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LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST A Magazine from the Heart of Western Pennsylvania

A Unique Vision Of Art They’ve Got It Covered:

Indiana County’s 1st Covered Bridge Festival

Forgotten Paths Don’t Tread On Me!

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE:

Rick Sebak Takes Us For A Ride Along the Lincoln Highway SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2008 cover art: detail of “Country Road” by Gina Capozzi, from the Special Collection of Greater Latrobe School District Every Story Begins At Home.

FREE September/October 2008 - 1


Celebrate Our 250th Anniversary! Ligonier Highland Games Pipe Band Concert – September 7 featuring the Seton Hill University Pipe Band at 1:00 pm on the Diamond.

49th Fort Ligonier Days – October 10, 11, 12

It's no mere historical coincidence that Ligonier is celebrating its 250th birthday at the same time as Pittsburgh's 250th. Ligonier, after all, is the town that made Pittsburgh possible. This year’s celebration promises to be the biggest ever!

Scarecrow Contest – October 16 - November 1

Sponsored by the Ligonier Valley Chamber of Commerce 120 East Main Street • Ligonier, PA 15658 • 724-238-4200 • www.ligonier.com

2 - September/October 2008

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


W SEPT/OCT 2008 (Volume V, Issue 5)

The Laurel Mountain Post is a bimonthly publication designed to focus on the people, places and events of Westmoreland County and the surrounding areas in the heart of western Pennsylvania. We print stories about real people and their daily lives; feature local merchants, craftsmen and professionals; present short pieces of art & literature; and never lose sight of what makes this area a great place to call home. Most of our writers are not professional reporters, but accomplished local practitioners with years of experience in their respective fields who bring credibility and personality to every article. In October 2006, the BBC News quoted us as “the voice of Pennsylvania.”

Laurel Mountain Post P.O. Box 227 Latrobe, PA 15650 advertising: 724-331-3936 editorial: 724-689-6133 Office Hours by Appointment at 206 Weldon Street in Latrobe, Pennsylvania

Cathi Gerhard Williams Editor & Publisher editor@laurelmountainpost.com

Briana Dwire Tomack Marketing Director & Business Manager advertising@laurelmountainpost.com Proud members of the Latrobe, Ligonier, and Strongland Chambers of Commerce, The Pittsburgh Advertising Federation, and The Pennsylvania Newspaper Assocation Special thanks to our advertisers for supporting this community publication!

www.LaurelMountainPost.com

Our distribution of 15,000 reaches beyond Westmoreland County into the neighboring counties of Allegheny, Washington, Armstrong, Bedford, Cambria, Indiana, Somerset and Fayette. In 2006 our web traffic increased by 53% and continues to grow. Every day, more and more readers and advertisers across western Pennsylvania are discovering the Laurel Mountain Post.

Every Story Begins At Home.

elcome . . . MOUNTAIN VIEWS Cathi Gerhard Williams

Long and Winding Roads . . . How many times have you heard that the shortest path between point A and point B is a straight line? Or zoomed through the Allegheny Mountain tunnel on the Pennsylvania Turnpike to avoid the twisting, slower passage of Route 30 in Somerset County? It seems like every day we find shorter ways to do everything . . . multitasking, bypassing, and convenience shopping. Life is wasted by rushing and complaining about how busy we are. Eventually we realize there is nothing to show for all the time we’ve spent racing toward the next deadline. What we have is a string of commitments without actual experiences. With all of the scrapbooking people seem to be doing these days, you would think we’d take more time outs to actually make some of those memories. Some favorite photos of my children came from a Halloween project when my daughter was three. Fifteen years ago I sewed Elizabeth’s cow costume from scratch, cutting out the black felt patches and attaching them with an old-fashioned needle and thread. I braided ropes of yarn into a fuzzy chain for the bell she wore and jingled around her neck. I can’t remember how many hours it took me, and I definitely wasn’t counting. The feeling it gave me to see her proudly mooing in her custom-made-by-mom costume was matched only by the joy of my son, Robert, wearing it eight Halloweens later. I would have missed it all if I had taken some mainstream shortcut to dress her that year.

This issue of the Laurel Mountain Post is a collection of stories about taking the oft-quoted but typically avoided “long and winding roads.” You’ll get a sneak peek at Rick Sebak’s Ride Along the Lincoln Highway before it premieres on WQED October 29. There’s a lot to learn about the country’s first transcontinental high-

way that twists right through Westmoreland County! Barbara Nakles takes us on a grand tour of Greater Latrobe School District’s special collection of art, assembled over 70 years by countless students and volunteers. Works are on display throughout the senior high school and provide viewers with a unique record of local history and culture. Discover Ligonier’s historic past as we celebrate its 250th anniversary. Devin Winklosky digs up the local origin behind the fa-

mous slogan “Don’t Tread On Me,” while Ohio neighbor Dick Phillips pays a visit with the far-reaching legacy of a man named Arthur St. Clair. Finally, it wouldn’t be a celebration of Ligonier without talking about horses, and lots of them . . . childhood friends, hayrides, and miracles in a corn field. Zach Teich takes the scenic route with a crosscountry bike ride along the Great Allegheny Passage, and Ruth Richardson remembers some forgotten paths. If you’ll recall, The Laurel Mountain Post debuted five years ago in the autumn of 2004. We started out on thin newsprint with a handful of hard-working and faithful friends. Now the Post has a fancy glossy cover on the outside, but on the inside you’ll still find the same stories about your friends and neighbors who take those fascinating roads less traveled right here in Western Pennslvania. We’ve come a very long way up and down a complicated road thanks to the continued sponsorship of our advertisers. Without their financial support and the belief that good news about everyday people is worth sharing, we could not exist in your community. So we thank them and all of you, our readers, for going on this epic journey with us right here at home.

September/October 2008 - 3


REPARTEE FOR TWO Barbara M. Neill

Riding With Rick: We Shall See What Sebak Shall See These days everyone talks about stepping out of the box. Not Pittsburgh’s Rick Sebak. The documentary filmmaker can’t wait to create boxed marvels that hold more than a little of himself. He painstakingly packages perfectlymeasured morsels of local, regional and national flavor. Inside are film bytes of historical and social commentary for everyone to indulge in. The ingredients are as varied as regattas, restaurants, roller coasters and Mr. Rogers, but they always contain sweetly satisfying confections. Opening one of his DVDs is as enjoyable for me as opening a ballotin of truffles is for a chocolate connoisseur and I savor the concluding outtakes as one might that last chunk of candy.

A wit’s wit and a clever wordsmith, his amusing narrations provide no shortage of out-of-the-ordinary details to compliment the welledited footage. With his offbeat eye, narrative knack and blessed assurance Sebak creates programming that reminds of the well-known and educates about the unknown. He even supplies us with a “see the sights” solution that doesn’t include painful trips to the pump – a Sebak staycation. In Sebak’s Pittsburgh History Series, a set of WQED Multimedia “scrapbook documentaries,” everything old in The ‘Burgh seems new again (and oft times even better). As one of the area’s biggest fans and hometown PR men, Sebak has been promoting the city and the region fully and without reser-

Sebak, cameraman Bob Lubomski and Glenn Syska (audio guy/video blogger) set out in June to traverse the Lincoln Highway. Although not wishing to make light of this travel trio, I must admit that the road blog sounded at times like a script for The Three Stooges Do Da Asphalt. In other words – it was fun, chaotic and presages a documentary that promises to be appreciated by lovers of Americana everywhere. Between the filming, editing and exhibiting of his soon-to-be-seen PBS special, A Ride Along the Lincoln Highway (premiering locally on WQED-HD and WQED-TV October 29th at 8:00 pm), Sebak answered the questions posed by this columnist.

********** A true egalitarian, Sebak has a finger on LMP: What makes the pulse of the times Rick “tick” or in film and the people, speak – what’s your whichever era or MacGuffin? whatever topic he showcases. Rather RS: What makes me than having a fixed tick? Good food with point of reference, the good friends in nonproducer seems to chain restaurants. I possess a sort of love discovering a inner “VistaVision.” restaurant that I’ve His gaze equally never been to before, surveys the bridges of being served food our local metropolis that exceeds my and the nation’s first expectations, and transcontinental having some lively highway; his eye fixes conversation to go on subject matter as ACROSS AMERICA ON MOTORBIKES ALONG THE LINCOLN HIGHWAY: These two old friends, with it. I think I make “low” as the Caterpillar Buddy Rosenbaum and Bob Chase, have ridden motorcycles all over the world, but in the all my programs so I ride in Kiddieland at summer of 2008, they decided to cross America on three-wheeled motorbikes called can go places I’ve made by the Italian company Piaggio. Since Buddy lives in New York City and Bob in Ligonier’s Idlewild and MP3s never been before, San Francisco, it made sense to travel the country’s first transcontinental highway, the as soaring as the Lincoln Highway, that originally linked their two hometowns in 1913. (Photo Credit: Rick meet people I’ve never metal rocket ships of Sebak, WQED Pittsburgh) met before and check yesteryear at Pittsout restaurants that burgh’s Kennywood. are new to me. And As a master of the art of vation for 20 years. Never to be my MacGuffin? That’s a Hitchcock encapsulation, he presents the big accused of being a “one reel term, isn’t it? And it means the picture in a relatively small wonder,” he turns out television object around which the plot amount of time (60-90 minutes). specials the way Pittsburgh once revolves? Like the statue in the manufactured beer and steel – in Maltese Falcon? I guess the Rick Sebak has a face that simply quantity without sacrificing MacGuffin for my life would be the cannot be imagined without a quality. (It is said that pledge dollars TV set. Or any screen where you smile and with it he brings out the flow fluidly from viewers to coffers can watch my shows. best in even the curmudgeonliest. when Sebak’s shows air during pledge drives.) 4 - September/October 2008

LMP: The more I learn about the travels and tales of the adult Rick Sebak, I get the distinct impression that you had a memorable childhood. Am I supposing correctly? RS: Who didn’t have a memorable childhood? I had a great time growing up in Bethel Park, and my parents always encouraged all four of us kids to think about moving away when we got older. My mom always said she’d like to have places to stay in cities far away. My father wasn’t such an enthusiastic traveler. He liked to get places fast, and he loved getting somewhere in less time than ever before. We never stopped to look at things. We were always trying to get to Pymatuning Lake in less than two hours. And I think now, my mode of stopping everywhere is a rebellion against my dad’s preferred mode of traveling as fast as possible. LMP: Generally, I have found that the youth of America seem to have very little reverence for things historical. Your take? RS: I think you’re right. When you’re young, you don’t care so much about history and preserving the past and all that. But it seems as though we all love well-told stories, and sometimes we overlook aspects of the past that can grab the attention of even young audiences. We can tell the histories of unexpected places and people and things that interest kids, and hope such stories awaken some curiosities, and lead to more interest and searching out more information. I’ve just always thought of kids as the hardest and most demanding audience, and that’s why I love it when kids say they love my “Kennywood Memories” program or any of the other shows we’ve made. LMP: Michael Moore, you ain’t. Your positive approach to filmmaking is heartening in a LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


world filled with negativity and cynicism. Comment?

celluloid diet” one of your cinematic secrets?

RS: Well, thanks, I guess. (I wouldn’t mind having some of the money that Michael Moore must have made by now.) But I generally think of my shows as celebrations, not investigations or diatribes. I like to point out things that I think are often ignored or taken for granted, and I’ve learned to enjoy especially showing things that are still here. Sometimes people will say my shows are “nostalgic,” and that gets to me. I don’t think of myself as a nostalgic sort of guy. I like to point out things, often small family-owned businesses that were or are surviving in a franchised, big-boxed, chain-stored, homogenized world. And I like to celebrate their success. I’m so glad that people seem to enjoy this sort of thing. I think there should be more celebratory television.

RS: There’s always food. And we just want it to be good and tasty. I don’t think there’s ever been any conscious attempt to regulate the fat content of topics. The trick is finding foods (or any sort of topics) that people are passionate about. Hot dogs and ice cream were good because everybody is an expert on those foods, and the markets were wonderful because so many great farmers and gourmands love local markets.

LMP: As a childhood cemetery picnicker and longtime admirer of serene eternal resting places, I truly enjoyed your PBS program, A Cemetery Special. Might I inquire where Rick Sebak is going to be buried? RS: I am supposed to be buried out in Washington County in the same cemetery where all my four grandparents are buried, along with my dad and my brother. But it’s one of those mid-20th century cemeteries where all the markers are flush with the ground, and after working on that program, I think I’d like a real stone monument – maybe carved in the shape of an old console TV. And I love Allegheny Cemetery in Lawrenceville. Who knows? LMP: A number of your films have showcased food products. Have you ever considered “covering” chocolate? RS: Oh, we’ve talked about candy, but never specifically chocolate. Although I love the book Candyfreak by Steven Almond, I’m not a big chocolate fan. Offered the choice between chocolate and vanilla, I’ll usually go with vanilla. LMP: Your hot dog, ice cream, and diner food footage could be used as effective propaganda for the worldwide suspension of saturated fat. Yet, your farmers’ market show segments could not include more heart-healthy fare. Is a “balanced Every Story Begins At Home.

LMP: Technology is a wonderful thing when it works. Your trusty laptop expired not long after you began your Lincoln Highway jaunt. What are your thoughts on our universal reliance on today’s tools of communication? RS: I love learning new technology and new tricks. I’ve had so much fun learning about how to put the blog together, but there is still so much to learn that it’s intimidating. What do I think about “our universal reliance on today’s tools of communication?” I think it’s really scary – and totally wonderful. And I hope I can figure out how to set up a back-up system so losing a hard drive wouldn’t be so traumatic. LMP: It wouldn’t normally occur to me to place the names Rick Sebak and Blanche Dubois in the same sentence. But, you have both been known to depend on “the kindness of strangers.” Are there any notable examples of this benevolence that you would care to share?

LMP: Your recent road blog included this observation: “Pittsburghers are everywhere. And they all seem to have a fondness for the place.” How do you account for this “Transplanted Pittsburgher Phenomenon?” RS: I think it was the collapse of the steel industry and the loss of jobs in western Pennsylvania in the late 70s and 80s that sent Pittsburghers scrambling across the country. People had to find work, but they continued to love this city and this area. And we Americans are just a mobile society, I guess, and some people have passed through Pittsburgh at some point and have fond memories of it. While living here, we don’t always acknowledge it but the Pittsburgh area is a really quirky, interesting, beautiful place

RS: Oh, that’s hard to imagine. I don’t want to select a favorite because there’s too much time and energy invested in them all, and there are always moments that I love in each program. Having said that, I think I’d want to preserve “A Hot Dog Program” or “Sandwiches That You Will Like.” I love all the voices, all the people and their collective energy. LMP: If someone were to create a documentary about Rick Sebak, what would you suggest as a title? (My own suggestion: The Rick Sebak We Thought We Knew But Didn’t Have a Clue.) RS: Hmm. I place great value on titles and think they’re really important. I also know I have a fondness for generic titles that use the indefinite article so that no one can accuse me of trying to make the definitive documentary on any subject. So I guess you could title such a program “A Documentary About Rick Sebak” or “A Documentary About A Documentarian.” I also like conversational titles, so maybe “The Guy Who Made That Kennywood Show.” And I also like “There Will Be Food.” Kevin Conrad, my editor and friend, says he might call it “Mr. Pittsburgh.” (Cliff Curley our tape vault guru calls me that all the time.) Minette Seate, my lunch buddy and colleague, says she would call it “A Documentary About That Guy Who Makes Those Great Shows That Nobody Can Remember The Titles Of.” LMP: From your perspective as a documentarian, do you think history really does repeat itself?

RS: I do depend on the PRODUCER RICK SEBAK ARRIVES AT THE TERMINUS MARKER IN SAN FRANCISCO: When you get to western end of the Lincoln Highway in RS: Yeah, I think history often kindness of strangers. I Lincoln Park in San Francisco, there’s one final concrete marker-post repeats itself in lots of ways, always have to call people and that travelers like to touch or get a photo with, to prove they’ve been many of them unexpected and ask if we can come and invade there. Rick Sebak has stopped there twice while shooting scenes for his new PBS special titled A Ride Along The Lincoln Highway. Read sadly invisible to the people who and interrupt their work, but about his exploits in his production diary in a blog at www.wqed.org. are in the middle of the I try to be as nice as I can. I (Photo Credit: Glenn Syska, WQED Pittsburgh) “replay.” I just hope I don’t generally don’t know anybody repeat myself too often. And I when we start researching a hope I’m not too self-centered in potential topic, but I get to meet to live, and I think sometimes people saying that. many people whose lives have been don’t realize that until they end up touched by the topic. And I rely so in some place like Houston, Texas. ********** much on people saying “Yes” when I call. So I fear bad karma, and I LMP: If all the films in the world When you ride with Rick the new or always want to say “Yes” when people were to be destroyed except for one novel are seen in perspective; the like you ask me for an interview or by each producer, which of your for some time. films to date would you select for continued on page 34 immortality? Why? September/October 2008 - 5


Horse Fever

A Perennially Feminine Condition

724-834-4688 271 Frye Farm Rd. Greensburg, PA 15601

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I have long wondered what the deal is with girls and their horses. Having watched many a Kentucky Derby, Preakness and Belmont Stakes, I certainly realize that horses are beautiful creatures. (But then so are cocker spaniels and cockatoos.) I watch the Triple Crown races more for the pageantry, hats, suspense and blankets of flowers than I do for the actual horseflesh. However, I can recall countless magazine shots and movie scenes over the years featuring a beautiful young woman as she rides, usually bareback, with her tresses and those of her horse flying in the breeze. These “virus of the blood” victims invariably look rapturous and to be envied. Even Dale Evans seemed somehow more alluring and liberated when she was sitting astride Buttermilk singing “Happy Trails.” (Of course, there are obvious reasons that come to mind as causes for this “nightmareish” state, including delirium and prescription drugs.) Given that I am but an equine observer, my opinion concerning this female affliction is virtually valueless. As fate would have it, it so happens that I have a multi-talented niece and “initalsake” who has contracted a very severe case of the saddle sickness in question. The lass with the “brandie”-brown horse named Misty explains that it is extremely difficult to explain the symptoms of her malady in words. On the other hand,

she has managed to put on paper a handpainted representation of the re-occurring image she envisions when the horsey disorder overcomes her. Added to this is a photographic portrait of the young lady and her mount that I recently captured. Well, there you have it straight from the horse’s mouth, so to speak – and the images speak volumes. It is evident that although

Brandie Marie & Misty the Mare; “Horse Fever” (inset)

there seems to be no available cure for the ailment known as “horse fever,” when caught it can transport a perfectly healthy earthbound young female to that celestial firmament beyond all imagining: Feminine Equestrian Heaven! – Story & photo by Barbara Marie Lyons Neill & artwork by Brandie Marie Lyons

It’s Not Just Grandpa’s Music Anymore! Jerry D. Felton, P.T. integrating traditional and alternative physical therapy services

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6 - September/October 2008

Friedens, PA - Join us for the 5th annual Coleman Station Bluegrass Festival. Nestled in the picturesque Allegheny Mountains in Somerset County, the festival will be held on September 12th and 13th, 2008. The natural outdoor amphitheater setting and shaded concert area create a cozy atmosphere to relax and enjoy bluegrass music. Friday’s lineup will feature: the Coal Mountain Ramblers from the Bedford area with a modern take on bluegrass music, Mac Martin & The Dixie Travelers from Pittsburgh, veteran performers with 50 plus years playing bluegrass music. Poverty Hollow from the Somerset area, a fairly new group that offers a bluegrass style on songs like “Yellow River” and “House of the Rising Sun”. The Stevens Family from Berkeley Springs, WV. This group features Mom and Dad and six children who are known for their gospel music and down-home bluegrass. Saturday’s lineup will feature: Blue Shades from western PA with a traditional & contemporary bluegrass style. The

Allegheny Drifters from Pittsburgh who just released a new CD titled “Can’t Wait”, Mountain Therapy, the festival host band, who feature their bluegrass style on songs like “A Better Man” and “Over the Rainbow”. Kayla Clevenger & Lost –N- Lonesome from WV, a very talented young lady who is an up and coming force in the future of bluegrass music. Pine Mountain Railroad an award winning group from Tennessee with great harmonies, great tunes and great pickin’. Also featured on Saturday is the younger generation of the Custer Family. The kids age six and up really enjoy singing bluegrass songs for the audience so you see... “It’s Not Just Grandpa’s Music Anymore!” Friday’s entertainment starts at 4 PM and goes until 10 PM. Saturday is from Noon until 10 PM. Concessions and Vendors on site. Planned childrens activities on Saturday afternoon. More info available at www.bluegrass.org/festival or call Tim or Brenda Custer @ 814-444-8509. Show goes on rain or shine. LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


EARTH TALK Questions and Answers About Our Environment

I am considering solar panels for my roof to provide heat for my hot water and possibly to do more than that. Are there some kinds of solar panels that are better than others? How do I find a knowledgeable installer?

Heather & Bob Kuban Owners

What type of solar energy capture system you put on your home depends on your needs. If you want to go full tilt and generate usable electricity from your home’s rooftop—and even possibly contribute power back to the larger grid—tried and true photovoltaic arrays might be just the ticket. A typical installation involves the panels, which are constructed of many individual silicon-based photovoltaic cells and their support structures, along with an inverter, electrical conduit piping and AC/DC disconnect switches. These systems can cost tens of thousands of dollars to install, and as such may not pencil out for those looking for the cheapest power solution. But the upside is that home-owners with photovoltaic panels on their rooftops can rest assured that as long as the sun shines, they will have power to spare without generating emissions of carbon dioxide and other noxious pollutants.

swimming pool, a much simpler (and less expensive) solar thermal system might be all you need. A basic hot water system usually consists of a solar collector— basically a small metal box with a glass or plastic cover and a black copper or aluminum absorber plate inside—tied into the building’s plumbing and electrical works. According to the industry tracker website Solarbuzz, such solar collectors are usually mounted on rooftops. Professional installers can get your home up and running with a solar thermal system for less than $4,000 in most cases. While the savings in your electric bill may be small, homeowners in it for the long haul will definitely save over time, all the while enjoying the fact that you have lowered your family’s carbon footprint significantly. Homeowners looking to find out more about residential solar systems should be sure to check out the RealGoods Solar Living Sourcebook, a 600+ page renewable energy “bible” now in its 30th edition. The book features the latest nuts-and-bolts information on how to harvest renewable energy in a variety of ways depending on need. And RealGoods also sells much if not all of the equipment needed. Another reason to consider going solar in one fashion or another is tax incentives. According to the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), 17 states now offer homeowners some kind of Some 17 states now offer homeowners tax rebates or incentives for the purchase tax rebate or incentive for the and/or installation of solar power equipment, including rooftop solar collectors purchase and/or installation of for home heating or hot water. Photo by Rob Baxter, courtesy Flickr. solar power equipment of any kind. You can see what if any your Qualified solar installers can usually state offers by logging onto the dsireusa.org advise clients on which specific types of website, where the searchable database is systems will work best given the specific available in its entirety for free. location of a home. U.S. homeowners can find qualified photovoltaic installers via CONTACTS: Solarbuzz, www.solarbuzz.com; FindSolar.com, www.findsolar.com; NABCEP, the website FindSolar.com. And the North www.nabcep.org; RealGoods, www.realgoods.com; American Board of Certified Energy DSIRE, www.dsireusa.org. Practitioners (NABCEP) provides a free GOT AN ENVIRONMENTAL QUESTION? searchable database of its U.S. and Send it to: EarthTalk, c/o E/The Environmental Magazine, P.O. Box 5098, Westport, CT 06881; Canadian members specializing in home submit it at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalk/ solar set-ups. thisweek/, or e-mail: earthtalk@emagazine.com. For less demanding applications, such Read past columns at: www.emagazine.com/ as for heating water for your home or earthtalk/archives.php. Every Story Begins At Home.

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September/October 2008 - 7


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What Did You Do This Summer? “What did you do this summer?” is a great way of the king to his subjects. We also visited a to start a conversation at the beginning of a museum which displayed original wooden plates typical school year. Most people talk about their containing the history of the nation as well as vacations to the beach or typical tourist haunt. the histories of individual families. One couldn’t However, I am sure that Barb Hollick, a 20-year touch the actual plate, but you could touch the veteran teacher from Derry Area Middle School, edges of the plate. So I actually touched spent her time at the most unique vacation thousand year old history.” She also visited a destination—Barb spent fourteen days this July Buddhist temple where she attended a prayer in South Korea. ceremony. Barb said, “Prior to the ceremony, a Barb’s trip was sponsored by the Korean monk will strike a wooden replica of a fish to call Foundation and the Institute of International all creatures from the sea to temple. Then he Education with the purpose of bringing Korean will strike a cloud to call all creatures from the culture into the schools and communities of heavens. Finally, he strikes a bell to call all other countries. Barb said that she traveled to creatures from earth. Believing in reincarnation, Korea for the adventure and to contribute to her the Buddhists do not believe in ‘hell;’ one can knowledge as a life-long redeem him/herself by being a learner. However, she later better person in a new life.” She admitted that she had always said that the site that most stayed at home while her impressed her was the husband and children traveled demilitarized zone located and that she felt that she between North and South deserved to travel now that her Korea. She said, “We did this children are on their own. a few days after the killing of a Barb flew from Pittsburgh South Korean woman visiting a to Seoul, Korea in seventeen North Korean resort area— hours. Her tour guides were which is the only place in North students from Yonsei Korea that South Koreans are University and Goyang Foreign allowed to visit. We were Language High School. During warned by our guide not to point the trip, Barb toured the fingers when we saw North schools and learned that the Korean guards watching us. Korean educational system And we did see about four has a different focus than looking through their binoours. All education is geared culars at us. Also, seeing the towards preparing students guards in the Meeting Room for quality jobs. There are at leaves a vivid picture in my least two types of public head. The guards are darkschools: one caters to those skinned, wearing trench coats interested in the sciences, and black sunglasses. The while the other prepares guides described these guards students to study abroad. All as being the best of the best students learn more than one to be entrusted to guard this language, usually English, critical area.” Chinese, Japanese or She was particularly Spanish. Also, the schools are Barb Hollick (right) was given a guided tour impressed by the South Korean not necessarily uniformly on of the Goyang foreign language school in Korea people whom she described as vacation during the summer by Jackie, one of the students.. quiet-speaking, helpful, and like ours. At one school friendly. Barb said, “As [our district Barb toured, the high school was out of group was] walking through Seoul looking lost, session, but the middle school was still in we had people stop to help us. Many Koreans session. Like in the USA, the students go to speak English. Parents with young children would school five days a week from 8 am to 3 pm. stop to talk and encourage their children to However, they also attend after-school activities practice their English. “ to enhance their education. Barb learned that Barb plans to use her new knowledge to most students stay at school working on their create a unit on South Korea for her sixth grade studies until 11 pm! Teachers are required to social studies students at Derry Area Middle tutor after school at least two days a week. School. She also wants to share her many Parents who can afford it send their children to pictures and souvenirs with her colleagues at boarding school. the middle school. One day, Barb hopes to return Barb also had a chance to tour some of the to South Korea on her own to tour the modern temples and museums of South Korea. She parts of the country and learn more about the visited the Royal Palace Museum at Gyeongpeople. In the meantime, she wants to explore bok Palace and the National Museum in Seoul. new cultures. Barb said, “I have learned that Barb said, “At those sites, we viewed many there are more programs similar to this one for ancient artifacts including a belt worn by a king. educators. I have plans to apply to them also.” The gold belt had symbols of the responsibilities

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A Family-Owned and Operated Provider of Delicious Pennsylvania Table Wines that are sure to please every palate

Lorrie and Scott Hudimac with their cat, Tiger, and dog, Sandy.

Latrobe Dentist Receives Prestigious Fellowship from Academy of General Dentistry The Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) announced July 19 that Scott Hudimac, DDS, of Latrobe, PA, received the prestigious Fellowship Award during the AGD’s Convocation ceremony, a commencement celebration that recognizes AGD member’s commitment to excellence in dental education. In order to receive this award, Dr. Hudimac completed 500 hours of continuing dental education, passed a comprehensive written exam and fulfilled three years of continuing membership with the AGD. As a recipient of this award, Dr. Hudimac has joined an elite group of more than 14,000 members of the dental community who understand that great smiles and good oral health for their patients are the results of going above and beyond basic requirements. The Fellowship Award symbolizes excellence in the dental profession and a commitment to providing exceptional patient care. “Dr. Hudimac’s accomplishment shows his allegiance to the profession and commitment to ensuring his patients receive excellent oral health care,” says AGD President, Paula Jones, DDS, FAGD. “The challenging process of becoming a Fellow exemplifies Dr. Hudimac’s dedication to continuing education and distinguishes him professionally in the dental community.” Dr. Hudimac graduated from West Virginia University School of Dentistry in 1990 and currently practices in Latrobe, PA. Founded in 1952, the AGD is a professional association of more than 35,000 dentists dedicated to staying up-to-date in the profession through continuing education.

638 Turner Drive, Blairsville, PA. 724-459-0132 Hours of Operation: Wednesday - Sunday,11 AM - 7 PM, Closed all Major Holidays Visit our website for more information on upcoming special events! We are now taking orders for holiday gift baskets and custom-labeled wine bottles. Please stop by during business hours or call for information.

We invite you to visit Walnut Hill Winery, make yourself comfortable and enjoy the tasteful atmosphere. Treat yourself to complimentary samplings of our flavorful wines created by Al McClinton, one of the owners.

BACON BROTHERS THE

An Evening with

Colin Mochrie & Brad Sherwood An evening of hilarious improv comedy with the stars of “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” Don’t miss the fun!

Saturday,

Complimentary Tastings Daily Large Groups by Appointment

September 20 8pm Tickets $45, $50 Tons of tricks and many treats! Master illusionist David Caserta has people levitate, disappear and reappear right before your eyes. Mind-blowing magic and comedy with audience participation and costume contest!

Kevin Bacon and brother Michael are lifelong musicians. With countless JLJVDQGÀYHDOEXPVRYHU 11 years, their six-piece rock band will turn heads in its regional premiere.

Thursday,

October 9 7:30pm Tickets $25, $35, $45

rockapella Often imitated, never duplicated. As the undisputed kings of contemporary a cappella music, this unique group takes the genre into the 21st century.

Thursday,

October 30 7pm Adults $20, $25, Children 12 & under $12, $15

Every Story Begins At Home.

Tuesday,

November 18 7:30pm Tickets $20, $25, $30

The Palace Theatre, Greensburg 724-836-8000 • www.thepalacetheatre.org September/October 2008 - 9


On the Road Again

The Latrobe Art Center Trolley Project It’s been a long time since trolleys made their way down the streets of our local communities, but now they are back for a limited engagement! The Latrobe Art Center trolleys will be on display in our neighborhood through the month of September at their sponsor locations. There are still a few available – contact the Art Center (724-537-7011) if you would like to display one and support your community artists.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Glassware • Books • Antiques • Furniture • Collectibles • Art Prints Gem Stones & Minerals • Jewelry • Soy Candles • Baskets • and much more

Be Curious

9. 10. 11. 12.

A Mix of Old & New

Thurs. - Fri. 10 am-5 pm Saturday 9am-1 pm Appointments Available

8.

814-442-5690 501 at North & Diamond Streets Berlin, Pennsylvania 15530

13. 14. 15.

Phone: 724.864.1575 Mobile: 724.640.3803

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10 - September/October 2008

Flyin' Down 30 Trolley - by Regis Patrick - Sponsored by Adelphoi Villiage Bearcat Banana Split Trolley - by Greater Latrobe High School Student - Sponsored by Arthur Warner Co. Eastwood Beer Trolley - by Doreen Currie - Sponsored by Fran & Sue Freedman of Eastwood Beer Distributors Sunflower Trolley - by Glenda Washburn - Sponsored by Christ the Divine Teacher School Commercial Bank Trolley - by Sue Hrubes - Sponsored by Commercial Bank & Trust Cable Car Trolley - by Skye Undferdorfer, Saint Vincent Student - Sponsored by DiSalvo's Train Station Mr. Rogers Trolley - by Anna Shrift, Saint Vincent Student - Sponsored by Drs. Sung, Moss, Kassir, & Ward Carousel Trolley - Artist Abbey Binky, Greater Latrobe High School Student Sponsored by Greater Latrobe School District Winnie Palmer Nature Reserve Trolley - by Carol Steele - Sponsored by Guskiewicz & Associates Red Tulips Trolley - by Sarah Grumbine - Sponsored by Latrobe Art League Neighborhood Trolley - by Kathy Rafferty - Sponsored by Latrobe Country Club Funny Skeletons Trolley - by Saint Vincent Student - Donated by Latrobe Art Center to Latrobe Pattern for cutting out all of our Trolleys Rudy the Cat Trolley - by Gabrielle Nastuck - Sponsored by Loyalhanna Veterinary Clinic Steeler Country I Trolley - by Dolly Lynch - Sponsored by Mahady & Mahady Law Office Mr. Rogers Neighborhood Trolley - by Saint Vincent Student - Sponsored by McFeely Rogers Foundation Tiger Trolley - by Saint Vincent Student - Sponsored by: McFeely Rogers Foundation Susans and Daiseys Trolley - by Sue Hrubes - Sponsored by PAO2 The Janitor Trolley - by Gabrielle Nastuck - Sponsored by Rolling Hills Industry Daiseys and Hydrangeas Trolley - by Sue Hrubes - Sponsored by The Medicane Shoppe Tiger Cubs Trolley - by Ellie Brendlinger - Sponsored by Total Service Inc. Hardware Trolley - by Kathleen Hicks - Sponsored by True Value Hardware Eye in the Sky Trolley - by Mandy Jessel, Saint Vincent Student - Sponsored by Westmoreland Country Community College Steeler Trolley - by Skye Undferdorfer, Saint Vincent College Student - Sponsored by Westmoreland Federal Credit Union Country Road Trolley - by Pat Dickun - Sponsored by Scott & Pam Kroh Rolling Rock #33 Trolley - by Doreen Currie - Sponsored by Jim Mickinak Latrobe Cable Car Trolley - by Br. Daniel, Saint Vincent Monastery - Sponsored by Ronald Raimondo The Hamburger - by Saint Vincent Student - Sponsored by Saint Vincent College Admissions Office Neighborhood Steeler Trolley - by Kathy Rafferty - Sponsored by Saint Vincent Monastery Steeler Country II Trolley - by Dolly Lynch - Sponsored by Saint Vincent Monastery Neighborhood WPNR Trolley - by Kathy Rafferty - Sponsored by Saint Vincent Monastery Fabric Covered Trolley - by Lauren Etling, Seton Hill Student - Sponsored by Seton Hill University Alumni Office Latrobe Trolley - by Bill Hoffmann Jr. - Sponsored by David & Janet Seremet Latrobe's Banana Split Trolley - by Gabrielle Nastuck - Sponsored by Carol Steele to be displayed at Adam's Memorial Library Mr. Rogers Sweaters Trolley - by Lolita George - Sponsored by Arnold Palmer Regional Airport - Gabe Monzo The Faces in Our Neighborhood - by the Laurel Mountain Post - Sponsored by Courtyard by Marriott, Pittsburgh-Greensburg Horses - by Robert Williams & Scott Sinemus - Sponsored by Equine Chic, Ligonier Silver Surfer - by Elizabeth Srsic - Sponsored by Hanna Insurance Agency The Mill - by Henry George - Sponsored by Kattan-Ferretti Insurance

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


Electronics Recycling

The Time Is Ripe! Celebrate local flavor at its peak all week with Local Food Week from the Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture. The kick-off event will take place at the East End Food Co-Op’s Annual Art Harvest Festival, beginning Sunday, September 21 on Meade Street in Pittsburgh. On Wednesday and Thursday, September 23-24, 5th Avenue Place Goes Green! PASA will be working with the Rachel Carson Homestead and other local organizations to share cooking demonstrations with chefs from Whole Foods.

Sample some sumac lemonade on A Wild Edible Walk along the South Side River Trail and identify wild plants which often have many times the nutritional value of even organic food. (Saturday, September 27). Other planned events include brunches, dinners and a special vodka sampling party with vodka made from locally grown potatoes and White Russians using milk from Turner’s Dairy. For complete details and a list of events in your community during Local Food Week, please visit www.buylocalpa.com and click on the Western Pennsylvania region.

Westmoreland Cleanways is pleased to announce that it is now partnering with eLoop llc in Murrysville to collect electronic waste at its popular tire/battery/appliance and scrap metal collections. ELoop collects electronics from communities, businesses and institutions with the expressed intent of either reusing or recycling these materials to assure they do not end up in a landfill or are exported to under-developed countries. Westmoreland Cleanways’ upcoming recycling collection will be held on Saturday, September 13, from 8:30 a.m. to Noon at the Westmoreland Fairgrounds on Greensburg-Mt. Pleasant Road south of Greensburg. Items to be collected include: electronic waste, tires, lead acid batteries, clean scrap metal, freon appliances, cell phones, printer cartridges, household batteries, and CFL bulbs (no tubes). Participating vendors are: eLoop llc, Dan’s Tire, Salandro’s Refuse, and the Appliance Warehouse. A modest fee will be charged for all electronic waste, such as computers and peripherals, CRT monitors, printers, scanners, fax machines, DVD/ VCRs, keyboards/mice/cables, and televisions. Call Westmoreland Cleanways at 724-836-4129 with questions or visit

www.westmorelandcleanways.org for a complete price list. Freon-containing appliances such as refrigerators, freezers, and dehumidifiers will be accepted for a nominal $20 fee. The costs for tire disposal are $1.75 per tire for passenger and light truck tires off-rim and $2.75 per tire for passenger and light truck tires on-rim. The cost for heavy truck/tractor tires will be determined at the collection. Westmoreland Cleanways members receive a discount on electronics and tire disposal. Vehicle batteries, clean scrap metal (no plastic, cloth, or rubber attached), non-freon containing appliances, cell phones, printer cartridges, household batteries and CFLs will be collected at no charge. The Household Hazardous Waste Collection has been RESCHEDULED for SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Westmoreland Fairgrounds. Westmoreland Cleanways offers many opportunities for people to help clean up their environment, such as road adoptions, illegal dump cleanups, recycling opportunities, and educational programs for schools and youth groups. For more information about the upcoming collection, or other Westmoreland Cleanways programs, please call 724-836-4129.

Old Bedford Village Enjoy Autumn’s Advent with OLD BEDFORD VILLAGE! • September – October (Thursday - Sunday Open 9am - 5pm) Special events are a time to create special memories with friends and loved ones. This year enjoy your autumn with Old Bedford Village.

Oct 18-19: Pumpkinfest ‘08

Oct 31 & No v 1: Haunted V illa ge Ev enin gs Nov Villa illag Evenin enings Scare easily? The Village is taken over by ghosts and things that go bump in the night. Haunted houses, hayride and haunted maze all for $8.00! 6pm - 9pm

Our Autumn festival with a pumpkin theme. See the Village decorated for Fall. Filled with activities for the whole family – buggy rides, petting zoo, scarecrow making, face painting, pumpkin painting and carving, magic show and more. Pumpkin pie-eating contest and goodies galore! Adults $10.00, Children 14 and under admitted free. (additional cost may apply to some activities) Open 9am to 5pm Rain or Shine

Oct 4 & 11 11: Murder Mystery Evening There’s been a murder in the Village. You are the detective. Wander the Village interviewing suspects and determine ‘Whodunnit?’ 6pm - 10pm. $8.00 per person

Located along Business Route 220, Bedford, PA -1/2 mile south of PA Turnpike Exit 146 www.OldBedfordVillage.com • 814-623-1156 or 1-800-238-4347

Every Story Begins At Home.

September/October 2008 - 11


TECH TALK Bob Appleby

A Good Snapshot Stops A Moment from Running Away In this issue of Tech Talk I thought I would talk a little about something that is near and dear to me. I have been enjoying taking pictures of family, events and the world around me since I got started with photography in the early 70’s. Today with the ease of use of most digital cameras and the limited expense of taking hundreds or even thousands of pictures we need an easy and safe method to store all of those wonderful memories you have captured. The following products can be fun to setup and work with and provide some added protection to your digital photographs. I am going to focus primarily on photography storage services but there are many other ways that you can safely store and protect your pictures both at home or off site in the internet cloud. There are a lot of services on the internet that give you the ability share your photographs and videos, some are free and some are not. Microsoft has Microsoft Live Spaces where you can upload up to 500 photos per month, create albums to organize your images, download a photo or the entire album (this is the true sharing part), and order prints. As with most of the free sites, the images are stored in a compressed format so you will lose some resolution but they are not bad. I like this product because it integrates very well with some of Microsoft’s other Live Spaces products and allows easy sharing of your pictures in Web Sites and Blog Sites that you might create.

Flickr probably has the best known photo sharing site and has the largest following. It is owned now by Yahoo and provides a large number of addon services. To find out more about Flickr, take the Flickr tour at: http:// www.flickr.com/tour/. Flickr’s albums are called collections and you can organize your pictures and control access to them as well. They also have a service that allows you to print your

12 - September/October 2008

photos on objects, in picture books, calendars and more. There are a lot of sites that have hooks to allow the images to easily be used on them. The Internet is becoming more and more of a social meeting place and Flickr’s features lean more in this direction than some of the other sites.

Google has a photo site as well called Picasa that installs on your computer and then integrates with the online site. Their approach is a little different then Flickr and Microsoft Live Spaces. Picasa’s site tour can be found here: http://picasa.google.com/ features/features-edit.html. Their approach is to provide you with an application on your computer to help you manage your pictures and then push them to their online site. After you install the program it will index all of your pictures on the computer in an easy to use and view format. You can create a slideshow, print your pictures, and share your pictures with others by mailing or publishing them to your Picasa website. This program has many simple photo editing features to crop, straighten, correct redeye and other image enhancements. Be careful that you work on copies of your images because it changes them immediately. It has drag and drop capabilities easily manage your pictures both on your computer and your website. You can create gift CD’s and movies of you pictures as well. A very nice photo application with one drawback, you are limited to 1GB of storage on the Picasa Website. You can purchase more very reasonably. This storage is shared between several different

Google Applications including plain file storage, photos and your email. Upgrades are for 10, 40, 150 and 400GB and are priced per year. https:// www.google.com/accounts/Purchase Storage?hl=en_US, My personal favorite is a site that you pay for. Now you might ask why you would want to pay for site when there are so many choices that are free. It is really quite simple. The site I am talking about is called SmugMug and it is located at http://smugmug.com . The one benefit that you get with this site is that it stores your pictures in their original format (full resolution) with all of their metadata (information that is stored in the picture detailing the camera settings and other data). There are no commercials being played on the site because you are paying for the site. The cost is just $49.95 per year and it gives you all of the capabilities of the other sites with the added benefit of being an off-site storage facility for your digital photographs. Nothing can be more devastating than losing all of your pictures when the drive they are stored on fails and you don’t have a backup. By storing them on this site you will be able to put together a well documented portfolio but also have your pictures backed up on a secure server, off site, on one of the largest storage networks in the world, Amazon’s S3 storage system. I also like the strong and easy to use interface for documenting and categorizing your pictures. It makes it very easy for me to find stock pictures to work with or display on a moment’s notice. Of course many of these features can be found in both Flickr and Picasa but interface (the

look and feel) feels right to me and I am very comfortable using it. An added benefit of this site is their webcart. If you think others may want to purchase your photos, you can upgrade to the pro version and use their webcart feature to promote and sell your pictures on the web to your adoring

public. Maybe someday I can become another Ansel Adams. You may view my gallery at http://bappleby. smugmug.com .

How do you decide which site is best for you? Well one thing to consider is what other applications you are using from any of these companies. As the Web 2.0 applications keep getting better you will probably settle on one company’s products to work with. I am currently using Microsoft’s Live Spaces for my web blogs (both personal and professional) and Microsoft’s OfficeLive for some of our company’s support web pages. (See an example at http://localsupport1.com to see what this looks like.) Many of these products are free (I did upgrade our OfficeLive site to the next level to gain more bandwidth and storage space.) A free program from Microsoft called LiveWriter makes it very handy to make quick formatted blog entries to help you publish your information pages quickly and easily. If you have any questions or comments on the information I have provided, please feel free to contact me at bobstechtalk@comcast.net. I would love to hear from you and if you have any content suggestions or questions on any computer-related subject. Bob has been working in the computer field since 1975 and started Computer Connections with his partner Jude Daigle in 1981 at the beginning of the personal computer revolution. Bob grew up in Ligonier and graduated from Ligonier H.S. in 1972. George Wash-ington University is his college alma mater and he is currently living in the Greensburg area. You can see more tech tips and product reviews in Bob’s Blog pages at http://www.bobstechtalk.com.

(Title Quoted from Eudora Welty)

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


featuring the White Swan Tea Room

60-page Driving Guide for 200 miles of the Lincoln Highway in PA, which includes Roadside Museum insert with locations of the 12 murals, 65 interpretive exhibits, and 22 vintage gas pump reproductions. Send $2.50 check to LHHC, PO Box 582, Ligonier, PA, 15658 or order online at

www.LHHC.org Keep Thinkin Thinkin’ Lincoln! The photo shows Grades 3, 4 and 5 Principal Mrs. Kris Higgs and K, 1 and 2 Principal Mrs. Marty Rovedatti-Jackson anxiously awaiting the beginning of another school year and committing Grandview School to another year of Excellence in the Derry Area School District. Mrs. Higgs holds degrees from the University of Pittsburgh and Indiana University of Pennsylvania. She has certifications as a K-12 Reading Specialist and a K-12 Principal, both from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Her professional experience includes five years as an Elementary Teacher at Saint Joseph School, Derry, PA, seven years as an adjunct faculty member at Saint Vincent College as a Secondary Reading Instruction Instructor, 12 years as a DASD Middle School Teacher as a 7th and 8th grade reading teacher and in 2007 she was appointed the Elementary Principal (Grades 3-5) in the Derry Area School District. Mrs. Rovedatti-Jackson holds degrees from Our Lady of Holy Cross, New Orleans, LA; and Indiana University of Pennsylvania. She has a certification in Early Childhood Education and K-12 Principal Certification. For five years she served in the United States Navy as a Dental Technician and is a Petty Officer Second Class/E-5 and for four years she served with the United States Navy Reserves in the same capacity and the same rank. She served as a day to day substitue teacher in the Greater Latrobe School District for two years and as a long term substitue in the Ligonier Valley School District for three years. In the Derry Area School District she served as a classroom teacher for eight years and as K-5 Math Coach for two years. She also spent 1 year on an internship in the DASD. Both of these young women are a tribute to their profession. They are enthusiastic, love children, are highly qualified educationally and are always seeking new ways to motivate and encourage children and teachers. In the spring the DASD Grandview School PTO sponsored an event called CinemArt. Families and/or students were invited to do a family or group art project, eat lunch and watch a movie. The art project was a mural of the United States. Each family was given a plywood cutout of a state, a research book and materials such as colored sand, corn, beans, crushed shell, etc. with which to work. The students arriving without parents worked on the lettering in the same manner. The 16’x8' mural was recently mounted in a main hallway at Grandview Elementary School. What a great display of parents, students and the school working together for a fun and educational project. Pictured with the finished product are Maureen and Laney Sagan who worked on Rhode Island; Art Instructor, Mr. Brian Sabo; and Jordan Allen who worked on New Mexico.

Every Story Begins At Home.

Ristorante Catering Service Casual Dining Wide variety of dishes! Menu includes chicken, seafood, veal, beef and large dinner salads

181 East Brown Street Blairsville, PA 15717 Phone: (724) 459-7145 www.piecucina.com

Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill Plan Benefit Concert in Greensburg The Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra and guest soloist Mary Gornick will perform in the “Sounds of Charity,” a concert scheduled for Saturday, September 20, at Seton Hill University’s Cecilian Hall (One Seton Hill Drive, Greensburg, PA). This concert will benefit the Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill and their Far East Missions. In many ways, this concert will be a homecoming the Sisters of Charity, the Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra, and Mary Gornick. First, the Sisters of Charity founded Seton Hill University, and the Administration Building once served as the Congregation’s motherhouse. Second, the roots of the Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra pass through Seton Hill University and the Sisters of Charity. According to the Archives of the Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill, the founding of the Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra can be traced back to efforts of Sister Miriam David Volker, SC. While chair of Seton Hill University’s music department in 1969, Sister Miriam David and Dr, David Karp, a fellow faculty member, took the initial steps to plan and launch the orchestra. They were aided in this endeavor by violist Will MacCalla, who recruited the first 50 musicians to perform in the fledgling orchestra. Sister Miriam David also assisted in forming the Women’s Committee and served on the Westmoreland Symphony Board of Directors. In 1975, Sister Miriam David received the Tribune Review’s Cultural Achievement Award for her efforts in founding the organization. Third, Gornick is a 2008 graduate of Seton Hill University where she earned a bachelor of arts in music. Her credentials include participating in the Ezio Pinza Council for American Singers of Opera (EPCASO) in Oderzo, Italy. There she received training in voice, repertoire, and language from some of opera’s most gifted teachers and performers, including Claudia Pinza, Enza Ferrai, Maria Chiara, and Vivica Genaux. In May 2007, Gornick participated in a performance tour of China as a member of the Duquesne University’s Opera Workshop. The group performed operatic scenes at various universities in Beijing, Shanghai, Xi’an, and Qingdao. Gornick also was a member of the prestigious Bach Choir of Pittsburgh during the 2006-2007 season.

Locally, Gornick will be recognized for her performances as a past member and soloist with the Diocesan Choir of Greensburg and her ongoing work as a paid core choir member and soloist at the First Reformed United Church of Christ in Greensburg. Tickets for the event are available by calling the Advancement Office at 724-8360406, ext. 644, or at www.scsh.org through a secure link in the News & Events section. Tickets for the event are $25 each. The evening will begin at 6 p.m. with a reception featuring hot and cold hors d’oeuvres and a silent auction. The concert will begin at 7:15 p.m. and will feature a mix of classical and contemporary selections. The performance of the Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of Kypros Markou, is being underwritten by the event sponsor, Seton Hill University. In addition to a variety of silent auction items that will be available for viewing and bidding the evening of the event, the Sisters of Charity are also offering chances to win a Winter Holiday for two in the Caribbean. This five-day cruise with the Carnival Cruise Lines will run from January 17 through January 22, 2009. First Commonwealth Bank is underwriting the trip package, which includes roundtrip airfare from Pittsburgh to Mobile, AL; 5day, warm, tropical holiday with ports of call at Costa Maya and Cozumel; a fourpiece set of Dockers luggage, and a $250 American Express Gift Card. Tickets are available for $5 by calling 724-836-0406, ext. 644. The winning number will be taken from the 7 p.m. PA three-digit Lottery on Monday, September 29. The Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill is an international, apostolic congregation of women religious. Founded in 1870, the Congregation traces its roots to the first American saint, Elizabeth Ann Seton. Today, the United States Province numbers 244 sisters in active or retired ministry, while 205 sisters serve in the Korean Province. Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill serve in four countries and 10 states in the United States. They work primarily in education, health care, social services, pastoral care, and parish ministry. Programs and activities supported by the Sisters of Charity are respectful of human dignity, protective of human rights, and devoted especially to the poor and oppressed.

September/October 2008 - 13


THE REC ROOM Zachary Teich, C.S.C.S., C.P.T., Advanced C.P.T., Certified Nutrition Consultant, B.S. Biology

Just To Say We Did It! The 2008 Connellsville to Washington D.C. (and back) Bike Trip Via the Great Allegheny Passage and the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Towpath It would be nice to know how many miles I’ve ridden on the Great Allegheny Passage Bike Trail. Now, I know all the various distances between stops on the trail. Now, I have an odometer for my bike. Now, I record all my rides, all the distances, my average heart rate, my time, my average speed. But when I first started riding, I didn’t have, or do, any of those things. It wasn’t even my idea to start riding the trail at all. My Dad first heard about the Passage and started biking it, and I was quickly introduced to something that I had no idea existed. I had always just ridden my bike on roads, never thinking that there was a safer, and very beautiful and scenic alternative. I started riding the Great Allegheny Passage in 2000 with my Dad and my family. Although my riding was sporadic at first, I became more consistent as time went on, and always looked forward to the next opportunity to make a trip. Dad and I always ride from Connellsville to Ohiopyle and beyond. At the southern trailhead in Connellsville, there is a sign giving the mileage to Washington, D.C. 279 miles, it says! I think it was seeing this sign that first made us think, or at least made my Dad think. Whatever the case though, last year the talks about his thoughts became serious. He wanted to make a trip, on bike, to Washington, D.C. and back. I can’t remember my initial thoughts about this, but last year, as I spent more and more time on the trail, the desire grew in me to do the trip. I really wanted to try it. Dad and I began to discuss it seriously last summer, and decided for sure that we were going to make the trip in the summer of 2008. We began to research the trail, the trip, and everything involved in it. We made a ride back from Cumberland, MD last year with little difficulty, and from then we knew that we could do the DC trip. In January we picked the week we would ride. In April we made our hotel reservations. We began to purchase things we would use for the trip. We trained as much as we both could. We were ready. Finally, June 15th was here! My Mom dropped the two of us off at Connellsville and we set out. Our plan was to ride to Cumberland that day, then to Shepherdstown, WV the next, and then to make it to Washington, D.C. on the third day. There we would take an off day to see some of the sights. After the off day, we would start back, riding first to Williamsport, MD, then to Cumberland again the following day, and finally the last day would lead us back to Connellsville. So we rode, on and on, through forests and mountain gorges, through fields and small towns, over bridges and mostly along rivers. The trail on the first day was familiar to us, but we weren’t left without surprises. Near the Big Savage Tunnel, in eastern Somerset County, we think we saw a young mountain lion on the trail! The weather was beautiful that entire day, and before we descended into Frostburg and Cumberland, we stopped at the

14 - September/October 2008

Big Savage overlook for a spectacular view. From there, it was downhill quickly into Cumberland. The next day brought us to the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Towpath, which follows the Potomac River all the way to Washington, D.C. The canal was always present on our left, whether full of water or empty, but the surrounding land brought us new sights and experiences: the Paw Paw Tunnel, the canal locks and lockkeeper homes, the forests and fields of western Maryland, and the Potomac River. We also took the Western Maryland Rail Trail on this day for 22 miles, which gave us a chance to ride on a paved trail and take a break from all the mud

holes on the Towpath. We got rained on that day, got lost once but quickly found the trail again, took a detour on roads, and ended up getting completely filthy and wet on the last leg of the ride. This did get me frustrated, but riding up to Shepherdstown, WV, and pulling into a carwash and knowing that we had ridden 113 miles that day was an amazing feeling. The frustration at the bad trail conditions was gone. The third day brought us closer and closer to Washington, and through more beautiful scenery. Although the trail was still wet and muddy in many locations, our determination to reach Washington led us on. We passed Harpers Ferry, WV, and the beautiful stretch of river and surrounding hills there. We rode past Brunswick, MD, the Kayak training center in a power plant’s outflow, past White’s Ferry, through more bad sections of the trail, and finally to Great Falls Park. After viewing the rapids and falls, we continued on. We passed underneath the Beltway and headed into Georgetown. There we almost collided with a jogger, who turned out to be John Edwards! We got lost briefly again, and once more, but finally made it to Mile Marker 0 of the Towpath! We had bike all the way to Washington, D.C.! The off day down there was very nice. We met my brother, who lives in Maryland, on the National Mall, and spent some good time together. We saw the Lincoln Memorial, the World War II Memorial, and toured the Air and Space Museum. Later that afternoon, we said goodbye to my brother and returned to our motel in Arlington, VA. Before we knew it we

were waking up to another day – Day 4 of riding for us – and headed down through Arlington and back to the Towpath. Now it was time to get home. The journey always seems faster on the way back, but the experiences this time were no less wonderful. The trail was in much better condition on our return, and on and on we rode. We saw a fox at one point, we met more and more people, we enjoyed the beauty of the land and river around us. We passed by all the sights we had already seen, took the road detour again, and finally arrived in Williamsport, MD after 100 miles that day. We were tired then and got to bed early, but no sooner had we done this than the alarm was going off. Day 5 had begun. It was only 10 or so miles on the Towpath before we hit the Western Maryland Rail Trail again. On the western half of this, along a large cliff, we saw a Bald Eagle take off and fly out towards the Potomac! Back on the Towpath again, we dodged more puddles and mud holes. Again we went through the Paw Paw Tunnel. And finally we came into Cumberland for the second time. We now only had one more day of riding to go. The morning of Day 6 was very foggy and very quiet. We began our climb out of Cumberland to Frostburg. The fog began to lift as the morning wore on. Finally we came to Frostburg, and then to the Mason-Dixon Line, and once again to the Big Savage Tunnel and overlook. We stopped there once more to admire the magnificent view and the mountain that we had just ascended, and then passed through the tunnel. A few miles later we were at the Continental Divide. From there, the trail gradually descends about 1400 feet to Connellsville. With the slight downhill grade, we made excellent time. The day was wonderful, and being close to accomplishing our goal felt even better. We reached Ohiopyle around 1:30, and Dad called Mom to let her know to be in Connellsville around 3pm. The most familiar section of the trail to us was now the final leg of our journey. We passed all the sights we knew so well, and finally, around 3pm we made the last downhill ride to the southern trailhead in Connellsville! We had done it! I had recorded all the data from our trip, but it really didn’t matter then. I’ll never be able to go back and figure out all the miles I’ve ridden on the trail before I started recording them. And looking back on the trip that Dad and I made, the numbers won’t mean a thing. What matters is the wonderful time – the wonderful journey – that we had. This trip is something that my Dad and I will always look back on, and something that we know we want to do again. For 549 miles we rode, sometimes struggling and getting frustrated, but mostly smiling and content with the world around us, enjoying the beauty of the trip, and the fact that we were so blessed to make it. We met a lot of nice people, saw many beautiful sights, caught glimpses of wildlife continued on top of next page

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


Trip Notes & Tips • Train by increasing your distances gradually, and doing just a small percentage of training near or at anaerobic levels. • Give yourself plenty of time to get to your destination. • Eat! Don’t think you’re going to lose a lot of weight on this trip, or don’t try to anyway! Remember, you are constantly moving and working your legs, even at low intensities. If you’re trying to cut calories and lose weight, you are going to end up losing muscle too. This point was reinforced by how good I felt on the way back. My muscles were adapting and getting stronger as we went along, not the other way around! This is because I ate, a lot! • Be prepared for anything, including flat tires, bugs, wildlife, rain, poor trail conditions, soreness, etc. On that note, get some heavy duty inner tubes for your tires, especially the rear one. We had no flats with the heavy duty tubes. The flat on my Dad’s bike occurred with a regular tube. • Find a way to keep your camera protected, yet very easily and quickly reached. Had it not been in my tow, I could have had it out in a flash and potentially gotten a picture of the possible mountain lion, the Bald eagle, the fox, or the mink. Those, especially the possible mountain lion, would have been really nice! On that note, if someone living up by the Big Savage Tunnel has a 3-4 foot long and tan colored house cat, please let me know, otherwise we’re calling it a young mountain lion! • If a former presidential candidate is running on the wrong side of the Towpath, please move over to the opposite side and avoid a collision.

that we’d never seen before, took in some familiar and some new places, traveled through part of our nation’s history, became stronger and more fit, and accomplished our goal. Leading up to the trip, my Dad was often asked his reason for wanting to bike to Washington D.C. and back. “Just to say we did it,” was his response. But he knows how much more it is than that. And there’s only one way to truly find out just how much that is! Zach Teich is the owner of Fitness To You Personal Training. He wants to help people enjoy the kind of life that he is able to enjoy by being healthy, feeling good, and being full of energy. Learn more about Zach and read his complete Trip Journal at www.FitnessToYouTraining.com

Every Story Begins At Home.

Specialty Gift Items and Home Decor 745 Lloyd Avenue Extention (Behind Auto Zone)

724-537-5283

Tues-Sat 10AM-6PM, Closed Sun & Mon

Gift Certificates Available

Visit us in our new location! Framed Art Heirloom Dolls Soy Candles & Warmers Kites, Spinners & Flags Gund Bears We have a year-round Christmas Room!

Why Not Learn to Use A Computer This Fall?

Fabian to Receive the Harvey Award The Board of Directors of the James M. Stewart Museum Foundation are pleased to announce that in continuation of the special celebrations of the Centennial of the birth of Jimmy Stewart, the Museum will present a Harvey Award to Fabian, the singing and acting star of the late 50’s and early 60’s. Fabiano Anthony Forte was born in Philadelphia in 1943. At 15 he was named “The most promising Male Vocalist of 1958.” Fabian released a series of hit singles including “I’m a Man”, “Hound Dog Man”, “Turn Me Loose”, and his biggest hit “Tiger.” Fabian went on to appear in more than 30 films including “Five Weeks in a Balloon” , “ High Time”, “North to Alaska” , “ The Longest Day” , and “Ride the Wild Surf.” Mr. Forte appeared in two films with Jimmy Stewart: “Dear Brigette” and “Mr. Hobbs takes a Vacation” Recently, he has been appearing with Frankie Avalon and Bobby Rydell performing as The Golden Boys. Carson Greene, President of the Museum stated “The museum is certainly honored to have Fabian take time from his busy schedule to receive the Harvey”. “ Fabian treasures the

D’s Windy Cottage

time he spent with Stewart, sharing the fact that Mr. Stewart always took time to help him feel comfortable on the set and would offer suggestions to the young actor.” Fabian is married to former Miss Pennsylvania, Andrea Patrick. Fabian and his wife are actively involved with the American Diabetes Association and the American Heart Association. The Fortes live in southwestern Pennsylvania. Rich Little will serve as host for the event scheduled for 24 October 2008 at the Chestnut Ridge Resort in Blairsville. Attendance is by reservation only. Ticket prices are $85, for dinner and the public reception beginning at 6pm. Tickets including a private reception beginning at 5pm in the Crystal Room are $125. Corporate Sponsor Tables are available. Call the Museum for reservations and information: 724349-6112.

Adult Beginner Computer Classes will be taught at Latrobe Senior Center beginning Wednesday Sept 3 and Thursday Sept 4 starting at 9:00 to 11:00 am. Monday evening classes will also be taught beginning Sept 8 starting at 7:00 to 9:00 pm. Classes at Adams Memorial and Unity Township Libraries will begin on Friday Sept 5 starting at 9:00 to 11:00 am. A prepaid $20 seat reservation donation (non-refundable) is required to guarantee a seat in the class. Scholarships are available if needed and a free computer will be given to any student who needs one. These classes are sponsored by Senior Computer Associates through (LAPA) Laurel Area Partnership of Aging. You can sign up at the above locations or call 724 539-9288 for more information and to sign up.

PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE JIMMY STEWART MUSEUM www.jimmy.org

September/October 2008 - 15


“Don’t Tread On Me”

The Local Origin of the Rattlesnake Flag by Devin A. Winklosky

History can be an elusive subject. If you are like me, then your study of history is probably limited to contemporary books and movies, some historical tours, and perhaps an occasional class. We would love to learn more because we’re interested or excited about what history can reveal to us; unfortunately, we often lack the time or patience. Fortunately, one of the wonderful things about history is that it sometimes shows up when you least expect it. For instance, a while ago I started noticing an increasing number of snakes – Timber Rattlesnakes to be specific. I would regularly see them only a few feet away and always poised to strike. Rattlesnakes are ugly and intimidating and they demand attention. Unless you’re a snake charmer or a mongoose, close proximity to rattlesnakes is normally a bad thing. Additionally, these snakes weren’t in the woods or at a zoo. I saw them on the highways, in parking lots, even in driveways. These coiled rattle-snakes looked fierce and deadly, but they were also accompanied by a written warning: “Don’t Tread On Me.” O.K. No problem. Needless verbiage. Fortunately, the snakes I encountered were pressed flat and stuck against windows as twodimensional decals. The decals depicted a popular Revolutionary War flag known as Gadsden’s Flag: a dark brown rattlesnake centered in a bright yellow rectangle with the bold command “Don’t Tread On Me” along the bottom. It’s an odd image that is difficult to miss. The Gadsden Flag has shown up on tshirts, sweatshirts, hats, mugs, pins, and even license plates. I was curious where such a powerful, popular, and enduring symbol originated. So, I started some research. My curiosity led me back home to Westmoreland County. Well, first it led me to the internet, then to the library, then to some books, and then to Westmoreland County. Ultimately, I discovered that this was not a 16 - September/October 2008

new trend at all. Pennsylvania has a special place in American history, particularly Revolutionary War history. Not surprisingly, numerous treasures of the Revolution come from Westmore-

land County. One of the greatest is the Rattlesnake Flag of John Proctor’s Independent Battalion of Westmoreland County. First, some background: On April 6th, 1773, an English court in Hanna’s Town split Bedford County almost in half and formally established Westmoreland County. Prior to the split, the original Bedford County was gigantic and, not surprisingly, the resulting Westmoreland County encom-passed all of Southwestern Pennsylvania. Westmoreland was the first county located entirely west of the Allegheny Mountains – the colony’s far western frontier and remote backcountry. I imagine the first county residents carrying tomahawks and long rifles and wearing buckskin leggings and brown hunting shirts. They were strongly independent and hearty people who jealously guarded their liberty. Soon after Westmoreland County’s formation, the American Revolution began. The Revolution had urban origins – Philadelphia and Boston were epicenters of unrest – though news of the turmoil travelled slowly to the western frontier. Paul Revere made his famous ride on April 18th, 1775, but the news of Lexington and Concord didn’t reach Westmoreland County until mid-May. When the news

finally reached the county, the residents viewed the British actions as a serious threat and the ensuing conflict as a struggle to preserve their precious liberty. On May 16th, 1775, they resolved to resist the tyranny of the British Parliament yet remain loyal to King George III since they were, after all, still English subjects (remember, this was before we declared independence). Importantly, they also agreed to form a military organization to help fight the British. Pennsylvania’s Quaker influence precluded the formation of a formal active militia; therefore, they agreed to form a battalion of Associators – a military unit voluntarily funded and manned by groups of men from neigboring townships. This unit became the Independent Battalion of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, commanded by Colonel John Proctor. What does this have to do with rattlesnakes and flags? Well, let’s review what we have so far: Tyrannical English government? Check. Upset colonists from the backcountry who think their liberty is threatened? Check. A newly formed military unit? Check. Appropriately ranked commander? Check. Cool and inspiring unit flag? Um, well, not yet. For centuries, military units world-wide have adopted unit colors that reflect rich symbolism and strict tradition; Colonel Proctor’s battalion was no different. The battalion’s flag was sewed and embroidered by Elizabeth Craig, the 18 year-old daughter of Samuel Craig, Senior, the unit color-bearer. Miss Craig followed precisely the British regulations for regimental colors. The flag measured an impressive six feet four inches broad by five feet ten inches high. It was made of heavy watered crimson silk and embroidered with gold thread. Since they still considered themselves British subjects, the flag correctly included a small British flag – the Union Jack – in the upper righthand corner. The Battalion’s flag also included one other very unusual

symbol. Instead of a distinguished crest and pithy Latin motto, the center of the crimson field held an imposing brown and black banded rattlesnake with 13 rattles and a 14th rattle just starting to form. The 13 rattles obviously represented the 13 colonies of America. The 14th represented Canada and reflected the early colonial hope that Canada would side with the American cause. The rattlesnake faced the Union Jack and was coiled to strike – indicating the discontent with British rule. The snake was surrounded on the left and right by gold embroidery. Above the snake appeared two lines of goldthreaded monograms: first, “J.P” for John Proctor and then “I.B.W.C.P.” for Independent Battalion Westmoreland County Pennsylvania. Under the snake was a gold scroll with black lettering that read (you guessed it!): “Don’t Tread On Me.” Why a rattlesnake and not some traditional heraldic symbol? The Timber Rattlesnake has a strong association with our area. Today, the Timber Rattlesnake is often found in the rural areas of Westmoreland County; imagine how many there were in the backcountry of 1775. Moreover, like the men of Proctor’s battalion, the rattlesnake is fiercely independent with numerous admirable qualities. Charles G. Edwards, a Kittanning native who has researched and written about our Rattlesnake Flag notes: “In 1775 a study was made of the symbolic use of the rattlesnake, as follows: ‘The rattlesnake’s eye is brighter than that of any other animal and has no eyelids; therefore, ever vigilant, and never begins an attack but when once attacked, never surrenders. The weapons with which nature has furnished her she conceals in the roof of her mouth so that, to those who are not familiar with her, she appears to be a most defenseless animal, and even when those weapons are shown and extended for her defense, they appear weak but their wounds, although small, are fatal. She never attacks until she has given notice and cautions against treading on her.’ This was a strong picture of the temper and conduct of America – vigilant, courageous and ready todefend herself when provoked.” LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


The rattlesnake was the perfect symbol to reflect the attitudes of these backcountry warriors. The flag accompanied the proud Battalion in the battle of Trenton in 1776, as well as the battle of Princeton and the fight at Ash Swamp in Plainfield, New Jersey, in 1777. After the war, Elizabeth Craig’s brother, Alexander, brought the flag home to Westmoreland County. The flag stayed in the Craig family and remained remarkably well preserved. The last Craig descendent to possess the flag was Alexander Craig’s great granddaughter, Jane Maria Craig, of New Alexandria. She died in 1914 and bequeathed the flag to the Commonwealth. The original Rattlesnake Flag of John Proctor’s Independent Battalion of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, is displayed in the William Penn Memorial Museum in Harrisburg. It was designated the official flag of Westmoreland County in 1973, the county’s bicentennial year. As one historical commentator noted, “It is properly one of Westmoreland’s most valuable heritages of the past, and we trust will ever remain with our people, and be preserved for the admiration and patriotic inspiration of generations yet unborn.”

The rattlesnake symbol was popular during the Revolutionary War and there are a number of Revolutionary War era flags that use the rattlesnake. The Gadsden Flag that originally sparked my curiosity was proposed as the naval ensign for the Continental Navy. There are rattlesnake flags from Virginia, South Carolina, and other Pennsylvania military units. Ships of the U.S. Navy still fly a variation of the flag from their jackstaffs today. But the flag of the Independent Battalion of Westmoreland County Pennsylvania – our flag – is special. Special because it is more than a fancy museum flag; it is a tangible link to our forefathers, an enduring symbol of our past, and an indispensible part of our heritage. Although no longer carrying tomahawks or wearing buckskin leggings, residents of Westmoreland County are still hearty, independent, libertyloving people. To me, it is also special because, although histo-rians do not know for certain, historical evidence suggests that Colonel Proctor’s flag was the country’s first rattlesnake flag. I’m convinced that it was. John Proctor died in 1824 and is buried in Unity Cemetery. At a glance, his tombstone reveals what took me weeks to uncover – that, indeed, the Rattlesnake Flag originated in Westmoreland County.

©2005 by Tim Vechter. Used with permission.

Every Story Begins At Home.

“Adopt A Sailor” Sneak Preview to Be Held in Indiana Carson Greene, Jr., President of the Jimmy Stewart Museum announced that a new film, Adopt a Sailor, by writer and director Charles Evered will have a sneak preview at the Jimmy Stewart Museum Theatre for a special benefit performance in support of the museum and in continuation of the Jimmy Stewart Hometown Hero Centennial Celebrations. Greene noted “ The Jimmy Stewart Museum is quite fortunate to host this special presentation of Adopt a Sailor here in Indiana. Again, the Museum has attracted nationally known talent which helps continue the mission of keeping Jimmy Stewart’s legacy alive for future generations. We hope that the public will join us in welcoming our special guests to the Indiana community to preview this film.” Star of the film, Ethan Peck, grandson of the movie great, Gregory Peck, will join writer and director Charles Evered at the Stewart Museum Theatre for a special cocktail reception and screening at 6pm on Saturday November 1, 2008. Evered, who received a MFA from Yale, has written screenplays for Universal Pictures, DreamWorks and Paramount—as well as other studios. He has also written a double episode of the popular USA Network series “Monk,” starring Emmy winner Tony Shalhoub. Mr. Evered’s work has been profiled in the New York Times, BBC World and on NPR. Mr. Evered commented on his film Adopt a Sailor by saying: “Adopt a Sailor came to be from my experience as an officer in the Navy Reserves—as well as my experiences living as a writer in New York City. Writing this film is my effort to remind our country that no matter where you stand politically, we should all remember there are amazing people serving in the armed forces, and we should all show our appreciation to them. “Adopt” is an effort to try and bridge the considerable culture gap that has been widening in our country.” This screening is being made possible by the generosity of the producers of Adopt a Sailor, Kim Waltrip and Michael Marix of Californiabased WonderStar productions. The Special Preview and Reception is by reservation only and is limited to 50 guests. A hors d’oeuvres buffet and cocktail punch is included, a cash bar will be available. Guests will have the opportunity to speak with Mr. Evered and Mr. Peck before and after the screening. Tickets for the event are $50. Per person Please call the Museum for details 724-349-6112.

September/October 2008 - 17


A Unique Vision Of Art The Special Collection of Greater Latrobe School District Her face lit up with excitement, “I collection and the basic concept of addition, the collection was remember that painting; I voted for student choice remains today. photographically documented and it my senior year.” That senior The community quickly joined a security system was installed. year was a half-century ago and the the students’ efforts with the The Trust’s next project in woman was part of an alumni organization of the Latrobe One 1996 was to publish a catalog to group celebrating its 50th reunion Hundred Friends of Art in 1938. introduce the viewer to the by including a tour of the unique That group, far outnumbering the collection. The first edition of A Special Art Collection at Greater original 100, continues today Unique Vision of Art provided a Latrobe Senior High School. Her although the initial $1.00 a year chronological display of the response was not unusual, for the dues is now $25.00. paintings, each in full color and experience of living daily with The collection continued to accompanied by a description of the original art and the sense of grow under the care of the two work and a brief biography of the ownership does not end for Latrobe teachers. After Miss Himler’s death artist. The two thousand copies students upon graduation. and his own retirement, Mr. Beatty that were published are no longer More than 70 years ago, the was concerned about the future of available. These catalogs have Student Council purchased two the works. At his strong suggestion, been used by students; the books original oil paintings, Blossom Time in 1991, the Board of School have visually helped to proclaim by Martha Morgan and Deserted Directors established the Art the mission of the Art Conservation Farm by Clarence McWilliams. Conservation Trust to oversee and Trust; they have been cherished Those works and now nearly by the alumni who share in 200 others line the corridors the ownership of the of the senior high school. The collection and all those whose collection is truly special in generosity made possible the that it is student-selected first publication. and, for the most part, The Trust raises funds for student purchased and is their projects through totally accessible to all contributions of foundations, students every day. In corporations and individual addition, it is one of the donors. The Trust also hosts finest collections of 20th and an Art Gala each year while 21st century regional art on the works under considerpermanent display. ation by the students are on The real story, however, display. The Gala has is about two dedicated become a major community teachers, the thousands of event with more than 400 students who joined with guests enjoying the festthem to create and to ivities. Student docents continue the collection and present the works during a the enthusiastic community program in the auditorium that supported them. During and guests vote in order to the Great Depression of the compare their choices with 1930s, the students of the those of the students. As district could not experience always, works purchased are original art because they selected from the top five couldn’t travel to the student choices. museum in Pittsburgh. High The progress never stops school art teacher Mary because creativity always Martha Himler solved the kindles further vision. problem by borrowing works The next project of the Art from the Associated Artists of Conservation Trust was the Pittsburgh’s annual show most ambitious. In a unique and bringing them to the partnership between the KISS by William DeBernardi is one of a series of paintings in which school. She then discussed Trust and the School District, the artist attempts, as he says, “to present everyday objects in a each of those works during a the Center for Student manner that elevates their importance to an iconic level.” special assembly for the Creativity became part of a entire student body. Social major renovation at the high Studies teacher and Student conserve the collection and to raise school. The Center opened in Council Advisor James R. Beatty, funds to do this. Ned J. Nakles September 2003 and is a model for himself an artist, proposed to the served as the first chairman of the schools everywhere. It is a 4500 Council that students vote for their Trust. The group of members from square foot multi-use facility favorite works and raise the money the community and the school where the faculty and every to buy them. The first two works district raised the money to have student in the school are encournamed above were purchased in each painting professionally aged to incorporate the visual, 1936. That was the beginning of the cleaned, restored and conserved. In performing and written arts into all 18 - September/October 2008

aspects of the academic curriculum. Student productions, projects, concerts, recitals and displays are experienced in the Center. Visiting artists and lecturers are regularly scheduled. Meetings, conferences and social events, both school district and community, take place here. The Art Conservation Trust raised nearly two million dollars for the Center for Student Creativity and related projects. Outside the Center and very much a part of it is a courtyard that can be used for class projects and for other events. For example, a glassblower spent a week as a visiting artist with his furnace set up in the courtyard. The space includes an amphitheater for outdoor performances. Included in the Center Campaign was lighting for the art collection. Nearly a mile of museum-quality lighting was installed in the corridors so that the works may be viewed as they were meant to be seen. Because the first edition of A Unique Vision of Art is no longer available, the Art Conservation Trust has undertaken the publishing of a new catalog. This new edition contains all the works in the original plus the nearly 30 works that have been added to the Special Art Collection since 1996. The works are presented chronologically according to the date of acquisition allowing the viewer to see not only the changing styles of art over the years but also to consider the changing ideas of the students who chose the works. Many, many people have helped to make this new edition possible and they are listed in the IN APPRECIATION pages that appear at the end of this volume. Several exceptional people contributed their valuable talents and gave countless hours to the production of this book. James R. Okonak and Ronald D. McKenzie headed the campaign to raise the necessary funds to publish the catalog. George Fetkovich of Apollo Design Group designed both the first and second editions of A Unique Vision of Art and then guided us through the publication process with unwavering patience. Jessica O. Golden, Director of the Center for Student Creativity, edited copy LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


and supported us at every step. Nicole M. Golden spent long hours checking the smallest details. Special mention must be made of William D. Stavisky, recently retired Superintendent of the Greater Latrobe School District. Dr. Stavisky’s leadership in all aspects of administration and his deep concern for each of his students led to his being named 2006 Pennsylvania Superintendent of the Year. A dedicated member of the Art Conservation Trust, he has been unwavering in his belief in the importance of the creative arts in education. We also recognize the Greater Latrobe Board of School Directors, the administration and the community who have all been important in this undertaking. Finally, there are the students for whom this collection exists: for the woman celebrating her 50th reunion and all those who remember the paintings from their high school days; for those young people who stand and dream before the works today; and for all those students of the future who have yet to experience the wonder of living daily with original art. Long ago, Mary Martha Himler said, “1 am an artist; my job is to make people see.” She did that; James R. Beatty did that; Ned J. Nakles did that. Because of them, because of all those who have loved and supported the Special Art Collection, we can continue to help people “see” in this unique vision of art. – Barbara H. Nakles, 2008

Christ United Church of Christ invites you to attend our annual

Blackburn CenterTea Sunday, September 14

We’ll have food, tea tasting, entertainment, door prizes, and a silent auction. Proceeds benefit the Blackburn Center in Greensburg. All attendees are asked to bring a donation of non-perishable food, paper products, cleaning supplies, personal care products or gift cards to grocery and discount stores. For more information, please call Christ Church at 724-537-4901.

Every Story Begins At Home.

Sustainable Energy Field Day A Homeowner’s How-To: Thursday, October 16 Westmoreland Conservation District, Donohoe Center, and GreenForge buildings, all located adjacent to each other on Donohue Road in Greensburg . . . OPEN HOUSE, 9:00 am - 2:00 pm Come visit a variety of vendors and exhibitors who will be displaying their energy-saving products and services. Tours of the campus’s sustainable buildings will be on-going. Activi-

ties for children are also planned. FREE, no registration required! WORKSHOPS, 2:00 pm - 6:00 pm Experts from various fields will be on hand to give homeowners tips and techniques for saving energy. Topics may include: conducting a home-energy audit . . . the practicality of using alternatives such as wind, hydro, and solar . . . how native plants and care-

ful landscaping can save energy . . . what’s new in insulation, windows and metering your electric use . . . and funding programs that could help with the cost of making energy-conservation changes. Space for workshops is limited and registration is required. Contact Christie at 724-837-5271 ext. 210 or christie@wcdpa.com by October 3. $20, includes lunch. www.wcdpa.com

September/October 2008 - 19


DERRY REMEMBRANCES Ruth Richardson

Forgotten Paths When I was a little girl, exploring my little world, I always took ‘The Road Less Traveled.’ My neighborhood, like most in the 1950’s, was crisscrossed by a myriad of narrow dirt footpaths. Some were intersected along the way with various offshoot paths that could lead you in another direction. Some lead only from point A to point B, with no forks in that little trail. But all were the familiar, yet uncharted map of the tiny communities we called home. Within walking distance of our homes, we knew the ‘short-cut’ to just about anywhere, although sometimes that short-cut was, in reality, the long way around. Even in those days, there was enough traffic on West Fourth Avenue for our moms to make a firm and fast rule: “Stay off the road!” So, the back way was the only way to get where you were going. When I went to visit a friend, or to see my grandma, or to the store, I would always take the ‘off-road’ route. That route usually took us through several back yards and eventually lead to a well-worn path that had

My brother, Keith, wetting a line at O’Donnel’s Pond.

been carved out through the neighborhood. Unlike today’s kids, we were rarely offered the convenience of being driven 20 - September/October 2008

anywhere within a mile or two of home. If we didn’t walk, or as we referred to it, ‘hoof it’, we didn’t go. Besides, my mom usually didn’t have a car at her disposal during the day; Daddy took it to work with him. So we had no choice but to take the ‘shoe leather express.’ Our bikes got us around, too, but I had to push my bike up Fourth Avenue to Ruby Street because I was forbidden to ride it on the highway. Once on the side streets, I was good to go. Those little paths, and my adventures on them, are some of my fondest memories. Upon reflection, it was a wonderfully educational time to explore, to familiarize ourselves with the wonder of nature that was all around us. And we learned, without even realizing it, in our vast outdoor classroom. I remember strolling down a dusty little path on a warm summer afternoon, and taking my time to watch the meandering flight of a Monarch butterfly as she gathered nectar from the wildflowers. I learned that if I was very still, she would ignore my presence and come close enough for me to witness her tongue unfold into a flower to sip the nectar. Those wildflower patches were also a perfect place to observe fat bumblebees, covered with pollen, diligently at work collecting their own nectar from flower to flower. I had learned in Mr. Rupert’s science class at West Derry School (he was one of my favorite teachers and made science so much fun) that the pollination from these bees was essential for the creation of fruit, or to assure next years blossoms would be as spectacular as this years, and I found it fascinating to watch the science lesson in practice. I recall spying a grasshopper, his shades of green camouflaging him perfectly in a thicket. When I got too close, he would suddenly spring from his perch like he was shot from a gun. If I snuck up to a grasshopper and somehow managed to catch him, I would close my fingers gently around him and whisper into my fist, “Spit, spit tobacco juice, or

I’ll grind your bones to mincemeat!” Where this phrase came from, I have no idea, but when I opened my hand, the grasshopper would look at me and spring away, leaving a tiny spot of brown liquid

I never lost my anticipation of finding a dragon, or an undiscovered tribe of Indians deep in those forests. The Indian part of the story wasn’t really so far fetched because it wasn’t unheard of for us to find arrowheads

Keith and me and one of our “non” mountain bikes.

on my palm, just like he really had been chewing tobacco! I remember stopping to watch an anthill take shape, one grain of dirt at a time. If my brother and his friends were nearby, that anthill would be flattened rather quickly, only to be meticulously rebuilt several hours later. I also recall the occasional ancient maple tree, its low-slung branches shading a portion of the way with dappled sunlight. I would jump as high as I could, just to see how big a handful of leaves I could grab before landing back on my well-worn Keds. Some of the paths we used had originally started out as narrow dirt roads, trailing toward some long forgotten destination. Gradually one of the lanes would become overgrown and all that remained was a single footpath. The lane had evolved, and now would take its travelers in a different direction. Sometimes those trails would wind though a field of high grass and wildflowers, and sometimes they would wend their way mysteriously into a patch of woods. I always liked to imagine the woods near my house were enchanted forests, and

while playing outside, or at least rocks that we could pretend were arrowheads. I always thought of the forests in West Derry as shadowy and enigmatic, and the exploration of them was magical for me. My friends and I could also traverse a great many of these paths on our bikes. Sometimes the terrain would get a little steep or rocky, and we knew exactly which trails to avoid while traveling by bike. If there was a shortcut that was bicycle friendly, we knew about it. We didn’t have mountain bikes back then. I guess any bicycle could have been considered a mountain bike, if you had enough guts to try it, and didn’t care about the damage to your lovely, fat, white-walled tires. There was a little fishing hole part way up the ridge, just off Ruby Street called O’Donnell’s Pond. It had a lovely trailing path all around it, and the neighborhood kids would take their poles and worms and try their luck in the murky water. You could also find buckets full of blackberries on that path, or take a mid-summer dip if you didn’t mind being knee deep in mud. LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


My husband, Doug, tells me his neighborhood of Goosetown, (near the Derry Pool) had lots of paths, too. There were paths leading to the ball field behind Pryce’s machine shop, paths all along the railroad tracks, and others hugging the banks of the mighty Magee’s Run. His favorite was the path that went around Ethel Springs Lake. This is where he and lots of other kids in town would spend countless languid hours every summer. Today it is a manicured walking and jogging path, but back then, it was a childhood wilderness wonderland. The fishing was always terrific, but there were many other activities to entice a young adventurous spirit. There were crayfish to catch in the creek (or as we called it, crick) beside the lake, and turtles, too. You could set a trap-line for the muskrats, mink, and weasels that called the lake home, and even make a nice little profit by selling those pelts to a furrier. You could spend an entire afternoon trying to identify all the species of waterfowl. It was also the perfect spot to perfect your slingshot aim, to take a refreshing dip, or just to daydream the afternoon away. In winter, most of our paths were drifted shut with snow, and forgotten. All except the one that lead to West Derry School. It was packed down and used all winter, since we all walked to school every day. Each year, the spring thaw

was heralded by the Johnny jumpups and crab apple blossoms that returned to decorate those little hidden walkways, reminding us where they were and enticing us to rediscover them. With the help of the warm spring breeze, the blossoms seemed to wave to us, coaxing us to come closer, and renew our old friendship. Our summers were spent safely traversing the neighborhood, always on the familiar and friendly little trails we knew so well. And in the fall, the trees would send a multi-hued cascade of leaves drifting to the ground, carpeting those paths with the vibrant shades of autumn we knew would quickly fade, just like the memories of those blissful days from long ago have faded. During the ‘hurry-up’ and bustle of our daily lives maybe we should listen to that little voice that sometimes whispers in our ear. The one that beckons us to get off the freeway we have allowed our lives to become. Maybe, just for an afternoon, we should slow down, take the ‘short-cut’ that is really the longer route on a well-worn and familiar little path. Life can speed by so quickly, as we scurry from one place to the next. Sometimes the most magical and worthwhile things are found in the slow lane, down a little path, on that road less traveled.

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1958 – Doug – Getting ready for a day’s adventure at Ethel Springs Lake.

Every Story Begins At Home.

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SHOPS AROUND THE CORNER Getting To Know Unique Local Businesses and the People Behind Them

Shootin’ the Breeze at D’s Reuben II, 2001 Mixed media on canvas, 38 1/2" x 48" Courtesy of the artist The Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art at Ligonier Valley is pleased to announce the opening of its latest exhibition, Joan Coate Milsom: Breaking Free. On view September 13 through November 23, the exhibition features 55 oil and watercolor paintings by the Pittsburgh artist. A true abstract expressionist, Joan Coate Milsom is an action painter who finds the realistic representation of subjects to be less important than conveying the feelings they elicit or the aesthetic experience they provide. The fresh, spontaneous quality of her work lends an impressive richness and variety to her catalogue, as well as reflects her independent, restless nature. Utilizing all the elements of her highly refined and personal style, Milsom paints with an explosive energy using vibrant colors and a wide range of tone and texture. With a flair for the dramatic, she channels her emotions into a rich color palette for a powerful and compelling visual impact. The works in this exhibition are a testament to the great range and depth of the artist’s vision, her immense talent, and the technical skills she has mastered over the course of her distinguished, awardwinning career. Originally from Toledo, Ohio, Milsom received a B.FA from Wittenberg University in Springfield, Ohio, and has pursued graduate studies at Chicago Art Academy and Carnegie Mellon University. Her work has been featured extensively in solo exhibitions throughout Pennsylvania and Ohio. Her paintings are included in numerous public, private and corporate collections throughout the world. To celebrate the exhibition, the Museum will host an opening reception with the artist from 7 to 9 p.m. on Saturday, September 13. The reception is open to the public free of charge, though reservations are required by September 10 by calling the Museum at (724) 238-6015. Milsom also will speak at a Lunch a l?Art program at the Museum on Thursday, September 18. Cost for the program, which includes lunch and lecture, is $13 or $12 for SAMA members. Reservations are required by September 15. The Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art at Ligonier Valley is located at One Boucher Lane and Route 711 South in Ligonier. Hours of operation are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. The Museum is a handicapped-accessible facility, and is open to the public free of charge. For more information, please call the Museum or visit www.sama-art.org.

22 - September/October 2008

I have rethought my position on “Welcome” signs. In the past I was somewhat leery of homes or businesses with an abundance of these symbols of salutation. Alphabetic invitations into one’s home or establishment have been around for centuries in most cultures, but “Willkommen” overkill became noticeable in the US in the 1980s with the “country store” and PA Dutch crazes. Greeting signs are available in many mediums (e.g. wood, metal, resin, acrylic, etc.) and their trimmings range from American Primitive stark to high-Victorian fussy. (I knew I was in the wrong retail outlet when I once encountered a welcoming plaque constructed of wood, noodles, pheasant feathers and sequins. There simply is no accounting for taste.) “Welcomes” of all sorts can be purchased in person, by phone and online in myriad venues. However, none are as welcoming to me as those found at D’s Windy Cottage – 745 Lloyd Avenue Extension in Latrobe. Dolores “Dee” Barnhart is a Derry Area graduate and resident. She had a 25-year career as a nursing professional with Latrobe Area Hospital (now Excela Health Latrobe Hospital) – 9 in Homecare Hospice and 16 in the ER. After her

retirement Dee and husband Larry decided to take the plunge into retail sales. Opening in a Route 981 location in December of 2006, D’s Windy Cottage offered a unique combination of items. The business moved in the summer of 2008 to 745 Lloyd Avenue Extension and still provides the customer with the same great choices, but with far more room to accommodate and invitingly display them. An added plus in these inflated economic times – the prices here won’t blow you away! Aside from the aforementioned signs, D’s Windy Cottage offers the kites, flags and spinners implied by the shop name. Housed in a spacious gallery that looks as if it could shelter The Spirit of St. Louis, patrons can find dozens of colorful, whimsical and often seasonally-themed “windy” choices. For the children or child-minded among us, D’s stocks Gund bears, porcelain dolls and hand-crafted wooden toys from Defiance, OH. Candles and warmers are popular with soy candles from Latrobe’s Scents by Stacey a customer favorite. There are several brands of soaps and lotions with which to pamper your gift recipients or yourself. (May I recommend the White Tea and Ginger selections?) About a mile as the crow flies from the Pittsburgh Steelers training camp at Saint Vincent College, the team is well-represented in merchandise. The highlight for any winter holiday lover is the Christmas Room, as festive in July as it is in December. Complete with a stuffed Reindeer-topped mantel and trimmed tree, the area is filled with snowmen, angels, plush creatures and ornaments to lure the “Grinchiest” of shoppers. A wide-ranging assortment of framed art prints is available and a new line of cards is being considered for future sales. (D’s also offers shipping options for your convenience.) Dee could be the poster girl for “Every Day is a Gift,” another of the signs that hang in her establishment. Although both she and her husband have endured

various major and minor surgeries and health issues are a daily concern, the proprietor is never without her sunny smile for shoppers. And her customers can’t help but smile back. The chairs in D’s are not there by accident, because you just can’t help sitting and talking – before, during or after your shopping experience. (I have

per-sonally whiled away untold minutes during the past year “talking shop.”) “We have a lot of conversation here and everyone has been so supportive. I’ve met wonderful people and found that it is a small world,” explains Ms. Barnhart. Community-minded, D’s Windy Cottage has supported Greater Latrobe High School Band, Western PA Fireman’s Association, PA State Police and donated items for a number of area functions and events. The newly relocated store isn’t drifting away any time soon. Dee Barnhart says, “I hope to stay in this location for a long time, expand our product line when we can and keep on meeting awesome people.” Stop, shop and “shoot the breeze” at D’s Windy Cottage soon. You’re always welcome there and you may find just the breath of fresh air you’re looking for! To find out more about D’s Windy Cottage call 724537-5283. – Story and photos by Barbara M. Neill

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


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Fall Is the Time to Prepare for Old Man Winter by Brian Mishler

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Every Story Begins At Home.

This time of year as we prepare for school, often the last thing folks want to think about is the cold, snow and slop of winter. However, by making use of these days, we can make winter chores easier and our homes more comfortable. While many have the best intentions of getting work done around the house, often grand plans are laid to waste by lack of funds, time and procrastination. Yes, there are times when it’s best to perform certain chores, but doing them anytime is better than not doing them at all. So, here are some inexpensive ideas the average homeowner can do to make winter living a little easier and more comfortable: • Edge and clear your sidewalks How can this help? Clearing weeds and other debris from the cracks in your sidewalk, and giving the walk a clean edge will make “plowing” the walk much easier. When shoveling, it’s best to push the snow like a plow rather than lift it. By weeding and edging the shovel will glide over the surface more easily without snags. And remember, if you have concrete sidewalks, don’t use rock salt; use calcium chloride. Besides killing your grass, rock salt can damage concrete. If you have sidewalk segments that have heaved or sunken more than ¾ of an inch, consider getting them replaced, or at the least marking the transition joint with bright paint so passersby won’t trip. • Clean and clear gutters and downspouts One of the most common homeowner complaints any time of year is water in the basement. Most often caused by roof water, clogged gutters and downspouts are the most frequent culprits. During a 1 inch rainfall, a 2000 square foot roof can generate 6,000 gallons of water! If it isn’t directed away from the building, the path of least resistance is into the basement. Cleaning your gutters after the leaves have fallen is ideal; but by then the kids are in school, sports are in full swing . . . poorly timed maintenance is better than none. If you’re not comfortable with heights, hire a company to clean your gutters, and make sure water is run down the downspouts to make sure they are running away from the house, preferably to “daylight”. If you own a home over 40 years old, having a video scan of the underground pipes is a good idea to make sure they’re not leaking next to your foundation. • Exterior maintenance While it’s still warm, now is the time to check your windows, doors and any other openings to make sure that the caulking and sealing is intact, and without cracks. If you find deteriorated caulking or sealants, first remove the old, before re-sealing. If you can’t see your windows for the vegetation, now is a great time to start trimming those bushes!! Ideally, there should be at least

12 inches of clear space between the exterior house wall and any tree or bush limbs. This allows air circulation and will allow the house walls to dry. The bushes should also be trimmed small enough so a burglar cannot use them to hide behind. Tree limbs should be trimmed so they’re not above the roof, lest the snow weight bring them down on the house. • HVAC Maintenance Usually at this time of year, folks have had their air conditioners serviced or installed, and few are thinking about heating season yet. Often the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) service companies struggle to fill their schedules and keep their technicians busy. Having your furnace or heating system serviced in August or September beats the winter rush of work, and prepares your system to run efficiently and can help avoid Murphy’s Law that states: “Heating systems shall break down on a holiday while the house is full of guests!” As you may have noticed, fuel bills, electricity, food and most everything we use is becoming more expensive rapidly. Having a home energy audit performed can give you more tips and recommendations to improve the overall efficiency of your home, lower your bills and make the house more comfortable; eliminating those pesky drafts. Find a professional home energy auditor at: www.pahomeenergy.com. You can also find more do it yourself home energy conservation tips online from the department of energy at: http://hes.lbl.gov. • Clean your dryer vent One of the simplest and most overlooked tasks is cleaning the dryer vent. Ideally, the dryer should be partially disassembled and the entire apparatus cleaned. However, simply removing the dryer vent pipe, taking it outside and brushing it can do wonders. A dirty dryer vent not only can reduce the efficiency of the dryer, it is one of the leading causes of residential fires! If you have one of those old plastic expandable dryer vents replace it with a new metal type. If your dryer doesn’t vent to the exterior, now is a good time to get a vent installed; the moisture a dryer discharges can contribute to all kinds of indoor air quality problems, including mold. As with any repair; if you’re not certain how to perform a task or are uncomfortable working in a given environment, hire a professional. The cost of maintaining a home will always be less than that of renovating it, and hiring a professional from the start will always be less (costly and embarrassing!) than hiring one to repair your mistakes!! Plus, the emergency room is not a fun, or cheap place to spend your day; be careful! Brian Mishler of HomeStudy Professional Home Inspection has enjoyed 14 years experience in the home inspection industry helping to educate buyers and sellers on their current or new home/property.

September/October 2008 - 23


Dad’s Horses by Marge Burke My dad was a jolly, stout, peopleoriented man, who loved nothing more than to have fun. He was not particularly athletic and abhorred hunting in any form; he did not like to watch or attend sporting events and never spent a night out with the ‘guys.’ He did, however, have a great love of antiques, Buck Owens, clocks, food, and everything fun. It was nothing for my dad to polish off a halfgallon of ice cream in several sittings, or eat the meatloaf slated for Sunday dinner on Saturday night for a bedtime snack. The missing food he always blamed on the neighbor. “Harry came up and just ate it right out of the fridge,’ he’d tell us – but we knew better and just shook our heads and laughed. When my sister or I would have friends over, he would call Royal Pizza and order several large with pepperoni. It was during those times when the Pepsi or Tab flowed freely and Mom played hostess to Dad playing clown. We were the first in the neighborhood to have a television and the first to have a color TV. I thought we were rich. And we were, but it had nothing to do with money and everything to do with my dad. Our house was in a rural area between Greensburg and Youngwood. There were about a dozen houses on our area of Shady Lane, and we were all good neighbors. They were very gracious to accommodate my dad’s continually evolving passion to collecting things, everything from antiques to clocks to chicken and even

a cow. But I think the most amazing thing that Dad introduced to our neighborhood was a horse. Little One came to shady Lane one fall, the year I was about sixteen. He was part Arabian, 16 hands high; a beautiful brown specimen of a horse. He was spirited and frisky and had a mind of his own. It was a good thing, too, as we had absolutely no idea what to do with a horse. If Little One hadn’t have told us what to do, he wouldn’t have survived. That horse’s tenure with us was short. He was a bit too spirited and not at all prone to pulling a buggy, which was Dad’s fondest dream. When the buggy ended up in pieces in the ditch, Little One ended up on someone else’s farm. I was not at all sorry to see him go. My first experience with him had been my last. I had climbed on his back, grabbed the reins, and hung on for dear life as he pummeled toward the four-lane highway at the end of our road. I was shaking in my cowboy boots as I finally (safely) handed the reins over and washed my hands of the whole affair. I thought that might have been the end of our horse trading, but Dad had other ideas. White Cloud – a glue factory reject and former show horse – joined Dusty, a huge racer – 17 hands high and a glossy chestnut brown – in the corral. As we had barely enough lawn to get the mower out, our spinster neighbor agreed to lease part of her acreage to Dad for his horses to graze. There was even a small

stream on the property which made it perfect for creating a pony paradise. My 1963 Chevy Biscayne was more to my taste, and I certainly enjoyed that much more than I did the horses. My friends, however, didn’t agree. They stopped by often to visit – not me, but the horses. They would take turns riding with my sister

to keep the animals exercised. My friend Gen loved to groom Dusty and could often be found in the fields rubbing his neck and whispering sweet nothings. Dad respected my aversion to these beasts, and I seldom had to step in. But occasionally they took a weekend trip, and as I had a part time job by now, I generally stayed at home. I traipsed down to the barn twice a day to feed them, and spent more time than I would have liked (which was none, actually) mucking out the

stables. Yucky mucky. Most people would have formed a bond with Dusty and White Cloud, spending time with them and caring for them. I did not. They were huge, and big, and strong, and did I mention huge? They frightened me to death and I would tread carefully and fearfully. We had the horses for several years. I don’t even remember now why we got rid of them. I think White Cloud got sick, and then my dad became ill, and it didn’t make sense to keep horses by then. I do remember, though, that my dad thought they were wonderful, and he was proud as punch to spruce them up and prance them down Main Street in a holiday parade. He was in his glory when he was sitting astride Dusty, trailing around our country roads surprising passing motorists who had often never met a horse in person before. It was exciting to hitch Dusty up to a rebuilt sleigh and glide through a winter afternoon snowfall, bundled up and warm snuggled under blankets while Dusty’s bells jangled in the frosty air. My dad had been gone over twenty years, but I still remember his laughing eyes as he teased my friends, his busy hands as he polished antiques or repaired clocks, and his heart of love as he shared himself and his home to our friends. But I remember dad’s horses, and the sense of pride he had in them, and the fun he had riding and taking care of them. And for my dad, it always was about the fun.

THE LIGONIER CHEF Scott Sinemus

Talkin’ ’Bout My Regeneration Although spring is my absolute favorite season I always seem to be the most nostalgic in the fall. Perhaps it’s Ligonier turning 250 this year but I seem to be feeling it a lot more this year. Of course it could be because I haven’t turned my Sirius radio off of the Alternative 80’s since I got it last Christmas. A few weeks ago I kept hearing about a “Regeneration Tour”… an evening of 80’s music featuring Naked Eyes, A Flock of Seagulls, ABC, Belinda Carlisle, and The Human League!! Could it get any more nostalgic than that? The moment I was near a computer I logged on to see if and when it would be coming near us. I found the nearest location was Vienna, VA at the Wolf Trap Amphitheater. A wave of delight swept over me, as I know that the Ritz-Carlton at Tyson’s Corner is moments from there. I couldn’t get tickets or a room fast enough. Of the four Ritz Carlton’s around DC, Tyson’s Corner is by far the nicest. Not-to-mention it’s attached to a

24 - September/October 2008

stunningly couture shopping mall and has a spa. I also contacted Stephanie from the promotion company to arrange back stage access to meet some of the artists. The Wolf Trap Amphitheater is a positively delightful place to see a show. Its open-air concept and natural wood design, reminded me of an outdoor version of the New York Philharmonic’s home in Lincoln Center. The acoustics were so good people were picnicking on the park lawn outside the venue just listening to the concert. The show was phenomenal! It was so good to see so many of my favorite bands still looking good and sounding the same if not better than they did as I remember. ABC was the only group that announced it has a new album to offer. A Flock of Seagulls no longer has extravagant “coiffitures.” And Belinda Carlisle had people nearly apoplectic when she sang “Vacation” and “We got the beat,” especially when she busted

out the old dance moves! The most extraordinary set of the evening went to The Human League. There were multiple screens of cool old clips from movies, cartoons and advertising playing above them. Bright white Apple Mac’s and a huge networking module in the center of the stark black stage, while every member of the band was dressed in black. There couldn’t have been a more impressive way to end the evening. The most exciting part of the evening for me though was meeting and talking with Pete Byrne from Naked Eyes (pictured with me at right). After watching him woo a girl from the audience onto the stage for what turned out to be an amazing dance, I said, “You still seem to be able to get the girls.” And he laughed and said, “Yes, she was a fun one”. As it turns out Pete’s hobby is cooking. Although he dabbles in a bit of every cuisine the more refined and time-consuming dishes of the French Classical kitchen are his favorite. Beef Wellington and Maine lobster being two of them.

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


They’ve Got It Covered! Indiana County’s First Covered Bridge Festival “Easy and safe passage over the waters of the United States are much wanted.” - Charles Wilson Peale, An Essay on Building Wooden Bridges, 1797

Due to the agricultural and industrial expansion of the late 1800s and early 1900s inland bridges over rivers and creeks were necessary for the commerce of our nation. However, builders knew that the sultry summers and frigid winters of North America would wreak havoc upon stone paving. When considering how to best protect the wooden superstructures that were built, the obvious solution was to cover them. Although there were once 10,000 covered bridges in America, today only about 900 remain. PA boasts the highest total of remaining covered causeways with 210 (47 of which are in Southwestern PA). Indiana County is home to 4 covered bridges – Trusal (1870), Kintersburg (1877), Thomas (1879), and Harmon (1910). All are listed on the National Register of Historic Places and of the 4 only Thomas remains open to traffic. The Indiana County Covered Bridge Committee is an organization committed to restoring, improving, and maintaining the covered bridges of the county. Hoping to promote tourism and involve area students in the county’s history, a Wood Quilt Project was undertaken during the past year to enhance awareness of the bridges. With the assistance of Joy Fairbanks, project coordinator, local students and several interested persons have constructed 7 wood quilts adapted from the concept of Mid-western barn quilts. Like the barn versions, the covered bridge quilts are colorful, eye-catching and meticulously-crafted. A first-time festival to celebrate the covered bridges is set for September 27 from 10:00 am until 7 pm at Blue Spruce Park*. The day-long event will include guided bridge tours, artisans, crafts, food & music, a judged quilt show and assorted entertainments. An antique car show will provide a different sort of transportation nostalgia at Harmon Bridge. The previously-mentioned wood quilts will be installed near the bridges and at Blue Spruce Park in time for the festivities. Everyone interested in historic structures, scenic settings, autumn activities and the art of quilting should plan to “bee” there! *Blue Spruce Park is located 6 miles north of Indiana, PA at 1128 Blue Spruce Road 1 mile north of PA Route 110. Visit www.indianacounty parks.org/724-463-8636 or www.visitindianacountypa.org/724-463-7505 – Story and Blairsville Covered Bridge quilt photo by Barbara M. Neill

MARION CENTER SCHOOL DISTRICT WOOD QUILT - 1 of 7 designs created for the Wood Quilt Project undertaken to coincide with Indiana County’s 1st Covered Bridge Festival (see article right).

Daunise McDermott Marshall, President of the Historical Society of the Blairsville Area, displays the quilt she recently designed and created based upon the drawing (above) of Indiana County’s first covered bridge. Erected between the years of 1821-1823 with a 300 foot span, the Blairsville Covered Bridge was the longest single arch bridge in the US at that time. It operated as a toll bridge until 1865 with a yearly pedestrian pass priced at $1.50. On January 22, 1874 the bridge collapsed into the Conemaugh River. The 33" hand-quilted square pictured here was won in a raffle by a Blairsville resident at 2008’s Blairsville Diamond Days, but will be on display at Indiana County’s 1st Covered Bridge Festival.

Every Story Begins At Home.

September/October 2008 - 25


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“Long prior to 1776, when an alien flag yet floated over our country, the settlers of this pioneer region were accustomed to assemble on this hill to worship God.”

“Proudly Serving Northern & Eastern Westmoreland County”

So begins the inscription on a bronze tablet in Unity Cemetery. Together with Unity Chapel (pictured here) the Unity Township sites will be one of five historically significant venues included in Historic House Tour ’08, a self-driving tour sponsored by the Westmoreland County Historical Society. The event is scheduled for Saturday, September 13th from 10 am-4 pm to be followed by an exclusive tour of Greensburg’s Barclay House and cocktail party on Sunday, September 14th from 6 pm-8 pm.For more details: call 724836-1800 x10, email history@starofthewest.org or visit www.starofthewest.org.

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100 E. Main St. • Ligonier, PA • www.EquineChic.com • 724.238.7003 26 - September/October 2008

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


Neigh Rides: A Horse for All Seasons Hayrides, Harvest & Halloween I love September and October. Although they number 9 and 10 on the yearly calendar, for me they have always been months of new beginnings. This autumnal period signals the start of a school year; an occasional crisp morning or evening allows the wool to come out; football season adds just the right amount of forward-moving energy as baseball season winds down. These are also the times when the western PA palette is a glory to behold. The leaves exchange their emerald hue for jewel tones of topaz and fire opal and the snow-white blossoms of spring have miraculously been transformed into plentiful ruby orbs as well as tangy amber cider. Area wineries offer the fruits of their labors in shades ranging from palest citrine to deepest garnet. Even the grocery stores provide a miniadrenaline rush with their multicolored mums, ornamental gourds and “trick-or-treats.” (Though I detest the taste of candy corn, the icon of the tricolored triangular tidbit sends me over that old harvest moon.) Fall Festivals spring up everywhere and a ginormous happening on my celebration list approaches: Halloween. A much-cherished compliment I received as a teacher came from a little redhead named Aubrey, who exclaimed upon entering my boo-tifully decorated music room, “It’s a Halloween Wonderland!” One of the best of all best childhood memories was my tweenage Halloween party. I entertained the guests in not your usual costume, but the white communion dress of a friend. (I was the “ghostess with the mostest.” Carmel Snow would so understand here.) A frustrated costume designer at heart, I must admit to a fashion fetish for spooktacular creations for creatures such as “skeletons, spiders and fairies – oh my!” (BPI – Bad Puns Intended) In keeping with the horsey motif of this edition, a mention of autumn hayrides seems especially appropriate. Originating in Kansas, hayrides have made the trip to our region very nicely. Usually considered “good, clean fun” and as American as apple pie, a ride in the hay should be experienced at least once in a lifetime. (That was ride, not roll.) Some hayrides are horsedrawn, but many are tractor-pulled these days. There follows a hopefully helpful list of area farms and fun-zones that feature a range of hayride or horsedrawn wagon ride choices (e.g. romantic, “haunted,” safari). Included at numerous locations are pony rides, corn mazes, farm animal petting areas, hay tunnels, fall decorations, food concessions, live music and entertainment, bonfires and even a marshmallow roast. Rounding out the fall festivities are those great balls of marmalade-tinted magic – pumpkins! Whether you pick or purchase, paint or carve, use in tasty pastries or decorative displays: pumpkins are prime patch investments. (One site actually offers “pumpkin bowling.”) Please check out the individual websites or give the venues a call ahead for event schedules and site-specific information to find the horse ride and activities that best suits your needs. And remember – Think Orange! Allegheny County • Reilly’s Summer Seat Farm & Garden Center – 1120 Roosevelt Road, Pittsburgh, 412-367-7259 or reillyssummerseatfarm.com

Every Story Begins At Home.

• Shenot Farm, Inc. – 3754 Wexford Run Road, Wexford, 724-935-2542 or shenotfarm.com • Simmons Farm – 170 Simmons Road, McMurray, Farm Market 724-941-1490, Rt.19 Market (724) 941-7540 or simmonsfarm.com • Soergel Orchards – 2573 Brandt School Road, Wexford, 724-935-1743 or soergels.com Armstrong County • Dragon Run Forge and Livery – 323 Porterfield Hill, Cowansville, 724-5433367 or dragonrunlivery.com (under construction) Bedford County • Old Bedford Village – Business Route 220, Bedford, 814-623-1156/800-2384347 or oldbedfordvillage.com Butler County • Cheeseman Farm – 226 Cheeseman Road, Portersville, 724-368-3233 or cheesemanfarm.com • Harvest Valley Farms – 125 Ida Lane, Valencia, 724-443-5869 or harvestvalleyfarms.com Cambria County • Vale Wood Farms – 517 Vale Wood Road, Loretto, 814-886-7171 or valewoodfarms.com • Weakland Farms – 582 Munster Road, Portage, 814-736-9531 or weaklandfarms.com Fayette County • Allen’s Haunted Hayrides – 2430 Pittsburgh Road, Smock, 724-677-2589 or allenshayrides.com • Haunted Mountain Hayrides & Trail – Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park CampResort, Mill Run, 724-455-2929 or jellystonemillrun.com Indiana County • Windgate Vineyards & Winery – 1998 Hemlock Acres Road, Smicksburg, 814257-8797 or windgatevineyards.com • Reeger’s Farm & Café – 755 Laurel Road, Shelocta, 724-463-0440 or reegersfarm.com Lawrence County • Living Treasures Animal Park – Route 422, New Castle, 724-924-9571 or ltanimalpark.com Somerset County • Faranda Farm – 1171 Penn Avenue, Route 601, Hollsopple, 814-479-7109 or farandafarm.net • Seven Springs Mountain Resort – 777 Waterwheel Drive, Seven Springs, 814352-7777 ext. 7285/800-452-2223 ext. 7285 or www.7springs.com Washington County • Trax Farms – 528 Trax Road, Finleyville, 412-835-3246 or traxfarms.com • Triple B Farms – 823 Berry Lane, Monongahela, 724-258-3557 or triplebfarms.com Westmoreland County • Kerber’s Dairy – 1856 Guffy Road, North Huntingdon, 724-863-6930 or kerbers.com • Living Treasures Animal Park – Route 711, Donegal, 724-593-8300 or ltanimalpark.com • Schramm Farms & Orchards – 1002 Blank Road, Jeannette (Harrison City), 724-744-7320 or schrammfarms.com • West Overton Village – Route 819, Scottdale, 724-887-7910 or westoverton.org – By Barbara M. Neill Look for Part 2 of Neigh Rides in the Nov/Dec edition of the LMP!

fall into fun with WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS WEST OVERTON VILLAGE - SCOTTDALE, PA 15683 3rd ANNUAL Interactive Murder Mystery Dinner & Play September 26, 27 and October 3, 4 Looking for A Little Distilled Murder? Step back to the era of Prohibition. Get the password to enter the speakeasy! Come enjoy an excellent dinner served by Pat's Country Catering and LL Kuhn Catering while you puzzle through an interactive mystery play and help solve whodunnit! You'll have a chance to be a detective in this period play featuring the West Overton Players. Show starts at 6:30pm. Prizes and gifts are given to those who guess the killer's identity. Admission fee is $25 for members and $30 for non-members. Reservations are required as seating is very limited. These shows do sell out! Call 724-887-7910.

FALL BUS TOUr to the susquehanna valley – October 10 Join us for a trip to Harrisburg for a guided tour of the State Capitol Building., followed by Wheatland, the beautiful 19th century mansion which was the home of President James Buchanan; and concluding at the Landis Valley Museum which is a living history village of Pennsylvania Dutch life. Dinner will be at 5:00 pm at the Country Table located in Manheim, PA. The cost is $80.00 for members and $90.00 for non-members if you register before Friday, September 19. The cost after the 19th will be $85.00 for members and $95.00 for non-members. If you're interested in the bus trip or need additional information, please call Lois at (724) 887-7910 or email her at admin@westoverton.org. Deadline for reservations is September 30.

Haunted village tours – october 24, 25, 26 This year we investigate the grounds of the museum and determine if the stories about the "Lady in Purple", the "Stove-Top Hat Man" and the other odd occurrences in the Homestead and the Stock Barn are real - or imagined. New this year - Haunted Homestead Hayride! Winners of the Annual Flash Fiction Contest held by the Ligonier Valley Writers will be read in the Other Worldly Cafe. Phone: (724) 887-7910 Fax: (724) 887-5010 Email: Admin@westoverton.org www.westoverton.org

September/October 2008 - 27


A Man Named St. Clair by Dick Phillips Arthur St. Clair’s career as an American military strategist and statesman began in Pennsylvania and spans 45 years of service in the military, government and political life. His forsaking of British position and wealth for his lifelong pursuit of America’s freedom and democracy makes it difficult to understand why he seems to be one of the most underappreciated public figures in our nation’s history. Pennsylvania Heritage After service as a British army lieutenant in Canada during the French-Indian War (175762), he was made Captain and Commandant of Fort Ligonier in Pennsylvania. He settled his family in the Ligonier Valley on acreage granted by King George in return for British military service. His first contributions to America’s growth began in Bedford, PA, as a surveyor for the Penn family. In 1774, Governor Penn named St. Clair a Council for Westmoreland County and a Justice in the County Court. First Judiciary Challenge Soon after St. Clair’s appointment, Virginia’s governor, Lord Dunmore, known for his ruthlessness against colonists, sent his agents from Virginia to claim Fort Pit (now Pittsburgh) and its surrounding lands for Virginia. Dunsmore, a British Earl named John Murray, who paid Indians to scalp the mothers and babies of colonists to destroy their spirit, is so described in the History of Westmoreland County “few names in American history were more evil or vulgar.” St. Clair had the agents tracked down, brought to his court and jailed. Lord Dunmore demanded that Governor Penn dismiss St. Clair as magistrate. Penn refused. Although Dunmore eventually won release of his men on bail and their return to Virginia, St. Clair’s courage in dealing with lawlessness had been well demonstrated. Unfortunately, his honesty, his unselfish spirit and freedom from greed were often an inconvenience to the self interests of constituents and would later cost him politically. Because of the important responsibilities he took on, however, St. Clair soon became known as one of the most influential men in western Pennsylvania. Life-changing Decision St. Clair’s character, military experience and success in Indian affairs did not go unnoticed by Continental Congress President John Hancock who summoned him to Philadelphia in 1775. There he made his lifechanging decision to take up his adopted country’s cause for freedom and became a Colonel in the Continental Army. Frazer Wilson, in his 1944 epic of the American Frontier, Arthur St. Clair, Rugged Ruler of the Old Northwest, says, “It is difficult to conceive the courage required for making this decision, as St. Clair’s connection with the British army had been 28 - September/October 2008

appreciated and rewarded by grants of land and important emoluments. Besides, he was friendly with King George, closely related to General Gates and had been intimately associated with many officers who were to serve conspicuously in the coming conflict.” Statesman Prior to George Washington’s being elected the first President of the United States in 1789, America was governed from 1781 by 10 Presidents of the United States in Congress Assembled. From 1785 to 1787, St. Clair served Congress as the elected delegate from his home state of Pennsylvania. In 1787, Arthur St. Clair

served as the Congress’s ninth President, during which Congress enacted the Northwest Ordinance and the current United States Constitution. In 1789, St. Clair began a 15-year career as President George Washington’s first Governor of the Northwest Territory, overseeing the growth in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and Michigan, along with parts of Wisconsin and Minnesota. While governor, St. Clair made his home and headquarters in Cincinnati, Ohio, a city he is credited with naming after the Society of the Cincinnati. During the second half of his term, the first road West from Virginia across Ohio through St. Clairsville to Zanesville, was started by Colonel Ebenezer Zane, the founder of Wheeling. Called Zane’s Trace, it stands today as the National Road (U.S. 40). St. Clair

reportedly used the road often on trips to Philadelphia, via Wheeling and his Ligonier home. In addition to Upper St. Clair, Pennsylvania, St.Clairsville, Pennsylvania, St. Clairsville, Ohio and St Clair Township in Ohio; other counties and towns in Alabama, Illinois and Missouri also bear the St. Clair name. St. Clair’s government and legislative contributions were significant, but he also had a distinguished military career, mostly as a general officer. Soldier and Patriot Born in Caithness, Scotland, in 1734, St. Clair’s service as a lieutenant and captain for the British army in the Indian wars of Canada and western Pennsylvania earned him favor with the King and both his fellow and superior officers. However, because of his opposition to the King’s corrupt policies, notably new taxes imposed by the Stamp and Sugar Acts of 1763, St. Clair could not accept the promise of British wealth and position. This made his momentous decision to embrace American democracy and accept President Hancock’s commission as Colonel in the Continental Army all the more noteworthy. By the mid-1770’s St. Clair considered himself more of an American than a British subject. Because of his Indian war experience, Colonel St. Clair’s first assignment in 1775 was to raise a regiment of six companies to cover the retreat of the American army being overwhelmed by the British near Quebec. This he completed in three months. Washington’s Favorite St. Clair was promoted to Brigadier General by George Washington before being sent to organize the New Jersey Militia. He served with Washington during Valley Forge and took part in his crossing of the Delaware on Christmas night, 1776, before the Battle of Trenton. St. Clair is credited with developing the strategy and leading the flanking army which complemented Washington’s own force and led to Washington’s capture of both Princeton and Trenton, New Jersey from the British. St. Clair and Washington remained close friends for 24 years, culminating with St. Clair’s being named Commander of Federal Troops in 1791. Honor Before Glory In 1777, St. Clair was promoted to Major General and ordered by President Hancock to upstate New York to defend the strategically located Fort Ticonderoga from the British. Upon arrival, St. Clair found the fort in serious disrepair and under-supplied. Recognizing that he was outnumbered five-to-one and that both the fort and his force would be lost, St. Clair executed a retreat strategy which saved his men who would live to return and fight again. For this he faced court martial, but was later continued on page 34

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


49th Ft. Ligonier Days Schedule It's no mere historical coincidence that Ligonier is celebrating its 250th birthday at the same time as Pittsburgh's 250th. Ligonier, after all, is the town that made Pittsburgh possible. This year’s celebration promises to be the biggest ever!

Friday October 10, 2008

B. P. Insurance, Inc. Brian E Panichelle Panichelle_Agency@nwagent.com 3720 Rt 711 Suite 9 Ligonier, PA 15658-5004 (In Ligonier Valley Mini-Mall ) (724) 238-2148

9:00 AM

Community food booths open, Craftsmen’s Fair opens at several locations Runa Pacha - Music of the Andes Mountains - Lower West Main Street

10:00 AM

Fort Ligonier Museum & Gift Shop opens Ligonier Merchant’s Old Fashioned Sidewalk Sales begin

NOON

OFFICIAL OPENING CEREMONY on the Bandstand

1:00 PM

Second Wind Band – Country/Rock – Bandstand Stage

3:00 PM

Dr. Langford & The Jedzie Polka Band - Bandstand Stage

5:00 PM

The Jaggerz – Oldies, blues, rock, funk – East Main Street Stage

6:00 PM

Craft booths close

7:00 PM School Aud

The U S Marine Corps Band from Quantico – Ligonier Valley High

Saturday October 11, 2008 9:00 AM

Community Food Booths Open - Craftmen’s Fair continues Runa Pacha - Music of the Andes Mountains - Lower West Main Street

9:00 AM

Fort Ligonier Museum and Gift Shop opens

10:00 AM

Ligonier Merchants move their bargains outside for sidewalk sales

11:00 AM

COMMUNITY PARADE BEGINS on Main Street

2:00 PM

Battle Re-enactment at Fort Ligonier

2:30 PM

Girlz in Black Hats - Country - Bandstand Stage

4:00 PM

Battle Re-enactment at Fort Ligonier

4:30 PM

Dead Irish Blues - Traditional Celtic Music - Bandstand Stage

6:00 PM

Craft booths close

7:00 PM

Aaron Tippin in Concert - Ligonier Valley High School **This event requires a ticket!!! Limited number will be available.

Sunday October 12, 2008 RuthAnn Kalinowski

10:00 AM

Fort Ligonier open to the public

Noon

Craft and Food Booths open Runa Pacha - Music of the Andes Mountains - Lower West Main Street

12:30 PM

Covenant Praise Band featuring Noel McLeary – Contemporary Christian Music – Bandstand Stage

2:00 PM

Neon Swing X-perience – Big Band Sound – Bandstand Stage

“too much fun for such a small town”

2:00 PM

Battle Re-enactment at Fort Ligonier

check upcoming events and our menu on line at www.ligoniertavern.com

4:00 PM

Gashouse Band - Country/Rock - Bandstand Stage Battle Re-enactment at Fort Ligonier

5:00 PM

Craft booths close

5:30 PM

Carillon Concert from Calvary United Methodist Church Bell Tower, Shirley Benner at the keyboard closes Fort Ligonier Days

Independent Beauty Consultant www.marykay.com/rakalinowski 724-989-4979

Sun. 12:00 pm to 8:00 pm Monday -Thurs. 11:30 am - 9:00 pm Fri. & Sat 11:30 am - 10:00 pm 724-238-4831 • 137 West Main Street Ligonier, PA

Every Story Begins At Home.

September/October 2008 - 29


Miracle In A Corn Field by JB Rossi

Jazzercise. Why Wait? Pay only $50 for the rest of this year when you register for January 2009 with EFT (easy fitness ticket). Be one of the first 15 new signups and pay only 1/2 the joining fee of $25 with this ad! Classes 7 Days A Week Latrobe/Derry Jazzercise Loyalhanna Community Center 724-244-2869 for more information

jazzercise.com • (800)FIT-IS-IT

100% Home Purchase No Down Payment Jim Miller, Branch Manager

724-925-2727

30 - September/October 2008

It was a cold, blustery day when the two of them my hair, and having extreme hunger bouts. I went out in search of the perfect place to carry could not do the normal kid things like riding a out their dream. They searched all morning with bike, because I would not have been able to heal no luck. Their feet were frozen and their bodies if I had gotten a scratch.” chilled to the bone. They were ready to quit for Today at age 17, Brooke is able to lead a the day. Then down a very bumpy winding road, normal teenager’s life. “Thanks to the money they came upon a small, “not quite flat” corn raised through Polo for the Cure for research of field covered in snow and tucked away in the new and more effective drugs, I am still here countryside of Ligonier. It was here after months and eternally grateful. And I feel very blessed to of hard work on behalf of have the opportunity to see many good people that the a polo game; most of my first miracle happened. And friends have never even now twenty years later, this heard of the sport. It’s so miracle keeps happen-ing intense and exciting. every September. Sometimes the horses come This year the miracle right up next to where you will happen on Saturday, are sitting! I feel lucky to be a September 20th. Shortly part of such a wonderful event before noon, Dorothy and that is fun and saves lives!” Richard Raizman and “Thanks to the magnetic hundreds of dedicated personality of our Society people will transform Stom liaison, Tina Massari, Hollow Field into the site the Polo Match has exceeded of the 15th Annual Polo for our expectations,” says the Cure Field Match Dorothy Raizman. “There between the Ligonier Polo has been no limit to the Team sponsored by energy, creativity and vision American Airlines and the that Tina has brought to our German Polo Team from event. What started as a Dusseldorf, Germany, small group of women has sponsored by Bayer. Tents now expanded into a will be erected, truck loads network of committees who of beautiful flowers will have raised over a million “Research funded by Polo for the Cure saved my life,” arrive, and the delicious dollars with this event.” explains 17-year-old Brooke Templin, Patient Ambassador.. smells of gourmet food will The overwhelming begin emanating from the success of Polo for the Cure field. Other fun festivities include the traditional has not gone unnoticed. This year the event stomping of the divots, the exceptional silent won the Dr. Kenneth B. McCredie Award for auction, and the parading of the hounds by the commitment and excellence in fundraising. Polo Rolling Rock Hunt. Yet amidst all the fun, for the Cure has become legendary and has made a everyone has come here together to this corn significant difference by raising more than $1.1 field in search of the “Cure”. million to support the fight against blood cancers. Leukemia and its related diseases such as “Polo for the Cure is like a crown and everyone lymphoma and myeloma are blood cancers that who comes brings a jewel to add to its glory,” originate in the bone marrow or lymphatic remarks Dorothy Raizman. “Last year we raised tissues of its victims. Leukemia itself causes over $135,000 for lifesaving efforts. When I see more deaths than any other cancer among young ladies like Brooke who are surviving children and young adults under the age of 20. because of our efforts, I am bolstered by the However, the millions of funds that the importance of our project. This is the miracle Leukemia and Lymphoma Society has invested that is happening in our corn field!” in biomedical research have produced key For more information, tickets, or contributions advances in understanding blood cancers. New to Polo for the Cure, please contact Tina Massari treatments have been discovered which prolong at the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society at 412and enhance the lives of young victims. But a 395-2872. “Cure” is still needed and so the pilgrimage to Become part of the miracle in the corn field, the corn field must continue every year. join the fight to find the “Cure!” Everyone comes for his/her own reason. Some have come to honor and remember those who have lost their match with the devastating diseases of Leukemia and Lymphoma. “I lost my sister to this horrid disease,” states one of the sixteen tent sponsors. “Polo for the Cure is one way I can honor her memory while helping to raise funds for the research needed to beat this killer. I want to do my part to make sure no one else has to suffer like she did or experience the loss like I did.” Some have come to show the progress that has been made through this important fundraiser. “I was first diagnosed with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) when I was two years old,” explains Brooke Templin, Patient Ambassador. “After two years of chemotherapy, I had a Alexandra Mayes Birnbaum, National Board Member, presents the relapse at age five. Most of my childhood was Dr. Kenneth B. McCredie Award to Polo for the Cure co-chairs, Dorothy Raizman and Kristine Samloff. spent going to the hospital for chemo, losing

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST

$15 annual subscription $25 for international orders expires 10/31/08 (LMP)

10% OFF one item of your choice with this coupon! expires 10/31/08 (LMP)

1107 Ligonier St • Latrobe, PA 15650 • 724-537-2233 NAME: ___________________________________ Pennsylvania’s only residential craft school 1049 Wharton Furnace Road Farmington, PA 15437 724-329-1370 • www.touchstonecrafts.com

ADDRESS: ________________________________ CITY: ____________________________________ STATE: __________ ZIP: ____________________

Saturday, October 11: 2pm to 6pm

Annual Fall Benefit: “Jazzed About Art III”

Touchstone is hosting its third annual fundraising benefit and auction, Jazzed about Art III. The afternoon of art and music will feature the work of dozens of regional and national artists. Art lovers will find a myriad of original artworks available for bid in the event’s silent and live auctions. The silent auction will be from 2pm to 4:30pm, followed by the live auction at 4:45pm. Tickets at the door are $50.00 Hors d’oeuvres and complimentary wine/beer will be served. Saturday-Sunday, October 18-19

“Pioneer Craft Days”

TCC Pioneer Craft Days is a celebration of the arts for the citizens of Fayette County and the surrounding tri-state region. Visitors of all ages are invited to participate in hands-on studio projects, creating works of art to take home. Build a clay pot in the ceramics studio, forge a nail in the blacksmith shop, learn a traditional metalsmithing technique in the metals and jewelry studio, manipulate glass in the glass studio, or express yourself in the painting studio. Fiddlers and cloggers will provide entertainment and an opportunity for participation in music and dance. There will also be a pumpkincarving contest and a traditional buckwheat cake dinner. Together with over Pittsburgh 250 events, Touchstone’s Pioneer Craft Days will provide an educational and inspirational experience for young and old. Saturday, November 1st

Membership Meeting Members are invited to the annual member meeting where we will review the year’s accomplishments, elect board members, and plan 2009.

Every Story Begins At Home.

Please make check payable to Laurel Mountain Post, and return with this form to: PO Box 227, Latrobe, PA 15650

This coupon good for $2 OFF any order of $20 or more! expires 10/31/08 (LMP)

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Buy 1 Bucket of Balls Get 1 Half Off Equal or Lesser Value w/this coupon expires 10/31/08 (LMP)

Affordable Family Fun! Value Packages for Gift Giving, starting at $35 Sand Bunker 2 Grass Hitting Areas

Self-serve 8 1/2 x 11 BW copies 4¢ each with this coupon only! expires 10/31/08 (LMP)

1020 Latrobe 30 Plaza | 724-532-2374 pa113@highvision.net

Apple Hill Playhouse Buy one ticket, get second ticket to the same performance 50% off! through 10/31/08 (LMP)

724-468-5050 • 275 Manor Rd Delmont 15626 www.applehillplayhouse.org

60 West Market Street Blairsville, PA 15717

724-459-5883

Present this coupon and receive $5 off any chemical service. One coupon per person. expires 10/31/08 (LMP)

Buy one cup of coffee at the Gristmill Coffeehouse, get the other for half-price. expires 10/31/08 (LMP)

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Tour Clayton, the 19th-century mansion of Henry Clay Frick.

Buy one Clayton Tour admission and get one FREE with this coupon. expires 10/31/08 (LMP)

Reservations recommended.

Coffee, Sweets, Polish Pottery and More!

10-20% off selected items with this coupon expires 10/31/08 (LMP)

1731 State Route 56 - Spring Church, PA 724-478-5284 or 877-641-3301 www.uncommongrounds.org

September/October 2008 - 31


SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2008 COMMUNITY CALENDAR

Sept 10 Free Morning Movie 10:30 AM GLSD Center for Student Creativity, Latrobe, PA.724-537-2057 www.latroberecreation.org

Sept 13 Laurel Harmony chapter of Sweet Adelines show Presents “Moments To Remember “ Featuring Razzmatazz, a comedy quartet 7 PM Westmoreland Community College, Youngwood, PA For tickets call 724-863-2110

Sept 11 Thursdays at Westmoreland Small & Mighty Westmoreland Museum of American Art, Greensburg, PA. 724-837-1500 www.wmuseumaa.org

Sept 13-14 Hempfield Fall Festival Hempfield Park, Greensburg, PA 724-836-7900 ext.140 www.hempfieldtwp.us

Sept 12-14 Stage Right Presents “The Wizard Of Oz” Palace Theatre, Greensburg, PA 724-836-8000 www.thepalacetheatre.org

Sept 13-14 Stahlstown Flax Scutching Festival Rt. 711 Stahlstown, PA 724-593-2119 www.flaxscutching.com

Sept 12-13 Coleman Station Bluegrass Festival Allegheny Mountains of Somerset County www.bluegrass.org/festival, 814-444-8509.

Sept 14 Westmoreland County Historic House Tour ’08 6 PM- 8PM Barclay House,Greensburg, PA 724-836-1800 ext. 15

Sept 5-6 Ligonier Highland Games Idlewild Park, Ligonier, PA 412-851-9900 www.ligoniergames.org

Sept 12-14 Saltsburg Heritage Days Saltsburg, PA 724-639-3728

Sept 5-7 Mountain Craft Days Somerset Historical Center, Somerset, PA 814-445-6077 www.somersethistoricalcenter.org

Sept 13 2008 Alzheimer’s Association Memory Walk Legion Keener Park, Latrobe, PA 412-261-5040

Sept 15- Oct. 20 Belly Dancing 8-9 PM YWCA Mansion, Greensburg, PA Pre-registration Required 724-834-9390 www.ywcawestmoreland.org

Sept 5-7 23rd Annual West Newton Community Festival West Newton, PA, 724-872-7939 www.westnewtonfestival.com

Sept 13 Brian J Downey Memorial Lake Side 5K Walk Twin Lakes Park, Greensburg, PA 724-837-6111 www.westspol.org/walk.htm

Sept 6 Delmont Community Day Shields Farm, Delmont, PA 724-468-4422 ext. 4

Sept 13 Laurel Harmony Chorus Presents Laurel Harmony Chorus of Sweet Adelines Intl. 7 PM Westmoreland Community College, Youngwood, PA. 724-837-5550

Sept 1-6 Ox Hill Fair Ox Hill Fair Grounds, Home, PA. 724-397-2137 Sept 2, 4 Senior Social 2PM Country Café & Video, Pleasant Unity, PA 724-537-2057 www.latroberecreation.org Sept 5 Scottish Highlands Dinner Mountain View Inn, Greensburg, PA 724-834-5300 www.mountainviewinn.com

Sept 6 Latrobe Arts, Crafts & Foods Fair Ligonier Street, Latrobe, PA 724-537-8742 Sept 6 River City Brass Band Presents “Shall We Dance” 8 PM Palace Theatre, Greensburg, PA 1-800-292-7222 www.thepalacetheatre.org Sept 6 Stone Villa Presents The Rock & Blues of The Tim Scott Band 1-5 PM Stone Villa Wine Cellars, Acme, PA 724-723-5604 www.stonevilla.com Sept 6 Westmoreland County Volunteer Fair 10-2 PM WCCC Founders Hall, Youngwood, PA 724-516-0566 Sept 6-7 Tour de Strongland Bike Race Strongland Chamber of Commerce, Vandergrift, PA. 724-845-5426 www.strongland.org Sept. 6-7, 13-14, 20-21, 27-28 Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival 10 AM- 6:30 PM. Route 31, West Newton, PA 724-872-1670 www.pittsburghrenfest.com Sept 7 Free Concerts In The Park 6:30-9 PM Gazebo Area, Downtown Mt. Pleasant, PA 724-457-6745 www.mtpleasantboro.com Sept 7 Stone Villa Presents Uncorked & Unplugged with the acoustic trio Backstreets 1-5 PM Stone Villa Wine Cellars, Acme, PA 724-723-5604 www.stonevilla.com Sept 7-Dec 28 From the Ruhr Valley to the Steel City: Industrial Scenes from the Rhineland Industrial Museum Westmoreland Museum of American Art, Greensburg, PA. 724-837-1500 www.wmuseumaa.org Sept 8-13 Cookport Fair Green Township, Cookport, PA 814-743-6894 www.cookportfair.com.

32 - September/October 2008

Sept 16-Oct.21 Child’s Play Fitness Class Ages 6-8 5PM-5:45 PM YWCA Mansion, Greensburg, PA Pre-registration Required 724-834-9390 www.ywcawestmoreland.org Sept 17 Prime Outlets-Grove City Bus Trip 9 AM Departing from Latrobe Memorial Stadium, Latrobe, PA. Register by Sept 10 724-537-2057 www.latroberecreation.org

Sept 13 Westmoreland County Historic House Tour ’08 10 A.M. Self-driving tour. 724-836-1800 ext. 15

Sept 17 Mountain Playhouse Presents George Washington and The French & Indian War Rt. 985 North, Jennerstown, PA 814-629-9201 www.mountainplayhouse.org

Sept 13 Live Music By Neon Swing X-perience 1-5 PM Stone Villa Wine Cellars, Acme, PA 724-723-5604 www.stonevilla.com

Sept 17 College Fair 2008 WCCC Main Campus, Youngwood,PA 6:30-8:30 PM

Sept 13 Babysitting Certification 9 AM-3 PM YWCA Mansion, Greensburg, PA Pre-registration Required 724-834-9390 www.ywcawestmoreland.org

Sept 17-28 The Road to Washington: The making of a man. The making of a president. Mountain Playhouse, Jennerstown, PA 814-629-9201 www.mountainplayhouse.org

Sept 13 32nd Annual Downtown Latrobe Arts, Crafts & Food Fair 10 AM-4 PM Downtown Latrobe, PA

Sept 17-Nov 5 Young Rembrandts Preschool Drawing Class 12 PM-12:45 PM YWCA Mansion, Greensburg, PA. Pre-registration Required 724-834-9390 www.ywcawestmoreland.org

Sept 17-Nov 5 Young Rembrandts Progressive Drawing Class 5-6 PM YWCA Mansion, Greensburg, PA Pre-registration Required 724-834-9390 www.ywcawestmoreland.org Sept 19-21 Avonmore Harvest Jubilee 724-697-4910 Sept 19-21 Fall Festival Geyer Performing Arts Center, Scottdale, PA 724-887-0887 www.geyerpac.com Sept 20 Fall Family Day Hike 11 AM.-2 PM Lynn Run State Park, Ligonier, PA Register before Sept.12. 724-537-2057 www.latroberecreation.org Sept 20 A Chocolate Affaire Chocolate Festival Seven Springs Mountain Resort, Seven Springs, PA. 800-452-2223 www.7springs.com Sept 20 Bushy Run Battlefield Heritage Society Presents A History Of Fort Ligonier 1 PM Bushy Run Battlefield, Harrison City, PA 724-527-5584 www.bushyrunbattlefield.com Sept 20 Westmoreland Cultural Trust Presents An Evening with Colin Mochrie & Brad Sherwood 8 PM Palace Theatre, Greensburg, PA 724-836-8000 www.thepalacetheatre.org Sept 20 Scottdale Community Free Concert Band Geyer Performing Arts Center, Scottdale, PA 724-887-0887 www.geyerpac.com Sept 20 The Women in the Wild Adventure Race Challenge presented by YWCA of Greater Johnstown 6:30 A.M. Registration 8:30 AM Start Summer’s Best 2 Weeks at the Que, Quemahoning Dam in Jenner Township 814-5363519 www.maradnet.com/wildwomen/ww08.html Sept 20-21 Smicksburg Apple Fest Downtown Smicksburg, PA 814-257-0192 www.smicksburg-dayton.com Sept 20-21 Lincoln Highway Road Rally 724-238-9030 www.lhhc.org Sept 20-21 50th Annual Fall Coin Show Best Western University Inn, Indiana, PA 724-254-2471 Sept 21 10th Annual Mountain Harvest Festival & Chili Cook-Off Christian W. Klay Winery, Chalk Hill, PA 724-439-3424 www.cwklaywinery.com Sept 21 Punxsutawney Region AACA Car Show Marion Center Community Park, Marion Center Registration 9:00 AM-1:00 PM, show 1:00-4:00 PM. 724-479-9345 Sept 24 Latshaw Productions Presents “As Time Goes By: Swingin’ Through the Decades” Palace Theatre, Greensburg, PA 724-836-8000 www.thepalacetheatre.org Sept 25 Derry Railroad Days Hobo Picnic Downtown Derry, 6 PM. Bring your own lawn chair and enjoy Hobo Stew, Dirt Cookie & Drink. www.derryborough.org Sept 25-28 34th Annual Used Book Sale sponsored by YWCA of Westmoreland County Literacy Program Thursday- Saturday 10AM-9:30 PM. Sunday 11-3 Westmoreland Mall, Greensburg, PA Literacy@ywcawestmoreland.org

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


Sept 26-27 Chili Cook-Off at Benner’s Benner’s Meadow Run Camping & Cabins, Farmington, PA. 724-329-4097 www.bennersmeadowrun.com

Oct 3-4 Haunted Mountain Hayrides & Trail Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park Camp & Resort, Mill Run, PA. 800-439-9644 www.jellystonemillrun.com

Sept 26-27 Interactive Murder Mystery Dinner & Play West Overton Museums, Scottdale, PA 724-887-7910 www.westoverton.org

Oct 3-4 Interactive Murder Mystery Dinner & Play West Overton Museums, Scottdale, PA 724-887-7910 www.westoverton.org

Sept 26-28 Clymer Days Festival Clymer, PA 724-254-2855 www.clymerpa.com

Oct 3-4 Springs Folk Festival Springs Road, Springs, PA 814-662-9202 www.springspa.org

Sept 26-28 Mount Pleasant Glass & Ethnic Festival Downtown Mt. Pleasant, PA 724-830-7544 www.mtpleasantglassandethnicfestival.com

Oct 3-5 Annual Smicksburg Fall Festival Smicksburg, PA 814-257-0192

September 27 Derry Railroad Days Festival 10 AM to Dusk, Downtown Derry. Parade, Craft and Food Booths, Live Entertainment. www.derryborough.org Sept 27 Indiana County’s 1st Covered Bridge Festival 10 AM – 7 PM Blue Spruce Park, Indiana, PA 724-463-8636 Sept 27 17th Annual Ebensburg Potato Fest Downtown Ebensburg, PA 814-472-8780 www.potatofest.com Sept 27 Fall Nature Walk Bushy Run Battlefield, Harrison City, PA 724-527-5584 www.bushyrunbattlefield.com Sept 27-28 Hallowboo! Idlewild Park, Ligonier, PA 724-238-3666 www.idlewild.com Sept 28 Nostalgic Nights Car Cruise 5 PM Oakhurst Tea Room, Somerset, PA 724-961-3085 www.oakhursttearoom.com Weekends In Oct Kerber Dairy Pumpkin Festival North Huntingdon, PA 724-863-6930 www.kerbers.com Oct 1 You’ve Got A Friend Day Twin Lakes Park, Greensburg, PA 724-830-3950 Oct 1-12 Mountain Playhouse Presents The Bible: The Complete Word of God (abridged) Mountain Playhouse, Jennerstown, PA 814-629-9201 www.mountainplayhouse.org Oct 1-31 Autumnfest Nemacolin Woodlands Resort, Farmington, PA Call Toll Free 866-386-6957 www.nemacolin.com Oct 2 PA Governor’s Conference For Women 7:30-4:15 David L Lawrence Convention Center, Pittsburgh, PA. 866-251-3537 info@Pagovernorconferenceforwomen.org Oct 2 Senior Social 2 PM Valley Dairy in Latrobe, PA 724-537-2057 www.latroberecreation.org Oct 2 Evenings At Westmoreland: Time Tested Treasures Westmoreland Museum Of American Art Greensburg, PA. 724-837-1500 www.wmuseumaa.org Oct 3-4, 13-14 Halloween Weekend At Benner’s Benner’s Meadow Run Camping & Cabins, Farmington, PA 724-329-4097 www.bennersmeadowrun.com

Every Story Begins At Home.

Oct 4 River City Brass Band Presents “Anthem for America” 8 PM Palace Theatre, Greensburg, PA 1-800-292-7222 www.thepalacetheatre.org

Oct 17 Latshaw Productions Presents “Charlie Prose” Palace Theatre, Greensburg, PA 724-836-8000 www.thepalacetheatre.org Oct 18 Babysitter’s Training Course (Ages 11-15) 9AM-3PM American Red Cross Building, Latrobe, PA. 724-537-2057 www.latroberecreation.org Oct 19 Duquesne University Tamburitzans Ligonier Town Hall, Ligonier, PA 877-826-6437 www.tamburitzans.duq.edu Oct 19, 25 Halloween Murder Mystery Dinner Theater Christian W Klay Winery, Chalk Hill, PA 724-439-3424 www.cwklaywinery.com Oct 17-19 25-26 PA Arts & Crafts Christmas Festival Washington County Fairgrounds, Washington, PA 724-863-4577 www.familyfestivals.com

Oct 4-5 Delmont Apple Festival Shields Farm, Delmont, PA

Oct 18-19 Westmoreland Dollhouse & Miniature Show Mountain View Inn, Greensburg, PA 724-837-8199. www.mountainviewinn.com

Oct 4-5, 10-12 44th Annual Bedford’s Fall Foliage Festival 9AM-5PM Downtown Bedford, PA 800-765-3331 www.bedfordcounty.net

Oct 18-19 Potters Tour 10 AM- 5PM Smicksburg, PA 877-640-7315 www.potterstour.com

Oct 4-5 Hallowboo! Idlewild Park, Ligonier, PA 724-238-3666 www.idlewild.com

Oct 18-19, 25-26 Fall Leaf Rides Noon, 2 PM, 4 PM Kiski Junction Railroad, Schenley, PA. Reservations required 724-2955577. www.kiskijunction.com

Oct 4-5 Autumnfest Seven Springs Mountain Resort, Seven Springs, PA. 800-452-2223 www.7springs.com Oct 4-5 Pumpkinfest Community Park,Confluence, PA 814-395-5080 www.confluencepumpkinfest.org Oct 4-31 Schramm Farms & Orchard Fall Fest Jeannette, PA, 724-744-7320 www.schrammfarms.com Oct 7 Senior Social 2 PM Country Café & Video, Pleasant Unity, PA 724-537-2057 www.latroberecreation.org Oct 8 Free Morning Movie 10:30 AM GLSD Center for Student Creativity, Latrobe, PA. 724-537-2057 www.latroberecreation.org Oct 11 FREE Mystery Saturday 1-4 PM. Greensburg Hempfield Area Library. “The Zombie Murders” is a participatory writing workshop by Mary Ann Mogus and Barb Miller. Oct 9-12 Arsenic & Old Lace Geyer Performing Arts Center, Scottdale, PA 724-887-0887 www.geyerpac.com Oct 10 Latshaw Productions Presents “The Oak Ridge Boys” Palace Theatre, Greensburg, PA 724-836-8000 www.thepalacetheatre.org Oct 10-12 Fort Ligonier Days Midtown Ligonier, PA. 724-238-4200 www.ligonier.com Oct 11 Elko Productions Presents “Joe Satriani” 7:30 PM Palace Theatre, Greensburg, PA 724-836-8000 www.thepalacetheatre.org Oct 16-26 Annual Scarecrow Contest On the Diamond, Ligonier, PA

Oct 21 Annual Halloween Parade Downtown Scottdale, PA www.scottdale.com Oct 23 Latshaw Productions Presents “The Duprees and Jimmy Beaumont & The Skyliners” 8 PM Palace Theatre, Greensburg, PA 724-836-8000 www.thepalacetheatre.org Oct 24 3rd Annual Black Tie & Tails Gala Auction Benefiting Animal Friends Of Westmoreland County 6:30 PM. Greensburg Country Club, Greensburg, PA Oct 24 Halloween Family Movie Night (for ages 6-10) 8 PM Legion Keener Park, Latrobe, PA 724-537-2057 www.latroberecreation.org October 24-26 Otherworldy Weekend and Flash Fiction Contest Readings Sponsored By The Ligonier Valley Writers. 6:30 to 10 p.m. each night, West Overton Museums, Scottdale, PA Oct 24-26 A Halloween Haunting Storytelling Event Compass Inn Museum, Laughlintown, PA 724-238-4983 www.compassinn.com Oct 25 Annual Haunted History Hayride Bushy Run Battle Field, Jeannette, PA 724-527-5584 www.bushyrunbattlefield.com Oct 25 Annual Craft Show Penn Trafford High School, Penn Trafford, PA 724-527-6672 Oct 25 Outdoor Adventure for Ages 3-5 10:30 AM- Noon LK Park Timken Plaza, Latrobe, PA. Register by Oct 17th 724-537-4331 www.latroberecreation.org Oct 25 Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra Presents “Opening Night!” 8 PM Palace Theatre, Greensburg, PA 724-837-1850 www.thepalacetheatre.org

BARN HOURS Spring/Summer (MAY-OCTOBER) Tuesday, Thursday and Friday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Wednesday 10 a.m. – 8 p.m. 1st Saturday ONLY of each month 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. CLOSED Monday and Sunday

MAKE THYME FOR HERBS Growing, Harvesting, and Using Culinary Herbs in the Home Garden. Saturday, September 6 from 11:00 am to 1:00 pm.

TINY WONDERS TIME Children ages 2-4 with an adult can play in nature on the 3rd Wednesday of each month at the Reserve with a naturalist from 10 to 11 am.

FALL HOME SCHOOL SERIES hands-on environmental science classes begin September 11 and continue the 2nd Thursday of each month. The Fall Series theme is WATER. Home Schoolers ages 516 are invited to enroll. Registration Required for all events. Please call 724-537-5284 or 724-537-5285, or visit our website: http://facweb.stvincent.edu.eec. Trails Open Year Round 7 Days a Week, Dawn to Dusk

Oct 28-31 Halloween Rides Kiski Junction Railroad, Schenley, PA Reservations required 724-295-5577 www.kiskijunction.com Nov 1 River City Brass Band Presents “Birth Of A Great City” 8 PM Palace Theatre, Greensburg, PA 1-800-292-7222 www.thepalacetheatre.org Nov 2 Bridal Show Mountain View Inn, Greensburg, PA 724-834-5300 www.mountainviewinn.com Nov 8 Nature Hunt (Preparing for winter) Ages 4-7 & 8-12 1-2:30 PM Creekside Pavillion, Latrobe, PA Register by Oct 24 th 724-537-4331 www.latroberecreation.org

To submit your community event to this calendar, please email complete information to: advertising@LaurelMountainPost.com Questions? Call 724-331-3936

September/October 2008 - 33


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continued from page 28

acquitted and commended for his wisdom in not sacrificing his men in a lost cause. The British army was later defeated by the American army and Fort Ticonderoga retaken.

Turtle and Shawnee Chief Blue Jacket, the Indians ambushed St. Clair’s inferior force, most of whom deserted at first threat. Though St. Clair survived, Ohio History Central reports that “he had two horses shot out from under him and incurred several bullet holes in his clothing.” He resigned from the army the following year, while remaining as governor. It was not until three years later that a well- trained, well-armed force under the command of General Anthony Wayne finally defeated these Indians. After 15 years as Governor of the Northwest Territory, Arthur St. Clair was removed from office by President Thomas Jefferson over a political disagreement about Ohio Statehood. Put simply, St. Clair, a Federalist, favored an Ohio divided into two states for greater congressional representation; Jefferson favored that Ohio be one state.

One Battle Too Many Unfortunately for St. Clair, his last military campaign resulted in what many consider the bloodiest defeat of an American army by an Indian force in the Northwest Territory. In 1791, St. Clair, as territorial governor, was charged with preparing the way for Ohio settlement.. This required negotiation of treaties with the Indians. Some agreed, but most did not and hostilities began. The most fierce and well-trained Indian forces were the Miami and the Shawnee tribes, against whom Governor St. Clair, as senior general of the army, sent General Josiah Harmar and a force of 1500 Satisfaction of Service militiamen to win the peace along His Only Reward the Wabash River. Harmar’s force Today, giving a lifetime of service was soundly defeated. Arthur St. Contact : SueAnn Zippi to one’s country at the level St. Clair Clair,Independent now 57 and Consultant ailing, illdid, might at least entitle one to advisedly led a retaliatory expedition retire in comfort. However as with a force of irregulars who were governor, it’s said Saint Clair was not grossly under-prepared and undersueannzippi@comcast.net good at compromise which made him supplied. Led by Miami Chief Little many enemies. So he should not

724-681-3184

34 - September/October 2008

have been surprised at the lack of support from his peers upon his retirement. Upon return to his family estate in Ligonier, Pennsylvania he found that his wealth had been eroded by unpaid loans and business reverses. Congress would not vote to reimburse him for professional expenditures made as part of his duties while Governor. America’s lack of funds often forced him to guarantee recruitment payrolls and contractor services. These debts were still unpaid at his retirement and debtors won a personal court judgment against St. Clair. His land and holdings were sold at sheriff’s sale and he was forced to live in a small cabin in poverty until his death on August 31, 1818, at age 84. A half- century later, Congress voted what has only been described as a “substantial sum” for the St. Clair heirs.

continued from page 6

aged or commonplace are viewed with fresh appreciation. Looking down the road, I foresee the spirit of Rick Sebak and his films remaining forever young – the rest being history. In fact, my reputation as a seer is riding on it.

51st Annual Springs Folk Festival Experience how our forefathers worked and played!

October 3rd & 4th Friday & Saturday 9 am to 5 pm Craftsmen at work, PA Dutch Food Music All Day Route 669, Springs, PA 814-662-9202 Springs Historical Society

www.springspa.org

For more on Rick Sebak and his national & local specials visit www.wqed.org COVER PHOTOS (left to right) • Rick Sebak - WQED Multimedia • Green River, Wyoming, rocks! It’s impressive. This rock formation known as Tollbooth Rock beside the Green River is one of the natural joys of traveling on the Lincoln Highway. Although this old stretch of highway is now marked simply “Frontage Road,” it follows the path of the old Lincoln Highway. If you’re on nearby Interstate 80, you don’t get to see this amazing landscape. (Photo Credit: Rick Sebak, WQED Pittsburgh) • You Need Lincoln Highway Souvenirs. In Franklin Grove, Illinois, you can find all sorts of merchandise that celebrates the history and the enduring charms of the old Lincoln Highway, and Lynn Asp has been running a small shop here since 1996. She stocks a good supply of guide books, maps, magnets, coffee cups and T-shirts too. Photo Credit: Rick Sebak, WQED Pittsburgh All photos used courtesy of WQED Multimedia.

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


Indiana County, PA ENJOY OUR FESTIVALS AND CELEBRATIONS! September 1-6: Ox Hill Fair September 8-13: Green Township – Cookport Fair September 12-14: Saltsburg Heritage Days September 20-21: Smicksburg Apple Fest September 20-21: 50th Annual Fall Coin Show September 21: Punxsutawney Region AACA Car Show September 26-28: Clymer Days Festival September 27: Indiana County’s 1st Covered Bridge Festival October 3-5: Annual Smicksburg Fall Festival October 18-19: Potter’s Tour in Smicksburg October 18-19, 25-26: Fall Leaf Rides on Kiski Junction Railroad October 28-31: Halloween Rides on Kiski Junction Railroad

Stop by our Visitor Center or Call us for your Complimentary Visitor Guide

INDIANA COUNTY TOURIST BUREAU 2334 Oakland Avenue – Indiana Mall – Indiana, PA 15701 1-877-7INDIANA – WWW.VISITINDIANACOUNTYPA.ORG

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Courtyard by Marriott Marriott Greensburg Greensburg 700 700 Power Power Line Line Drive Drive •• Greensburg, Greensburg, PA PA 15601 15601

Host your next successful meeting in one of our state of the art meeting rooms. Experience the Courtyard by Marriott Pittsburgh Greensburg, the newest and friendliest of Greensburg hotels.

Every Story Begins At Home.

September/October 2008 - 35


36 - September/October 2008

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


Laurel Mountain Post, September-October 2008