise buildings are sprouting up everywhere and recent NIST (National Institute of Standards & Technology) study findings show that we are not sending nearly enough staff on initial vertical responses, which should be thirty-two fire fighters. Our current response is sixteen to seventeen fire fighters. Your Association is working closely with the International Association of Fire Fighters to compile statistics, which will show comparisons of our staffing levels to other large municipalities in North America, helping us to demonstrate that

Ed Kennedy

we are a lean department. Most large cities in North America operate with some form of Fire Based EMS, with the most recent merger being in the City of Winnipeg, Manitoba. You would think that a committee looking into Emergency Services would at least actively consult with Winnipeg, where I understand, the consensus is that it has been a huge success. I want to stress that our Association does not want to take over Paramedic positions. However, if there is a better way to deliver services to the public, it should at least be part of the discussion. Whether a hazmat call, a rescue, a vehicle accident or a medical situation, it makes no sense to me not to fully utilize the skills that we have developed and are ready and willing to continue using while working co-operatively with other emergency service partners. Any debate should begin with a pledge of service quality. Under the present climate at City Hall, we must be cognizant that sometimes any excuse will be used in an attempt to downsize the City’s public services. We know that the public supports a professional and well-trained Fire Service and your Association will continue to work hard to ensure a safe city for its people and a safe workplace for fire fighters - meaning a proper complement of staff to perform at any emergency scene.

Ed Kennedy President, Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association, I.A.F.F. Local 3888

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SECRETARY-TREASURER’S MESSAGE THE “TOP TEN”

ARE GOOD FOR ALL CANADIANS!

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was recently in a Tim Horton’s, as I am sure that most of you are from time to time. I noticed something, so I asked my son to comment on what he noticed with the people working there? He took a look and quickly counted that he could see eight employees. He then stated that five of them were young - the age you would associate with people working a minimum wage job. The other three, he pointed out, in which two were in training, were as he put it, “really old.” I estimated that they were probably in their 50’s. It made me wonder why they started to work there? Was it that they retired and did not have enough to make ends meet? Did they work in the private sector and had a defined contributions retirement plan that did not provide the level of retirement income needed? Is this the type of future that some politicians and media pundits, who are against defined benefit plans, want for us? I have nothing against Tim’s and I appreciate that they are a successful business that can employ people. This article is about preparing and educating ourselves in regard to defined benefit plans, like the one we all belong to. Canada’s ten largest public pension funds, dubbed the “Top Ten,” provide Canadians with one of the strongest retirement income systems in the world and also contribute significantly to national prosperity, a new study concludes. The landmark study commissioned by several members of the Top Ten and conducted by The Boston Consulting Group (BCG) provides, for the first time, data on the aggregate impact of these global organizations. The study is an in-depth examination of the economic impact of these pension funds to the end of fiscal 2011. The study concludes the Top Ten are a Canadian success story on the world stage. BCG’s study focused on the ten largest public sector pension funds in Canada, including our OMERS.

Among the key findings: • The Top Ten pension funds are healthy, growing, and increasingly important to Canada, as it faces challenging demographics and economics; • They have created a centre of excellence in Canada for managers of quality, large-scale investments; • They manage 35% of Canada’s retirement assets; • Their net assets grew by more than 100% in the previous eight years; • They have invested roughly $400 billion in Canada, including $100 billion in real estate, infrastructure and private equity; • They are strong proponents of good corporate governance practices, ultimately improving the efficiency and effectiveness of capital markets; • They comprise four of the top 20 global commercial real estate investors; • They also comprise four of the top 20 global investors in infrastructure assets; • They directly employ 5,000 professionals in the Canadian financial sector and an additional 5,000 employees in their real estate subsidiaries.

Global investment scale

At the end of 2011, the Top Ten funds managed $714 billion in pension funds, which is equivalent to 35% of Canada’s total retirement assets. This total includes all public and private sector pension plans, RRSPs and other registered savings plans. Since BCG’s study, which was conducted in the fall o f 2012, the funds have continued to grow, with recent reporting periods indicating a total of roughly $775 billion in pension assets.

Growing Canadians’ retirement investments

The Top Ten’s $714 billion in pension assets under management in 2011, is an increase of more than 100% since 2003,

Frank Ramagnano

a time in which the world faced one of its most challenging economic periods. Two-thirds of the increase has been driven by solid investment returns of $240 billion vs. net inflows to the funds made by members and their employers of $125 billion. The funds have focused on prudent investments offering attractive, risk-adjusted returns in public and private equities, infrastructure, real estate and bonds. The Top Ten are “major long-term investors in Canada,” with over $400 billion invested across various asset classes in Canada. BCG also found the Top Ten to have a broader impact on the Canadian financial sector, with a $1.5 billion payroll and the ability to attract and retain top Canadian talent. “The Top Ten benefit from two key strengths: professional, active management of diverse assets and a low cost structure,” the study concludes. Like many other nations, Canada is experiencing challenging demographics and economics that make excellence in the management of these funds even more necessary. The study examined external rankings of retirement systems and found Canada’s to be among the strongest in the world; ahead of the United Kingdom, the United States and Germany. Here are some facts specific to OMERS • OMERS members contribute 50/50 with employers to support their pension. • OMERS members bear a share of the risk, and contribute to their pension with every paycheque.

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Secretary-Treasurer’s Message...Continued from page 7

• Over the past 20 years, 2/3 of the capital added to the Plan has been through investment returns; only 1/3 was through shared employee/employer contributions. • The average OMERS member retiring in 2011 receives an annual lifetime pension of about $23,000 (excluding a bridge benefit payable to early retirees until age 65). • For all existing OMERS retirees, the average pension being paid is about $18,000 per year. • The average OMERS retiree’s annual lifetime pension amounts to only 30% to 50% of his/her annual compensation just prior to retirement. • OMERS “Deficit”: Largely as a result of the 2008 global financial crisis, OMERS has projected an actuarial deficit of over $9 billion by the end of 2012. This “actuarial deficit” represents a long-term projection and is based on best estimates for the next 50, 60, or 70 years of numerous factors such as salaries and wages, life expectancies, retirement ages, investment returns and of course the pension benefits that have been promised. These factors are all subject to change. The actuarial deficit is NOT an indication of OMERS’ ability to pay pensions in the short term. In fact, in 2011 OMERS collected $2.7 billion in contributions, and paid $2.4 billion in benefits. On top of that, OMERS owns $55 billion in assets. In other words, unlike a government’s annual budget deficit or a household debt, it is not a real deficit at all. There is no money being borrowed to cover pension payments and no interest being paid on the “deficit”. The actuarial deficit is not new; OMERS has had a plan in place to deal with it since 2010. At that time, OMERS implemented a three-year plan of temporary employee/employer contribution rate increases

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and benefit reductions to address the actuarial deficit over the next 10 - 15 years. Furthermore, when OMERS returns to an actuarial “surplus” position, OMERS plans to roll back these employer and employee contribution increases • The Value of OMERS to the Canadian economy; Over 25,000 Canadians are employed in OMERS-owned or controlled companies. 1 in about 20 people employed in Ontario is an OMERS member, set up for retirement without reliance on government assistance. • OMERS has $37 Billion invested in Canada. The Boston Consulting Group will be conducting a second phase of the report. It will look at the impact that a retiree has on the economy of these Top 10 Canadian pension plans. Let us all do what we can to not spiral into this unnecessary race to the bottom. When pensions come up in conversation, get engaged. If you can state anything, explain how 2/3 of your pension comes from investment returns and only 15% from deferred salary. Ask them to explain how removing Defined Benefit plans would improve their own lot in life? Then explain the negative effects this would have on the economy, which would certainly affect them. I will report on the second phase of the study when it is concluded.

Frank Ramagnano Secretary - Treasurer, Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association I.A.F.F. Local 3888

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VICE PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE COURAGE, COMPASSION, SERVICE A LOOK AT OUR CREDO ompassion. It’s a word we hear a lot in our line of work. A ten letter word for a deep sympathy and sorrow for another who is stricken by misfortune, accompanied by a strong desire to alleviate their suffering. It’s the middle word in our Toronto Fire Services credo of “Courage, Compassion, Service” and it’s probably one of the most important character traits one must possess in abundance in order to be a productive member of our profession. Our Association lives by similar values, as our members have, on countless occasions, been witness to many of those stricken by misfortune and have stepped in to make a positive difference in so many lives. We have done this throughout our 100 years of history, not only for the citizens of Toronto but around the world as well. It’s something we can all be proud of, as we continue a legacy that all fire fighters strive to live up to. It’s been a difficult few months for our members, as we were all left reeling at the sudden tragic loss of three members within a two-week time frame. We have rallied together to mourn our losses and comfort those most closely affected by these overwhelming circumstances. Additionally, we were all touched by the multiple line-of-duty deaths through the tragic circumstances in Houston, Colorado and Arizona. These have been trying times for every member of our profession, as well as our families, as we struggle to deal with these significant, sudden losses. We take time to grieve, tend to those directly affected and try to move on as best we can. Some people are better equipped to cope with life’s difficulties, others struggle daily to get past personal hurdles. Everyone, at some point in their life, deals with personal tragedy and the sudden awareness of the fragility of our lives. We speak of the fire fighting community and the close bonds that our profession creates. As a very large Association, with over 3,000 members and their families, it

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is inevitable that some of us will be dealing with tragic loss, illness or other personal difficulties every day. Colleagues and coworkers, deal with their own personal circumstances and do their best to soldier on and do their duty every day. Many of us will never realize the difficulties some are facing unless they reach a critical point, where it begins to outwardly affect their work life. Is there more we can all do to look out for those around us and reach out compassionately before one’s circumstances become critical? I was recently reminded of a story where a man is walking down the street and falls into a deep hole. The sides are very steep and he can’t climb out. He calls out for help to those above passing by. A doctor walks by, writes out a prescription, throws it down and continues walking. Then, a priest walks by, writes out a prayer, throws it in the hole and keeps on walking. Finally, a friend comes along; the man in the hole cries out for help - the friend immediately jumps down in the hole. The man says,” Why did you do that? Now, we are both stuck down here!” The friend says, “ Yes, but I have been down here before and I know the way out.” It’s a touching story that speaks to the true meaning of compassion. As fire fighters, it is a part of who we are to instinctively jump into most any hole in order to assist anyone in trouble. Surely, each of us would jump in to assist a colleague in peril at any emergency scene. However, sometimes, it’s easy to lose sight of those around us in our day-to-day lives, who may be “in a hole” searching for a way out. It is important for each of us to look around ourselves every day and reach out to anyone who may have fallen down in his or her own hole. At times, it’s hard to recognize, but it is in our own desire to be in this profession of caring and compassion that we can reach out to those who need help in their daily struggles. It can also be difficult if we perceive that a person brought their troubles upon themselves out of their own unfortunate choices. True compassion disregards

Damien Walsh

judgment, just as we go about serving people on the street every day, stepping in to act without considering how it may have happened. These are difficult times and we must look out for each other, if we are to truly live up to the words we say we live by. It has been said that there are only two certainties in life - death and taxes. Well, there is a new certainty - that the Internet is FOREVER! Once something is posted online, it is there for eternity. Even if you suddenly realize that you may have made an error in haste and try to remove it, with today’s technology of screen-grabs, someone else may have already taken it and you will have lost all control of your post forever. Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram; they can all be useful, entertaining applications but can also potentially change one’s life forever. One can find numerous examples of politicians, CEOs, celebrities and ordinary people, whose lives have been forever affected by a single, inappropriate online post. When any member of our Association puts anything online, which could bring shame or embarrassment to himself or herself, it impacts all of us. Think before you press ‘Enter’ - then think again.

Damien Walsh, Vice President, Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association I.A.F.F. Local 3888 S U M M E R 2 0 1 3 | F I R E WAT CH

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S U M M E R 2 0 1 3 | F I R E WAT CH 10


CHAPLAIN’S CORNER MANAGING MY

DISTRESS

BY HUGH DONNELLY, EAST COMMAND CHAPLAIN

S

tress is not a bad thing. In fact, we need some stress to keep us active; if we had no stress in our lives, we would be motivated to do very little. This healthy level of stress (called eustress, or good stress) is necessary in order for us to live as functional, energetic human beings. However, if the amount of stress in our lives tips over a certain threshold, it can become a destructive force. This unhealthy stress (called distress) is something most of us know all too well. In recent years, I have been living too often in the realm of distress, and feeling its effects. As a clergyman, father, and community leader, I find myself being pulled continually in different directions, confronted by people’s many needs and expectations. There have been stretches of time during which I have found myself able to deal quite well with the stress this induces; other times, however, I have tipped over that threshold. I know myself well enough to tell when this has happened: the day-to-day feels like a burden, I exhibit symptoms of depression and struggle with feelings (and expressions) of anger. Too often, I have disliked my behaviour and, sadly, myself. I wondered if this was a cycle I would be caught in forever. Thankfully, I found something that has helped me considerably. One day last January, I was in a bookstore and a title on the top shelf caught my attention: Anger, by Thich Nhat Hanh. A Vietnamese monk in a Buddhist tradition, Hanh has written extensively on how some Eastern philosophies and practices can help people (from any tradition) find deeper peace,

East COMMAND calm, compassion and joy in their lives. A Zen master, Hanh has the gift of introducing people to the practice of meditation. I liked what I was reading. It’s an approach that makes good sense. Everyone is born with a specific temperament, but maturing as a human being occurs when each one of us learns to work with the temperament each has been given. My anger is a part of me, and it doesn’t help for me to repress it or pretend it’s not there. My expressions of anger are part of a pattern of behavior which I have learned over the years, and which I now express as a kind of habit. Now, when my stress level

begins to rise and I feel myself entering the anger danger zone, I recognize that this is happening and I interrupt the pattern of behaviour before I do something I may regret. And just how do I interrupt this destructive pattern of behaviour? As simple as this sounds, I stop what I am doing and breathe deeply for a few minutes, concentrating intensely on my breathing, on each and every inhale and exhale. This allows me some mental space in which to contemplate my anger, to recognize it as

Rev. Hugh Donnelly 416-450-8372 hughdonnelly@rogers.com

real, but then to acknowledge that my anger need not overwhelm me, control me, or define my behaviour. In order to do this effectively in the heat of the moment, however, I have learned that I need to train for it. And the training ground for this growth is a daily 20-minute time for meditation. Meditation can take many different forms, but at its fundamental level, meditation (in the Zen tradition) is paying attention to one’s breathing. This helps clear and calm the mind, and teaches us that we need not be slaves to our emotions. As strange as this may sound, a focused time of concentration on one’s breathing has beneficial effects: it grounds us emotionally, spiritually, and physically; it helps us learn to be more objective about our behaviour when intense emotions bubble up in us. It makes perfect sense that the calmness and self-control that we learn in a daily time of meditation helps us live out those qualities in our day-to-day lives. We naturally become gentler, calmer and more insightful about ourselves. None of us must be stuck in the same old rut; the potential for growth lies in all of us, waiting to be discovered. I happened to find some help from an unexpected place. I offer this story to you so that you may be encouraged to continue on your own path of discovery and health. S U M M E R 2 0 1 3 | F I R E WAT CH 11


SUPPORTING PERSONALIZED CANCER MEDICINE

THE TRADITION CONTINUES! Since 1954, Fire Fighters have been and continue to be the backbone of Muscular Dystrophy Canada. Fire Fighters are our best ambassadors and are champions for those affected with muscular dystrophy. Last year, Canadian Fire Fighters raised almost $3.2 million for Canadians affected with muscular dystrophy and we are thrilled to inform you Ontario Fire Fighters raised 40% of that amount. The combined efforts of 275 Ontario Fire Departments/ Associations raised $1,251,000 during our past fiscal year, which ran April 1st, 2012 to March 31st, 2013.

On behalf of The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation, I would like to thank you for supporting the Journey to Conquer Cancer Run or Walk. Your generous donation helps to support cancer research at The Princess Margaret. The Princess Margaret Cancer Centre is ranked among the top five cancer research centres in the world. This achievement is only possible because of

the critical support we receive from donors like you. Recent advances in genetics - including the ability to decode cancer genes - are leading us towards a more customized approach, combining a better understanding of each patient’s type of cancer and how that patient is likely to respond to particular therapies: in other words, finding the right treatment for the right patient at the right time. The Princess Margaret Cancer Centre has embarked on a Billion-Dollar Challenge to continue our world-leading efforts to improve the standard of care

Congratulations! Thank you to the Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association for your dedication and commitment. Your generous gift of $12,368.44 during this past year is helping to change the lives of those affected. Because of your support, our organization was able to assist families across Canada in the areas of support, education, equipment, advocacy and research. Fire Fighters have been a part of Muscular Dystrophy Canada for almost 60 years and have pledged their support until a cure is found. Fire Fighter fundraising continues to be our largest and most significant source of revenue and we are extremely proud to be affiliated with you. To date, Canadian Fire Fighters have raised over $75 million. Thank you for your partnership and for being a part of this longstanding Fire Fighter tradition. Warmest Regards, Kerri Stocks Revenue Development Coordinator

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for cancer patients at The Princess Margaret, across Canada and around the world. This Challenge is a five-year initiative to secure $1 billion to revolutionize cancer care by creating a new gold standard: Personalized Cancer Medicine. Believe it. By supporting Personalized Cancer Medicine at The Princess Margaret, We Will Conquer Cancer In Our Lifetime. Thank you for sharing our vision and committing yourself to the fight against cancer.

to enhance relationships between the community and the police and gives children, youth and adults more confidence in approaching police officers when the need arises. The role of the 43 Division CPLC is to establish meaningful community-police partnerships and to problem-solve local policing issues. The CPLC hosts community events that encourage positive police relationships with residents, businesses, schools and faith communities within our division.

It is the generous sponsorship of local businesses, organizations and individuals that make it possible for us to offer these events. We would like to extend our sincere gratitude to you for supporting us in this initiative. Sincerely, Superintendent Mark Fenton Co-Chair, 43 Division CPLC Marilyn lodge Co-Chair, 43 Division CPLC

Sincerely, Paul Alofs President & CEO

HELPING OUR POLICING FAMILY’S COMMUNITY EVENT On behalf of the 43 Division officers and the Community Police Liaison Committee, we would like to thank you for your very generous donation of the fire truck bouncy castle to the 8th Annual Community Picnic and Open House, held on Saturday May 11, 2013. Approximately 1,300 residents, as well as police and auxiliary officers, CPLC members, community volunteers and politicians contributed to the success of this year’s event. A free BBQ, police, fire and EMS vehicles, police horses, bands, singers, face painters, community displays, a balloon clown and a bouncy castle provided entertainment for everyone. The Prescription Drug Take-Back Day was an added attraction this year and was extremely successful, with 47,800 grams received at 43 Division and a total of 196 kilograms collected at the 5 locations. The Community Picnic and Open House provided an opportunity for residents of all ages to enjoy a day of fun with many of the officers of 43 Division. This free event helps

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BY BILL MCKEE, LOCAL 3888 EXECUTIVE BOARD MEMBER

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e have seen our brothers succumb to Occupational Disease far too often. We’ve been to the funerals, and we’ve mourned their loss. Occupational Disease is non-discriminatory and the reality is, we are all at risk. Paul Atkinson, our long time WSIB and Occupational Disease representative, began an initiative several years ago to educate our members. I have had the opportunity to join him in speaking with our newest members of the Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association. We give them a lengthy talk on the realities of occupational exposures. We discuss the importance of PPE, reporting, and documenting all injuries and exposures. There is a famous saying in the fire service, “150 years of tradition unimpeded by progress.” Well, in large part, this is because we fail to change our attitudes. In turn, we continue to make the same mistakes over and over again. Now, let me come down from the pulpit and reaffirm that I am your Brother. I fully admit that I make mistakes and have habits engrained in me that need to be broken. So, my finger is firmly bent pointing back at myself. The past three years as a WSIB representative has sobered me to these errors. Unfortunately, it has been at the expense of our injured, disabled members and those who have made the ultimate sacrifice. This has opened my eyes to the reality that we collectively need to change. We are our best line of defense to protect against occupational disease. We have the science and the knowledge that fires are burning faster and hotter than ever before. New building materials and household products are made with synthetics, and when in the combustion stages, they change the atmosphere we enter into a chemical cocktail. It’s a toxic environment and unfortunately we are not equipped to identify what exactly we’re exposed to. Our equipment allows us the ability to get in deeper and stay longer than in years past; it allows us to gain control of the fire and prevent further spread and loss of property. However, that also means we are exposed to these toxins for longer. Although extremely toxic when the fire is in the free burning stages and venting, the chemical, particulate and carcinogenic exposure is far greater when the temperature of the fire area begins to decrease. This is when the micro particulates and off gassing begins and can continue for days afterwards. Yet, we still see fire fighters entering scene’s to perform overhaul, fire watch and assisting the fire marshal without using proper PPE and SCBAs. I become exceptionally disappointed when I see coverage in the media of our members on scene of a working fire and not using their full PPE

properly, or when a DC states, “It’s okay, crews don’t need their SCBAs, its only overhaul.” Really? Come on folks! We know better! We can do better! We need to collectively change our attitude toward how we operate and break these habits. We need to make an effort to, not only look out for ourselves, but also our Brothers and Sisters. All officers need to make sure that wearing proper PPE becomes routine for all fire fighters on scene. It must be made a priority. We need to ensure that we document all exposures and workplace injuries, regardless of how serious you think it may or may not be. I certainly urge all members and supervisors to ensure that exposure reports are completed after every incident - from a pot on the stove to a U.S.E. Hickson type of fire. It’s a simple rule: If you can smell it, you’re exposed! Documenting these exposures should become part of your routine. After you have relayed the hose and washed and checked your SCBA, sit down as a crew and complete these forms. Submit them to the TPFFA and keep a copy for yourself. It is always a good idea to keep a folder at home or in your locker of all exposure forms, Form 6 and supervisor’s reports for WSIB injuries. This gives us a detailed history of your workplace exposures. It ensures that you protect yourself and your family should you ever develop an occupational disease. By documenting your exposures throughout your career, there’s a paper trail of what you went through. So if you ever need WSIB coverage, you will have the necessary material to back up your claim. It’s simple enough but it can be life changing. This simple task can help ensure coverage for any treatment you need. It can also ensure your family will be provided for, should anything happen to you. We also need to change our approach to LODDs as a result of an Occupational Disease. These deaths are directly related to our duties as fire fighters and are recognized as such under presumptive legislation. Each one of us has worked with or knows another Brother or Sister who passed in the line of duty as a result of an Occupational Disease. Yet, funerals for these members are notoriously under attended. Thousands of fire fighters will attend a funeral for a Brother or Sister who passes away in a fire. Yet, only a handful of our members show up for a Brother or Sister who succumbed to cancer. We need to treat these deaths equally. They are both tragic and unfortunately they are both tied to our job. It is up to us to ensure that we are protected in case of any eventuality. We must stand together and support one another equally in life and in death. S U M M ESRU2M0M 1 3E R| F2 I0R1E3 WAT | F I RC EH WAT CH15 15


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FIRE FIGHTER

SURVIVAL RESCUE Photo by Larry Thorne

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RITSO-SERIOUSLY? BY GEOFF BOISSEAU AND JOHN MCGILL, TORONTO FIRE FIGHTERS

“EVACUATE, EVACUATE,

EVACUATE comes from Command… “MAYDAY, MAYDAY, MAYDAY

echoes across the radio in response.

A

nother District Chief is on scene, thank god, but the rest are a ways out. You take control - this is what you have been preparing for and fearing your entire career - but you were careful not to let anyone else know. When you hear those words come across your radio, you feel your stomach drop. You look at your FIT and he has a look on his face that you are sure you have on yours as well. The best way to describe it is as a mixture of panic and fear. It comes with the emotions that you are wrestling with. The panic comes from the initial feeling of helplessness… your brain is craving information… now is the time to get it. “Breathe, breathe in the air. Don’t be afraid to care. Leave but don’t 16

leave me. Look around and choose your own ground,” no time for (expletive) Pink Floyd now - stay focused – it’s show time. You can feel yourself instantly going through your own mental ‘rolodex’: where, who, what, why? You know that the best way to deal with this primal need is to focus on the things you can control. The cortisol is now running through your body and you can feel the changes starting to happen. It is taking everything that you have in you to resist that urge to run in, you are not a fire fighter anymore, you are a leader; you know that everyone is better served with strong leadership. There is no time to second-guess your decisions now; rely on your training and experience, develop a plan and stick with it. “Fire fighter calling MAYDAY what is your location?“ flows out of your mouth in a calm and controlled tone. No answer… “Fire fighter calling MAYDAY what is your location?” No answer…

“Toronto Fire this is Main St. Command, announce a MAYDAY has been called.” The dreaded MAYDAY tones go off instantly. Is this a dream or a memory? Radio silence echoes across the air from Communications - she was right on it - nice job. The RIT Captain has run up to you. ‘Alright,’ you tell him, hoping the rising fear isn’t creeping into your voice. ‘I am your RITSO. The other DC is in command’ - stating the obvious. The RIT Captain confidently exclaims that he and his crew are ready. You can see he is focused on the task at hand and itching to get going… good…you will need that in your RIT leader. Again, the success of these fire fighters’ rescue comes down to solid leadership at all levels. You need to quickly develop your rescue plan; the on-scene crews must have confidence in the abilities of the RITSO – seriously…no (expletive) pressure… You press the transmit button on your remote mic, “Fire Fighter calling S U M M E R 2 0 1 3 | F I R E WAT CH 16


crew - partial collapse on the Bravo side; two fire fighters fell through the floor on the second story; the remaining crewmember is separated and disoriented, on what remains of the second floor. Okay, let’s stay focused here. Remember, they need strong leadership. Start a PAR to make sure all interior crews are accounted for. With what feels like pure panic on the inside, but trying to look calm on the outside, you give an order to your FIT, “Get me the names of everyone in the building and their locations – STAT.” Cripes…did I just say STAT?...I just sounded like Dr. Early. Now request another crew to be assigned to your sector as a RIT, because your first team is being deployed and statistically, you know there is a chance of the first RIT getting into trouble - you hope their God is with them today. You try to organize what you know, into something you can use: • Two fire fighters down on first floor; • Partial structural collapse; • Still heavy fire in the structure; • G iven the age of the structure,

probably traditional wood...but with the number of renovations in this area, who really knows? • RIT crew - solid AC and crew; • Crews are on TAC 2 in the building and radio silence has been requested. Let’s get help to that fire fighter on the second floor. “RITSO to fire fighter on second floor, what is your LIP?” “Second floor Bravo side, Fire fighter Shaffer, my (expletive) crew members, Arvizu and Captain Davis fell through the floor - they are just gone. I can see a window and I need to get out. I got to get out!” “Roger Shaffer, I am sending a crew now to get you, can you get to the window?” “Roger Chief.” You relay the information to the IC and get him to deploy a crew to the Bravo side of the building with a ladder. The crew quickly makes contact and removes Shaffer, as he is ripping his face piece off. He is going to be okay. “RITSO this is Command, Shaffer is out of the building.” Okay, one down and two to go. You turn your full focus to the two remaining in the building. Crews on the interior first floor report that they can hear a PASS alarm and have

Photo by Larry Thorne

MAYDAY, we are sending in a RIT Team, keep calm, try to radio if you can. If you can activate your pass…” You pause and take a deep breath… let’s see what you are made of…no Pink Floyd - stay focused – it’s show time. Back at the academy, not long ago, you recall a discussion regarding a survival procedure the International Association of Fire Fighters had developed utilizing the mnemonic ‘GRABLIVES’. This mnemonic outlines the steps that could be followed by an Incident Commander or Department Communications Centre, which may increase a fire fighter’s survivability in a MAYDAY situation. An Incident Commander can relay these steps to the fire fighter in an effort to control panic and lower stress levels. The discussion highlighted how the use of these steps can be used to help minimize negative reactions to stress and help a fire fighter cope with their stress and assist them to deal with the emergency at hand. Well, this seems like a great time to put this theory to the test, you think to yourself. “Concentrate on your breathing,” you tell the fire fighter - while you start to work down the GRABLIVES procedure. You hear an update from an interior

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2014 TORONTO PROFESSIONAL FIRE FIGHTERS’ ASSOCIATION 2014

HOLIDAYS

RED: A WORKING

GREY: B WORKING

BLUE:C WORKING

YELLOW: D WORKING

Jan. 1

New Year’s Day

May 11

Mother’s Day

Oct. 13

Thanksgiving Day

Feb. 14

Valentine’s Day

May 19

Victoria Day

Nov. 11

Remembrance Day

Feb. 17

Family Day

Jun. 15

Father’s Day

Dec. 23 - Jan. 3 School Christmas Break

Mar. 10-14

School March Break

Jul. 1

Canada Day

Dec. 25

Christmas Day

Apr. 18

Good Friday

Aug. 4

Civic Holiday

Dec. 26

Boxing Day

Apr. 20

Easter Monday

Sep. 1

Labour Day

*Red-Contractual Statutory Holidays

which Fire Watch was mailed.

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RITSO? SERIOUSLY?...Continued from page 17

requested permission to go investigate. Good, the last thing we want is to lose fire ground discipline. We still need to fight the fire, and if everyone drops what they are doing to go and help, it will just make matters worse and jeopardize more lives. You have heard of the loss of fire ground discipline in a MAYDAY situation - it’s a natural human reaction - but as a Chief, you are in charge, it is your job to ensure there is no break down. The crews do not need a friend right now - they need a leader. You know every fire fighter wants to assist but a disorganized rescue will just contribute more to the problem. The image of the two, trapped fire fighters starts to creep into your mind and quickly you push it out; don’t even think about it...you need to keep the emotions in check and stay focused. It seems to take a lifetime for you to explain what you want done. The RIT Captain listens intently to the rescue plan and repeats it back to you to ensure you are both on the same page. Damn this guy is good! You watch as he heads over and briefs his

crew, they listen while re-organizing their equipment and donning their PPE, and then they are gone. Heading into a scene from Backdraft, not looking back, completely focused on the daunting task ahead of them. The second RIT Captain approaches and stands beside you, you brief him on the rescue plan and what the deployed RIT is doing. You look over at his crew; they are listening intently to the MAYDAY channel, have switched to one-hour cylinders, checked their RIT kit and other tools and have even managed to track down a second TIC. Your FIT is standing with the entry control kit, tags of the first RIT team hanging off his board, radio at his ear, listening intently. Damn, these crews are as professional as you are ever going to get, you think to yourself. Okay, now seems like a good time to update the downed fire fighter again. Back to GRABLIVES - where was I? It doesn’t matter, it’s all helpful. “RITSO to Arvizu or Captain Davis.” “This is Arvizu. I’m in big trouble here Chief…” - message is cut off.

“Ok Arvizu, we have crews heading to you right now, they should be there any minute - make some noise, stay low - we are coming to get you.” Standing there watching your deployed RIT crew enter into fire conditions, you resent the position that you have been put in by this (expletive) fire. You have been forced to place your people in serious danger, knowing that they are the only chance that the two downed fire fighters have. Without the RITs, the fire ground crews, and Communications, these two don’t stand a chance. Fire fighters save fire fighters. At least you have given them a chance…it may be a long shot but at least its something. However, now you not only have to worry about their fate, but also the fate of every fire fighter that you send in to rescue them. You pray that they can get these guys out before things get too unsafe. Nobody wants to be faced with making the decision to call off the rescue attempt…no one wants that - but you may have to. You know your day just got worse… and their day got much (expletive) worse - seriously…

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BY DAMIEN WALSH, LOCAL 3888 VICE PRESIDENT, CHAIR, GOVERNMENT RELATIONS

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This past year was once again a very politically active year for Toronto Fire Fighters. For the second consecutive year, we faced a public campaign to prevent cuts to Toronto’s Fire Service, which would have endangered the lives of the people of Toronto and placed further risk to fire fighters. Your Association will not stand by and allow the erosion of the fire service, placing lives in danger. Our ‘Seconds Count’ campaign was very successful, thanks to the hundreds of members who generously volunteered their time. We demonstrated how an effective grass roots campaign could make a difference and change political direction through public education. We continue to raise our profile on the Provincial and Federal fronts and advance our issues. The provincial legislature is in a very tenuous position and a general election is likely in the near future. We must be ready to stand up for fire fighters and their families! As has been stated many times, successful political action requires two important factors: volunteers and money. While the membership of Local 3888 has made significant contributions in both of those areas, we will need to continue to raise the bar regarding membership involvement

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if we are to successfully meet the challenges that lie ahead for our Association. Each year at this time, the Toronto FIREPAC Committee publishes a list of all those members whose financial contributions enabled fire fighters to have a voice at all levels of government. Please take a minute to recognize these individuals and thank them for their contribution. While we strive to ensure the list is complete, please let us know of any omission. Your Toronto FIREPAC Committee is always looking for interested members to participate and get involved. Please contact a member of Toronto FIREPAC. We are just a year away from the next municipal election, which is the most important event on the political calendar for Toronto Fire Fighters. This will set the political climate for the next four years. Our mission has always been clear - we support political candidates across the spectrum who support our issues. I would also like to recognize the continued dedication of the Toronto FIREPAC Committee. On behalf of your Toronto FIREPAC Committee, thank you for doing your part and we look forward to an even more successful 2013! Please continue to support Toronto FIREPAC!

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Platinum Contributors Michael Sinclair Geoff Boisseau Adrian Burtenshaw Kevin McCarthy John Maclachlan James Reed Ernie Thorne James Coones Denis Piperidis Kirk Fudge Brian Sangster Robert Rivard Dennis Graba Tim Algar Don Beer Keith Black Steven Buckingham Brian Cartwright Peter Chow Bill Cooney John Cooper Chris Dickinson Mike Domenagato Michael Edgerton Doug Erwin Ryan Fairlie James Fletcher Colin Giffin Paul Halls Dan Hals Keith Hamilton Peter Harvey Peter Hayes Karl Hoefel Dave Holwell Tom Imray Tracey Lamb Mike Langford Mike Latour Ron Loibl Ed Lukachko Murray Manson Scott Marks Travis Mathews William McKee Andrew MacLean Mark McKinnon Neil McKinnon Jeff Nester Mike Ogle Adrian Olley Andrew Pett Neil Reynolds Jonathon Robinson Martin Smith Brian St Thomas Alfred Walker Damien Walsh Mathias Werginz Jeff Whiskin John Wright Ian Yuill Gerlando Peritore Paul Beames Janos Csepreghi Jim Dillon Hugh Doherty Dara Douma James Enslen Doug Erwin Jost Kaempffer, Ed Kennedy Paul Mogavero Milda Morgan

Michael Neely Dennis O’Connell Tom Osadca Frank Ramagnano John Walsh John Woodbury Gold Contributors William Morris Tracey Powell Norman Clark Matt Downes Greg Haley David Walsh Robert Jackson William McIntyre Catherine Robertson Warren Douglas Alan Watson John Carson Bruce Dunbar Dan Salvatori Gord Snellings Peter Koehler Pekka Ahola Greg Anderson Dan Baxter Mark Bills Joe Brandstetter Liam Cullen John Dion Leo Downey John Dyer Darrell Element David Falconer Tim Geekie James Green Craig Jansen Chris Knaggs Eric Landman Maurice Doyle Ross MacCannell Ercole Pace Igor Ptasiuk Ron Romard Dave Roynon Joseph Shepherd Robert Stroud Michael Turnbull Steven Gambier Greg Steffler Mark Wilson Andrew Ganguly Justin Gaspini David Kurmey Duncan Brown John Creed Dave Denysek Patrick Doyle Peter Duhamel Brad Evaschuk Al Falkner John Gillelan Dan Kendrick Morris Lakeman Jim Mayor Randy Murrell Doug Nurse John Robinson Jonathan Steffler Chris Stewart Rick Straub Dany Vieira Anthony Wallace Steve Walsh

Tim Weeks Norman Clements Silver Contributors Cary Stather Dave Albright John Mogavero Brent Watson Rodney Johnston Bob Fulford Armando Pittiglio Gary Hastings Don Coleman Craig Dennison Stephen Mogford Mike Fitzgerald Mark Thornhill Colin Barrett Roy Bartell Ken Braiden Terry Bugg Steve Case Paul Dodds Peter Farren Danny Filippidis David Inglis John Malcolmson Brian McAlinden Mike McCann Allan Meyers Paul Nicholas Mark Reynolds Paul Richardson Michael Schmitt Glen Storey Lee Thompson Paul Versace Scott Weaver Roman Wojnarski Bob Wong Ryan Moonlight Phillip Bonanno Greg Checca Matt Rayner Denise Whitehead Glenn Norris Dave Battah David Lee James McGowan Dan Alston Jon Barnes Bertram Buckley James Coleman Paul Cunningham Traci Dixon Drew Ellery J Paul Gaudet Kieron Hickey Brian Irvine Darren Ivins Goran Jakopcevic Mke Lewandowski Richard MacDonald Cam MacEachern Murray Macken Dale Markham Doug McEachern Jeff Miles David Mullin Ian Peters Jason Plugowsky Vincent Pratchett Craig Price Kevin Smalley Mike Smith

Gord Tewnion Neil Tullett Stuart Way Sonny Wright Jonathon Andrew Bill Baker Brent Barton Scott Belford Carlo Bernardi Brad Blanchard Michael Boileau Lee Bosak John Brodie William Brown Jeff Bruce John Brunton Mark Bush Tim Callacott Dave Camley Mary Carpenter Eamon Cassidy Derrick Cherun Aldo Chiola Rick Churchmack Derek Clausen Sam Colavita Jordon Comfort John Cooper Dave Cossitt Michael Cox Rick Crowder Craig Cunningham Mark Daniels Brian Dedrick Ken deJong David Dey Mario Di Leonardi Robert Dies Derek Dion Richard Divalentin Kyle Dobrowolski Nelson Domingues John Dooreleyers John Drimmie John Evans John Eyre Peter Gallo Chris George Andrew Gliosca Rolando Gloria Greg Goertzen Todd Graves Godfrey Greaves Tim Green Doug Harper Andrew Hauerbach Bill Hicks Kevin Hill Michael Iaconis Patrick Isaacs Rob Jackson Tim Janes Doug Johnstone Gary Keogh Glen Keogh Peter Kuhn Roland Kuijpers Kirk Lajeunesse Robert Langille John Leonard Bernard Leufkens Michael Leufkens Ken Lines Bruce Linn Dean Makimoto John Martin

Ian McIntosh Laura McWade Jim Mechano Joseph Mitchell Kevin Moloney Bryan Moore Tom Mundy Kyle Musselman Dave Nagle Dan Nystrom Ian Ollerenshaw Rob Patterson Thomas Pawson Jeff Pos Chase Proctor Mike Radonicich Mike Rainforth Cheryl Rendle Jack Ritchie Mike Russell Allison RychmanChisholm David Sadler Nunzio Salvatore Mark Sargeant Jeff Savage James Siddall Jason Simmonds Michael Sippel Christian Skillen Steve Smith Sparkes, Terry Patrick Steed Earl Strong Guillermo Taboada Ken Taylor Dennis Thompson Jeno Toth Jerry Tyrrell Steve Valk John Van Goethem Greg Vandenheuvel Chris Vasconcellos Tom Vinkovic Sabina Von Der Heide Mike Walsh Brent Weaver Ken Webb Sean Wellwood Martin Wittemeier Mike Wolf Lu Wong Bronze Contributors Dave Durocher David Leschak Paul Atkinson Shawn Gracey Troy Lindmeier Derek McCron Kurt Poyhonen Richard Eldon (In Memory) Rick Morgan Tom Lloyd Matthew Dunn Sam Nastamagos Robert Cooke Rick Gallo Steve Hilton Danielle Alosinac Alan Anderson Scott Bailey Andrew Baldwin Jeff Bigham

Michael De Bruyn Tony Casarin Ken Close Richrd Gunns Mike Hasson William Jacklin John Kalliokoski Tom Kassen Brian Kelly Edmundo Krolow Larry Leeson Scott Masters Robert McArdle Tim O’Dacre Jeff Richardson George Safian Jorge Soares Russell Aitchison Steve Alder Richard Annis Philip Barnes Don Barrett William Beattie Rick Berenz Ted Bird Leslie Booth Bill Boyd Grant Boyd Matt Brierley Brian Britton Donald Brown Patrick Bryant Ward Burchell Geoff Burton David Cameron Jennifer Chamberlain Derek Collins Robert Connor Rick Cooper Jack Cossarini Robert Counsel Michael Cranston Matt Cranswick Lee Croft Robert Crummey Trevor Crummy Sean Curran Stuart Dey David Donnelly Eugene Draper Marc Dunn Gary English Paul Evely Peter Falk Jeff Fievez Rob Forsythe Richard Gaboury Michael Garcia Meaghan Garrett John Getty Glen Gibson Claudio Gloazzo Stephan Gooch Matt Hanlon Rob Hanna Don Hanson Levi Har Chris Harms Bruce Harrison Peter Hennessy Brad Hoy Jeff Hubbard Brian Hurd Divina Imbrogno Michael Innes Shawn Ireland

Ihor Iwanisiw Jorge Jensen Alex Jones Christian Jorgensen Justin Juneau Tom Kiatipis Ted Kular Paul Kwiatkowski Kris Labuda Russell Lackey James Leung Bill Lewis Steve Love Matthew MacCormick Ian Macpherson Emile Marino Gaston Maurice Daryl McBay Bruce McDonald Kevin McDonald Scott McDonald Mark McGee Ian McTavish Anthony Mellozzi David Merrifield Gary Muir Michael Neu Kevin Nicholls John Nicholson Robert Noakes John Noble Randy Obie Chris Orosz John Pagnotta Stratis Papastratigakis Ronald Pilkington Mary Polsoni Ian Portigal Brian Power John Randall Jody Rank Peter Rappos James Reilly Brad Richardson Todd Roberts Peter Roccasalvo James Rosenback Caitlin Roy Patrick Rusnak Joe Sarta Scott Sefton John Sheridan Brian Sherwood Christian Sickinger John Snider Frank Sonego Aldo Sorrenti Brian St. Thomas John Stoat Stan Stojanovic Brian Swant Graeme Sweeney Ted Szabunia Kelly Theaker Craig Thompson Daniel Thompson Matthew Toth Anne Vavra Sam Warnock Steve Way Kevin Webber Don Wilson DougWright Paul Wright Tim Young Sydney Zigah

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DEVO COMMITTEE REMIN The Driver Education and Vehicle Operation (DEVO) Committee first met this year at Station 114 on April 25. The committee is comprised of Trevor Trotter, Matt Woodrow, Mike Ogle, Josh Kramer, Ted Kular, Gerald Pyjor, Gord Tewnion, Rick Cooper, Robert Gutray, and Rodney Johnston. The committee meets on a quarterly basis, and discusses various aspects of apparatus operation, pertinent to the TFS. Topics include reviewing related SOGS, current safety initiatives, and making suggestions to enhance the safety of both TFS personnel, as well as the citizens we serve.

The mission of the DEVO Committee is simple: • Improve driving skill across the TFS • Reduce collisions citywide • Educate drivers rather than discipline • And most importantly, make recommendations

Red light cameras are routinely installed in targeted intersections throughout Toronto. Currently, there are 87 cameras rotating throughout 114 intersections within Toronto. Fines can be as much as $325 dollars, but the implications of running red lights are far more serious. Injury to Toronto Fire Services personnel and citizens, damage to vehicles and property, and downtime for apparatus are just a few of the issues. The risk of all these issues far outweighs the benefit of a few seconds gained while responding. Clearly, through ongoing education and heightened awareness, our infractions are successfully trending downward, with our goal being zero infractions in the near future. As we continuously improve, I know this worthy goal can be met. Keep up the good work! TFS Drivers continue to show a high degree of professional conduct on the roads, and specifically at intersections

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while enroute to an emergency. Driving courteously and sensibly maintains our good image with the public. Coming to a complete stop with lights on and siren sounding, then proceeding across each lane, only when it is safe to do so, ensures trouble-free passage through the intersection. At multi-lane intersections, we should treat each lane as an individual intersection and stop, and then proceed only when safe to do so. A risk vs. benefit analysis is the key to our safety. Collisions involving TFS apparatus average approximately 200 incidents per year, with most of them being preventable with just a little attention to detail. Backing up into the station, as well as hitting stationary objects, continue to be areas that need improvement. Things like utilizing mirrors properly, taking more time while attempting close-quarters maneuvering, and properly judging distances, will go a long way to improving our numbers. Always utilizing spotters while backing up is another way to avoid needless collisions. Captains must always remember to help spot their apparatus to ensure the safety of the public and their crew. While much of our driving doesn’t afford us the luxury of extra time, we still need to operate our apparatus safely and effectively by avoiding careless mistakes. Responding during severe weather poses unique challenges for TFS Drivers. Examples of severe weather include,

but are not limited to the following: • Electrical storms • Snow storms • Heavy rains • Flooding events • Tornados • Hurricanes • Ice storms • Other conditions with the potential to overtake available emergency resources. Ultimately, senior staff has the responsibility to invoke and terminate the SWRP (Severe Weather Response Protocol) based on real-time conditions in any

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DERS AND REFRESHERS

particular part of the city. The Fire Chief, Deputy Chief, Division Commander, On-Duty Platoon Chief, and On-Duty Communications District Chief equally share in this responsibility. The TFS Communications Centre will initiate a single apparatus response to all alarm calls and lightning strike calls,

unless there is a report of smoke visible and/or a possible working fire. For all other responses, dispatch personnel shall prioritize calls based on their importance (life threatening emergencies being the top priority), and place non-life threatening calls on a waiting list until all high-priority calls have been sufficiently dispatched. The on-duty Communications Centre Officer shall have the authority to adjust the type of apparatus dispatched to specific incidents during activation of the SWRP, i.e., send an aerial in place of a pumper if necessary. Captains in charge of apparatus should exercise extreme caution and

consider safety implications when approaching potentially volatile scenarios, such as the following: 1. Structures • Building integrity, collapses, etc. 2. Utilities • Hydro, natural gas, steam, propane, etc. 3. Terrain • Mud slides, falling trees, sinkholes, standing water, etc. 4. Waterways •Fast, high and rising water, heavy swells and surf, etc. 5. Weather • Lightning strikes, high winds, falling objects, etc. District familiarization is key to avoiding potential problems when the bad weather does hit. Surveying problematic areas within your district helps you to respond more efficiently and could also save you a lot of grief down the road! The DEVO Committee would like to thank long-time member, Matt Woodrow, for his many years of contributions to our Committee. Good luck and all the best in your retirement Matt…you will be missed!

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Standing up for Campaign Launch Where free unions and collective bargaining are forbidden, freedom is lost. - Ronald Reagan

BY DAMIEN WALSH, LOCAL 3888 VP AND DOUG ERWIN, LOCAL 3888 EXECUTIVE BOARD OFFICER

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pen a paper, turn on the radio or TV, surf the Internet today; you’ll find the latest attack on ‘greedy’ workers by a covert rightwing campaign to take away your rights. Yes, the hard won rights that many generations of workers fought for, tooth-and-nail, are being threatened by a relentless crusade against us all. It’s ironic that the quote above was made by Ronald Reagan at a Labour Day address in 1980, whose best remembered initiative on the labour front was to fire 11,000 members of the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization, as a means of ending a strike by workers protesting working conditions. It’s no surprise that many politicians have short memories when their own words come back to haunt them. Many political leaders have championed the rights of the working class while out on the campaign trail to win votes but seem to have a dramatic change of opinion once elected. It takes courage to continue to stand up for workers in the face of

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big business. Much has been made recently of organized labour’s lobbying efforts at all levels of government. Your own Association has been criticized for doing so; yet, little is mentioned of the powerful, ever-present business and right-wing think tank lobby with its influence at each legislative body. So-called, ‘Right to Work’ legislation is the new buzz term for dividing and conquering organized labour. It is more appropriately called “free-riding,” as workers are allowed to opt out of paying union dues while still enjoying all of the benefits and protection that many generations have fought so hard to achieve. Check out this video produced by OPSEU, which clearly illustrates the concept of “free-riding” and how it only serves to hurt all workers while advancing the attack against labour. http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=qCqRkn1IRnM In the wake of a devastating recession caused by unparalleled greed in the financial services sector, it has become fashionable to blame working class people, as right leaning governments scramble to protect their own interests. While the U.S. economy plummeted to record depths, we in Canada were pulled down as well, enduring serious economic loss across all sectors and affecting thousands of hard working families.

South of the border, there are currently 24 states, which have some form of “right to work” legislation, with an additional 16 states having anti-union legislation before their state legislature. This is nothing more than a veiled attempt at stripping away workers rights, while using the struggling economy as an excuse. Without question, we are in the midst of an all out declaration of war against organized labour, as many states spiral down in a “race to the bottom” for the middle class worker. The current working conditions and common benefits enjoyed by all workers, whether unionized or not, were not granted by the good will of employers. These were hard won, by many previous generations of workers. S U M M E R 2 0 1 3 | F I R E WAT CH 24


Workers’ Rightsand Training

The Union movement has always sought to protect all workers across the broad spectrum of labour. It is for the benefit of all that rights and privileges won by any particular group are soon after sought for all. As the saying goes, “A high tide lifts all boats.” In a union environment, there is no disparity in wages for men as opposed to women. Consequently, women make up the majority of public sector workers and are protected by collective agreements to ensure they receive fair compensation based upon the work they do and not upon their gender. It is clear that every benefit that we enjoy has come through a hard won collective bargaining process. It would be a tragic consequence to allow all

that those before us worked so hard to achieve, to be eroded away by this new threat against workers everywhere. Here in Ontario, a new agenda has been clearly established by the Hudak Conservatives. A number of ‘white papers’ have been produced, which set out a clear plan to strip away the standard of living of the working class. On March 2nd, the Toronto and York Region Labour Council held its launch of a workers’ rights campaign, inviting members from all labour unions, public and private, to begin a grassroots movement to push back against this rising tide against us. Hundreds of workers came out to learn more about this campaign, including twelve members of your TPFFA. Round table discussions were held to ensure perspectives across all labour groups are included. Workers were asked to imagine the consequences of a workplace where some workers willingly paid to be represented by their union while others did not but still enjoyed the same benefits. Other discussions included strategies for educating the public on the value that unions have brought to many aspects of our current standard of living. The many pieces of legislation that have improved the lives of the majority of workers were highlighted and ideas were exchanged on the future of unions in Canada. This day was the first of many future events to be held by the labour movement, as we move forward together to combat anti-union legislation. Similarly, on March 22-24, the Canadian Labour Congress held a political action conference in Toronto, bringing workers together from across the country to discuss plans to push back against anti-labour legislation, which is becoming more common in

every province. As you are probably aware, the House of Commons recently passed Bill C-377, a Private Members Bill, which would require labour unions to disclose detailed financial information, including how much they spend on political activities. It’s curious that no legislation would require big business to disclose similar financial records. The Bill is currently in the Senate where it is being heavily debated in the Upper Chamber, as members across all party lines oppose many parts of this Bill. All Canadian parent labour organizations will be moving forward co-operatively, to oppose new legislative initiatives and to educate every member of the labour movement. It is vitally important for all workers to get involved and actively engage in our efforts to push back against the rising tide against us. We will be making a wide range of resources and educational material available to our members so that everyone can be aware of what we are facing, as well as learn what each of us can do to fight for what we have. Please go to http://www.labourcouncil.ca or http://www.canadianlabour.ca for the latest news on the labour front. Please take the time to have a look at some of these links, get educated and be ready to stand up for yourself, your family and every Canadian worker. http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=ew071qdbEHU

http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=ToI1I10a3J4

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Eighty-seven TPFFA members have retired from Toronto Fire Services within the last year.

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ith careers spanning between sixteen and forty-three years, there was a cumulative total of 2,710 years of hard work and experience that served to protect the people and property of Toronto. The average years of service were just over thirty-one. Thirty-one years in a profession as difficult and demanding as fire fighting is no easy task and is worthy of respect. It is something to be proud of and something to be honoured. This is what the membership of the Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association did on Friday June 7th at Q-ssis Banquet Hall by hosting a retirement ceremony to honor the contributions of eighty-seven newly retired members. The evening started with cocktails and an opportunity for retirees and their families to mingle with each other. It was a chance for some to re-connect with classmates that hadn’t been seen

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since recruit graduation. The theme was one of pride in their accomplishments but also of some dismay on how quickly time has gone by. Once the honourees took their seats, they were treated to some entertainment from our very own Toronto Fire Services Pipes and Drums Band. This has become a highlight of these evenings and we are thankful to the TFS Pipes and Drums for attending every year. The evening was an opportunity to celebrate and look back upon numerous contributions over a long career and to pay tribute, not only to the fire fighter, but also to their family for the lifetime of sacrifices that are inherent to our profession. Recognition was given to those that made the journey to retirement, and those that were lost along the way. We wish our retirees a  long and healthy retirement and thank them for their many years of dedicated service in our profession.

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Name

INT

Surname

Rank

Service

Name

INT

Surname

Rank

Service

Pekka

J.

Ahola

CAPT

28

Ian

F.

Leslie

CAPT

28

John

W.

Anderson

CAPT

31

Kenneth

J.

Lines

CAPT

33

Alan

S.

Anderson

DC

36

Vincent

Love

FF

37

Antle

DC

42

Brian

Lowes

CAPT

31

Marchand

CAPT

33

Maunder

DC

43

McEdwards

FP FF

19

McKenzie

FF

33

McNichol

CAPT

28

Morgan

CAPT

30

Moss

FF

30 35

Daniel Larry

N.

Aplin

CAPT

32

Raymond

William

H.

Beattie

CAPT

31

William

Kirk

A.

Bell

FF

34

Patricia

Bellmore

CAPT

34

Steven

Ted

E. E. B.

Brian

J.

Bertram

CAPT

35

Mark

Kenneth

G.

Bodrug

DC

36

Richard

Steven

B.

Bowen

FF

31

Stephen

David

J.

Branson

FF

31

Eric

C.

Motton

CAPT

James

G.

Breedon

CAPT

33

Paul

R.

Nicholas

CAPT

34

Terry

L.

Buckley

TO

27

Larry

H.

Niece

FP Capt

26

Garry

S.

Burtney

CAPT

34

Glenn

G.

Norris

DC

31

William

J.

Cameron

APC

42

Brennen

Oakley

CAPT

27

Colin

J.

Campbell

DC

31

James

Park

CAPT

32

Brian

W.

Cartwright

FF

34

Juris

Perkons

CAPT

36

Stephen

R. Sr. Clark

CAPT

30

Randy

R.C.

Piercey

IO

24

Clarke

CAPT

29

Paul

G.

Pierre

FF

31

Reid

CAPT

30

Rivard

CAPT

31

Rock

CAPT

32 35

Danny

B.

David

J.

Collins

CAPT

36

David

David

S.

Colwill

CAPT

35

Robert

Allan

V.

Cotter

CAPT

32

Jeffrey

Rickie

C.

Dale

CAPT

33

Joe

J.

Rogers

DC

Gilbert

R.

Daoust

CAPT

29

Hugh

M.

Ross

DC

37

Gord

A.

Dickie

CAPT

36

Michael

P.

Rzadkowski

FF

29 37

J.

Dion

CAPT

36

Robin

Sanders

APC

Ambrose

G.

Donovan

FF

31

Kenneth

Simpson

FP FF

16

Michael

R.

Draper

CAPT

38

Bruce

Smith

FP Capt

25 36

John

W.

Ellis

FF

34

David

Smith

FF

James

J.

Fletcher

CAPT

32

Ronald

E.

Smith

DC

34

Gary

E.

Fyles

CAPT

37

David

F.

Snowball

FF

35

Michael

W.

Gaiger

FP FF

24

John

J.

Sperrino

27

Thomas

M.

Galand

CAPT

34

Senior Marine Engineer

William

C.

Gill

CAPT

34

William

A.

Sproule

FF Mechanical Maintenance

26

Gairy

J.

Gonsalves

FF

27

John

A.

Strong

CAPT

33

Hamilton

DC

36

Leslie

S.

Trempe

APC

36 31

Michael

Ian George

E.

Hann

FF

22

Johnnie

C.

Walker

CAPT

Al

A.

Harris

FF

31

Andrew

M.

West

FF

35

Brian

J.

Healy

FF

27

Mark

D.

Williams

CAPT

33

Ed

K.

Ingram

CAPT

34

Craig

Wilson

CAPT

34

Jasudavicius

CAPT

36

Robert

N.

Wilson

TO

30

Johnson

CAPT

30

Scott

R.

Winton

COM Capt

33

Kapralik

CAPT

32

John

Zammit

AC

23

Jean-Marie Brian Michael

T.

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STATION 222 BY MATT DUNN, TORONTO FIRE FIGHTER

ow an area full of commercial and industrial buildings, Scarborough’s “Golden Mile” along Eglinton Avenue East went through a rapid transition period following the outbreak of World War II. Mainly comprised of quiet farmland prior to the 1940s, the landscape quickly shifted, when the Government of Canada secured a substantial piece of land to house a munitions plant that was required for the war effort. Built in 1941 and often referred to as the GECo (General Engineering Company) plant, it had thousands of mainly female employees, who were ultimately responsible for the production of more than 250 million munitions by the end of the war. The project was so massive that it was like a miniature city that eventually included a network of over 170 buildings and tunnels in the Warden Avenue and Eglinton Avenue East area. By the end of 1941, the GECo facility had its own Fire Department that occupied building 90 at the north end of the property on Civic Road. The building was constructed as both a fire and ambulance station and in 1942 an auxiliary fire station was constructed at the south end of the GECo property. Throughout the war years, the department regularly responded to emergencies but surprisingly, with the amount of explosives on site, they were never called for a single fatal accident at the plant involving munitions. When the war ended, the area experienced a number of changes, as many of the underground tunnels were filled and

N

buildings repurposed. Many of the buildings were converted for temporary residential use while others would later include Scarborough municipal offices and a library. One building that remained untouched for quite some time was the fire station on Civic Road. The GECo fire fighters continued to work out of the hall for a number of years and even participated in fire prevention programs within the community. By 1951, the pumper at GECo routinely had problems and required repairs due to leaks, so Scarborough Fire Fighters would frequently cover the area while they were out of service. On November 1st, 1951, the Chief of the GECo Fire Department received notice that as of November 1st all equipment and staff would be turned over to the Scarborough Fire Department, which then took possession of what would become the original Scarborough Fire Station #3. In the years that followed, Scarborough Fire Fighters regularly responded to industrial fires in the area, such as the Golden Mile factory blast in 1957. At the fire, all available resources in Scarborough were deployed after walls were blown off the Canadian Thermos Products Ltd. Building,

causing $1,000,000 in damage. In

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the same year, the Scarborough Fire Department lost its first fire fighter in the line of duty when Pumper #3 responded to a call from the station on Civic Road. As he drove south on Warden Avenue to a call on St. Dunstan Drive, fire fighter Alexander Budd was approaching the intersection of Warden Avenue and St. Clair Avenue East when he clipped a car as he attempted to pass on the right. When the pumper careened through the intersection it struck two other vehicles and landed on its side pinning Budd beneath it, as he was ejected from the open cab. When he was pulled from the wreckage after a thirty-minute wait for tow trucks to move the pumper, Fire Fighter Budd had died from injuries to his chest, caused by the weight of the truck. More unbelievable than the fact that there were no other injuries at the scene, were the events that unfolded in the years that followed. Budd’s widow was later remarried to Scarborough Fire Captain, John Wilde, who worked out of the Dorset Road Fire Station and years later when responding to a call, his aerial crashed into a gravel truck at the same intersection, killing Captain Wilde and Fire Fighter Joseph Kennedy instantly. As Scarborough Fire Fighters were mourning the loss of Firefighter Alexander Budd in 1957, the problems with Fire Station #3 were becoming increasingly evident. Since many of the buildings were constructed with

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Station 222...Continued from page 27

with the war in mind, they were not necessarily expected to have a significant lifespan. By the end of the year, the walls of the GECo Fire Station were being pulled apart by frost; snow would routinely be blown in underneath the apparatus doors; and the structure was deteriorating rapidly. Within months, Scarborough Council proposed the construction of a new fire station at Warden Avenue and Malley Road. Due to delays in the process, some minor reconditioning was performed on the GECo Fire Station to extend its lifespan until the completion of the new Scarborough Fire Station #3. In the meantime, the city hired Parrot, Tambling & Witmer to design the new station, as they had previously designed two other Scarborough Fire Stations in the 1950s. Among the details in the original block plan for Station #3 were a district chief’s office, control room, store room, hose tower, two apparatus bays and a large concrete apron for the apparatus. With the design prepared and no need for additional staff, as they would be transferred from the existing Station #3, the $100,000 construction was delayed in 1960, as Scarborough Council tried to cut costs. The hall officially opened in 1961, and in the same year, after twenty years in service, the department retired the Ford Pumper that started in the GECo Fire Station because it did not have the same pumping capacity as the latest trucks. Not only had the Scarborough Fire Department experienced a number of changes since the years working out of the GECo plant but the neighborhood had changed drastically as well. Incentives of cheap land and low property taxes in the post-war boom led many businesses to the area and in turn saw the rise of local shops, including the Golden Mile Plaza that was visited by Queen Elizabeth II in 1959. The influx of development and population density made for no shortage of fires for the new Scarborough Fire Station #3 on Warden Avenue. In 1963, when the Canadian Electric Box and Stampings plant on Warden Avenue caught fire in its paint shop, the cost

30

was over one million dollars and left over two hundred people out of work. A year later, fire fighters responded to an old GECo building on Civic Road that housed Aerosol Packing Ltd., after several explosions left thousands of aerosol cans littering the area around the plant. Over forty Scarborough Fire Fighters protected several massive fuel and chemical tanks, preventing widespread destruction. By the 1980s, much of the industry that had come to the area began relocating to cut costs and several fires in the area certainly did not help the local businesses. With the Golden Mile Plaza in the process of demolition in 1986, a fire started in the old Woolworth’s store, eventually becoming a threealarm blaze that left the plaza in ruins. The largest outdoor shopping centre in Canada at that time had finally met its demise. On New Year’s Day in 1989, another plaza fire at Eglinton and Kennedy caused over $2,000,000 in damage and sent seven fire fighters to hospital after they had extinguished the fire and helped residents evacuate the adjoining apartments. Newly designated as Toronto Fire Services Station 222 after the amalgamation of Toronto, the station was one of few to receive the call to Toronto’s first cross-border dispatch. When a threealarm fire broke out on Danforth Road requiring apparatus from both Scarborough and Toronto areas, both old Pumper #3 and Aerial #3, which had moved to Warden Avenue years earlier from the Dorset Road Hall, responded to the call. As the area has again undergone numerous changes in recent decades, very little of the original GECo site buildings and Scarborough’s original “Golden Mile” remain. The developments that ultimately brought Scarborough its third Fire Station are now commemorated simply by the Heritage Toronto plaques that stand at the shopping centre at Eglinton Avenue East and Pharmacy Avenue.

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Letter from the Editor… Lynn Pezzelato

I

know, I know, every school kid’s (and believe it or not teacher’s) nightmare is returning to school! I certainly used to get ‘butterflies’ in my stomach, starting on the Sunday night before Labour Day, and by

the Monday night, the feeling got even worse. I would have a very restless sleep thinking about the summer

days gone by and another school year ahead. The first day of school came and went, as did my thoughts, restlessness and anxiety, when I discovered school, “was a whole lot better than I had imagined” and I became a life long learner. It is amazing how we can “train” our minds! I learned very quickly that I was my own worst enemy and that putting thoughts and unknowns into my head caused my own anxiety, unnecessarily. I too have eased the minds of my own kids by passing this valuable information along and helping them cope with the unknown and keeping a positive perspective. As parents of school aged children approach the school year once again, we begin to think about what is ahead. Some of us have children going to pre-school, some beginning JK/SK, some high school, university and college - and some parents are hoping their kid(s) land a job after finishing school! It is not a simple task raising children. I always thought it was. I also never thought it was the bestunpaid job in the world and now I do! School is just one of the milestones that we as parents help our kids develop through and work to succeed in. Growing up and working our way through school certainly sets the pace for the working world, as we discover our abilities,

strengths, weaknesses and behaviours. So, the sooner we learn about ourselves, the more opportunity we have to select a career that is well suited. As we can all attest to, our career most often lasts longer than school. This edition’s article, “School Struggles and Positive Work Habits,” is very timely for the upcoming school year and provides something for us to consider, as we help our kids achieve and guide them toward a successful school year. I hope you will take the time to share the points in the article with your kids and be part of their learning and progress; your support will only help them succeed. My best to you during this upcoming school year! Lynn S U M M E R 2 0 1 3 | F I R E WAT CH 31

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School Struggles and Positive Work Habits By Cary Stather, Peer Support Member

I have a younger daughter who has been struggling with grade 6 math and all the homework that comes with it. I had a chance to attend a seminar and thought it would be helpful to share a few things with you that I learned. Here are four habits, which have the potential of doing more harm than good for a child in school and even for us as adults in the workplace.

1. Oversleeping or not getting enough sleep. This

can hinder one’s ability to concentrate and focus on school work or otherwise.

2. Poor nutrition can cause one to lose concentra-

tion and have poor performance issues (sports, grades, projects).

3. Too much time with electronics can cause major

distractions when trying to complete homework and assignments.

4. Procrastination, which will make it difficult to

maintain deadlines. Help young children work out a schedule to provide ample time to meet deadlines. Make a provision for presentation/ projects, where supplies and time to assemble and practice are required.

Here are some great tips to get your kids on the right track and help them get great grades and be more organized:

1. Introduce them to wall calenders and agendas. 2. Teach them to ask for help - it is okay and is actually a key component to success. Getting a head start on teaching this element will lead to feeling confident and asking for extra help from their teacher when they need it.

3.  Praise them for a job well done and provide constructive criticism to help them boost their grades. Review hardships at report card time and make success a milestone.

4.  Before they finish their homework, a test or exam, take the time to check their work. Have them present and review it with them, ie. have them read their work aloud to ensure that words have not been added or left out. Suggest that they review a question where you find an error, in order to see if they can recognize their own mistake; if not, work through the question with them. Be patient, as it may take a few tries if the first attempt is not successful.

5.  Learn to plan for the next date by gathering all the supplies and books they need and put them in their backpack. 6.  Set limits for electronics, like when their homework is complete. The golden rule for electronics of any type (tv, ipod, cell phone,

facebook etc.) is 10 minutes for every year of their age - for example, a 9-year-old would have the potential for 90 minutes of electronics per day, based on their homework completion, grades etc. If time is not warranted during the week, cut it back and provide extra time on the weekend, again, as appropriate.

7.  Create an electronic blackout for the whole family, so that your whole family can do a activity together like a board game. 8.  Try to create and develop balance in your child’s life. Help encourage them to actively use media in their lives, read a newspaper or magazine and also incorporate outside and traditional activities like soccer, biking, baking, gardening and camping. Make learning fun and integrate it into everyday life (ie. create a juggling exercise and count out fruit after a shopping trip to help young ones learn their numbers).

9.  Help your child develop objectives and goals and celebrate them upon success. This will be a good lesson learned, long after school is complete! 10. Most of all let your kids be kids. Encourage them to have fun; be stern, yet fair; be involved in their lives and with their friends; be a parent and take pride in doing so!

TORONTO FIRE SERVICES EAP/CIS NEWSLETTER - SPRING EDITION 2013

2


Captain John Calhoun July 7, 1957

Captain Ross Gledhill December 31, 1958

With less than a year until retirement and a career dating back to the days of horse drawn hose reels, Captain John Calhoun had seen some of the worst fires in Toronto’s history throughout his forty years as a Toronto Fire Fighter. In 1952, he narrowly avoided death when, at a three-alarm fire, a building wall collapsed on him and two other fire fighters. They were all fortunate enough to dig their way out. Five years later, while responding on Pumper 27 from Ascot Avenue, Captain Calhoun and his crew arrived at a house fire at 998 St. Clarens Avenue. As is often the case, fire fighters were unsure of whether or not the house was occupied and proceeded to search through the dense smoke. Captain Calhoun collapsed during the search and was immediately removed and treated by his crew with an inhalator before being transported to St. Joseph’s Hospital, where he was pronounced dead on arrival. This was not the first time the Calhoun family had been touched by tragedy from a fire call. More than twenty years earlier, John’s brother, Robert, died when the aerial ladder he was on broke while fighting a fire on Sherbourne Street. A family man with a wife and four children, Captain John Calhoun was buried at Park Lawn Cemetery.

As fire fighters are regularly called to respond at a moment’s notice, the inherent risks to the heart are always present and something that Captain Ross Gledhill knew all too well. The forty-three year old Captain had recently been cleared to return to duty after a heart attack and rejoined his crew at the Earlscourt Fire Hall. Down the road at McCormack St., a homeowner was having trouble with his fuse box that caused the first of two fires in his home that day. Several trucks arrived to find many guests from a party standing outside while a fire burned within the house. With the fire knocked down, Captain Gledhill and his crew proceeded to the second floor to pull down ceilings and search for fire extension when he became overcome by smoke and had another heart attack. Despite quick action by his crew to remove him from the home and treat him with an inhalator, he was pronounced dead at Northwestern General Hospital later that day. The forty-two year old Captain had served not only the Toronto Fire Department for nearly two decades but was also a World War II veteran. Due to the municipal borders at the time, had the fire been just a few yards further west, Captain Gledhill never would have been called, as the fire would have been within York Township.

Alexander Budd November 21, 1957 Working out of the Scarborough Fire Hall on Civic Road, twenty-nine year old fire fighter, Alex Budd, was driving the open cab Pumper #3 on the day he was called to St. Dunstan Drive for reports of a smoking furnace. With Captain Norman Davis and Fire Fighters Frank Morris and Albert Burrows onboard, Fire Fighter Budd began to navigate his way south on Warden Avenue. As they approached the intersection of Warden Ave. and St. Clair Avenue East with the gong and siren ringing, Fire Fighter Budd swerved to avoid a car that was ahead of him about to make a left turn, clipping the car as he passed on the right. Continuing through the intersection but off course from the impact, the pumper struck two other cars on St. Clair, as they waited for the light to change. Alex Budd was ejected from the open cab as the truck rolled onto its side and pinned him beneath it. Miraculously, all of the car occupants, as well as the Captain and two fire fighters on the back of the pumper were relatively unscathed. Fire Chief George Collins would later credit the leather safety straps on the rear of the truck with saving the lives of Fire Fighters Burrows and Morris. With nobody else significantly injured, all attention immediately turned to the condition of Alex Budd, whose boots could be seen sticking out from under the truck. After waiting for nearly thirty minutes for tow trucks to remove the truck from his body, it was evident that Budd had died from chest injuries sustained in the crash. A married father of five young children, Fire Fighter Alexander Budd became the first member of the Scarborough Fire Department to die in the line of duty. Budd’s widow, Alice, was eventually remarried to Captain John Wilde, a member of the Scarborough Fire Department. In a most bizarre coincidence, the next line of duty deaths for the Scarborough Fire Department took place at the same intersection, when two fire fighters died in a vehicle accident responding to a call. One of those fire fighters was Captain John Wilde.

Brian Kozluk

Dec. 18/62 - June 5/13 Start April 26/93

Mark LeMessurier Mar. 26/72 - June 11/13 Start April 29/02

David Ross

Feb. 1/52 - Aug. 17/13 Start May 29/78

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old; age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them. SU S PMRMI NE G R 2 0 1 3 | F I R E WAT CH 33


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T

he single largest natural disaster in Ontario’s history occurred on the eve of our 2013 TPFFA Island Picnic but it did not deter our members, as hundreds made the journey to Centre Island for a fun-filled day. On Monday July 8th, torrential rain and widespread flooding, the likes of which Toronto had never seen, resulted in thousands of emergency responses and over $850 million dollars in damage. This does not make a great backdrop for the annual picnic, but the desire for a funfilled day with family and friends, paired with a free ferry ride and tee-shirt had our members show up in numbers that exceeded all expectations. Plans for the July 9th TPFFA Island Picnic had been coming together perfectly. Over 900 freezies had finally frozen (a painstaking two week process), tee-shirts were printed and sized, ferry tickets were purchased and an overwhelming response from the membership had close to 1,000 people confirmed for the event. All that was needed was a little co-operation from Mother

Nature. However, that was not part of her plan. At 3pm on July 8th, a mere 18 hours before the start of the picnic, the sky above Toronto grew dark and the rain began to fall. No one could imagine the forthcoming destruction. Back at TPFFA headquarters, questions began to surface about the fate of the picnic and whether it was prudent to issue a cancellation notice, given the state of emergency the city was facing. The decision was made to move forward, knowing that the membership was counting on us to fulfill the promise of a fun-filled family event. At 7am on July 9th, driving a TFS cube van and Box 12 packed to the roof with supplies and equipment, members of the TPFFA Executive Board and numerous volunteers left the ferry docks for Olympic Island. Lake Ontario had been turned into a bubbling mess of tree branches and debris from the carnage of the previous night. The Island did not fair much better as it was saturated by the evening downpour and had become a giant puddle. Alas, a small patch of elevated ground was discovered, large enough to hold all of the inflatable bouncers, slides and obstacle courses. Quickly the area was transformed into a close-quarters picnic

area, reminiscent of a small country fair. Inflatables were located on the east side, close to the bathroom facilities. Food, including popcorn, candyfloss, freezies (still frozen), and lots of water was situated at the west end, near the registration table. The face painting and airbrush tattoo stations were on the south side near the puppet theatre. A small, puddle-less strip of land was discovered that would be suitable to host the races and skill competitions. The shoe toss, wheel barrow race and watermelon eating contests would all have sufficient space to continue. Despite the devastation of the previous night, a surprisingly upbeat picnic with a full agenda of activities, attractions and refreshments was delivered to the membership. The reduced profile of the workable terrain made for a more intimate event (no children were lost) that was thoroughly enjoyed by the almost 500 members and their families who attended. Thank you to the Executive Officers, volunteers and TPFFA members and their families who made this event special, despite the flooding that incapacitated much of the city.

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BY JULIE FROST, EVENTS CO-ORDINATOR

T

he 84th Annual Pre-Gala and OffDuty/Media Awards reception and luncheon was held on April 12, 2013, at the Sheraton Centre Toronto. This year, we were thrilled to have another member of the Global Toronto News Team, Antony Robart, as the Master of Ceremonies. Antony is a veteran reporter and video-journalist, who brings a wealth of experience with him as Anchor/Host of Global Toronto’s News at Noon. Highlights of Robart’s coverage with Global News include reporting live, on the ground from Haiti just a day after the January 2010 earthquake. Antony enjoyed working side-by-side with Toronto Fire Fighters on this relief mission. Everyone in attendance enjoyed Antony’s humour and stories, as he helped TPFFA recognize and honour our media friends and fire fighters at this year’s Off-Duty and Media Awards Ceremony. On behalf of the Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association, Thank you! One guest in particular caused quite a frenzy, as everyone wanted their picture taken with him. Known for his trademark overalls and construction boots…and his slogan, “Make it right,” was none other than the beloved Mike Holmes. Mike and his crew stepped up to get involved, along with Ward 13 Councillor Sarah Doucette and other local businesses and members of the community, in the rebuilding of the Jamie Bell playground structure in High 36

Park, which was completely destroyed by a fire set by vandals. The TPFFA is grateful to Mike Holmes and all of his crew for their recognition of Toronto’s Fire Fighters on this project. Mike’s acknowledgment and coverage of the valuable contribution of fire fighters in their community on an episode of “Holmes Makes It Right,” makes him a worthy recipient of the Glen Cole Award. We would also like to thank Mike for his patience while having his picture taken with over 100 guests. (smile!) Mike Holmes was not the only celebrity we had the privilege of recognizing at this year’s Media Awards Ceremony. We were thrilled to acknowledge the presence of Gord Martineau, Anchor for CityNews, who received the Best Opinion Story for a piece on fire fighter labour issues. As well, from Global News, Beatrice Politi and Kathlene Calahan who aired the heartbreaking story of the death of Peter Czulinski, our brother, who was a 45-year-old fire fighter that lost his battle with what we believe is a job related cancer. Their story drives home the prevalence of silent killers that haunt many fire fighters, and the need for additional cancers to be added to the current presumptive legislation, in order to protect fire fighters’ surviving families. Fire fighters are respected members of their communities and are always first to respond in a time of need whether on or off-duty. This year, it was an honour to

recognize our members who, during the past year, rescued, provided aid or enhanced improvement to their community and fellow citizens. At this year’s Off-Duty Awards Ceremony, Constable Jeff Blair and his family were in attendance to thank and express their gratitude as fire fighter Mike Salb received the Ben Bonser Award. While at home, Mike heard gunshots and quickly called 9-1-1. Mike then quickly provided first aid to Constable Jeff Blair by applying pressure to the officer’s serious wound. Mike helped stabilize the officer until help arrived. This same evening, the Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association hosted our annual Fire Fighter’s Gala at the Sheraton Osgoode Ballroom. For the second year in a row, we were thrilled to have the George Lake Big Band, consisting of its 20-piece band (including our very own Chris Burrell on drums) that attracted dancers of all ages. Their unique mixture of music had the crowd spinning, swaying and swinging to the timeless sounds of this Big Band. Once again, the money raised from the ticket sales will go toward the numerous Toronto Charities that TPFFA is proud to support each year. This includes MD Canada, Sunnybrook Hospital, Variety Village, Toronto Food Banks and Camp Bucko - Burn Camp for Kids in Ontario. We would also like to thank our ticket sellers, Bill Monson and Charlie Mahoney, for their tireless efforts in reaching out to local business within Toronto. S U M M E R 2 0 1 3 | F I R E WAT CH 36


LOCAL 3888’s 2012 OFF-DUTY AWARDS BOX 12 AWARD This award is presented annually to an individual or individuals who have gone above and beyond the call of duty in a voluntary capacity for the direct betterment of Local 3888 members. This may be exemplified by a single significant contribution or by continued extraordinary work. The spirit of this award is to recognize outstanding service and volunteerism, as demonstrated by the Box 12 Association.

Winners: Captain Peter Ross and Captain Stewart Dey Peter Ross and Stewart Dey have gone above and beyond in their quest to help preserve a unique piece of Toronto Fire History. For more than three years, these two men have been working tirelessly to restore a 1939 Ford LaFrance fire engine that was formerly in service on Toronto Island. Their hard work turned a broken down truck into what will be a parade and display showstopper for a multitude of purposes; none more important than that of keeping the history of Toronto Fire Services alive for everyone to enjoy.

BARRY WHITE AWARD This is the second year the Barry White Award is being presented. This Award will be presented annually to the Volunteer/Volunteers of Box 12 or Support 7 for their outstanding & dedicated service to Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association members at emergency calls.

Winner: John Skillen - Box 12 John has been a Fire Buff all of his life. John joined Box 12 in 1994 and has been an active member since. Even to this day, he still does most of the daytime runs and many of the nighttime runs as well. John is a very gentle, laid back soul with a wicked sense of humor. At the end of most runs, when the cleanup was done, John would always say, “Good enough for government work.” Congratulations John, you have been nominated by all of your peers.

THE AL PEARSALL AWARD Awarded to the Local 3888 member(s) who contributed time and ability toward the improvement of his/her/their Community and Fellow Man, while “off-duty”

Winner: Greg Schultz When the children’s playground at

High Park was destroyed by fire in 2012, Fire Fighter Greg Schultz, along with a group of community minded people, mobilized swiftly to rebuild that playground into something that not only highlighted the play area but shone light on the great community spirit of West End Toronto.

THE BERNARD “BEN” BONSER AWARD Awarded to the Local 3888 member(s) who, during the past year while “off-duty”, have distinguished himself/herself/themselves by making a rescue or being involved in saving the life of a fellow citizen in a hazardous or threatening situation.

Winner: Mike Salb Fire fighters go to work every day and save lives. Sometime the lives they save are put in peril as a result of a violent crime. Award recipient Mike Salb never expected to come face-to-face with violent crime and lifesaving action, especially while off-duty and in front of his own home. On April 15th, 2012, Mike was in his home when he heard a police officer yelling, “Stop! Police,” followed immediately by gunshots. Mike Salb looked out his window and saw an officer leaning against his cruiser. Mike called 9-1-1 and then, instead of staying in the safety of his own home, he ran outside to provide aid for the wounded officer. He helped Constable Jeff Blair secure his weapon, and then applied pressure to the officer’s very serious wounds. Mike helped stabilize the officer until help arrived. In a very dangerous and harrowing situation, Mike Salb put his personal safety aside in order to help. No one appreciated this more than Constable Blair, who recovered fully, and stated quite simply, “If it wasn’t for Mike, I wouldn’t be here.”

ROY SILVER AWARD Awarded to the Local 3888 member(s), who during the past year, while “off-duty,” has distinguished himself/herself/themselves by performing first aid or CPR on or for a fellow citizen.

Winner: Jim Trenholm On January 12, 2012 Fred Jandrasits was out walking his dogs on a trail in wooded parkland in Pickering when he slipped and injured his leg. In sub-zero temperatures with heavy snow and freezing rain, unable to bear any weight on his leg, he attempted to crawl out. Fred called for assistance and “off-duty” fire fighter, Jim Trenholm, came to his aid. Jim accessed the situation and determined that evacuation was the best course of action. Jim carried Fred out of the woods on his back and transported him to hospital. Fred’s leg was cast and with rehabilitation, is well on his way to a full recovery.

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The Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association has sponsored the annual TPFFA Media Awards since 1949. The purpose of these awards is to honour journalists who produce unusual and dramatic coverage of the exceptional work that Toronto Fire Fighters perform on a daily basis. The judges for the competition this year were: • Ken Mallett - A veteran print and television journalist and the former news director of Global TV News. • Norm Betts - A distinguished news photographer with decades of experience and himself the winner of several TPFFA Media Awards • Bill Dampier - A former police reporter for the Toronto Telegram and the winner of a National Newspaper Award as a writer for the Toronto Star. • Judge Emeritus: Bob Johnstone - A retired national reporter for CBC radio and television, and a former police reporter for the Toronto Star.

Here are the winners of the 2012 Toronto Professional Fire Fighters’ Association Media Awards:

GLEN COLE AWARD Glen Cole was a long-time Chief Assignment Editor for City pulse News, who was dedicated to highlighting Toronto’s Emergency Services in the critical roles they played across the city, whether on an emergency scene, assisting the public or working within their community. Glen’s dedication to showing Toronto’s emergency workers’ positive contributions to our city earned him the respect of police officers, fire fighters and EMS workers. Glen Cole passed away in 1990 but his dedication to Toronto’s Emergency Services continues to be recognized. The Glen Cole Award was created by the former Toronto Fire Fighters’ Association prior to the amalgamation of the city of Toronto and is now presented by the TPFFA to an individual or group who, through their work in televised media, continue to shine the spotlight on the many positive contributions of Toronto Fire Fighters in their community every day.

Winner: Mike Holmes Mike Holmes is a professional contractor and the host and creator of Holmes on Homes, Holmes Inspection and Holmes Makes It Right. He has been named the “Second Most Trusted Canadian” by Reader’s Digest and “Third Most Trustworthy Celebrity” by Forbes. Through his company, The Holmes Group, Mike leads an international brand with operations in independent media production, new home building and home inspection, as well as expansion into product development. It is entirely owned by Mike Holmes and is responsible for developing and managing all HOLMES branded entities, including HOLMES Homes, MIKE HOLMES Inspections, HOLMES Work wear, Make It Right Releasing Inc. and The Holmes Foundation. For more information on Mike Holmes please visit makeitright.ca.

BEST PRINT ARTICLE, CIRCULATION OVER 100,000 Winner: Laura Stone, Toronto Star They are the worst words fire fighters can hear at an emergency scene: “Mayday, Mayday, Mayday, fire fighter down.” That’s what happened when Toronto Fire Captain, Kevin Aucoin, fell through a floor directly into the fire in 2012. Toronto Star writer Laura Stone did a tremendous job of capturing the tense moments of that terrifying day at a warehouse fire in downtown Toronto and the teamwork that went into saving Captain Aucoin in the horrifying minutes following his Mayday call. Laura gave us a great glimpse into the inner workings of fire teams in the scariest moments of their jobs. 38

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BEST PRINT ARTICLE, CIRCULATION UNDER 100,000 Winner: Adam Giambrone, Now Magazine There are a surprisingly large number of people that actually have very little understanding of how wide-ranging the service is that Toronto Fire Fighters provide. Likewise, not everyone understands the logistics behind the operation of a major fire service. In his Now Magazine article, Adam Giambrone does an excellent job of diving a little deeper into how Toronto Fire operates, and sheds some light on some of the misunderstood concepts of big city fire fighting. Adam discusses how, quite often, the stroke of a budget cutting pen may not reflect the real needs of the fire service, and the importance of maintaining proper staffing should never be balanced on a ledger sheet when it affects real lives every single day.

BEST PHOTO, CIRCULATION OVER 100K FIRE Winner: Victor Biro There is something about a fire that draws your attention. Crowds gather on fire scenes, watching in awe at the terrible power of flames. However, all of those people walk away and then attempt in futility to describe what they saw. Words cannot do justice to what the eye beholds, yet Victor Biro has harnessed the ability to capture with his lens, the horrible beauty of the fire scene. We throw around the term photojournalist to describe those with the talent to tell a story with their photos, but time and time again, Victor has transcended from photojournalist to true artist. At dozens of different scenes, he composes photos that are both deep in beauty and steeped in reality. To pick one would be a disservice. To see them all is a must.

BEST PHOTO, CIRCULATION OVER 1OOK RESCUE Winner: Rick Madonik, Toronto Star There are few moments from 2012 that are more chilling than the horrifying Eaton Centre shooting that occurred in June. Of all the images captured on the day, the most dramatic was Rick Madonik’s photo that ran on the front page of the Toronto Star. The photo brought to life the terrifying urgency of that moment. Two fire fighters, one of them breathing for a critically injured victim, along with police and EMS running out of the Eaton Centre, trying desperately to get the victim to the hospital. In the background, disbelieving bystanders line the path, watching in horror as the drama unfolds. It’s a brilliantly composed portrait of a moment we’d rather forget.

BEST FIREWATCH ARTICLE Winner: Patrick Hayter As hard as the Fire Service tries to honour its history, it is sometimes hard to bring that history to life. However, Toronto Fire Fighter, Patrick Hayter, found an amazing way to bring a piece of our past to life. In the old days of the TFD, aerial ladders had TWO drivers: one in the front, and one on the very back. That rear driver was called a Tillerman. Pat tracked down the last of the TFD Tillerman, retired Captain, Murray Fenton. Murray’s story and Pat’s background and interview, made for a wonderful look into the storied past of the Fire Department in Toronto.

BEST PHOTO BY A FIRE FIGHTER Winner: Keith Hamilton Fire fighters, as a rule, do their jobs because they love doing it. Helping others, doing a proud civic service, and being part of a long and storied history, are all parts of every fire fighter’s makeup. Another part of the job is a somber one: paying respect to those, past and present, that make the ultimate sacrifice and give their lives in the line of duty. Keith Hamilton, a member of Toronto Fire Services, perfectly freezes one of those somber moments with his fine camera work. A lone fire fighter, standing vigil in front of the fallen fire fighter’s memorial, reminding us all that when called, all are willing to pay the ultimate sacrifice in order to protect the people of Toronto. S U M M E R 2 0 1 3 | F I R E WAT CH 39


TPFFA Media Awards...Continued from page 39

BEST NEWS STORY, BROADCAST Winner: : Beatrice Politi and Kathlene Calahan, Global News It’s a fact of life in the fire service: fire fighters die on the job. However, while most of the public would imagine that fires would be the cause of most deaths, the sad truth is that cancer is a much deadlier foe for those that fight fires for a living. Modern construction burns with hundreds of deadly toxins being emitted, and those toxins cause a multitude of cancers that are much more prevalent in fire fighters. Reporter Beatrice Politi and Producer Kathlene Calahan did an amazing job of bringing us the heartbreaking story of the Line of Duty Death of Peter Czulinksi, a 45-year-old fire fighter struck down by job-related cancer.

BEST OPINION STORY ON FIRE FIGHTER LABOUR ISSUES Winner: : Gord Martineau, Reporter; Karen Pinker, Director; and Gordon Henderson, Producer CityTV This 2012 story on labour relations in Ontario was an even, balanced piece that highlighted the ins and outs of unions in the province. Educating the public has always been a staple of Gord Martineau’s reporting.

BEST WEB BASED NEWS STORY Winner: : Jerry Lanton, Openfile.com Virtually everyone these days find the Internet a great source of information. However, not everyone puts the right amount of effort and research into online writing that is necessary. A good writer finds multiple sources, gathers quotes, searches statistics and does some legwork to make sure that their story is on the money. That’s exactly what Jerry Langton did with his story that raised the question, ‘Is fire fighting more dangerous than we thought?’ His story dug into the history of big chemical driven fires and the after effects on the crews that fight those fires.

BEST WEB BASED PHOTO Winner: : Jason Scott This photo of the accident scene on Wilson Avenue in October 2012, captures the importance of fire fighters responding immediately to traffic/transportation accidents. This call turned into a full auto extracation with a citizen trapped in their vehicle. This is why “Seconds Count!”

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}


AT TORONTO FIRE HALLS

B

Team 325

Team 312

Team 415

Jason Emond Rob Kular Pete Andrew John Evans

Patrick doyle Josh Chisholm Rob Langille Glenn Gaw Jamie Hoffman Dave Willats

Tony Giguere David Bulata Paul Versace

ecause heart disease is the leading cause of death among firefighters, we recently teamed up with Beachbody and the Heart and Stroke Foundation for the Insanity Firefighter Challenge. The Challenge: complete the famously hard 60-day Insanity DVD workout program to get in heart healthy shape, while helping raise money for Heart and Stroke. Insanity is a total body-conditioning program, which flips traditional interval training on its head - having you perform long bursts of maximumintensity exercises with short periods of rest. The result: you burn up to 1,000 calories in just one hour. Fire halls 325, 312 and 415 were brave enough to take on the gruelling six-day a week Insanity workout program and had incredible results that have helped them on the job.

“The Insanity workout is a lot like fire fighting,” said fire hall 325 team captain, Jason Emond. “You go from zero activity to a maximum workout and then back to zero. That’s basically our job. You’re waiting for a call, then you get one and you have to be fully ready as soon as you get that call. Sometimes, you have to go up ten flights of stairs carrying all your gear and by the time you get there, you can be exhausted. The problem is, once you climb those ten flights of stairs, that’s when the job really starts.” Beachbody Master Trainer Felicia Taub volunteered to coach the teams and 325 took her up on her offer. Taub had regular workout sessions with the Regent Park team, which were often paused when the fire alarm sounded. Taub was constantly amazed the interruptions didn’t discourage them from completing the workouts. When the guys got back to the station, “off went

the boots and on went the runners.” “Over the 60 days, 325 lost weight, but more importantly, they improved their job performance,” said Taub. “On one of our last trainings, they reported how much more energy, speed and strength they had because of their increased fitness level.” After her experience working out with 325, Taub wants to encourage more fire halls to get active with Insanity. “Firefighters put their health at risk for our city every time they go out on a call. Being in the best shape of your life will keep you safer on the job and decrease the risks of heart disease.” Congratulations to the fire hall teams for completing the challenge and helping raise $1,855 for the Heart and Stroke Foundation. These funds were matched by Beachbody and $3,710 will be donated to the Heart and Stroke Foundation toward the placement of an AED in the community. S U M M E R 2 0 1 3 | F I R E WAT CH 41


Fit to SURVIVE

Quick Steamed Fish Fillets with Potatoes and Asparagus This elegant supper for two is simplicity itself. The entire meal is prepared in a steamer and ready in 15 minutes.

Ingredients: • 3 cloves garlic, roughly chopped • 2 tbsp (25 mL) grated gingerroot • 1/2 tsp (2ml) salt • 1/2 cup (125 mL) chopped fresh cilantro • 2 tbsp (25 mL) olive oil • 1/2 tsp (2 mL) freshly ground black pepper • Grated zest of 2 limes • 6 salmon fillets 
(about 2 1/4 lbs/ 1.125 kg total)

Preparation: 1. Using a mortar and pestle (or a food processor), crush garlic, ginger and salt to form a paste. Stir in cilantro, olive oil, pepper and lime zest. 2. Place salmon on a plate and coat top evenly with paste. Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or for up to 2 hours. Preheat broiler, with rack set 4 inches (10 cm) from the top. 3. Transfer salmon to prepared baking sheet and broil for 7 to 10 minutes or until salmon is opaque and flakes easily with a fork.

Nutrients per serving: • Calories: 189 • Protein: 25 g • Fat: 3.0 g • Carbohydrates: 16 g • Saturated fat: 1.4 g • Sodium: 106 mg • Fiber: 5 g

1 to 2 tsp (5 to Tip: Substitute 10 mL) of your favorite fresh herbs for the dried herbs. If asparagus is out of season, use fresh green beans instead.

Very high in: niacin, vitamin B6, folacin, vitamin B12, magnesium.
 High in: vitamin C, thiamine, iron.
Source of: vitamin A, riboflavin, pantothenic acid, calcium, zinc, fiber. 42

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Recipe courtesy of Simply Great Food. Dietitians of Canada.

The fire fighter’s guide to health and nutrition


5

TIPS FOR RUNNING

Re-printed with the permission of Sunnybrook Foundation, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

#1: S TART WITH THE BASICS

#4: CLOTHING AND FOOTWEAR

• If you’re just learning to run, start by using intervals. Try two minutes running, one minute walking. Gradually increase the number of minutes spent running. • Run two times per week with at least one day of rest in between. • Work towards adding one more run per week, up to a maximum of five runs per week.

• Wear comfortable, supportive running shoes. Make sure the soles are not worn out. Walk in new shoes for 1-2 weeks prior to using them for running. Talk to the staff at your local running store — they can recommend the best footwear for your specific needs.
 • Wear bright, reflective clothing if running on the road or at night. • Wear layers in cooler weather to help you stay warm and dry.

#2: STAY HYDRATED • Hydrate pre- and post-run, or bring water with you if you’re running a long distance. Dehydration can lead to premature fatigue.
 • Avoid running during the hottest part of the day. (And always wear sunscreen!)

#3: F  IND YOUR MOTIVATION • Find a running buddy. Set dates one week in advance so you don’t run out of time to exercise. • Join a learn-to-run club. Your local Running Room offers a learn-to-run program and has free sessions available throughout the week.
 • Check out MapMyRun, a free website that allows you to calculate the distance of your runs. Plus you can save each run to your profile, so you can track your progress.

#5: NUTRITION • Eat something small about an hour before running. You don’t want to be trying to digest a big meal while you’re running, but you also don’t want to be running on empty! • For runs longer than 10 km, have a sufficient meal the night before and try experimenting with different types of nutrition during your run. This could include gels, chews and water additives that replenish your electrolytes, and refuel you with simple carbohydrates to keep you going.

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3888 RECENT HAPPENINGS

Welcome to our 41 newest recruits who began their training at the Eastern Avenue Fire Academy on Tuesday August 6th. Jn alphabetical order by last name: Ronald Bahen, Dan Bellamy, Bryan Bouchard, Jeffrey Brydges, Michael Burgoyne, Christopher Chaktsiris, Stephen Coda, Brent Cossitt, Phillip DeWolf, S haron Dillon, Mike Dinsmore, Adam Doerner, Ryan Evers, Nathan Finucci, Scott Fitzpatrick, Matthew Fortier, Mark Gallo, Jesse Gray, David Grixti, Michael Grossi, Kevin Heacock, Mike Henderson, Mitchell Hill, Greg Jones, James Kennedy, Paul King, Dan Lacourciere, Harry Locke, Christopher Love, Adam Lychak, Andrew McGeorge, Kevin McKay, Aubrey Oldham, Sylvia Pranaitis, Joshua Sarta, Jamie Sloboda, Steve Sotiropoulos, Josh Stringer, Lincoln Tyler, Matthew van Warmerdam, Bryan Walker, Jonathan Wonch. Brent Foster Memorial Ride Approximately 25 Toronto Fire Fighters attended the Brent Foster Memorial “Ride to Remember,” on July 31, 2013. Approximately $11,000 was raised for The Bereaved Families of Ontario (Durham Region).

Several Local 3888 members volunteered their time on August 24, 2013, to hand out water during the 4th Annual Toronto Women’s 10k/5k.

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Local 3888 members Paul Garber, Kurt Poyhonen, Rashid Rawdat and Yehhia (Bub) Ahmed participate in the Danforth Bed Races on August 9, 2013.

Many Local 3888 members proudly participated in the annual Labour Day Parade in downtown Toronto on Monday September 2, 2013.

Alan Louthe, Chairman of the St. Patrick’s Day Parade Society presents Mike Ogle, Ed Kennedy and Damien Walsh with a certifica te of appreciation for our participatio n in the 2013 St. Patrick’s Day Parade .

Open Toronto Fire Fighters held several 6, 415, (42 s ion stat ous House events at vari out the ugh thro ) 315 , 115 215, 321, 227, 133, out turn The ust. Aug of th city during the mon dy, can on cott of lots was was great and there kids the to out ded han m popcorn and ice crea ty safe Fire ). ired des so (and adults too, if they e wer ns stio que and ted ribu information was dist y nce to spra answered. The kids also had a cha just have a and es hos fire some water from the fighters in good time interacting with the fire ryone who eve to you nk their community. Tha ted! visi and ated volunteered, particip

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2013 UPCOMING EVENTS LOCATION

IAFF Fallen Firefighter Memorial Colorado Springs, CO

Sept. 23, Monday Day (0930 Hrs) 3888 General Union Meeting

RCL Br. 527 948 Sheppard Ave. W.

Sept. 24, Tuesday Night (1900 Hrs) 3888 General Union Meeting

RCL Br. 527 948 Sheppard Ave. W.

Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013

Fire Prevention Week Main Event TO Fire Academy 930-1530

Sunday, Oct. 6, 2013

Ontario Firefighter Memorial

Toronto

October 7 - 10, 2013

Fire Prevention Open houses

Various stations in Toronto

Oct. 7 - 10, 2013

OPFFA Fall Seminar

Niagara Falls

Nov. 25 - 28

OPFFA Legislative Conference

Toronto

Saturday Nov. 30, 2013

3888 Children's Christmas Party Variety Village

*DATES AND TIMES

NOV.

OCTOBER

SEPT.

Sept. 21, 2013

EVENT

Olga Grigoriev Vice-President

50 Rossdean Drive Toronto, ON M9L 2S1 olgagrigoriev@trinityroofingltd.com www.trinityroofingltd.com

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SUBJECT TO CHANGE

*DATE/TIME

Tel: 416-630-9213 Fax: 416-630-1722 Cell: 647-219-7437 Toll free: 1-866-559-0552

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Fire Watch (Summer 2013)