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INside R E A DE R ’S POLL From food trucks to thrift stores, Local iQ readers recently voted on the best of everything the Duke City has to offer

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PUBLISHER

Francine Maher Hopper fran@local-iQ.com ASSOC. PUBLISHER/ART DIRECTOR

Kevin Hopper

kevin@local-iQ.com EDITOR

Mike English mike@local-iQ.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Chela Gurnee 505.264.6350, chela@local-iQ.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Derek Hanley 505.709.0364 derek@local-iQ.com

F OOD

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

The innovative pursuits of stalwart Albuquerque chef Jennifer James doesn’t stop in the kitchen

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M A R QUE E

Colleen Dugle colleen@local-iQ.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Jaime Gutierrez jaime@local-iQ.com AD PRODUCTION MANAGER

Jessica Hicks jessica@local-iQ.com

AD PRODUCTION ASSISTANT

Nathan New

nathan@local-iQ.com EXEC. ASSISTANT/CALENDAR COORDINATOR

Derek Hanley 505.709.0364 derek@local-iQ.com PHOTOGRAPHER

Festival celebrates the fellowship and fondness people feel for coffee and chocolate

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Wes Naman wes@local-iQ.com PHOTO ASSISTANT

Joy Godfrey joy@local-iQ.com PROOFREADER

Kayla Sawyer EDITORIAL INTERNS

Todd Rohde, Shari Taylor PHOTO INTERN

Carissa Simmons

ON THE COVER

M USI C James Douglas Show reaches 10th year as a band, releases new record, 9

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CONTRIBUTORS

A R TS Traveling production of West Side Story gets a modest present-day makeover

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CA LE N DA R S Arts Events............................................................................................32 Books Events....................................................................................... 40 Community Events............................................................................ 40 Live Music..............................................................................................29

COLUM N S 1+1=3........................................................................................................... 9 First Bite................................................................................................... 8 Get A Job.............................................................................................. 40 Paw Prints...............................................................................................12 Stir It Up................................................................................................. 10 Soundboard...........................................................................................28

F E AT UR E S Books.......................................................................................................36 Crossword/Horoscope..................................................................... 40 Film...........................................................................................................38 The Intelligence Report...................................................................... 5 Marquee.................................................................................................... 6 Sports........................................................................................................ 7 Places To Be............................................................................................ 4 Smart Arts..............................................................................................35 Smart Music............................................................................................31

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

PHOTO BY WES NAMAN

Smart List “Best Tattoo Artist” Chris Partain (right) and Runner-up Jason Ward (left), both of Star Tattoo.

EDITORIAL Hakim Bellamy Jeff Berg Charlie Crago Justin De La Rosa Marisa Demarco Matt Edwards Eric Francis Eric Garcia Kate Gerwin Justin Goodrum Jim and Linda Theresa Maher Sam Melada Kyle Mullin Bill Nevins Cristina Olds

Susan Reaber Ross Scharf Carissa Simmons Steven J. Westman Margaret Wright DISTRIBUTION Miguel Apodaca Kristina De Santiago Kurt Laffan David Leeder Susan Lemme Cassie Martinez Shawn Morris Andy Otterstrom CFC Distributech Targeted Distribution

Local iQ

P.O. Box 7490, ABQ., N.M. 87194 OFFICE 505.247.1343, FAX 888.520.9711 • local-iQ.com SUBSCRIPTIONS are $10 for 6 bi-weekly issues within the Continental U.S. Please send a local check or money order payable to Local iQ, attention “Subscriptions” to the address above. You may also use the number above to place a credit card order. DISTRIBUTION: Find Local iQ at more than 600 locations in Albuquerque, Santa Fe and surrounding areas. If you can’t find a copy, want to suggest a new location, or want to help deliver Local iQ, please call 505.247.1343.

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SAKURA, INC. ALL CONTENTS ©2012 LEGAL SERVICES PROVIDED BY ALLISON AND FISHER


LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

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PLACES TO BE

$18-$103 Tickets: unmtickets.com

$15-$18

pbr.com

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SPORTS Selection Sunday 6p, Sun., Mar. 17

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ver the last few years, the UNM men’s basketball team has been one of the most consistently dominant teams in the Mountain West Conference. That’s no different this year. After clinching the conference championship — their third in four years under coach Steve Alford — and slowly climbing the ranks as one of the country’s best teams, the Lobos look to put together another impressive showing when they travel to Las Vegas, Nev., for the Mountain West Tournament as the number-one seed. The Lobos are guaranteed to play in the NCAA tournament, but their performance at the Mountain West Tournament will determine where they will be seeded for “the big dance.” Selection Sunday marks the beginning of March Madness. Almost anything can happen at this point — the Lobos could be as high as a number one seed (unlikely), a three seed or even lower. Be sure to tune in to find out the fate of our Lobos, then get ready for a wild ride. The 64-team tournament starts Mar. 19. —TR

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

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n a city with an excess of theatrical talent, Vivian Nesbitt stands out. She’s a thirdgeneration actor with theater and television credits that range from Shakespeare to Law and Order; she operates the Sol Acting Academy; and she and her husband John Dillon created and operate the nationally syndicated public radio show Art of the Song. Nesbitt wrote and stars in this onewoman play directed by Lee Kitts. It’s about her visit to Ireland in hopes of understanding the legacy of her great-great grandmother, an Irish poet known as “Eva of the Nation.” The journey bends time and place to reveal Nesbitt’s own identity through a series of transformational events, some funny, some touching, some profound. There will be a reception after the Saturday evening performance and a talk-back after the Sunday performance. —ME

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barkandtree.bpt.me

PERFORMANCE Nrityagram Dance Ensemble
 8p, Fri., Mar. 22
 Popejoy Hall
on the UNM campus, 505.277.3824


$20-$39
 Tickets: unmtickets.com
 popejoypresents.com
 nrityagram.org



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ndia is coming to the Duke City, and it is arriving in the form of the Nrityagram Dance Ensemble. With a blend of classical Indian forms and contemporary concepts, Nrityagram embodies the Indian spirit of dance that much of the world only sees watered down in Bollywood films. More than a simple group of performers, Nrityagram dancers live a lifestyle surrounding the philosophies and dream of the Odissi dance, a dance which has embraced the transformation of time while cherishing traditional techniques. Albuquerque is honored to experience the famously symmetrical and precisely patterned movements of the ensemble, as Nrityagram makes its way around the world to share a beautifully choreographed and costumed performance representing an ancient and evolving dance style and a philosophy of life. —ST

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f attending a Professional Bull Riders event is something that is on your bucket list, now is your chance to pull out the permanent marker and cross it out. The Ty Murray Invitational is returning to Albuquerque for the fifth consecutive year and is bringing with it a no-fear attitude, promising one of the wildest events in the Southwest. Between the pyrotechnics, bucking bulls and clowns, this is quite obviously the most intense, on-the-edgeof-your-seat event The Pit has to offer. For three grueling days, the top 35 bull riders on the planet will battle some of the fiercest beasts known to man. The event will feature last year’s winner, J.B. Mauney, who you can guarantee will be looking to recapture first place. If you won’t be able to make one of the three days, don’t panic. The event is always nationally televised. —TR

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indianpueblo.org



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The Pit 1414 University SE, 505.925.5858

The Cell Theater 700 1st NW, 505.766.9412

$6, $5.50 sen., $3 students/ kids


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PBR Ty Murray Invitational 8p, Fri., 7:30p; Sat., 2p, Sun., Mar., 22-24

The Bark and the Tree 7:30p, Sat., 3p; Sun., Mar. 16-17

Indian Pueblo Cultural Center
 2401 12th NW, 866.855.7902


n 2006, high school sophomore Phillip Marmolejo delved into his ancestral past and founded what is now known as the Laguna Corn Dancers. Hailing from Laguna Pueblo west of Albuquerque, the group is allowing outsiders an opportunity to observe a selection of its dances at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center. The group’s blend of traditional and contemporary dances — such as the Buffalo Dance, the Eagle Dance and the Corn Dance — are not typically considered performances. Rather, they are meant to be prayers and stories in which even the feathers and beads which the dancers wear serve a purpose beyond decoration. The Laguna Corn Dancers’ offering of a unique glimpse into New Mexico’s rich cultural history is an opportunity that is both an honor and a privilege. —ST

RODEO

THEATER

Laguna Corn Dancers
 Sat.-Sun., Noon, Mar. 16-17


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The where to go and what to do from March 14-27

FUNDRAISER Free to Breathe Bike Ride 8:30a, Sun., Mar, 24 National Hispanic Cultural Center 1701 4th SW, 505.246.2261

$15-$28 freetoBreathe.org

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his year, thousands of Albuquerque residents will come together on their bicycles, joining forces to help raise money and awareness for the treatment and research of lung cancer. Free To Breathe Albuquerque is proud to be hosting the second annual Free to Breathe Albuquerque Lung Cancer Bike Ride, with all proceeds benefitting the National Lung Cancer Partnership. One man responsible for helping bring the event back to Albuquerque is Arturo Olivas. In late 2011 Olivas was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer and was given less than a year to live. A year and a half later, he has far surpassed the doctors’ expectations and continues to fight cancer to this day. Not only is he winning, but he is also spreading hope to others impacted by the disease. If you’re passionate about creating public awareness of lung cancer and are unable to participate in the Bike Ride, you can also participate in National Walk Week and show your solidarity by walking around your neighborhood. —TR


NEWS ROUNDHOUSE 2013

Mo’ Money, Mo’ Problems? With three bills pending, legislation to raise minimum wage seems likely to make it to the desk of Gov. Martinez Relief for Servers and Small Towns

BY MARISA DEMARCO

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he 60-day legislative session should see a flurry of activity as lawmakers rush the last bills standing toward final votes before noon on Saturday, March 16. Check out NMCompass.com for updates from the finish line.

BY MARGARET WRIGHT

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NM COMPASS COORDINATES BY MARGARET WRIGHT Public Education Controversy Perhaps the most contentious issue of this year’s legislative session: the confirmation of Hanna Skandera, head of the state Public Education Department. She’s been a divisive figure from the start, serving for more than two years without official legislative approval of her title. Gov. Susana Martinez insists the reform initiatives Skandera is spearheading, such as A-F school letter grades and merit pay for educators, are urgently needed to improve New Mexico’s public school rankings. But her critics, including a large number of teachers, say they fear the changes are part of a broader effort to privatize public schools. Read more about the sparks that flew during the Senate’s committee hearing at bit.ly/SkanderaConfirmation. Women on the Frontlines: A Vet’s Perspective In January, the Pentagon announced 230,000 combat positions will be available to women as early as May. Albuquerque veteran Stacia King Sakya says that’s a good thing. “I’m excited for the women that are going into the military now,” she told Compass reporter Elise Kaplan. “It will give just more opportunities for someone to stretch themselves and grow.” The transition won’t be without complications, Sakya predicts. But she says it’s high time that female soldiers — many of them already fighting and dying in war zones — get their fair share of recognition and promotion opportunities. Find Kaplan’s full profile at bit. ly/VetWomenInCombat. Bosque Development Backtrack Albuquerque City Council members have handed down decisions with repercussions for the city’s riverfront, including a denial of plans for an embattled big-box retail development at the Coors/Montaño intersection. Also axed: funding for the bosque component of Mayor Richard Berry’s long-term planning effort. Find more of reporter Carolyn Carlson’s ongoing government coverage by clicking bit. ly/CompassBigBox. Still thirsty? Elizabeth Hughes breaks down the metro area water authority’s latest news at bit.ly/DryTimes. Water utility board member Rey Garduño called out Kirtland Air Force Base for “back-pedaling” measures to clean up jet fuel contamination of Albuquerque’s groundwater supply. Also check out details on a drought watch declaration, new penalties for wasteful watering, and special incentives for homeowners to aid in conservation efforts.

The Minimum Wage Battle Rep. Phillip Archuleta worked for the Department of Workforce Solutions for 20 years. His job was to handle cases where people weren’t getting paid their due, he said. “Anything to do with wage theft.” The Democrat from Las Cruces says during those two decades, he encountered folks who were working for tips but not making the state’s minimum of $7.50 an hour. “Some parts of the state might have customers that give high tips. Rural areas might not.” That’s why Archuleta proposed a statewide increase for tipped employees: HB 550 would raise the state’s minimum from $2.13 to $3.25 — but only if the employee’s tips don’t add up to $7.50 an hour. The measure was a smaller jump than Albuquerque’s January increase. With it, the hourly minimum hit $3.82 for tipped employees and $8.50 for everyone else. Owner of the Route 66 Malt Shop Eric Szeman refused to comply with the law. After city attorneys filed a lawsuit, Szeman changed his mind. Two other bills aimed to enact statewide standards similar to Albuquerque’s new wage ordinance. One sponsored by Sen. Richard Martinez (D-Española) was passed by the Senate in March. It raised the minimum to $8.50, except for businesses with fewer than 10 employees. Those workers would make $7.50.

Rep. Miguel Garcia (D-Albuquerque) proposed a joint resolution to increase wages every year in line with cost of living increases. Archuleta, who brought forth the measure for tip-earners, said he’d work hard to get his bill enacted. Though he hadn’t spoken with Gov. Susana Martinez about it as of press time, he said he assumed she would sign it. “There are thousands of waiters and waitresses hoping this goes through. It’s not political. It’s a necessity to make sure people are able to make a living.” Carol Wight, CEO of the New Mexico Restaurant Association, said she opposed all three bills. In a free market, the minimum wage goes up on its own, she said. “If my competition is paying a little more to get the good employees, I have to pay a little bit more.” When the wage is mandated by

MORE NEWS Local-iQ.com/news nmcompass.com

ILLUSTRATION BY ERIC GARCIA

government, it causes price hikes, too, Wight said. That affects people on a fixed income, like senior citizens, she added. “It’s been proven time and again: You cannot redistribute wealth or disincentivize employers, or you will have a state like New Mexico where employers are running for the hills.”

ext time you mosey up to the bar for a cocktail, don’t forget to tip your server. After all, he’s been shouldering heavy responsibility for ensuring you’re of legal drinking age. As of press time, state law says if a liquor license owner or any of their employees “knows or has reason to know” that they’re selling booze to someone under 21 years old, the server and license owner can be charged with a fourth-degree felony. SB 259, aimed at easing that penalty, made it through the Senate on Feb. 13. If passed by the House and signed into law, the bill would step penalties for a first-time service-to-aminor offense down to a misdemeanor. J. Dee Dennis, Jr., superintendent of the Regulation and Licensing Department, said his office watched the bill closely because it also required shorter renewal periods for alcohol servers’ permits. Trimming the permit lifespans from five to three years, said Dennis, would make it easier for servers to stay on top of changing liquor laws. “We anticipate that it will make it all the way through the House and get to the governor’s desk,” said Dennis. Other liquor-centric provisions were weighed this session. Because of New Mexico’s cap on the number of liquor licenses issued statewide (only 1,411, based on 2010 population measurements), the cost of setting up a restaurant in rural areas is prohibitive. One license available in Clovis in January was priced at more than half a million dollars. Legislation like HB 413, carried by Yvette Herrell (R-Alamogordo), would help encourage new eateries to set up shop. “It’s really more of an economic development tool than anything else,” said Dennis.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

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MARQUEE

Banff Grand Prize winning film Crossing the Ice, which follows the adventures of two Australian adventurers will be one of many films screened at this year’s traveling Banff Mountain Film Festival,

Mountain high Banff Mountain Film Festival celebrates outdoors, raises funds for NM wilderness New Mexico’s one-of-a-kind climate allows for multitudes of outdoor activities. From ach fall in the brisk wilderness whitewater rafting in Taos, to climbing the of Alberta, Canada, thousands petroglyphs in the summer, to skiing Red of extreme sport enthusiasts, River in the winter, there is never a shortage filmmakers, authors and artists from of things to do in the great outdoors in the across the globe descend upon the town of Land of Enchantment. Because of that, you Banff for the annual Banff Mountain Film can expect a wide selection of films to be Festival. Inspiring creativity for the last 35shown at the film festival. plus years, and regarded as one of the most prestigious mountain film festivals around, Some documentaries to look forward to the Banff Mountain Film Festival showcases at this year’s Albuquerque festival at the many incredible mediums of art — most KiMo are Crossing the Ice, directed by Justin notably films — including a Jones. The film features two collection of the most inspiring adventurous hikers who take MARQUEE action, environmental and on the daring feat of traveling adventure documentaries. across Antarctica to the South Pole and back again, trying to Banff Then the show hits the become the first people to ever road, traveling to over 35 Mountain do so. countries and more than Film Festival 400 communities around Reel Rock 7: Honnold 3.0, the 7p, Mon.-Tue., Mar. the world, bringing with it 2012 Banff Mountain Film 18-19 its award winning films and Festival winner of best film, Lensic Performing documentaries to share with follows Alex Honnold, one Arts Center adventure and film junkies of the most fearless solo 211 W. San Franalike. That includes stops in rock climbers in the world, cisco, Santa Fe, Albuquerque and Santa Fe. as he prepares for his most 505.988.1234 daring task yet, conquering The unique film festival $16 ($28 two-day) the Yosemite triple. Other serves as a fundraiser for New ticketssantafe.org award-winning films to be Mexico Wilderness Alliance lensic.org featured at the Albuquerque and The Mountain Fund at its event include Petzl RocTrip 7p, Wed.-Thu., Mar. Albuquerque screenings, while 20-21 China, another film about the Santa Fe Conservation mountain climbing, as well as Trust and The Lensic benefit KiMo Theatre 423 Central NW, 1st Afghan Ski Challenge, a film from the Santa Fe showings. 505.768.3522 documenting the first-ever ski The festival made its first Duke races in the conflicted country. $20 City stop In 2000 and has been kimotickets.com coming every year since. While there’s some overlap with the Santa Fe screenings, Of the approximately 350 films other movies being shown entered into the Banff event during the two-day festival at each fall, roughly 25 films, or the Lensic include Flow Hunters, Ernest and two-and-a-half hours of footage, are chosen Mountains in Motion — allowing audience by a local select committee for viewing in members to experience everything from the towns like Albuquerque and Santa Fe, said depths of desert canyons to the frozen peaks Bryan Pletta of Stone Age Climbing Gym. of the wildest mountains. “Our Albuquerque sponsors Stone Age The event has become one of the highlights Climbing Gym, REI and NM Kayak of the year for New Mexico outdoor Instruction review film clips and audience enthusiasts, who have shown big support for feedback from previous shows to select a both the Albuquerque and Santa Fe events. diverse and interesting selection of films for our local showing of the tour,” said Pletta. “After paying our expenses to bring the films to Albuquerque and rental fees for “Films are also chosen based off of what is the venue, last year we were able to donate popular, or relevant among the community in which the festival is presenting,” he said. almost $2,500 to charity,” Pletta said. BY TODD ROHDE

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013


SPORTS

Not for the faint of heart Duke City Derby poised to popularize roller derby in New Mexico BY JUSTIN GOODRUM

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t’s a Saturday morning at the Heights Community Center basketball court and competitors are engaged in a physical practice. No, it’s not weekend warriors looking for another chance at glory. Instead it’s a group of roller skaters pushing, bumping and battling each other to prepare for the 2013 season of the Duke City Derby. While suiting up for a practice session, Vanessa “B Tona Brat” Valadez Anderson, who handles PR for the league, explained how having an athletic background doesn’t matter as long as participants put in the effort. “It’s for anybody. It’s for SPORTS any body type. We’ve got girls who come from Duke City athletic backgrounds to Roller Derby girls who have never done 3p, Sat., Mar. 23 anything athletic before,” Anderson explained. Heights Community Center Co-captain of the Muñecas 826 Buena Vista Muertas, Angela “Killer SE, 505.848.1334 Queen” Reece, got hooked FREE (donations after watching a friend at welcome) a local bout. Years later, Reece is a seven-year veteran who lives in Santa Fe and makes the commute to Albuquerque to pursue her passion. Despite her experience, Reece still gets excited when PHOTO BY WES NAMAN she recalls receiving her first pair of new Participants in the Duke City Roller Derby competition set for March 23 include (left to right) Jenni Higginbotham, Tracy Cross, Deana Brown, skates. Nichole Lusk, Amanda Speights and Mary Peifer. The sport, with its organized chaos and physical competition, has been experiencing a resurgence of popularity in the Southwest. “I remember when the skates that I personally bought came in the mail, it was popularity among fans and new skaters events,” said Anderson. back in Albuquerque, the Duke City Derby like Christmas and the best day ever,” said joining the sport around the country. Owner will produce a fundraiser on March 23rd at The league also holds fundraisers to help Reece. of Free Radicals Clothing, Nan Morningstar, the Heights Community Center spotlighting pay for their away bouts in cities like Dallas, To new fans roller derby may look like a saw an opportunity to bring the sport their junior team, The Marionettes, facing Tucson, Ariz., San Jose and Sacramento, sea of confusion, but instead it’s more like to New Mexico and brought the league Texas Junior Roller Derby and a mash-up Calif. March will be a big month for the organized chaos. Teams of two maneuver into existence. Morningstar’s impact still bout between New Mexico Red Chili vs. league as the Muñecas Muertas compete around a track filled with four members remains, as some of her first recruits still Green Chili. in the Clover Cup in Dallas. The same day called “blockers” and two assigned members compete for the league. called “jammers.” Teams score points when The league first held bouts at Midnight the jammer laps members of the opposing Rodeo and moved to the Santa Ana Star team after the first pass. Each bout has two Center before landing in its current home at 30-minute periods, with the team with the the Albuquerque Convention Center. most points awarded the victory. Now the Duke City Derby is comprised of While anyone can compete, roller derby Hobots, the Dooms Dames, the Santa Fe is a full-contact sport not for the faint of Disco Brawlers and the Taos Whiplashes heart. New skaters come to a “newbie who form an All-Star travel team, the practice” and get training to pass a basic Muñecas Muertas. The Muertas compete in skills test. After passing the test, skaters are the Women’s Flat Track Derby Association permitted to participate in league practices and have performed well at regional and scrimmages and wait to be drafted by a tournaments. team. Nichole “Nikki Nailer” Lusk played sports her entire life but was still nervous about strapping on the skates for the first time. “I was completely intimidated because the last time I was on skates I was 13. So it had been half my life. I was sore and I was nervous. Everyone was friendly but there’s that element of the unknown. But after that first practice it was great and it gradually got easier,” said Lusk. The sport has appeared in movies and television shows, but few realize the growing

While the league has experienced a solid fan following, getting publicity for the sport has been dependent on efforts by the participants to promote themselves. Without any sponsors, Facebook, Twitter and community outreach has been vital in gaining more exposure. “We really try to depend on social media because it doesn’t cost us any money. We really try to use that to our advantage. We get together in groups and flier; things from going to a local bar after practice to going to LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

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FOOD

FIRST BITE BY JUSTIN DE LA ROSA

Chasing cheeseburgers

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PHOTOS BY WES NAMAN

Renowned chef Jennifer James likes to focus on the basics, such as a single sea scallop served with bacon Brussels sprouts (left), or a first course of deviled eggs made with local mustard Lusty Monk (right). The concept has made her restaurant, Jennifer James 101, one of the top-tier eateries in the Southwest, and continues to be a favorite among local gourmands.

Dining ‘101’ The innovative pursuits of stalwart Albuquerque chef Jennifer James doesn’t stop in the kitchen BY KEVIN HOPPER

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ne of the hardest things in the world to do is climb Mount Everest, which a very good friend of mine just happens to be doing as I write this. A close second is running a successful restaurant. The key word here is successful. Not only do restauranteurs have to create a solid, consistent menu, hire and manage an equally consistent staff (one of the most difficult tasks in the industry) and have a business mind to balance the books, they have to market themselves in a way that keeps their eatery at the top of mind of diners. If you are an owner or a co-owner, “monumental” is a word I would use to best describe this effort. There are a number of local restaurants that do this well. Slate Street Cafe, Scalo and Zinc come to mind. But perhaps the most successful restaurant in terms of consistency across the board is Jennifer James 101. You’ve most likely heard of Ms. James as she has managed to accumulate a good amount of publicity over the years, particularly when her previous restaurant, Graze, held sway at the corner of Bryn Mawr and Central in Nob Hill. While it’s unfortunate that Graze is no longer James around, it came as a huge relief to local foodies when James decided to open JJ101 in 2008 — albeit after a sabbatical which was far too long for many to bear. James just also happens to be a 2012 James Beard Award semifinalist for “Best Chef: Southwest,” an award she is up for again this year — a clear sign that she is great at what she does. For what it’s worth, Local iQ readers voted James “Best Chef” in this year’s Smart List. The concept at 101 is basic, basic, basic, hence the name. And while it’s very true to form in each of the eight seasonal menus that switch out each year, somehow James and her partner Nelle Bauer (also a food columnist for Local iQ) elevate simple and spare ingredients to, well, Everest-like heights. Freshness is a big factor here, as is the manner in which each dish is prepared. Some dishes on the menu might have as few as three or four ingredients, but still grace the palate with a widerange of flavors. Simply fantastic, especially since diners get to watch the process unfold as the kitchen at JJ101 is wide-open.

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On a recent visit, my dining mate and I ate very well, so well that we couldn’t muster up our dessert stomachs (even Jennifer though Bauer made sure we left on a sweet note, serving us each a spoonful James 101 of ginger ice cream and caramel sauce). 4615 Menaul NE, Our setlist, so to speak, for the evening 505.884.3860 included a Lusty Monk-deviled egg HOURS: topped with pickled fennel (smooth and 5p-close, Tue.-Sat. silky with a sharp mustard pop), seared Reservations required sea scallops with crispy bacon, brussels Private dining available and brown butter (savory, rustic, earthy) jenniferjames101.com and harissa-roasted vegetables over couscous w/ yogurt, green chermoula and lime (deliciously spicy, fragrant, complex). The highlight of the meal was when Bauer treated us to a delightfully sinful serving of foie grois, the richness of which we each savored for as long as we could possibly manage. Easily one of the best meals I’ve had in a very long time. The other ingredient James and Bauer utilize in the restaurant’s successful strategy is untraditional marketing techniques. This includes maintaining a consistent (there’s that word again) email campaign that keeps 101 regulars informed on seasonal menu switches, one-of-a-kind themed dinners (there are many throughout the year) and special offers. Currently, JJ101 offers a three-course dinner every Thursday for $25 (in addition to their regular menu). Last week’s key ingredient was ginger — ginger carrot soup, spicy ginger cashew chicken and that delectable ginger ice cream. Other innovative ideas that make dining at 101 extremely accessible are $25 bottles of wine (five thoughtfully chosen labels to pick from), small-plate dinners reminiscent of the Graze style of dining and always providing gluten- and dairy-free options. James and Bauer definitely work hard, but as I watched them and their employees, it’s obvious that their work is a form of play. They have a passion for what they do and instill it at every turn. This is a shining example of how to have a successful restaurant, while creating a small insider community of gourmands who are equally as passionate about tasting the best food available at any given time. Hats off JJ.

PROFILE

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

heeseburgers have always been a fast-food staple. In a way, they have a bad reputation — like maybe they’re junk food, or incapable of being anything more than an arterial ailment. Lately, however, burgers have become better than ever and are even attracting adjectives like “gourmet” and “artisan” to describe their delectable differences. These descriptions can be intimidating to those who really only want a basic burger, but “basic” shouldn’t have to equate to “boring.” Luckily, there have been burger joints popping up over the past few years that provide Albuquerque with some seriously sumptuous burgers. The most recent addition to Burque’s burger restaurants is Freddy’s Frozen Custard & Steakburgers (6420 Paseo Del Norte NE, 505.796.9020). It may be part of a chain, but it offers a traditional, made-to-order burger that originated in Kansas, giving us a taste of something different than the southwestern burgers we are accustomed to. Another new joint in the Northeast Heights is Flamez (9821 Montgomery NE, 505.275.0522, flamezabq.com), which is also grilling up steak burgers. They don’t just stop at a traditional burger, though — you can order buffalo, lamb, salmon, turkey, or veggie (falafel) burgers. Fans of fromage will enjoy the options of cheeses ranging from American to a creamy Havarti. Nob Hill has plenty of great offerings for burgers. Nob Hill Bar & Grill’s (3128 Central SE, 505.266.4455, upscalejoint. com) Dirty Burger ($15/$19) is a monster of a burger, with queso, Kobe chili, frizzled onions, bacon, fried egg and beeronnaise. Monte Vista Fire Station’s (3201 Central NE, 505.255.2424, montevistafirestation.com) Lobo Burger is more of a challenge than a meal, as your typical GCCB is sandwiched between green chile grilled cheese sandwiches, and topped with bacon and baconwrapped jalapeños. Gecko’s (3500 Central SE, 505.262.1848, geckosbar.com) is good for burgers on a budget, with $5 cheeseburgers on Wednesdays after 6p. Nob Hill’s newest restaurant considers itself a burger bistro. B2B Bistronomy (3118 Central SE, 505.262.2222, bistronomyb2b.com) opened at the end of last year, and serves up 1/3-pound burgers that are built with lush toppings, like the Pierre ($9) with gruyere, wild mushrooms, and a demi glace or the Nawlins ($9) with crumbled blue cheese sauce and a black and blue cajun rub. Pair any of their burgers with pint of local brew — they have 33 beers to choose from. A last suggestion for chasing cheeseburgers is Rustic Food Truck. It’s not just street meat, their burgers can compete with any other restaurant around town. Follow them on Facebook to find out where they’ll be during the week. First Bite is a look at what’s happening in Albuquerque’s restaurants and breweries. Justin De La Rosa can be reached at justin@local-iQ.com.


DRINK

Be a wine smarty at your next dinner party

Land of the freestyle

Not long ago, I invited a small group of people over to my house for a finger-food potluck. I wanted people to mingle who hadn’t met before or were separated from each other by one degree. As with the people, I wanted the food and wine to mingle comfortably, even if they hadn’t officially been introduced before. Nothing would be too controlled or predetermined. I knew there would be everything from stuffed mushrooms, jerk pork tenderloin and short rib lasagna with porcinis to a cheese, olive and pickle plate. Then I found out that an incredible boudin blanc terrine with a cherry compote was on its way. … The flavors of the food ranged from pungent and spicy to earthy and savory with a little sweet lurking around in the glazes. It was time to test the most reliable grapes with this smorgasbord: Riesling and Pinot Noir. No formalized pairing, just a glass in one hand and fork in the other.

The company you keep

Riesling is the most food-friendly grape of all, but most exciting when you let it bring a few of its friends along to your party. Just as I made new friends among the people that came with my formally invited guests, you should make friends with the grapes that hang out with Riesling: Gewürztraminer, Pinot Blanc or Sylvaner. Theses grapes are often used in the Alsace region of France. The wines are slightly sweet or “off-dry,” but with spicy Jamaican Jerk

Pork, or savory preparations with fruit, you will be amazed at the flavors you experience. This is your smart pick for any fare, especially with warm weather coming and grills getting dusted off and readied for cookouts. The “Gentil” from winemaker Hugel is a great introduction (available at Jubilation for around $17/bottle), or try anything from winemaker Trimbach. “Gentil” has all the noble grapes of Alsace in it and is well balanced between sweet and dry. If you want to meet the grapes on their own, try Pinot Gris from Willamette Valley Vineyards at $18/bottle, or Benton Lane for a little more. Oregon’s cool climate yields great Pinot Gris, and this is a great place to start if you want a dry but food friendly white. Willing to try a Riesling on it’s own from Germany? Look for the word Kabinett on the label and the wine will be on the drier side with light crisp acidity and low alcohol; perfect for spicier pot-luck fare. Treat yourself for $10 to a bottle from winemaker Fritz Zimmer at Jubilation, or ask one of their knowledgeable staff to point you in the right direction.

Earth … the final frontier

Though some people only like giant Cabernets and Zins (and some people can only hear music if it’s really loud), your smartest choice for red wine at a potluck is Pinot Noir. While you could spend eternity exploring the earth and minerals that balance with fruit and tobacco in great Pinot, you no longer have to break your piggy bank to get started. Begin with something like the Chime “California” Pinot Noir at Jubilation or Quarters for $13/bottle. It’s not the best to pair with spicy dishes, but with the mixed wild mushroom soup with fresh thyme, the lasagna and the boudin blanc it was stellar. Pinot Noir is grown all over the world but the places to

PHOTO BY WES NAMAN

S

ometimes being smart is about good critical thinking skills or analysis. Sometimes it’s about not having to think at all before making the best choice. This month I am going to give you the short answer to the question, “What should I bring to that dinner party?” I have devoted the last couple years to enriching your basic knowledge of what to cook or order at a restaurant and what to drink alongside it, but what to do if you’re not the one cooking? What if it’s going to be a potluck and 20 people are invited? They’re gluten free, vegan, vegetarian and then there’s the one who is going to do pork five different ways (you know who you are). Red or white, here’s a smart way to go …

look for are the cooler climates like Oregon and Northern California, or New Zealand. Some of the most expensive wine in the world is made from Pinot Noir in the Burgundy region of France, but they make plenty of affordable wine too. Pinot Noir excels for potlucks because it has herbal, earthy notes for ingredients like mushrooms or beets, dried and fresh fruit notes for chutney or compotes, and minerals and smoke for grilled meat or fish (especially salmon). My only word of warning is don’t go

below about $12 to $15 a bottle: no Smoking Loon, no Yellow Tail. The grape requires love and care to grow and is stripped of its essential beauty when mass produced. As always I welcome your feedback and questions at sam@local-iQ.com. Cheers! A self-described “wine optimist,” monthly wine columnist Sam Melada spent 15 years working with food and wine. He spends his free time chasing perfect pairings around his kitchen and cellar.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

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DRINK

Try a brandy milk punch for a not-so-Bloody Mary morning

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will never forget my very first milk punch, unlike my first tequila shot, which I honestly couldn’t tell you when or where it took place. This was a memorable experience, not only because I was sitting amongst some of the best pals a girl could ever ask for, but because I was enjoying a leisurely brunch of beignets in New Orleans with a backdrop of soulful live jazz, searching for a bit of a “hair of the dog” cure to the previous evening’s shenanigans. New Orleans is a cocktail geek’s Mecca, home to the Sazarac, Ramos Gin Fizz, Brandy Crusta, the Hurricane and more of my classic cocktails. The town is also accredited for the revival of the milk punch, a cocktail that dates back to the 1600s. Believed to have been originated in medieval Ireland, a milk punch is a brandy or bourbon cocktail combined with sugar, vanilla extract and of course, milk or cream. It is usually served cold and topped with grated nutmeg (add egg to this mixture and you have an eggnog). A brilliantly smooth and nurturing mixture, it is sweet, creamy and has enough of a kick to ease the pain you may have caused the night before. Recipes for this mid-day libation vary greatly. Some call for brandy, whiskey or bourbon. Some use superfine sugar while

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others utilize the powdered form, which I favor because it dissolves easily. You might use cream or milk, or even both. You can prepare it in bulk as a punch, where the cream is meant to curdle and be strained away. This makes sense, because it then becomes stable enough to sit out for your guest’s pleasure. This “other” Bloody Mary can also be prepared in a glass, which I actually prefer because the lush texture of this drink is one of its principal lures. Some recipes call for bottling the mixture and saving for a later date. Even Benjamin Franklin had his own recipe, a combination of lemon juice, brandy, lemon zest, sugar, whole milk, freshly grated nutmeg and spring water. According to the recipe, after soaking the lemon zest in the brandy overnight and then removing the zest, all of the ingredients except the milk are combined. The milk is brought to a boil and then

added to the brandy mixture, which will curdle. The punch then sits for two hours before being strained until the liquid is clear, after which it is served cold. My favorite version of the milk punch was taught and served to me by famed fourth generation bartender, and one of the founders of the Museum of the American Cocktail in New Orleans, Chris McMillan.

The Brandy Milk Punch Ingredients: 1.5 oz. Brandy
1 oz. Simple syrup Half a bar spoon High quality vanilla extract
2 oz. Half-and-half
Cubed ice
Grated nutmeg Method: Pour brandy, simple syrup, vanilla extract and half-and-half into a pint glass. Add ice to a shaker and shake the concoction until well mixed and frothy. Add cubed ice to a rocks glass and, using a strainer, pour the mixture into it. Top with grated nutmeg. Kate is a bartender at Marcello’s Chophouse, vice president of the USBG (United States Bartender’s Guild) New Mexico and the President of LUPEC (Ladies United for the Preservation of Endangered Cocktails) New Mexico.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

PHOTO BY JOY GODFREY


FOOD

Cocoa java Southwest Chocolate and Coffee Festival celebrates the fellowship and fondness people feel for two of the ‘greatest foods known to mankind’ and chocolatiers will attend this year’s event, and Strober is launching a new chocolate sculpture-making contest featuring the work of some of Central New Mexico Community College’s culinary students. Raffles will be held, with the winning prizes being the superbly artistic (and edible) sculptures themselves.
So if you have a special place in your heart for chocolate truffles or for that first sip of your morning cup of coffee, or even if you’re just interested in getting out for the weekend, the Southwest Chocolate and Coffee Fest is the place to be. Offering up mounds of richly flavored treats and events, the festival is a one-of-a-kind chance to celebrate two of the greatest foods known to mankind.

BY SHARI TAYLOR


C

offee or cocoa? At the Southwest Chocolate and Coffee Fest, you don’t have to choose. Celebrating its third year as the sole chocolate and coffee festival of the sunny Southwest, this event stands as a tribute to the perfect match created within the creamy texture of a mocha cappuccino. With a list of activities created to entertain Albuquerqueans of all ages, it’s no wonder that this festival has grown to its now-doorbusting size of over 10,000 chocolate and coffee enthusiasts over the course of two days.
 This year the fairgrounds will see cooking demos by the Santa Fe Culinary Academy, Villa Myriam Coffee and more. Festival attendees can also see or participate in baking contests and chocolate eating contests. Of course, the biggest reason for attending has to be the chance to taste the culinary delights of almost a hundred different vendors. Coffee makers and chocolatiers range from popular favorites as well as rarely tasted local companies. Families will enjoy free activities like face painting, games and entertainment from The Crew NM and Sandra’s School of Dance. Meanwhile, those with a palate adjusted toward more subtle flavors can visit the Local iQ Lounge for a taste (or two) of local wines and beers.
 Festival founders Dean and Lena Strober have seen this celebration grow into what it is today. The annual event is a labor of love for the sake of local coffeemakers and chocolatiers whose products, Strober said, are far better than anything you can get at the grocery store. The coffee and chocolate products that you can sample at the festival are fresher and prepared right here in Albuquerque. Strober said that the festival is a way for local businesses to reach their customers, adding that some of these businesses don’t have store fronts. This year’s event is also more affordable and accessible for customers themselves. Strober said he likes to keep the cost of registration low with the hope that attendees will walk away with more than just samples. 
Several new coffee roasters

F E S T I VA L

Southwest Chocolate and Coffee Fest
 10a-6p, Sat.-Sun., Mar. 23-24
 EXPO New Mexico State Fairgrounds, Lujan Event Center
 300 San Pedro NE, 505.510.1312
 $10-$15, $8 seniors/students, 12/under FREE
 chocolateandcoffeefest.com

PHOTO BY WES NAMAN

The Chocolate Cartel, a gourmet chocolate business owned by brothers Tim and Scott Van Rixel of Albuquerque, will be one of the exhibitors at this year’s Southwest Chocolate and Coffee Fest.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

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PETS

Avoid a royal mess with structured potty regimen

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ith the recent news of the upcoming birth of the first child of Prince William and Duchess Catherine, most people are focused on whether or not their child will be a future king or queen. I, however, having spent years helping people train their dogs, wondered, “Do Queen Elizabeth’s corgis soil in Buckingham palace?” I own a Corgi and with the large number of dogs that Queen Elizabeth has running around her massive homes, my guess is that the queen’s staff probably find the occasional Welsh Pembroke corgi poop pile in one of the palaces. This is my suspicion because people who have large homes with wide-open floor plans often struggle most with house soiling issues. House soiling is one of the most frustrating behavior problems for dog owners and can unfortunately often be a deal breaker for some pet parents. We frequently receive dogs at Animal Humane that are surrendered because they have been soiling in their homes. However, the problem is one that can be easily dealt with if you understand what motivates a dog to choose a spot to use for elimination and how to use this information when teaching your dog the boundaries of your home. Everyone who calls me for house-soiling advice tells me that they take their dog outside and wait, wait, wait for them to go. I always feel bad for these pet owners, whom I picture standing outside in all types of weather, usually in a robe, willing their dogs to eliminate. What most of them report to me next is that they finally give up and return inside, only to watch their dog immediately find a spot to urinate or defecate. This behavior follows a typical pattern that I can explain and help you prevent. What matters most to dogs is to avoid eliminating where they spend the majority of their time. When people tell me their dog is soiling in the house I ask them, “Is he soiling in your formal living room or dining room?” At this point they think I am clairvoyant. Not at all, I just know that the rooms of the house that people rarely spend time in makes a perfect place for dogs to eliminate. The dog has learned that this room is just like outside, in that he can easily move and stay away from his pee or poop. So, what are the steps to prevent your dog from using parts of your house as a toilet? To teach your dog where it is appropriate to urinate or defecate, take him outside at the times when he is most likely to eliminate. This would be after meals or times of high activity. When he eliminates in the right spot in the yard immediately give him treats, pets and praise. The next part of the training process is to keep your dog restricted in your home, even if he

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

recently eliminated outside. You can do this in a variety of ways: have him on a leash near you, put up baby gates, close doors or keep him crated. Even if you have very large rooms, you can purchase baby gates that span several feet. This will prevent your dog from freely wandering around your home unsupervised. Over time, when your dog has been restricted in all areas of the house, he learns to “hold it” until his next trip outside. You will need to keep him restricted as you introduce him to all areas of the house that you plan on giving him access. Eventually he will learn that the whole house is his territory and he will not want to soil there. Once he is reliably eliminating outside, you can gradually decrease your supervision and restrictions. Be patient! This process may take several months, but giving your dog structure will quickly become second nature. While our homes may not be as big as a palace, we can still run into some of the same problems that I’m sure the Royal Family has encountered. Even if we don’t have staff to clean up our dogs messes, we do have the knowledge and understanding to prevent or solve this problem. Find more behavioral tips and advice at animalhumanenm.org. Susan Reaber, CPDT-KA, is an Animal Humane New Mexico animal behavior specialist. She teaches puppy and adult training classes and assists pet parents through Animal Humane’s free pet behavior helpline: 505.938.7900.

Adoptions Learn more about these and many other great pets at AnimalHumaneNM.org Find us: facebook.com/animalhumanenm

COSITA ID #30369 Cosita is a 1-year-old, female, Sharpei Dachshund cross. She’s a bit fearful and shy and desperately needs a human companion who can be patient and kind to her. She is very sweet and just needs some gentle coaxing in order to blossom.

GEORGIE GIRL

ID #29864

Georgie Girl is an 8-year-old, female, Domestic Short Hair cross. She’s sweet and gentle and she comes running when called. She just needs a loving home and a fresh new start.


BEST BAND: Red Light Cameras

The best

in Albuquerque.

From food trucks to mechanics and thrift stores to bartenders, Local iQ readers know their way around town and recently voted on the best of everything the Duke City has to offer

W

e asked, and Local iQ readers told us,

of” Albuquerque list, we know it’s much more than that.

in record numbers. The 2013 Local iQ

It’s the educated, astute readership of Local iQ offering

Smart List represents the collected

a perceptive guide to the city’s finest and brightest,

wisdom of you, our readers, who have

circa 2013. Whether you’re in search of Albuquerque’s

once again shown your smarts when it comes to picking

unsurpassed red chile, top chef or peerless politician, here

the Duke City’s incomparable and nonpareil. While some

are 150-plus categories of shrewd observations from you,

people might think the following is just another “best

the readers of Local iQ. Thanks for voting!

Story by LOCAL iQ READERS • Introduction by MIKE ENGLISH Photos by WES NAMAN + JOY GODFREY + CARISSA SIMMONS

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

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2013 SMART LIST READER’S POLL

FOOD & DRINK

BEST COFFEE DRINK Mexican Latte, Satellite Coffee

BEST ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET Route 66 Casino

Multiple locations satellitecoffee.com RUNNER UP: Regular coffee at Michael Thomas

14500 Central SW, 505.352.7866 rt66casino.com

BEST COFFEE SHOP Satellite Coffee

RUNNER UP: Furr’s

BEST ASIAN FUSION Streetfood Asia

Multiple locations satcoffee.com RUNNERS UP (TIE): Limonata and Java Joe’s

3422 Central SE, 505.260.0088 streetfoodasia abq.com

BEST HOT DOG + BEST FRIES: BEST CUPCAKE Urban Hotdog Company SHOP

RUNNER UP: Fan Tang

Cake Fetish 2665 Louisiana NE, 505.883.0670 cakefetish.com

BEST BBQ Rudy’s 2321 Carlisle NE, 505.884.4000 10136 Coors NW, 505.890.7113 rudys.com RUNNER UP: Mr. Powdrell’s

BEST BAKERY Flying Star Multiple locations flyingstarcafe.com RUNNER UP: Golden Crown

BEST BREAKFAST SPOT Weck’s Multiple locations wecksinc.com RUNNER UP: The Grove Cafe & Market

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BEST BREAKFAST BURRITO Golden Pride

BEST BRUNCH The Grove Cafe & Market

Multiple locations goldenpride abq.com

600 Central SE, 505.248.9800 thegrovecafe market.com

RUNNER UP: Frontier Restaurant

RUNNER UP: Slate Street Cafe

BEST BREWERY Marble Brewery

BEST BURGER Holy Cow

111 Marble NW, 505.243.2739 marble brewery.com RUNNER UP: Tractor Brewing Company

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

BEST CHEAP EATS Frontier Restaurant 2400 Central SE, 505.266.0550 frontierrestaurant. com RUNNER UP: Bailey’s on the Beach

700 Central SE, 505.242.2991 holycownm.com

BEST CHINESE RESTAURANT StreetFood Asia

RUNNER UP: Blake’s Lotaburger

3422 Central SE, 505.260.0088 streetfoodasiaabq. com RUNNER UP: Budai Gourmet

RUNNER UP: Gold Rush Cupcakes

BEST DELI DG’s Deli 1418 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. NE, 505.247.3354 dgsdeli.com RUNNER UP: Hello Deli

BEST DESSERT Flying Star Multiple locations flyingstarcafe.com RUNNER UP: Farina Pizzeria

BEST DINER 66 Diner 1405 Central NE, 505.247.1421 66diner.com RUNNER UP: Standard Diner

BEST DONUT SHOP Rebel Donut 2435 Wyoming NE, 505.293.0553 rebeldonut.com RUNNER UP: Donut Mart

BEST FINE DINING Artichoke Cafe 424 Central SE, 505.243.0200 artichokecafe.com RUNNER UP: Farm & Table

BEST GREEK RESTAURANT Olympia 2210 Central SE, 505.266.5222 olympiacafe abq.com RUNNER UP: Yanni’s

BEST GREEN CHILE Frontier 2400 Central SE, 505.266.0550 frontier restaurant.com RUNNER UP: Sadies


2013 SMART LIST READER’S POLL

BEST MILKSHAKE: 66 Diner

BEST FOOD TRUCK The Supper Truck

BEST ICE CREAM Cold Stone Creamery

BEST LOCAL BEER Elevated IPA, La Cumbre

505.205.7877 facebook.com/ thesuppertruck

Multiple locations coldstone creamery.com

RUNNER UP: Dia De Los Takos

RUNNER UP: I Scream for Ice Cream

3313 Girard NE, 505.872.0225 lacumbre brewing.com RUNNER UP: Marble Red

BEST FRENCH FRIES Urban Hotdog Co.

BEST INDIAN FOOD Taj Mahal

10250 Park NW, #400, 505.898.5671 urbanhotdog company.com

1439 Carlisle NE, 505.255.1994 tajmahalcuisine ofindia.com

RUNNER UP: Holy Cow

RUNNER UP: India Palace

BEST LUNCH SPOT Streetfood Asia

BEST FROZEN YOGURT Olo Yogurt Studio

BEST ITALIAN RESTAURANT Scalo

3422 Central SE, 505.260.0088 streetfoodasia abq.com

3339 Central NE, 505.718.4656 oloyogurt.com RUNNER UP: Menchie’s Frozen Yogurt

BEST HAPPY HOUR Gecko’s Bar and Tapas 3500 Central SE, 505.262.1848 5801 Academy NE, 505.821.8291 geckosbar.com RUNNER UP: Nob Hill Bar and Grill

BEST HOT DOG Urban Hotdog Co. 10250 Park NW #400, 505.898.5671 urbanhotdog company.com RUNNER UP: Dog House Drive In

3500 Central SE, 505.255.8781 scalonobhill.com RUNNER UP: Trombino’s

BEST JAPANESE RESTAURANT Japanese Kitchen 6521 America’s Parkway NE, 505.884.8937 japanesekitchen. com RUNNER UP: Shogun

BEST LATE NIGHT EATS Frontier 2400 Central SE, 505.266.0550 frontier restaurant.com RUNNER UP: Last Call

BEST LOCAL FOOD PRODUCT 505 Green Chile 505chile.com

RUNNER UP: The Grove Cafe & Market

BEST MEXICAN RESTAURANT Zacateca’s 3423 Central NE, 505.255.8226 zacatecas tacos.com RUNNER UP: El Patron

BEST MIDDLE EASTERN FOOD Sahara 2622 Central SE, 505.255.5400 saharamiddle easterneatery.com RUNNER UP: Olympia Cafe

BEST MILKSHAKE 66 Diner 1405 Central NE, 505.247.1421 66diner.com RUNNER UP: Holy Cow

BEST NEW MEXICAN FOOD RESTAURANT Sadie’s 6230 4th NW, 505.345.5339 sadiesofnewmexico.com RUNNER UP: Los Cuates

BEST NEW RESTAURANT Urban Hot Dog Co. 10250 Park NW #400, 505. 898.5671 urbanhotdog company.com RUNNER UP: Vinaigrette

BEST PACKAGE LIQUOR STORE Jubilation Wine & Spirits 3512 Lomas NE, 505.255.4404 jubilationwines. com RUNNER UP: Kelly’s Liquor

BEST PET FOOD BAKERY Three Dog Bakery 9821 Montgomery NE, 505.294.2300 threedog.com RUNNER UP: Rebel Donuts

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

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2013 SMART LIST READER’S POLL

BEST RESTAURANT WITH A VIEW Bien Shur, Sandia Resort and Casino 30 Rainbow NE, 505.798.3700 sandiacasino.com RUNNER UP: High Finance

MOST ROMANTIC RESTAURANT Antiquity

BEST TASTING COFFEE + COFFEE SHOP: Sateliite

BEST PIZZA Farina Pizzeria 510 Central Ave SE, 505.243.0130 farinapizzeria.com RUNNER UP: Dion’s

BEST RED CHILE Duran’s Pharmacy 4201 Menaul NE, 505.830.0007

BEST PLACE TO GET A CHOCOLATE FIX Chocolate Cartel/Van Rixel 315 Juan Tabo NE Ste. A, 505.797.1193 chocolatecartel.com RUNNER UP: Flying Star

RUNNER UP: Mary y Tito’s

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

112 Romero NW, 505.247.3545 antiquity restaurant.com RUNNER UP: Farm & Table

BEST SALAD Vinaigrette 1828 Central SE, 505.820.9205 vinaigrette online.com

RUNNER UP: El Pinto

BEST SANDWICH Cubano, Relish 8019 Menaul NE, 505.299.0001 relishsandwiches. com RUNNER UP: The Unforgettable, Baggins

BEST SEAFOOD Desert Fish 4214 Central SE, 505. 266.5544 desertfish.abq RUNNER UP: Pelican’s

BEST STEAKHOUSE Vernon’s Hidden Valley Steakhouse

RUNNER UP: Flying Star

6855 4th NW, 505.341.0831 thehiddensteakhouse.com

BEST SALSA Sadie’s

RUNNER UP: Marcello’s Chophouse

6230 4th NW, 505.345.5339 sadiesofnew mexico.com

BEST STREET TACO Dia De Los Takos

BEST TEA SHOP NM Tea Co.

505.550.8540 facebook.com/diadelos.takos

1131 Mountain NW, 505.962.2137 nmteaco.com

RUNNER UP: Pink Ladies Food Truck

RUNNER UP: St. James Tea Room

BEST SUSHI Shogun

BEST THAI RESTAURANT Thai Vegan

3310 Central Ave SE, 505.265.9166 RUNNER UP: Sushi King

BEST TACO SPOT Zacatecas Tacos + Tequila 3423 Central NE, 505.255.8226 zacatecastacos. com RUNNER UP: Dia de los Takos

BEST TASTING COFFEE Satellite Coffee Multiple locations satcoffee.com RUNNER UP: The Grove

5505 Osuna NE, 505.884.4610 thaivegannm.com RUNNER UP: Street Food Asia

BEST VEGAN RESTAURANT Thai Vegan 5505 Osuna NE, 505.884.4610 thaivegannm.com RUNNER UP: Annapurna’s World Vegetarian Cafe


2013 SMART LIST READER’S POLL

BEST THAI + BEST VEGAN RESTAURANT: Thai Vegan

BEST VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT Annapurna’s World Vegetarian Cafe

BEST VIETNAMESE RESTAURANT StreetFood Asia

Multiple locations chaishoppe.com

3422 Central SE, 505.260.0088 streetfoodasiaabq. com

RUNNER UP: Thai Vegan

RUNNER UP: Cafe De Lat

BEST WINE BAR Zinc Wine Bar & Bistro

BEST WINERY St. Clair Winery & Bistro

3009 Central NE, 505.254.9462 zincabq.com

901 Rio Grande NW, 505.243.9916 stclairwinery.com

RUNNER UP: Slate Street Cafe

RUNNER UP: Gruet Winery

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

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2013 SMART LIST READER’S POLL

SHOPPING BEST ANTIQUE STORE C. Dimery Morningside Antiques 4001 Central NE, 505.268.0188 morningsideantiques.com RUNNER UP: Gertrude Zachary

BEST BIKE SHOP Bike Coop 120 Yale SE, 505.265.5170 bikecoop.com RUNNER UP: Two Wheel Drive

BEST CAR DEALERSHIP Garcia Automotive Group Multiple locations garciacars.com RUNNER UP: Perfection Honda

BEST COMIC BOOK STORE Astrozombies 3100 Central SE, 505.232.7800 astrozombies.com RUNNER UP: Kaboom Test Lab

BEST ELECTRONICS STORE LOCAL:

BEST BOOKSTORE Bookworks

Baillio’s

4022 Rio Grande NW, 505.344.8139 bkwrks.com

NATIONAL: Best Buy

RUNNER UP: Page One

Multiple locations baillios.com

Multiple locations bestbuy.com

BEST FLOWER SHOP The Flower Shop at Nob Hill 3222 Central SE Ste.D, 505.256.5252 RUNNER UP: People’s Flower Shops

BEST FURNITURE STORE A Store 3500 Central SE, 505.266.2222 theastore.com RUNNERS UP: (TIE) American Home Furniture and Tema

BEST NURSERY Osuna 501 Osuna NE, 505.345.6644 osunanursery.com RUNNER UP: Rehm’s

BEST GIFT STORE Beeps 3500 Central SE, 505.262.1900 RUNNER UP: Hey Jhonny

BEST JEWELRY STORE Ooh Aah! Jewelry 110 Amherst SE, 505.265.7170 oohaahjewelry.com

RUNNER UP: Bank of Albuquerque

BEST MEN’S CLOTHING STORE LOCAL:

Izzy Martin

BEST KID’S CLOTHING STORE Zap ... Oh!

NATIONAL:

103 Amherst SE, 505.268.2050 zapoh.net RUNNER UP: Gymboree

BEST KITCHENWARE STORE Now We’re Cooking

RUNNER UP: A Store

BEST LINGERIE SHOP LOCAL:

Seductions 2528 Juan Tabo NE, 505.293.3654 NATIONAL:

Victoria’s Secret Multiple locations victoriassecret.com

18

Multiple locations nmefcu.org

RUNNER UP: Wright’s Indian Art

5901 Wyoming NE, 505.857.9625

BEST JEWELRY STORE: Ooh Aah

BEST LOCAL BANK New Mexico Educators Federal Credit Union

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

3019 Central NE, 505.232.9223 izzymartin.net

Dillard’s Multiple locations dillards.com

BEST FLOWER SHOP: The Flower Shop at Nob Hill

BEST MEN’S SHOE STORE LOCAL:

Izzy Martin 3019 Central NE, 505.232.9223 izzymartin.net

BEST RESALE CLOTHING STORE

Dillard’s

BEST PLACE TO SHOP ORGANIC La Montanita Coop

Multiple locations dillards.com

Multiple Locations lamontanita.com

600 Central SE, 505.242.3600 shop2time.com

NATIONAL:

BEST PET STORE Clark’s Pet Emporium

RUNNER UP: Sprouts

4914 Lomas NE, 505.268.5977

BEST RECORD STORE Charley’s 33s and CDs

11200 Menaul NE, 505.293.5977 clarkpets.com

7602 Menaul NE, 505.296.3685 RUNNER UP: Mecca

RUNNER UP: Dawg Gone Good

LOCAL:

2 Time Couture

NATIONAL:

Buffalo Exchange 3005 Central NE, 505.262.0098 buffaloexchange. com

BEST SHOE STORE LOCAL:

Terra Firma 113 Carlisle SE, 505.260.0507 NATIONAL:

Dillard’s dillards.com

BEST SOLAR COMPANY Affordable Solar 4840 Pan American NE, 505.244.1154 affordable-solar. com RUNNER UP: Consolidated Solar Technologies


LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

19


2013 SMART LIST READER’S POLL BEST WOMEN’S CLOTHING STORE Runway Apparel 5901 Wyoming NE, 505. 797.7087 runwayapparel.net RUNNER UP: Aqui

BEST THRIFT STORE Thrift Town 3900 Menaul NE, 505.872.0647 thrifttown.com

BEST VINTAGE CLOTHING STORE Off Broadway

BEST SPORTING GOODS STORE REI

BEST WOMEN’S SHOE STORE

3110 Central SE, 505.268.1489 offbroadwaycostumes.com

1550 Mercantile NE, 505.247.1191 rei.com

113 Carlisle SE, 505.260.0507

RUNNER UP: Sports Authority

NATIONAL:

RUNNER UP: Revolver

LOCAL:

Terra Firma

Dillard’s Multiple locations dillards.com

RUNNER UP: Savers

PEOPLE BEST ACUPUNCTURIST Jinlen Silva Gambei Wellness 1016 Lomas NW, 505.255.2555 gambeispa.com RUNNER UP: Yvonne Corcoran

BEST ARCHITECT Antoine Predock predock.com RUNNER UP: Mark Baker

BEST ARTIST Alice Yazzie

BEST ACTOR: Lauren Poole

RUNNER UP: John Paul Gutierrez

BEST BAND Red Light Cameras redlightcamerasband.com RUNNER UP: Le Chat Lunatique

BEST BARTENDER Kate Gerwin, Imbibe 3101 Central NE, 505.255.4200 imbibenobhill.com RUNNER UP: Blaze Montana, Imbibe

BEST BLUES ARTIST Chris Dracup 505.266.1153 chrisdracup.com RUNNER UP: Hillary Smith

20

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

BEST CHEF Jennifer James

BEST DOCTOR John Guttman

4615 Menaul NE, 505.884.3860 jenniferjames 101.com

200 Rio Bravo SE, 505.873.6400 RUNNER UP: David Scrase

RUNNER UP: Marc Quinones, Bien Shur

BEST DENTIST Alicia Abeyta 4830 Juan Tabo NE, Ste. K, 505.293.7611 bestalbuquerquedentists.com RUNNER UP: Byron Wall

BEST ESTHETICIAN Denise Hayes, Shine 101 Bryn Mawr SE, 505.336.0277 shineskinand body.com RUNNER UP: Summer Bennett

BEST HAIR COLORIST Gerhardt Ackerman, Heart & Soul 3408 Central SE, 505.848.8002 heartandsoul salon.com RUNNER UP: Shannon Vigil, Orbit

BEST HAIRDRESSER Gerhardt Ackerman, Heart and Soul 3408 Central SE, 505.848.8002 heartandsoul salon.com RUNNER UP: Erika Quist, Atelier


LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

21


2013 SMART LIST READER’S POLL

BEST JAZZ BAND Le Chat Lunatique

BEST MORNING RADIO SHOW Jackie, Tony, Donnie, 100.3

lechatlunatique. com

1003thepeak.com

RUNNER UP: Hillary Smith

BEST JUDGE Ben Chavez

BEST MUSICIAN Gregg Daigle

BEST LOCAL ACTOR Lauren Poole

daigleband.com

RUNNER UP: Alex Knight

BEST LOCAL AUTHOR Rudolfo Anaya RUNNER UP: Daniel Abraham

BEST MASSAGE THERAPIST Josh White, Por Vida Therapeutics 505.270.1315 porvida therapeutics.com RUNNER UP: Kim Wilson, Shine

22

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

RUNNER UP: Buck and Dex with Baxter, 104.1

BEST PERSONAL TRAINER Rocky Ramirez, Westside Power Gym 1534 Stephanie, Rio Rancho, 505.220.8712 westside powergym.com RUNNER UP: Nikki Sims, Black Box

BEST PHOTOGRAPHER Wes Naman wesnaman photography.com RUNNER UP: Rip Williams

BEST BARTENDER: Kate Gerwin RUNNER UP: Blaze Montana BEST POET Hakim Bellamy hakimbe.com RUNNER UP: Danny Solis

BEST POLITICIAN Martin Heinrich 505.346.6601 heinrich.senate.gov RUNNER UP: Michelle Lujan Grisham

BEST RADIO DJ Swami Rob, 94 Rock 94rock.com RUNNER UP: Buck and Dex with Baxter, 104.1

BEST SOLO ARTIST Kimo RUNNER UP: Chris Dracup


2013 SMART LIST READER’S POLL

BEST SOMMELIER Myra Ghattas, Slate Street 515 Slate NW, 505.243.2210 slatestreetcafe.com RUNNER UP: Kate Gerwin, Imbibe

BEST TATTOO ARTIST Chris Partain, Star Tattoo 10200 Corrales NW, 505.922.6217 startattoo.com RUNNER UP: Jason Ward, Star Tattoo

BEST THEATER TROUPE Blackout Theatre 505.672.8648 blackouttheatre. com RUNNER UP: The Dolls

BEST TV PERSONALITY Steve Stucker RUNNER UP: Nikki Stanzione

BEST HEALTH CLUB: Ryde Shack

BEST VETERINARIAN Aztec Animal Clinic 4340 Coal SE, 505.265.4939 aztecanimal clinic.com RUNNER UP: Blue Cross Animal Clinic

BEST VOCALIST Hillary Smith hilljam.com

PLACES BEST ART GALLERY Matrix Fine Art 3812 Central SE, 505.268.8952 matrixfineart.com RUNNER UP: Mariposa

BEST AUTO SHOP All in the Wrist 1401 4th NW, 505.242.9778 allinthewrist auto.com

BEST BED & BREAKFAST Los Poblanos Historic Inn 4803 Rio Grande NW, 505.344.9297 lospoblanos.com RUNNER UP: Casa de Suenos

BEST CASINO Sandia Resort and Casino 30 Rainbow, 505.796.7500 sandiacasino.com RUNNER UP: Hard Rock Casino

RUNNER UP: Overall Services

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

23


2013 SMART LIST READER’S POLL BEST COLLEGE BAR Brickyard Pizza 2216 Central SE, 505.262.2216 brickyardpizza.com RUNNER UP: Monte Vista Fire Station

BEST GAY BAR Effex Night Club 420 Cental SW, 505.842.8870 effexabq.com RUNNER UP: Albuquerque Social Club

BEST DAY SPA Betty’s Bath and Day Spa

BEST GOLF COURSE Sandia Resort and Casino

1835 Candelaria NW, 505.341.3456 bettysbath.com

30 Rainbow NE, 505.798.3700 sandiacasino.com

RUNNER UP: Gambei Wellness Spa & Salon

RUNNER UP: Arroyo Del Oso

BEST DIVE BAR Anodyne 409 Central NW, 505.244.1820 theanodyne.com RUNNER UP: Burt’s Tiki Lounge

BEST HEALTH CLUB Ryde Shack 101 Bryn Mawr SE, 505.401.9288 rydeshack.com RUNNER UP: Defined Fitness

24

BEST ORGANIC FARM Los Poblanos Organic Farm 4803 Rio Grande NW, 505.344.9297 lospoblanos.com

BEST ORGANIC FARM: Los Poblanos

3408 Central SE, 505.848.8002 heartandsoul salon.com RUNNER UP: Gambei Wellness Spa & Salon

BEST DOG PARK Bullhead Park RUNNER UP: Domingo Baca

RUNNER UP: Marcello’s Chophouse

BEST PILATES STUDIO Core Works

BEST PLACE TO DANCE Effex Nightclub

127 Bryn Mawr, 505.239.7285

420 Cental SW, 505.842.8870 effexabq.com

BEST PLACE TO ACT LIKE A KID Explora

BEST HOTEL Hotel Parq Central 806 Central SE, 505.242.0040 hotelparq central.com RUNNER UP: Hotel Andaluz

BEST LOUNGE Apothacary, Hotel Parq Central 806 Central SE, 505.242.0040 hotelparq central.com RUNNER UP: Hotel Andaluz

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

BEST MUSEUM Albuquerque Museum 2000 Mountain NW, 505.242.4600 cabq.gov/ culturalservices/ albuquerquemuseum RUNNER UP: New Mexico Museum of Natural History

BEST NAIL SALON Gambei Wellness Spa & Salon 1016 Lomas NW, 505.255.2555 gambeispa.com

BEST NEW BAR Sister Bar 407 Central NW, 505.555.5555 sisterthebar.com

510 Central SE, 505.243.0130 farinapizzeria.com

RUNNER UP: Skaarsgard Farms

RUNNER UP: Blissful Spirits

BEST HAIR SALON Heart + Soul

BEST PLACE TO BE SEEN Farina Pizzeria

1701 Mountain NW, 505.224.8300 explora.us

RUNNER UP: Dirty Bourbon

BEST PLACE TO GET A MANI/PEDI Gambei Wellness Spa & Salon

RUNNER UP: Gravity Park

1016 Lomas NW, 505.255.2555 gambeispa.com

BEST PLACE TO DISAPPEAR Sandia Mountains

RUNNER UP: Mark Pardo

RUNNER UP: The Bosque

BEST PLACE TO GO HIKING La Luz Trail, Sandias RUNNER UP: Sandia Foothills


LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

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2013 SMART LIST READER’S POLL

BEST PLACE TO SEE LIVE MUSIC Launchpad

BEST SPORTS BAR Uptown Sports Bar & Grill

618 Central SW, 505.764.8887 launchpadrocks. com

6601 Uptown NE, 505.884.4714 uptownsportsbar.com

RUNNER UP: Low Spirits

RUNNER UP: Gecko’s Bar and Tapas

BEST PLACE TO SHOOT POOL Anodyne 409 Central NW, 505.244.1820 theanodyne.com RUNNER UP: Doc and Eddy’s

BEST PLACE TO TAKE THE KIDS Explora 1701 Mountain NW, 505.224.8300 explora.us RUNNER UP: Play Conservatory

BEST THEATER The Box Performance Space 114 Gold SW, 505.404.1578 theboxabq.com RUNNER UP: Guild Cinema

BEST YOGA STUDIO Hot Yoga Downtown 724 Central SE, 505.243.4688 hotyoga-abq.com RUNNER UP: Bhava Yoga

BEST PUBLIC PARK Roosevelt Park RUNNER UP: Tiguex Park

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

BEST TV PERSONALITY: Steve Stucker


LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

27


MUSIC

SOUNDBOARD BY HAKIM BELLAMY

The classical soul of Josef Scott

H

top, one music manager who saw JDS showcase at the Sunset Sessions Convention in Las Vegas said “the circus just came to town!” The new record is an attempt at the impossible, fitting that organic energy into a digital music format. However, with the help of bandmate and veteran engineer Mike “Cee” Carpenter (L.A. Reid, Babyface, Terry Lewis, Jimmy Jam) they’ve got the kind of magic that makes the impossible possible. Though their music has been described as “the bridge between LMFAO and the Red Hot Chili Peppers,” Nunez characterizes their overall genre as “a live dance band.” After I floated the idea that their music plus their showmanship makes them a Carnivale/Mardi Gras-like attraction, the group (Douglas, Nunez and Carpenter) gives some consideration to the idea of having their music characterized as “Black Salsa.” According to Nunez that means, “It’s funky but it’s spicy.” In short, the James Douglas Show has a musical offering as diverse as New Mexico itself. “Love Song” is the latest single off 9 — a Raphael Saadiq post-Tony! Toni! Tone! vibe. “‘Love Song’ is a different take from the James Douglas Show,” said Douglas. “‘Love Song’ was a surprise, we weren’t thinking of anything like that.” “Love Song” was spontaneous as JDS’s fashion decisions, and their “flava” is not limited to Mr. Douglas. Zach Fowler (bass, vocals), Jessie Martinez (lead guitar) and Delmone Taylor (sax, keys, vocals) complete “The Show.” Each with their own personality, musical identity and costume, JDS suits up more like the Justice League than the New Kids on the Block. JDS is not a monolith; they are a menu. On this menu there is something for everyone … even the vegetarians. I’d recommend the number 9.

is “dream show” would have the following team: Prince on guitar, Stevie Wonder on keys, and Questlove (of the Legendary Roots Crew) on pots and pans “for some hip hop” flavor. But you might not be able to see that show … or any others for that matter! “Unfortunately the majority of my shows are private events at this time,” said Josef Scott. “But with musicians, that changes by the minute.” Albuquerque resident Scott has got the kind of voice that makes parties private. Even though he considers himself an R&B singersongwriter, he doesn’t limit himself to those genres. With Scott a vocal style and range that fits somewhere between Donny and Lalah Hathaway, Scott also comes from a distinguished and talentimmersed gene pool. Son of Joe and Rita Powdrell, Scott grew up learning how to sing with his family members. “The majority of my technical training comes from my classical training background,” Scott said. “Being able to sing in front of or with my family is where I got my soul training.” As a songwriter, Scott enjoys the storytelling more than the singing. “I don’t just write for myself, but for others as well,” said Scott. “I love telling the story and interpreting the ministry.” Scott will be wearing his singing hat and his songwriting hat for Black Turquoise, his upcoming album with Soundboard alum John Maestas and celebrated Burque musician Clausio Tolousse, the trio that make up the group Black Turquoise. “If I have learned anything it is that growth shines light on my aspirations,” reflected Scott. “I see myself as a more mature artist with a refined vision on my craft. I see more production work and projects for other artists more than myself.” Even if you don’t have an exclusive invite to any of Scott’s upcoming “private” events (even my Local iQ press credentials couldn’t score me an invite!), you can follow Scott at blackturquoise.com.

See the James Douglas Show on the After After Party every Saturday Night immediately following Saturday Night Live on NBC.

Hakim Bellamy is ABQ’s poet laureate and an admirer of musical talent in all its many forms.

After 10 years of relentless touring and honing their craft, the members of Albuquerque’s The James Douglas Show (James Douglas, front, with Zach Fowler, Marco Nunez, Delmone Taylor and Jessie Martinez) have built a national reputation. Their third studio recording, 9, was released this month.

Hungry, humble and hustling James Douglas Show reaches 10th year as a band, releases new record a person to fly the six-man outfit, plus crew and minus equipment travel costs, the band’s he James Douglas Show is a living prospects of getting to the Super Bowl seemed lesson in hustle and humility. As down bleak. That’s when Albuquerque stepped in. JDS to earth as mesa mud, JDS took some put out an S.O.S. on their website, social media, time out of the booth (and between personal networks and the radio (shout out to conference calls) post-tour to chat with Local iQ. Power 106.3FM). Nunez says supporters were At 11 at night, JDS percussionist and founding showing up outside their studio handing him band member Marco Nunez told me “it’s no $50 cash donations. An outpouring of that kind thang” after I apologize for my scheduling of grassroots support, in addition to a special dysfunction. “We’re here,” said Nunez. “If we are gift from the girlfriend of Mark Russo (a late not on tour, we’re here working. We’ll be here for friend of “The Show”) helped to get JDS to the hours after you leave too.” Big Easy. Twenty-four hours after the band put Even though Nunez said it with a laugh, he was out its distress signal “everything not joking. When I arrived at was paid for,” said Douglas, “by Arkitects (JDS’ studio home), the city, the town, the people of R E V I E W lead vocalist James Douglas Albuquerque, New Mexico.” was on the couch in his typical In the process of heaping an The James flair. Leathered up from head to endless amount of gratitude on toe in a two-piece, jacket-pant Douglas Show the people of the Duke City, Nunez ensemble, he was handling 8p, Thu., Mar. 21 added a qualifier. A qualifier that is business by phone. Nunez was The Underground at self-reflective, honest and critical. in a closed-door office doing the Evangelo’s An analysis that is always found same thing, handling business 200 W. San Francisco, in ambitious artists that are never by phone. Santa Fe, 505.982.9014 satisfied with “good enough.” He Alliteration aside, it would be $10 added, “Thank you Albuquerque equally apropos to describe thejamesdouglasshow.com for not noticing right away, “The Show” as a case study of because it gave us time to become hunger and humanity. While a better band.” most of us were trying to decide Now in their 10th year, JDS is known for their which consumer-inspired flavor of Doritos was outstanding musicianship as much as their going to become a staple while watching the astounding showmanship. Called a “show” for a most exciting Super Bowl in recent memory, reason, JDS prioritizes the stage over the studio. JDS was in New Orleans playing a benefit gig At over 200 live shows per year, it is amazing that for the Wounded Warriors Fund at the house of they’ve found time to produce their third studio two-time Super Bowl Champion Jim McMahon. album, 9, released on Mar. 12. Impressive, yeah? Well, what’s more impressive is how JDS got there. “We have more fun falling down on stage and getting back up than any studio effort we’ve ever Propositioned three days before the gig, Douglas done,” said Douglas. With a wardrobe and a live says that the band called the airlines and did the math on this incredible opportunity. At $800 show that is not just over the top, but over the big BY HAKIM BELLAMY

T

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013


MUSIC The Kosmos Sunday Chatter-Chatter Varsity

L I V E MUSIC

SUBMIT TO LO CA L iQ The next deadline is March 20 for the March 28 issue. SEND CALENDAR ENTRIES TO:

calendar@local-iQ.com f: 888.520.9711 a: PO Box 7490, ABQ., N.M. 87194 PLEASE USE THIS FORMAT:

Venue Band GENRE Time, Cost List events any time for free at local-iQ.com *All events subject to change. Check with individual venues before heading out

** CALENDAR LISTINGS ARE A FREE SERVICE AND MAY BE CUT DUE TO SPACE. PREFERENCE IS GIVEN TO FREE EVENTS.

THU 14 Blackbird Buvette Song Writers Showcase 7p, FREE Burt’s Tiki Lounge Josh Burg DANCE PARTY 8:30p, FREE Hotel Andaluz Jazz Brasileiro 5-8p, FREE Launchpad Chunk! No Captain Chunk!, Handguns, State Champs, City Lights, My Heart the Hero 6:30p, $12

Malarky’s The Rudy Boy Experiment 9p-1a, FREE

Marcello’s Chophouse Karl Richardson 6:30-9:30p, FREE Molly’s Bar Bella Luna 5:30p-Close, FREE O’Niell’s Heights High Desert Pipe Drums 6p, FREE O’Niell’s Nob Hill High Desert Pipe Drums 4p, FREE Qbar DJ Quico TOP 40 LATIN 9p, FREE Scalo Il Bar Three Sting Bale FOLK/AMERICANA 8p, FREE

Sol Santa Fe Karaoke 7p, TBD Zinc Cellar Bar Old You 9:30p, FREE

FRI 15 Blackbird Buvette Jose Antonio Ponce BLUES/JAZZ/ AMERICANA 6p, FREE The Vapors w/ Speed One & DJ Cello 10p, FREE Burt’s Tiki Lounge Venus Bogardus, Lady Uranium, The Charming Cobras 8:30p, FREE Casa Esencia DJ Chil and DJ Justininc. TOP 40/ DANCE 9p, $20

Cathedral of St. John New Mexico Philharmonic performing The St. John Passion 7p, $25-$55

Launchpad Diverje CD Release Party, Malifick, Satyrino, Black Window Cabal, DJs Dammerung, Xibalbalola, Nihill 9p, $3

Lloyd Shaw Dance Center Third Friday Dance Party 8-11p, $5 Los Cuates-Sandia Park Los Radiators JAZZ/ROCK/MOTOWN 6-9p, FREE

10:30a, $5-$15

Lounge 54 Santa Ana Star Casino Shane Wallin 9p-Midnight, FREE Low Spirits B Side Players, Da Bruddah Project, BuddhaFunk 9p, TBD Marcello’s Chophouse Karl Richardson Duo 6:30-9:30p, FREE

Monte Vista Fire Station Le Chat Lunatique 9:30p, FREE Molly’s Bar Bailout 5:30p-Close, FREE Moonlight Lounge The Gamits, Stabbed in Back, The Sound Collapse 8p, $6 Qbar DJ Huggie 80S-TODAY 9p, FREE Scalo Il Bar Stu MacAskie Trio JAZZ 8:30p, FREE Sunshine Theater Pierce the Veil, Memphis May Fire, Letlive, Issues 7p, $17.50 Opa Bar-Yanni’s Saudade 7-10p, FREE

SAT 16 Blackbird Buvette Ray Anthony & PowerSlyde JAZZ/ FUNK 6p, FREE Close Contact 80S REQUEST 10p, FREE

Burt’s Tiki Lounge Canyonlands, Wurlybirds, Cheers Elephant 8:30p, FREE Cooperage En-Joy CUBAN SALSA 9:30p, $10 Elliott’s Bar Duke City Saints ROCK/FUNK/SOUL 8p-Midnight, FREE

Launchpad The Unemploid, Rebilt, Deadmary, Domestic Violence, BeefCake in Chains, APD, DC Bombers, Psycho 78, Intoxicated, The Car Bombs 6p, $5

Lounge 54-Santa Ana Star Casino Shane Wallin 9p-Midnight, FREE Low Spirits The Barnyard Stompers, Cowboys & Indian, Voodoo Swing, The Shadowmen, Mr. Right and The Leftovers 8p, $5 Marcello’s Chophouse Tony Rodriquez Duo 6:30-9:30p, FREE

Molly’s Bar Atomic Balm 1:30-5p, The Replicators 5:30p-Close, FREE Qbar DJ Chil TOP 40/DANCE 9p, $10 Scalo Il Bar Todd and the Fox INDIE/FOLK 8:30p, FREE

Zinc Cellar Bar Keith Sanchez & The Moon Thieves AMERICANA/LATIN/BLUES 9:30p-12:30a, FREE

SUN 17 Blackbird Buvette Billy Miles Brooker IRISH PUB/ROCK COVERS Noon, FREE

Launchpad I Declare War, Upon This Dawning, From Sacrifice To Survival, Weslandia, Divide the Foundation 7:30p, $10

Malarky’s The Rudy Boy Experiment 3-7p, FREE

Santa Fe University of Art and Design Gerry Carthy CELTIC/IRISH 3-5p, FREE

MON 18 Blackbird Buvette Karaoke 9p, FREE Low Spirits Caveman, Pure Bathing Culture 9p, $8

Marcello’s Chophouse Open Piano Night 6:30-9:30p, FREE

Sunshine Theater All That Remains, Hellyeah, Nonpoint 8p, $22

TUE 19 Blackbird Buvette Groove the Dig w/ Old School John ROCK/GARAGE/PUNK/GLAM 10p, FREE

Il Vicino Brewery Canteen Swag Trio JAZZ/BLUES/MOTOWN 6-9p, FREE

Launchpad Today is the Day, Black Tusk, KEN Mode, Fight Amp 9p, TBD Low Spirits JC Brooks & The Uptown Sound, 4OnTheFloor, Pure X 9p, TBD Molly’s Bar Southwest Wind 5:30p-Close, FREE

Qbar Franc Chewiwie LAITIN JAZZ 9p, FREE

Scalo Il Bar Joe Daddy & Hoodoo Jeff BLUES 8:30p, FREE

Zinc Cellar Bar Danny the Harp FOLK/BLUES 8-11p, FREE

WED 20 Blackbird Buvette Too Good For Radio HIPHOP/INDIE DANCE 10p, FREE

Burt’s Tiki Lounge ABQ True Skool UNDERGROUND HIP HOP 8:30p, FREE

Launchpad Lydia, From Indian Lakes, Sweet Talker 7:30p, $10 Low Spirits West Water Outlaws, The Breaktone, Snake Oil Spill 9p, $7 Marcello’s Chophouse Bob Andrews 6:30-9:30p, FREE Molly’s Bar Steve Kinabrew 5:30p-Close, FREE Scalo Il Bar Cali Shaw Band Acoustic Showcase

Me, Myself, and I: A Night of Solo Music w/ Kimo, Jim Phillips & Lauren Anderson 7p, FREE Burt’s Tiki Lounge Good Green, Bandwidth No Name, Merican Slang 8:30p, FREE Cathedral of St. John New Mexico Philharmonic performing The St. John Passion

8:30p, FREE

Great Face and Body Hillary Smith & Chris Dracup Brunch 11a-1:30p, $22

10p, FREE

3p, $25-$55

Sol Santa Fe Municipal Waste 7:30, $12

THU 21 Blackbird Buvette Jack Littman CRUNK/SOUL/FOLK 7p, FREE KGB Club GOTH/INDUSTRIAL Burt’s Tiki Lounge Freaky Tiki Bass DANCE PARTY 8:30p, FREE

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

29


MUSIC

LI V E M USIC Launchpad The Flood, DJ X-Man, Wolfman Jack, Jubes Juberstein, Down South Thugstaz, Iball, Flip Dat, High C, Cronikole, U.B.O., Insidious Lyricists, Csrucker, GBZ the Duke, Marcellus One 9p, $8 Malarky’s The Rudy Boy Experiment 9p-1a, FREE

Marcello’s Chophouse Karl Richardson 6:30-9:30p, FREE Molly’s Bar Boss Hogg 5:30p-Close, FREE Qbar DJ Quicko TOP 40 LATIN 9p, FREE Scalo Il Bar Keith Sanchez SONGWRITER 8p, FREE

Sister Bar Proceeds benefit Whole Planet Foundation through Whole Foods, Traviezos, Wildewood, Le Chat Lunatique CUMBIA/FOLK ROCK/ FILTHY, MANGY, JAZZ 7p, $10

Sol Santa Fe Karaoke 7p, TBD

FRI 22 The Barley Room The Electric Edric Project 9p-1a ROCK FREE

Blackbird Buvette DJ Caterwaul 6p, FREE The Haptics, Amature Dramatics, Psycick Monkey ROCK 10p, FREE Burt’s Tiki Lounge The Ground Beneath, Psychothermia, Indemified 8:30p,

Santa Ana Cafe-Hyatt Regency Tamaya Jazz Brasileiro 6-9p, FREE Scalo Il Bar Bert Dalton Trio JAZZ 8:30p, FREE Vernon’s Hidden Valley Steak House The Rudy Boy Experiment 7:3010:30p, FREE

SAT 23 Blackbird Buvette Cosmic Dancing w/ Brendangerous and Nicolatron

FREE

Burt’s Tiki Lounge Music is the Enemy, Gusher, H[OHM] 8:30p, FREE Cooperage Son Como Son CUBAN SALSA

MON 25

10p, FREE

9:30p, $7

GiG The New Mexico Guitar Duo

FREE

7:30p, $15

9p, $20

FREE

Casa Esencia DJ Devin & DJ SEZ TOP 40/DANCE

Juan Tabo Library Consort Un-Caged ROCK 3-4p,

Launchpad 2bers, Day-Go Produce, Mic Deli, The Royal Heist 9:30p, $5 Lounge 54-Santa Ana Star Casino Sally Townes 9p-Midnight, FREE Low Spirits Ryan McGarvey 8p, $8 Marcello’s Chophouse Karl Richardson Duo 6:30-9:30p,

Launchpad The Big Spank, The Riddims 9p,

Molly’s Bar Tom Cat 1:30-5p, FREE Badfish

FREE

FREE

5:30p-Close, FREE

Qbar DJ Huggie 80S-TODAY 9p, FREE

TBD

Lounge 54 - Santa Ana Star Casino Sally Townes 9p-Midnight, FREE Low Spirits Crazyfool, Felonious Groove Foundation 9p, $8 Marcello’s Chophouse Tony Rodriquez Duo 6:30-9:30p, Molly’s Bar Bartender 4 Mayor 1:30-5p, FREE Memphis P-Tails 5:30p-Close, FREE

Monte Vista Fire Station The Rudy Boy Experiment 9p-1a, FREE Qbar DJ LT. TOP 40/DANCE 9p, $10 Santa Ana Cafe - Hyatt Regency Tamaya Swag Duo 6-9p, FREE Scalo Il Bar Chris Dracup Trio BLUES 8:30p, FREE

SUN 24 Blackbird Buvette A Band Named Sue Noon, FREE Sexy Sunday ft. Wae Fonkey 90S LOVE JAMS 7p, FREE

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

The Kosmos Sunday Chatter-Apple Hill String Quartet 10:30a, $5-$15 Launchpad On Believer, Betting on Red, Two Year Saga, Wasteland, Inkorporated, Disavowed, Croyal, Pyramids of the Social Committee, Capital M, Silver and High, Agony Before Defeat 4:30p, TBD Malarky’s The Rudy Boy Experiment 3-7p, Sunshine Theater TECH N9NE 7p, $32.50

Blackbird Buvette Karaoke 9p, FREE Marcello’s Chophouse Open Piano Night 6:30-9:30p, FREE

TUE 26 Blackbird Buvette Sons of Juan Tabo BLUES/CLASSIC ROCK 10p, FREE

Molly’s Bar Gene Corbin 5:30p-Close, FREE Scalo Il Bar Two Thirds Trio JAZZ 8:30p, FREE

WED 27 Blackbird Buvette Cynical Bird AMERICANA/FOLK ROCK/ POP 10p, FREE

Launchpad Master, Sacrificial Slaughter, Fisthammer, Laughing Dog, Suspended 9p, $10 Marcello’s Chophouse Tony Rodriquez 6:30-9:30p, FREE Molly’s Bar Skip Batchelor 5:30p-Close, FREE Scalo Il Bar Cali Shaw Band Acoustic Showcase FOLK 8:30p, FREE St. Clair Winery & Bistro Dianna Hughes, Michael Anthony, Milo Jaramillo 6-9p, FREE

ROAD TRIP McDowell Mountain Music Festival FEATURING, THE ROOTS, THE SHINS, DR. DOG, PLUS MORE

Mar. 22-25 Margaret T. Hance Park, Phoenix, Ariz. MULTIPLE EVENTS:

$20/$40/$120 (3-day pass)/$150 (VIP) mmmf.ticketfly.com mmmf.net

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s spring and summer approach, so does music festival season. The McDowell Mountain Music Festival is one of the better run festivals in the Southwest and is only a six hour trek from New Mexico. Now in its 10th year, the festival will take place at Margaret T. Hance park in Phoenix, Arizona for the first time. This year’s line-up features a variety of bands such as Albuquerque’s own The Shins, The Roots, Umphrey’s McGee and Yonder Mountain String Band. Also billed this year is Edward Sharp and the Magnetic Zeros, Les Claypool’s Duo de Twang, Dr. Dog, Heartless Bastards and Orgone (performing late night at Crescent Ballroom in downtown Phoenix) among many, many others. Camping is available at the festival and all proceeds benefit Ear Candy Charity, Phoenix Children’s Hospital and UMOM New Day Centers. The McDowell Mountain Music Festival exists to integrate and support the community, the arts and the underprivileged. It’s the perfect weekend escape for music festival-goers. —Matt Edwards


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old. Brazen. Unabashed. Billy Bragg is all this and more. In the late 1980s, he became Britain’s most prominent folk punk, never strumming his acoustic guitar but instead thrashing its strings, never singing his lyrics but instead screaming them at lung-searing pitches. It’s an abrasive method, but the content of his songs and press comments is what truly rubs his opponents the wrong way. Bragg has marched in leftist protests, supported Scottish independence, toured Russia just Billy Bragg as it was thawing from years from the bitter 7:30p, Sun., Mar. 24 Cold War and said England’s hard-right KiMo Theatre BNP party should be beat or “duffed up in 423 Central NW, 505.768.3522 the streets.” Yet, Bragg has always insisted that his politics aren’t gimmicky. He’s $25-$35 been quoted as saying, “I’m not a political Tickets: holdmyticket.com songwriter. I’m an honest songwriter.” billybragg.co.uk That honesty has indeed resulted in the tenderest of ballads, especially the lovelorn “The Saturday Boy.” But, more often than not, he’s drawn ire and awe from fans and foes alike for his socially conscious anthems like the anti-homophobic “Sexuality,” and the revolution touting “Waiting For the Great Leap Forward.” On the latter hit he belts out lines like “One leap forwards, two leaps back/Will politics get me the sack?” and, “In a perfect world we’d all sing in tune/But this is reality so give me some room.” A realist, a leftist, but never an apologist. —Kyle Mullin

Saoirse

Caveman 8p, Mon, Mar. 18

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implicity is key to an indie band’s success. There’s no need for a standLow Spirits out guitarist or heavy-hitting rhythm 2823 2nd NW, section. Rather, it is a collective of skillful 505.344.9555 songwriting in which each musician in a band complements the others. Caveman is $8 a Brooklyn-based band that has achieved Tickets: holdmyticket.com a simple, effective style that incorporates cavemantheband.com illuminating guitar lines paired with hypnotic rhythms that leave you in reverie. The atmospheric quintet has made a mark on the scene since their debut with 2011’s CoCo Beware. The group created an easily likable sound that meanders through interesting progressions from song to song, but doesn’t get lost in its own entrancing experience. Each song carries itself into the next with a hovering soundscape, making a blissful blend that never gives the listener the desire to skip a track. Caveman is self made. Though its sound echoes the influences of others, ranging from The Beach Boys to The Strokes, their style stands alone. Perhaps what adds to that is the guitars the band uses are custom built by the band’s guitarist, Jimmy Carbonetti. Pair handmade guitars with Matt Iwamusa’s calm and charming tenor vocals, and its easy to see how Caveman has made its waves in an ocean that is over saturated with imitation indie bands.

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aiorse, New Mexico’s self-described “Celtic eclectic” band, take its name from the Gaelic word for “freedom.” Saoirse 3p, Sun., Mar. 17 Maloney’s Tavern recently released their second CD, Rigs, which 325 Central NW, features dynamic musical revisionings of songs 505.242.7422 and tunes from the far-flung Celtic lands of FREE Ireland, Scotland, Galicia and beyond, as well as fine Celtic-spirited originals. Saiorse is Laura 1p, Sat., March 23 (Lo) Berg on vocals and percussion, Suzanne Belen Public Library 333 Becker, Belen, Taichert on vocals, piano and percussion, John 505.966.2600 Brinduse on rhythm guitar and vocals, Lisa Nichols on flute, sax and vocals, Glenn Maxwell FREE on bodhran and bones, Norm Toy on bass and Harlow Pinson on violin, Uilleann pipes, concertina, banjo, whistles and vocals. Pinson told Local iQ, “We have always been interested in telling stories through our music. We combine Celtic musical traditions with some non-traditional arrangements. Most of the songs we perform seem to tell a story, often political, and often associated with loss of freedom, and the effects of war on the individual.” The band specializes in four-part harmonies and explores musical traditions outside Ireland, from Scotland to America, the Canadian Maritimes and the Spanish/New Mexico connection. The band’s St. Patrick’s Day show promises to be an authentic celebration. —Bill Nevins CELTIC ECLECTIC MUSIC

—Justin De La Rosa PHOTO BY KAREN MCBRIDE

PHOTO BY WES NAMAN

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

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ARTS

AR TS EV ENTS

SUBMIT TO LOC A L iQ The next deadline is March 20 for the March 28 issue. SEND ENTRIES TO: calendar@local-iQ.com f: 888.520.9711 a: PO Box 7490 ABQ., N.M. 87194 Name of Exhibit/Event Description of exhibit/event VENUE/GALLERY ADDRESS website List events any time @ local-iQ.com

Events are always subject to change, check with individual venues before heading out ** CALENDAR LISTINGS ARE A FREE SERVICE AND MAY BE CUT DUE TO SPACE. PREFERENCE IS GIVEN TO FREE EVENTS.

THU 14 The music and dance numbers of West Side Story have been famous ever since the play first hit Broadway in 1957. The production visiting Popejoy Hall this month is based on the 2009 Broadway revival of the show.

Sharks and Jets Traveling production of West Side Story gets modest present-day makeover to emphasize timeless emotional appeal BY ROSS SCHARF

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hank Addison Reid Coe’s mom for getting her son interested in musicals. Kathy Coe has long been a fan of the Golden Age of American musical theater. Growing up in Rochester, Minn., Addison would go with his mom to see live musical theater productions or watch films of such venerable musicals of that era as Oklahoma, South Pacific and Singin’ in the Rain. In 2009 she and Addison went to New York City to see the revival of West Side Story on Broadway. Bring it forward to 2011. Coe had just S TA G E graduated from Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Mich., where he acted in theater West Side and film in his spare time. He was Story planning to head for New York City. 7:30p, Thu, Mar. 14; 8p, Even before her son moved, mom Fri, Mar. 15; 2, 8p, Sat, suggested he audition in the Big Apple Mar. 16; 2p, 7:30p, Sun, for the upcoming touring production of Mar. 17 West Side Story. Popejoy Hall, UNM “I was nervous about it even before I had campus, 505.925.5858 settled there,” Coe said. $37.50, $52.50, $80 But he took his mom’s advice. He Tickets: unmtickets. went ahead and auditioned. Funny com thing happened. Forty-five days after popejoypresents.com auditioning Coe was told he got the role of Tony, the male lead. The character of Tony is a member of the gang called the Jets. The show’s famous love story is about Tony and Maria. But it’s a forbidden love (think Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet). Forbidden because Maria’s brother Bernardo is the leader of the Puerto Rican gang, the Sharks. The love story plays out against a background of prejudice. The touring production, like the 2009 Broadway revival, has been tweaked. There’s more Spanish dialogue sprinkled in.

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All of Jerome Robbins’ original award-winning choreography is still in the show. So is Leonard Bernstein’s music. You can still hear the songs “Tonight,” “America,” “Somewhere” and “Maria.” Coe said the tweaking has made the staging more balanced and some lines have been changed or dropped to give the story a sharper, less dated focus. David Saint, the director of the national tour and the associate director of the Broadway revival, has said that Stephen Sondheim and Arthur Laurents wanted any revisions to eliminate the period feel of the musical — it premiered in 1957 — and to bring its “timeless emotional appeal full throttle to the present.” Sondheim wrote the lyrics and Laurents wrote the book. “I think audiences are liking the story. It’s touching people deeper,” Coe said. He’s been on the road with the touring company since last October. He’d been in rehearsals for a month before the producers tech-ed the show in Ashland, Ky. The tour officially began in Utica, N.Y. The role has been challenging for Coe but he’s got a terrific support system on the road. The music director has been helping him find new ways to express his songs. A fellow cast member has been helping him find nuances in his character. The songs and the choreography aren’t the only original elements Albuquerque audiences will see. So is the special way the cast members take their bows. “These are the original Jerome Robbins choreographed bows and they pay homage to the piece and not to our ourselves nor to our performance,” Coe said. The original Broadway production of West Side Story ran for more than 725 performances. Sure, it was a hit, but was beaten out by The Music Man for a Tony for Best Musical. The stage show went to London where it had an even longer run. In 1961 the movie West Side Story starring Natalie Wood came out. The film won 10 Oscars, including one for “Best Picture.” Moral of the story: Listen to your mom.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

PERFORMANCE

West Side Story From the first note to the final breath, West Side Story soars as the greatest love story of all time and remains as powerful, poignant and timely as ever. The Bernstein and Sondheim score is considered to be one of Broadway’s finest. 7:30p, call

POPEJOY HALL-UNM 1 UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO, 505.277.3824

popejoypresents.com LECTURE/DEMO

Modernist Moves: Imaging Dance in American Art This talk will cover American paintings, sculpture, prints and photographs of the early 20th century that focus on capturing movement in new, abstract ways often inspired by modern dance. Presented by Sharyn R. Udall, art historian, author, and independent curator. GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM EDUCATION ANNEX 123 GRANT, SANTA FE, 505.946.1012

okeeffemuseum.org

FRI 15 THROUGH MAR. 31: PERFORMANCE

Venus in Fur A naughty sort of comedy, one that has a slightly kinky, dangerous flair but with a flip side that’s elegant, erotic and infused with sexual heat. The play is also a tour-de-force for the two actors who play several characters and switch gender roles. Featuring Sheridan Johnson and Brendan Foster, both with deep theatrical roots. 8p, Fri., Sat.; 2p, Sun., $10-$18 AUX DOG THEATRE 3011 MONTE VISTA NE, 505.254.7716

auxdog.com THROUGH MAR. 23: PERFORMANCE

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare: Teatro Serpiente Taos’ Rich Greywolf, Adam Overley and Scott Tennant cover Shakespeare’s 37 plays in under two hours — what could be simpler? Watch as Teatro Serpiente — with a little bit of dumb luck, and a whole lot of fly-by-the-seat-of-their-pants — recreates for your viewing pleasure the splendor, grandeur and sheer literary brilliance of the entire Shakespearean


ARTS

OPE NI N G S/ PER F O R M A NC E S canon (and some sonnets too). 7p, Fri., Sat.; $12-$15

THE HARWOOD MUSEUM OF ART 238 LEDOUX, TAOS, 575.758.9826

harwoodmuseum.org ARTISTS RECEPTION AND TALK

Seeing is Believing The Gallery ABQ presents Seeing is Believing featuring Tim Gifford’s bronze sculptures, created in the time-honored art of lost wax casting and landscape photography by Garry Philips who draws his inspiration from the powerful vistas of NM. Hybrid artist Chris Meyer will discuss how he combines digital photography and printing with traditional collage and assemblage techniques to create his unique mixed-media objects. 5-8p, FREE THE GALLERY ABQ 8210 MENAUL NE, 505.292.9333

thegalleryabq.com RECEPTION

Appalachian Alchemy Weyrich presents Appalachian Alchemy New Work by Willi Singleton. Willi Singleton, a Pennsylvania ceramicist states, “It is my hope that people who choose to use my pots in their daily lives will sense their warmth and ‘sense of place’ as reflections of their Appalachian geneses.” 5-8:30p, FREE

WEYRICH GALLERY 2935 D LOUISIANA NE, 505.883.7410

weyrichgallery.com

RECEPTION

Groupies View the vibrant and intriguing acrylic creations of abstract artist Stefan Geissbühler. The show, entitled Groupies, will highlight a handful of paintings from his “mini” series; but what this body of work lacks in size, it makes up for in texture, liveliness and imagination. A selection of Geissbühler’s larger paintings will also be on display. 5-8p, FREE PALETTE CONTEMPORARY ART & CRAFT 7400 MONTGOMERY SUITE 22, 505.855.7777

palettecontemporary.com IMPROV PERFORMANCE

Friday Night Live Composed of incredibly talented local performers, Friday Night Live is a witty and risqué short form improv show performed by Stump! an improv team created and directed by Jessica Osbourne. 10:30p, $7-$10

AUX DOG THEATRE 3011 MONTE VISTA NE, 505.245.7716

auxdog.com Open House Framing Concepts will host an open house with artworks from three well known local artists; one each in watercolor, oils, and pastel. You must stop by to see who they are and to see their art. 5-7p, FREE FRAMING CONCEPTS GALLERY 5809 JUAN TABO NE, 505.294.3246

framingconceptsgallery.com

Sandy Voss - Hand-woven Rugs Voss has been weaving rugs for three decades. She works with contemporary materials, including fabric, textiles, vintage neck ties and high-end loom factory waste. 5-7p, FREE

MARIGOLD ARTS 424 CANYON, SANTA FE, 505.982.4142

marigoldarts.com RECEPTION

The Art of John McHugh John McHugh (1918-1995) was a noted Santa Fe architect, best known for designing the Santa Fe Opera. He was also a highly skilled painter and printmaker. This retrospective features both paintings and prints from the 1950s-1990s and includes many never before exhibited works. 5-7p, FREE

MATTHEWS GALLERY 669 CANYON, SANTA FE, 505.992.2882

thematthewsgallery.com PERFORMANCE

Stuart Davis With his trademark synergy of sacred and profane punchlines, Stuart Davis—writer/director/ actor/comedian/songwriter and practicing Buddhist monk—takes his audience through a circus of sexuality, spirituality and showbiz. In Davis’ universe, horny is holy, funny is profound and Love has no opposite. Davis twists mind, body and spirit into a hot ménage à trois. And his melodies are catchy and instantly memorable: intelligent, thought-provoking songwriting in the vein of Joe Jackson, Elvis Costello, XTC and fellow Minnesota native Bob Dylan. 7:30p

PERFORMANCE

In The Time of The Butterflies This new play by Caridad Svich, based on the novel of the same name by Julia Alvarez, tells the tale of the Mirabal sisters in the Dominican Republic in 1960, who led the resistance against the dictator Trujillo and who ultimately were assassinated. Directed by Nicole Phelps. 7:30p TEATRO PARAGUAS 3205 CALLE MARIE, SANTA FE, 505.424.1601

PERFORMANCE

Chickenheart by Craig Sodaro Braveheart doesn’t have anything on Chickenheart — a hysterical medieval melodrama set in 1340 in England. Faced with marriage to the despicable Sir Cutbert Cleever, Lady Emma does what any liberated medieval woman would do — she runs! Lady Emma and her maid disguise themselves and hide out at the Abbey of the Little Sisters of St. Meade. 8p DESERT ROSE PLAYHOUSE 6921-E MONTGOMERY NE, 505.881.0503

desertroseabq.org

SAT 16

MON 18

Sandia Performing Arts Company presents A Performance of One Acts This performance will be featuring The Last Act is a Solo by Robert Anderson and The Flattering Word by George Kelly. 7p, Sat., Sun.,

LECTURE

$8-$12

VISTA GRANDE COMMUNITY CENTER 15 LA MADERA RD, SANDIA PARK, 505.307.2333

sandiaperformingarts.org

SUN 17 THROUGH APR. 6: RECEPTION/ EXHIBITION

15th Annual Santos Show Traditional NM religious art will be on display. Local saunters have created images of sands with bultos and retablos as well as traditional arts in clay, fiber arts, paintings, sculpture, wood, metal and tin work. 2-4p, FREE TOME GALLERY 2930 HWY 47, LOS LUNAS, 505.565.0556 tomegallery.com

Michael Govan Story on page 35. 5:30p, FREE/ DONATION

UNM ART MUSEUM 1 UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO, 505.277.4001

unmartmuseum.org

THU 21 Pueblo Pottery by Pam Lujan-Hauer Enjoy a presentation by Pam LujanHauer, award-winning traditional and contemporary potter from the Taos Pueblo. Lujan-Hauer will demonstrate her art and tell the story of Pueblo Indian pottery, from the history of clay as an art form to the threats to traditional pottery. The presentation includes displays of raw materials and finished pieces, and slide show. 7p, FREE

OLD SAN YSIDRO CHURCH 966 OLD CHURCH, CORRALES, 505.890.5583

THE BOX, 100 GOLD SW, 505.232.9868

ampconcerts.org

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

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ARTS

OP E N I N G S/ P E R F O R M A NC E S FRI 22 THROUGH APR. 14: PERFORMANCE

The Motherf**ker with the Hat Set in a blue-collar Puerto Rican community in New York City, The Motherf**ker with the Hat is a high-octane verbal cage match about love, fidelity and misplaced haberdashery. Things are looking up for recovering alcoholic Jackie and his girlfriend Veronica—until Jackie spots another man’s hat in their apartment and embarks on a sublimely incompetent quest for vengeance. Fast-paced and uproarious, Mother is a gleefully foul-mouthed look at modern love and other addictions. (See story on page 35) 7:30p, Fri., Sat.; 2p, Sun., $10-$18

THE VORTEX THEATRE 2004-1/2 CENTRAL, 505.247.8600

vortexabq.org

IMPROV PERFORMANCE

Friday Night Live Composed of incredibly talented local performers, Friday Night Live is a witty and risqué short form improv show performed by Stump! an improv team created and directed by Jessica Osbourne. 10:30p, $7-$10

AUX DOG THEATRE 3011 MONTE VISTA NE, 505.245.7716

auxdog.com Nrityagram Dance Ensemble Nrityagram Dance Ensemble blends India’s classical dance with contemporary concepts. Nrityagram. With exceptional synchronicity, compelling physicality and emotional honesty, they have earned international acclaim for their ability to redefine both dance and theater. (See story on page 4) 8p, call for prices

SAT 23

SUN 24

LECTURE/DEMO

THROUGH MAR. 27: PERFORMANCE

Family Program: Skyscapes The expansive skies of northern NM served as more than a backdrop for the extraordinary landscapes of Georgia O’Keeffe. The light, the clouds, the rich palette of colors that dance across the desert skies, were central themes in her canvases. Explore the skies immortalized in her paintings. Led by Jonathan Cohen, arts educator. 9:30-11:30a

John Donald Robb Composers’ Symposium The centenary of Igor Stravinsky’s revolutionary Rite of Spring will be celebrated during the 2013 John Donald Robb Composers’ Symposium. This year’s symposium will explore the intersection of music and movement and will feature the works of 18 accomplished composers in seven concerts. Multiple times and prices. Check website for more details.

GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM 217 JOHNSON, SANA FE, 505.946.1000

okeeffemuseum.org

POPEJOY HALL-UNM 1 UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO, 505.277.3824

popejoypresents.com

UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO 1 UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO

robbtrust.org OPEN STUDIO AND PERFORMANCE

with Jamison Chas Banks MoCNA’s Local Artist in Resident Jamison Chas Banks opens his studio to the public to view his recent body of work Terrortories: The Frontier. Banks, a recent graduate of the Institute of American Indian Arts, is an interdisciplinary artist who incorporates performance, printmaking and new media in his practice to address and complicate contemporary and historical inaccuracies established across time and history. Noon-4p, TBD MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY NATIVE ARTS, 108 CATHEDRAL, SANTA FE, 505.983.1666

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

RECEPTION

Spring Forward Over 200 pieces featuring original works in oil, watercolor, acrylic, ceramic and photography with a portion of the sales price to benefit cancer patients in NM. 1-4p, FREE

passions ignite and a love story fueled by the dramatic leaps and turns of dancers’ bodies begins to build against a backdrop of Celtic rhythm. 7:30p

POPEJOY HALL-UNM 1 UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO

GALLERY WITH A CAUSE 4901 LANG NE, 505.828.3789

popejoypresents.com

nmcancercenter.com

TUE 26

PERFORMANCE

“Eleanor, Her Secret Journey” Starring Loretta Swit Throughout her life, Eleanor Roosevelt found the courage to face her challenges and discovered they made her stronger. The play begins when President Truman asks her to head the American delegation to the United Nations. Knowing this would be a big step for any woman, she reviews her life before accepting the offer that ultimately lands her on the world stage. Loretta Swit (M*A*S*H ) portrays Eleanor in this rewarding one-woman play. 3p

WORKSHOP

Art and Leadership for adults: Moved by Place Nurture the creative process with a two-hour pilgrimage into a world of art making. Gather inspiration from word and image, then move on to build small works: your landscapes, real and imagined. Led by E. Klingner, visual artist. 6-8p GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM EDUCATION ANNEX 123 GRANT, SANTA FE, 505.946.1012

okeeffemuseum.org

POPEJOY HALL-UNM 1 UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO

ONGOING

popejoypresents.com

EXHIBIT: THROUGH JUNE 1

MON 25 PERFORMANCE

Lord of the Dance Lord of the Dance is a mesmerizing blend of traditional and modern Celtic music and dance. The story is based upon mythical Irish folklore as Don Dorcha, Lord of Darkness, challenges the ethereal lord of light, the Lord of the Dance. Battle lines are drawn,

Flatlanders & Surface Dwellers This group exhibition featuring diverse visual art media that explore the intimate and exotic realm of surface texture, evoking visceral, multi-sensory responses. It features 25 artists, with painting, photography, sculpture, printmaking, fiber art, electronic media, video and installation. 516 ARTS, 516 CENTRAL SW, 505.242.1445 HOURS: TUE.-SAT., NOON-5P

516arts.org


smart ARTS T

rying to orchestrate a stage performance of any kind is a daunting task, and Albuquerque drama troupe Fusion has taken on the task magnificently with its original adaptation of Bruce Norris’ Clybourne Park. Clearly the world we live in today has become one in which the average person would rather watch a two-minute video adaptation of a good book rather than take the time to read the original story. The good news is, the arts are not dead, as is evidenced by director Fred Franklin’s take on the tale of the revolving cycle of race relations in the U.S. The original play received several prestigious awards, including the 2012 Tony for best play. Using Norris’ mechanism of setting the story in the same location but separated by 50 years, Franklin is sure to raise some provocative questions surrounding the nature of race-relations. Boasting a cast of some of New Mexico’s finest talent, the presentation is sure not to disappoint. So, share a bottle of red and a bite of sushi with a loved one, and head out for a night of wonderfully thought-provoking live theatre. —Charlie Crago

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ne of the country’s leading museum directors visits the UNM Art Museum for this lecture about the relationship between art and its community. Michael Govan is the director and CEO of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, where he has spearheaded ambitious development plans and orchestrated the commission and installation of art projects that dot the museum’s campus, beginning with Chris Burden’s Urban Light (2008), Robert Irwin’s evolving palm garden and most recently Michael Heizer’s Levitated Mass (2012). His vision as a museum director is one of contemporary artists interacting with a museum’s historic collections, a philosophy he developed as director of the Dia Art Foundation in New York City and deputy director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Govan holds a B.A. in art history from Williams College, in Williamstown, Mass., where he served as acting curator of the Williams College Museum of Art and, in 1986, organized the exhibition Picasso and Rembrandt. In 2008, Govan was selected as one of Esquire Magazine’s 75 most influential people. —Mike English

Michael Govan: Art and its Environment 5:30p, Mon., Mar. 18 Clybourne Park 7p, Fri.-Sat., Mar. 15-16 Kimo Theatre 423 Central NW, 505.768.3522

8p, Fri.; 2, 8p, Sat., Mar. 22-23 The Lensic 222 W. San Francisco, Santa Fe, 505.988.7050

$30-$37 fusionabq.org

UNM Art Museum On the UNM Campus, 505.277.4001

FREE unmartmuseum.org

The Motherf**ker with the Hat 7:30p, Fri.-Sat.; 2p, Sun., Mar. 22-Apr. 14 The Vortex 2004 Central SE, 505.247.8600

$10-$18 vortexabq.org

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sually you wouldn’t expect a play about addiction and jealous love to be a comedy, but The Motherf**ker with the Hat is just that. It’s a laugh-a-minute farce full of profanities and profundities, and is unlike anything you have ever seen. In the play, Jackie is a recovering alcoholic, fresh out of a lengthy stint in prison, who comes home to find another man’s hat in his shared apartment with his girlfriend Veronica. On a quest for vengeance, Jackie buys a gun and seeks to find the hat’s owner, but discovers more than he bargains for. It’s the New Mexico premiere of a Tony Award-nominated play that debuted on Broadway in 2011, and which resulted in a best actor Drama Desk Award for Bobby Cannavale. For this Albuquerque production, the main character roles of Jackie, Veronica and Julio are played by native New Mexican actors Ed Chavez, Alicia Maldonado and Efrain Villa, respectively. Directed by veteran Leslee Richards and written by Stephen Adly Guirgis, The Motherf**ker with the Hat is sure to be outrageously explicit and hilarious. —Todd Rohde

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

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BO0KS

Writing mind Natalie Goldberg says True Secret of Writing serves as a bookend to her 1980s classic Writing Down the Bones BY CRISTINA OLDS

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he true secret of writing, according to Natalie Goldberg, is a myth. “There isn’t one true secret and if someone tells you there is, run for the hills,” she said laughing in a recent interview with Local iQ. But that’s the title Goldberg has used for her retreats offered in Taos at the Mabel Dodge Luhan House for the past 12 years, and the inspiration for her latest book. More than just writing seminars, the workshops offer students meditation practice to improve their writing, and their lives, according to Goldberg. Sitting meditation, walking meditation and writing: sit, walk, write is the practice. “The quietest, deepest sits I’ve experienced have Goldberg included writing. The writing helps to empty and settle the mind. We then can sink into a quiet pool, into silence,” she writes in the introduction. When Goldberg penned her classic Writing Down the Bones in 1986, she had been practicing Zen Buddhism for nine years. Now, 27 years later, she’s honed her teaching methods. “The retreats I developed for writing, but not just for writing,” she explained. “They’re for waking up our whole being, and when we’re awake, how much more we can give to writing.” Goldberg has lived in New Mexico, first in Taos and now in Santa Fe, for nearly 40 years. Her connection with the Southwest is evident in her writing, and she samples from the setting to add detail to the personal stories peppered throughout The True Secret.

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“I care about New Mexico. I bring With this 12th book, the 63-year-old says people here and I teach them about the she’s created the capstone to her teaching environment,” she said. Fans should pay and a bookend to her first book on attention for the woman scribbling in her writing. “I feel this is my legacy book, my notebook when at Kakawa Chocolate or The completion with the journey.” Teahouse, or walking the Dale Ball trails or Goldberg is taking a break this year, she visiting the farmers’ market, as well as the claimed, then proceeded to list workshops various meditation centers where Goldberg she’s leading in France and Taos and a book sits. about her painting she’s currently writing. “I just deeply love New “Are you kidding?” she Mexico,” she said. “I travel laughed. “I’m always SIGNING a lot and I love other places, writing!” She said she but when I come back, I’m teaches students to Natalie home.” Santa Fe serves as write fluidly without Goldberg a great muse for her, and editing, and she believes she said many people don’t that beginning with 7p, Wed., Mar. 20 realize she wrote Writing meditation creates pure Bookworks Down the Bones there. passages. 4022 Rio Grande NW, 505.344.8139 “I write very well in Santa Fe, “You’re getting below I don’t know why that is,” she discursive thinking, bkwrks.com said. “I like to come back to always thinking about The True Secret of Albuquerque, too, and I find ourselves. Many of the when I do a reading there it’s chapters for True Secret Writing: Connecting always quite wonderful, the came out pretty much Life with Language audience is deep listeners.” whole,” she said. By Natalie Goldberg Goldberg recommends The book offers writing Atria Books, 2013 numerous books for exercises that tap into $25 discussion, “leaning toward our deeper selves, like ISBN: 978-1451641240 the classics.” When urged writing lists, visiting nataliegoldberg.com to name her favorite New a coffee shop and Mexican authors, Goldberg recording what you said that’s not something she see for seven days in a is usually asked. “Miriam row, and banging out a Sagan’s work I love,” she started. “I love six-word memoir. Another section of the John Nichols, and a few not as well known, book celebrates teachers and their works as like Gregory Martin who teaches at the models for our own writing. And another University (of New Mexico) in the creative part covers the specifics of the workshops, writing department. Jimmy Santiago Baca, encouraging writers to follow structure to Sean Murphy and Katie Arnold, who I order our minds and our lives. After all this hiked with this morning.” instruction, ultimately the message is to “shut up and write.” Writing is for everyone, “like eating and sleeping,” and serves as a natural human “The True Secret method is based on 2,000 expression, according to Goldberg. “It helps years of watching the mind,” Goldberg with democracy to say what you think and said. “It’s not just about writing, it’s about feel and to have a relationship with your practice. Students come because they have mind,” she said. a spiritual longing.”

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

SI GNI NGS THU 14

SUN 17

AUTHOR TALK

AUTHOR TALK

Mary Johnson presents Her Memoir, An Unquenchable Thirst After 20 years of service as a nun in Mother Teresa’s order, Johnson left the church to find her own path, but her magnificently told story holds universal truths about the mysteries of faith and how a woman discovers herself. 7p,

Emily Rapp, The Still Point Of The Turning World Like all mothers, Emily Rapp had ambitious plans for her first and only child, Ronan. He would be smart, loyal, physically fearless, and level-headed, but fun. 3p, FREE

BOOKWORKS 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8139

TUE 19

FREE

bkwrks.com

FRI 15 BOOK SIGNING

Maggi Petton Signs When Rain Remembers Maggi Petton signs copies of her new novel When Rain Remembers a sequel to Heaven’s Daughter. 7p, FREE

BOOKWORKS 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8139

bkwrks.com

SAT 16 BOOK READING

Albuquerque Poet Marge Saiser Reads From Losing The Ring In The River Spare and incisive, the poems in Losing the Ring in the River deal with three strong women — Clara, Emma, and Liz — who are tough, often sassy, and have dreams that aren’t quelled by the realities they face. Saiser deftly explores the undercurrents connecting three generations. Saiser’s poetry is as harsh as it is beautiful3p, FREE BOOKWORKS 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8139

bkwrks.com

BOOKWORKS 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8139

bkwrks.com

AUTHOR TALK

Linda Jacobs Discusses Her Novel Jackson Hole Journey Francesca di Paoli, a gifted yet penniless chef, arrives in Jackson Hole in 1925. Rescued by William Sutton, the “steady” son of a dude ranching family, she begins to feel safe, until the historic Gros Ventre landslide buries her and William alive. 7p, FREE

BOOKWORKS 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8139

bkwrks.com

THU 21 mar 21 AUTHOR TALK

Maria Nieto Presents Her Mystery That Explores Real-Life Death Of La Times Reporter Ruben Salaza It’s 1971, one year after the killing of famed LA Times reporter, Ruben Salazar. A junior reporter is asked to write a commemorative piece on Salazar and becomes embroiled in a murder mystery that appears to have ties to Ruben Salazar’s death. 7p, FREE

BOOKWORKS 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8139

bkwrks.com


LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

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smart FILM

A

Birth Story: Ina May h, babies. Thanks (or no thanks) to the fact that everyone on the Gaskin and The Farm planet knows how to have sex, Midwives we can count on a steady stream of DIRECTED BY SARA LAMM babies to continue until the world ends. Opens Mar. 15 Call for show times With 7 billion-plus people on the planet, CCA babies are big business. All sorts of 1050 Old Pecos Trail, things come into play nowadays with Santa Fe, 505.982.1338 current birthing practices … doctors, ccasantafe.org hospitals, scare stories and so on. But for birthstorymovie.com those who eschew such expensive and often unnecessary things, there are the midwives. In Birth Story, director Sara Lamm follows the story of Ina May Gaskin, who, with several other women, taught themselves the practice of midwifery in the 1970s at the “intentional living community” The Farm, located in Tennessee. Vivid detail and archival video is used to show Gaskin and her fellow practitioners and the mom’s describe and go through the process of giving birth. At the opening showing at 7p on Fri., Mar., 15, there will be an introduction and talk-back session with Peggy O’Mara, publisher of Mothering magazine. —Jeff Berg

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Local-iQ.com/film: Read Jeff Berg’s review of the 2011 Italian drama Shun Li and the Poet A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III

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ot nearly as bad as has been reported by other reviewers, this odd, sexist, slightly artsy comedy DIRECTED BY ROMAN won’t appeal to everyone, but it does have COPPOLA a certain charm and is 100 times better 4, 6, 8p, Mar. 22-24 than the stupid Identity Thief, which I Guild Cinema found to be nearly unwatchable. Charlie 3405 Central NE, Sheen stars as a version of himself 505.255.1848 (perhaps), a successful graphic designer, guildcinema.com womanizer and often-times jerk who facebook.com/ gets dropped by his latest girlfriend, with charlesswanIII the last straw being her discovery of a drawer full of photos of his numerous girlfriends. Sheen, as Swan, falls into a sometimes funny funk, aided by his useless best friend, played by Jason Schwartzman. Finally realizing that he is a cad and a jerk, he sets out to win her back, while living and reliving certain fantasies in his head, including a quite funny one that features Bill Murray as John Wayne (which is a bit off-putting due to a very negative stereotype of American Indians). As directed by Coppola, it is a sometimes clever low-budget romp, similar in tone and atmosphere as a Wes Anderson film, but not nearly as good. Odd but likable. —Jeff Berg

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

T

The Revisionaries
 exas sucks. Except for Big Bend DIRECTED BY SCOTT THURMAN National Park, Austin, Marfa, 6p, Mar. 25-28 and my friends who somehow Guild Cinema live in El Paso, it would not offend 3405 Central NE, 505.255.1848 me in the least if the state seceded guildcinema.com from the union as it often threatens therevisionariesmovie.com to do. Politics is the main reason, which infects the state like a flu virus, running all and ruining all, and a good example of that is shown in this stomach-churning documentary. The story of The Revisionaries focuses on Don McElroy, a dentist by trade, who somehow got to be on the state board of education for some years and was the chair for several (the story takes place in 2009-2010) and led the charge to erase evolution from being taught or even referenced in school books, 5 million of them, due to the conservative canon of himself and his allies. And it worked. Zeroing in on key meetings where the board literally changes the text of books to read as they want them to read, it’s unbelievable stuff, but it is presented without a heavy hand so you can decide for yourself just what is going on. Scary and informative. —Jeff Berg


PLANET WAVES

by Eric Francis • planetwaves. net

ARIES (MAR. 20-APR. 19) Pull out old photo albums and study photographs of yourself. Study how your image has changed, and how your selfimage has evolved over time. Try to identify the relationship between how you feel, what you look like and what you’re trying to project. Focus on this carefully and reflectively. We are under a rare combination of astrological factors that may indeed never happen again in our lifetimes, which suggest that photographs and your relationship to them are an unusually powerful force for healing and also for creativity. If you have a friend you trust or are good with self-portraits, take photos of yourself that are designed to be the person you want to become. Create the image as if it’s something you’re going to grow into (this is true of nearly all good portraits — they can offer a glimpse of the future). Photography has never been easier or more available and affordable; right now it has the power to change your life, in the best possible ways.

LEO (JUL. 22-AUG. 23) If you’re negotiating an arrangement with someone, take it slow. This is true for emotional, sexual or financial situations. This is what you might think of as a developing story, viewpoints and positions are changing, and information is gradually emerging. You’re not on a journey with a destination, but rather one that pauses in interesting places. Rather than being about fixed patterns, your relationships and the agreements that support them are continually evolving. I would remind you that part of the developing story is about how you respond to information that emerges from behind the scenes. Some of what comes out you will have known all along. Some you would never have guessed. All of it will prove to be useful, and there are a good few discoveries on the way that will prove to be essential. Just don’t get ahead of what you know; pause and allow the next revelation to come to the surface.

TAURUS (APR. 19-MAY 20) It’s time to loosen up your perspective and your perception. You know all the times you were seeing the world in black and white, and then it turned out that you could see in many colors — that’s where you are at right now. Yes, the spectrum of possibilities, of personalities, of what is simply interesting rather than being a moral issue, is more than most people think they can handle. However, your own sense of potential is directly linked to what you’re able to perceive and be at peace with in the world around you. The more you embrace what is so, without any need to judge it, the more you will expand into who you are and what you’re becoming. Most notions of right vs. wrong make no sense at all, and to some extent, we’re all carrying around the residue of moralism. If you take even one step toward freedom, you’re likely to feel like an anarchist. That’s not really true; that sensation is just an indication of how wound up you were in the past, and how much you’re letting go of today.

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEP. 22) You may not know where you stand with a relationship for a few weeks. Remember though that the information you’re waiting for is coming from you, not from someone else. You may think you’re waiting to figure out what they want, or what is happening with the relationship. What you really want to know is how you feel and where you stand. Don’t assume you know that today, because your opinion could change several times. And even then, you may still feel like you’re standing on a shifting foundation. If you keep coming back to the same feeling and the same basic analysis day after day, that’s something to take careful note of. That said, you’re likely to make a series of discoveries, particularly around the time Mercury changes directions on the 17th, which will very likely serve to shift or evolve your point of view. Remember that the new information is likely to obviate old information and therefore, your prior point of view. Keep your files current.

GEMINI (MAY 20-JUN. 21) Mercury is about to change directions in the angle of your chart associated with your career, your reputation and your sense of responsibility. Take nothing for granted. Use the approach of doing as little as possible, in terms of staking out new ground, trying to move up or claim new territory. This is the time to watch, and observe carefully what you see. Things are not as they might seem at first look, and your role is likely to be considerably different than what you now imagine it is or might become. When you get new, possibly long-soughtafter information, pause rather than act on it. Timing is everything. Therefore, all the information you obtain needs to be considered in terms of when it is relevant, and for how long. Just remember, it’s unlikely to be right now. There’s likely to be a built-in delay, and you need to keep that in mind. Even if you determine that something must be acted on “right now,” you will likely have an hour or a day. Therefore, take your time — in the literal sense of that expression. CANCER (JUN. 21-JUL. 22) The New Moon in Pisces is designed to open up the horizons of your life, which will begin with feeling the sensation of potential. I cannot emphasize this point enough: potential starts with the feeling that something is possible. It’s not about the plan that will get you there; it’s not a reasoning process. It’s an emotional experience that feels like you have space to open up, expand and be something different and more interesting than you are. From that feeling, you can then move into a more creative mode, and then into some planning. Yet through this process, the most significant element is being aware of what you want, and tuning into the feeling that you can create it. That is what your current astrology is about. There does appear to be a secret that you’re keeping from yourself, though rather than trying to root it out, I suggest you listen, observe and notice when it bubbles to the surface. When it does, say hello, be friendly and establish a relationship to what you discover.

LIBRA (SEP. 22-OCT. 23) You may see the possibility of two different paths ahead of you, though it looks like they have a lot more in common, and can be supportive of one another. Said differently, this is not a case of either/or, but rather one of integration, and organizing your life so that the various elements work in a state of synergy. You can stop thinking of your life as existing in parts or in pieces and shift your perspective to the sensation of being a whole person, who expresses yourself many different ways. If you find something that does not seem to support the larger whole, ask yourself how you can bring it into the mix. You, your existence and your environment are all far more flexible than you have given them credit for being. The way to make the best use of your abundant opportunities is to stretch yourself into them; experiment like you would mixing colors, combining words and pictures, music and sculpture. Remember, this is about you; there is no “it.” SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 22) All sex is an experiment. When it ceases to be so, the life, the vital force, has gone from the experience. Where the conversation begins, pleasure is soon to follow, and that is the way to tap the astounding depth, diversity and richness of sexual potential. Start by revealing yourself, or asking someone else to. Describe what you’ve done, what you want, or what you’re feeling. You can also express yourself in words and pictures, though I suggest that you stay as close to direct, relational experience as you want — there will be plenty of time to reflect. Your chart is hinting at a secret desire that you have not been quite up to admitting to yourself, much less expressing to someone else. Now may be just the right time to make contact with that desire, and step into full awareness and embrace. Yes, you may feel a little awkward, especially if you ask yourself, “Is this who I really am?” This is a question to hang out with for a while, rather than answer immediately.

UNIVERSAL CROSSWORD

SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 22) People in your family were not, and are not, saints; it’s unlikely that many of the saints were saints. Therefore, you don’t need to hold yourself to any moral or ethical standard except what is right for you. When the contents of the subconscious are examined, we discover all kinds of rules, expectations, contradictions and double standards. It’s enough to drive anyone insane, and in fact we all verge on that insanity when it comes down to the expectations that family lays on us as children and even as adults. That is a complex issue; the thing to remember now is, don’t deceive yourself by attempting to hold yourself to anyone’s standard for moral purity. You want what you want, you like what you like. It’s up to you to discern whether your conduct hurts anyone. It’s also up to you to deal with people who tend to “get hurt” by your basic choices some way other than pruning yourself back. Anyway — the whole “getting hurt” game is worth careful analysis. It’s not what it seems. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 20) Are you ready to let go of jealousy? Are you ready to let go of the need to have power over others? By others, I mean the people close to you, and those you’re aware of in your environment. Jealousy and its cousins, such as envy and guilt, only serve to keep everyone bound up in a state of frustration and limited potential. You seem to be feeling the craving to unravel all of that, and to set free your mind and your feelings. You can do this, if you remember that pleasure is the opposite of power. Those are essentially the choices you have, which you can think of as existing along a spectrum of experience. From where you stand now, here is what’s possible: that no idea is threatening; that no experience of another person is threatening; that no fear is necessary in relationships. You would be surprised how these emotions are not the “bottom line” we often experience them as, but rather emotional habits that you can release by decisions, and in the end, simply by loving more. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 19) Among the most significant decisions you can ever make are the ones about what is the most meaningful to you, which are a reflection of yourself. Right now you are making some profound decisions about what you want, what is possible, what you believe and what you deserve. You can safely think of this as the very core of growth or evolution. There seems to be one critical point that you’re struggling with; one belief that has the power to throw your whole life out of alignment. If not for that one thing, you would have the freedom to be fully present in your own life. I will offer a few words from A Course in Miracles that I’ve quoted a number of times, and which seem relevant to you in this moment of your journey. “Every decision you make stems from what you think you are, and represents the value that you put upon yourself. Believe that little can content you, and by limiting yourself you will not be satisfied. For your function is not little, and it is only by finding your function and fulfilling it that you can escape from littleness.” Or translated into two words: Be Bold. PISCES (FEB. 19-MAR. 20) I suggest you not occupy your mind with why people do what they do, or think the way they think. It’s a good way to get caught in the very darkness you would be trying to figure out. When you see a mystery that is perplexing, just let it be a mystery. The thing you really want to understand are your own motives and your own goals. Most of the time you’re not an “the ends justify the means” kind of person, however, the choices you make this week may seem to lean in that direction. Once you know what you want and why you want it, you’re likely to become aware of the fact that there is a way to make it happen, if only you have the courage or motivation to make it so. If you determine that something is questionably ethical, then the thing to do is to question the ethics, and remember that any real question has an answer. Your ability to pause and reflect on the nature of your options and the actual impact of your choices is your most important boundary.

SOLUTION ON PAGE 40

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

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There’s preparation, eagerness, and then there’s stalking

 A lot of emphasis is placed on being prepared in your job search. You’ll find tips on everything from getting ready for an interview, to thoroughly conducting your company research, to finding ways to network with professionals in the field. While these are all very important steps, it is important to understand that overpreparing and obsessing can hurt your search more than help it. Here are a few things to be aware of when looking for your next position:

Connect on LinkedIn, not Facebook It is great to “like” a company Facebook page; you can learn a lot of valuable information by doing so. However, trying to tap into the personal life of a recruiter can cross the line. Unless the recruiter uses their personal Facebook page specifically for work purposes, stick with the more business-focused connections on LinkedIn. You shouldn’t know details

to, but shy away from launching a full out campaign to find people who know them. This may be communicated poorly to the hiring manager.

Follow-up tastefully of the interviewer’s family or vacations during an interview.

Limit “accidental” encounters  

Using industry-specific associations or charity groups to network with professionals from a company you are targeting is a great way to make a connection. However, you need to be sure you are not trying to join every group a recruiter is part of. Steer clear of looking like you are following them around town.

Tap into your close network only 

You should always ask your close contacts if they know anyone who works for the company you are interested in applying

Following up after an interview is not only courteous, it’s also a great way to stay top of mind. However, repeated follow-ups can become burdensome. Send a handwritten thank you note after your interview and respect the recruiter’s time. You should also clarify the prefered next steps before you leave the interview.
Everyone has his or her own way of preparing for a job search. Just be sure yours is strategic and respectful of the recruiter or hiring manager’s time and boundaries. Theresa Maher, a former Albuquerque resident, is vice-president, creative and partner services at Recruiting.com. For the latest Albuquerque job openings, visit the careers section of local-iQ.com.

C OM M U N I T Y E VE N T S THU 14 Whole Foods Market Karaoke Fundraiser This fundraiser supports the “Whole Planet Foundation” through Whole Foods to provide opportunity around the world. There will be contests and prizes. 6:30p, $1/song

ED’S PUB AND LEISURE BOWL 7400 LOMAS NE, 505.268.4371

SAT 16 Stargazing The Rio Rancho Astronomical Society’s monthly meeting. 6p, FREE CORONADO STATE MONUMENT 485 KUAUA, BERNALILLO, 505.220.5492

rrasto.org EVENT

Soil Science And Composting Come to this workshop to understand how to determine what type of soil you have and how to build healthy soil with composting. Shawn Hardeman will cover soil science, what soil is made of and what that means to the backyard farmer. John Zarola will explain compost methods and compost building so that participants will be ready to begin at home. 9p, FREE GUTIERREZ-HUBBELL HOUSE 6029 ISLETA SW

bernco.gov/BCOS-Events

CROSSWORD SOLUTION

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 14-27, 2013

LECTURE

Winter of the Metal People Dennis Herrick will reveal the history of the little-known, but bloody, Tiguex War. He became interested in local Pueblo lore and Coronado’s expedition when he moved to Rio Rancho’s Rivers Edge III development. For two winters Coronado’s military headquarters was at Santiago Pueblo, the original site just a short walk from his house. 2p, FREE CORONADO STATE MONUMENT 485 KUAUA, BERNALILLO, 505.867.5351

nmmonuments.org/ about.php?_instid=CORO

WED 20 Wine Dinner with world famous Gruet Wineries An elegant five-course dinner paired with Gruet Wines. Casablanca is transformed and Gruet representatives will be on hand explain their wine making process. The executive chef has paired an exquisite menu to enhance flavors and treat the palate. 6:30p, $64 per person, reservations required. HOTEL ANDALUZ 125 SECOND, 505.923.9013

hotelandaluz.com

Disco For Dogs Join NM Pets Alive for a benefit event. Adoptable pets will be on site and skating will be fun for the whole family. No pets allowed. 6-8p, $10

ROLLER SKATE CITY 400 PAISANO NE, 505.281.2002

newmexicopetsalive.org

THU 21 LECTURE

Thinking About Nuclear Deterrence in Today’s World Nuclear weapons issues continue to dominate headlines 50 years after their invention.  Philip Goldstone, PhD, addresses the moral dimensions of nuclear deterrence, its present role and weapons elimination as a goal.

and low water plant varieties in the Railyard Park! All welcome, no previous experience needed. 9-11:30a, FREE

RAILYARD PARK COMMUNITY ROOM CALLEJON STREET, SANTA FE, 505.316.3596

railyardpark.org

SUN 24 Explora Adult Night Out, Bubbles and Bubbles As part of Women In Creativity, this fundraiser benefits Explora! Experiment with the art and science of bubbles. Price includes activities and supplies as well as champagne tastings. 4-7, $20. Q BAR, HOTEL ALBUQUERQUE 800 RIO GRANDE, NW, 224.8382

explora.us

1-3p, $10

ST. JOHN’S UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, 1200 OLD PECOS TRAIL, SANTA FE, 505.982.9274

ONGOING

renesan.org

SUNDAYS THROUGH APR. 7

SAT 23 Santa Fe Railyard Yardmaster Orientation As spring approaches, become Yardmasters volunteers at the Railyard Park for another fun season of gardening and handson workshops. Perfect your green thumb with the over 150 native

Evolutionary Circle This group is based on the work of Barbara Marx Hubbard and designed to facilitate the process of moving from ego to essence. 6:30-8:30p, FREE

THE SOURCE 1111 CARLISLE SE, 505.350.7895

thesourceabq.com


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