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2008-09 Women’s Tennis Media Guide QUICK FACTS

THE DEPARTMENTS

LMU WOMEN’S TENNIS STAFF Head Coach: Jamie Sanchez Alma Mater: LMU ‘75 Record At LMU: 428-389 (34th season) Overall Record: 428-389 (34th season) Assistant Coach: Amanda Ammerman (second season) Alma Mater: UCLA, ‘01 Assistant Coach: Tami Adkins (second season) Alma Mater: San Francisco ‘93 Tennis Office Phone (310) 338-7506 Tennis Office Fax (310) 338-5915 TEAM FACTS 2008 Record: 2008 WCC Record:

11-14 4-3

POSTSEASON INFORMATION WCC Championships (1):

John Shaffer (310) 338-7643 jshaffer@lmu.edu Tyler Geivett (310) 338-7638 (310) 345-6997 tgeivett@lmu.edu Mark Dodson (310) 338-5798 mdodson2@lmu.edu Maria Ortiz (310) 338-7768 mortiz13@lion.lmu.edu (310) 338-2703 www.LMULions.com

INSIDE LMU ........................... 13-46 What Do You Know About LMU? ................13 LMU Mission Statements and Facts .........14-15 What LMU is About ................................16-17 The Colleges ...........................................18-19 Academic Support ..................................20-21 LMU Sports Medicine ..............................22-23 LMU Strength and Conditioning .............24-25 LMU Athletics Facilities............................27-28 LMU Campus Map .......................................29 Lion Game Day ............................................31 History of LMU Athletics .........................33-39 Rev. Robert B. Lawton, S.J. ...........................40 Dr. William S. Husak.....................................41 Compliance Information .........................42-43 Los Angeles ............................................45-46 TENNIS HISTORY .................... 47-52 All-Time Roster ............................................47 Program History ...........................................48 All-Time Honors ...........................................48 All-Time Career Records ...............................49 All-Time Season Records ..............................49 Program Year-by-Year .............................50-52

Athletic Media Relations Gersten Pavilion 1 LMU Drive Los Angeles, CA 90045 Óään‡ä™ÊUÊ£ÊUÊ1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ

2008-09 LIONS’ MEDIA GUIDE

MEDIA RELATIONS Asst. AD: Office Phone: E-Mail: Asst. SID: Office Phone: Cell Phone: E-Mail: Asst. SID: Office Phone: E-Mail: Assistant (Tennis SID): Office Phone: E-Mail: SID Office Fax: Website: Mailing Address:

2002

MEET THE TEAM ...................... 1-12 Table of Contents...........................................1 Quick Facts ....................................................1 Betty Werner ..............................................2-3 2008-09 Schedule..........................................4 2008-09 Roster ..............................................5 The Coaches ...............................................6-7 Jamie Sanchez .......................................6 Amanda Ammerman .............................7 Tami Adkins ...........................................7 The Players................................................8-12 Audrey Bulkley.......................................8 Maria Garcia-Planas Albert.....................8 Jasmin Heckel ........................................9 Estelle LaPorte .......................................9 Shauna Morgan ...................................10 Bliss Nixon ...........................................10 Elisaveta Pironkova ..............................11 Jane Pringle .........................................11 Tina Razloznik .....................................12

MEET THE TEAM

UNIVERSITY INFORMATION Location: Los Angeles, CA Founded: 1911 Enrollment: 8,836 (5,560 Undergrad) Nickname: Lions Colors: Crimson, Navy, Gray Affiliation: NCAA Division I West Coast Conference Conference: Home Courts: LMU Tennis Center President: Rev. Robert B. Lawton, SJ Alma Mater: Fordham, ‘71 Athletic Director: Dr. William Husak Alma Mater: SUNY-Cortland, ‘72 Athletic Phone: (310) 338-5404 Ticket Office: (310) 338-LION

2008-09 LIONS

LMU WOMEN’S TENNIS 2008-09

2008-09 LIONS

MEET THE TEAM

the heart of a lion...

BETTY WERNER A Season Dedicated The 2008-09 LMU women’s tennis season will be dedicated to the life and memory of Betty Werner. Werner, who served as a senior associate athletics director at Loyola Marymount University from 2000 to 2008, saw her final challenge, a five-month battle with cancer, come to an end on Saturday morning, Aug. 16, as she passed away at her home in Torrance, Calif. She was 59. Growing up in the heart of Texas, Betty Werner knew from the beginning where her heart was headed. Battling anyone she could find in any sport she could find at a young age, she knew her life was to be spent in athletics. For more than 40 years, Werner has been blazing new trails and taking on new challenges to provide opportunities for women in athletics. And she did it with a heart the size of the state she came from. “Betty has done so much in establishing opportunities for young people specifically women,” said Athletics Director Dr. William Husak. “Everyone you talk to will tell you she did it with so much love. Betty will be deeply missed. Words do not do justice in describing how wonderful she was to so many.” Werner was hired to oversee all internal operations of the athletics department at LMU in 2000. During her time, the Lions saw unprecedented success, including the program’s first conference titles in women’s tennis, women’s basketball and men’s golf, and the first-ever NCAA tournament appearances for men and women’s soccer - all sports she supervised. “I grew to love Betty, appreciate her energy and her genuine willingness to make everything around her better,” said Nora Lynn Finch, Associate Commissioner of the Atlantic Coast Conference and chair of the original NCAA Women’s Basketball Championship Committee Werner served on from 1982-86. “She was just a joy to be around. Our teams might be playing at the NCAA tournament together, but I smile at the simple fact that I got to see her.” Prior to LMU, she held similar positions at Arkansas State (1999-00), Eastern Kentucky (1996-99) and Drake University (1974-86). She also worked at the private sector as a director for country clubs in Phoenix, Ariz., and Dallas, Tex., (1987-93) and then as a coordinator of concessions at Coors Field for the Colorado Rockies in Denver, Colo. (1994-96). “She believed in doing things the right way,” said Chris Wyche, a former co-worker of Werner’s at Arkansas State and current Vice President of Operations for the Kansas City Wizards. “She would do things to benefit the student-athlete. I have an 11 year-old daughter, and every day my daughter plays soccer, I remind her that it was Betty and those she worked with that blazed the trail for her to play soccer today. So many owe so much to what she has accomplished in her career.”

2008-09 LIONS’ MEDIA GUIDE

It all began in Dallas, Texas. She was born on Oct. 14, 1948 and as she grew, so did her love for basketball. “Betty really loved basketball growing up,” said her father, Gene. “At the time, there were no teams for girls to play on. She would go to the boys’ practice, shoot baskets and play.” At Thomas Jefferson High School in Dallas, the women’s tennis coach saw her playing at a boys’ basketball practice and suggested she play on the tennis team. She did and an athletic career was born. She went on to have a successful career, playing No. 1 singles and doubles, playing the Texas Tennis Circuit and earning the Dallas Tennis Association Sportsmanship Award in 1964. At the same time, she caught the eye of the new boy’s basketball coach, Barry Dowd. “I first saw her play as an 11th grader,” said Dowd. “She was a very good tennis player, very smart player. I knew she would have a future.” Dowd kept an eye on Werner throughout her career and hired her at Arkansas State when he was hired as the Athletics Director out of Oklahoma State. “She excelled because of the competitiveness she had in her. She was that way as an administrator. As an athlete she did that. She overcame the `prejuÓään‡ä™ÊUÊÓÊUÊ1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ

the heart of a lion...

Werner graduated high school in 1966 and went on to the University of Tulsa where she played tennis. She played No. 3 singles from 1967-68 and No. 1 singles from 1969-70 and finished in 1970 with a Bachelor of Science. She went straight to graduate school and finished with a Master of Education at the University of Missouri in 1971.

2008-09 LIONS

dice’ that women had to go through to excel. That is how she was in everything,” said Dowd. “She was so bright and did things with such care. She was so dedicated to the student-athletes. She will be missed.”

She then went on to play tennis after college and was ranked No. 1 in women’s doubles and No. 3 in women’s singles in Louisiana in 1971-72. She also claimed several international championships in racquetball, and was hired at Maryville College as an instructor of health and physical education.

In 1979, when President Jimmy Carter implemented Title IX throughout the collegiate level, women were given the opportunity to have scholarships for the first time at universities around the country and Werner was at the center of it. “I look at her as one of the people who made Title IX a reality,” said Wyche. “But she didn’t do it because there was a piece of paper that said she had to. She did it because it was the right thing to do. It is what she strived for. Her whole life was based on that.”

MEET THE TEAM

She was then hired as the Women’s Athletics Director at Drake in 1974. She was the youngest woman administrator in collegiate athletics history (at the time) and the first female administrator at the University.

Werner helped develop Drake into a national power in women’s athletics and was moved to Associate Athletics Director for both the men and women’s program when they merged in 1981. In 1982, she was appointed to the committee of the NCAA’s flagship sport, women’s basketball. She served on the groundbreaking committee for five years. While with the group, she was the CBS Liaison, bringing women’s athletics at the collegiate level to national television for the first time. “The NCAA was adamant that women’s basketball was to be their flagship sport for women,” said Finch. “If you are going to raise up an entire group, you have to raise up the flagship. It was important we established a strong foundation for the sport, to sell it, to market it and to fill the seats. We did that. Betty, Jim Jarrett, and Fern Gardner were cornerstones in the development of this committee. I knew I could give the toughest assignments to Betty and they would get done the right way.” And the coaches she had to work with, including the legendary ones, agreed. “I have great respect for Betty Werner and her impact on collegiate athletics,” said University of Tennessee Women’s Basketball Head Coach Pat Summitt. “She was very passionate about making a difference and having a positive influence on student-athletes.” As her career continued, so did her involvement. In addition to the basketball committee, Werner served as chairperson on the NCAA Joint Men’s and Women’s Tennis Committee. Under her direction, Werner brought both the men and women’s tennis championship to the same competitive site, bringing a heightened marketing exposure to the sport. “Most people know of her devotion and passion,” said Wyche. “Sometimes it is the little things that truly define someone. I will always remember her devotion to her dog Sunny and their Christmas letters. They were very special. The things she went through for Sunny, is really no different in how she lived her life. She was very special.”

2008-09 LIONS’ MEDIA GUIDE

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2008-09 LIONS’ MEDIA GUIDE

2008-09 LIONS

SECTION

the heart of a lion...

2008-09 Women’s Tennis Schedule Date Sep. 27 Oct. 10-12 Oct. 10-12 Oct. 23-26 Nov. 7-10 Nov. 14-16 Feb. 5 Feb. 8 Feb. 14 Feb. 15 Feb. 18 Feb. 19 Feb. 22 Feb. 28 Mar. 1 Mar. 5 Mar. 7 Mar. 11 Mar. 14 Mar. 15 Mar. 19 Mar. 21 Mar. 27 Mar. 28 Mar. 29 Apr. 3 Apr. 5 Apr. 9 Apr. 16-19 May 8-10 May 13-19 May 19-24

Day Sat Fri-Sun Fri-Sun Thu-Sun Fri-Sun Fri-Sun Thu Sun Sat Sun Wed Thu Sun Sat Sun Thu Sat Wed Sat Sun Thu Sat Fri Sat Sun Thu Sun Thu Thu-Sun Fri-Sun Wed-Tues Tues-Sun

Opponent Alumnae Match Cal State Fullerton Tournament St. Mar.y’s Invitational ITA Regional Tournament @ San Diego Cal State Northridge Tournament UCI Invitational Florida International University of San Diego Cal Poly San Luis Obispo UC Santa Barbara Pepperdine University UCLA Louisiana-Lafayette University University of San Francisco Santa Clara University Cal State Fullerton San Diego State Temple University University of Memphis Columbia University Cornell University of Louisville Gonzaga University St. Mar.y’s College Portland University Cal State Northridge UC Irvine Cal State Long Beach WCC Tennis Championships NCAA Regional Championships NCAA Team Championships NCAA Individual Championships

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Site LMU Tennis Center Fullerton, Calif. Moraga, Calif. Barnes Tennis Center Northridge, Calif. Irvine, Calif. LMU Tennis Center San Diego, Calif. San Luis Obispo, Calif. Santa Barbara, Calif. LMU Tennis Center Los Angeles, Calif. LMU Tennis Center Santa Clara, Calif. Santa Clara, Calif. Fullerton, Calif. LMU Tennis Center LMU Tennis Center LMU Tennis Center LMU Tennis Center LMU Tennis Center LMU Tennis Center Moraga, Calif. Moraga, Calif. Moraga, Calif. Northridge, Calif. Irvine, Calif. LMU Tennis Center Barnes Tennis Center TBA TBA TBA

Time 10:00 a.m. All Day All Day All Day All Day All Day 1:30 p.m. 11:00 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 1:30 p.m. 1:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m. 11:00 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 10:00 a.m. 10:00 a.m. 1:30 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 1:30 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 2:00 p.m. 11:00 a.m. 1:30 p.m. All Day All Day All Day All Day

the heart of a lion... 2008-09 LIONS

2008-09 Women’s Tennis Roster

MEET THE TEAM

Name Audrey Bulkley Maria Garcia-Planas Albert Jasmin Heckel Estelle LaPorte Shauna Morgan Bliss Nixon Elisaveta Pironkova Jane Pringle Tina Razloznik

Ht. 5-9 5-8 5-7 5-5 5-5 5-4 5-8 5-6 5-9

Yr-Exp. JR-2V JR-2V SO-1V FR-HS SO-1V JR-2V FR-HS JR-TR SR-1V

Hometown/Previous School Springfield, Ill./Futures HS Barcelona, Spain/Schiller International School Wolfsburg, Germany/Ratsgymnasium Wolfsburg Hermosa Beach, Calif./Santa Monica CC Las Vegas, Nev./Laurel Springs HS Gold Coast, QLD, Australia/Coomera Anglican Plovdiv, Bulgaria/Sport School Vasil Levski Bedford, South Africa/University of Texas, Austin Indrija, Slovenia/University of Arizona

Head Coach: Jamie Sanchez (LMU, ’75) – 34th season Assistant Coach: Amanda Ammerman (UCLA, ’01) – second season Volunteer Assistant Coach: Tami Adkins (USF, ’94) – second season

2008-09 LIONS’ MEDIA GUIDE

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2008-09 LIONS

MEET THE TEAM

the heart of a lion...

JAMIE SANCHEZ Head Coach UÊSixth Season Jamie Sanchez is in his 34th season as head coach of the Loyola Marymount women’s tennis program. Sanchez, the program’s only coach since its inception, began coaching the team in 1975 and has posted a career record of 428-389 in 33 seasons. Sanchez ranks 12th all-time nationally among active coaches with 428 victories. In 2001, the Lions were represented in the Individual NCAA Playoffs with the doubles duo of Andrea Lord and Angelina Zdorovytska. In 2002, Sanchez guided the Lions to their first ever West Coast Conference Championship with a 4-2 win over Pepperdine. With the win, Sanchez and the Lions advanced to the NCAA playoffs as a team for the first time in program history. He was named the West Coast Conference Coach of the Year for the second straight year in 2002, and in 2006 he earned his third WCC Coach of the Year honor. In his 31 years at the helm of the Lions’ program, Sanchez’s teams have never finished lower than fourth in the WCC. The Lions finished 12-14 and in second place after reaching the WCC Championship in 2006.

211 Division I victories. He was an assistant coach for both the football and men’s soccer teams in the 1970’s, and served as the head athletic trainer and equipment manager in 1978 and 1979. He was also the NCAA Division I Chair of the West Region and will serve on the NCAA Tennis Committee once again this year. Sanchez also served as the director of intramurals for 14 years. In 1990-91, Sanchez was the Athletics Facilities Manager and the Assistant to the Athletic Director for seven years, with duties including supervision of the ticket and event management staff for men’s and women’s intercollegiate athletic events. His work as a liaison to the NCAA on compliance issues led the department to add a position dedicated to that work. Sanchez has been a member of the United States Tennis Association (USTA) since 1968, and a member of the United States Professional Tennis Registry (USPTR) since 1987. In addition to his duties at LMU, Sanchez serves as the Head Tennis Professional at the El Segundo Recreation Center. He still competes in regional tournaments in the open division. Sanchez currently resides in El Segundo, CA. His daughter, Erin, joined the Lions’ tennis program in 2001 and played four seasons for her father and the Lions.

In November of 2004, Sanchez was honored with the US Tennis Association/Intercollegiate Tennis Association Campus Recreation Award as the sectional winner for all of Southern California. In its second year, the award honors an ITA coach who has done an outstanding job implementing recreational tennis programs on campus in an effort to grow tennis participation. Sanchez, who developed and supervised the original LMU fitness center and club sports program, also worked with the current Campus Recreation department to direct LMU Tennis 101, where a recreational class open to all members of LMU’s Burns Recreation Center is offered twice a week to promote fitness and interest in the sport of tennis. As the Southern California sectional winner, Sanchez advanced to the national finalist pool of nine.

2008-09 LIONS’ MEDIA GUIDE

Among other highlights of his 32-year coaching career are leading his 1978 squad to a No. 20 national ranking at the AIAW Division II level (one of three straight undefeated conference title teams), and the 1982 squad finishing 12th in the nation in NCAA Division II, its only year at that level. The Lions then received a preseason ranking of third in the nation in 1983, before the Lions moved to the Division I level. Through the years, Sanchez has had four players earn LMU Athlete of the Year honors (Pavla Mesterova 2005-06; Penka Fileva 2002-03; Edit Pakay 2001-02; Julie Oshiro 1993-94) while Kris Anderson was named LMU Scholar-Athlete of the Year twice (1987-88; 88-89). He has had 23 players earn All-WCC honors as singles players in the last six seasons, while 13 doubles teams have earn all-conference accolades since 2000-01. In 2006, a record-equalling six Lions received All-WCC recognition. In addition, eight players have earned Academic All-WCC honors since 1996 and 40 National Scholar-Athlete selections since 1990. Sanchez has been a student-athlete, coach and administrator at Loyola Marymount for over 36 years. He earned eight varsity letters in tennis and football at LMU from 1969 to 1974. He graduated from LMU in 1975 with a bachelor’s degree in English. In February of 1993, Sanchez was inducted into the Loyola Marymount Athletics Hall of Fame. He became a two-time inductee in 2003 when he was inducted again with the 1969 Club National Championship football team. Sanchez has served in many different capacities throughout his tenure. He coached the men’s tennis team for 21 seasons (1975-96) and posted Óään‡ä™ÊUÊÈÊUÊ1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ

the heart of a lion...

Assistant Coach Amanda Ammerman

A two-time All-American, Ammerman began her collegiate playing career at the University of Florida from 1996-97. An All-American in singles, she advanced to the third round of the NCAA Singles Championships, losing to the eventual national champion, while also advancing to the second round in doubles. Ammerman achieved a final national ranking of No. 15 in singles and No. 20 in doubles. She concluded her year ranked No. 5 in both singles and doubles in the South Region while also garnering first team All-Southeastern Conference honors at No. 1 singles and No. 2 doubles. Ammerman transferred to UCLA in 1997 where she played for two seasons. In her first season as a Bruin, she entered the preseason ranked No. 15 and climbed to No. 4 in the fall edition. Her accolades include being named the ITA National Player of the Month, winning the Rolex Southern California Regional and claiming the consolation title at the Riviera AllAmerican Championships. She won 10 consecutive matches to register a 10-1 record in fall tournaments. In doubles, Ammerman entered the

preseason ranked No. 23 and climbed up to the No. 12 spot. In her second season at UCLA, Ammerman finished second on the team in victories with 26, ending the season 26-13 overall. Her 24-10 overall doubles record garnered her All-America honors for the second time in her career. She earned a First-Team Pac-10 All-Academic selection, along with honorable mention All-Pac-10 accolades. She reached the second round in both singles and doubles at the NCAA Championships. Ammerman finished the season ranked No. 43 in singles and No. 5 in doubles. In her final season at UCLA, Ammerman was team captain for the team, which made it to the NCAA quarterfinals before losing to eventual champs Stanford. Ammerman entered college as the No. 1 ranked player in the USTA Girls 18s division for singles and doubles in 1995. A member of U.S. National Team from 1993-95, she played singles and doubles at the 1996 Wimbledon, the U.S., French and Italian Open juniors tournaments while winning the 1995 Easter Bowl Girls’ 18 Championships. Ammerman finished the 1994 season ranked No. 10 in the ITF world junior rankings and as a singles finalist at the Canadian and Japan Open Junior Championships. She reached the semifinals of the 1993 French Open Junior Championships in singles, won the 1992 National Girls’ 16 Championship singles title and was involved with the USTA Training Assistance Program in 1991-92 and 1996. Ammerman was named Athlete of the Year and High School AllAmerican as a senior at Peninsula High School in Lomita, CA.

MEET THE TEAM

After serving as the volunteer assistant coach for the Loyola Marymount women’s tennis team two years ago, Amanda Ammerman begins her second season in the assistant coach position.

2008-09 LIONS

THE ASSISTANTS

Born June 20, 1978, Amanda now resides in Marina Del Rey with her husband Ben. Ben is a former Lion who played on the men’s basketball team and attended Loyola Law School. Ammerman is currently getting her masters in guidance and counseling at LMU.

Assistant Coach Tami Adkins Tami Adkins begins her second season as Volunteer Coach with the Women’s Tennis Program. Adkins, who is no stranger to Loyola Marymount, served as an Assistant Coach with the LMU Women’s Basketball team from 2000-2007. In 2004, the Women’s Basketball program won its first WCC regular season and Conference Tournament Titles and advanced to the NCAA Tournament. Adkins was also a part of LMU’s first post-season appearance when the Lions were invited to the 2001 WNIT.

Upon graduation, Adkins began her career in coaching, first serving as an assistant at LMU during the 1994-95 season before returning to her alma mater in 1995. She remained at USF as an assistant for the next five seasons, helping the Dons to two WCC Tournament Championships and two NCAA tournament appearances, including a trip to the Sweet Sixteen in 1996. Adkins’ primary responsibilities with the Women’s Tennis program include coordinating all team travel and equipment, assisting with fund-raising and on campus recruiting, summer camp coordination and community service outreach. Adkins is married and resides in El Segundo, Calif. with her husband, Jamie. Óään‡ä™ÊUÊÇÊUÊ1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ

2008-09 LIONS’ MEDIA GUIDE

Adkins is very familiar with the West Coast Conference as she was an All-Conference point guard at the University of San Francisco. She was the captain for the 1992 team which finished as WCC CoChampions. In her senior season, Adkins was named All-WCC as well as All-WCC Academic Team. Adkins graduated in 1993 with a degree in Political Science.

2008-09 LIONS

MEET THE TEAM

the heart of a lion...

THE PLAYERS 2008-09 Tennis Player Bios AUDREY BULKLEY x‡™ÊUĂŠĂ•Â˜ÂˆÂœĂ€ -ÂŤĂ€ÂˆÂ˜}wiÂ?`]ĂŠÂ?Â?°ÊUĂŠĂ•ĂŒĂ•Ă€iĂƒĂŠ-

Briefly‌ Audrey Bulkley enters her third year of collegiate tennis at Loyola Marymount... At LMU... 2007-2008... went 13-20 in singles play and 7-5 in Tournament play... competed in No. 4, 5, and 6 singles... Won her last three singles and doubles matches against opponents from San Francisco, Santa Clara, and Gonzaga... 2006-07... went 4-5 in singles while going 2-2 in doubles play... played seven matches at No. 6 singles... won her first two dual matches of the season against Stephanie Galainena of Santa Clara, 6-3, 6-4 and at San Jose State against Sivana Dukic, 6-1, 4-6, 10-8... High School... She graduated from Futures High School in Mission Veiho, Calif., in 2006... Personal... Audrey Lynne Bulkley was born in Springfield, Ill., and is the daughter of Angela Bulkley and Reginald Bulkley... she has a sister... taught tennis to deaf and hard of hearing children while in high school... undeclared major.

MARIA GARCIA-PLANAS ALBERT x‡nĂŠUĂŠĂ•Â˜ÂˆÂœĂ€ >Ă€ViÂ?œ˜>]ĂŠ-ÂŤ>ÂˆÂ˜ĂŠUĂŠ-V…ˆÂ?Â?iÀÊÂ˜ĂŒiĂ€Â˜>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜>Â?ĂŠ-V…œœÂ?

Briefly‌ Maria Garcia-Planas Albert is in her third season of collegiate tennis at Loyola Marymount... At LMU... 2007-2008... medically red-shirted last season... 2006-07... went 0-9 in her first season as a singles player... also went 1-6 in doubles action... earned at win in doubles play with teammate Audrey Bulkley against Occidental’s Taylor Kaplan and Jennifer Wahba, 8-2...

2008-09 LIONS’ MEDIA GUIDE

High School... Graduated from Schiller International School in Barcelona in 2005... went to Saddlebrook Prep in Wesley Chapel, Fla.... played tennis for Sanchez-Casel Academy since the age of 11... Personal... Maria Garcia-Planas Albert was born in Barcelona, Spain and is the daughter of Berta and Jose... has a brother, Jose Maria, and a sister, Ines... a business marketing major.

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Briefly… Jasmin Heckel begins her second season of collegiate tennis at Loyola Marymount...

High School... A 2007 graduate of Ratsgymnasium Wolfsburg in Wolfsburg, Germany...

MEET THE TEAM

At LMU... 2007-2008... went 11-14 in singles play... competed at the No. 3 and No. 4 singles position... Paired with Tina Razloznik in doubles, the duo went 7-6 overall, going 3-0 in tournament play... won her final two individual matches of the season against Gonzaga’s Clare Dodge 6-3, 1-0 and Santa Clara’s Carmen Pham 6-1, 6-0...

2008-09 LIONS

JASMIN HECKEL

Personal... Jasmin Heckel was born on April 15, 1988 in Wolfsburg, Germany... parents are Klaus and Uta Heckel... has an older brother Stefan... chose LMU over Cal State Northridge, University of Denver and University of Maryland because of the academic and athletic possibilities... is a business administration major.

ESTELLE LaPORTE x‡xÊUÊÀiœ>˜ iÀ“œÃ>Ê i>V…]Ê >ˆv°ÊUÊ->˜Ì>Êœ˜ˆV>Ê

Briefly… Estelle LaPorte is in her first season of collegiate tennis at Loyola Marymount... At Santa Monica College... Medically red-shirted the 2007-2008 season... High School... A 2007 graduate of Redondo Union High School in Redondo Beach, Calif...

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2008-09 LIONS’ MEDIA GUIDE

Personal... Estelle LaPorte was born May 3, 1989 in Torrance, Calif... the daughter of Daniel and Georgia LaPorte... her brother Shane is a professional tennis player... chose LMU because the tennis program is exactly what she was looking for... has not declared a major...

2008-09 LIONS

MEET THE TEAM

the heart of a lion...

SHAUNA MORGAN x‡xĂŠUĂŠ-ÂœÂŤÂ…ÂœÂ“ÂœĂ€i >ĂƒĂŠ6i}>Ăƒ]ĂŠ iÛ°ÊUĂŠ>Ă•Ă€iÂ?ĂŠ-ÂŤĂ€ÂˆÂ˜}ĂƒĂŠ-

Briefly‌ Shauna Morgan begins her second season of collegiate tennis with Loyola Marymount... At LMU... 2007-2008... went 5-8 overall in her first season in singles play... competed at the No. 5 and No. 6 singles... went 4-3 at No. 6 singles... defeated Amber Chandronnalt of the #61 team in the country University of Nebraska, 6-4, 6-6, 5-2... High School... A 2007 graduate of Laurel Springs High School is Las Vegas, NV... primarily played in national junior level tournaments... earned All-City honors as a sophomore... Personal... Shauna Erickson Morgan was born on April 24, 1990 in Las Vegas, NV... the daughter of Kelley and Dennis Morgan... has one sister, Courtney, and a brother, Garrett... chose LMU over San Diego, Santa Clara and the University of Maryland because it is close to home, likes not only the tennis program but also what LMU has to offer... an art major...

BLISS NIXON x‡{ĂŠUĂŠĂ•Â˜ÂˆÂœĂ€ ÂœÂ?`ĂŠ Âœ>ĂƒĂŒ]ĂŠ+ ]ĂŠĂ•ĂƒĂŒĂ€>Â?ˆ>ĂŠUĂŠ œœ“iĂ€>ĂŠ˜}Â?ˆV>˜

Briefly‌ Bliss Nixon is in her third season of collegiate tennis at Loyola Marymount...

2008-09 LIONS’ MEDIA GUIDE

At LMU... 2007-2008... went 3-10 in singles play... competed at No. 6 singles... had back-to-back wins against San Diego’s Ellie Faulkner 3-6, 7-6, 6-3 and Cal State Northridge’s Whitney Paluch 6-1,75... 2006-07... went 8-9 in singles play in her first season at LMU... also went 11-13 in doubles play... played 11 matches at No. 6 singles and three matches at No. 5 singles... won her first two matches of her collegiate career, defeating Cheyenne Inglis of Cal State Fullerton, 5-7, 6-4, 6-0 and earning a victory over Kristen Wilson of 73rd-ranked Santa Barbara, 6-4, 7-5... High School... She graduated from Coomera Anglican College in Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia in 2005... played three sports - tennis, soccer and softball... played tennis all four years and the other two for three years... earned honors all four years in tennis... she earned the Academic Achievement Award from 2001-2004... and served as a primary school mentor... Personal... Bliss Alicia Nixon was born in Caringbah, New South Whales, Australia... She is the daughter of Bev and Peter Nixon... has an older brother... a Theater major. Óään‡ä™ÊUÊ£äÊUĂŠ1ĂŠ7œ“iÂ˜Â˝ĂƒĂŠ/iÂ˜Â˜ÂˆĂƒ

the heart of a lion...

x‡nĂŠUĂŠĂ€iĂƒÂ…Â“>˜ *Â?ÂœĂ›`ÂˆĂ›]ĂŠ Ă•Â?}>Ă€Âˆ>ĂŠUĂŠ-ÂŤÂœĂ€ĂŒĂŠ-V…œœÂ?ĂŠ6>ĂƒÂˆÂ?ĂŠiĂ›ĂƒÂŽÂˆ

Briefly‌ Elisaveta is in her first year of collegiate tennis at Loyola Marymount...

Personal... Elisaveta Kirilova Pironkova was born March 25, 1989 in Plovdiv, Bulgaria... the daughter of Radosveta Pironkova and Kiril Pironkov... her mother was a swimmer at the National Sport Academy... she has a older brother and sister who both play tennis in college... attended LMU because its considered one of the best universities to further develop her skills.

MEET THE TEAM

High School... A 2008 graduate of Sport School Vasil Levski in Plovdiv, Bulgaria... played under coaches Kiril Pironkov and Doia Rangelova in the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th singles position... National Doubles champion under 18... ITF doubles title under 18... Ranked #13 nationally in Bulgaria...

2008-09 LIONS

ELISAVETA PIRONKOVA

JANE PRINGLE xÂ‡ĂˆĂŠUĂŠĂ•Â˜ÂˆÂœĂ€ i`vÂœĂ€`]ĂŠ-ÂœĂ•ĂŒÂ…ĂŠvĂ€ÂˆV>ĂŠUĂŠĂŠ1Â˜ÂˆĂ›iĂ€ĂƒÂˆĂŒĂžĂŠÂœvĂŠ/iĂ?>Ăƒ

Briefly‌ Jane Pringle is in her third season of collegiate tennis, her first with Loyola Marymount... At the University of Texas... 2006-2007... played two years for the Longhorns... earned Big 12 Academic Honor Roll... High School... A 2006 graduate of Somerset College ...played tennis, field hockey and squash... played tennis under Pietie Norval... top 10 nationally ranked from U12-U18... honored as Sports Woman of the year in 2006...

Óään‡ä™ÊUĂŠÂŁÂŁĂŠUĂŠ1ĂŠ7œ“iÂ˜Â˝ĂƒĂŠ/iÂ˜Â˜ÂˆĂƒ

2008-09 LIONS’ MEDIA GUIDE

Personal... Jane Alexandra Pringle was born October 12, 1988 in Port Elizabeth, South Africa... she is the daughter of Barrie and Alexander Pringle... is the youngest of four... chose LMU because it seemed like a great community to be a part of... is a communications major with a business minor...

2008-09 LIONS

SECTION

the heart of a lion...

TINA RAZLOZNIK x‡™ÊUÊ-i˜ˆœÀ ˜`Àˆ>]Ê-œÛi˜ˆ>ÊUÊ1˜ˆÛiÀÈÌÞʜvÊÀˆâœ˜>

Briefly… Tina Razloznik begins her second season with Loyola Marymount after transferring from the University of Arizona... At LMU... 2007-2008... Honorable Mention All-WCC singles... went 21-12 overall in singles play... went 15-8 in the No. 3 singles position... went 7-6 in doubles with teammate Jasmin Heckel... defeated Ellie Krausova from #50 San Diego State and Anastassia Lyssenko from #57 Sacramento State... University of Arizona... 2005-2007... played for two years under coach Vicky Maes... 16-14 as a freshman in singles... High School... a 2005 graduate of Gimnazija Jurija Vege in Idrija, Slovenia... played four years of tennis under coach Sreco Zavrski...

2008-09 LIONS’ MEDIA GUIDE

Personal... Tina Razloznik was born on April 9, 1986 in Ljubljana, Slovenia... the daughter of Janez and Nusa Razloznik... chose to come to LMU because of the great tennis program, nice campus and location... an English major with a Psychology minor.

Óään‡ä™ÊUÊ£ÓÊUÊ1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ

INSIDE LMU

What do you know about lmu?

Right Place. Right Time.

M

aybe that we’re the only

Or that our five colleges, all connected

At LMU, we inspire you to take ideas apart

Catholic University in Los

to Los Angeles, enable students to make

and learn how they fit together. You’ll test

Angeles and one of the

current contacts in technology, business,

your limits, forge enduring friendships,

world’s renowned Jesuit institutions, a

politics, art, music, and naturally, the en-

promote justice and become a contribut-

group that includes 28 U.S. universities

tertainment industry.

ing citizen of the world.

and over 100 schools worldwide.

Yet there’s something more to consider. If

Our curriculum is broad and deep. Our

Or that Loyola Marymount University has

you’re looking for a place to acquire facts

pace is demanding. Our expectations are

been called a Hidden Gem by the Wash-

and skills that will help you get along in

high. Our plans are ambitious. And we’re

ington Post and ranked among the Best in

the world, you have many choices. But if

looking for curious, accomplished, enter-

the West by U.S. News & World Report.

you’re looking for a place where God fits

prising, visionary students eager to em-

Or that our serene campus, overlooking

in, a place that honors faith as well as rea-

brace the challenge.

Marina del Rey, offers one of the most ex-

son, Loyola Marymount University may be

hilarating academic locations anywhere.

the place for you.

1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ Óään‡ä™Êi`ˆ>ÊՈ`i

13

INSIDE LMU

LMU Mission statements and facts:

A Solid Foundation University Mission AND Identity Loyola Marymount’s Mission and Goals Statement, approved by the Board of Trustees in 1990, succinctly states in its preamble the university’s three-fold mission: * The encouragement of learning * The education of the whole person * The service of faith and the promotion of justice These often quoted phrases are at the heart of the campus community’s communal self-understanding. When unpacked, they tell us much about LMU’s identity as a Catholic, Jesuit/Marymount university

Athletics Department Mission The mission of the department is to provide an environment for student-athlete development that supports the pursuit of the highest level of success athletically and academically for the growth of the whole person in the tradition of the Jesuit and Marymount ideals. The purpose of the Intercollegiate Athletics Program at Loyola Marymount University is to support the overall mission, goals and objectives of the University by complimenting its primary academic pursuits with championship sports programs. Additionally, Loyola Marymount University Athletics supports “Pursuing Victory with Honor”.

14

1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ Óään‡ä™Êi`ˆ>ÊՈ`i

INSIDE LMU

LMU Facts ĂŠ UĂŠ ÂœĂžÂœÂ?>ĂŠ>Ă€ĂžÂ“ÂœĂ•Â˜ĂŒĂŠ1Â˜ÂˆĂ›iĂ€ĂƒÂˆĂŒĂž]ĂŠvÂœĂ•Â˜`i`ĂŠ in 1911, is the largest Catholic university on the West Coast. ĂŠ UĂŠ *Ă€iĂƒÂˆ`iÂ˜ĂŒ\ĂŠ,ÂœLiĂ€ĂŒĂŠ °Ê>ĂœĂŒÂœÂ˜]ĂŠ-°° ĂŠ UĂŠ -ÂŤÂœÂ˜ĂƒÂœĂ€ÂˆÂ˜}ĂŠ,iÂ?ˆ}ÂˆÂœĂ•ĂƒĂŠ"Ă€`iĂ€Ăƒ\ĂŠ Society of Jesus (Jesuits); Religious of the Sacred Heart of Mary ĂŠ UĂŠ Ă€i>\ĂŠÂŁxäÊ>VĂ€iĂƒ ĂŠ UĂŠ ÂœV>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜\ĂŠÂœĂƒĂŠ˜}iÂ?iĂƒ]ĂŠ >Â?ˆvÂœĂ€Â˜Âˆ> Student Life ĂŠ UĂŠ 1ĂŠÂœvviĂ€ĂƒĂŠÂ“ÂœĂ€iĂŠĂŒÂ…>Â˜ĂŠnäÊ`i}Ă€iiĂƒĂŠ>˜`ĂŠ programs. The Graduate Division offers 29 master’s degrees, one doctoral degree and 15 credential programs. ĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ ÂœÂ?Â?i}iĂƒĂŠ>˜`ĂŠ-V…œœÂ?Ăƒ\ĂŠĂŠ Bellarmine College of Liberal Arts; College of Business Administration; College of Comm. and Fine Arts; Frank R. Seaver College of Science and Engineering; Loyola Law School; School of Education; School of Film and Television ĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ ÓäÊÀiĂƒÂˆ`i˜ViĂŠÂ…>Â?Â?Ăƒ]ĂŠÂ…ÂœĂ•ĂƒiĂƒĂŠ>˜`ĂŠ apartments for 3,278 students ĂŠ UĂŠ ÂŁĂŽĂ“ĂŠVÂ?Ă•LĂƒĂŠ>˜`ĂŠÂœĂ€}>Â˜ÂˆĂ˘>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜Ăƒ ĂŠ UĂŠ ÂŁxĂŠĂ€iiÂŽĂŠvĂ€>ĂŒiĂ€Â˜ÂˆĂŒÂˆiĂƒĂŠ>˜`ĂŠĂƒÂœĂ€ÂœĂ€ÂˆĂŒÂˆiĂƒ Enrollment ĂŠ UĂŠ 1˜`iĂ€}Ă€>`Ă•>ĂŒi\ĂŠx]Ç{Ăˆ ĂŠ UĂŠ Ă€>`Ă•>ĂŒi\ĂŠÂŁ]n™™ ĂŠ UĂŠ >ĂœĂŠ-V…œœÂ?\ĂŠÂŁ]ÎÓÇ ĂŠ UĂŠ /ÂœĂŒ>Â?\ĂŠn]™ÇÓ ĂŠ UĂŠ Ă›iĂ€>}iĂŠĂ•Â˜`iĂ€}Ă€>`Ă•>ĂŒiĂŠVÂ?>ĂƒĂƒĂŠĂƒÂˆĂ˘i\Ê£™ ĂŠ UĂŠ Ă›iĂ€>}iĂŠ}Ă€>`Ă•>ĂŒiĂŠVÂ?>ĂƒĂƒĂŠĂƒÂˆĂ˘i\ĂŠÂŁĂŽ ĂŠ UĂŠ -ĂŒĂ•`iÂ˜ĂŒĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠv>VĂ•Â?ĂŒĂžĂŠĂ€>ĂŒÂˆÂœ\ʣӇ£ Scholarship ĂŠ UĂŠ >VĂ•Â?ĂŒĂžĂŠ>Ăœ>Ă€`Ăƒ\ĂŠĂ•Â?LĂ€Âˆ}Â…ĂŒĂŠ-VÂ…ÂœÂ?>Ă€Ăƒ\ÊÇÆÊ Nobel Prize Winners: 1; Pulitzer Prize Winners: 1

ĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ >VĂ•Â?ĂŒĂžĂŠĂ€iĂƒi>Ă€VÂ…ĂŠ}Ă€>Â˜ĂŒĂƒĂŠ>˜`ĂŠVÂœÂ˜ĂŒĂ€>VĂŒĂƒ\ĂŠ $4.3 Million in 2006 ĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ ՓLiĂ€ĂŠÂœvĂŠvĂ•Â?Â?Â‡ĂŒÂˆÂ“iĂŠv>VĂ•Â?ĂŒĂž\ĂŠ{ÂŁĂˆ ĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ ՓLiĂ€ĂŠÂœvĂŠi˜`ÂœĂœi`ĂŠVÂ…>ÂˆĂ€Ăƒ\ĂŠÂŁx ĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ ՓLiĂ€ĂŠÂœvĂŠi˜`ÂœĂœi`ĂŠĂ•Â˜`iĂ€}Ă€>`Ă•>ĂŒiĂŠ scholarships: 186 ĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ 1ĂŠĂƒĂŒĂ•`iÂ˜ĂŒĂŠĂƒVÂ…ÂœÂ?>Ă€ĂƒĂŠĂ“Ă¤Ă¤Ă‡Â‡Ă¤n\ĂŠ Fulbright: 2; Rotary: 1; Goldwater: 1; Capital Fellow: 1 ĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ Â“ÂœĂ•Â˜ĂŒĂŠVÂœÂ˜ĂŒĂ€ÂˆLĂ•ĂŒi`ĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠĂƒĂŒĂ•`iÂ˜ĂŒĂŠ}Ă€>Â˜ĂŒĂƒĂŠ and scholarships by LMU, 2006-07: $32 million ĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ 1˜`iĂ€}Ă€>`Ă•>ĂŒiĂŠĂƒĂŒĂ•`iÂ˜ĂŒĂƒĂŠĂœÂ…ÂœĂŠĂ€iViÂˆĂ›i`ĂŠ financial aid, 2006-07: 71%

ĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ 1ĂŠ>“ˆÂ?ĂžĂŠÂœvĂŠ-V…œœÂ?ĂƒĂŠÂŤ>Ă€ĂŒÂ˜iĂ€ĂƒĂŠĂœÂˆĂŒÂ…ĂŠ LAUSD to help 7 Westchester schools. ĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ 1ĂŠĂœ>ĂƒĂŠÂ˜>“i`ĂŠ>ÊÓääÇʺ/Ă€i>ĂƒĂ•Ă€iĂŠÂœvĂŠ Los Angeles.â€? ĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ >Â˜ĂžĂŠÂŤĂ€Âœ}Ă€>Â“Ăƒ]ĂŠÂˆÂ˜VÂ?Ă•`ˆ˜}ĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠi>Ă›iÞÊ Center for the Study of Los Angeles, the Bioethics Institute, the School of Education and the Dept. of Natural Science, make L.A.’s politics, healthcare, education and environment part of the curriculum. ĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ ÂœĂžÂœÂ?>ĂŠ>ĂœĂŠ-V…œœÂ?ĂŠÂˆĂƒĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠwĂ€ĂƒĂŒĂŠ ‡ accredited law school in California with a mandatory pro bono requirement.

Alumni ĂŠ UĂŠ /ÂœĂŒ>Â?ĂŠĂ•Â˜`iĂ€}Ă€>`Ă•>ĂŒi\ĂŠ{ä]ÂŁĂŽĂŽ ĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ /ÂœĂŒ>Â?ĂŠ}Ă€>`Ă•>ĂŒi\ĂŠÂŁĂŽ]ÂŁĂˆx ĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ /ÂœĂŒ>Â?ĂŠÂœĂžÂœÂ?>ĂŠ>ĂœĂŠ-V…œœÂ?\ĂŠÂŁ{]ĂˆĂŽÂ™ ĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ 1˜`iĂ€}Ă€>`Ă•>ĂŒiĂŠ>Â?Ă•Â“Â˜ÂˆĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŠ >Â?ˆvÂœĂ€Â˜Âˆ>\ĂŠ 29,341 (77%) ĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ Ă€>`Ă•>ĂŒiĂŠ>Â?Ă•Â“Â˜ÂˆĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŠ >Â?ˆvÂœĂ€Â˜Âˆ>\ĂŠ 10,007 (80%) ĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ 1˜`iĂ€}Ă€>`Ă•>ĂŒiĂŠ>Â?Ă•Â“Â˜ÂˆĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŠÂœĂƒĂŠ˜}iÂ?iĂƒĂŠ County: 17,410 (46%) ĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ Ă€>`Ă•>ĂŒiĂŠ>Â?Ă•Â“Â˜ÂˆĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŠÂœĂƒĂŠ˜}iÂ?iĂƒĂŠ ϡ\ĂŠ 6,955 (55%) ĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ 1˜`iĂ€}Ă€>`Ă•>ĂŒiĂŠ>Â?Ă•Â“Â˜ÂˆĂŠĂœÂ…ÂœĂŠÂ…>Ă›iĂŠ graduated since 1980: 27,872 (69%) ĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ 1˜`iĂ€}Ă€>`Ă•>ĂŒiĂŠ>Â?Ă•Â“Â˜ÂˆĂŠĂœÂ…ÂœĂŠÂ…>Ă›iĂŠ graduated since 1990: 19,703 (49%)

Distinctions ĂŠ UĂŠ >“i`ĂŠ>“œ˜}ĂŠĂŒÂ…iʺÓxĂŠVĂ•ĂŒĂŒÂˆÂ˜}ĂŠi`}iĂŠ schools with an eye toward the futureâ€? in Kaplan’s “You Are Hereâ€? College Guide, 2008 ĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ ˜VÂ?Ă•`i`ĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŠÂş iĂƒĂŒĂŠĂŽĂˆĂˆĂŠ ÂœÂ?Â?i}iĂƒ]Êº iĂƒĂŒĂŠ Colleges in the Westâ€? and “10 Most Beautiful Campusesâ€? in Princeton Review, 2008 ĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ ,>˜Ži`ĂŠ{ĂŒÂ…ĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŠÂş iĂƒĂŒĂŠ1Â˜ÂˆĂ›iĂ€ĂƒÂˆĂŒÂˆiĂƒĂŠ7ÂˆĂŒÂ…ĂŠ Master’s Program in the Westâ€? in U.S. News & World Report, 2008 ĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ *>Ă€ĂŒÂ‡ĂŒÂˆÂ“iĂŠ° °Â°ĂŠÂŤĂ€Âœ}Ă€>“ÊÀ>˜Ži`ĂŠ{ĂŒÂ…ĂŠ best in the United States in Business Week magazine, 2007 ĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ Â˜ĂŒĂ€iÂŤĂ€i˜iĂ•Ă€ĂƒÂ…ÂˆÂŤĂŠÂŤĂ€Âœ}Ă€>Â“ĂŠÂ˜>“i`ĂŠ among top 10 in the nation in Princeton Review and Entrepreneur magazine, 2007 ĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ >“i`ĂŠ>ĂŠÂşĂŒÂœÂŤĂŠÂŤĂ€Âœ`Ă•ViĂ€ÂťĂŠÂœvĂŠĂ•Â?LĂ€Âˆ}Â…ĂŒĂŠ awardees, 2006-07 in Institute of International Education ĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ >“i`ĂŠÂşÂœĂŒĂŒiĂƒĂŒĂŠvÂœĂ€ĂŠÂˆĂƒÂŤ>˜ˆVĂƒÂťĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŠ Newsweek/Kaplan’s “How to Get into Collegeâ€? Guide, 2006

LMU in L.A. ĂŠ UĂŠ i˜iĂ€>ĂŒiĂƒĂŠÂ“ÂœĂ€iĂŠĂŒÂ…>Â˜ĂŠfĂ“xĂ¤ĂŠÂ“ÂˆÂ?Â?ÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠ annually in direct economic activity in Southern California ĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ “Â?ÂœĂžĂƒĂŠÂ“ÂœĂ€iĂŠĂŒÂ…>Â˜ĂŠĂ“]Ă“{äʍiÂœÂŤÂ?i ĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ -ĂŒĂ•`iÂ˜ĂŒĂƒĂŠĂ›ÂœÂ?Ă•Â˜ĂŒiiĂ€ĂŠÂ“ÂœĂ€iĂŠĂŒÂ…>Â˜ĂŠÂŁĂ‡x]äääÊ service hours a year with 350 community organizations. ĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠ UĂŠ Â?Ă•Â“Â˜ÂˆĂŠÂ…>Ă›iĂŠĂŒÂ…iÂˆĂ€ĂŠÂœĂœÂ˜ĂŠĂƒiĂ€Ă›ÂˆViĂŠ organization, Alumni for Others.

For complete list of fact and figures, visit:

http://www.lmu.edu/pagefactory.aspx?PageID=110

1ĂŠ7œ“iÂ˜Â˝ĂƒĂŠ/iÂ˜Â˜ÂˆĂƒ Óään‡ä™Êi`ˆ>ĂŠĂ•Âˆ`i

15

INSIDE LMU

what lmu is about:

Develop the whole person. IT’S STARTING WITH WHY

lenging, fascinating and fun. Class sizes are 13 to 1 and give each stu-

At LMU, we want you to think hard about your college choice. Are you

dent a chance to exceed even their own expectations.

up for four challenging years of intellectual inquiry, self-discovery, and service? If your answer is yes, come share your talents and determina-

IT’S WHO YOU ARE WITH

tion as part of our lively community.

Looking for camaraderie? When it comes to providing friends and mentors, you won’t find a university surpassing LMU. The campus popula-

Thanks to our combined Jesuit-Marymount legacies, LMU has a special

tion comes from all 50 states and 70 countries. Better still, LMU offers

way of approaching liberal-and liberating-education. For more than 400

more than 100 extracurricular organizations that hone the students

years, the Jesuits have fostered great universities, rigorous academics,

skills and help them find like-minded colleagues for life.

and the pursuit of justice. Central to our philosophy is the idea of cura

16

personalis or “ care of the person.” At LMU, students don’t simply ben-

Whatever the religious belief, the university pays attention to individual

efit from cura personalis; they practice it, too, carrying out the Jesuit

spirit. “I’ve thought a lot about what makes my friends at college dif-

ideal of “men and women for others.” The Marymount sisters contrib-

ferent than those from high school, and I’ve realized that the people

ute a history of educating women and teaching through the arts, with

at LMU live up to the mission of being men and women for others,”

a deliberately international perspective that encourages respect for all

said a sophomore. Students are free to examine faith in social or service

others.

activities.

IT’S ABOUT THE SUPPORT

IT’S WHERE YOU LIVE

Throughout an LMU education, students enjoy the support of instruc-

Every fall, nine out of 10 first-year students take advantage of LMU

tors who know each individual by name and who make classes chal-

housing and for some very good reasons. Some of the benefits of LMU

1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ Óään‡ä™Êi`ˆ>ÊՈ`i

INSIDE LMU

living are simple: an active social scene, meal plans that allow students to dine at various campus locations, and easy access to classes and campus facilities. But university housing offers much more than simple convenience, it also give students an edge. As a resident, students are immediately plugged into programs that help them achieve better grades, meet new friends, develop professional contacts and graduate in a timely manner. At LMU, we know that everything you do - including where you live shapes the person you’re becoming. So LMU offers themed living communities where you pursue your education in a social context that’s relevant to you. Here, you live and learn in an environment that promotes reflection and character development, where your values are celebrated, challenged, shared.

IT’S WHERE YOU’RE BOUND “We’re trying to get rid of you,” so professor Kelly Younger, who directs the Honors Program, likes to tell LMU students. He’s referring to the study abroad opportunities, scholarships, internships, academic conferences and competitions that take students off campus and into the world. When it comes time to graduate, students will have the knowledge, the confidence, and the strength of spirit to achieve anything the students can imagine. To help you toward your ideal career, LMU offers a network of loyal alumni. “Even the summer after graduation, I am already aware of the benefits that LMU alumni networking offers,” says a new alum. “When we leave the undergraduate family, it’s as if we graduate into an even larger family that offers constant support.”

-* Ê-/1 9Ê ,"

" /" SUMMER PROGRAMS Auckland, New Zealand Bonn, Germany Dublin, Ireland Kenya, East Africa Oxford, England Paris, France Roatan, Honduras Rome, Italy San Lucas Toliman, Guatemala Spetses, Greece Tuscany, Italy Washington, D.C. Business in Asia SEMESTER/YEAR PROGRAMS Bonn, Germany Dusseldorf, Germany London, England Madrid, Spain Sikkim, India Washington D.C. -* Ê / , -*20th Century Fox ABC, NBC, CBS AVP Volleyball American Express Anaheim Ducks Aquarium of the Pacific Bank of America Capital Records Cartoon Network Studios The Children’s Nature Institute Colombia Records

Disney Dreamworks, SKG E! Entertainment Fox Sports G4 Media Greater LA School Districts Johnson & Johnson Kaiser Permanente Kraft Foods L.A. Angels of Anaheim L.A. Clippers L.A. Dodgers L.A. Kings L.A. Lakers Miramax Films MTV NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory NFL Network Oakland Athletics Paramount Pictures Premier Financial Roundhouse Marine Studies Lab Sony Entertainment TBWA/Chiat Day UPS Universal Studios U.S. Army Corps of Engineers U.S. Congress House of Reps. U.S. Secret Service Vivendi Universal Warner Brothers Washington Internship Program Wells Fargo X Games YMCA

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INSIDE LMU

Education experience:

T

A View to a Promising Future.

he Chronicle of Higher Education notes that at Jesuit institu- ENCE AND ENGINEERING address real-world design challenges, like tions, this precept “translates into a large amount of indi- devising plans for improving LMU’s traffic flow. “The project takes a vidual attention from faculty members and accessibility to lot of creativity and some pretty complex problem-solving,” says as-

high-level administrators, including the president.” At LMU, students sociate dean Tom Calder. “During students’ presentations, we’ve had don’t simply benefit from cura personalis; they practice it, too, carrying the University’s V.P. for facilities sit in to listen to their ideas and offer out the Jesuit ideal of “men and women for others.” The Marymount professional feedback.” sisters contribute a history of educating women and teaching through the arts, with a deliberately international perspective that encourages UÊ-ÌÕ`i˜ÌÃʈ˜Ê̅iÊSCHOOL OF FILM AND TELEVISION produce their respect for all cultures. LMU brings these gifts together in five colleges: own short films and TV pilots, with acting and music often supplied by Business Administration, Communications and Fine Arts, Film and Tele- student performers from our COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATION AND vision, Liberal Arts, and Science and Engineering.

FINE ARTS. When our talent pool can’t accommodate them, Hollywood can. “For my junior thesis, I teamed up with two other people to

UÊ 1˜`iÀÊ Ì…iÊ `ˆÀiV̈œ˜Ê œvÊ >Ü>À`‡Üˆ˜˜ˆ˜}Ê i˜ÌÀi«Ài˜iÕÀň«Ê «ÀœviÃÜÀÊ make a two-part, 10-minute sitcom,” says a TV production major. “We Fred Kiesner, for instance, students in our COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AD- developed an idea and asked a senior in screenwriting to write a script. MINISTRATION participate in an internship program that places them When it came to casting, we ran an ad in Backstage West and received with social entrepreneurs who are working to better society. “More and 300 head shots. It was like a real casting audition.” more, students are saying, ‘Hey, I can use my abilities to do good for others by doing business,” said Kiesner.

UÊ ÌÊ 1]Ê Ài>‡ÜœÀ`Ê iÝ«iÀˆi˜ViÃÊ Li˜iwÌÃÊ >˜ÞÊ `ˆÃVˆ«ˆ˜i‡iÛi˜Ê ˆÌiÀ>ture. Students in the BELLARMINE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS don’t

UÊ Àœ“Ê ̅iˆÀÊ wÀÃÌÊ Þi>À]Ê i˜}ˆ˜iiÀˆ˜}Ê “>œÀÃÊ ˆ˜Ê œÕÀÊ COLLEGE OF SCI- just read Jack Kerouac. They go on the road. English professor Kelly

18

1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ Óään‡ä™Êi`ˆ>ÊՈ`i

INSIDE LMU

Younger explains: “I teach a course called Road Read in which we study not only the literature of Los Angeles and California, but also the city itself as text. After reading Nathanael West’s The Day of Locust, we take a walking tour of downtown L.A., focusing on the architecture of the 1920s and 30s. We read Kerouac’s Big Sur and drive up the coast, spending a week reading, writing and sharing on the intellectual adventure. HONORS PROGRAM UÊ/…iÊ1˜ˆÛiÀÈÌÞÊœ˜œÀÃÊ*Àœ}À>“Ê«ÀœÛˆ`iÃÊ>˜Êˆ˜Ìi˜ÃˆÛiÊ>˜`ʈ˜˜œvative academic experience for the serious student. The program combines four interdisciplinary University Honors core courses with an intensive year-long sequence in writing, critical thinking and American Cultures. A second year-long sequence in the history of civilization and a course in natural philosophy are also a part of the curriculum. All honors students are required to display proficiency in a foreign language, take an upper-division ethics course, an interdisciplinary seminar in the junior year and a senior thesis. Interested students should apply to the University Honors Director.

*,",-Ê"Ê-/1 9 Accounting African American Studies Animation Archaeology Art History Asian and Pacific Studies Asian Pacific American Studies Athletic Training Biochemistry Biology Business Administration Business Law Chemistry Chicana/o Studies Civil Engineering Classical Civilization Classics Communication Studies Computer Engineering Computer Information Systems Computer Science Dance Economics Electrical Engineering Elementary Education Engineering Physics English Entrepreneurship Environmental Engineering Environmental Science Ethics European Studies Film Production Finance French General Science German Greek History Human Resource Management Humanities Individualized Studies

International Business Irish Studies Italian Latin Leadership Liberal Studies Liberal Studies - Elem. Edu. Management Marketing Mathematics (Pure and Applied) Mathematics Education Mechanical Engineering Modern Greek Multimedia Music Natural Science Operations Management Peace Studies Philosophy Physics Political Science Pre-Dentistry Pre-Journalism Pre-Law Pre-Medicine Pre-Optometry Pre-Pharmacy Pre-Physical Therapy Pre-Pediatric Medicine Pre-Veterinary Medicine Psychology Recording Arts Science Education Screenwriting Sociology Spanish Studio Arts Television Production Theatre Arts Theological Studies Travel and Tourism Urban Studies Women’s Studies

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INSIDE LMU

Student-athlete support

S

Building Academic Champions.

tudents who choose LMU for higher learning receive a

Department posted a rate of 84 percent for all student-athletes who

world-class education on a campus known for its athletic

exhausted their eligibility and a rate of 79 percent for those student-

excellence. The LMU Athletics Department is committed to

athletes who received athletics aid. Listed are some examples from the

assisting student-athletes achieve their full potential both academi-

2006-2007 academic year of the academic excellence LMU student-

cally and athletically.

athletes epitomize:

The Student-Athlete Academic Support Staff exists to support all stu-

ACADEMIC SERVICES

dent-athletes in their goals of getting a degree on time, maintaining

The Academic Center and support staff is housed in Gersten Pavilion,

athletic eligibility, and preparing for life after LMU. The Academic

providing academic support for the 350+ athletes in 21 sports. The

Support Staff provides guidance and counseling from the moment a

Academic Center includes a study area and desktop computers for

recruit first walks on to the campus to the moment a student-athlete

student-athlete use. The staff consists of the Academic Coordina-

graduates.

tor and three Graduate Assistant/Interns, who monitor the progress of student-athletes, ensure timely graduation, and assist in degree

TRADITION OF EXCELLENCE

preparation. In addition, the academic support staff offers a variety of

LMU has a proud reputation of academic excellence among its stu-

other services, including:

dent-athletes. In the past few years the LMU Athletics Department has been in the highest percentile of the APR (Academic Performance

>œÀÊ,iµÕˆÀi“i˜ÌÃ

Rate) scale among all schools in NCAA Division I.

*ÀˆœÀˆÌÞÊ,i}ˆÃÌÀ>̈œ˜

-ÌÕ`ÞÊ>

/Õ̜Àˆ>Ê-iÀۈViÃ

According to the 2006 NCAA Graduation Rate, the LMU Athletics

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1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ Óään‡ä™Êi`ˆ>ÊՈ`i

INSIDE LMU

>«Ìœ«Ê …iVŽœÕÌÊvœÀÊ/i>“Ê/À>Ûi

˜vœÀ“>̈œ˜Ê>LœÕÌÊÜ>À`ÃÊ>˜`Ê*œÃÌÊÀ>`Õ>ÌiÊ-V…œ>Àň«Ã

ˆviÊΈÃÊ>˜`Ê iÛiœ«“i˜Ì>Ê7œÀŽÃ…œ«ÃÊ>˜`Ê-«i>ŽiÀÃ

i>`iÀň«Ê>˜`Êi˜ÌœÀˆ˜}ʜ««œÀÌ՘ˆÌˆiÃ

The Athletics Department is committed to ensuring every student-ath-

staff:

lete reaches their full potential in the classroom. Each student-athlete is required to be enrolled in 15 units per semester and is asked to keep a minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA. Each team can increase the department standard depending on the philosophy of the coach. AT-RISK STUDENTS If a student falls below a 2.5 GPA during a given semester they are required to meet weekly with a member of the academic support staff and attend study hall the following semester. Depending on the situation and circumstances, the student meetings can last from anywhere between 15 minutes to an hour. To help students in need, tutorial services through the Learning Resource Center (LRC) may be recommended by

MATT CASANA Dir. of Academic Services (310) 338-1736

SHERILYN FRAZIER Asst. Dir. of Academic Services TBA

the advisor or requested by the student. FIRST YEAR STUDENTS All first semester student-athletes are required to meet weekly with a Student-Athlete Mentor to ensure they assimilate to life as a studentathlete at LMU. In addition, they are expected to attend study hall for a minimum of 4 hours weekly, in 2 hour blocks. Students are also encouraged to form study groups with fellow students. Finally, first year students will be enrolled in a one-unit class, LIBA 125, Foundations of Academic Achievement. Taught by the Academic Coordinator, Matt Casaña, this class serves to foster important lessons in students such as time management, study skills, diversity, and nutrition.

ERIC WIENER Academic Services Assistant TBA

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INSIDE LMU

Athletics medicine:

T

A Hub of Activity.

he busiest place per square foot on the campus of Loyola

“And it is not just my staff. It is the students that make this place

LMU’s on campus commons area, the Lair, University Hall or

great. The student-athletes care and respect what we are doing. With

the LMU bookstore. It is the LMU Athletics Training Room.

21 sports and just three trainers, it can get difficult in seeing to every

Right around 1,000-square feet, the LMU training room at any giv-

need of the athletes. But the students understand and respect each

en moment in season is what Head Athletics Trainer Keith Ellison calls

other and make this place very, very successful now and in the fu-

“organized and controlled chaos.” In the height of its busiest time of

ture.”

the year, when all 21 LMU NCAA Division I sports are in action, the Training Room can make a casual onlooker dizzy. However, Ellison, his three full-time assistants, Joe Gonzalez, Beth Drayer, Steve Cortez and 15 student assistants make it look easy. In his 16th-year at LMU and 10th as the Head Athletics Trainer, Ellison and his staff have turned the LMU training room into a model for the school’s main conference affiliate, the West Coast Conference.

22

person as a whole.

Marymount University is not what one would think. It is not

On a given day, the Athletics Training Room will see about half of the 325 student-athletes at LMU. A given day will include lots of paperwork, therapy for student-athletes recovering from injuries that keep them out of competition, appointments with doctors and preand post-practice needs. “Our mission is to eliminate the chance for injury. We stress the use of ice and strength and conditioning to reduce the risk of injury.

“This is a great place to be because of the people,” said Ellison,

Thus, the traffic in our training room can get very heavy throughout

who graduated from LMU in 1987. “The full time staff we have here

the day,” said Ellison, who has been busy this year. “We have had a

is the best in the conference. We have the right personalities for LMU

lot of different injuries with many different teams. Because of that we

and they all genuinely care and are concerned about the student-

have had a lot of traffic in our training room doing rehab and doing

athletes, not just for their injuries and sports they play, but for each

the normal stuff to prepare for practice or games.”

1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ Óään‡ä™Êi`ˆ>ÊՈ`i

INSIDE LMU

staff:

In addition to providing the best care available in the nation to LMU athletes, the training program services the needs of its opponents in a first class manner and provides an opportunity for students in the field of athletic training to earn valuable experience. With more than 50 years of experience in the field, the Training

KEITH ELLISON Dir. of Athletic Medicine (310) 338-2874

JOE GONZALEZ Asst. Athletic Trainer (310) 338-2764

BETH DRAYER Asst. Athletic Trainer (310) 338-2340

STEVEN CORTEZ Asst. Athletic Trainer (310) 338-5220

Program provides services that includes a philosophy that places a high value on health and wellness, a program that allows injured student-athletes to return to their sport as soon as medically safe and to substantially reduce the risk of athletic injury for those student-athletes. The Training Room at LMU features state-of-the-art equipment in a 1,000-square foot sports medicine complex. The equipment includes whirlpools, paraffin bath, ultrasound, muscle stimulation and hydrocalators.

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INSIDE LMU

strength and conditioning:

T

A Hub of Activity.

he strength and conditioning program at Loyola Marymount

the key components of improved speed, agility and overall athletic per-

University has become an essential component of the Ath-

formance. Throughout the training period, specific attention is given

letic department’s quest for Building Champions. The pro-

to:

gram is constantly looking at different training mechanisms to make

UÊ-«Àˆ˜ÌʓiV…>˜ˆVÃÊ

the LMU student-athletes Champions. Leading the way is Strength and

UÊ iÕÀœ“ÕÃVՏ>ÀÊVœœÀ`ˆ˜>̈œ˜Ê

Conditioning Coordinator, Sergiu Boerica and his assistant, Ciara Carl.

Uʘ>iÀœLˆVÊ>˜`Ê>iÀœLˆVÊVœ˜`ˆÌˆœ˜ˆ˜}Ê

In the past three years, the Strength and Conditioning program has

all of which have the specific purpose of improving every athlete’s per-

a partnership with the Athletic Republic Corporation, which is running

formance.

the same speed training system. The FAST speed training system has

According to John Frappier, more than 2,000 professional athletes

been established through research and development by John Frappier,

from NFL, MLB, NBA and NHL have participated in the program. Some

MS in Exercise Physiology and Kinesiology and his team of researchers,

of the professional athletes who use the system regularly are: Garrett

starting in 1986. John Frappier’s scientifically designed programs have

Lowney (2000 and 2004 Olympic Wrestler), Heather Mitts (Professional

two goals: to make the athlete as efficient as possible and to find a

Soccer Player), Jason Kreis (Professional Soccer Player), Dan O’Brien

balance between different muscles. In order to increase speed, there

(Olympic Decathlon Athlete), Cris Carter (All-Pro Wide Receiver), Pascal

are two elements which can help do that: stride length and stride fre-

Dupuis (Minnesota Wild), Jim Kleinsasser (Minnesota Vikings fullback),

quency. “The longer the stride and the more frequently it occurs, the

Shaun Alexander (Seattle Seahawks), Rick Helling (Baltimore Orioles),

more ground you’ll cover in a shorter period of time,” states Frappier.

Darin Erstad (Anaheim Angels) and Brett Hull (Detroit Red Wings).

The FAST Programs are complex and systematic. They bring together

24

UÊÕÃViÊ«…ÞȜœ}ÞÊ

implemented the Frappier Acceleration Speed Training (FAST) through

1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ Óään‡ä™Êi`ˆ>ÊՈ`i

The tools used to implement the FAST protocols for our student/

INSIDE LMU

staff: athletes are: 2 Generation II Super Treadmill (29+ mph, 40% grade), 4 specially designed hardwood plyometric floors, and weight machines designed to target the muscles of the hip girdle, trunk, and legs (2 Hip Machines, 2 Implosion Machines and 2 Plyo Press Machines). Loyola Marymount University is striving in offering our student/athletes an exceptional individualized experience during their time on campus. “The philosophy of the program is to develop the student-athlete potential through training routines specific to the athletes’ sports. Customizing the strength program ensures the athletes’ growth, which helps the team win the conference and become a national contender,”

TODD SUTKER Head Strength Coach (310) 338-5796

SERGIO BOERICA Asst. Strength Coach (310) 338-7690

said Boerica. “Life and sports are about opportunities, commitment and rewards. There are ample opportunities to participate in sports, but athletes need to realize that with these opportunities, they need to commit to being the best they can be,” said Boerica, who took over the program in 2007. “This takes hard work and determination from each individual to optimize their individual talents and abilities. This commitment and dedication leads to secondary benefits of physical and mental fitness as well as the rewards of participation in sports. Every athlete has the opportunity to succeed by using the FAST program but their commitment to go the extra mile turns into life-long rewards on and off the field.”

CIARA CARL Asst. Strength Coach (310) 338-5796

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INSIDE LMU

LMU athletics facilities:

Building Champions. T

he athletics facilities at Loyola Marymount University have seen a little of everything in the almost 70 years while in its current Westchester location. From the 1984 Olympic games to LMU basketball to the World Cup and everything in between, the LMU athletics facilities have become home to the best and it continues to get better. Thanks to continued commitment by the University, the Athletics Complex over the next two years will show lots of growth. It started this summer when the University allocated office and meeting space to Lion Athletics within the Dorothy and Thomas E. Leavey Center on the Westchester campus. The Leavey Center will become home to 15 of the Lions’ 21 varsity program in the newly remodeled and modern office complex. With six suites on two floors in the heart of the LMU campus, Athletics at Leavey joins an impressive list of facilities. At the center is Albert Gersten Pavilion, home to LMU basketball, volleyball and the administrative offices. The facility also includes the Academics Center, the LMU Training Room, LMU Weight Room, locker room facilities, and LMU Media Room - all of which will undergo renovations over the next two years. In addition to Gersten Pavilion, the complex includes George Page Stadium, Sullivan Field, the Burns Recreation and Aquatics Center, the Jane Bove Boathouse, Smith Field, the LMU Tennis Complex and the Thomas Higgins Short Game Center. Each facility has undergone modifications and improvements since 2000, including the newest competition venue on campus, Smith Field, which opened in 2006. Other competitive venues have been added in the last 10 years, including the George P. Kading and Morris A. Pivaroff Tournament Court at the LMU Tennis Center in 2004, the Boathouse in 2002 and the Burns Aquatics Center in 2001. In addition to the playing “fields,” other facilities have been added to enhance the Athletics’ Complex. The Higgins Short Game Center was completed in 2006 for the men’s golf team. At Page Stadium, the LMU Batting Cage

athletics

AT THE

leavey center

̅ïVÃÊ œ>V…iÃÊ"vwViÃÊUÊOpened: 2008 Notes: 7,000 square feet of office and meeting space to Lion Athletics within the Dorothy and Thomas E. Leavey Center. Six suites to be used by men’s and women’s basketball, men’s and women’s soccer, baseball, volleyball, softball, men’s crew, women’s rowing, men’s and women’s tennis, men’s golf, men’s and women’s cross country/track

and Weight Room was completed in 2007, Pride Park at the entrance to the stadium in 2004 and the Mikos Blue Monster in leftfield in 2001. Sullivan Field had new turf and new bleachers installed this summer while a new scoreboard was added in 2005. Gersten also had its lower seating sections replaced in 2007 and a state-of-the-art sound system in 2006. More is on the horizon. Construction for a new weight room facility with locker rooms for baseball, softball and soccer is scheduled to start soon and new training room and locker room suites in Gersten are scheduled within the next 24 months. To help continue LMU’s facility growth, go online at LMULions.com and click on Building Champions. 1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ Óään‡ä™Êi`ˆ>ÊՈ`i

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INSIDE LMU lmu athletics’ facilities:

28

Albert Gersten Pavilion

george c. page stadium

i˜½ÃÊ>˜`Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ >ÎiÌL>]Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ6œiÞL>ÊUÊOpened: 1981 Capacity:Ê{]£xÈÊUÊLargest Crowd:Ê{]xÓxÊ­iL°ÊÓä]Ê£™nn®ÊUÊNotes: Weightlifting venue for 1984 Olympics; Host of highest scoring NCAA game

>ÃiL>ÊUÊOpened: 1983 Capacity:Ê£]äääÊUÊNotes: Batting cage and weight facility built in 2007; Pride Park built in 2004; Mikos Blue Monster built in 2001

sullivan field

burns aquatics center

i˜½ÃÊ>˜`Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ-œVViÀÊUÊOpened: 1990 Capacity:ÊÓ]äääÊUÊNotes: New bench back seating in 2008; new turf in 2008; new scoreboard in 2006; Training site for FC Barcelona in 2006

i˜½ÃÊ>˜`Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ7>ÌiÀÊ*œœÆÊ7œ“i˜½ÃÊ-܈““ˆ˜}ÊUÊOpened: 2000 Capacity:Ê£]äääÊUÊNotes: Hosted 2002 and 2005 NCAA Men’s Water Polo Championships; Teams have won 12 conference titles since it opened

Smith Field

LMU Tennis Center

-œvÌL>ÊUÊOpened: 2006 Capacity:ÊxääÊUÊNotes: Newest competitive venue for athletics; team won 2007 PCSC title; built with gift from Mike and Patty Smith family

i˜½ÃÊ>˜`Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃÊUÊOpened: n/a Capacity:Ê{ääÊUÊNotes: Morris A. Pivaroff and George P. Kading Tournament Court and stadium seating was built in 2003; new scoreboard in 2007

higgins short game center

jane browne bove boathouse

i˜½ÃÊœvÊ*À>V̈ViÊ>VˆˆÌÞÊUÊOpened: 2006 Notes: The state-of-the-art facility will be named in the honor of Thomas Higgins, S.J.; Includes 5,900-square feet of synthetic turf, nine different pins, two bunkers

i˜½ÃÊ ÀiÜÊ>˜`Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ,œÜˆ˜}ÊUÊOpened: 2002 Notes: The Jane Browne Bove Boathouse was completed in 2002 and the facility includes two boat bays, a work area, an office, a new dock and restrooms. The boathouse is part of beautiful Marina del Rey, Calif.

1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ Óään‡ä™Êi`ˆ>ÊՈ`i

INSIDE LMU athletics and campus map: ATO BSF REC GER HGC LEV

LVF

ATHLETICS OFFICES/FACILITIES Athletics’ Ticket Office ....................... H-7 Baseball Storage Facility ....................I-10 Batting Cages & Weight Room Burns Recreation and Aquatics CenterH-7 Men’s & Women’s Water Polo Offices Women’s Swimming Offices Gersten Pavilion .................................. H-8 Athletics Director, Academic Services, Administration Offices, Training Room Higgins Short Game Center ................ J-8 Men’s Golf Practice Facility Leavey Center....................................... F-6 Men’s & Women’s Soccer ...1st Floor-Suite A Crew/Rowing ...................... 1st Floor-Suite B Men’s Golf ......................... 1st Floor-Suite B Cross Country/Track ........... 1st Floor-Suite B Reception ........................... 1st Floor-Suite B Men’s Basketball ................2nd Floor-Suite E Men’s & Women’s Tennis .. 2nd Floor-Suite F Baseball ............................ 2nd Floor-Suite G Volleyball ......................... 2nd Floor-Suite G Softball ............................ 2nd Floor-Suite G Women’s Basketball ......... 2nd Floor-Suite H Leavey Field ......................................... D-6 Soccer Practice Field

ATHLETICS COMPETITION VENUES GER Gersten Pavilion .................................. H-8 Men’s & Women’s Basketball Women’s Volleyball LTC LMU Tennis Center ................................I-8 Men’s & Women’s Tennis PBS Page Stadium ........................................I-9 Baseball POOL Burns Aquatics Center ........................ H-7 Men’s & Women’s Water Polo Women’s Swimming SUF Sullivan Field ..................................... H-10 Men’s & Women’s Soccer SMF Smith Field .............................................I-8 Softball A B C D L P2-3 FOU HNL

GAME DAY/VISITOR PARKING General Parking.................................... F-9 Media/Handicap Parking .................... H-8 Must have pass/credential Handicap Parking ................................ H-8 Must have pass General Parking................................... H-6 After 5 p.m. when gate is up Drollinger Parking Plaza ..................... D-7 U-Hall Visitor Parking ....................... A-10 ONCAMPUS DINING Founders Pavilion..................................I-2 Pete’s Arena Hannon Loft ......................................... F-8 Sports Pub

MAL UNH MCK

BIR BUR BAN CPL CCC COM DAU DHA DOO EST EDC FAN FMA FMC FMT FOL GRE HIL JES MAL NOR PER

Malone Student Center ...................... H-4 Bookstore, The Lair Marketplace Jamba Juice University Hall ..................................... A-9 Bookstore, Lions Corner Café, Roski Dining, Crimson Lion McKay Hall............................................ F-7 Iggy’s Diner CAMPUS FACILITIES Birds Nest ................................................ I-1 Burns Fine Art Center ............................ G-6 Murphy Recital Hall & Laband Gallery Burns Fine Art Annex .............................. F-6 Central Plant ........................................... F-4 Child Care Center ................................... E-9 Communication Arts ............................... F-6 Daum Hall................................................J-4 Daum Hall Annex.....................................J-4 Doolan Hall .............................................. I-6 East Hall...................................................J-6 Engineering Design Center ......................J-6 Foley Annex (Public Safety) .................... H-5 Facilities Management .............................J-7 F.M. Craft Shops ......................................J-7 F.M. Transportation ..................................J-7 Foley Building (Shrub Theatre)................ H-5 Greenhouse ............................................. I-5 Hilton Center for Business....................... E-4 Jesuit Community ................................... E-3 Malone Student Center ......................... H-4 North Hall (Del Rey Theatre) .....................J-5 Pereira Hall of Engineering ....................... I-6

PAN RAX SHC SEA SOU STR UNH UPB LIB XAV

Pereira Annex ..........................................J-6 Research Annex .......................................J-5 Sacred Heart Chapel ............................... F-2 Seaver Science Hall ................................ H-6 South Hall ................................................J-5 St. Roberts Hall ....................................... F-4 University Hall ........................................ A-9 Ahmanson Auditorium University Pool & Building Von der Ahe Library ............................... G-5 Xavier Hall (Admissions/Financial Aid)...... F-2

DES DOH DRN DRS HAN HUE LV4 LV5 LV6 MCC MCK OMA RAI ROS SUL TEN WHE

CAMPUS HOUSING Desmond Hall .......................................... I-3 Doheny Hall .............................................J-4 Del Rey North .........................................1-2 Del Rey South .......................................... I-2 Hannon Apts. ......................................... F-8 Huesman Hall .......................................... I-4 Leavey 4 Apts. ....................................... C-6 Leavey 5 Apts. ........................................B-7 Leavey 6 Apts. ....................................... C-7 McCarthy Hall ........................................ D-5 McKay Hall ............................................. F-7 O’Malley Apts. ....................................... C-5 Rains Hall ............................................... D-6 Rosecrans Hall.......................................... I-3 Sullivan Hall ............................................. I-5 Tendrich Hall ........................................... F-8 Whelan Hall ........................................... H-2

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1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ Óään‡ä™Êi`ˆ>ÊՈ`i

INSIDE LMU

Lion Game Day:

Feel the Roar. ORIGIN OF THE LION

LIONPRIDE

Although its origin is somewhat clouded, the Lion mascot has been synonymous with Loyola Marymount University for more than 70 years. According to the Oct. 5, 1923 edition of the school newspaper, the Los Angeles Loyolan, the Lion mascot was suggested by an enthusiastic fan after 1919 when St. Vincent’s College became Loyola College. Noting the Loyola football player’s fierce competitiveness, that unknown fan described the Loyola players as Lions. The name did not generate too much popularity and the Loyola athletic nickname remained “Loyolan’s” until 1923. At that time, the article explains, the college wished to inspire new pride in its athletes and fans. Noting the success of nicknames for other colleges, the college opted to give the Lion’s nickname a rebirth. Calling the old Lion mascot “mistreated and forgotten,” the article explains that the Lion would officially find its way into all college songs and cheers. The Lion has remained firmly entrenched in Loyola lore to this very day. An alternative origin story traces the nickname to the abundance of actual mountain lions which roamed Westchester when Loyola College moved here in 1927. The area remained widely unpopulated and teemed with wildlife when the school moved atop the bluffs. School officials reportedly adopted the nickname because mountain lions inhabited the area when ground was broken.

This organization is the official student booster club of LMU athletics. Seen throughout the athletic season, LionPride has been a major reason for record student attendance the last several years. With more than 1,000 members this year, LionPride will be a factor at LMU events. Open to all students enrolled at LMU, LionPride offers free admission to all home regular season athletic events, opportunity to participate in in-game promotions, drawings for valuable prizes and much, much more, including the LionPride T-Shirt. In addition, LionPride makes its way to road games thanks to multiple road trips through out the year.

PEP BAND In what many consider its first appearance at any LMU athletic event, the LMU Pep Band broke onto the scene late in the 2001-02 season. Bringing energy and atmosphere to athletics events, the Pep Band is the latest addition to making LMU the best place to play and watch. Making up the 35-member band, with more members on the way, are LMU students from all backgrounds. The band is in its sixth year.

CHEER TEAM The Loyola Marymount University Cheer Squad became the an official varsity sport sponsored by LMU in the Summer of 2005 and are a co-ed competition team that performs annually at the USA Nationals. Serving as a “Spirit Squad” for men’s basketball when the university was known as Loyola, the current cheer team has grown to a service-oriented organization that not only appears and supports all 21 LMU athletic teams and events, but performs community service. The cheer squad has continued to impress with its overall in-game routines with advanced tumbling, stunt and dance performances. In addition to providing support to the teams during the games, the squad will once again perform halftime and timeout routines. This year’s squad includes Kristina Alarcon, Analee Almeida, Amanda Barthel, Alyse Chong, Heather Chong, Kristen Cirillo, Oscar Contreras, Ashley Cordes, Arianne Cortes, Lisa Green, Kim Hein, Penelope Horan, Caroline Jahna, Kendra Jones, Julia Karnoski, Tracie Kogura, Thomas Miller, Teresa Moore, and Amanda Veitia.

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INSIDE LMU history of lmu athletics:

Decades of Champions.

1890 – 1910 Then known as St. Vincent’s College, the school is known on record as having a football team and a basketball team. The year 1889 is shown to be the first game of football while the 1906 season was the first for basketball. The records show the Lions going 5-0 as a basketball team in 1906. 1910-1930 Loyola College was founded in 1911 as an outgrowth of St. Vincent’s College, the first college in Los Angeles. In 1924 the College opened a new gym on the old St. Vincent’s campus. A year later the Lions post first season with double-digit wins in basketball, going 10-7 in the 1924-25 season. Coached by Harold “Bill” Hess, the Lions had wins over Woodbury Business College, Cal Tech and the Hollywood All-Stars. In the fall of 1925, George Casey became the third head coach of St. Vincent’s, finishing his only year as coach 6-5. In 1926 the school plays in first overtime game, a 20-16 loss to Whittier. They win their first overtime game a year later, a 16-14 victory against California Christian College. Then in 1928, the then Loyola College moved to its current location on the Westchester bluff and two years later became Loyola University. Loyola Law School, located in downtown Los Angeles, was founded in 1920. 1930s In the 1930s Loyola established its new campus on the bluff in Westchester while basketball greats Pete Newell and Phil Woolpert began their legendary careers as Lions. While Loyola discontinues the men’s basketball program for four seasons during the great depression, it is hockey of all sports that emerges as Loyola’s top program, thanks in large part to the use of its football players as hockey players. The first college hockey league started in 1927 and while increasing in popularity, it became part of the official athletic program of multiple southern California schools, thus the formation of the Southern California Intercollegiate Hockey League. USC dominated the league, winning 36 straight before Loyola, led by Head Coach Tom Lieb, snapped that streak on March 6 of 1932, beginning one of fiercer rivalries of its day. Then in the 1934-35 season, the Lions knocked off USC in the prestigious Yosemite Tournament for the first time and then went on to defeat the Trojans for Loyola’s first conference crown. As the league grew, the main attraction continued to be the games between Loyola and USC, “as the two teams were in a class by themselves.” The 1935-36 season was the year college hockey really caught on. The final game between Loyola and USC for the Pacific

pionship in the 100-yard dash. He later played seven seasons as a tight end for the NFL’s Los Angeles Rams, helping the team to the 1951 World Title. The Lions men’s basketball team advanced to their first collegiate sponsored postseason tournament, competing for the NAIA National Championship. The Lions posted a 16-9 record and were selected to participate in the NAIA Tournament where they faced San Francisco State in the first round. With a 57-56 win, the Lions moved on to face Southwestern (KS) in the second round. South1940s In 1941, the Lions face in-town rival Pepperdine for western won, 83-79. Then in 1956, the Lions joined the first time in the two program’s histories. They faced the California Basketball Association, which two years each other twice in the 1940-41 season, with Loyola later formed the West Coast Athletic Conference. winning both, 30-18 and 43-23. In that season, both Pete Newell and Phil Woolpert suited up for the Lions. The two Loyola greats went on to become legends in the coaching profession, leading college teams to NCAA National Championships. In 1948-1949, Loyola went on to its first 20-win season, posting a 22-14 record under coach Scotty McDonald. The Lions would see their longest winning streak at that time of 10 games. The season included the first game in Alumni Gymnasium, the Lions’ home until the 1981-82 season when the Lions moved to Gersten Pavilion. Coast title was a double overtime thriller in front of 4,000 fans. The Lions won their second PCHC championship in a row. The Lions would then win their third league title in a row in a three-game playoff in 1937, winning two games to one. With World War II on the horizon, Loyola would drop hockey in 1941 and college hockey in Southern California would slowly break apart.

1950s The 1950s started with one of best football seasons in school history as the team, led by future NFL star Don Klosterman, finished the season 8-1, losing to Santa Clara 28-26 and missing out on a trip to the Orange Bowl. Klosterman would go on to earn All-America honors in 1952. A member of that team, Bob Boyd, former Loyola football and track great, captured the 1950 NCAA men’s track cham1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ Óään‡ä™Êi`ˆ>ÊՈ`i

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INSIDE LMU Lions and went on to host events with the 1984 Summer Olympic Games in Los Angeles. The year prior to the Olympics, the NCAA takes over women’s sports as the National Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW) is dissolved. In Women’s Tennis, the Lions finished 12th in the nation in their division as Debbie Delgado is first recipient of All1970s The University merged American status. with Marymount ColSunderland, lege to become Loyola Paul Marymount University and in 1971 women’s athletics who played both begins to appear as the Association for Intercollegiate volleyball and basAthletics for Women is formed to plan, govern and pro- ketball at LMU, mote the growing number of college tournaments for went on to earn women athletes. That same year the five-player, full- All-America honors court game and the 30-second shot clock is introduced in volleyball at LMU and then played 10 years of the to women’s basketball. And then one year later one U.S. National Volleyball Team, earning U.S. Player of the of the most important pieces of legislation for wom- Year honors three times (1978, 79, 82). He played in en’s athletics is put into place as Congress passes Title the 1978 and 1982 World Championships and then as IX, setting into motion the Lions success to come in a member of the 1984 U.S. Olympic Team, he helped women’s sports. Title IX officially went into effect on the team to the Gold Medal. June 21, 1975. In 1973, Marv Wood’s baseball squad brought LMU its first West Coast Conference Champi- Paul Westhead is hired as head coach of the men’s onship after a 13-game win streak allowed the Lions basketball team, replacing Ed Goorjian, who coached from 1980-1985. In his first season, he leads the Lions to clinch the title on back to the postseason for the first time since 1980. the final weekend of In 1985, US International and LMU begin a four-year the season over secseries that would result in the highest scoring games in ond place Santa Clara. NCAA history. After defeating USIU 84-65 in January of USC knocked off the 1985, the “track meets” would begin. In Westhead’s Lions and Cal State Los first season in 1985-86, the Lions would defeat USIU Angeles in the NCAA 151-107. District 8 regionals and eventually won its The 1986 LMU baseball team had the best season in fourth consecutive naprogram history. It was also one of the best overall seational championship. In sons of all time for LMU Athletics. Following a 1985 1976 the first full scholseason in which the Lions did not have a winning rearship for a female is cord at 27-28, the program performed one of the best given and LMU adds turnarounds in LMU athletics history. They finished the its first varsity program season with a program-best 50 wins and wrapped up in Women’s Tennis as the season at 50-15, a 23-game improvement from alum Jamie Sanchez the previous year. LMU produced a 13-game winning begins the program streak from March 21 through April 11, and won 20 with a 13-6 record. of 21 games in the middle of the season. With the They went on to win a conference championship (AIAW), the first in women’s winning streak came the nation’s top ranking by the programs at LMU. They went 10-0 and won the title in ESPN/Collegiate Baseball National Poll. The Lions never 1977 and 1978 as they combined for a record of 28-2 looked back, finishing tied with Pepperdine for first place in the West Coast Athletic Conference at 19-5, in conference play. setting up a one game playoff to determine the conference’s automatic bid to the NCAA Regional. Played 1980s The decade started with men’s basketball earning a bid at Jackie Robinson Stadium on the campus of UCLA, to the NCAA West Regional, losing to Arizona State in the Lions defeated the Waves 14-9 to earn the bid to the NCAA West Regional. LMU would reel off its next the first round, 99-71. four games, fighting through four separate elimination Then in 1981, with the opportunity for women to games to earn a bid to the school’s first appearance in compete at the collegiate level, LMU athletes waste the College World Series. On May 30, the Lions opened no time in making their mark. Therese Kozlowski ran a up their first World Series trip with a 4-3 win over petime of 17:34.9 to win the 1981 AIAW Individual Na- rennial power LSU, to earn a two-day rest and play in tional Championship in cross country while women’s the winner’s bracket. The Lions played the University of volleyball begins as a varsity program at LMU with the Arizona on June 2 and lost a heartbreaker 7-5 to drop NCAA hosting as a championship in 1981. The banner to the elimination bracket to face Oklahoma State. The year continued as the Women’s Rowing Varsity Four Cowboys were too much for the Lions, as they went team won the 1980-81 National Championship and on to an 11-5 win. Tim Layana was a member of the the brand new Gersten Pavilion opened as home to the 1990 World Series Champion Cincinnati Reds. The Limember of the Rowing Eight with Coxswain Team that won the Gold Medal. In 1968, NBA coach Rick Adelman finished his threeyear playing career with 1,425 points, averaging 18.8 points in his career at LMU. The 1960s ended with the final curtain call of the football team as they went on to win the 1969 National Club Football National championship with an 8-1 record.

Loyola finished the CBA with a 9-5 record, second in the conference. 1960s In 1960, Loyola men’s basketball tied for first with a 9-3 record in the West Coast Athletic Conference. The title was shared with Santa Clara, who defeated the Lions in a playoff game to end the season. The Lions closed the regular season with eight straight wins. Then in 1961, LMU basketball had a record breaking season for the Lions, earning their second 20-win season, finishing 20-7 overall and earning their first-ever out-right WCAC title with a 10-2 mark. Loyola started the season 3-4, but responded with 17 wins in their final 20 games, including a nine-game winning streak. It was the Lions’ first trip to the NCAA tournament, a date in the Far West Regional at Portland. The Lions fell to Utah, 91-75 in the first round, and fell to the consolation bracket. Utah, who Loyola defeated in exhibition play 85-64 earlier in the season, went on to the Final Four. Loyola defeated USC, 69-67, to earn their 20th win of the season. It was head coach William Donovan’s final year at the helm of the Lions. In his eight years as coach, he earned 107 wins, the most among all LMU coaches. In 1964 Hugh Miller Foley rowed in the 1964 Olympics. He was a

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INSIDE LMU round against power North AVCA Coaches’ Poll and No. 22 by Volleyball Monthly. Carolina. The Tar Heels would The glimpse of success in 1993 opened the door to the Lions dominating the WCC in women’s volleyball for dismiss the Lions 123-97. the next three seasons. In 1994, they garnered the first The Lions earned their second of three consecutive WCC Championships with a 19consecutive WCAC Tourna- 10 overall mark and a 12-2 conference record, earning ment Championship in 1989 a NCAA tournament appearance. Head Coach Steve with another win over Santa Stratos then led LMU to its second straight WCC title Clara, 75-70. The Lions fin- and NCAA tournament appearance in 1995 with a perished 20-11 on the season, fect 14-0 record, the first in school history. following a 120-101 loss to Arkansas in the first round of A year later, Stratos and the West Coast Conference the NCAA tournament in the Champion Lions celebrated the most successful seaMidwest Region held at the son in program history. The Lions had advanced to the Hoosier Dome in Indianapolis. NCAA’s Sweet Sixteen and finished among the nation’s top-10 in the final AVCA rankings. Dating back to the The 1980s would conclude 1994 season, the Lions had racked up 31 straight WCC with another national title as victories. LMU went a perfect 14-0 in WCC play for the women’s rowing varsity the second straight season in 1996, earning Stratos his four took home their second third consecutive WCC Coach of the Year selection. He ons would return to the postseason in 1987, 1988 and was the first coach in the history of the conference to national championship. 1989. Concluding the 1985-86 season, men’s basketball found themselves in the NIT for the first time in school history. Traveling to Berkeley, Calif., to face the Bears in the first round, the Lions would begin a successful end to the 1980s decade that made a habit of winning in the postseason. The Lions defeated Cal 80-75 to advance in a postseason tournament. LMU would fall to Wyoming 99-90 to end Westhead’s first season at 19-11 and 10-4 in the WCAC (second). Also in 1986, the women’s volleyball team won the WCC and advance to the NCAAs, where they topped UCLA in first round action before falling to Stanford in the second round. The Lions finished the 1986 season 24-8 and 10-2 in WCC play in their final season under Coach Nancy Fortner. One year later, the Hank Gathers and Bo Kimble era of Lions’ basketball began with a 114-78 win over Tennessee Tech. The season would finish as the Lions’ best in winning percentage, finishing with a 28-4 mark and a perfect 14-0 in the WCAC. The 1987-88 season would include a 25-game winning streak, the best in school history. The fast-break offense began to take hold, as the Lions scored in triple figures in all but nine of their 32 games. The Lions would clinch their first WCAC regular season championship since the ‘60s and their first Tournament Championship with a 104-96 win over Santa Clara in the WCAC Championship game. LMU advances to the NCAA tournament, and earns its first win in the “Big Dance,” a 119-115 win over Wyoming, who two years earlier knocked the Lions out of the NIT. Playing in the West Sub-Regional in Salt Lake City, Utah, LMU would be a surprise opponent in the second

1990 The 1990s started the way the 80s ended, fast. In addition to their 28 games scoring in triple digits, men’s basketball earned its third straight WCC title and trip to the NCAA tournament. In finishing 26-6, the Lions advanced further than any team in school history by reaching the Elite Eight in the NCAA Championships. However, tragedy marked the Lions’ cinderella run. On March 4, 1990 in the second round of the WCC Tournament, the Lions took a 25-13 lead on Portland following All-American Hank Gathers’ dunk on an alley-oop from Terrell Lowery. Gathers would collapse to the floor and would not regain consciousness. Gathers would be pronounced dead later that evening at Marina del Rey’s Daniel Freeman Hospital. The WCC Tournament would be cancelled and the Lions would be named champion, earning the automatic bid to the NCAA tournament. A long shot and seeded No. 11 in the West Region, the Lions went on to beat New Mexico State, defending national champion Michigan and Alabama before falling to the eventual national champions, UNLV, 131-101. The run in the 1990 tournament will long be remembered, however, with the image of Gathers’ teammate and longtime friend Bo Kimble shooting the first free throw left-handed - a switch from his normal right-handed shot. Kimble made every shot he took left-handed. Months after basketball’s historic run, baseball captured sole possession of the league title for the first time in 17 years, LMU breezed to its third consecutive postseason appearance. The Lions posted 45 wins, the second highest total in school history. LMU representatives were honored with WCC Player of the Year, Newcomer of the Year and Coach of the Year accolades by the league. In the fall of 1991, Gina Eron becomes the first Lion to win the West Coast Conference individual title by running a time of 19:15 and men’s crew wins the Light Weight Four Pacific Coast Championship. Two years later, the women’s volleyball accumulated a 23-7 overall record and finished second in the WCC (11-3). For the first time in program history, LMU entered the nation’s top25, ranked No. 24 in the

earn the nod three straight years. He was also named the AVCA District Coach of the Year. Kim Blankinship joined Stratos in earning WCC accolades, as the Lions’ senior was named the 1996 WCC Player of the Year. Tracy Holman and Sarah Noriega, along with Blankinship, were All-WCC first-team and AVCA All-District selections. The Lions finished the regular season 25-2 and earned a bye in the first round of the NCAAs. A second-round win over UC Santa Barbara sent the Lions to the Sweet Sixteen, where they faced a tough Washington State squad. Despite the efforts of NCAA Pacific Regional All-Tournament selections Blankinship (21 kills, 11 digs) and Noriega (30 kills, four blocks), the Lions fell 3-1. LMU finished the banner 1996 campaign with an overall record of 26-3, winning 16 of its final 17 matches and 26 of its last 28. The AVCA ranked the Lions ninth in the final 1996 poll, though 1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ Óään‡ä™Êi`ˆ>ÊՈ`i

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INSIDE LMU season and its first-ever WWPA title thanks to a 7-6 win over UC Davis in the championship game. The win set in motion the most successful stretch by any program in LMU history. The Lions would go on to win five straight titles - 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005 reaching the NCAA National Championship game in 2004 thanks to a win over Stanford in the NCAA semifinals. It was the first time in program history to play in a national championship game at the NCAA Division I level. That same year, men’s soccer earned an at-large berth into the NCAA Tournament for the first time in program history. The Lions compiled a seven game winning streak during the season, including a 1-0 victory at #11 UCLA. It marked the program’s first win over UCLA, who it would face again in the first round of the NCAA Tournament, falling in a heartbreaking 3-2 double overtime decision. The Lions were ranked as high as #16 in the polls and finished the season with a 9-7-2 record.

LMU had climbed as high as sixth in the nation during the season. In 1997, Sarah Noriega became the first player to earn AVCA All-America first-team honors as well as Volleyball Magazine All-America second-team accolades. She was the WCC Player of the Year in 1997 after being named an All-WCC first-team selection for the third consecutive season. Noriega was a threetime All-District VIII honoree, LMU’s Female Athlete of the Year (1997-98), a participant at the U.S. Olympic Festival (1995), a World Games participant, and 2000 Olympian. In her final year as a Lion, Noriega was recognized as the AVCA National Player of the Week twice (Oct. 6 and Nov. 10). On November 7, 1997, Noriega set the NCAA record for most kills in a fourgame match with 47 against San Diego, a mark which still stands today. Second-year Head Coach Frank Cruz guided the Lions to their first WCC title in eight years in 1998. With the nation’s 16th best recruiting class, nearly all of which were freshmen. LMU edged rival Pepperdine by a half game for the conference crown earning the NCAA automatic bid to the West Regional at Stanford. Freshman Michael Schultz nearly no-hit Stanford in the first round (Stanford was ranked No. 2 in the nation) shutting out the Cardinal through the seventh inning. Schultz and freshman catcher Scott Walter were named WCC Pitcher and Player of the Year, the first time in WCC history freshmen from the same school garnered the awards. With their youth, the Lions would become the Lions third team to claim titles in three straight years. They successfully defended their conference crown, defeating Pepperdine in a threegame series for the WCC Championship at Page Stadium. The victory helped LMU

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win back-to-back titles for the first time in program history. LHP Billy Traber led the team and the WCC with 135 strikeouts while earning first-team All-WCC honors. Anthony Angel also earned first-team honors, the only member of the squad to do so in two consecutive seasons. 2000 The new century began with baseball’s continued dominance as they had one of the most complete teams since the 1986 College World Series team. The Lions won their third straight WCC title and their eighth NCAA bid. In 2000, women’s volleyball continued their pursuit of excellence by starting the season on a seven-match winning streak which propelled them to a season-best No. 21 AVCA ranking (Sept. 4). Success of the program has carried over into individual honors as well. Among the program’s top athletes and graduates, Stratos coached Loyola Marymount’s two AVCA AllAmerica first-team honorees, Sarah Noriega (1994-97) and Sarah McFarland (1997-00). As a member of the U.S. National Volleyball team that qualified for the 2000 Olympics in Sydney, Australia, Sarah Noriega became the third Lion to participate in the Olympic Games. Noriega became a key member of the U.S. National team in 1998. She was named team MVP for her efforts that season in 1999. As a member of the 2000 Olympic squad, Noriega finished the summer fourth on the team with 185 kills and a .393 kill percentage. Her serves wreaked havoc for opponents throughout the Summer Games as her 17 service aces ranked second best on the team. In 2001, women’s basketball earned the program’s first postseason tournament bid with an invitation to the NIT, setting up future success for the team. In addition, Edit Pakay won the West Coast Conference with a time of 17:58 in women’s cross country and women’s water polo, who was in just their fourth year of competition at LMU, finished with the program’s first 20-win

Also making waves in 2001 was men’s water polo as they won their first Western Water Polo Association Championship by defeating UC San Diego 4-2 in the final of the annual tournament. The Lions went on to the NCAA Men’s Water Polo Championship at Stanford and lost to UCLA 7-5 in the semifinals. They defeated UMass 14-6 in the consolation final to finish third. The men were as dominant in the pool as the women, winning four titles in six years - 2001, 2003, 2004, 2005. In 2002 the women’s soccer team earned their first bid

to the NCAA Tournament and women’s tennis won the program’s first West Coast Conference Championship by knocking off nine-time defending champion and rival Pepperdine. The conference crown gave the Lions the automatic bid to the NCAA tournament. Also in 2002, the Lions earned their second straight invitation to the NCAA Tournament after winning 14 games in the regular season, including a 2-0 win over #3 UCLA. LMU started the season with an 11-0-2 record, climbing to #7 in the national rankings. As a result of a strong regular season, LMU hosted its first ever postseason game, with the Lions picking up their first NCAA Tournament victory with a 1-0 win over Cal State Northridge. Andres Murriagui and Arturo Tor-

INSIDE LMU res became the first All-Americans in program history and Jeff Kovar was named an Academic All-American. The Lions returned to the NCAAs again in 2003 and 2004. In 2004, women’s basketball claimed the programs first West Coast Conference Championship, earning its first trip to the NCAA tournament. They finished the season 24-6 overall and 13-1 in the WCC action, winning the final 15 games of the regular season, including the WCC tournament. The WCC tournament champions lost to Baylor in the NCAA regional as Kate Murray was named WCC Player of the Year and WCC Scholar-Athlete of the Year. Adrianne Slaughter was the MVP of the WCC tournament while Head Coach Julie Wilhoit was WCC and Region 8 Coach of the Year. (WBB-2004-WCC Champs) After women’s basketball reach a milestone in March of 2004, three months later, women’s water polo added to LMU’s history. The Lions earned a 5-4 win over second ranked Stanford in the semifinals of the 2004 NCAA Women’s Water Polo Championship to advance to the national title game. It was the first time any LMU team in more than 90 years of intercollegiate sports played in a title game sponsored by the NCAA. The Lions went on to drop a heartbreaker to USC, 108, to finish second.The Lions advanced to the NCAA tournament thanks to their fourth straight WWPA title, earning a 7-3 win at the Burns Recreation and Aquatics Center on the LMU campus on April 25. Devon Wright earned WWPA Player of the Year honors while Head Coach John Loughran claimed his fourth straight Coach of the Year title. Teresa Guidi became the first women’s water polo player to earn first-team All-American honors. That summer a pair of Lions participated in the Olympic Games in Sydney, Australia. Christine Robinson and Rachel Riddell both played for the Canadian Olympic team that season. As 2004 continued, men’s water polo earned back-toback WWPA titles thanks to a 6-3 win over Redlands in the WWPA tournament held at Davis, CA. The Lions finished with the second most wins in program history at 21-11, defeating Princeton 6-5 to finish third in the NCAA Championships. Endre Rex-Kiss was named MVP of the WWPA while also earning second-team All-America honors. They then became the fourth team in LMU history to earn three straight conference titles, defeating UC San Diego 7-6 at the Burns Center in the WWPA Championships. The Lions fell to Stanford at the NCAA Championship in a heartbreaker, 7-6 but responded to defeat St. Francis in the third place game, 10-6. They finished the season 19-16 overall and Endre Rex-Kiss earned second-team All-America honors after finishing second in LMU history with 261 career goals. In the spring of 2005, softball won the program’s second PCSC title in three years and this time earned the conference’s automatic bid to the NCAA tourna-

ment, the program’s first trip to the postseason. Also that spring, women’s water polo team set the record for wins, posting an impressive 30-7 overall record as they won their fifth straight Western Water Polo Association championship. No team in LMU history has won five straight conference titles. LMU would advance to their fifth straight NCAA Women’s Water Polo Championship The 2005-2006 season saw LMU win its first-ever West Coast Conference Commissioner’s Cup for best overall athletics program in the conference. Part of that season saw Laura Mickelson placed fourth in the NCAA West Regional in the 5,000-meter to qualify for the NCAA Track Championships. She placed 22nd overall. Men’s basketball, in the first season under Head Coach Rodney Tention, advanced to the program’s first WCC Tournament Championship since 1989, with three players earning first-team All-WCC honors. The Lions finished the WCC season at 8-6, defeated Saint Mary’s in the WCC Tournament Semifinals to advance to the WCC title game where they fell to fourth-ranked Gonzaga at the buzzer, the ninth game of the season decided on the final play or overtime. Senior Wes Wardrop and juniors Brandon Worthy and Matthew Knight all earned first-team All-WCC honors for leading the Lions to the WCC Basketball Championship game. Further history was made in 2005-06 when men’s golf won their first ever West Coast Conference Championship. Freshman Brian Locke was the first Lion to win the individual championship as he was also named Freshman of the Year in the conference. The Lions would then place sixth in the NCAA West Regional to earn the first-ever trip to the NCAA Championships as they placed among the top 30 programs in the country. Matching golf that spring was women’s rowing with their first WCC Championship. In the fall of 2006, women’s soccer returned to the NCAA tournament for the second time in program history, led by WCC Defender of the Year Joslyn Slovek. Laura Mickelson was at it again as she won the individual WCC Cross Country Championship by more than a minute. That year also marked the 30th year Anniversary for women’s tennis, the longest running women’s program in LMU history. Since championships were created by the NCAA in 1981-82 for women’s programs, LMU women have won 20 of LMU’s 36 conference titles and have earned 21 NCAA tournament bids.

a program best 47-18 record, claiming their third PCSC title. In addition, the Lions won their first and second ever NCAA Tournament games, knocking UC Santa Barbara and UCLA out of the Los Angeles Regional before falling to Hawaii in the Regional final. LMU destroyed the competition in the PCSC, winning the conference with an 18-2 record, 6.5 games ahead of second place. Christine Foley was named Player of the Year, Tiffany Pagano was named Pitcher of the Year, Melissa Dykema was named Freshman of the Year and Gary Ferrin was named the Coach of the Year. Capping 2007 was women’s water polo as the Lions won their sixth WWPA Championship in seven years and finish the season ranked seventh in the nation. Senior Stacia Peterson is named WWPA Player of the Year, Third-Team All-American and becomes just the seventh student-athlete overall and just the second female to earn CoSIDA Academic All-American honors. In the fall of 2007, the LMU men’s water polo team won their fifth WWPA title in seven years despite the youngest roster in program history. The Lions defeated UC Davis 7-6 in the title game as freshmen Tibor Forai and Andy Stevens along with junior Mark Milovic earned All-America honors. Also in the 2007-08 season, the women’s swimming program overcame a huge deficit thanks to not fielding a diving team to claim their first Pacific Coast Swim Conference Championship. The Lions completed their first perfect season at 9-0 while Rebecca Plume, Alex Wike and Alicia Witter earned individual conference titles. All told, 11 swimmers earned All-PCSC honors in 2008. Capping the year was the women’s rowing team as their Lightweight 4 team claimed its third IRA national title with a convincing victory on Cooper River in Camden, NJ. The Lion boat of seniors Jill Austin, Jen Glassman, and Jennifer Guess (cox), along with freshmen Liz LaLonde and Mary Foster, brought home the gold 12 seconds ahead of defending champion Princeton.

The Lions most recent success was seen from their softball program as they finished its 2007 season with

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INSIDE LMU history of lmu athletics:

Champions & All-Americans  ½-Ê - / Ê WCC League Championships:

CHAMPIONSHIPS/ NCAA APPEARANCES 7" ½-Ê - / Ê WCC Championships: NCAA Appearance: NIT Appearance:

2004 2004 2001

7" ½-Ê,"7 Ê WCC Championships: 2006 2007-08 Varsity Four IRA National Champions 1988-89 Varsity Four IRA National Champions 1980-81 Varsity Four IRA National Champions 7" ½-Ê ,"--Ê "1 /,9Ê Individual NCAA Championships: 1980 (AIAW) Terese Kozlowski 17:34.9 (National Champion) Individual WCC Champion: 2006 Laura Mickelson - 21:16 (6k) 2001 Edit Pakay - 17:58 1991 Gina Eron - 19:15 7" ½-Ê-"

,Ê NCAA Tournament Appearances:

2002, 2006

-"/ Ê WISL Championships: PCSC Championships: NCAA Appearance:

1996, 1999, 2000 2003, 2005, 2007 2005, 2007

-7 Ê PCSC Championships:

2008

7" ½-Ê/ -Ê WCC Championships: NCAA Tournament Appearances:

2002 2002

7" ½-Ê6" 9 Ê WCC Championships: 1986, 1994, 1995, 1996 NCAA Tournament Appearances: 1986, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2003, 2004, 2005 NIVC Tournament Appearances: 1990, 1992 7" ½-Ê7/ ,Ê*""Ê WWPA Championships: 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 NCAA Appearances: 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006

NCAA Appearances: College World Series:

38

1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ Óään‡ä™Êi`ˆ>ÊՈ`i

 ½-Ê , 7Ê 1992 Light Weight Four Pacific Coast Champions  ½-Ê"Ê WCC Championships: 2006 NCAA Regional Appearance: 2006 NCAA Championship Appearance: 2006 WCC Individual Champions: 2006 - Brian Locke; 2007 - Brian Locke  ½-Ê-"

,Ê NCAA Tournament Appearance: 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004  ½-Ê/, Ê Individual NCAA Championship Appearance: 1950 Bob Boyd - n/a (1st)  ½-Ê7/ ,Ê*""Ê WWPA Championships: 2001, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007 NCAA Final Four: 2001, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007 ALL-AMERICANS

7" ½-Ê/, Ê Individual NCAA Regional Appearance: 2008 Tara Erdmann (5,000-meter) 17:19.15 (20th) 2007 Laura Mickelson (5,000-meter) 17:04.68 (15th) 2006 Laura Mickelson (5,000-meter) 17:16.59 (4th) Sara Mickelson (5,000-meter) 17:51.09 (13th) Individual NCAA Championship Appearance: 2006 Laura Mickelson (5,000-meter) 16:43.61 (22nd)

- Ê WCC Championships:

1961, 1988, 1990 WCC Tournament Championships: 1988, 1989 NCAA Appearances: 1961, 1980, 1988, 1989, 1990* NIT Appearances: 1986

1973, 1986, 1990, 1998, 1999, 2000 1973, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1998, 1999, 2000 1986

(since 1990)

£™n™‡™ä Bo Kimble (MBB - 2nd-Team) Hank Gathers (MBB - 2nd-Team) £™™ä‡™£Ê Kerry House (WVB - HM) £™™x‡™ÈÊ Julie Greer (WVB- HM) £™™È‡™ÇÊ Kim Blankinship (WVB - 3rd-Team) Tracy Holman (WVB - HM) £™™Ç‡™nÊ Sarah Noriega (WVB - 1st-Team) Reid Priddy (MVB - 2nd-Team) Robert Schildts (MVB - 3rd-Team) Scott Walter (BASE - Freshman 1st-Team, Michael Schultz (BASE - Freshman 1st-Team) Ryan Beaver (BASE - Freshman HM) £™™n‡™™Ê Reid Priddy (MVB - 2nd-Team) Billy Traber (BASE HM) Curt Fiore (BASE - 3rd-Team) £™™™‡ÓäääÊ Sarah McFarland (WVB - 2nd-Team) Tracy Sharp (WSOC - HM) Reid Priddy (MVB - 1st-Team) Scott Walter (BASE - 2nd-Team) Billy Traber (BASE -2nd-Team) Óäää‡ä£Ê Sarah McFarland (WVB- 1st-Team) Kevin Witt (MWP - 3rd-Team) Lucy Windes (WWP - 2nd-Team) Óä䣇äÓÊ

Kevin Witt (MWP - 2nd-Team) Kevin Paulsen (MWP - HM) Stephen Lipinski (MWP - HM) Devon Courtney (WWP - 3rd-Team) Lucy Windes (WWP - 2nd-Team) Teresa Guidi (WWP - 2nd-Team) Sean Smith (BASE - Freshman 1st-Team) Joe Frazee (BASE - Freshman HM) Billy Lockin (BASE - 1st-Team) ÓääӇäÎÊ Andres Murriagui (MSOC - 1st-Team) Arturo Torres (MSOC - 3rd-Team) Jeff Kovar (MSOC - Academic 1st-Team) Kevin Witt (MWP - 3rd-Team) Teresa Guidi (WWP - 2nd-Team) Rachel Riddell (WWP - 3rd-Team) Katie Hicks (WWP -HM) Óää·ä{Ê Kelli Nerison (WVB - HM) Kevin Novak (MSOC- HM) Michael Erush (MSOC -1st-Team) Endre Rex-Kiss (MWP - 2nd-Team) Teresa Guidi (WWP - 1st-Team) Devon Wright (WWP - 2nd-Team) Stacia Peterson (WWP - HM) Billy Lockin (BASE - 1st-Team) Óää{‡äxÊ Matt Kovar (MSOC - 3rd-Team) Diego Barrera (MSOC - Freshman 3rd-Team) Endre Rex-Kiss (MWP - 2nd-Team) Kelli Nerison (WVB- HM) Stacia Peterson (WWP - 2nd-Team) Rachel Riddell (WWP- HM) Vanessa Glendenning (WCRW - HM) Óääx‡äÈÊ Endre Rex-Kiss (MWP - 2nd-Team) Ian Elliott (MWP - HM) Brian McShane (MWP - HM) Brian Locke (MG - HM) Liz Stewart (WCRW -2nd-Team) Christine Robinson (WWP - 3rd-Team) Katie Hicks (WWP - HM) ÓääȇäÇÊ Kim Feeney (WSOC - Freshman 4th-Team) Amanda Lernor (WSOC - 1st-Team) Ian Elliott (MWP - 3rd-Team) Brian McShane (MWP - HM) Stacia Peterson (WWP - 3rd-Team) Brian Locke (MG - 3rd-Team) Angelo Songco (BASE - Freshman 1st-Team) ÓääLJänÊ Tibor Forai (MWP - ACWPC 3rd-Team) Andy Stevens (MWP - ACWPC HM) Mark Milovic (MWP - ACWPC HM) Nicole Hughes (WWP - ACWPC 2nd-Team) Alex Wike (WWP - ACWPC HM) COSIDA ACADEMIC ALL-AMERICANS 2006-07 Laura Mickelson (WXC) Stacia Peterson (WWP) 2002-03 Jeff Kovar (MSOC) 1998-99 Heather Hollis (SOFT) 1995-96 Sandor Demosthenes (BASE) 1993-94 Anthony Napolitano (BASE) 1972-73 Dean Jelmini (BASE) Steve Smith (MBB)

INSIDE LMU history of lmu athletics:

Hall of Fame & Retired Jerseys

MULTI-SPORT *Â?>ĂžiÀÊ ˜`Ă•VĂŒÂ°ĂŠ Ă€>`° Adams, Milton “Sparkyâ€? 1993 1937 Baseball, Football, Ice Hockey, Track & Field Agamenoni, Aldarico 1994 1937 Football, Ice Hockey Boyd, Bob 1986 1950 Boxing, Football, Track & Field Boyle, Hugh 1989 1943 Baseball, Basketball Brubaker, Harry “Budâ€? 1989 1932 Basketball, Football Donahue, Bernard 1986 1930 Baseball, Basketball, Football Donovan, Maurice E. 1991 1942 Baseball, Basketball, Golf Duvall, Al 1986 1936 Football, Track & Field Hoffman, Leo 1986 1930 Baseball, Football Hovland, Carl 1992 1939 Basketball, Football, Baseball, Tennis Jelmini, Dean 1987 1973 Baseball, Football Karagozian, John 1994 1933 Baseball, Football, Ice Hockey Kelly, Roger 1986 1939 Baseball, Football, Golf, Track & Field Nocerine, Dominic 1986 1937 Basketball, Football, Ice Hockey, Track & Field Polich, John 1986 1938 Football, Ice Hockey, Track & Field Quinn, Brian 2000 1964 Basketball, Baseball, Administration Race, Edward 1993 1937 Football, Ice Hockey Sanchez, Jamie 1993 1975 Football, Tennis Sunderland, Paul 1986 1975 Basketball, Volleyball Tunney, James 1989 1928 Baseball, Basketball, Football

- ĂŠ Bean, William “Billyâ€? Bradberry, Miah Kerslake, Bob “Whiteyâ€? Layana, Timothy Logelin, Dr. Michael G. McAnany, James E. Napolitano, Anthony Noah, Russ Sheldon, Robert Stone, Gerald

1992 2000 2007 1992 1991 1993 2005 1986 1986 1986

7" ½-Ê,"7 Ê Hjelm, Karen (Hock) Formento, Merri Lisa

2000 1991

1981 1980

7" ½-Ê ,"--Ê "1 /,9Ê Kozlowski, Therese

ĂŠ 1986

1982

""/ ĂŠ Acquarelli, Harry Alker, Guerin P Andorka, Bela J. Brito, Gene Cheatham, Ernie Currin, Paul Donahue, Burch A. Ferris, Neil G. Giancanelli, Harold “Skipâ€? Klosterman, Don Lauermann, Willard “Billâ€? E. Musacco, George Nipp, Maury Snyder, Frederick

1988 1991 1991 1986 1986 1986 1988 1991 1989 1986 1988 1987 1987 1992

7" ½-Ê-"

,ĂŠ Sharp, Tracy

2007

MEN’S BASKETBALL Adelman, Rick Arndt, John Baker, Dick Bento, Ed Brown, Garnette Donovan, Bill Fryer, Jeff Gathers, Hank Grote, Jerry Haderlein, Jim Kimble, Bo Kriste, Vide J. McDonald, Edwin “Scotty� McKenzie, Forrest Newell, Pete Philyaw, Luther Smith, Keith Smith, Stephen J. Woolpert, Phil Yoest, Mike

1986 1986 1993 1986 1987 1986 2007 2005 1986 1986 2005 1988 1987 1991 1986 1987 2000 1991 1986 1994

1968 1952 1956 1962 1957 1950 1991 1990 1962 1971 1990 1940 1939 1986 1940 1976 1986 1973 1940 1988

 ½-Ê/ -Ê Crawford, Roger

1994

7" ½-Ê6" 9 Ê Blankinship, Kim Fort, Andrea Holman, Tracy House, Kerry Lacour, Cheryl McFarland, Sarah Petrissans, Catherine Wohlford, Leslie Wrensch, Mardell

2007 1991 2005 2003 1988 2007 1992 1993 2005

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Brown, Sherri (WBB) Flanagan, Lynn (WBB)

2003 2000

1994 1991

7" ½-Ê/ -Ê Anderson, Kristi Delgado, Debbie Patridge, Carolyn B.

ĂŠ 1986 1990 1958 1986 1970 1987 1993 1973 1972 1974 ĂŠ

ĂŠ 1938 1950 1939 1951 1952 1929 1943 1951 1951 1952 1932 1951 1952 1952

"  -É  -/,/",-ÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊ Buckley, Terry 2005 1957 Season ticket holder Casassa, Rev. Charles S., S.J. 1988 University President (1949-69) Drager, Hub 1986 Athletic Administration (1949-80) Fortner, Nancy 1994 Women’s Volleyball Coach (1980-86) Higgins, Rev. Thomas P., S.J. 1991 Golf Coach (1970-2001) Jones, Arthur 2003 1950 Basketball Trainer, Season Ticket Holder Kilp, Rev. Alfred J., S.J. 1987 Athletic Administration (1956-1963) Lieb, Tom 1987 Football & Ice Hockey Coach (1930-38) Malone, Rev. Lorenzo, S.J. 1987 Athletic Admin., Golf Coach (1933-55) McIssac, Don 1986 Rugby Coach (1960-1980) McKenna, John 1992 Football Coach (1949-51) Merrifield, Rev. Donald P., S.J 1989 University President (1969-84), Chancellor (1985-present) Needles, James 1987 Basketball Coach, Football Coach (1936-1940) Neri, Jerry 1989 Assistant Football Coach (1949-51) Oliver, Jordan 1987 Football Coach (1949-51) Westhead, Paul 2000 Men’s Basketball Head Coach (1986-91)

ĂŠ 2000 ĂŠ 2003 1994 1991

1989 1985 1980 ĂŠ 1982 ĂŠ

/ -Ê Ê 1969 Football 2003 Club National Champions 1981 Women’s Crew 1986 National Champion - Lightweight-4 Shell 1990 Men’s Basketball 2005 Elite Eight/WCC Champions 1986 Baseball 2007 College World Series

1996 1987 1998 1991 1983 2000 1988 1989 1996

, /, ĂŠ ,- 9-ĂŠ Name Bean, Billy Baseball Holman, Tracy Volleyball Gathers, Hank Basketball Kimball, Kealani Volleyball Kimble, Bo Basketball Layana, Tim Baseball McFarland, Sarah Volleyball Noriega, Sarah Volleyball Stone, Gerald Baseball Wrench, Mardell Volleyball

ĂŠ Induct. 2000

Grad. 1986

2000

1998

2000

1990

2005

2004

2000

1990

2000

1986

2002

2000

2007

1995

2000

1974

2000

1996

1ĂŠ7œ“iÂ˜Â˝ĂƒĂŠ/iÂ˜Â˜ÂˆĂƒ Óään‡ä™Êi`ˆ>ĂŠĂ•Âˆ`i

39

INSIDE LMU

president

R

Rev. Robert B. Lawton, S.J. ev. Robert B. Lawton, S.J., was named the 14th president

1977. Fr. Lawton was a Danforth

of Loyola Marymount University on June 1, 1999. Father

and Woodrow Wilson Fellow

Lawton leads LMU into the next millennium after serv-

at Harvard. He was ordained in

ing as the dean of Georgetown College at Georgetown University since 1989.

Following his preparation for

Lawton, a classicist, scripture scholar, administrator, and priest,

ordination from 1979-81, Fr. Lawton traveled to Germany to con-

was born in Cumberland, Maryland, and entered the Society of

duct independent study in both German and theology. In 1982, he

Jesus in July 1965.

accepted an assistant professorship teaching Hebrew and Aramaic

Possessing a wealth of experience in both university teaching and administration, Fr. Lawton comes to LMU after giving 20 years

at the Pontifical Biblical Institute in Rome, Italy, a post he held until 1984.

of service to Georgetown University. Serving as the assistant Dean

In addition to his teaching and administrative duties at George-

from 1984-89, Fr. Lawton also taught in the Theology department

town, Fr. Lawton served on numerous campus committees exam-

as an adjunct assistant professor during that period. He started at

ining such areas as campus planning, student life, freshman and

the University in 1977 as an assistant professor of Theology and

transfer student admissions, and community relations. Outside of

worked in that capacity until 1979.

the University he has served as a member of the Board of Trustees

He earned his bachelor of arts degree in classics from Fordham University in 1971, graduating Phi Beta Kappa (summa cum laude). Fr. Lawton went on to attend Harvard University where he completed his doctorate in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations in

40

1981.

1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ Óään‡ä™Êi`ˆ>ÊՈ`i

of the University of Scranton and Fairfield University. Father Lawton holds the rank of professor in LMU’s Departments of Theological Studies and Classics.

INSIDE LMU

director of athletics

Dr. William S. Husak F

or Dr. William S. Husak life is all about family and his 11 years as the Athletics Director at Loyola Marymount University reflects his familyfirst approach to life. And that approach has brought success never before seen at LMU. Since taking over the program in 1998, the Lions’ success has been some of the best in program history, Husak firmly believes the program has “just scratched the surface.” His administrative efforts have focused on developing a family of coaches, support staff and administrators who believe that LMU’s athletics program can be among the elite in the nation. This period of time has been marked by enhancing the support of the athletic teams through the new and updated facilities, increased scholarship and operational support and enhancing the coaching and support staff. The past 11 years have been some of the most successful seasons in school history as the Lions won over 55 percent of its dual competitions in that span and claimed the school’s first ever Commissioner’s Cup in 1996. Since 1998, LMU has claimed 24 conference championships and 30 NCAA postseason appearances. Off the field, the Lions have had a 65 percent increase in national scholar-athletes as 210 claimed the honor in the 2007-08 academic year. Husak attributes the current success and the future growth of the program to the staff that is in place. Since he took over the program, the coaching and administrative staffs that lend support to the more than 450 studentathletes has more than doubled in size. A full-time head coach will lead 19 of the varsity sports sponsored at LMU. When Husak took over, only nine of the programs were led by full-time coaches. In addition, support for the student-athletes was enhanced with the addition of 10 brand new staff positions, which included an athletic academic coordinator, marketing/promotions manager, ticket manager, corporate relations manager, two assistant athletic trainers, a two strength and conditioning assistant coaches, a assistant compliance director and an assistant media relations director. The final major piece to LMU Athletics’ growth and success has been Husak’s commitment to facilities. Since he has taken over, $30 million has been

put into athletic facilities. That list includes the Burns Aquatics Center, which was used as host to the 2002 and 2006 NCAA Men’s Water Polo Championships. It has been the only time LMU has hosted an NCAA championship. Facility enhancements have also included the brand new Smith Field (softball), Thomas Higgins Short Game Center (golf), the Morris A. Pivaroff and George P. Kading Tournament Court (tennis), and the Jane Browne Bove Boathouse. LMU’s existing facilities have also seen their share of growth, including new bleachers and scoreboard to Sullivan Field (soccer), Mikos Blue Monster and Pride Park to Page Stadium (baseball), and a new sound system, floor design and bleachers in Gersten Pavilion. More is on its way as the University committed more than 7,000 square feet for coaches office at the Leavey Center. In addition, plans for the next 18 months include a new weight training facility with locker room and storage space and new locker room suites in Gersten Pavilion, including new stateof-the-art areas for men’s and women’s basketball. Husak comes from a long and accomplished background as an administrator, fundraiser and professor during a 19-year career at California State University, Long Beach. Between 1993-1998, he served as the Senior Associate Athletics Director and was mainly responsible for Athletics fundraising. While at CSULB between 1983 and 1997, Husak served as an assistant commissioner for the California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA). Between 1986 and 1993 he served as chairman of CSULB’s physical education department. As an associate professor of physical education at CSULB between 1979 and 1986, he established the university’s Motor Behavior Laboratory. A 1972 graduate of State University of New York (SUNY) at Cortland, Husak holds a master’s degree and Ph.D. in Physical Education from Texas A&M University. He and his wife of 37 years, Tish, live in Long Beach and have three sons, Greg, Todd and Jon. 1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ Óään‡ä™Êi`ˆ>ÊՈ`i

41

INSIDE LMU NCAA Compliance

What do I need to do in order to play at LMU as a freshman? If you intend to participate in Division I or II athletics as a freshman, you must register and be certified by the NCAA Eligibility Center. To register, you must go on-line to www.ncaaclearinghouse.net. You will need a major credit card to complete the registration. The fee is $60 for domestic prospects ($85 for foreign prospects). The Eligibility Center evaluates your academic records as well as your amateurism status to determine whether or not you are eligibile to play Division I or II sports. You will be required to designate all high schools you have attended and answer a series of questions relating to your status as an amateur. Once you’ve completed the registration and answered the amateurism questions, you will need to have each of the high schools you have attended supply an official copy of your transcripts directly to the Eligibility Center. You will also need to arrange to have your standardized test scores sent directly from the testing agency to the NCAA Eligibility Center. This BASIC INFORMATION QUESTIONS? Should you have any questions regarding any NCAA rules, please contact our Compliance Office at (310) 338-7789 or you can contact the NCAA at (317) 917-6222. GO ONLINE NCAA: www.ncaa.org Loyola Marymount University: www.LMU.edu LMU Athletics: www.LMULions.com LMU CONTACTS Dan Smith - Associate Athletic Director-Compliance (310) 338-7789 | (800) LIONS-R-1 John Infante - Assistant Director - Compliance (310) 338-3706 | (800) LIONS-R-1 MAILING ADDRESSES Loyola Marymount University - Department of Athletics Compliance 1 LMU Drive - MS 8505; Los Angeles, CA 90045 NCAA Clearinghouse 301 ACT Drive - Box 4043; Iowa City, IA 52243-4043 Toll Free – Domestic Callers: (877) 262-1492 Foreign Calls: (319) 337-1492 www.ncaaclearinghouse.net After November 1, 2007 NCAA Eligibility Center P.O. Box 7110 Indianapolis, IN 46206 WHAT CAN I RECEIVE FROM LMU You (or your family) may not receive any benefit, inducement or arrangement such as cash, clothing, cars, improper expenses, transportation, gifts or loans to encourage you to sign a National Letter of Intent or attend an NCAA college. Loyola Marymount University may offer you a one-year scholarship that covers room and board, tuition and fees, and required course-related books, or any part of these. The institution can recommend that this aid be renewed each year, as is the general practice at LMU.

42

1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ Óään‡ä™Êi`ˆ>ÊՈ`i

I Want to Play at LMU... must be done directly from the testing agency’s website. The NCAA Eligibility Center routing code is 9999. If you have questions, you or your high school counselor can obtain assistance by calling the NCAA Eligibility Center at (317) 223-0700. After you graduate and before school closes for the summer, your counselor must send a copy of your final transcript to the Eligibility Center that includes your confirmation of graduation from high school. How do I know if I’m being recruited? You become a “prospective student-athlete” when you start ninth-grade classes. Before the ninth grade, you become a prospective student-athlete if a college gives you (or your relatives or friends) any financial aid or other benefits that the college does not provide to prospective students generally. You become a “recruited prospective student-athlete” at a particular college if any coach approaches you (or any member of your family) about enrolling and participating in athletics at that college. Activities by coaches that cause you to become a recruited prospective studentathlete are: (1) providing you with an official visit; (2) placing more than one telephone call to you or any other member of your family; or (3) visiting you or any other member of your family anywhere other than the college campus; or (4) issuing to you a National Letter of Intent or written offer of athletically related financial aid. Boosters: In addition to general recruiting regulations, no alumni, boosters or representatives of a college’s athletics interests can be involved in your recruitment. There can be no phone calls or letters from boosters. If an LMU booster is contacting you, please call the LMU Compliance Office as soon as possible at (310) 338-7789. Don’t risk your NCAA eligibility! When can I talk to the coach and have him/her see me play? TELEPHONE CALLS ˜Ê>Ê-«œÀÌÃÊ"̅iÀÊ/…>˜ÊœœÌL>Ê >˜`Ê >ÎiÌL> A college coach (but not a booster) is permitted to call you (or your parents or legal guardians) on or after July 1 following the completion of your junior year in high school. On or after July 1 after the completion of your junior year in high school, a college coach is permitted to call you only one time per week. ÝVi«Ìˆœ˜ÊvœÀÊi˜½ÃÊ >ÎiÌL>Ê" 9 Only in the sport of men’s basketball, a college coach (but not a booster) is permitted to call you (or your parents or legal guardians) one time per month on or after June 15 of your sophomore year in high school through July 31 of your junior year in high school. Coaches are permitted to call you

two (2) times per week on or after August 1 prior to your senior year in high school. For junior college and four-year transfer prospects, you may only receive one phone call per week, regardless of the time period. ÝVi«Ìˆœ˜ÊvœÀÊ7œ“i˜½ÃÊ >ÎiÌL>Ê" 9 Only in the sport of women’s basketball, a college coach (but not a booster) is permitted to call you

(or your parents or legal guardians) one time during each of the months of April (on or after the Thursday after the conclusion of the Women’s Final Four) and May of your junior year in high school. You can receive one call on or after June 1 through June 20, and one call you can receive one call on or after June 21 through June 30 of your junior year in high school. In addition, you can receive three phone calls during the month of July following your junior year in high school, with no more than one call per week. On or after August 1 prior to your senior year in high school, you can receive no more than one phone call per week. 1˜ˆ“ˆÌi`Ê*…œ˜iÊ >ÃʇʏÊ-«œÀÌà Unlimited phone calls can be made to you (or your parents or legal guardians) by a college coach ONLY under the following circumstances: (1) during the five days immediately before your official visit by the college you will be visiting; (2) on the day of a coach’s off-campus contact with you by that coach; (3) on the initial date for signing the National Letter of Intent in your sport through two days after the initial signing date; and (4) you (or your parents or legal guardians) may telephone a coach at your expense as often as you wish. At the completion of your junior year (after July 1), coaches may also accept collect calls from you, using our toll-free number (1-800-LIONS-R-1). In men’s basketball ONLY, coaches may accept a tollfree call from you no earlier than the conclusion of your sophomore year in high school. RECRUITING CALENDARS Keep in mind that every sport has a different recruiting calendar. A coach in a particular sport may or may not be permitted to call you during certain times of the year. When you do speak to a college coach, be sure to ask about the recruiting calendar so you understand when you can accept phone calls from college coaches. You can also find the recruiting calendars for all sports on-line at www. ncaa.org. OFF-CAMPUS CONTACTS In all Sports Other Than Football and Basketball

INSIDE LMU A college coach is permitted to contact you in person off the college campus only on or after July 1 after the completion of your junior year in high school. A contact is any face-to-face meeting between a college coach or athletics staff member and you or your parents, during which any of you say more than “hello.” Also, any such face-to-face meeting that is prearranged or that takes place on your campus, at an organized competition or practice involving you or your high school, preparatory school, two-year college or all-star team shall be considered a contact, regardless of the conversation. Currently in all sports other than football, college coaches may contact you off the college campus no more than three times. However, a college coach may visit your high school (with the approval of your high school principal) only once a week during a contact period. Junior college prospects who are non-qualifiers as determined by the NCAA Eligibility Center may not be recruited until they have completed one academic year at the junior college. ˜Êi˜½ÃÊ >ÎiÌL> A college coach is not permitted to contact you prior to the opening day of classes of your senior year in high school. During the academic year, a college coach is limited to seven recruiting opportunities with you (contacts and evaluations combined) with no more than three in-person, off-campus contacts at any site during your senior year in high school. ˜Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ >ÎiÌL> A college coach is not permitted to contact you prior to the opening day of classes of your senior year in high school. During the academic year, a college coach is limited to five recruiting opportunities with you (contacts and evaluations combined) with no more than three in-person, off-campus contacts at any site during your senior year in high school. This restriction includes your relatives or legal guardians, but does not include any contact made during your official visit to campus. Further, all communication between you, your relatives, legal guardians, your coach, or anyone else involved with your participation in basketball, directly or indirectly, and a college coach during the month of July is prohibited. EVALUATIONS An evaluation is any off-campus activity used to assess your academic qualifications or athletics ability, including a visit to your high school (during which no contact occurs) or watching you practice or compete at any site. Currently in all sports other than football and women’s basketball, a college coach is limited to seven opportunities (contacts and evaluations combined) to recruit you and not more than three of the seven opportunities may be contacts. In women’s basketball, coaches have a limit of five opportunities with which to recruit you (contact and evaluations combined) off the college campus. Not more than three of those five opportunities may be contacts. Once you sign a National Letter of Intent, you may be evaluated an unlimited number of times by a college coach from the college with which you have signed. LETTERS AND RECRUITING MATERIALS In all sports other than men’s basketball, letters (including emails) and printed recruiting information may be sent to you starting September 1st at the beginning of your junior year in high school. In men’s basketball, you may receive these materials after June 15 at the completion of your sophomore year in high school. This information can only be sent to you through regular mail services. College coaches are not permitted to send anything to you (expect a National Letter of Intent offer) through any express mail service (e.g. Federal Express, UPS, DHL, etc.). For more information, please visit our website at www.LMULions.com. Good Luck and GO LIONS!!!

Staff Directory GENERAL PHONE: ......................................................................... (310) 338-2765 TICKETS: ......................................................................................... (310) 338-LION BY MAIL: ....................Administration: ....................... Loyola Marymount University ....................................................................................................... Gersten Pavilion ........................................................................................... 1 LMU Drive - MS 8505 ............................................................................................Los Angeles, CA 90045 ....................................Coaching Staff: ....................... Loyola Marymount University .......................................................................................................... Leavey Center ........................................................................................... 1 LMU Drive - MS 8235 ............................................................................................Los Angeles, CA 90045 BY FAX: Leavey Center: .......... (310) 338-5915 Men’s Basketball: ......... (310) 338-7644 Aquatics: ................. (310) 338-3796 Media Services: ............ (310) 338-2703 Training Room: ........ (310) 338-5191 Administration: ............. (310) 338-4577 Compliance: ............ (310) 258-4628 Administration (Area Code - 310) Athletic Director Dr. William Husak ........Director of Athletics ............................................. 338-5940 Dan Smith....................Associate Athletic Director - Internal Ops ............. 338-7789 Addie Casey.................Office Supervisor/Co-Camp Director ..................... 338-3047 Faith Sauerwald ...........Senior Secretary/Co-Camp Director ...................... 338-4504 June D’Amour..............Senior Secretary ................................................... 338-1743 Compliance TBA .............................Assistant Athletic Director - Compliance ........................ TBA John Infante.................Assistant Director of Compliance ......................... 338-3706 Business & Finance Maria Behm .................Associate Athletic Director - Business/SWA ........... 338-7645 Robyn Millen................Business Affairs Assistant ..................................... 338-2953 Media Services/Sports Information John Shaffer ................Assistant Athletics Director - Media Services ......... 338-7643 Sports: Men’s basketball, Men’s & Women’s water polo

Mark Dodson ...............Assistant Director of Athletic Media Relations ...... 338-5798 Sports: Men’s & Women’s Soccer, Women’s Basketball, Softball

Tyler Geivett .................Assistant Director of Athletic Media Relations ...... 338-7638 Sports: Baseball, Volleyball, Swimming

Maria Ortiz ..................Athletic Media Relations Graduate Assistant ........ 338-7768 Sports: Tennis, Rowing/Crew, Men’s Golf, Cross Country/Track, Cheer

Academics Matt Casana ................Director of Academic Services .............................. 338-1736 TBA .............................Assistant Director of Academic Services ................ 338-7583 Eric Wiener ..................Academics Assistant...................................................... TBA Development Brian Luft .....................Assistant Athletic Director - Development ............ 338-7853 Rob Anderson ..............Dir. of Annual Support for Athletic Giving ........... 338-2908 Tickets/Marketing/Promotions Karina Handeland ........Assistant Athletics Director - Marketing ................ 258-8608 Jason Hanchar .............Corporate Relations Manager .............................. 338-5201 Alisa Binetti..................Ticket Manager .................................................... 338-4537 ....................................Marketing Assistant ...................................................... TBA Heather Herkenhoff .....Central Ticket Agency .......................................... 338-4537 General Ticket Office ................................................................................ 338-LION Strength Room TBA .............................Strength and Conditioning Coach ................................. TBA Sergiu Boerica ..............Asst. Strength & Conditioning Coach ................... 338-5796 Ciara Carl ....................Asst. Strength & Conditioning Coach ................... 338-5796 Training Room Keith Ellison .................Coordinator of Athletics Medicine ........................ 338-2874 Joe Gonzalez ...............Assistant Athletics Trainer..................................... 338-2764 Beth Drayer..................Assistant Athletics Trainer..................................... 338-2340 Steven Cortez ..............Assistant Athletics Trainer..................................... 338-5220 Facilities Shane Howell...............Athletic Facilities Manager ................................... 338-7641 Shelton Lorick ..............Athletic Facilities Assistant.................................... 338-7642 Angelo Rawles .............Athletic Facilities Assistant.................................... 338-7642 SPORTS Jason Gill .....................Baseball Head Coach ........................................... 338-2949 Bill Bayno .....................Men’s Basketball Head Coach .............................. 338-7623 Julie Wilhoit .................Women’s Basketball Head Coach ......................... 338-7699 John Loughran .............Water Polo Head Coach ....................................... 338-1844 Bonnie Adair ................Women’s Swimming Head Coach ........................ 258-4685 Dawn Regan ................Rowing/Crew Head Coach ................................... 338-7624 Scott Guerrero .............Cross Country/Track Head Coach ........................ 338-7630 Alex Galvan .................Men’s Golf Head Coach ....................................... 258-8619 Paul Krumpe ................Men’s Soccer Head Coach .................................... 338-7640 Joe Mallia ....................Women’s Soccer Head Coach ............................... 338-2795 Gary Ferrin ...................Softball Head Coach ............................................ 338-7651 Brad Sceney .................Men’s Tennis Head Coach .................................... 338-7589 Jamie Sanchez .............Women’s Tennis Head Coach ............................... 338-7506 Steve Stratos ................Volleyball Head Coach ......................................... 338-4528 1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ Óään‡ä™Êi`ˆ>ÊՈ`i

43

44

1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ Óään‡ä™Êi`ˆ>ÊՈ`i

INSIDE LMU

Los Angeles

Home of the Lions

G

rab your sunscreen and your towel, because LA has more than 50 miles of coastline and 33 public beaches, so you can always find a stretch of sand to snatch and plenty of waves to catch. But don’t forget your appetite, an extra suitcase and a sense of adventure, because LA’s coastal cities are more than just a bunch of pretty places. From the quiet enclaves of Playa del Rey and Marina del Rey just minutes from the LMU campus to the funky ambience of Venice with its offbeat street performers, each of these waterfront wonders offers its own personality and its own take on dining, shopping, attractions and activities. Where to Eat: Coastal Cuisine Got a hankering for fresh seafood? How about a healthy entrée salad? Or a greasy burger? Our beach cities have them all. Representing diverse coastal cuisine is the spruced-up Mexican fare of celebrity chefs Susan Feniger and Mary Sue Milliken, hosts of the Food Network’s “Too Hot Tamales,” at Border Grill Santa Monica. For even more celebrity watching, head to The Lobster in Santa Monica or Geoffrey’s on the beach in Malibu. Artist types like the Asian fusion cuisine at Chaya Venice, where local artists, musicians and movie industry moguls hang out. Meanwhile, couples enjoy romantic dinners overlooking the marina and its million-dollar yachts at Café del Rey in Marina del Rey. More casual fare can be had at a number of local hot dog and hamburger stands. And several eateries at San Pedro’s Ports O’ Call Village serve up freshly caught seafood cooked on outdoor grills. Where to Shop: Retail Therapy If you’re looking for that perfect bathing suit or pair of sunglasses or

a chic, antique accent table for your living room, you’ve come to the right place. Head to Santa Monica’s Third Street Promenade for several pedestrian-only blocks full of well-known retailers such as Pottery Barn and Urban Outfitters, as well as one-of-the-kind shops, plus three multiplex cinemas and a slew of restaurants, cafes and bars. Nearby, the hottest celebs — Jennifer Aniston, Leonardo DiCaprio, Gwyneth Paltrow and George Clooney among them — shop at Fred Segal. Equally alluring is Montana Avenue, where you’ll find high-end designer boutiques, including some that are owned by celebrity clans. And if it’s quirky you want, go straight to Abbot Kinney Boulevard in Venice for antiques, vintage clothing, funky collectibles and locally created art — all set in the neighborhood’s laid-back beach atmosphere. What to See: Fabled Attractions When you get tired of sunbathing and surfing, there’s always something fun to do. For classic serenity, visit the Getty Villa, presiding on a promontory overlooking the ocean on the Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu. It recently reopened after nearly a decade of renovations and has an exquisite permanent exhibition of Greek, Roman and Etruscan antiquities. Partake in good old-fashioned fun and take a ride on the 1916, fully restored carousel inside a National Historic Landmark hippodrome building on the Santa Monica Pier. The pier also is home to Pacific Park, where you can hop onto a Ferris wheel, a roller coaster and other rides and play arcade games over Santa Monica Bay. Just south of the pier, there’s plenty to gawk at along the Venice Beach boardwalk, from the off-the-wall street performers on Ocean Front Walk to the washboard stomachs and bulging biceps at the Muscle Beach out

1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ Óään‡ä™Êi`ˆ>ÊՈ`i

45

INSIDE LMU

door gym. Or rent some skates and draw some of your own attention. If you’re farther south, visit the spectacular wood and glass Wayfarers Chapel, designed by Lloyd Wright, Frank’s son, which overlooks the Pacific Ocean just south of Palos Verdes. While you’re in the area, stop by the pristine Trump National Golf Club for a round of golf and breathtaking views. If it’s family fun you’re looking for, you can get an up-close-and-personal look at the Pacific Ocean’s inhabitants at the Aquarium of the Pacific on Rainbow Harbor in Long Beach. In San Pedro, the Cabrillo Marine Aquarium recently had a $10 million facelift and features a hands-on Exploration Center and an aquatic nursery. While you’re in San Pedro, catch the fantastic views from Point Fermin Lighthouse, one of LA’s most historic landmarks. Or better yet, take a stroll on the new San Pedro Waterfront Promenade, lined with magnolias, peppermint trees and colorful gardens. If you’d rather be on the water, you can take a cruise with Hornblower Cruises & Events in Marina del Rey or with Spirit Cruises & Yacht Parties in San Pedro. Dinner cruises are available, and if you want to celebrate a special occasion with 40 to 400 of your closest friends, you can charter yachts from Hornblower, Spirit or FantaSea Yachts & Yacht Club. You can even get away to Catalina, the “island of romance,” in less than an hour and a half from San Pedro or Long Beach via the Catalina Express ferry. Where to Stay: Hot, Hip Hotels After a day in the sun, there are plenty of places to relax and get a good night’s sleep. Santa Monica Beach is virtually the backyard of Shutters on the Beach and Casa Del Mar. Just steps away are Loews Santa Monica Beach Hotel and Le Merigot, a JW Marriott Beach Hotel and Spa. Nearby, the Viceroy Santa Monica is a hip, urban, boutique retreat, while the historic Fairmont Miramar Hotel Santa Monica. For a little vintage style, stay at Venice Beach Suites & Hotel, right in the midst of Venice’s bustling scene. Farther south, the Marina del Rey Marriott and the Ritz-Carlton Marina del Rey overlook thousands of yachts moored in one of the world’s largest man-made recreational marinas.

46

1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ Óään‡ä™Êi`ˆ>ÊՈ`i

Things To See And Do In Southern California Anaheim Ducks Los Angeles Sparks Big Bear Mountain / Lake Los Angeles Zoo Catalina Island Malibu Disneyland Mammoth Mountain Disney Studios Manhattan Beach Dodger Stadium Marina del Rey Dorothy Chandler Pavilion Mann’s Chinese Theatre Edison Field Melrose Getty Museum Newport Beach Great Western Forum Queen Mary Greek Theatre Paramount Studios Griffith Park Observatory Planet Hollywood Hard Rock Cafe Redondo Beach Hermosa Beach Rodeo Drive Hollywood Bowl Rose Bowl Hollywood Park Santa Monica Pier / Third Hollywood Walk of Fame Street Promenade House of Blues Sea World Huntington Beach Shrine Auditorium Knotts Berry Farm Six Flags Hurricane Harbor Legoland Six Flags Magic Mountain Long Beach Aquarium Snow Summit LA Angels of Anaheim Staples Center Los Angeles Avengers Universal Studios / Los Angeles Clippers City Walk LA Memorial Coliseum Venice Beach Los Angeles Dodgers Walt Disney Concert Hall Los Angeles Kings Warner Bros. Studios Los Angeles Lakers

the heart of a lion...

All-Time Roster 1994 1981-83 1999 2006-07 1987-88 1986 1986-89 2004-05

ÊUÊ ÊUÊ Jennifer Baker Robyn Baker Suzanne Bantz Karen Baum Claudia Baumann Carolyn Becker Marilynn Becker Kim Billner Melinda Boyd Shauna Brozek Lori Buchanan Audrey Bulkley Lia Bunker Julie Butler

2003-04 2003-07 1979-80 1981-82 1993 1976-78 1976-78 1991 1981 1991-92 1987 2007-08 1995-98 1988

ÊUÊ ÊUÊ

Michele Carnes Mara Colaizzi Vicki Cordova Milica Cukulic

1985 1995-98 1992-93 1998-01

ÊUÊ ÊUÊ

Nancy Davis Debbie Delgado Denise Delgado Doreen Delgado Andrea Denish Georgina Dinham Debbie Disbro Lisa Donabedian Mary Donnelly

1978-80 1982-85 1986-89 1988-90 1987-88 2002-03 1987 1981-84 1975

ÊUÊ ÊUÊ Danielle Elliott

1996-97

ÊUÊÊUÊ Maria Garcia-Planas Albert Alison Gatto Mary Gillespie Maureen Gillespie Laura Gross Cristi Gonzalez Alicia Gowey Christina Grasset Julie Gray Nicole Gurash

2003-07 2000-03 1993-94 1982 1990-92 1979 1998-01 2006-08 1996 1976-77 1976-78 1996-99 1986-89 1982-83 1985 1981-84 1995

1997-00 2007-08 1978 1990 1983 1988-90 1999-02 1977-80 2002-06

ÊUÊÊUÊ Erin Ivey

2003-07

ÊUÊÊUÊ Kimi Kaloi Velana Kassab Janina Kisic Jenny Knotts Sladjana Kos

2004-05 1999-01 1997-98 1989-92 2005-06

ÊUÊÊUÊ Amy Labetich Lara Labetich Cindy Lambert Mary Beth Lambert Marilyn Lauermann Andrea Lord Vanessa Lunardi

1995-98 1991-94 1980 1983-84 1975 2001-02 2006-07

ÊUÊÊUÊ Judy Magee Donna Mascari Shalita Masih Donde McCament Kelly McMillion Elizabeth Mee Pavla Mesterova Kelly Michaels Anne Miller Gabrielle Miller Jennifer Mitchell Lisa Miyamoto Donna Meyer Jenny Modarelli Michele Montano Shauna Morgan

1976-77 1976 1988-90 1986-87 1992-95 1986-87 2005-08 1983-84 1976-77 1999 2000-01 1985-86 1978-80 1985 1987-88 2007-08

UÊ ÊUÊ Cheryl Newman Kristi Niles Bliss Nixon Caroline Nothnagel Kacha Novacek

1981 1984-87 2007-08 2007-08 1981-83

"ÊUÊ"ÊUÊ" Amy Okum Julie Oshiro

1990-93 1991-94

*ÊUÊ*ÊUÊ* Edit Pakay Brahna Pastorini Carolyn Patridge Terry Pearsall Robyn Peot Wendy Peterson Jessica Placencia

2000-03 1998-99 1977-80 1975 1994 1994-95 2002

Óään‡ä™ÊUÊ{ÇÊUÊ1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ

+ÊUÊ+ÊUÊ+ Jill Quartararo

1988

,ÊUÊ,ÊUÊ, Angela Rask Tina Razloznik Mary Reidinger Peggy Reilly Michelle Rizza Kathy Ross Laura Ruben Barbara Rudolph Shawnell Russell

1995-96 2007-08 1976 1977-80 1978-80 1982-85 1996-97 1981-82 2005-08

-ÊUÊ-ÊUÊJennifer Saberon Beatrice Sagaria-Rossi Erin Sanchez Gerri Schubert Lynn Scott Lisa Shone Audra Silman Alane Soares Janie Soubliere Katie Stanton Ingrid Stephenson Jori Stinar Lynn Stogner Maja Sundac

1993-95 1999-02 2002-04 1978-81 1976-77 1982 2006-08 1992 1995 1977 1980-81 1987-90 1988-91 2005-06

/ÊUÊ/ÊUÊ/ Tamara Tanner Natalie Tejada Kirsten Thorstenson Lisa Tobuck

2003-08 2006-08 1989 1976

6ÊUÊ6ÊUÊ6 Norma Veal Diana Vinis

1983-84 2003-05

7ÊUÊ7ÊUÊ7 Tina Welsh Judy Willsmore Sue Wise

1982 1976-78 1978-81

9ÊUÊ9ÊUÊ9 Angela Young

1991-94

<ÊUÊ<ÊUÊ< Anna Zaricki Angelina Zdorovytska Annette Zenone Suzie Zerbel

1995-97 2000-02 1983 1979

The All-Time Roster is a work in progress. Please contact Tyler Geivett at tgeivett@lmu.edu if you have additions or changes.

2008-09 LIONS’ MEDIA GUIDE

ÊUÊÊUÊ Serena Fermin Penka Fileva Lisa Filpi Maura Flanagan Kim Florez Donna Freed Holli Freudenberg

ÊUÊÊUÊ Jacque Haas Jasmin Heckel Heide Heintzelman Heide Hentschell Stephanie Hicks Michele Hitch Julie Hladik Teresa Holden Patrycia Hubl

TENNIS HISTORY

ÊUÊÊUÊ Trisha Abe Mary Alessandra Lee Amitai Kelly Ammerman Tina Amstutz Cheryl Anderson Kristi Anderson Carla Arguelles

2008-09 LIONS

THE RECORD BOOKS

2008-09 LIONS

TENNIS HISTORY

the heart of a lion...

History/All-Time Honors 1975 - The first womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tennis team started as a club team consisting of eight players, before being given a varsity letter from the Athletic Director for their year of participation. UÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; *Â?>Ă&#x17E;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; 1Ă&#x160; 7Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; /iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;\Ă&#x160; Judy Willsmore, Barbara Donnelly, Mary Donnelly, Marilyn Becker, Donna Mascari, Margi Lieb, Judy Magee, Marilyn Lauermann 1975-1976 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; First womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s LMU Athletic Scholarship ever given in the sport of tennis to Lynn Scott. U1Ă&#x160;i>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;wĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;viĂ&#x20AC;iÂ&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x160; Â&#x2026;>Â&#x201C;ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;ÂŤĂ&#x160; as part of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference in Division V. This was a first for any womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team in the history of the LMU Athletic Department. LMU Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s First Tennis Dynasty: UÂŁÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x2021;xÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x160;-  Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;>Â&#x201C;ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;­£äÂ&#x2021;äŽ UÂŁÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160; >Â?Â&#x2C6;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;>Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â?Â?i}Â&#x2C6;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Â?iĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;ference Champions (10-0) UÂŁÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;nĂ&#x160;

 Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;>Â&#x201C;ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;­nÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;ÂŽ 2001 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Head Coach Jamie Sanchez earned WCC Coach of the Year for the first time in his career. U/Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x153;iĂ&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;iÂŤĂ&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;i`Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x2DC;`Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;`Ă&#x2022;>Â?Ă&#x160; NCAA Playoffs with the doubles duo of Andrea Lord and Angelina Zdorovytska. 2002 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; LMU wins first West Coast Conference Title, the 59th-ranked Lions head to the NCAA Regionals where they fall to Washington in the first round of the NCAA Championships. UÂŁ{Â&#x2021;ÂŁÂŁĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x20AC;>Â?Â?]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;Â&#x2021;ÂŁĂ&#x160;7

Ă&#x160;­LiĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;iĂ&#x203A;iĂ&#x20AC;ÂŽ Ui>`Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;>VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x160;->Â&#x2DC;VÂ&#x2026;iâĂ&#x160;i>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;7

Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;>VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160; of the Year honors for the second straight year. 2006 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The 65th-Nationally Ranked Lions finish second in the WCC (Finished at No. 11 in the West Region). U-Â&#x153;ÂŤÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;*>Ă&#x203A;Â?>Ă&#x160;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;>Ă&#x160;wÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;i`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; the nation in singles, while Mesterova and partner Robyn Baker earned a final national ranking of 52nd in doubles. UiĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;>Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;Â&#x17D;i`Ă&#x160;ÂŁnĂ&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Â?iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; West Region while the doubles pair earned the 11th spot. Ui>`Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;>VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x160; ->Â&#x2DC;VÂ&#x2026;iâĂ&#x160; i>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;i`Ă&#x160; 7

Ă&#x160; Coach of the Year honors for the third time in his career.

2008-09 LIONSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; MEDIA GUIDE

2007 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Ended the season in a tie for third in the WCC. U/Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;Â&#x17D;i`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x201C;Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;wÂ&#x2DC;>Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â?Â?igiate Tennis Rankings administered by the ITA. U*>Ă&#x203A;Â?>Ă&#x160; iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;>Ă&#x160; i>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;i`Ă&#x160; 7

Ă&#x160; *Â?>Ă&#x17E;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; Year honors while finishing 60th as an individual.

U >Â&#x201C;i`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â?Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;V>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;/i>Â&#x201C;° 2003 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Kris Anderson â&#x20AC;&#x2122;89 U/Ă&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x160;1Ă&#x160;-VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â?>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Â?iĂ&#x152;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;9i>Ă&#x20AC;° U,>Â&#x2DC;Â&#x17D;i`Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;ÂŤÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x152;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă?Ă&#x160;1Ă&#x160;V>Ă&#x20AC;iiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;V>Ă&#x152;igories and top-ten in three of the single-season categories.

7

Ă&#x160;Â?Â?Â&#x2021;V>`iÂ&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;V 2008 2007 2003 2002

1Ă&#x160;-VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â?>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Â?iĂ&#x152;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;9i>Ă&#x20AC;

2001 2000 1998 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992

1988-89 1987-88

Kris Anderson Kris Anderson

1991

Pavla Mesterova

2008

1Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Â?iĂ&#x152;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;9i>Ă&#x20AC; 2005-06 2002-03 2001-02 1993-94

Pavla Mesterova Penka Fileva Edit Pakay Julie Oshiro

>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;>Â?Ă&#x160;-VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â?>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Â?iĂ&#x152;iĂ&#x192;

1Ă&#x160; iĂ&#x153;VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;9i>Ă&#x20AC; 2005-06

7

Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Â?iĂ&#x152;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;9i>Ă&#x20AC; 2006-07

Pavla Mesterova

7

Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;>VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;9i>Ă&#x20AC; 2006 2002 2001

Jamie Sanchez Jamie Sanchez Jamie Sanchez

Â?Â?Â&#x2021;7

2008 Singles 2008 Doubles 2007 Singles 2007 Doubles 2006 Singles

2006 Doubles 2005 Singles 2005 Doubles 2004 Singles

2004 Doubles 2003 Singles

1Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Â?iĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160;>Â?Â?Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;>Â&#x201C;i

1991 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Carolyn Patridge â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80 UĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;]Ă&#x160;*>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;`}iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Â?iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x20AC;>VÂ&#x17D;iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160; giving her an automatic entry into the 1980 Division II National Championships (the only representative of LMU), where she proceeded to win and secure a #20 National Ranking for the Lions.

2003 Doubles

1994 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Debbie Delgado â&#x20AC;&#x2122;85 UiÂ?ÂŤi`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;ÂŁÂ&#x2122;nĂ&#x201C;Ă&#x160;1Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;ÂľĂ&#x2022;>`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;°Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x201C;Ă&#x160; >tional Ranking as she finished in fourth place at the #2 singles position and in seventh place at the #2 doubles position at the NCAA Division II National Championships.

2001 Singles

2002 Singles

2002 Doubles

2001 Doubles 1997 Singles

Pavla Mesterova Tamara Tanner Pavla Mesterova Penka Fileva Penka Fileva Julie Hladik Penka Fileva Penka Fileva Lia Bunker Anna Zaricki Anna Zaricki Lara Labetich Lara Labetich Lara Labetich Alane Soares Lynn Stogner

Pavla Mesterova (1st) Tina Razloznik (HM) Mesterova/Tanner Pavla Mesterova (1st) Robyn Baker (2nd) Elrien De Villiers (HM) Mesterova/Baker (1st) Fermin/Tanner (HM) Pavla Mesterova (1st) Robyn Baker (2nd) Patrycia Hubl (HM) Sladjana Kos (HM) Maja Sundac (HM) Mesterova/Baker (1st) Ivey/Hubl (2nd) Carla Arguelles (1st) Serena Fermin (HM) Kimi Kaloi (HM) Tanner/Kaloi (HM) Carla Arguelles (1st) Serena Fermin (HM) Patrycia Hubl (HM) Robyn Baker (HM) Kaloi/Arguelles (1st) Baker/Baker (HM) Penka Fileva (1st) Edit Pakay (1st) Patrycia Hubl (HM) Diana Vinis (HM) Fileva/Hubl (1st) Pakay/Vinis (HM) Andrea Lord (1st) Edit Pakay (1st) Penka Fileva (HM) Angelina Zdorovytska (HM) Lord/Zdorovytska (HM) Hladik/Pakay (HM) Penka Fileva (1st) Andrea Lord (HM) Angelina Zdorovytska (HM) Lord/Zdorovytska (HM) Mara Colaizi (1st)

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2007

2006

2005 2004 2003 2002 2001

2000 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990

Maria Garcia-Planas Albert Pavla Mesterova Bliss Nixon Shawnell Russell Audra Silman Tamara Tanner Robyn Baker Serena Fermin Maria Garcia-Planas Albert Pavla Mesterova Shawnell Russell Serena Fermin Patrycia Hubl Pavla Mesterova Shawnell Russell Carla Arguelles Serena Fermin Diana Vinis Robyn Baker Serena Fermin Penka Fileva Diana Vinis Edit Pakay Penka Fileva Julie Hladik Edit Pakay Milica Cukulic Penka Fileva Julie Hladik Velana Kassab Penka Fileva Lia Bunker Lia Bunker Janina Kisic Anna Zaricki Lia Bunker Anna Zaricki Lia Bunker Janie Soubliere Anna Zaricki Lara Labetich Lara Labetich Lara Labetich Alane Soares Jennifer Knotts Lara Labetich Lynn Stogner Doreen Delgado Heide Hentschell Lynn Stogner

the heart of a lion...

>ÀiiÀÊ,iVœÀ`à Years 1991-94 2000-03 1995-98 2005-08 1995-98 1986-89 2000-02 2002-06 1986-89 1995-98

Singles Winning Percentage (min. 30 matches – two seasons) Player Years 1. Pavla Mesterova 2005-08 2. Denise Delgado 1983-85 3. Andrea Lord 1999-01 4. Julie Oshiro 1991-94 5. Erin Ivey 2003-05 6. Patrycia Hubl 2002-05 7. Kristi Niles 1984-87 8. Kris Anderson 1986-89 9. Edit Pakay 1999-03 10. Penka Fileva 2000-03 Doubles Victories – Team Players 1. Anderson-Gonzales 2. Colaizzi-Zaricki 3t. Lord-Zdorovytska 3t. Okum-Oshiro 5. Debbie Delgado-Ross 6. Bunker-A. Labetich 7. McMillion-Oshiro 8. Knotts-L. Labetich 9t. Florez-Young 9t. McMillion-Young

Records 86-45 85-57 78-66 75-28 75-58 73-44 70-33 68-50 67-49 67-70

Record 75-28 32-14 70-33 86-45 24-13 56-31 61-36 73-44 63-41 85-57

Years 1986-89 1995-97 2000-02 1991-93 1983-85 1995-97 1994 1991-92 1991-92 1992-94

Doubles Winning Percentage - Team (min. 20 matches) Players Years Record 1. McMillion-Oshiro 1994 23-10 2. Florez-Stinar 1990 15-7 3. Dn. Delgado-Stinar 1989 19-9 4. Anderson-Gonzales 1986-89 57-28 5t. Florez-Young 1991-92 20-10 5t. Denise Delgado-Mee 1986-87 16-8 7t. Lord-Zdorovytska 2000-02 30-17 7t. Okum-Oshiro 1991-92 30-17 9. Deb. Delgado-Ross 1983-85 29-17 10. Colaizzi-McMillion 1995 13-8

Doubles Winning Percentage - Individual (min. 30 matches) Player Years Record 1. Norma Veal 1983-84 26-9 2. Kris Anderson 1986-89 74-37 3. Jori Stinar 1987-90 62-34

Record 57-28 47-34 30-17 30-17 29-17 26-21 23-10 22-17 20-10 20-27

Pct. .697 .682 .679 .671 .667 .667 .638 .638 .630 .619

Record 74-37 70-40 66-60 64-50 63-39 62-34 62-47 62-61 61-42 58-37

Pct. .743 .667 .646

1991-94 1986-87 1990-92 2000-02 1983-85 1986-89 2000-02

70-40 28-16 40-24 46-28 31-19 63-39 43-27

.636 .636 .625 .622 .620 .618 .614

-i>ܘÊ,iVœÀ`à Singles Victories Player 1. Andrea Lord 2. Julie Oshiro 3t. Mara Colaizzi 3t. Julie Oshiro 5t. Pavla Mesterova 5t. Cristi Gonzales 5t. Amy Labetich 8t. Lia Bunker 8t. Edit Pakay 10t. Pavla Mesterova 10t. Anna Zaricki 10t. Laura Gross

Year 2000 1994 1995 1991 2007 1989 1995 1995 2003 2006 1995 1996

Singles Winning Percentage (min. 20 matches) Player Year 1. Pavla Mesterova 2007 2. Kris Anderson 1986 3. Julie Oshiro 1994 4t. Julie Oshiro 1991 4t. Mara Colaizzi 1995 6. Cristi Gonzales 1989 7. Pavla Mesterova 2006 8. Denise Delgado 1987 9. Andrea Lord 2002 10. Lia Bunker 1995 Doubles Victories - Team Players 1. Colaizzi-Zaricki 2. McMillion-Oshiro 3. Anderson-Gonzales 4. Florez-Young 5t. Mesterova/Tanner 5t. Denise Delgado-Stinar 7t. Lord-Zdorovytska 7t. Colaizzi-Zaricki 9. Knotts-L. Labetich 10. Anderson-Gonzales

Record 31-12 30-8 28-9 28-9 27-6 27-9 27-14 26-12 26-17 25-10 25-12 25-15

Record 27-6 19-5 30-8 28-9 28-9 27-9 25-10 24-10 23-10 26-12

Year 1996 1994 1989 1991 2008 1989 2002 1997 1991 1987

Pct. .818 .792 .789 .757 .757 .750 .714 .706 .697 .684

Record 25-13 23-10 22-11 20-10 19-11 19-9 18-10 18-17 17-12 16-8

Doubles Winning Percentage - Team (min. 15 matches) Players Year Record 1. Debbie Delgado-Ross 1985 14-3 2. Okum-Oshiro 1991 12-3 3. Dinham-Baker 2003 12-5 4. McMillion-Oshiro 1994 23-10 5. Florez-Stinar 1990 15-7 6. Denise Delgado-Stinar 1989 19-9 7t. Anderson-Gonzales 1989 22-11 7t. Florez-Young 1991 20-10 7t. Anderson-Gonzales 1987 16-8 7t. Anderson-Gonzales 1988 10-5 Doubles Victories - Individual Player Year 1t. Mara Colaizzi 1996 1t. Anna Zaricki 1996 3. Julie Oshiro 1994 4. Kelly McMillion 1994 5t. Kelly McMillion 1995 5t. Amy Labetich 1995 7. Pavla Mesterova 2007 8t. Pavla Mesterova 2008

Pct. .824 .800 .705 .697 .682 .679 .667 .667 .667 .667

Record 25-13 25-13 24-11 23-10 21-12 21-14 20-10 19-11

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8t. Tamara Tanner 8t. Edit Pakay 8t. Pavla Mesterova

2008 1999 2006

19-11 19-14 19-16

Doubles Winning Percentage – Individual (min. 15 matches) Player Year Record 1t. Debbie Delgado 1985 14-3 1t. Kathy Ross 1985 14-3 3. Kristi Niles 1984 14-4 4. Norma Veal 1984 13-4 5. Kim Florez 1991 17-6 6. Angela Young 1991 16-6 7. Norma Veal 1983 13-5 8. Kim Florez 1990 18-7 9. Kelly McMillion 1994 23-10 10. Julie Oshiro 1994 24-11

Pct. .823 .823 .777 .764 .739 .727 .722 .720 .696 .685

9i>À‡Lއ9i>ÀÊ,iVœÀ`à Year 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Overall

W 13 15 16 13 14 16 10 15 14 7 12 22 13 15 12 17 9 13 6 22 12 13 10 10 15 12 14 12 11 11 12 11 11 428

L 6 11 11 11 11 10 14 9 12 10 12 12 13 13 12 9 15 12 14 10 12 12 15 18 9 10 11 10 12 13 14 12 14 389

Pct. .684 .577 .593 .542 .560 .615 .417 .625 .538 .412 .500 .647 .500 .536 .500 .654 .375 .520 .300 .688 .500 .520 .400 .357 .625 .545 .560 .545 .478 .458 .462 .478 .440 .524

WCC

4th 4th 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 2nd 1st t-3rd 3rd 3rd 2nd 3rd 5th

Record Book is at Division I level only.

2008-09 LIONS’ MEDIA GUIDE

Doubles Victories - Individual Player Years 1. Kris Anderson 1986-89 2. Julie Oshiro 1991-94 3. Mara Colaizzi 1995-98 4. Kelly McMillion 1992-95 5. Cristi Gonzales 1986-89 6t Jori Stinar 1987-90 6t. Penka Fileva 2000-03 6t. Lia Bunker 1995-98 9. Anna Zaricki 1995-97 10. Pavla Mesterova 2005-08

Pct. .728 .696 .680 .656 .649 .644 .629 .624 .605 .599

4t. Julie Oshiro 4t. Liz Mee 6. Kim Florez 7. Andrea Lord 8. Debbie Delgado 9. Cristi Gonzalez 10. Angelina Zdorovytska

TENNIS HISTORY

Singles Victories Player 1. Julie Oshiro 2. Penka Fileva 3. Mara Colaizzi 4t. Pavla Mesterova 4t. Amy Labetich 6. Kris Anderson 7. Andrea Lord 8. Patrycia Hubl 9t. Denise Delgado 9t. Lia Bunker

2008-09 LIONS

All-Time Records

2008-09 LIONS

TENNIS HISTORY

the heart of a lion...

Program Year-by-Year £™ÇÇÊ­£Ó‡£Ó® at UC Riverside at UC Riverside Whittier UC Riverside Cal Poly Pomona CS Dominguez Hills Redlands at Whittier at Cal State Northridge at Biola at Cal Lutheran Cal State Northridge Westmont at Cal State LA at Cal State LA at CS Dominguez Hills at Cal Poly Pomona at Redlands at UNLV at UNLV Westmont Cal Lutheran at Long Beach State at Cal State Fullerton

W, 6-3 W, 5-2 W, 7-2 W, 6-3 L, 2-7 L, 4-5 W, 6-3 W, 6-3 W, 5-4 W, 9-0 W, 2-0 W, 5-4 W, 7-2 L, 1-8 L, 2-6 L, 2-7 L, 1-8 L, 3-6 L, 0-9 L, 0-9 L, 3-6 W, 6-3 L, 1-8 L, 2-7

£™ÇnÊ­£Ó‡££® at UC Irvine L, 0-9 at Cal State LA L, 3-6 at Cal State Fullerton L, 2-7 Redlands W, 8-1 Cal Lutheran W, 9-0 Biola L, 4-5 Westmont (1) W, 8-1 UNLV (1) L, 3-6 Grand Canyon (1) W, 5-4 at Whittier W, 6-3 at Nevada L, 3-6 Montana State (2) W, 5-4 Montana (2) W, 8-1 Hawai’i L, 1-8 Cal State Fullerton L, 4-5 CS Dominguez Hills W, 8-1 at Cal State Northridge L, 3-6 UNLV L, 3-6 at Westmont W, 9-0 at UC Riverside W, 6-3 Cal Poly Pomona L, 2-7 at CS Dominguez Hills W, 6-3 Cal Lutheran W, 8-1 (1) UNLV Tournament, Las Vegas, NV (2) at Nevada, Reno, NV

2008-09 LIONS’ MEDIA GUIDE

£™Ç™Ê­£ä‡£Ó®I UC Irvine Cal State Northridge Whittier Point Loma Nazarene Biola at UC Riverside Weber State (1) Grand Canyon (1) Northern Arizona (1) UNLV (1) Westmont (1) at CS Dominguez Hills Cal State Fullerton Cal Lutheran at Whittier UC Riverside CS Dominguez Hills Cal State Bakersfield (2)

L, 0-9 L, 3-6 W, 6-3 W, 6-3 L, 3-6 W, 5-4 W, 8-1 L, 4-5 L, 4-5 L, 0-9 W, 6-3 W, 9-0 L, 1-8 L, 4-5 W, 7-2 W, 6-3 W, 5-0 L, 0-9

Nevada (2) L, 2-7 San Francisco (2) L, 4-5 at Cal State Fullerton L, 2-7 Westmont W, 6-3 (1) UNLV Tournament, Las Vegas, NV (2) Cal State Bakersfield Tournament * Results Incomplete

£™näÊ­™‡£Î® at Hawai’i L, 0-9 at Hawai’i L, 0-9 at BYU-Hawai’i W, 5-1 at Cal State Northridge L, 1-8 at UC Irvine L, 1-8 at Whittier W, 9-0 Claremont W, 7-2 at Claremont W, 9-0 Westmont W, 7-2 at Cal Lutheran W, 8-1 at Point Loma Nazarene W, 9-0 New Mexico (1) L, 1-8 UNLV (1) L, 2-7 Wisconsin (1) W, 5-4 US International (1) L, 2-7 at Biola L, 0-9 Oregon W, 5-4 Montana State L, 4-5 Minnesota (2) L, 0-6 UNLV L, 1-8 Cal State Northridge L, 1-8 Washington L, 0-9 (1) UNLV Tournament, Las Vegas, NV (2) at CS Northridge, Northridge, CA

£™n£Ê­£Î‡£ä® UC Irvine L, 0-9 at Cal State Northridge L, 1-8 Cal Lutheran W, 9-0 Biola W, 6-3 at Cal State Bakersfield L, 1-8 UNLV (1) W, 6-3 CS Dominguez Hills (1) W, 7-2 Dominican College (1) W, 9-0 Point Loma Nazarene W, 8-1 Notre Dame L, 2-7 Ohio State L, 0-9 Westmont W, 6-3 Hawai’i L, 1-8 at CS Dominguez Hills W, 7-2 Cal State Bakersfield L, 4-5 at Westmont W, 8-1 at Point Loma Nazarene W, 5-4 Cal Poly Pomona L, 0-9 CS Dominguez Hills W, 7-2 UC Riverside W, 8-1 Cal State Northridge L, 1-8 Biola L, 3-6 at UC Riverside W, 6-3 (1) UNLV Tournament, Las Vegas, NV

£™nÓÊ­n‡£{® at San Diego State UC San Diego Utah at Whittier at UC Irvine at Pepperdine Pacific Cal State Northridge at San Diego at Cal State LA at Cal Poly Pomona

L, 0-9 L, 0-9 L, 1-8 W, 9-0 L, 1-8 L, 0-9 L, 3-6 L, 1-7 L, 2-7 W, 5-4 L, 3-6

at Cal State Bakersfield Hawai’i Air Force CS Dominguez Hills Westmont Nevada Cal State Bakersfield Cal State LA Biola Biola at Cal State Northridge

L, 1-5 L, 1-5 W, 4-0 W, 9-0 W, 5-4 W, 5-3 L, 4-5 L, 4-5 W, 8-1 W, 9-0 L, 1-8

£™nÎÊ­£ä‡££® at Pepperdine UC Irvine UC Riverside at Hawai’i at BYU-Hawai’i at Hawai’i at Hawai’i at CS Dominguez Hills at Cal State LA at Cal State Northridge Cal State LA Biola at Westmont Northern Colorado at Cal State LA Long Beach State at San Diego at Cal Poly SLO Denver Hawai’i at Long Beach State

L, 0-9 L, 1-8 W, 8-1 L, 0-8 W, 7-0 L, 0-9 L, 1-8 W, 9-0 W, 9-0 L, 2-7 W, 8-1 W, 6-3 W, 5-4 L, 4-5 W, 9-0 L, 3-6 L, 1-7 W, 6-3 W, 7-2 L, 2-7 L, 0-9

£™n{Ê­££‡££® at Pepperdine at UC Santa Barbara at UC Irvine Santa Clara Cal State Fullerton Cal Poly SLO at Cal Poly Pomona US International Pacific Long Beach State at Biola Oklahoma at Cal State LA Notre Dame Montana State Cal Poly Pomona at Cal State Fullerton UC Irvine at San Diego at Cal Poly SLO Denver at Long Beach State

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£™nÈÊ­£Ó‡£Ó® at Hawai’i at Hawai’i UC Irvine Cal State Bakersfield Hawai’i at Long Beach State Regis College at Westmont at Biola Western Michigan UNLV San Jose State Santa Clara Brown Maryland Montana State Fordham at UC Irvine at Saint Mary’s at Nevada Westmont Cal State Fullerton Pacific at Long Beach State

L, 4-5 W, 5-4 L, 1-8 L, 3-6 L, 0-9 L, 1-8 W, 9-0 L, 4-5 W, 9-0 L, 1-8 W, 8-1 L, 3-6 W, 6-3 W, 5-4 L, 3-6 W, 7-2 W, 7-2 L, 1-8 W, 9-0 W, 7-2 W, 6-3 W, 8-1 L, 1-8 L, 3-6

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L, 1-8 L, 0-9 L, 2-7 W, 5-4 W, 5-4 W, 8-1 W, 8-1 L, 1-8 L, 3-6 L, 4-5 W, 8-1 L, 2-7 W, 8-1 L, 3-6 W, 8-1 W, 7-2 W, 5-4 L, 4-5 L, 3-6 W, 5-4 W, 7-2 L, 4-5

£™nxʭLJ£ä® at UC Irvine at Cal State LA at UC Santa Barbara at Westmont Long Beach State at Biola at Occidental Cal State LA at UC San Diego Biola Puget Sound (1) Boise State (1)

San Francisco State (1) W, 6-3 Nevada (1) L, 2-7 Montana State W, 6-3 Pacific L, 3-6 at San Diego L, 3-6 (1) Nevada Tournament, Reno, NV

L, 1-8 W, 5-4 L, 1-8 L, 4-5 L, 2-7 W, 8-1 W, 6-3 L, 4-5 L, 2-7 W, 6-3 L, 2-7 W, 6-3

at Hawai’i L, 4-5 at Hawai’i Pacific L, 0-9 at BYU-Hawai’i W, 8-1 UNLV (1) W, 5-4 Nevada (1) W, 8-1 Weber State (1) L, 2-7 at USC L, 0-9 at US International L, 1-8 Westmont W, 9-0 UC Irvine L, 2-7 at Occidental W, 7-2 at Long Beach State L, 2-7 Cal State Bakersfield W, 6-3 at San Diego L, 1-8 Cal State Fullerton W, 6-3 at Cal State LA W, 6-3 at Westmont W, 7-2 at Cal Poly SLO L, 2-7 at Santa Clara W, 6-3 at Biola W, 9-0 at Pepperdine L, 1-8 at Cal State Fullerton L, 2-7 (1) UNLV Tournament, Las Vegas, NV

£™n™Ê­£x‡£Î® New Mexico State (1) Texas-El Paso (1) UC Irvine UC Santa Barbara Long Beach State at US International Nevada (2) UNLV (2) Westmont at Cal State LA BYU-Hawai’i

W, 6-3 W, 9-0 L, 4-5 L, 1-8 W, 8-1 L, 1-7 W, 6-0 W, 5-4 W, 9-0 W, 9-0 W, 6-3

the heart of a lion...

£™™£Ê­£Ç‡™® W, 8-1 W, 8-1 W, 5-4 W, 9-0 L, 3-6 L, 1-8 L, 3-6 L, 2-7 L, 2-7 W, 6-3 W, 6-3 W, 7-2 W, 5-4 W, 7-2 W, 9-0 W, 6-3 L, 3-6 W, 5-4 L, 1-5 W, 6-3 W, 7-2 L, 1-8 L, 0-9 W, 6-3

£™™ÎÊ­£Î‡£Ó® at USC L, 0-9 at San Diego State L, 0-9 UC Irvine L, 2-7 at UC Santa Barbara L, 2-7 at Cal State Northridge L, 4-5 at San Diego L, 3-6 at Cal State Fullerton W, 8-0 Long Beach State W, 7-2 at Biola W, 9-0 Pennsylvania L, 4-5 at Westmont W, 8-0 Princeton W, 6-3 Weber State (1) W, 5-4 Cal State Northridge (1) L, 1-5 Cal State Fullerton (1) W, 5-4 Oregon W, 5-2 Nevada L, 2-7 Brown W, 5-4 BYU-Hawai’i W, 5-4 San Francisco (2) W, 7-1 at Chaminade W, 6-0 Pacific L, 0-6 at Long Beach State W, 5-1 Hawai’i L, 1-7 at Pepperdine L, 1-8 (1) CS Fullerton Classic, Fullerton, CA (2) at Univ. of Hawai’i, Honolulu, HI

£™™{ʭȇ£{® at UCLA Washington State at San Diego State Cal State Fullerton at San Diego Long Beach State Cal State Northridge at UC Irvine Western Michigan Pennsylvania at Long Beach State Princeton

L, 0-9 L, 2-7 L, 0-9 W, 7-2 L, 0-9 W, 8-1 L, 4-5 L, 4-5 L, 2-7 L, 2-7 W, 6-3 L, 3-6

W, 5-4 L, 3-6 W, 5-4 L, 3-6 L, 2-7 W, 7-2 L, 2-7 L, 3-6

£™™xÊ­ÓӇ£ä® at Hawai’i-Pacific W, 9-0 at Chaminade W, 9-0 at Hawai’i L, 4-5 at UCLA L, 1-8 Utah L, 3-6 Cal State Los Angeles W, 9-0 Southern Cal College W, 7-2 UC Irvine W, 7-2 at Long Beach State W, 9-0 Point Loma Nazarene W, 8-1 Pomona Pitzer W, 7-2 at Cal Poly SLO W, 5-4 Cal State Northridge (1) W, 5-1 Saint Mary’s (1) W, 6-0 Pennsylvania L, 3-5 Chapman W, 8-0 at UC Santa Barbara L, 3-6 at Cal State Fullerton W, 7-1 VCU L, 3-6 Colorado State W, 9-0 Santa Clara W, 7-2 Oregon W, 7-2 Westmont W, 7-2 Brown W, 6-3 Southern Colorado W, 9-0 Long Beach State W, 8-1 San Diego L, 1-8 at San Diego State L, 0-9 Pepperdine L, 0-9 Portland (2) W, 8-1 San Diego (2) L, 0-9 Santa Clara (2) W, 6-3 (1) at San Luis Obispo, CA (2) WCC Champs. at San Diego, CA

£™™ÈÊ­£Ó‡£Ó® at UCLA L, 1-7 at Saint Mary’s W, 7-0 at California L, 1-8 Cal State Fullerton W, 6-3 at San Diego State L, 2-7 at USC L, 1-8 Cal Poly SLO (1) W, 5-2 San Francisco (1) W, 7-2 at Long Beach State W, 6-3 Western Michigan L, 3-6 at Saint Mary’s W, 8-1 at Santa Clara W, 9-0 at San Jose State W, 9-0 Yale L, 4-5 UC Santa Barbara L, 4-5 Brown L, 4-5 at UC Irvine W, 9-0 Long Beach State W, 5-4 Fresno State L, 2-7 at San Diego L, 3-6 at Pepperdine L, 3-6 Santa Clara (2) W, 8-1 San Diego (2) L, 2-7 Saint Mary’s (2) W, 5-4 (1) Cal Poly SLO Tournament (2) WCC Champs. at Moraga, CA

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£™™ÇÊ­£Î‡£Ó® at Hawai’i-Hilo W, 7-0 at Hawai’i W, 6-0 at Stanford L, 0-9 at California L, 0-9 at Pepperdine L, 0-8 at USC L, 1-8 Nevada (1) L, 1-6 Cal Poly SLO (1) W, 6-3 Portland (1) W, 5-1 Long Beach State W, 5-4 at UCLA L, 0-9 UC Irvine W, 9-0 Pennsylvania L, 4-5 Cornell W, 5-4 Illinois-Chicago W, 6-3 Brown L, 1-8 at UC Santa Barbara W, 5-4 at San Diego State L, 0-9 Santa Clara (2) W, 7-1 at San Diego (2) L, 4-5 Saint Mary’s (2) W, 5-4 at Cal State Fullerton W, 8-0 at Long Beach State W, 5-4 at Fresno State L, 0-6 Pepperdine L, 0-9 (1) Cal Poly SLO Tournament (2) WCC Champs. at San Diego, CA

£™™nÊ­£ä‡£x® Cal Poly SLO L, 4-5 at UC Irvine W, 5-4 at UCLA L, 0-7 Cal State Northridge L, 3-6 at Washington L, 0-9 vs. Nevada L, 4-5 Cal State Fullerton W, 7-2 at Arizona State L, 0-9 Portland W, 7-2 VCU L, 4-5 Oregon W, 5-2 Syracuse L, 3-6 Illinois-Chicago W, 5-4 Boise State (1) L, 3-6 Southern Mississippi (1) L, 3-6 UC Santa Barbara (1) W, 6-0 Santa Clara W, 6-3 at Long Beach State L, 3-6 at Pepperdine L, 0-9 San Diego State L, 0-9 at Cal State Northridge L, 3-6 UC Santa Barbara W, 7-2 Santa Clara (2) W, 7-2 San Diego (2) L, 2-7 Portland (2) W, 5-4 (1) Boise State Tour., Boise, ID (2) WCC Tournament at Malibu, CA

£™™™Ê­£ä‡£n® at Hawaii vs. Hawaii Pacific at UCLA at USC Westmont at Cal State Northridge Washington at UC Santa Barbara UC Irvine vs. Oregon at San Diego vs. Furman at New Mexico at UTEP vs. Tennessee Tech.

W, 5-4 W, 8-1 L, 0-9 L, 0-9 W, 7-2 W, 7-2 L, 0-9 L, 0-6 L, 3-6 L, 0-6 L, 1-6 L, 0-6 L, 2-7 L, 1-8 L, 2-7

2008-09 LIONS’ MEDIA GUIDE

Texas-El Paso (1) New Mexico State (1) Trinity (1) at Chaminade at Hawai’i at UC Santa Barbara UC Irvine at Pepperdine at USC at Pomona Pitzer Point Loma Nazarene Westmont at Long Beach State Occidental San Jose State Pennsylvania Cal State Fullerton (2) Texas Tech (2) UNLV (2) Oregon Colorado at Arizona State at Arizona at Cal State Bakersfield

£™™ÓÊ­™‡£x® at UCLA L, 0-9 at USC L, 0-9 at Pepperdine L, 0-9 at San Diego State L, 0-9 at San Diego L, 0-9 Long Beach State L, 4-5 Cal State Fullerton W, 8-1 Western Michigan L, 2-7 Pennsylvania L, 1-8 Yale W, 6-3 at Cal State Northridge W, 7-2 Princeton L, 4-5 Utah State W, 9-0 Drake (1) L, 2-5 Cal State Northridge (1) W, 5-4 Texas-El Paso (1) W, 5-0 Cal State Northridge W, 6-3 UC Santa Barbara L, 1-8 at UC Irvine L, 3-6 at Arizona State L, 0-9 at Santa Clara W, 9-0 at Pacific L, 0-9 at UC Davis L, 4-5 at Long Beach State W, 5-4 (1) CS Fullerton Classic, Fullerton, CA

Yale at Pepperdine Oregon Saint Mary’s Brown at Cal State Northridge UC Santa Barbara Hawai’i

TENNIS HISTORY

£™™äÊ­££‡£x® at UC Santa Barbara L, 0-9 at Christ College W, 9-0 at Pepperdine L, 1-8 at UC Irvine L, 2-7 Cal State Bakersfield L, 4-5 Pomona Pitzer W, 7-2 Occidental W, 7-2 at Point Loma Nazarene W, 6-3 Long Beach State W, 8-1 at Occidental W, 8-1 Cal State LA L, 4-5 Point Loma Nazarene W, 8-1 Biola W, 9-0 at Westmont W, 9-0 Pennsylvania L, 3-6 Temple L, 2-7 Baylor L, 2-7 Cal State Fullerton L, 3-6 Oregon W, 5-4 UNLV (1) L, 1-8 Georgia Tech (1) L, 0-6 at Long Beach State W, 5-4 Brown L, 2-7 UC Santa Barbara L, 2-7 UC Irvine L, 0-9 Hawai’i L, 4-5 (1) UNLV Tournament, Las Vegas, NV

Long Beach State W, 6-2 Cal State Northridge W, 7-2 (1) Sun Bowl Invitational, El Paso, TX (2) UNLV Invitational, Las Vegas, NV

2008-09 LIONS

at Cal State Bakersfield W, 7-2 at USC L, 0-9 Cal State LA W, 8-1 Furman W, 7-2 Pennsylvania L, 4-5 Northern Illinois W, 5-4 Temple L, 4-5 Washington State W, 7-2 Iowa State L, 4-5 at Pepperdine L, 1-8 Pacific L, 3-6 Texas-El Paso L, 4-5 at UC Irvine L, 1-5 Cal State Fullerton L, 1-5 at UC Santa Barbara L, 0-9 at Long Beach State W, 7-2 Cal Poly Pomona W, 7-1 (1) UTEP Tournament, El Paso, TX (2) UNLV Tournament, Las Vegas, NV

2008-09 LIONS

TENNIS HISTORY

the heart of a lion... Virginia Commonwealth L, 3-6 Penn State L, 1-8 Yale L, 0-9 Cornell L, 3-6 vs. Portland W, 5-2 Claremont Mudd W, 6-3 Long Beach State W, 6-3 at Fresno State L, 0-9 Pepperdine L, 0-9 at Cal State Fullerton W, 5-4 vs. Gonzaga (1) W, 8-1 vs. San Diego (1) L, 0-9 vs. Santa Clara (1) W, 9-0 (1) WCC Champs. at Santa Clara, CA

ÓäääÊ­£x‡™® No. 68 University of Pacific W, 5-4 at No.10 USC L, 8-1 * Saint Mary’s W, 8-0 UC Santa Barbara W, 6-3 at San Diego State L, 8-1 at No.14 UCLA L, 8-1 at No.58 UC Irvine L, 8-1 at San Jose State W, 6-3 * at San Francisco W, 9-0 * at Santa Clara W, 6-3 Richmond L, 6-3 * at No.5 Pepperdine L, 9-0 Weber State W, 6-3 at Long Beach State W, 5-4 Princeton L, 5-4 Depaul W, 9-0 Stanford L, 9-0 Brown W, 7-2 Boise State W, 5-4 vs. Saint Mary’s(1) W, 9-0 vs. San Diego(1) L, 5-4 vs. Santa Clara(1) W, 6-3 Cal State Fullerton W, 9-0 Cal State Northridge W, 7-2 (1) WCC Champs. at Santa Clara, CA

2008-09 LIONS’ MEDIA GUIDE

Óää£Ê­£Ó‡£ä® at Hawaii L, 3-4 at Hawaii-Hilo W, -1 at Hawaii Pacific W, 7-0 at No.29 San Diego State L, 1-6 at No. 62 San Diego L, 3-4 at Cal Poly W, 4-3 vs. No. 51 Oregon W, 4-3 at No. 75 CS Northridge W, 6-1 No. 60 Florida State L, 3-4 No. 37 Virginia Comm. L, 2-5 Dartmouth W, 7-0 at No. 27 UCLA L, 1-6 at No. 18 USC L, 0-7 Brown W, 5-2 UC Riverside W, 7-0 at Cal State Fullerton W, 6-1 Saint Mary’s W, 5-2 No. 21 Pepperdine L, 2-5 No. 56 Long Beach State L, 2-5 vs. Gonzaga (1) W, 7-0 vs. No. 39 San Diego (1) W, 4-2 vs. No. 19 Pepperdine (1) L, 1-4 (1) WCC Champs. at Santa Clara, CA

ÓääÓÊ­£{‡££® at No.16 UCLA UC Riverside Cal State Fullerton No.65 Oregon vs. No.33 Mississippi Cal State Northridge

L, 0-7 W, 7-0 W, 7-0 L, 3-4 L, 0-7 W, 6-1

at No.7 USC No.12 California at No.54 UNLV No.75 Eastern Michigan UC Irvine at Fresno State UC Santa Barbara at No.52 Long Beach State Princeton San Diego* Saint Mary’s* Santa Clara* Portland* at San Diego State at No.32 Pepperdine8 vs. San Diego (1) at Santa Clara (1) vs. No.32 Pepperdine (1) vs. No.23 Washington (2) (1) WCC Championships ­Ó®Ê Ê/œÕÀ˜>“i˜ÌÊUÊ,œÕ˜`Ê£

L, 2-5 L, 2-5 L, 2-5 W, 5-2 W, 5-2 L, 0-7 W, 6-1 L, 2-5 W, 5-2 W, 6-1 W, 6-1 W, 6-1 W, 5-2 L, 1-6 L, 1-6 W, 6-1 W, 6-1 W, 4-2 L, 4-0

ÓääÎÊ­£Ó‡£ä® at San Diego L, 5-2 at CS Northridge L, 6-1 at No. 72 UC Irvine W, 4-3 Long Beach State L, 6-1 at No. 9 UCLA L, 7-0 vs. No. 65 New Mexico (1) L, 4-1 vs. Northern Arizona (1) L, 4-3 at Santa Clara W, 5-2 at Saint Mary’s W, 7-0 vs. Portland W, 6-1 Gonzaga W, 7-0 San Francisco W, 7-0 Princeton W, 4-3 at No. 30 San Diego St. L, 6-1 Brown L, 4-3 No. 54 Pepperdine W, 4-3 No. 33 Oregon W, 4-3 vs. Saint Mary’s (2) W, 5-2 vs. No. 69 San Diego (2) L, 4-2 Sacramento State W, 5-2 (1) UNLV Invitational - Las Vegas, NV (2) WCC Championships - Malibu, CA

Óää{Ê­££‡£Ó® at No. 11 UCLA L, 7-0 at CSLA tournament Won 11 of 12 at CSLA Tournament Won 11 of 14 at CSLA Tournament Won 5 of 6 at No. 14 William & Mary L, 7-0 at Temple W, 5-2 No. 1 Stanford L, 6-0 No. 61 UC Irvine CNCLD Cal State Fullerton W, 7-0 Furman L, 4-3 at No. 14 Fresno State L, 6-1 No. 5 North Carolina L, 6-1 Marquette W, 5-2 at No. 62 Long Beach St L, 4-3 No. 9 California L, 6-1 Princeton W, 4-3 at No. 68 San Diego St W, 4-3 at No. 9 USC L, 7-0 Santa Clara W, 7-0 No. 48 Sacramento St. L, 4-3 Brown W, 6-1 Saint Mary’s W, 7-0 Cal State Northridge W, 7-0 UC Santa Barbara CNCLD at No. 37 Pepperdine L, 7-0 vs. Portland (1) W, 4-0 vs.No. 53San Diego (1) L, 4-1

vs. SCU (1) (1) WCC Championships

W, 4-0

ÓääxÊ­££‡£Î® No. 4 UCLA L, 6-1 No. 62 Pacific L, 5-2 No. 39 Arizona L, 4-3 No. 51 San Diego L, 6-1 Cal State Fullerton W, 4-3 No. 74 Cal Poly L, 6-1 No. 35 Pepperdine L, 5-2 No. 68 San Diego State L, 5-2 San Francisco W, 6-0 Saint Mary’s W, 6-1 No. 75 Santa Clara W, 5-2 No. 67 Long Beach State L, 4-3 UC Irvine L, 5-2 Central Florida L, 4-3 Syracuse W, 6-1 No. 58 Colorado W, 5-2 Hawai’i W, 5-2 Brown L, 4-3 UC Santa Barbara W, 4-3 No. 55 Fresno State L, 6-1 No. 32 Sacramento State L, 8-4 Cal State Northridge W, 4-3 San Francisco (1) W, 4-1 San Diego (1) L, 4-3 Saint Mary’s (1) W, 4-2 (1) WCC Champs. in San Diego, CA

ÓääÈÊ­£Ó‡£{® at No. 12 UCLA at San Diego State at Long Beach State vs. Cal State Fullerton vs. No. 68 UC Irvine vs. Hawai’i vs. No. 52 Boston College at No. 70 Sacramento State vs. Eastern Tennessee State at No. 42 Nebraska at No. 8 Pepperdine vs. Cornell University vs. No. 47 San Diego vs. UC Santa Barbara vs. Saint Mary’s vs. Florida International at No. 21 Fresno State vs. No. 44 Oregon vs. Cal State Northridge Santa Clara (1) No. 56 San Diego (1) No. 13 Pepperdine (1)

L, 7-0 L, 5-2 L, 6-1 W, 6-1 L, 4-0 W, 6-1 W, 4-3 L, 4-3 L, 4-2 L, 4-0 L, 7-0 W, 5-2 L, 4-3 W, 5-2 W, 5-2 L, 6-1 L, 6-1 W, 4-3 W, 4-3 W, 4-1 W, 4-2 L, 4-0

ÓääÇÊ­££‡£Ó® at Cal State Fullerton at No. 70 UC Santa Barbara vs. No. 19 Pepperdine at No. 60 San Diego at No. 15 UCLA at Cal Poly vs. No. 15 UCLA at Saint Mary’s at San Francisco at Santa Clara at San Jose State at No. 6 Cal vs. Southern Mississippi vs. San Diego State vs. No. 57 Nevada vs. Pacific vs. No. 46 Sacramento State vs. No. 44 Long Beach State

Óään‡ä™ÊUÊxÓÊUÊ1Ê7œ“i˜½ÃÊ/i˜˜ˆÃ

W, 4-1 W, 4-3 L, 6-1 W, 4-3 CNCLD L, 4-3 L, 6-1 L, 5-2 W, 4-3 W, 5-1 W, 7-0 L, 6-1 L, 4-3 W, 4-3 L, 4-3 W, 7-0 L, 4-3 W, 4-3

vs. Hawai’i at No. 37 UC Irvine at No. 12 Fresno State at Cal State Northridge vs. Portland (1) vs. Saint Mary’s (1) (1) WCC Championsips

W, 7-0 L, 4-3 L, 7-0 L, 6-1 W, 4-2 L, 4-1

ÓäänÊ­££‡£{® No. 8 Southern California L, 6-1 No. 46 University of Tulsa L, 6-1 No. 59 Oklahoma State University L, 4-0 No. 50 San Diego State L, 5-2 No. 57 Sacramento State L, 4-3 No. 8 UCLA L, 7-0 No. 68 Cal Poly L, 4-3 Texas-San Antonio W, 6-0 No. 36 UC Irvine L, 5-2 Eastern Michigan W, 4-3 San Francisco W, 4-3 University of Hawai’i W 6-1 No. 27 Pepperdine L, 7-0 No. 45 Saint Mary’s College W, 4-3 Yale W, 4-3 No. 61 University of Nebraska L, 6-1 Cal State Fullerton W, 7-0 San Diego L, 4-3 Cal State Northridge W, 6-1 UC Santa Barbara W, 5-2 No. 37 Long Beach State L, 6-1 No. 17 Fresno State L, 6-1 San Francisco (1) L, 4-3 Gonzaga (1) W, 6-0 Santa Clara (1) W, 7-0 (1) WCC Championships


2008-09 LMU Women's Tennis Record Book