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LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST A Magazine from the Heart of Western Pennsylvania

What’s

?

Buzz the

Honey . . . Can You Help? The Feng Shui Way! To Market, To Market Dated Dating

ALSO: Every Story Begins At Home.

In A Word – Pittsburgh! . . . MAY/JUNE 2008

FREE May/June 2008 - 1


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LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


W MAY/JUNE 2008

“To make a prairie it takes a clover and one bee, One clover, and a bee, And revery. The revery alone will do, If bees are few.” – Emily Dickinson, Poems

elcome . . . MOUNTAIN VIEWS

(Volume V, Issue 3)

The Laurel Mountain Post is a bimonthly publication designed to focus on the people, places and events of Westmoreland County and the surrounding areas in the heart of western Pennsylvania. We print stories about real people and their daily lives; feature local merchants, craftsmen and professionals; present short pieces of art & literature; and never lose sight of what makes this area a great place to call home. Most of our writers are not professional reporters, but accomplished local practitioners with years of experience in their respective fields who bring credibility and personality to every article. In October 2006, the BBC News quoted us as “the voice of Pennsylvania.”

Laurel Mountain Post P.O. Box 227 Latrobe, PA 15650 advertising: 724-331-3936 editorial: 724-689-6133 Office Hours by Appointment at 137 East Main Street in Ligonier, Pennsylvania

Cathi Gerhard Williams Editor & Publisher editor@laurelmountainpost.com

Briana Dwire Tomack Marketing Director & Business Manager advertising@laurelmountainpost.com Proud members of the Latrobe, Ligonier, and Strongland Chambers of Commerce, The Pittsburgh Advertising Federation, and The Pennsylvania Newspaper Assocation Special thanks to our advertisers for supporting this community publication!

www.LaurelMountainPost.com

Our distribution of 15,000 reaches beyond Westmoreland County into the neighboring counties of Allegheny, Washington, Armstrong, Bedford, Cambria, Indiana, Somerset and Fayette. In 2006 our web traffic increased by 53% and continues to grow. Every day, more and more readers and advertisers across western Pennsylvania are discovering the Laurel Mountain Post.

Every Story Begins At Home.

Cathi Gerhard Williams

Buzz Words There are lots of buzz words – every industry has them. They are overused, trite, and usually insincere. But people use these words and phrases because they are easy – and expected. Buzz words are the most direct way to prove our intelligence, demonstrate our hip factor, and most importantly, impress others. However, they also reveal our tendency to hide behind safe walls built strong and high from years of insecurity. It takes courage to reveal our true opinions and knowledge: less to offer criticism and even more to actually say something nice. And mean it. I always hated the girls who complimented everyone’s hair or clothes each day in junior high school. It seemed like they were just fishing for an INSINCERE compliment in return. I would rather say nothing than something false. I thought it added extra value to the things I DID eventually say. Instead, most people thought I was just cold and disinterested. The point I missed was in trying to find something positive in every situation. That takes effort, as well as enthusiasm. Sometimes the key to successful uses of buzz is to identify the previously unacknowledged or overlooked aspect of a subject. Take the time to look beyond the obvious. As usual, I have a multiple meanings in my use of the phrase “buzz words.” First and foremost there is our founding belief behind the Laurel Mountain Post: to tell the best possible stories about the heart of western Pennsylvania. There is something wonderful and

interesting about every one of you out there! It might sound corny to say that we are your cheerleaders, but it’s true . . . we don’t even have to be drunk or sedated before surgery to say, “I love you, man!”

editor@LaurelMountainPost.com

Cathi Gerhard Williams Briana Dwire Tomack advertising@LaurelMountainPost.com

In other words, no buzz required. We love you just the way you are, to quote Billy Joel.

The other tune for this particular piano forte is quite literally “bees.” The kind that buzz and sometimes sting; the kind that were busy doing their jobs behind us in the lilacs and rhododendrons as we posed for this issue’s page three portraits. It’s that time of year when they are busy doing their jobs - no matter how inconvenient we might find them. They are dependable, and most importantly, fruitful. Their intense efforts yield countless things we take for granted. It is so easy to yell and swat when they get in our way, and yet so hard to say “thank-you” for the honey that sweetens our tea and the apples trees they pollinate. By the time fall arrives, we forget all about their hard work months earlier. It’s hard to see something if it isn’t right in front of us. That’s where the effort comes back, in the form of a pause or consideration. There are times we have to close our eyes to see . . . to focus on what’s important, and remember things we can’t live without. So much happens “behind the scenes” in our tiny little world view. Bees may be small, but humans can be even smaller in their selfish thinking. What are my personal buzz words? I think I have to go with: appraise, appreciate and acknowledge. All good stories have to be found and then told in order to be heard. And, usually, they all begin at home.

May/June 2008 - 3


The Feng-Shui of Trees by Ann Trump, CPIA

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D’s Windy Cottage Specialty Gift Items and Home Decor 5924 Route 981, Latrobe

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Gift Certificates Available

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We have a year-round Christmas Room!

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“For in the true nature of things, if we rightly consider, every green tree is far more glorious than if it were made of gold and silver.” Martin Luther said this in the 16th century and it still holds true, but what if trees could actually help you get some of that silver and gold or at least keep what you have? In Feng Shui, (pronounced fung shway) trees represent strength, are considered a source of protection and can offer support for your health, as well as for your wealth. Based on ancient Chinese wisdom, Feng Shui can be summed up as the art of placement. Feng Shui operates on the premise that our surroundings can dramatically affect the quality of our lives. By intentionally manipulating our environment, we can become happier, healthier, and more abundant. In landscape Feng Shui, trees can be a great way to keep the bad things out and keep the good things coming. For example, property that slopes downward behind a house represents the loss of vital life force (chi) which can impact the health and finances of the occupants. Chi, which is life energy, circulates throughout the environment. If chi is not impeded, energy flows harmoniously and life is good. If chi is stagnant or moves too fast, as in the case of the sloping backyard, areas of our life can begin to break down. Planting a row of trees behind the house acts to shore up the energy and symbolically keeps it from flowing away. This translates into keeping the health and wealth where it belongs. It is also believed to be difficult to conceive sons in a home that has sloping land behind the house, so if it’s boys that you want, plant the row of trees. Below are some guidelines for you to follow when thinking about your landscaping and the use of trees. • Trees should be healthy and thriving. Remove any dead or dying trees. Trees that are dead or in poor condition will drain vital chi from the occupants of the home. This is particularly important if someone in the home is elderly or ill. Trees planted on the eastern side of the property will promote good health. Large trees, such as oaks, are good for this purpose. • Trees provide excellent protection and can block negative and unwanted energy. Any structure that is near or facing your house can emit unwanted energies. The neighbor’s house, cemeteries, bars, gas stations, etc. all can be blocked

by planting trees. Roads that lead up to the house or that run by the house can cause chi to move too quickly and trees can slow the energy down and invite it to your home. • Trees can raise the property’s energy. Trees are life giving. In China, tree energy is called sheng chi, which means growth energy. Planting trees on your property will bless the occupants, especially children, with well-being and encourages chi to linger. Planted on the eastern side of the property, trees bring good health and encou-rage personal growth. • Eliminate struggle and provide support. If your house sits out in the open on flat land, it can represent struggle in key areas of your life. Planting trees can ease burdens. If there are anger issues in the home from the husband, plant trees to the left. If the anger is from the wife, trees should be planted to the right. • Do not plant trees too close to the house. Planted too close to the house, trees will symbolically smother the occupants. In this case, energy cannot circulate freely and is particularly harmful if the occupants suffer from circulation problems. Trees should never touch the house and should not block the front door. This represents opportunities, particularly in career, being blocked. The type of tree can also play a part in what you are trying to create in your life. Apple trees bring good marital relationships. Cherry trees represent physical beauty. Oak trees stand for masculine strength and virility. Pines promise long life and ease with emotions. Trees are majestic and can instill a sense of peace and wonder. They can add a sense of stability to our endeavors. They provide symbolic shelter from the storms in our lives. Placed correctly on our property they can help us to reach for the stars. Henry David Thoreau once said “I frequently tramped eight or ten miles through the deepest snow to keep an appointment with a beechtree, or a yellow birch, or an old acquaintance among the pines.” Let’s hope you have only to step out your back door. For more information on Feng Shui consultations contact Ann Trump for an appointment. Trump’s Landscaping is available for all of your landscaping needs and is the area’s number one landscape company to contact for landscape Feng Shui. Both can be reached at 724-925-1763.

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


THE LIGONIER CHEF Scott Sinemus

Honey . . . Can You Help? I always seem to have too many irons in the fire this time of the year, so naturally it’s tough finding something pleasantly inspiring enough for me to want to write about. I started reading the May issue of National Geographic, the ad opposite page 4 caught my attention. Haagen Dazs is introducing honeybee friendly ice creams! I smile knowing I just found my inspiration. On the following page there is a US map with graphics of the fruits in which states have been affected by a honeybee crisis. Normally I enjoy seeing PA featured on maps, but in this case we had a bright red apple looming. We are among 35 States that are currently affected; the phenomenon is called Colony Collapse Disorder. Colonies of honeybees are rapidly vanishing all over the world. Most people seem to be completely oblivious to the crisis let alone the magnitude of the situation. It’s only when there are suddenly no blueberries from Maine or pears from Washington will people take notice. If we all don’t start doing something about it that day is certainly not far off. Einstein has been quoted as saying that civilization will collapse without the honeybee. Perhaps the most alarming information is that this phenomenon has been detected since 2006! While I was looking at the ad I remembered an episode of Nature we saw after Fort Ligonier Days last year. It was called Silence of the Bees. I have to admit that there are far too many alarmists with access to television these days, but this program sent chills down my spine. I cannot stress enough the need for everyone to become familiar with the crisis at hand. There’s a scene in which people in a remote part of China are pollinating pear trees by hand because they’ve already lost their bees. There is a dramatic reduction in the crop, but at least they have managed to save the trees. Haagen-Dazs is the first marketing I have seen addressing Every Story Begins At Home.

this issue, if there were others my apologies. H.D. has created a very clever website called helpthehoneybees.com I must confess that the website is very well done. They present the facts in an aesthetically pleasing manner that allows the severity of this pandemic to sink in slowly. Children can easily navigate the site, and making your own bee to include in your “bee-mail” informing your friends is just as fun for adults. Stodgy adults will be pleased to know there’s a pre-made bee so you can just fill in the email addresses. Under the “how we’re helping” section of the site there is a link to Penn State’s research department! The University of California at Davis is also featured. The facts presented on their sites are both shocking and disturbing. I was going to write about picnics and easy foods to take to them for this article, but after reading about the bee’s I feel it would be socially irresponsible not to bring this to the attention of as many people as I can. I strongly encourage you to check out the links at the end of this article. In the meantime here are some things you can do to help. Plant Bee Friendly Flowers Planting bee friendly plants such as lavender, jasmine, rosemary~ which should always be planted at your garden gate anyway, coreopsis, violets, thyme, wisteria, bluebells, trumpet vines, sunflowers, coneflowers, and cosmos can actually increase the honeybee populations near you. Planting fruit trees is also very beneficial as most of them flower in the early spring when bees start looking for pollen. Raspberry bushes are also extremely good for bees since they produce an abundance of nectar. The added bonus to planting berries & fruit trees is that you get to enjoy the fruit produced because the bees have worked so hard pollinating them. There are actually a multitude of insects animals and eventually people that will benefit

from your efforts, several if not most of the plants suggested are perennials which really only require the effort once! Support Bee Keepers Buy local honey and products made from beeswax like candles. Use honey as an alternative to sugar at home & in restaurants. Learn more about beekeeping and possibly consider starting a hive of your own. Inform Family & Friends Getting the message out is extremely important. Aside from verbally telling people you know, sending a “bee-mail” from the H.D. site is a great way to start. Donate Money There are two links on helpthe honeybees.com where you can donate to either the Penn State or the University of California at Davis program. I was talking to my neighbor, Joe, who raises bees in our back yard. His hive has also been affected: out of four boxes three of them are empty. He’s not quite sure the reason, but he has treated with antibiotics, and there are no signs of mites or foul brood. His plan for this year is to grow bees instead of honey. He’s expecting what bees are left in his hive to double by July, but will still be short enough bees to harvest honey this year. I asked Joe how long he’s been involved with bee keeping and he said it’s been about six years. He mentioned it’s a very easy and fairly inexpensive hobby. He got completely set up for about $300. Joe gives all the honey away to friends and family. I personally love having honey that I know came from our own back yard. It is extremely important to buy local honey. If you don’t have the option, which quite frankly is nearly impossible since nearly every area in the world there is a place where you can find locally grown honey. Joe suggests checking the honey that you purchase in the market

to see where it comes from. Never buy honey that comes from China or Asia, since most of the time they do not take the antibiotic strips out of the hive and as a result people wind up ingesting the antibiotics. One other point that Joe made was that since most of the bees affected are from large commercial operations, if the smaller independent beekeepers would grow and divide a hive a year it would help to sustain the dwindling populations. It seems almost too simple of a solution, but makes perfect sense. I had a biosphere in glass for a number of years in Boston, still one of the coolest impulse buys I’ve ever had at the Museum of Science… everyone that ever came to visit couldn’t help but stare into it long and often during their visit. One of the most perceptive comments ever made about it was that it’s impossible not to realize that our planet is just a bigger version of what they were looking at. When I moved I bequeathed it to a friend to take care of for me. I asked her one day how it was doing, after a pause, she said she had put it too close to the sun and essentially poached the entire thing! After a tirade from me she said, “I didn’t put it on the window sill or anything, I just moved it a little because it looked better on that table”! I sincerely hope that we’re not pushing our planet closer to the sun just to look pretty and take the easy way out. I urge you to take a moment and actually do something that will make yourself get the special sense of satisfaction only doing a good deed can bring you. The links to the Hagen Dazs, Penn State, & Cal U Davis are: www.helpthehoneybees.com www.rps.psu.edu/probing/bee.html http://entomology.ucdavis.edu/dept/ beebio.cfm www.ebeehoney.com/zPA.html is also a site with many items for sale as well as some local contacts.

May/June 2008 - 5


Jerry D. Felton, P.T. integrating traditional and alternative physical therapy services

Piecing Together The Puzzle That Is Autism by Jennifer Smoker

2000 Tower Way, Suite 2039 Greensburg, PA 15601 Phone:(724)834-7400 Fax:(724)834-7402 www.JerryDFeltonPT.com JRFelton@aol.com

Heather & Bob Kuban Owners

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Left is right. Right is wrong. Up is down. Top is bottom. Open is closed. Start to finish and stop to go. Reverse to move forward. The end is the beginning You know but you don’t know! What? Imagine trying to drive your car by following the above instructions. How far do you think you would get? Let’s add in the garbled voice of Charlie Brown’s (from Peanuts) teacher and turn up the volume as loud as it will go. You’re lost in a fog without windshield wipers or headlights somewhere in the middle of Umpa Lumpa Land. I asked an autistic acquaintance (who asked to remain anonymous) what is it like to be autistic? He said he didn’t know. It took some real probing to get the above surreal snip-its. In all honesty, I’m still not sure if I interpreted it right. We both became frustrated by the communication gap. This is his reality and his alone. Even among the autistic each experience is unique with many variations on the theme. Back in 1943, Dr. Leo Kanner of Johns Hopkins University in a behavioral study of 11 children first applied the term autism (from the Greek “auto” meaning “self”) in describing Donald T. “He seems to be selfsatisfied. He has no apparent affection when petted. He does not observe the fact that anyone comes or goes, and never seems glad to see father or mother or any playmate. He seems almost to draw into his shell and live within himself.” Dr. Kanner further commented, “These children have come into the world with innate inability to form the usual biologically provided affective contact with people.” Dr. Bruno Bettelheim, director of the Orthogenic School, a home for disturbed children associated with the University of Chicago expanded on these observations hypothesizing that children became autistic due to what he termed the “refrigerator mothers”. That is, emotionally distant mothers some how cause their child’s autism. It’s a theory that has since been discounted but the stigma still lingers even today. (http://www.bestbehaviour.ca/ briefhistory.htm) The stereotypic perception of the autistic portrays an individual who never smiles, avoids eye contact and sits in the corner banging their head against the wall seemingly oblivious to any pain. Fortunately, researchers now realize the condition encompasses so much more. Referred to as a spectrum disorder, autism is measured by degrees of functioning ranging from high to low with impairment

rated as mild to severe. “At the highest end of the spectrum is Asperger Syndrome, sometimes called “The Little Professor” syndrome. At the lowest end of the spectrum is the disorder that’s most often called “classic autism,” which often includes mental retardation. In between are a variety of pervasive developmental disorders including Rett syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS).” (http:// autism.about.com/od/autismterms/f/ defautism.htm) Autism is a complex neurobiological disorder characterized by differences and / or disability in thinking, feeling, language and social interaction. Basically, the brain of an autistic person decodes the messages it receives from the senses differently. A smiling face for most of us implies friendliness or happiness. The autistic brain doesn’t necessarily make that connection. Noises that most of us dismiss as minor annoyances may grate on the autistic senses like fingernails on a chalkboard. The social niceties most of us employ as buffers to spare someone’s feelings elude the autistic. If you ask them “Do I look fat in this outfit?” You will receive a straight up, honest reply. So don’t ask unless you really want to know! Autistic people are also quite literal in their thinking. I was riding on a school bus once with a group of students. As the bus approached an underpass, a freight train was passing on the track above. I innocently remarked that we were going to be “run over” by the train. A child with “autistic tendencies” over heard my comment and let out a bloodcurdling scream! In her mind, “run over,” meant only one thing, CRASH! No matter how I tried to explain that it was a figure of speech, that the tunnel protected us and we were perfectly safe, she was convinced we were all going to be hurt. Even after we left the train far behind she remained highly agitated and fixated on a train wreck scenario. People often mistake an autistic episode for a temper tantrum. I recently talked with a Greensburg grandmother (who I will call G.G. to protect her family’s privacy) of autistic twin boys. Frustrated with trying to explain the situation, she became so fed up with the stares of disapproval and snide remarks that she actually had business cards made up stating “This child has autism so don’t be so LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


rude!” These kids (who look like typical kids) aren’t acting out for attention or throwing a fit because they didn’t get their way. They just can’t help it. “People just don’t realize, places like the mall can be too much stimulation for an autistic, this causes melt downs.” Daily life with autistic twins can be a real struggle. Running a mixer or a vacuum cleaner proves problematic because the noise agitates the kids. Even something as simple as getting a haircut is hard because they don’t like being touched. Getting a tooth filled required a trip to Children’s Hospital where the child was sedated in one of the operating rooms in order to perform the procedure. What the rest of us consider to be minor events, turn out to be major hurdles for the autistic and their families. “In the early years, I had everything tied down. My house was secured like Fort Knox; even adults had trouble getting out! We were so afraid the kids would hurt themselves or each other. They slept very little so neither did we.” But for G.G. the biggest heartbreak was the twin’s in- ability to communicate. “They can’t tell you if they’re sick or hurting, you have to be an FBI agent to decipher a conversation.” When the twins were born they appeared to be developing normally. By the age of 2, they were even saying a few words then they just stopped. Doctors assured the family that everything was fine. “They’re boys. They’re twins. They have their own language. Just give it time, they’ll catch up by the time they start kindergarten.” But for G.G. it didn’t jive and she just couldn’t wait that long to find out if the doctors were right. So she started doing research on why kids don’t talk. “Thank God, for the Internet, although, I came across the term “autism” I had no idea what it meant.” The family sought a second opinion and after extensive testing it was determined that the twins were autistic. “It was a nightmare! There’s just so much information thrown at you all at once. It was mind-boggling!” A chance meeting at a yard sale brought together G.G.’s family with another family dealing with autism. “It was

wonderful to have someone to talk to and compare notes with. We became a support system for each other.” The twins began receiving services and by the age of 4 or 5 started saying little words. According to G.G., “They can now recite an entire movie if you ask them to but conversation is still like pulling teeth!” Now 10, they love roller coasters and trains. “I’ve learned more about trains than I ever cared to know! They both want to be train engineers when they grow up.” G.G. realizes that there is still a long way to go. She worries about their futures but she is a very proud grandma. She credits early intervention with helping the twins be where they are today. “I just can’t stress it enough! You have to trust your own instincts. Go with your heart. You know if there is something wrong. You can just sense it! Speak up, push for testing, get the help. You are your child’s strongest ally and best advocate.” To that end, G.G., participates in the “Walk Now For Autism” sponsored by Autism Speaks Events to publicize and raise money for autism. To date she has raised more than $7,000 for the cause. For G.G. and her family life is very much one step at a time, one walk at a time and just maybe one more piece to the puzzle! Be sure to look for the next installment featuring A Unity Parent’s Dream for their Autistic Daughter in the July/August Issue of the Laurel Mountain Post! Special Thanks to G.G. for sharing her family’s story with our readers and to the rest of you (you know who you are) without your input (both direct and indirect) I would have never been able to write this article. Many, many thanks! Sources Used: www.autismspeaks.org (a comprehensive guide) useful to parents www.cdc.gov (government statistics and information on early intervention) www.ninds.nih.gov (autism fact sheet) www.autism-society.org (Autism Society of America) www.nimh.nih.gov (National Institute of Mental Health) www.cyh.com (site geared to talking to kids about autism)

Please join us for a

Spaghetti Dinner to benefit Scott & Phoebe Dietrich! Date:

Saturday, May 24, 2008

Time:

12:00 to 5:00 pm (We will stop serving dinner at 4:30)

Place:

Derry Area Senior High School Cafeteria

Cost:

Adults (ages 13 & up) Kids (ages 3 to 12) Kids (2 and under)

$6.00 $3.00 FREE

Dinner will include salad, spaghetti, bread, and a drink. Desserts will be available for purchase. We will also have a Chinese Auction, 50/50 Drawing, and more. All proceeds will benefit Scott and Phoebe Dietrich for Scott’s upcoming kidney transplant. For Information Call: Advanced Tickets Available

724-532-2701 724-424-7262

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May/June 2008 - 7


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814-442-5690 501 at North & Diamond Streets Berlin, Pennsylvania 15530

As part of its mission, the Laurel Area Partnership on Aging intends to develop ideas for solving existing problems for seniors while coordinating support services that already exist. To more efficiently achieve its many and varied goals, the partnership has created a steering committee to direct general operations. You are welcome to attend our monthly meeting the second Wednesday of each month at the Trinity Lutheran Church, Latrobe, at 8:00AM. For more information, please call 724-834-3278.

8 - May/June 2008

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT by Paula J. Forte

Leading In Reading According to a press statement made by the National Education Association in March, 2001, seventy percent of middle school students read more than ten books a year, compared with only forty-nine percent of high school students. Parents, educators and librarians would like to see the number of readers increase as children advance through school. However, the question has always been how to compete with the extracurricular activities that are present in the modern high school. Some educators might have found a way. Since 2001, Greensburg Salem Middle School, under the direction of Nancy Martz, has sponsored the Westmoreland Interscholastic Reading Competition or WIRC. Ms. Martz was convinced that the activity was valuable to young readers and decided to host the competition at Greensburg Salem Middle School with the help and guidance of the Westmoreland County Association of School Librarians. Ms. Martz acted as the hostess of the competition from 2001 to 2007. After Ms. Martz’s retirement, Debbie Kozuch assumed her position as middle school librarian. She and Carrie Vottero, Greensburg Salem’s senior high school librarian, currently cochair the event. The first event, held at Greensburg Salem Middle School, was only attended by twelve middle school teams. However, the participants enjoyed the contest, and the milieu had to be moved to Seton Hill University the following year to accommodate twenty-four middle school teams and six high school teams in a new senior high school division. This year, forty-three middle school teams and thirty-one high school teams participated in the two day event held at Seton Hill University. The rules for the competition are simple. The books are chosen from a list that is supplied by the Intermediate Unit #8 Appalachian Conference. The list consists of approximately eighty books for each division. Each spring, a committee of Westmoreland county school librarians under the direction of Carol Dinco selects forty books for the middle school division and thirty books for the senior high school division. This year’s reading lists included classics like Hesse’s Siddhartha and Huxley’s Brave New World, as well as best sellers such as Wish You Well by David Baldacci. The aim of the selection committee is to try to appeal to as many reading tastes as possible. Therefore, a variety of literature genres, reading levels and interest levels are included on both lists. The librarians then take these reading lists back to their schools and

form reading teams. Teams consist of eight to twelve students who share a love of reading. There are no set guidelines for how to coach these reading teams. Some schools have after-school practices, some are able to fit in discussions during study times, one even sponsored an all-night read-in on a Friday night! The idea is for the students to have a chance to discuss and share what they have read with others who share their love of reading and books. In March, the teams assemble at Seton Hill University and are asked questions about the books. The students are encouraged to discuss their answers with their teammates before their captain gives the final answer to the judge. This year’s high school competition was dominated by Hempfield High School. Three of their four teams took the first three places, while Greater Latrobe High School came in fourth and Franklin Regional High School placed fifth. On the middle school level, Ligonier Valley Middle School placed first, Connellsville Junior High West took second, Mary Queen of Apostles School took third, Wendover Middle School placed fourth, and Valley Middle School took fifth place. Every participant, however, benefited by the opportunity to share his/her love of reading with peers and by an increase in reading speed and comprehension.

Ligonier Valley Middle School took first place at the Westmoreland Interscholastic Reading Competition held at Seton Hill University on March 18. They outscored 42 other teams to capture this honor.

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


Henry Polasko – The Inspiration Behind the Westmoreland Interscholastic Reading Competition by Carol Dinco The original reading competition upon which the WIRC is modeled was initiated by Henry Polasko. Now retired from Forest Hills High School in Sidman, PA, Henry spent years working with students both within the school and on the playing field. As a classroom English teacher and department chair and sponsor of the forensics, mock trial and academic quiz teams, Mr. Polasko was well-versed in the difficulties students face as they move beyond the mechanics of reading into acquiring the subtle differences of the various literary formats. “Verbal emergence” is the phrase Henry prefers for this difficult challenge. After eight years in the classroom, Henry earned his Masters in Library Science from the University of Pittsburgh. As a librarian, he became aware of an additional disconnect. His library was stocked with the best the writing world had to offer, but the resources were greatly underutilized by the students in general. His career-quest of connecting kids though reading needed a new venue, one that combined fun and literary refinement through teamwork. He

turned to team sports for his model. The reading competition was born. As a team, eight to twelve readers divvy up the competition’s book list. Most of the participants are responsible for a minimum of four or five titles until all titles are covered. While the teams are free to practice by whatever method works for them, there is a required match format at the competition itself. The team is encouraged to huddle and conference in whispers, having 20-30 seconds in which to supply the agreed upon answer to a moderator’s question through their captain/spokesperson. Adding together the amount of a team’s correct and stolen points from their opponent’s missed questions determines the round winner. The total score from all rounds determines each team’s placement in the event. From the first competition, held in 1990 by the Applachia IU #8 which includes Cambria, Somerset, Bedford, and Blair counties, the event grew so popular so quickly that it soon was extended to all three divisions—elementary, middle, and high school—and a second night

was added to the schedule. In 1996, IU#8’s Special Projects Coordinator Joan Conway assumed the responsibility of orchestrating the event. In 2001, Nancy Martz, GreensburgSalem’s middle school librarian, recently retired, brought the concept of the reading competition home to Westmoreland County. Currently sponsored jointly by the GreensburgSalem School District and the Westmoreland County Association of School Librarians, the event has proven so popular it has outgrown the Westmoreland host site, Seton Hill University. Henry Polasko brought to fruition a venue to fulfill an outstanding need—a means to keep kids motivated and connected to books in an environment oversaturated with the “slick and the click.” His vision of the competition going to a state level after regional matches has yet to materialize. He had also hoped that schools would participate in matches on a weekly basis much as they do on a sports schedule. However, through his efforts, much has been accomplished in that direction. We thank Mr. Henry Polasko for the opportunity that he has enabled.

SHOPS AROUND THE CORNER Getting To Know Unique Local Businesses and the People Behind Them

Greensburg Cafes Offer More Than Just Coffee When looking for their next caffeine fix, most people turn to the standby— Starbucks. However, this chain isn’t the only place serving a good cup of coffee in the area. Greensburg is host to several small coffee shops, offering unique environments to get perked up. Downtown Greensburg alone has two small cafes breaking out of the Starbucks mold— the American Coffee Shop on Main Street and DV8 Espresso Bar and Gallery on South Pennsylvania Avenue (across from the Greensburg Hempfield Area Library). Each café has a specialized atmosphere, creating more than just the mainstream coffee shop experience. The American Coffee Shop takes a more traditional view of the coffeehouse, once called “Penny Universities” since the learned and not so learned would often discuss literature and philosophy over penny cups of coffee. The coffee shop is adorned with Revolutionary Americana décor, since, as the owner Marylynn Padgett said, “It’s like the beginning. Our founding fathers and mothers were the beginning of freedom and this is the beginning of our store.” Additionally, it specializes in bringing customers an array of freshly ground coffees for sale, ranging from blueberry cheesecake to Every Story Begins At Home.

tiramisu. The café is the only one in town that specializes in flavored coffees and about 10% of the sales come from bulk coffee, said manager Donna Olecki. Although it looks like a small place, the American Coffee Shop has comfort upstairs and a downstairs seating area for customers. The shop features not just specialized coffee drinks, such as lattes and cappuccinos, but fruit smoothes and a large variety of food including lunch items. Unlike Starbucks, that has a menu limited to just pastries, the American Café serves soup and sandwiches to a regular crowd of customers who range from court house workers to Seton Hill University students. DV8 differs from the typical chain through its avant-garde style and décor, even extending to its exterior. The front of the store is elaborately decorated in a huge 3D mosaic done by local artist Brian McCall, making the café hard to miss. The inside is equally eclectic, since the coffeehouse also doubles as an art gallery for local artists. Painting, sculpture, and jewelry line the walls and exhibit cases, creating an environment for a variety of customers. “We don’t have a target demographic. We treat our customers as people who are our friends. We genuinely care about this town and

the people in it. Our customers value divergentthinking, honesty, and open-mindedness— as do we,” said owner Terrie Barill who opened the café six years ago with her husband Mark. While DV8 does include a variety of specialty coffees, it has lately grown to offer over 50 different loose-leaf teas. Rather than offering a larger selection of food items, Barill instead focuses on offering the customers a little art with their brew. DV8 also draws attention by sponsoring a number of art-related events. Local musicians perform, knitting circles meet, and writers can even perform their works at a monthly open mike poetry night. As Barill said, there are so many creative people in Greensburg who are looking for a place to come and work on projects, get opinions, and be open about their creativity. The groups grew out of this need. “There is a lack of venues for performing original music and poetry in Greensburg,” explaned Barill. “We decided to schedule bands and events to fill this void. We feel we have helped promote positive change and revitalization in Greensburg by offering something unique to the community.” – By Vanessa Kolberg

May/June 2008 - 9


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Ligonier Country Market Changes This Season! This season’s Ligonier Country Market begins on May 24th and runs every Saturday through October 4th from 8:00 am till Noon. Early risers and long time Ligonier Country Market customers will want to note that the starting time of the Market has been moved back one hour from 7:00am to 8:00 am to accommodate the vendors who had to arrive so early in the morning that they were often setting up in the dark. The Market will offer even more varieties of homemade or homegrown products than before. Many new vendors have signed up for the Market along with all of the tried and true local favorites. In 1976 as the crescendo was building for a massive national celebration, the leaders of the Ligonier Bicentennial planning committee tapped John West to organize a farmers’ market as a part of the local festivities. That year ten vendors setup their tables and spread their wares in a barn then known as the American Legion Barn. The vendors who regularly attended the market during that first season were enthusiastic about their sales and profits and were ready to do it again. The Country Market at Ligonier was incorporated as a Penn-

Chesterfields Restaurant Farmers’ Market Route 30 East, North Huntington Saturday 9 –Noon Contact Paul Sarver 724-834-2334

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Greensburg Community Market Lynchfield Park & Aerobic Center, Rt. 819 Saturday 9 –Noon Contact Paul Sarver 724-834-2334 Greensburg Downtown Farmers’ Market Behind City Hall, Main Street Tuesday 3-6 p.m. Contact Paul Sarver 724-834-2334 Indiana Downtown Farmers’ Market 8th & Church Streets Wed 4-6 ; Sat 9:45 – noon; July 5- Sept. 30 Contact Jane Dorr 724-463-9170 Johnstown Downtown Farmer’s Market Central Park corner of Main and Franklin Streets; (814) 536-8616 Friday 9-3; jbyers@cojtwn.com

sylvania non-profit corporation in March of 1977 and there was no looking back. Continuously operating since 1976, the Market will celebrate its thirty-third season of operation this summer. The venue has changed a number of times from the barn to the high-school to the grounds adjacent to the barn to the present location on the Loyalhanna Watershed Association property at the end of West Main Street in Ligonier Township. From a modest start of ten vendors, over one hundred vendors setup the tents and stalls during the summer of 2007. A shopper can find a marvelous selection of farm fresh produce, locally grown plants and flowers, delicious prepared foods and beverages and a dizzying array of arts and crafts items. Fifteen volunteer members of the board of directors comprising vendors and interested citizens manage and operate the market for twenty Saturdays each summer. Because of the wonderful ambience of Ligonier and the interest and vitality of all the participants, the Country Market at Ligonier has become the largest and most successful farmers’ market in western Pennsylvania.

Latrobe Farmers Market Memorial Stadium Parking Lot, Tues 3-7 Laurel Valley Tree Farm The “Mail Pouch” Flea Market is directly on the Laurel Highlands Scenic Byway, 12 miles north of Ligonier and 1 1/2 miles south of New Florence, PA. Second Saturdays, May-September, 9-1. Ligonier Country Market Springer Road between Quik G’s gas station and the Senior High School Sat 8AM - Noon Contact Jim Mikula (724) 238-6702 Monroeville Lions Farmer’s Market Gateway High School Parking Lot May-November 9-Noon

Buying local food keeps your dollars circulating in your community. Getting to know the farmers who grow your food builds relationships based on understanding and trust, the foundation of strong communities. For mroe information about buying locally-grown foods, visit

Mount Pleasant Farmers’ Market Levin’s parking lot off Main Street Wednesday 4-7 Sarver Hill Route 66 Farmers’ Market Exit 9, Toll Route 66 North, Greensburg Thursday 3-6 Contact Paul Sarver 724-834-2334 Scottdale Farmers’ Market Rite Aid Parking Lot Rt.819 South Sunday 4-7 p.m Contact Tom Bailey 724-887-0952 Somerset County Farmers’ Market Georgian Place north parking lot Saturday 9-Noon; Wednesday 3-6 July 14- Sept. 27 Contact Larry Cogan 814-445-7420 Springs Farmers Market Saturdays May 24 - September 13 8AM-2PM Route 669 in Springs, PA; 3 miles north of Grantsville, MD; 4 miles south of Salisbury, PA; 814-662-4366

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LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


The Blairsville Area Underground Railroad Project, Passport to Freedom, recently held “The Quiet Heroes Luncheon” benefit at the Chestnut Ridge Golf Resort & Conference Center in Blairsville, PA. Bernatha Taylor (c) presented (on behalf of Gail and Ken Henshaw) Underground Railroad Mural to UGRR President Joy Fairbanks (l) and Secretary Nikki Cravotta (r). The artwork was created by Tunde Afolayan, a Nigerian-born artist committed to abstract expressionism. Find out more about UGRR by calling the Historical Society of the Blairsville Area at 724-459-0580 or go to www.undergroundrailroadblairsvillepa.com. – Photo by Barbara M. Neill

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Sunday Evening Band Concert Series: May 25 - August 31 Antiques on the Diamond: June 14 Ligonier House Tour: June 21 American Eagle Outfitters Tour of Pennsylvania Bike Race starts in Ligonier on June 28

Sponsored by the Ligonier Valley Chamber of Commerce 120 East Main Street • Ligonier, PA 15658 • 724-238-4200 • www.ligonier.com *Commemorative Ligonier Diamond Lampshades (with scene pictured above) on sale exclusively at Equine Chic, 100 East Main Street. Photo by Bruce Henderson.

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Every Story Begins At Home.

May/June 2008 - 11


REPARTEE FOR TWO Barbara M. Neill

In A Word . . . Pittsburgh! Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow “2008 Pittsburgher of the Year”

William E. “Bill” Strickland, Jr., President and CEO Einstein said, “Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is to not stop questioning.” In this the year of the city’s 250th anniversary, I thought it would prove enlightening to speak with a cross-section of the city’s luminaries about Pittsburgh – past, present and future. From his/her unique vantage point each of my participants answered the following questions with 1word responses. Elaboration was optional and showcasing of venues was encouraged.

1 2 3

Looking back on Pittsburgh’s rich history, in your opinion which individual best represented the spirit of the city and could qualify for the title of “The Quintessential Pittsburgher?” What does your organization offer the metropolitan area today that no other can, or does? As the city and its residents look to the future, what goal or objective would you place at the top of your personal “To Do” list for Pittsburgh?

Manchester Bidwell Corporation, www.manchesterbidwell.org 1. IRVIS – K. Leroy Irvis believed in diversity. He believed that everyone could make a contribution to the greater good. He believed that Pittsburgh could rate as one of the world’s great cities.

Photo by Julie May Queen

2. INNOVATION (in the social sector) – Since 1968, Manchester Bidwell Corporation’s (MBC) non-profit organizations have served thousands of adults and youth in the Pittsburgh region by providing instruction, guidance, and mentorship in career and arts education. Through education, MBC and its subsidiaries — Bidwell Training Center (BTC) and Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild (MCG) support individuals and entities to build, strengthen and enhance communities. For 40 years, BTC has attracted national recognition for its innovative and career-oriented training that changes the lives of adults in transition in southwestern Pennsylvania. BTC provides literacy and remedial education as well as partnering with leading corporations to design high-caliber, market-relevant career training programs that lead to entry level employment. For 40 years, MCG has been a unique haven – a multidisciplined arts and learning center that fosters a sense of belonging, interconnections, and hope within the urban community. MCG houses visual arts, design, digital imaging, ceramics and photography classrooms along with a concert hall and an art gallery – all designed to showcase the roles of creativity and craftsmanship in learning. 3. GROWTH (amid diversity) – If Pittsburgh is going to survive, it needs to become a worldclass city – not just a great city of the US.

Dan Onorato, Chief Executive Officer Allegheny County, www.alleghenycounty.us 1. CALIGUIRI – the late Pittsburgh Mayor Richard S. “Dick” Caliguiri (1931-1988) 2. STABILITY – Since taking office in 2004, I have held the line on property taxes every year. In fact, homeowners and businesses have not seen an increase in Allegheny County property taxes in six years. Meanwhile, all counties around us have raised taxes since 2002: Armstrong County up 35 percent; Beaver County up 19 percent; Butler County up 25 percent; Washington County up 21 percent; and Westmoreland County up 24 percent. Allegheny County’s decision to implement a base-year property tax assessment system has also brought stability to property owners and put an end to backdoor property tax increases by school districts and municipalities. 3. CONSOLIDATION

Most Reverend David A. Zubik, D.D., Bishop Diocese of Pittsburgh, www.diopitt.org 1. CANEVIN – In addition to overseeing the building of Saint Paul Cathedral, my predecessor Bishop Regis Canevin was the Shepherd of the Church in Pittsburgh as it took on a leadership role in the community. 2. HOPE – Our lives have to be rooted in hope, and hope comes from faith. Faith leads to a life based on the certainty of hope. Let me echo Pope Benedict XVI who has written that in faith and hope, “Our lives are involved with one another, linked together…No one lives alone. No one sins alone. No one is saved alone.” 3. HOPE – I’ll repeat myself – hope. Without hope, there is no future. Photo by John Homich & S. Pelaia

George L. Miles, Jr., President and CEO WQED Multimedia, www.wqed.org 1. HILLMAN – The quintessential Pittsburgher is Elsie Hillman, of course! Just look around us – her impact and that of her husband, Henry, can be seen and felt throughout our region. Not just in the buildings and places which bear their name; not just from a philanthropic perspective. Elsie’s love of Pittsburgh comes from her heart and that love is genuine. She is the consummate volunteer and gives of her time, as well. She’s a remarkable woman and Pittsburgh is blessed that Elsie Hillman is part of the fabric of our community. 2. CHANGE – WQED changes lives.

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3. JOBS = young people.

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


Dustin Stiver, Program Coordinator Pittsburgh 250 Community Connections; The Sprout Fund www.pittsburgh250.org/communityconnections, www.sproutfund.org 1. STRICKLAND – Bill Strickland, President and CEO of Manchester Bidwell Corporation and its subsidiaries, Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild and Bidwell Training Center. 2. CIVIC ENGAGEMENT – Pittsburgh 250 Community Connections is a funding stream of $1 million supporting 100 small-scale community-based projects in 14 counties of SW PA. Offering funding support for two classes of awards, Regional Projects of up to $50,000 and Grassroots Projects of up to $5,000, Community Connections is catalyzing new and emerging communitybased projects in 2008. By seeding many small projects across the region, Community Connections creates a critical mass of personal engagement and activity among participants, strengthens and multiplies community networks of support, and lays the foundation for future regional civic initiatives. By providing a vehicle for communities, organizations and individuals to take a meaningful role in the Pittsburgh 250 campaign, Community Connections helps to promote the region as a whole and at the same time serve local priorities of participating communities. 3. COLLABORATION – We have entered the age of collaboration and it is essential that organizations and individuals across Southwestern Pennsylvania cooperatively address the challenges facing this resilient region.

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Dr. Barbara Baker, President and CEO Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium, www.pittsburghzoo.org 1. ROGERS – as in Fred! 2. EXCITEMENT – The Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium is the most visited cultural attraction in Western Pennsylvania, surpassing one million visitors in 2007. Get up close and personal with polar bears and sea otters at Water’s Edge, our newest exhibit. Experience the thrill of standing in the new Underwater Polar Bear tunnel as Koda and Nuka, our 800 pound polar bears, swim overhead and dive down for a closer look at you! Sea otters Alki and Chugach will wear you out with their endless energy as they play, swim, eat, and frolic! In the African Savanna, we’re expecting two big bundles of joy – two of our African elephants are pregnant and due to give birth this summer. Kids Kingdom makes adults act like children and children simply go wild! We offer something for everyone at the Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium. Photo by Paul A. Selvaggio

Springs Farmers Market

3. CONTINUE – We will continue to make The Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium one of the top ten zoos in the country!

Art Rooney II, President Pittsburgh Steelers, www.steelers.com 1. ROONEY (ART SR.) – His humility and caring for others, as well as his love and appreciation for the city of Pittsburgh, helped bring positive publicity to the city beyond its reputation as an industrial leader. 2. NFL – The Steelers represent the rich history of professional football in Western Pennsylvania and the tremendous passion the people of Pittsburgh have for our sport. 3. JOBS – Pittsburgh has so much to offer from a cultural perspective and there are so many growth opportunities right here in our own back yard. We need to do whatever we can to bring even more businesses to Pittsburgh and keep our young professionals and recent college graduates in the city.

J. Kevin McMahon, President and CEO The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, www.pgharts.org 1. HEINZ – The late H.J. “Jack” Heinz is certainly a “Quintessential Pittsburgher.” Jack Heinz had a vision for a dynamic downtown, flourishing year-round with activity and millions of theatergoers, arts enthusiasts, employees, tourists, students and residents. Over the last two decades, The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s mission has been to make Jack Heinz’s vision a reality. 2. TRANSFORMATION – The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust has led the ongoing transformation of Pittsburgh’s Downtown from a “red light” district to a world-class destination for arts and entertainment that encompasses over 14 cultural facilities, public parks and plazas, and new and proposed commercial development. If you look around the Cultural District, you see the fruits of the Trust’s efforts before your eyes: the Benedum Center, the Byham Theater, the O’Reilly Theater, Theater Square, the Harris Theater, Wood Street Galleries, SPACE and much more. When you attend a Broadway Across America-Pittsburgh or Pittsburgh Dance Council performance, or Gallery Crawl – that’s The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust at work. 3. CULTIVATION – I want to help make Pittsburgh an even better place to work, live and play. Though I’ve only lived here for six years, I knew right away that Pittsburgh was a great city. We have a fantastic arts community – one of the best in the country – and I think we can do even more to cultivate it. I’m personally motivated to do all that I can to further the Trust’s mission and to make Pittsburgh a world-class destination for arts and entertainment.

May 24 through September 13 A wide selection of fresh produce, home baked goods (fresh donuts made Saturday mornings!), quilts, antiques, plants, tools, etc. www.springspa.org Route 669 Springs, PA

Deadline for the July-August issue of the Laurel Mountain Post is Friday, June 13!

“Pittsburgh” continued on page 20

Every Story Begins At Home.

May/June 2008 - 13


Platinum Anniversary Ponderings (Episode 3) My Twenty Years with The Young and the Restless To recap for those of you who have not read Episodes 1 & 2 of PAP, 2008 is Y&R’s 35th anniversary year as a daytime drama & my 20th anniversary year as a faithful viewer.

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There Is Nothing Like These Dames We’re All in This Forever – Several of the Genoa City gals have achieved Divine Diva status. Katherine Chancellor (nee Shepard) aka Kay, Mrs. C., The Duchess, Old Fossil – Katherine is the reigning Doyenne of Daytime. Jeanne Cooper plays her as one tough cookie who has cracked from time to time, but never crumbled. A gorgeous woman in her youth, Jeanne has maintained herself (and Katherine) well, even allowing footage of her 1984 facelift to appear in the show. Ms. Cooper, the mother of actor Corbin Bernson, will be 80 on October 25, 2008. Small wonder Kay announced her retirement not long ago at Chancellor Industries, so she can write her spicy memoirs. Nicole Reed Newman – Originally, I couldn’t stand Nikki, but she grows on you. Married to a Y&R executive producer, I hope Melody Thomas Scott gets more respect from her husband than her character, Nikki, gets from Victor. On-again-off-again soul mates, the Newmans are currently disconnected. I know the back story, so trust me; they will realign. (Melody was fleetingly seen in the film Marnie playing the young Marnie. Years later Tippi Hedren, the adult Marnie, did a turn on Y&R. It’s a small, small soap world.) Jill Foster Abbott – The fifth actress to play the part of Jill, Jess Walton has hung in there for 20 years. Not a woman known to have won any Miss Congeniality Awards in her lifetime, Jill holds the show’s Terminal ‘Tude Title. The manicurist turned corporate maven is forever afraid of being marginalized, so this woman warrior tends to be just a wee bit paranoid. In her day the lustiest wench in town, Ms. Abbott still shows evidence of a healthy libido when given the opportunity. Lauren Fenmore Baldwin – Lauren is the mistress of reinvention. You name it; she’s been there and done that. Today the plucky head of the Fenmore department store chain is ostensibly a stay-at-home mom. Portrayed by the beautiful Tracey Bregman (not a spring chicken by any means), Lauren categorically holds her own in the pecking order. No one does glitzwear better. (This may have something to do with the fact that Tracey is a cousin of designer Bob Mackie. Just a thought.) They Don’t Say No – Although a tame town by today’s TV standards, GC is definitely not a “no-sin zone.” I blame much of the serial promiscuity of the last decade on Grace

14 - May/June 2008

Turner. Nick would still be with Sharon and Phyllis with Jack, if that tramp hadn’t started the betrayal ball rolling. So glad that vixen was vaporized. (A mirror image of Malibu Barbie, the actress is now on The Bold and the Beautiful portraying another silicone-enhanced and morally-challenged character.) New Ways to Scheme – Mercifully, in 2005 doe-eyed Judith Chapman replaced Joan Van Ark in the role of Gloria. (I wouldn’t want to relive the hours I spent watching Gloria #1.) Any woman who can manage to marry (and be widowed by) two such wealthy and attractive GC men in such a short space of time, lobby her way to a prestigious position at Jabot and look as “Glo-rious” as she does at her age, deserves her own category. Forever plotting and planning, she is one intriguing lady. The jury is still out on new hubby Jeffrey (played by Ted Shackelford), but gun to my head I’d say he’ll be around awhile. I haven’t enjoyed an onscreen couple this much since Maddie and David.

Part of Y&R World We Can’t Grow Up – The young (and the really restless) adult actors are lost in Generation Y Limbo (e.g. sibs Lily & Devon and BFF Daniel & Amber). Most of them are years older than the characters they play and are just biding their time until they can move up the soap chain or move on. Younger on Daytime – Generally, children are napping, with the nanny, at ball practice, sleeping over at a friend’s house or eating ice cream in someone’s kitchen. Paradoxically, children don’t remain young for long on Y&R. (I must remember to enjoy Summer, Fen and Reed while I can.)

Replaceable You Everybody Used to Have a Maid – The ditzy, but lovable, Esther and the stately, steadfast Miguel were once a daily presence, but are rarely seen nowadays. Aunt Mamie expanded her horizons beyond the boundaries of WI long ago and Meals on Wheels must be helping out at the Abbott Mansion, since Mrs. Martinez is nowhere to be found. Anyone Goes – Some characters inexplicably drop off the radar. Perfect examples of missing persons are Paul’s parents and secretary. Mary (his spare rib-andsauerkraut-toting mom) and Carl (the amnesiac police detective pop) don’t even send a card at Christmas anymore. Lynn, his long-suffering Girl Monday-Friday, gave it her all for Paul, but got naught. Oh, What a (The Bold and the) Beautiful Morning – Any number of GC residents and actors have relocated to LA. I consider this to be the equivalent of being sent to Soap Opera LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


Hades. (The oddest road to Daytime’s Inferno was taken by Heather Tom, the first adult Victoria.) Prime Nearly Was Mine – Various Y&R actors have pursued other career avenues only to return, which proves once again that home is where the paying part is. If They Could Be Me Now – GC grads who went on to greater glory after scoring Y&R face time include Eva Longoria Parker (Isabella Brana Williams) who now resides on Wisteria Lane; John O’Hurley (Jim Grainger) who “danced his way to the stars” but came back down to earth for Chicago and Family Feud; and Shemar Moore (Malcolm Winters) who is currently dealing once a week with the criminally deranged. Cameos-A Lot – The formerly or presently famous visit this cradle of serialization civilization frequently. (It seems everyone wants to sample a squirt of this careerrejuvenating soap.)

You Gotta Have Art I’m Singin’ and I’m Trained – Gina has long provided us with her throaty renditions and there is her rock star brother, Danny Romalotti, who just showed up to perform at the “Restless Style” online-mag launch party and mend fences with son Daniel. (Danny is Michael Damian – a Grammy-nominated musician, actor, and producer). Two of my favorite series songbirds were Leanna (warbling atop a piano) and Brittany (cooing a few tunes while cuddling up to a pole). Amber and Karen are the newest chanteuses for the masses. Gentlemen have also performed on city stages to acclaim. In fact, J.T. was offered an LA recording contract, which fizzled thanks to insipid Colleen. (I really wish they would just burst that bubblehead.) Be Our GCuest – Bringing it, singing it and topping the midday charts was operatic-pop group Il Divo. Many other talented guests have performed onscreen, but only as distant seconds to Simon Cowell’s international supersongsters.

Couture Me and My Gal Clothe Ev’ry Mogul Finance: 10; Looks: 3 – Although no one likes to see a man in an Armani suit or a cashmere top coat more than I, daytime menswear really isn’t what Y&R is about. Photographers and techies, being creative types, do mix it up a bit in the workplace wardrobe department with their collarless shirts and man bags. Tux Lure a Lady Tonight – The money men in monkey suits confirm that the boys in the ‘hood clean up very well indeed.

Every Story Begins At Home.

Out of My Jeans – Buff in the boardroom; buff in the bedroom. ‘Nough said.

We Can’t Get a Man Clad as Nuns Afternoon Is Bustin’ Out All Over – No fashion police on patrol here. There’s almost more cleavage inside these administrative offices than inside the SI swimsuit edition. The fashion-forward Phyllis did “push-up” the envelope for several days when she wore an open blouse over her bra. Yet, not one set of false eyelashes was batted and we were left to assume that no letter of reprimand was received.

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Send in the Gowns – The women of this community are definitely red carpet-ready. Glamming it up in sensational cocktail dresses and gowns is de rigueur for the club dates, charity events, holiday parties and weddings. Hometown Fenmore’s and B&B’s Forrester Creations dress the dolls, although an occasional haute couture confection has been overnighted from Paris. You’re Never Fully Dressed With Just Your Smile – Taking this concept to extremes eons ago was a rather plump young Nikki as she strutted her stuff at the Bayou and more recently Brittany gyrated gamely at Marilyn’s. But, nearly everyone shows up in brief bikinis and tantalizing teddies sooner or later. Even Katherine skinny-dipped with John in their youth. (Speaking of the deceased Mr. Abbott – his ghost has finally vanished. Jerry Douglas, however, has resurfaced as a “Johnny-comeback-lately,” the rhetorically expressive Alistair.)

Some Enchanted Bling-Bling I Enjoy Getting Those Pearls – The jewelry “rocks” – think Katherine’s rings and brooches, Jill’s necklaces and Ashley’s oversized hoops. I also recall an infinity pendant that Ashley received following the death of husband Stephen Lassiter. Supposedly, Stephen arranged to have it sent before his untimely demise; in truth, it was sent by that intrusive Victor. (You just can’t keep that big dog on the back porch.) My Favorite Slings (and Things) – The fashionistas wear fantastic footwear, accessories and outerwear. Rodeo Drive boutiques must get ransacked by Y&R personal shoppers weekly. Furs were once the real deal (most notably Jill’s), but most are faux these days. (Soapdom’s nod to PC PETA.) Get’cha Head in the Tam – Always fond of hats, I find it a shame they aren’t in vogue right now. Wisconsin winters do bring out ear muffs and mittens, but only Dru really excelled at building an outfit around a chapeau.

– By Barbara M. Neill To be continued, of course!

May/June 2008 - 15


Indiana County, PA

ENJOY OUR FESTIVALS AND CELEBRATIONS! MAY 16-17: May Mart Flower and Craft Festival MAY 18-24: The Jimmy Stewart Centennial "100 Years of Jimmy" JUNE 6-8: Saltsburg Canal Days JUNE 14: Pick-A-Dilly Herb Faire JUNE 14-15: Jimmy Stewart Airport Festival JUNE 21-22: Smicksburg Summer Country Days JULY 4: Indiana Lions Club 4th of July Celebration Stop by our Visitor Center or Call us for your Complimentary Visitor Guide

INDIANA COUNTY TOURIST BUREAU 2334 Oakland Avenue – Indiana Mall – Indiana, PA 15701 1-877-7INDIANA – WWW.VISITINDIANACOUNTYPA.ORG

Mothers Need Time-Outs, Too! It’s Good to be a Little Selfish – It Actually Makes You a Better Mother TOP TEN THINGS WOMEN CAN DO NOW TO ENJOY MOTHERHOOD Give yourself a break – you don’t need to be so hard on yourself. Just say no! What are your real priorities? Take time to write it down: journaling will bring clarity to your life. Slow down and savor living in the moment. Plug into your kids so you can really connect with them. Don’t forget about your husband – intimacy is life-affirming! Reach out beyond your family: it will enrich everyone. Make your physical and mental health a priority. Is more always better? Simplify everything. Be a little selfish – you deserve it, and it will make you a better mother!

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As the mother of two boys, ages 5 and 6, the title of book immediately grabbed me! A time out for me? What a novel idea! Many moms, like myself, often feel overwhelmed with the daily stress of being pulled in so many different directions, and having so many daily obligations at home, work and kids’ schools that they feel like they lose themselves somewhere along the way. We all sometimes feel the pressures from society, each other, and most often, ourselves to be perfect in every way when it comes to raising our children. Keeping up with taking care of a home, providing healthy meals for your family, and making it to school and extra-curricular activities day in and day out can be exhausting to even the most energetic among us! Physically, as well as mentally. The problem is, when we, as mothers, feel exhausted from all the running, and cooking, cleaning and smiling, we tend to feel under appreciated. So what are we to do? According to the book Mothers Need Time-Outs, Too, taking time for yourself is the only way to recharge your batteries, replenish your energy and renew your spirit: by doing something that makes you feel

peaceful and happy and navigate the daily stress that is your life. A simple idea, but one that most moms feel guilty about....taking time for themselves has never been worked into the equation. Moms are often thought of as the selfless givers. But even just a short break doing something for yourself can translate into a much happier mom! Something simple like taking a few minutes to polish your toenails or taking a walk can reverse a the effects of a hectic, crazy, overscheduled week! I took the advice of this book and a friend and recently took up running. In 20-30 minutes a day, I am gaining perspective, energy, inner peace by doing something that gives me pleasure and helps me be a better, happier me – and hopefully, a better mom! – Briana Dwire Tomack “Doctors and psychologists churn out parenting books by the dozen, telling parents how to get it right. This thought-provoking and timely book is different. It’s by three mothers in the trenches of life; ordinary women with some extraordinary insights. This book will help mothers take care of themselves, so their families can be healthy. It’s poignant, enlightened, and filled with stories that will make those exhausted women out there take a deep breath and say, O.K., I can do this, and I can do it my way.” - Dr. Richard Dupee, contributing doctor to “The Today Show”

A massage relaxes muscles, easing and soothing your aches and pains. It rejuvenates – restoring balnce to our body and being, making us better for all the things life throws our way. Everybody deserves a great massage, so I have made relaxation convenient with flexible appointment times to fit the busiest of schedules. let me help you relieve stress, lower your blood pressure, or get some much needed relaxation.

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


Nine Decades of Dedication The Greensburg College Club 1918-2008 Take a moment to consider clubs. Some that come to mind are sport, health, hobby and special interest, outdoor pursuits, media and art, entertainment, life style, and age-specific. Most of the previously mentioned groups provide personal enjoyment, enrichment or improvement. Rarely does there exist today a club which focuses on the betterment of others. (Granted, there are many organizations that promote good will, but not many with “club” status.) Since 1918 the Greensburg College Club has met for the primary purpose of helping others. Spearheaded by Miss Martha Steckel, the Westmoreland County Chairman for National Defense, the GCC was established during World War I as a group that aided the war effort. During peacetime its purpose became the fostering of the ideals of higher education and contributing to the educational and civic welfare of the community. The association women met at The Steckel Studio (a music facility) until 1931 and later moved to the school administration building in Greensburg. The GCC has been housed in the Greensburg Garden and Civic Center since 1969, one of three civic groups to occupy a suite there. Historian Dawn Himler is in the process of cataloguing the nonprofit organization memorabilia kept there in an effort to document the history and influence of the GCC in the community. The GCC convenes September through May (January excluded) to conduct club business, plan projects and hear guest speakers. Related club special activities have varied with the times, but members have always shared interests, exchanged ideas and enjoyed the company of friends as they have taken on their selfless tasks, which include community volunteer service. As times have changed and many are less inclined to think of others ahead of themselves, the women of the GCC have persevered and continued to do good works. Dwindling membership has not deterred the group from striving to be an educational force in the area. Through the years numerous fund raisers have been held to supplement the revenue from the nonprofit club dues for the yearly scholarship funding. Most prominent of these would be the Travelogue

Series dating from 1954 to the present day. Highly successful and informative, these presentations can be viewed at the Greensburg Salem Senior High School Auditorium on scheduled evenings during the school year. The first GCC scholarship of $150 was given in 1920 at what was to become an annual spring tea. As membership grew and fund raising flourished, the number of scholarships and their amounts increased. To date, 286 club scholarships have been given totaling $279,400, and since 1998 an additional $1,000 scholarship has been given in memory of Elizabeth Spangler by her family. As a part of the local community, the seniors of Hempfield Area Senior High School have joined the Greensburg Salem Senior High School students as potential recipients and male nominees are now considered for financial gifts. Educational loans are also available to students who meet application requirements. A celebratory 90th Anniversary Luncheon was recently held at the Greensburg County Club. The program of the day included a set of Historical Highlights narrated by Past Presidents and enhanced by the era-appropriate vocal selections of the Laurel Harmony Chapter of the Sweet Adelines. Contemplating the GCC centenary mark in 2018, Past President Carolyn D’Astolfo told the audience, “As we look to the future, we hope that we can continue to be a viable part of the Greensburg area always striving for excellence in education and forging wonderful friendships among our members.” The culmination of 2008 will be an awards luncheon honoring the year’s scholarship recipients on May 8 th at the Greensburg Garden and Civic Center. GCC scholarships of $1000 each will be presented to Adam Pappalardo (Hempfield Area High School) and James Kaufmann (Greensburg Salem High School). Amber Stahl (Hempfield Area High School) will receive The Elizabeth Spangler Scholarship in the same amount. For more information about the Greensburg College Club call GCC President Rose Marie Appel at 724-2193289 or contact the group at Greensburg College Club, PO Box 816, Greensburg, PA, 15601-0816. – Story & Photo by Barbara M. Neill

Summer Reading Programs Adams Memorial Library 1112 Ligonier Street in Latrobe Caldwell Memorial Library • Unity Library • Bookmobile

www.AdamsLib.org

Relay For Life Quilt This year’s quilt, crafted by Jim Mikula of Ligonier, will be raffled off at this year’s American Cancer Society Relay For Life at Latrobe Memorial Stadium June 21-22.

(Front Row - seated): Nancy Hogue, Rose Marie Appel (Current President) and Marnie Abraham Russell. (Back Row): Dawn Himler, Rita Boynton, Marjorie Shields, Rita Perotti, Pauline Moyar, Carolyn Zappone D’Astolfo and Paula Daily

Every Story Begins At Home.

May/June 2008 - 17


Re-Energize the Feng Shui Way! by JB Rossi Finally, it’s Spring! The bluebirds, cardinals, and robins are singing, the tulips are starting to bloom into vibrant colors, and the leaves are making their way back on the trees. Everything is so fresh and new. I love this time of year. I love the newness and excitement of spring. This spring revival is so invigorating for me that I decided to tackle my spring cleaning. Not only am I tossing out the old and broken and updating the antiquated, I’m trying something new altogether. I’m going to Feng Shui my home for revitalization and positive energy flows. I became interested in Feng Shui this past holiday when a friend of mine whose name I had in the Christmas grab-bag had a “Laughing Buddha” on her wish list. Having no idea what or where I was going to acquire such a thing, I began to do a little research. After only a few hours, I was intrigued by the scope and diversity of this ancient science. Feng Shui, pronounced fung-shway, is the art practiced by the ancient Chinese to utilize the laws of nature to achieve harmony and balance within the environment. The ancient Chinese relied heavily on astronomy (heaven) and geography (earth) to define the rules of Feng Shui. They used it extensively for the construction of their palaces and other dwellings. Even the capital cities of China followed these rules in the course of their design and layout phases. During the Zhou era, these rules were codified into manuals for builders. Evidence even suggests that their graves and tombs were also constructed following the rules of Feng Shui. Literally translated as windwater, Feng Shui is based on the philosophy that it is better to live with the land rather than against it. I totally agree with this premise. Today I think we call it “green”. Tradtional Feng Shui encompasses a wide variety of topics. Supposedly, by applying the very sensible and fundamental Feng 18 - May/June 2008

Shui techniques, one is able to enhance and energize every area of life. There are rules to enhancing everything from career potential and material wealth to marital happiness and social popularity. Although Feng Shui has been applied to many diverse areas, I decided to concentrate on just a few of the fundamental principles that I found intriguing. After all, one can’t become an “Empress” overnight! It seems that modern Feng Shui concentrates on the practice of arranging objects within a structure to achieve a positive energy flow or Qi, pronounced “chi”. Feng Shui relies on the notion that our lives are deeply affected by our physical and emotional environ-

“ Buddha Laughing let the

do his magic!

ments. If we surround ourselves with clutter, noise and ugliness, we contaminate ourselves with the bad energy flows of “sha”. If, on the other hand, we encircle ourselves with beauty, cleanliness, and tranquility, we energize ourselves to achieve success, happiness, and harmony in every aspect of our lives. Personally, I like happiness and harmony, so I continued my in-depth research.

There are five elements associated with Feng Shui; water, fire, wood, earth, and metal. Polarity also has an influence and is expressed as Yin and Yang. Acting like a bipolar magnetic field, Yin and Yang act upon each other in equal and opposite ways. One creates an exertion and the other receives, much like the pitcher and the catcher in a baseball game. Yin is the water, yang is the fire. The elements of wood (the giver) and metal (the receiver) are all kept in equilibrium by the Earth, thus creating balance. Feng Shui first became of interest to Westerners in 1972 when Richard Nixon traveled to The People’s Republic of China. Rumor has it that other celebrities such as Prince Charles of Wales and Donald Trump have also used Feng Shui. But enough of the theory, let’s get down to the practice. Let’s start with clearing the clutter. According to the Feng Shui guide, the negative energy of too much stuff weakens your personal energy level and dampens the good spring cleaning intentions. I know this for a fact. Recently I opened an over-stuffed closet and immediately felt all my good intentions and my cleaning energy drain as all of the junk came pouring out. It was like I opened the dam that held back an entire river of “sha”. But Feng Shui tells us not to despair. By using Feng Shui as an energy tool, it is easier to begin the process. Here are two important clutter clearing Feng Shui guidelines: 1. Motivate your cleaning energy by bringing in higher Feng Shui energy. (No, not a bulldozer or a dumpster like I thought.) In Feng Shui, it means a positive state of mind. Before attacking a room of clutter, bring in fresh air, put on your favorite music, and add something beautiful to the space to create a flow of positive “Qi or chi” energy. So I opened two windows (even though it was barely fifty degrees

out), blasted the Beatles from my I-pod, and put on a movie starring George Clooney. So far, so good! 2. Expect to “underachieve” rather than “overachieve.” (Not normally what I tell my kids, but in this case, it makes sense.) Start small and then build up with each subsequent session. Plan to spend 15 minutes in a specific area. When the time is up, walk away. You’ve done what you expected to do. Then the next time, increase the amount of time by 5 or 10 minutes. Well, I tried applying these two rules and it worked. I am now well on my way to being clutter-free! But wait! Now that the clutter is gone, there is still more work to do to achieve the best Feng Shui results. The manual continued with some more intense ground rules. 3. The carpets in the house reflect the foundation upon which the house is built. The shape of the carpet should mirror the shape of the room to create balance and harmony. The carpet should not have an extremely exaggerated or abstract pattern because this will cause the energy flow to be confused. Small exquisite detailing such as that on Persian rugs is preferable. So now I’m throwing out all of the round and/or patterned rugs in my house and replacing them with beautiful Persian rectangular carpets. Every rug now mirrors the shape of the room and, in turn, the shape of the foundation. No confused energy in my house! Speaking of mirrors, Feng Shui has very distinct rules on their usage also. 4. Mirrors possess a very unique form of energy and must be used properly to benefit from its positive energy. A large mirror in your dining room is a great feature in your home because it symbolically doubles the food on your table. (On the other hand, if it doubles the calories, I’m not so sure I want to do this one.) Put the mirror in the north to energize protection for the family’s livelihood, thus ensuring that the family will never go hungry. In addition, bowls of fruit on the table as well as hanging a beautiful painting of deliciouslooking ripe fruit will also enhance the positive “chi”. LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


So I bought a large glass bowl and lots of fruit to put in it. I also enrolled in a still life painting class. After all, the rule never said that it had to be a good painting, did it? I continued perusing the Feng Shui manual. Suddenly, there was a large caution symbol! 5. Caution! Mirrors in the bedroom are taboo, especially on the ceiling (obviously). In Feng Shui lure, mirrors in the bedroom allow the entrance of third parties and can create havoc on the relationship of the sleeping couple. (A real problem for the Yin and the Yang. Remember, two is a party, three’s a crowd.) Another master contributed the bad luck of a mirror in the bedroom with the disturbing shock of waking up and immediately seeing oneself, thus creating an enormous amount of negative energy to be released. “Sha”, yeah! Either way, mirrors in the bedroom are bad according to Feng Shui. Rules suggest that they be covered during the most vulnerable hours. Okay, so now I understand the “common sense” element of Feng Shui!!! If you currently have a mirror in the bedroom, don’t despair. All is not lost in the romance department. Another Feng Shui rule can take care of this problem. 6. Hang a picture of Peonies just outside your bedroom door to dispel the bad energy. But never hang the picture inside the bedroom. Peonies make a man more amorous. If you are not up to the challenge, a man could develop a roving eye and cause havoc in a boring relationship. Better yet, hang the peony painting in the living room. The good energy will follow you to the bedroom. Adding a vase of real peonies is always preferable; the larger the blooms, the better. Curious as to the reason that the Peony of all the flowers was chosen for this important task, I continued my research. The legend of the Peony dates back to the famous Yang Kuei Fei, esteemed to be the most beautiful woman in Chinese history and mistress to the Emperor. Yang decorated her bed chambers throughout the year with the peony, the “King of Flowers”, which had to be brought up especially for her from the South. The Emperor was spellbound and could deny her nothing. Thus the peony brings great good fortune to women (and apparently to the emperor as well.) I’ve already placed my order for the biggest buds in the county. Another important area of Feng Shui that I would like to Every Story Begins At Home.

concentrate on is the hanging of quartz crystals. Natural quartz crystals are thought to be very powerful in the practice of Feng Shui. 7. Natural quartz is the best symbol of Mother Earth and can energize good luck if placed in the Southwest corner of the bedroom or living room. Before displaying the crystal, however, wash it thoroughly to get rid of any negative energy it may be carrying. Soak the crystal for seven days and seven nights in sea salt water to cleanse it thoroughly. A cluster of natural crystals hung in the southwest corner of the house also attracts the energy of romance into the home. Manmade crystals can also be used and are especially effective when placed in sunny windowsills where they will catch the sunlight and bring in great Yang energy. So now I have invested in a cluster of crystals, a spool of fishing line, and a compass since I’m directional challenged. Suddenly I’m becoming aware of how much this new Feng Shui practice is costing me in both time and financial resources. I’ve bought four new Persian rugs, a membership in the “Peony of the Month” club, and new bedroom furniture without mirrors. I invested in stilllife painting lessons, joined an orienteering group, and enrolled in a geometric rock discovery course called “Getting to Know your Crystals!” I wondered if Feng Shui had any rules dealing with the financial aspects of life. To my surprise, I found a very familiar figure at the forefront of the Feng Shui rules for better wealth luck, the laughing Buddha. 7. The fat laughing Buddha brings lots of success and helps to take away financial problems when included in the home. ( I wonder if he had a mirror in his dining room or his bedroom!) I have now purchased (more financial output) not only one, but two lovely little green laughing Buddhas, one for my friend and one for myself. At this point, I decided that I have made a good start both in my spring cleaning and my revitalization using the Feng Shui techniques. I can feel the freedom of the positive “Chi” energy and the weightlessness of my wallet. Further exploration of Feng Shui will have to wait. Besides, I’m late for one of my classes. Perhaps it’s time to let the laughing Buddha do his magic!

Miner’s Memorial Day Weekend June 13, 14 & 15 2008 Windber, Pennsylvania (Northern Somerset County)

Live music, ethnic food, parade, children’s activities Large car cruise-in on Father’s Day Motorcycle Show/Cruise-in Saturday

A Festival that celebrates the life of the coal miner and his family.

May/June 2008 - 19


Andrew E. Masich, President and CEO Senator John Heinz History Center & Western PA Sports Museum www.pghhistory.org/Heinz 1. WESTINGHOUSE – With 361 patents to his name, George Westinghouse was a powerhouse of Pittsburgh innovation and his “can do” spirit helped change the world. His ideas – such as the use of alternating current – helped to safely and efficiently shine light throughout the world. Other Westinghouse inventions, such as the air brake, revolutionized railroad transportation, making it possible to operate longer, heavier, faster locomotives than ever before.

Be A LOCAVORE Buy Local!

2. PRIDE – As the Smithsonian’s home in Pittsburgh, the Senator John Heinz History Center offers our visitors a place to celebrate our region’s pride. From George Washington’s first experiences in Western Pennsylvania to the Steelers’ five Super Bowl championships, the History Center and Western Pennsylvania Sports Museum celebrate our region’s 250 year tradition of innovation like no other place in the world. 3. AMBASSADORS – As residents of Western Pennsylvania, it is our responsibility to become ambassadors for our region to help showcase the people, places and ideas that have shaped our incredible tradition of innovation.

Bob Page, Director of Marketing Omni William Penn Hotel, www.omniwilliampenn.com 1. FRICK – Henry Clay Frick was instrumental in shaping the landscape and architecture of Pittsburgh. He played a key role in building Pittsburgh into an industrial Mecca which in turn helped fuel the economy and growth of the entire country. 2. NOSTALGIA – The Omni William Penn Hotel, the “Grande Dame” of Pittsburgh is the only original truly “historic” hotel in the city. The hotel offers our guests the ability to step back in time to a bygone era, and enjoy the beauty, grace and elegance that was prominent when the hotel opened in 1916!

NEW HOURS! Open every Saturday – 8:00 am to Noon Rain or Shine! May 24th through October 4th This is a producer only market as our motto is:

“Make It, Bake It or Grow It!”

Special Features Weekly Western PA’s oldest and largest farmers market Jim Mikula, Market Manager (724) 238-6702 West Main Street and US Route 30, Ligonier

3. PRESERVATION – As the city of Pittsburgh evolves, it becomes increasingly important to preserve the history of the city. This includes, but is not limited to, historic landmarks such as the Omni William Penn Hotel. Our city has such a rich history and such beautiful architecture. It is critical that we preserve this part of Pittsburgh’s heritage. As the city progresses, this becomes paramount in “telling the story” of our city’s past and the great visionaries that played a critical role in building Pittsburgh into the city that it is today. “Pittsburgh” continued on page 21

One Week FREE + $ 20 OFF 20 classes wk/7 days $20 value good toward EFT or 3-month registration. Valid for those who have not attended Jazzercise in the last six months. Not valid with any other offer. Limit one per customer. Offer expires 6/30/08. A Savings of $118 • Exams, all x-rays and consultation New Patients Only • Offer good through June 30, 2008

Classes 7 Days A Week Latrobe/Derry Jazzercise Loyalhanna Community Center 724-244-2869 for more information

jazzercise.com • (800)FIT-IS-IT

20 - May/June 2008

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


KIDS CARE PEDIATRICS Kids Are Our Priority

CHRISTINE C. FLORENDO, MD MELANIE B. SEMELKA, DO 5927 Route 981, Suite 8 • Latrobe, PA 15650 Phone: 724-537-2131 • Fax: 724-537-2153 Hours: Monday–Friday 9 AM to 6 PM

Robbee Baker Kosak Vice President University Advancement Carnegie Mellon University www.cmu.org 1. CARNEGIE – Andrew Carnegie is the quintessential Pittsburgher, because he created an unequalled, sustained array of important institutions that have forever changed and enhanced our citizens and our region. He also espoused so many of the region’s values: hard work, creativity, leadership and generosity. An industrial titan, he built Carnegie Steel Corporation into the world’s largest and most profitable industrial enterprise in the 1890s. A self-made man, he then sold the business and dedicated the rest of his life to philanthropy, with a special emphasis on local libraries and scientific research. The inventor of modern-day philanthropy, Carnegie’s generosity continues to impact not only Pittsburgh, but also the world.

New Book Captures Area’s Vibrant Past Throughout time, postcards have been a vital way to retell history through images and personal accounts. With a history beginning in 1834, vintage postcards have helped pave the way into Latrobe and the Ligonier Valley’s dynamic past. In her second book with Arcadia Publishing, local author Rachel E. Smith pictorially depicts the region with a variety of highlights: • Reveals numerous unseen and previously unpublished vintage postcards from both public and private collections. • Includes images of the area’s own Rolling Rock beer, the banana split, and more. • Features well-known personalities such as Arnold Palmer and Fred Rogers. • Contains images and stories of the everyday folk who helped make the valley what it is today. • Spotlights areas homes, churches. schools, industry and daily life. Rachel E. Smith is a member of the Westmoreland County Historical Society and author of Greensburg, another book in the postcard series. A local history aficionado, she has drawn from both her own postcard collection and that of another local collector to chronicle the history of these two dynamic communities. Latrobe and the Ligonier Valley is now available at area bookstores, independent retailers, and through Arcadia Publishing at 888313-2665 or www.arcadiapublishing.com.

2. INNOVATION – It’s difficult to take a university and distill its many attributes into one word, but innovation IS Carnegie Mellon. We are a leading innovator in a variety of fields – from technology, business, science and public policy to the arts and education. We seek and create solutions to realworld problems, whether it’s developing robots to improve the quality of life for older adults, discovering ways to reduce global warming or applying cognitive psychology to develop new learning tools for K-12 students.

Celtic Culture

Goods from Ireland and the British Isles

3. EDUCATION – I think the key “to do” for Pittsburgh is education. I urge each of us to re-commit ourselves to providing world-class educational opportunities for all of our citizens, at all stages of life, from children to retirees. Providing affordable and accessible quality education is essential to ensuring that all Pittsburghers enjoy a high quality of life and for each citizen, and the region, to prosper economically. We already have all the educational pieces in place – public and private, across the life spectrum. It’s just a matter of putting these pieces together so they work for all citizens.

AUCTION FOR THEANIMALS Friday, May 30th Mountain View Inn, Greensburg Admission: $20 per person. Auction preview will begin at 6:00PM Bidding will start promptly at 7:30PM

Every Story Begins At Home.

724-238-2420

“Pittsburgh” continued on page 22

137 East Main St in Ligonier, PA 15658 May/June 2008 - 21


Jennifer Kent, Business District Manager Lawrenceville Corporation/ 16:62 Design Zone www.lawrenceville-pgh.com/ www.1662designzone.com 1. FOSTER – One of the most influential songwriters in American history, Stephen Foster was born in 1826 in the preindustrial Pittsburgh neighborhood of Lawrenceville (his father charted the street plans in 1814). Foster is considered the founder of “pop music” with his notable tunes like Oh! Susanna and De Campton Races. His music marked the beginning of a long history of the arts in Pittsburgh.

Kutztown Folk Festival Nine days of wholesome family fun with a distinctive Pennsylvania Dutch flavor awaits visitors at the Kutztown Folk Festival June 28 – July 6, 2008 at the Kutztown Fairgrounds. Now in its 58 th year, the Kutztown Folk Festival is the oldest, continuing folklife festival in America. It is one of the largest too, and in 2007 drew well over 150,000 visitors. In addition, it is one of the most celebrated festivals in the nation. Among many honors, the festival has been twice selected as one of America ‘s Top 100 events by the American Bus Association, and was named by the Washington Post aas one of three “must see” festivals in the region.

Frank Coonelly, President Pittsburgh Pirates www.pirates.com 1. CLEMENTE – Though Roberto Clemente was from Puerto Rico, he spent his entire career playing in Pittsburgh and did so representing the spirit of this great city. He was a hard worker that gave everything he had on the field and off the field in the community. 2. BONDING – Pirates baseball has been a constant in Pittsburgh for nearly half of Pittsburgh’s 250 years of history. As a result, it has bonded generations of Pittsburghers and will for years to come. PNC Park is considered by many to be the best ballpark in America, and it presents an opportunity for Pittsburghers to bond with their family, their friends and their team. Like the Pittsburgh region, the Pirates have a rich history and a bright future. The gold “P” that has for so long been proudly displayed on our caps represents the Pirates organization, but it stands for Pittsburgh and has for some 122 years.

2. DESIGN – Known as Pittsburgh’s Design Zone, Lawrenceville is home to more than 220 independently owned businesses, including specialty shops, chic boutiques, artisan studios, furniture showrooms, and restaurants and cafes. Recently recognized by The New York Times as a “go-to destination,” Lawrenceville celebrates its historic significance as one of Pittsburgh’s oldest neighborhoods while trans-forming into a vibrant, artsy neighborhood. Visitors are greeted personally by friendly shop owners, many of whom offer unique treasures like hand-crafted clothing and jewelry by emerging designers, furniture and home décor from retro to modern styles, and art and craftwork from local artisans. A destination for the arts, Lawrenceville has a large, active community of independent working artists and arts-related community events. 3. ART – Pittsburgh is fortunate to have fantastic arts organizations and independent working artists, but Downtown and its neighborhoods would benefit from more public art that enhances streetscapes and public spaces.

3. RESTORE – As we at the Pirates organization work tirelessly to restore the culture of pride, the culture of passion and expectation of excellence associated with the ballclub, the people of this great city must work to do the same for Pittsburgh. Our city and this region have so much to offer for families, businesses and tourists. It is important we all recognize that, we all believe in that and we all do our part to showcase that to the world.

“Pittsburgh” continued on page 27

22 - May/June 2008

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


Shelving Rocks by Jim Wright The area’s oldest known swimming cannon. Marching from the location rests beneath the West Loyalhanna camp he the first day bound lane of Route 30, under the passed through a gap of the Chestnut bridge near Lazor’s Furniture store. Ridge, and traver-sing most probably ‘Shelving Rocks’ has been, and is the southeastern part of now Derry still very popular due to the deep township came to the Loyalhanna, pool at that particular bend in the which he crossed about half a mile Loyalhanna, and the high shelf of below the Shelving Rocks. He made rocks used for diving. The bridge his camp on the opposite side of took away much of the beauty and Nine-Mile Run, so called from Looking through my own files, I finally the diving platform, but has not being nine miles from the fort at found what I thought was Shelving Rocks in a 1932 Latrobean. The photo deterred the divers who now Ligonier. The site was well chosen, was unlabeled, but after showing it to merely dive FROM the bridge. it having on the east the run at the Harry Frye and my sister’s friend, Originally known as Shelving base of a steep bank of twenty feet, confirmed to be what I was searching. Rocks, the name has been altered on the south a deep ravine. over the years. Locals dubbed the area Shelvin’s The plateau above was using Latrobese to covered with heavy shorten the name as it timber. On this plateau was used in the forties, and where he rested he threw possibly earlier. Recent up an earthen wall facing changes have been found the west and north, in local write-ups using running in an angle from Sheldon’s Rocks, probably one side to the other. The because they couldn’t wall was of the height of a believe Shelvin’s was man. The ditch from proper. I wonder how many which the earth was cast people searched for the was on the outside of the Sheldon family? wall, and the camp proper Shelving Rocks actuwas within this triangle ally goes back to very so formed by nature and early times. George art. We have an exact Dallas Albert, an early description of this Youngstown historian, encampment and the writes in his 1882 book, road upon which Grant, The History of Westmorefollowing the old Indian land County, on page path, went. This is in the 28,an account of the journal of Christian Post.” Forbes Expedition. This There is so much history particular expedition of in this area, as it was the 1758, under the direction early West. Remembering of Coloniel Boquet, but led ‘Shelving Rocks’ as a part by Major Grant, is of that history continues described as follows: that tradition. “He left the camp at Pictures of Shelving Rocks, prior to bridge construction, are difficult Those pursuing more inforthe Loyalhanna (Ligonier) to find. I called Harry Frye, the former Bulletin Photographer, to mation on the history of on the 11th of September, ask if he had any photos. I got a picture from him showing Westmoreland County, may youngsters jumping from the rocks, just after the bridge had been the command not being want to try a WEB site which built, but alas, no pictures of Shelvins’ sans bridge. encumbered with baggage has many local history volumes or provisions, and having no scanned and ready to be searched for Names, Phrases, Etc. http:/ /digital.library. pitt.edu/pittsburg/

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(LEFT) A mile West of Kingston Dam, Route 30 crosses the Loyalhanna Creek at a beautiful spot used for many years as a popular swimming area, known by the locals as Shelvins’ Rocks. Along with other notable past swimming locations on the Loyalhanna, such as Kingston Dam, Murphy’s bridge, and Patty’s Hole, Shelvin’s maintained it’s popularity until Route 30 West was constructed in the mid ‘50’s. Although the peak platform for diving was removed for construction, occasionally you may see swimmers today using the bridge itself for their summer diving recreation.

Every Story Begins At Home.

May/June 2008 - 23


DERRY REMEMBRANCES Ruth Richardson

Dated Dating My earliest dating memories took place when I was a to ring. If it didn’t, you were out of luck. It was unheard be greeted by my father, who would give him an student at Derry B junior high school. At that early age of for a girl to even hint to a boy that she wanted to go embarrassing lecture about his manners, or lack thereof, of 13 or 14, we didn’t really ‘date.’ My group of friends out with him. You could tell your girlfriend to tell a and warn him that if he thought this was the proper would all decide on some activity, like meeting at Derry’s friend of his that you might be interested, but that was way to treat a girl, maybe he should go find some other Gem Theater on Friday night to see a movie. We would girl, not HIS daughter. I was always mortified when as bold as you could be. Otherwise, our moms told us all arrive separately and buy our own tickets, (it was a my dad spoke his mind to my friends, but upon we would be considered fast, and get a bad reputation. whopping 50 cent admission). We would wait in the reflection, I think he sometimes did them a great service. The only exception was the Sadie Hawkins dance held inside lobby, behind those glass windows by the Needless to say, no one ever beeped the horn for me on each February. I think the idea originated from the Lil’ concession stand where Fred Piper always stood, so the second date, if indeed there was a second date. Abner cartoon strip. And the rule was that for this one he could keep a close eye on all of us. After everyone And I wouldn’t be surprised if they gave up that rude day of the year, the boys had to wait, and the girls did arrived, we would pair up to sit together. The most practice all together. Another example – I remember the inviting. The girl also bought matching shirts or overwhelming fear at the movies back then was that the summer evening one of my dates arrived at my house sweaters for them both to wear to the dance. old ‘arm around you’ dilemma. I recall how my girlfriends wearing a pair of madras Bermudas and penny loafers Rule number two was the unwritten dress code for and I whispered about it and giggled with anticipation, with no socks. This was the typical uniform of the a date. Any evening date, a movie, a school dance, or and I can only imagine the angst it caused the boy. day. My dad looked him up and down and said, “If you going to a concert, meant the boy would be wearing a After all, he was the one who actually had to decide can’t afford socks, maybe you shouldn’t be spending tie and probably a sports coat, or at least a tie with a when the timing was right, if his arm should be on the money on a date,” then he shook his head slowly and sweater. And girls would worry over coordinating the back of your seat or directly on your shoulders, how walked away. Way to embarrass me, daddy! right outfit, weather it was a skirt and sweater or a close to sit, and whether to try to remove that arm once It seems to me we had a lot more options for things dress, and matching it with the perfect accessories. It it fell asleep and cramped up so much he didn’t think to do on a date than are available today. The most popular was not at all uncommon for your date to stop at the he could ever use it again. After the movies, we would date destination was the movies. Unlike today, it didn’t florist and arrive with a box of fresh flowers for you, all walk up to Murray’s restaurant for a Coke, and wait cost a lot, and there were lots of theaters around, with even for a casual date. And a corsage was always the for our parents to pick us up. If you had a ‘steady’ you a big variety of movies to choose from. Latrobe offered rule of thumb for a dance or as a special treat for any could also meet him at the roller rink in Latrobe on a the Manos, and up the street, the Olympic. You could dinner at a nice restaurant. Summer dating would Saturday or Sunday afternoon. Skating together also go to Greensburg, to the much larger and swanky offer a more casual dress code, but you still had to look practically forced you to hold hands – another pretty Manos; today it’s the Palace Theater. Around the corner freshly pressed and well groomed. terrifying prospect for a 13 year old. I remember hoping from it, on Pennsylvania Avenue, was the Cinema. Rule three – arriving for the date. The boy would my hand didn’t get all sweaty, and if it did, what should Then there were the drive-in theaters. The Hi-Way always come to the door, introduce himself to your I do next? Come summer, we would meet our ‘significant was the most popular because of its convenient location. parents, sit for a few minutes, inform them where he other’ at the Derry Pool, and listen to our transistor There was also the Rustic, a little further down the would be taking you, and ask what time he should radios while marinating in the baby oil/iodine road. It always gave us a laugh to see cows grazing in have you home. If it was chilly, he would help you on concoction that was so popular. To the field behind the screen. If you signify you were going steady, your wanted a lovely summer evening boyfriend sometimes gave you his ID drive, you could venture even further bracelet to wear, or a favorite ring. down the road to the Evergreen or And he was the one you slow-danced the Blue Dell drive-ins. But if, like with in the gym at the lunchtime me, you had a curfew these two drivedances. ins were so far away from home, you Even when my friends and I would have to miss at least part of reached senior high, most of us had the second feature to make it home to wait until we were 16, or very close on time. All the information I have to it, to start dating. When that about going to the drive-in I learned magical age finally arrived, there was from my friends. It is all here-say, I a fixed protocol and a long list of have no first hand knowledge – (that’s rules for the entire dating experience my story and I’m sticking to it!) since – from the actual process of making my father forbid me from ever setting the date, to the dress code, the foot (or wheel) inside a drive-in. He behavior before, during, and after the said they were a den of sin. date, the destination, and the hours. Sometimes, for a really During those first dating excursions, special date, a boy would choose one most of my girlfriends and I were only of the many theaters in Pittsburgh. allowed to double date, which meant It was always an exciting treat to there had to be four people in the car. make that big trip, have a bite to eat Not just me, all alone, with (in the at a classy restaurant, and spend the words of my dad) that goofy-looking evening in the big city. There was a (he thought they were all goofy) theater in Pittsburgh that the boys untrustworthy, hormone filled, talked about, but for some reason, Doug and Ruthie at Sugarbush, for a Christmas party, juvenile delinquent punk. So we they never took a date there. It all would call our girlfriends and make seemed quite mysterious to us girls. with her crazy brother Keith in the background. arrangements to go out together. I They would laugh amongst themhave to admit, the double dates were selves and we never quite got the a lot of fun. Since we were all fairly new to this joke. To hear those boys talk, it sounded quite with your coat, hold the car door open for you, and adventure, the stress level of a date could be pretty entertaining and informative. The mystery theater slowly and carefully drive away, especially if your dad high, and having other friends along really took some was located on Liberty Avenue, and it was called The was watching! Being a gentleman was second nature of the pressure off. Most parents wanted to know Art Cinema. to most boys. They were instructed, when they were everything about the boy in question. Who his parents In the summertime, Statler’s mini golf was another very young, how to behave, and how to treat a lady. were, including his mom’s maiden name, (my mom favorite dating location, as was the driving range across Every once in a while, some foolish boy would drive up always called them by their maiden name if she knew the street. Sometimes your date would pick you up and to my house, sit in the driveway, and blow the car them), where he lived, and most importantly, how old you would spend the entire date just cruising around. horn, signaling me that he had arrived and I should he was. He had to be about the same age as me. No A warm summer night, a rag-top with a full tank of gas, run out to greet him. I knew that going out the door to older boys, not ever, no way. and Cousin Brucie on the radio – what a wonderful warn him of his faux pas was not an option, and he Let’s go through each phase of that protocol, at way to spend an evening. We would cruise from Eat ‘N would have to face the music by himself. Eventually, least the way I remember it. First - When making a Park in Greensburg, to the Eat ‘N Park in Jeannette, the unlucky young man would make his way to my date, we girls had to sit at home and wait for the phone all around Latrobe, out to Cindy Sue’s in Mt. Pleasant, door, assuming that no one had heard him. He would

24 - May/June 2008

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


and back home through Greensburg again. There were so many places to stop for a burger or shake, and at each stop you could always find another car full of friends to chat with. There was Pete’s on route 30 and Carlson’s across the street. Rizzo’s was just up the highway, and further towards Greensburg was Jimmy Maestrol’s Lincoln Inn, and a little further west was Winky’s. Coming back towards Latrobe, you could stop at Lipecki’s drive in just past the Beatty crossroads. For a great pizza, Himic’s, the Pond, or Jioio’s in Lloydsville were the places to go. So was Demagone’s for anything Italian. Then there were the restaurants that boys had to save up to take a girl to. These select spots were for special occasion treats only, like your birthday. One of these was the Encore in Shadyside, where we would listen to Harold Betters play while dining. The ultimate elegant spot of my dating years was LeMont, on top of Mt. Washington. Doug took me there for my birthday one year. We parked the car at the bottom and rode the incline up. How nice to know it’s as breathtaking today as it was some 40 years ago. We also used to go to a place called Omar Khayyam’s in Oakland, I believe. It was the first time I had ever heard of, let alone tasted, grape leaves. You could get a great steak downtown at the Flame, and Ben Gross’s on route 30 was very elegant, as well. And last, but not least, our favorite dining extravaganza in Monroeville - Johnny Garneau’s Golden Spike. It was an all you can eat smorgasbord, and that buffet bar seemed to go on forever. I remember how difficult it was to decide what to order to eat while on a date. A girl never knew how much money her date had to spend, and there-in lay the problem. It just was not proper to bring up the subject of money, and unless your date told you, ‘Order anything you would like’ there was no way to discern what his budget was. My mom said I should tell my date I couldn’t decide what to have, and to ask him what he was going to order. This would give me a guideline. She said to never order anything more expensive than he was having. It seemed to be a pretty good rule. We also had several wonderful supper clubs that hosted the famous acts of the day. I remember seeing Johnny Mathis at the Twin Coaches, and the Fifth Dimension at The Holiday House in Monroeville. I also remember going to the Syria Mosque and the Civic Arena,

Every Story Begins At Home.

where we saw Diana Ross and the Supremes. We also saw Ray Charles in concert at St. Village College. There was so much to do in the summer. It seemed like every weekend offered a myriad of local fairs and carnivals. Crabtree Fair was a huge draw, and had wonderful fire works, as did the annual Bradenville Fair. We would go to the stock car races in Jennerstown to watch Blackie Watt and Joe Viglione vie for that checkered flag. I remember how loud and dusty it was, and so much fun. The best races of all were the figure 8 demolition derbies, especially the powder puff version, where all the drivers were women. There were also the drags at Keystone, and picnics at Linn Run and Stoughton Lake in Jennerstown. They had ropes tied high up in the trees. You could grab onto them, swing far out and drop into that freezing water from what seemed like dizzying heights. And there were parties, lots of parties, all the time. My favorites were the ones at Sugarbush on the Youngstown Ridge Road. It was a lovely old lodge in a beautiful wooded setting. Some-times those parties were semi-formal, complete with a full buffet and a band. And what date would be complete without watching a few submarine races at the local lover’s lane. Doug and I tried to find a few of our favorite spots several years ago. Much to our dismay, they had all been converted into housing developments, industrial parks or shopping centers. And time marches on. We went to the movies the other night. Admission was $16.00. A tank of gas is at least $50.00. Popcorn, a drink and some candy added up to $20.00. If you have dinner first, even at McDonald’s, you are already over $100.00. How can boys take a girl on a date today? Who could afford it? And the big dates, like the prom, I bet they set you back close to $1,000 when you add up the tickets, the dress, flowers, tux, limo, dinner, and Kennywood the next day. It all seemed so much better back then, even though our parents were really strict, and always tried to run our lives. They allowed us to be poor and made us budget every penny of our allowance, and they didn’t care if we were flat broke, it was our own fault for not budgeting better. We had to beg our dads to let us borrow the car. We were forced to be polite and learn good manners, and help out around the house. We were grounded when we didn’t listen. We had curfews, and rules, and regulations, and protocols. They crammed their old fashioned standards, and ethics, and morals, and values down our throats…..and I wish they were both here so I could just tell them - Thanks mom and daddy, I hope I’ve grown up to be just like you.

Foxfire May 2 & 3 at 8:00 PM May 4 at 2:30 PM $12.00 Adults, $10.00 Seniors & Students Annie Nations, an indomitable Appalachian widow of 79, lives on her mountain farm with the acerbic ghost of her husband Hector. Her tranquility is threatened by a brash real estate developer who wants to turn her land into a vacation resort and by concern over her son Dillard, a country singer who has come home with two stranded children because his wife has run away. Written by Susan Cooper and Hume Cronyn, Foxfire “glows with funny, touching and magical moments.” 208 West Main Street in Ligonier

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May/June 2008 - 25


Did you know that the Great Dane is the state dog of Pennsylvania? “...WHEREAS, the physical and other attributes of the Great Dane, to wit: size, strength, beauty, intelligence, tolerance, courage, faithfulness, trustworthiness and stability exemplify those of Pennsylvania;...”

EARTH TALK Questions and Answers About Our Environment “I just read an article that said air fresheners contain chemicals that can cause health problems when inhaled. Are scented candles any better?” Like most air fresheners, many scented candles contain and release phthalates, potentially harmful chemicals that have been linked to the disruption of hormonal systems and other health problems in people exposed to them. Burning candles can also emit small amounts of acetaldehyde, formaldehyde and naphthalene, organic chemicals that are also potentially harmful and that can leave nasty black soot deposits on floors and other surfaces. According to Pamela Lundquist of the nonprofit Children’s Health Environmental Coalition (CHEC), this black soot deposit “is primarily made up of elemental carbon, but may also contain phthalates and volatile organic compounds like benzene and toluene, which can cause cancer and neurological damage.” Children can easily ingest these chemicals if their hands have been wandering and end up in their mouths. The chemicals can lodge deep in the lungs, disrupting the lower respiratory tract, exacerbating existing problems like asthma, and potentially causing other longer term breathing problems.

“too much fun for such a small town” The Ligonier Tavern is a full service restaurant in a turn-of-thecentury Victorian house located in beautiful, historic downtown Ligonier, PA. Our three distinct dining rooms downstairs offer a uniquely elegant atmosphere. We use only the finest, freshest ingredients in all our dishes, and our service is extraordinary. Our aim is to create an exceptional dining experience just for you!

Despite laws against it, many candlewicks still contain lead, long linked to impaired learning and brain damage in children. Lead dispersed from burning candles can be breathed in and also constitute part of the dreaded black soot deposit. Candles with lead-containing wicks are on the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission ban/recall list now (thanks to efforts by nonprofits like U.S. Public Interest Research Group (PIRG), but many are still out there on store shelves. Consumers can avoid them by sticking to candles with soft cotton wicks, not stiff, metal ones. Eco-conscious candle burners should also avoid paraffin-based candles, which are made from waxes derived in the process of refining crude oil and literally consist of fossil-fuel generating hydrocarbons. Unfortunately, the vast majority of

commercially available candles are made from paraffin, though many alternatives are now available. Soy-based candles are a popular choice, as they are made from plant waste and emit less soot than the paraffin variety. Beeswax candles are another nice alternative, as well, especially if you can pick them up at a local farmers’ market. For scented or aromatherapy candles, look for varieties that use only pure plant essential oils instead of synthetic chemicals with unintelligible names. Some leader makers of Earth- and people-friendly candles include Blue Corn Naturals, Honeyflow Farm, Vermont Soy Candles and Aveda.

LOCAL RESOURCES: Crafts Unlimited Swan Creek 100% Soy Candles 331 W Main St in Ligonier • 724-238-3079

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CONTACTS: Children’s Health Environmental Coalition (CHEC), www.checnet.org; Blue Corn Naturals, www.bluecornnaturals.com; Honeyflow Farm, www.honeyflowfarm.com; Vermont Soy Candles, www.vermontsoycandles.com; Aveda, www.aveda.com. GOT AN ENVIRONMENTAL QUESTION? Send it to: EarthTalk, c/ o E/The Environmental Magazine, P.O. Box 5098, Westport, CT 06881; submit it at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalk/thisweek/, or e-mail: earthtalk@emagazine.com. Read past columns at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalk/archives.php.

check upcoming events and our menu on line at www.ligoniertavern.com Sun. 12:00 pm to 8:00 pm Monday -Thurs. 11:30 am - 9:00 pm Fri. & Sat 11:30 am - 10:00 pm

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26 - May/June 2008

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


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Doug Heuck, Publisher and Editor Pittsburgh Quarterly, www.pittsburghquarterly.com 1. WESTINGHOUSE – As Pittsburgh’s chief claim to fame has been industrial innovation, George Westinghouse is my Quintessential Pittsburgher. Like so many others, he moved here from elsewhere: Schenectady, NY. He was the dominant industrial pioneer in the two chief industries of his day – railroads and electricity – two industries which brought greatness to Pittsburgh and great leaps ahead for the world.

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He founded scores of companies and died with more than 300 patents. As both innovator and industrialist, he has no peer in Pittsburgh history. 2. KNOWLEDGE – Pittsburgh Quarterly has the best writers, photographers and illustrators in the region and together they put together a product like no other. 3. GREATNESS – The area needs to become more ambitious and set a goal of becoming the best city in the world. It is doable. “Pittsburgh” continued on page 30

Every Story Begins At Home.

May/June 2008 - 27


MAY/JUNE 2008 COMMUNITY CALENDAR Thru May 18 Frank Lloyd Wright ‘Through the Eyes of a Child’ The Barn at Fallingwater, Route 381, Mill Run, PA 724-329-8501 www.fallingwater.org May 1 Senior Social 2 PM Valley Dairy on Jefferson Street, Latrobe, PA (724) 537-4331 www.latrobecrecreation.org May 1-3 Blue Grass Festival 487 Dogwood Road, Cherry Tree, PA 724-254-4649 May 3 Ligonier Valley Writers Present “Starting Young” Help Desk followed by the Annual Student Poetry Contest Awards 2 PM-5 PM Barnes & Noble, Greensburg, PA May 3 River City Brass Band presents FABULOUS 50s 8 PM Palace Theatre, Greensburg, PA 412-434-7222 or 800-2927222. www.rcbb.com May 3 Fishing Event Sponsored Derry Volunteer Fire Co. and Derry Police Association (benefit the DARB Playground Fund) 6AM Lake Ethel, Derry, PA Registration Required (724) 694-2653 May 3 Westmoreland County Cleanways presents a program on composting 9:30 AM at Winnie Palmer Nature Reserve, Saint Vincent College, Latrobe, PA 724-537-5284 angela.belli@email.stvincent.edu

May 8 Salamanca, New York Casino Bus Trip 724-834-2153 www.aerobiccenter.org May 9-11 All the Kings Men Philadelphia Street Playhouse 725 Philadelphia Street, Indiana, PA 724-465-8228 www.indianaplayers.com May 10 CPR & First Aid Classes Chestnut Ridge Chapter, Latrobe, PA 724-537-3911 Pre-Registration and PrePayment are required. www.redcross-crc.org May 10 Elko Concerts Presents Tegan & Sara 8 PM Palace Theatre, Greensburg, PA (724) 836-8000 www.thepalacetheatre.org May 10 Muffins & Makeovers 9:30 AM The Pampering Center Irwin, PA RSVP by May 9th. 724-861-4747 sbone@comcast.net May 10-11 Stone Villa Wine Cellar’s Spring Fling Stone Villa Wine Cellars, Acme, PA 724-423-5604 www.stonevilla.com Hours: Sat.: 11am-6pm, Sun.: Noon5pm May 10- Aug 30 French & Indian War Paintings Exhibit Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art in the Ligonier Valley, Ligonier, PA, 724-238-6015 www.sama-art.org May 14 Free Morning Movie and Popcorn 10:30 AM Center for Student Creativity, Latrobe, PA 724-537-4331 www.latroberecreation.org May 15 Westmoreland Jazz Society: Trio Bravo Westmoreland Museum of American Art, Greensburg, PA 724-834-1500 www.wmuseumaa.org

May 3 Spring Nature Walk 10 AM Bushy Run Battlefield, Harrison City, PA 724-527-5584 www.bushyrunbattlefield.com

May 16-17 May Mart Flower and Craft Festival S & T Bank Arena, 497 East Pike, Indiana, PA 724-465-4594 www.indianagardenclub.com

May 4 River City Brass Band presents FABULOUS 50s 3 PM Pasquerilla Performing Arts Center, Johnstown, PA 800-292-7222 www.rcbb.com

May 16-18 Old Time Radio Geyer Performing Arts Center, Scottdale, PA 724-887-0887 www.geyerpac.com

May 4-8 Elderhostel: Biking the Great Allegheny Passage Laurelville, Mt. Pleasant, PA 800-839-1021 www.laureville.org May 6 Senior Social 2 PM Country Café, Pleasant Unity, PA (724) 537-4331 www.latroberecreation.org May 7 John Noble’s 12th Annual Westmoreland Night of the Stars 6:45 PM Palace Theatre, Greensburg, PA (724) 836-8000 www.thepalacetheatre.org May 8 River City Brass Band presents FABULOUS 50s 8 PM Gateway High School, Monroeville, PA 800-292-7222 www.rcbb.com

28 - May/June 2008

May 16-18 52nd Annual Pittsburgh Folk Festival David L Lawrence Convention Center, Pittsburgh, www.pghfolkfest.org May 16-22 Birdwalk Ligonier Area Businesses, Ligonier, PA 724-238-8083 or 724-593-6105 www.birdhousedreams.com May 17 Babysitting Certification sponsored by The American Red Cross 9 AM-3 PM YWCA Mansion, Greensburg, PA Pre-registration Reqd 724-834-9390 www.ywcawestmoreland.org May 17-18 Spring Antique Show Georgian Place, Somerset, PA 15501 814-443-1244 www.georgianplace.net

May 18-24 The Jimmy Stewart Centennial Week “100 years of Jimmy” Indiana, PA 724-349-6112 www.jimmy.org May 19 through June 12 YWCA Field Hockey for Girls Seton Hill University, Greensburg, PA Contact YWCA to register 724-834-9390 www.ywacwestmoreland.org May 21 Pre-School Open House 6:30-7:30 PM First Lutheran Church, Greensburg, PA 724-834-1457 www.felchurch.org May 22 The Count Basie Orchestra 7:30 PM Palace Theatre, Greensburg, PA 724-836-8000 www.thepalacetheatre.org. May 22 Opening Day Idlewild Park Ligonier, PA 724-238-3666 www.idlewild.com May 22-25 Greensburg Community Days Lynch Field, Greensburg, PA 724-834-4880 www.greensburg.pa.us May 24-25 Stone Villa Wine Cellar’s Summer Concert Series Stone Villa Wine Cellars, Acme, PA 724-423-5604 www.stonevilla.com May 25 2008 Fishing Derbies 8 AM Northmoreland Park, Registration at Boathouse 724-830-3950 May 25 & 26 2nd Annual Bike Swap Route 31 Bike, Board & Ski 3731 Glades Pike, Somerset, PA 15501 814-443-1282 www.route31boardandski.com May 25 & 26 WJAC-TV “Food for Fun Days” Bring a canned good to Idlewild Park to receive a discount. One can per person. All canned food will be donated to the Salvation Army Food Bank. 724-238-3666 www.idlewild.com May 26 Tour de Park - Ligonier Valley YMCA (5K Walk / Run) Idlewild Park, Ligonier, PA 724-238-7580 to register www.idlewild.com

May 31- June 14 Vandergrift Fine Arts Festival Downtown Vandergrift, Vandergrift, PA 724-567-5286 www.gabriellenastuck.com June 2 StrongLand Tour de Trout Fishing Tournament Sponsored StrongLand Chamber of Commerce, Vandergrift, PA 724-845-5426 www.strongland.org ours: 7pm June 3 Senior Social 2 PM Country Café, Pleasant Unity, PA (724) 537-4331 www.latroberecreation.org June 3-15 Mountain Playhouse Presents: ‘Stand By Your Man: The Tammy Wynette Story’ Mountain Playhouse, Jennerstown, PA 814-629-9201 www.mountainplayhouse.org : June 4-6 SPIDER-MAN Meet and Greet Idlewild Park, Ligonier, PA 724-238-3666 www.idlewild.com June 5 Senior Social 2 PM Valley Dairy on Jefferson Street, Latrobe, PA (724) 537-4331 www.latroberecreation.org June 5-7 ‘Up the Down Staircase’ Geyer Performing Arts Center, Scottdale, PA 724-887-0887 www.geyerpac.com June 6 Summer Sounds Greensburg’s Concert Series St. Clair Park, Robertshaw Amphitheater Greensburg, PA 724-838-4323 www.summersounds.com June 6-8 Saltsburg Canal Days Saltsburg, PA 724-639-9413 June 7 Nature Photographs with Robert Earl Lynch 12 PM at Winnie Palmer Nature Reserve, Saint Vincent College, Latrobe 724-537-5284 angela.belli@email.stvincent.edu June 7 Elko Concerts Presents Bob Saget 8 PM Palace Theatre, Greensburg, PA (724) 836-8000 www.thepalacetheatre.org

May 31 Stone Villa Wine Cellar’s Summer Concert Series Stone Villa Wine Cellars, Acme, PA 724-423-5604 www.stonevilla.com

9th Annual Stonycreek & Kiski-Conemaugh Rivers Sojourn This trip is an excellent outing for heritage and eco—travelers.The course follows the KiskiConemaugh rivers between Johnstown and Avonmore, in southwestern PA. The trip features remnants of the PA Main Line Canal, stone arch rail road bridges that now host the West Penn Trail and stops in historic towns. The Thunder Mountain Lenape tribe, along with others, will provide cultural history education. Ideal for churches, employee groups, civic and social clubs, families and friends, this Sojourn has appeal for experienced paddlers while catering to first timers. Once among the most polluted waterways in the Commonwealth, these rivers have made an astounding comeback and provide perfect opportunities to become acquainted with river sojourning. For those who want a little extra adventure, an adrenaline packed whitewater trip down the Stonycreek River in northern Somerset/southern Cambria counties is offered on Sunday. You can sign up for all four days or each day individually, but space is limited so please register early. For more information, contact Jill Latuch at 814-444-9695 or email latuch@2alc.com.

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


June 7 Portraits and Patriots: Annual Spring Garden Party 4 PM Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art at Ligonier Valley Ligonier, PA 724-238-6015 www.sama-art.org June 7 StrongLand Tour de Trout Fishing Tournament Sponsored by StrongLand Chamber of Commerce, Vandergrift, PA 724-845-5426 www.strongland.org June 7 Walk Now For Autism Heinz Field-East Club Lounge, Pittsburgh, PA 412-367-4571 June 7- July 13 25th Annual Quilt Show West Overton Village, Scottdale, PA 724-887-7910 www.westoverton.org June 11 Free Morning Movie and Popcorn 10:30 AM Center for Student Creativity, Latrobe, PA 724-537-4331 www.latroberecreation.org June 13 Summer Sounds Greensburg’s Concert Series St. Clair Park, Robertshaw Amphitheater Greensburg, PA 724-838-4323 www.summersounds.com June 13 DJ Tim Pietro’s 80’s Party 8 PM Mountain View Inn, Greensburg, PA 724-834-5300 www.mountainviewinn.com June 14 Antiques on the Diamond Downtown Ligonier, Ligonier, PA 724-238-4200 www.ligonier.com June 14 CPR & First Aid Classes Chestnut Ridge Chapter, Latrobe, PA 724-537-3911 Pre-Registration and Pre-Payment are required. www.redcross-crc.org June 14 Pick-A-Dilly Herb Faire 10 AM- 5 PM Dillweed Bed and Breakfast Route 403 North, Dilltown, PA 814-446-6465 www.dillweedinc.com June 14 Ligonier Valley Writers Sponsor Workshop 9 AM- 4 PM The Geyer Performing Arts Center, Scottdale, PA students from the Tom Savini School of Stage Make-up will teach horror and special effects makeup techniques. In the afternoon: local playwrights will teach the art and craft of play writing. June 14 Laurel Ballet Presents Alice In Wonderland & Peter Pan Palace Theatre, Greensburg, PA (724) 836-8000 www.thepalacetheatre.org June 14-15 Jimmy Stewart Airport Festival 7 AM-5PM Jimmy Stewart Airport, 398 Airport Road, Indiana, PA 724-463-3883 June 15 Free Concert in the Park 6:30- 9:30 PM Gazebo Area in Downtown Mt. Pleasant 724-547-6745 www.mtpleasantboro.com Hours: 6:30pm-9pm

Every Story Begins At Home.

June 15 2008 Fishing Derbies 8 AM Twin Lakes Park, Registration at Boathouse 724-830-3950 June 15 Firefighter/EMS Family Appreciation Day Featuring “Battle of the Barrel” competition & vehicle/apparatus displays. Idlewild Park, Ligonier, PA 724-238-3666 www.idlewild.com June 17-29 Mountain Playhouse Presents Unnecessary Farce Mountain Playhouse, Jennerstown, PA 814-629-9201 www.mountainplayhouse.org June 20 2008 Movies in the Park Dusk-weather permitting. Refreshments available. All movies will be new releases. (724) 537-4331 www.latroberecreation.org June 20 Summer Grand Tasting on the Bocce Porch Mountain View Inn, Greensburg, PA 724-834-5300 www.mountainviewinn.com June 20 Summer Sounds Greensburg’s Concert Series St. Clair Park, Robertshaw Amphitheater Greensburg, PA 724-838-4323 www.summersounds.com June 20 Westmoreland Jazz Society: ]Jazz in June Westmoreland Museum of American Art 7 PM Greensburg, PA, 724-834-1500 www.wmuseumaa.org June 20-22 Ox Hill Blue Grass Festival Ox Hill Fairgrounds, 1352 Oxhill Road, Home, PA 724-397-9149 June 20-22 Games Galore Weekend Benner’s Meadow Run Camping & Cabins, 315 Nelson Road, Farmington, PA 724-329-4097 www.bennersmeadowrun.com June 21 Beer & Gear Festival Falls City Pub 104 Garrett St. Ohiopyle, PA 800-272-4141 www.wildernes-voyageurs.com June 21 Academy Hill Garden Tours 10 AM -3 PM Greensburg, PA 724-834-3424 www.academy-hill.org June 21-22 American Cancer Society Relay For Life at Latrobe Memorial Stadium, Latrobe Registration is required. (724) 309-1538 Ext: 1062 June 21-22 Children’s Living History Weekend Special hands-on activities for children ages 3 and up. Compass Inn Museum, Laughlintown, PA 724-238-4983 www.compassinn.com June 21-22 Smicksburg Summer Country Days RT. 954 Smicksburg, PA 814-257-0192 www.smicksburg-dayton.com

June 22 Special Guest Appearance Karolyn Grimes (ZuZu in “It’s A Wonderful Life”) 3 PM Jimmy Stewart Museum, 835 Philadelphia Street, Indiana, PA 724-349-6112 www.jimmy.org June 22 “That 80’s Band” Free Concert 2 PM Band shell at Legion Keener Park, Latrobe (724) 537-4331 www.latroberecreation.org June 22 Sunday Pool Party Mountain View Inn, Greensburg, PA 724-834-5300 www.mountainviewinn.org June 22-30 Youth Summer Camp Laurelville, Mt. Pleasant, PA 800-839-1021 www.laurelville.org June 26-29 7th Annual Writing Popular Fiction Retreat Seton Hill University, Greensburg, PA 724-830-1005 www.setonhill.edu June 27 Summer Sounds Greensburg’s Concert Series St. Clair Park, Robertshaw Amphitheater Greensburg, PA 724-838-4323 www.summersounds.com June 28 Latrobe 4th of July Celebration 5 Mile Run Latrobe Memorial Stadium, Latrobe, PA 724-537-8417 June 28 Special Day For Special Kids sponsored by the Disabled Sportsman’s Club 9 AM-3 PM Pavilion 1 Keystone State Park, Derry, PA Call Harry for reservations 724-539-3095 June 29 Ex-Paws-ition (a benefit for Fayette Friends of Animals) Christian W. Clay Winery, Chalk Hill, PA 724-439-3424 www.cwklaywinery.com June 29 thru July 5 Showcase of Stars Featuring the best of the area’s talented young performers. Idlewild Park, Ligonier, PA 724-238-3666 www.idlewild.com

June 29- Aug. 24 Bill Wade- Waterfall Spirits Westmoreland Museum of American Art Greensburg, PA 724-837-1500 www.wmuseumaa.org June 29 – Oct 19 Painting in the United States Westmoreland Museum of American Art Greensburg, PA 724-837-1500 www.wmuseumaa.org July 1-20 Mountain Playhouse Presents Disney’s Beauty & the Beast Jennerstown, PA 814-629-9201 www.mountainplayhouse.org July 3 Independence Celebration 6-10:30 PM Gazebo, Downtown Mt. Pleasant, PA 724-547-6745 www.mypleasantboro.co, July 3-6 Westmoreland Arts & Heritage Festival Twin Lakes Park, Greensburg, PA 724-834-7474 www.wmuseumaa.org July 4 Latrobe 4th of July Celebration Downtown, Latrobe, PA 724-537-8417 July 4 Red, Wright & Blue Celebration Frank Lloyd Wright’s Duncan House at Polymath Park Resort Acme, PA 877-833-7829 www.polymathpark.com July 4 Summer Sounds Greensburg’s Concert Series St. Clair Park, Robertshaw Amphitheater Greensburg, PA 724-838-4323 www.summersounds.com

To submit your community event to this calendar, please email complete information to: advertising@LaurelMountainPost.com Event listings received after the deadline will be added to our online edition as needed. Questions? Call 724-331-3936

May/June 2008 - 29


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Your community website is packed with changing community information, resources, monthly contests, the Latrobe Bulletin headlines, sports, videos, and much, much more . . . You were introduced to the Greater Latrobe Community Network(GLCN) in our March/April issue. Now to start exploring what’s online for you at www.greaterlatrobe.net Check out the local sports links and find your favorite team or activity. The American Legion Latrobe Baseball website is hosted by GLCN and has loads of information & pictures. If you have a local sports website, get it listed by contacting the GLCN. If you don’t have a website, the GLCN provides local non-profits with free web hosting and help to get online. You can even update and change your content as you need too. Churches, clubs and other local non-profit organizations can easily be online for their members and the world. You can find videos of church services at some of the listed websites. Visit the Seniors section with links to the GLCN hosted Senior Center site, Senior Computer Associates (for training courses and a free computer), and much, much more. The Mini Gardens site has a beautiful picture tour with the start of Spring. You can view the daily Latrobe Bulletin headlines, a link to their front page and get a subscription form. There are changing video news clips of local information and other multimedia resources. Try your luck with the monthly jigsaw puzzle of a local view and enter the monthly contest with a great prize! The local community calendar provided by the Adams Memorial Library is a great way to find the many events and activities in our area. Click on Community – History and goto the developing Latrobe Area Historical Society website to see what you’ve been missing. View the history slideshow and find out more about this great community organization. There is more and more information being digitized as this GLCN hosted website is being created. Check out the expanding community links to government and other information. This section is expanding to include all businesses in the area. If you are looking to schedule a speaker for your local organization or event, the GLCN can provide with a multimedia presentation of your community network. The Greater Latrobe Community Network gives you an exciting opportunity to become involved. Volunteers are needed for the Advisory Council and there are opportunities to add more content of the past, present and future of the Greater Latrobe Area. Call 724-537-6698 or send an email to greaterlatrobe@gmail.com. Your Gateway to Online Local Information

Marcela Böhm-Vélez M.D., FACR Weinstein Imaging Associates, President/Pennsylvania Radiological Society, Past President, www.weinsteinimaging.com 1. FISHER – As a practicing radiologist/breast imaging subspecialist, I am impressed on a daily basis by the very real difference Dr. Bernard Fisher, a Pittsburgh surgical oncologist, has made in our understanding and management of breast cancer. His visionary and courageous work displaced the radical mastectomy approach, a severely disfiguring procedure that had been the standard of breast cancer treatment for decades. Beginning his quest in the 1950s on the heels of Pittsburgh’s recent polio vaccine triumph, he dared to ask questions that traditional practitioners did not welcome! Dr. Fisher was among a new breed of scholars who subjected accepted practice to formal methods of evaluation (randomized controlled trials), demonstrating that for malignant breast tumors lumpectomy with radiation was as effective in preventing recurring cancers as mastectomy. Justifiably, it has been stated by leading cancer specialists that Pittsburgh’s own Dr. Fisher has done more to pioneer and improve the outcome for women with breast cancer than any physician. His protocols required radiologists to elevate the standards of breast imaging making Pittsburgh internationally known as “the” center for breast imaging and treatment.

2. QUALITY – Weinstein Imaging Associates is a group of board certified radiologists dedicated to providing expert, customized care to patients in need of breast imaging, ultrasound and bone densitometry studies. Our private practice prides itself on providing same day/on site results, continuity of care and leading edge technology. Our comprehensive breast imaging facility offers the latest digital mammography with computer assisted detection and the newest ultrasound equipment with 3D, and molecular imaging with Breast Specific Gamma Imaging. Also offered is MRI with computer assisted detection and breast biopsies guided with ultrasound, mammography (stereotactic) and MRI. In addition we always strive to be at the forefront of developments in the rapidly changing field. 3. INSPIRE – At WIA we will inspire ourselves to provide the highest quality of patient care, as well as staying at the cutting edge of technology. Encouraged by Dr. Fisher’s example, Pittsburghers should challenge themselves to become involved in the economic revitalization of this beautiful region as a place known for scientific excellence.

Tom Sokolowski, Director The Warhol, www.warhol.org 1. CARNEGIE – Andrew Carnegie came to this city as an immigrant in the middle of the 19th century. He used some of the resources that the new world provided, such as a free library, and then combined hard work and ingenuity to create an extraordinary steel industry empire which served both Pittsburgh and world. He also created a pattern for extraordinary philanthropy which has never been equaled to this day. 2. CHANGE – Although Warhol was from Pittsburgh and was touched by the city through his college days, he really needed to have a larger format for his life and his ideas. I think with The Warhol Museum coming back to Pittsburgh it offers a rare window into the outside world, because even today I think

Pittsburgh is still a very closed-in place. It also offers the people other options in terms of art, technology and the intermix. This even carries into the social realm, since many of the programs we present suggest changes to the status quo – changes that some people find difficult and hard to swallow. We feel these changes are important in looking at the world today. 3. SHOCK – I’ve lived here 12 years, so I feel I understand the place to some degree. I think that when people are shocked or forced into doing something, they often say “That was a good thing. That was interesting.” Instead of looking to the past, Pittsburgh indeed has to look to the future.

Pittsburgh has “gone the distance” to its first semiquincentennial with incomparable flair and if the responses given here are any indication, it sounds like The City of Rivers & Bridges is “good to go” for the next 250 years. Wouldn’t it be divine to think that this edition of the Laurel Mountain Post might be found in a Pittsburgh 2008 Time Capsule in 2258? One can always hope. Happy 250 th Anniversary & Congratulations to Pittsburgh and its People!

30 - May/June 2008

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


Jump into Bed at Equine Chic!

On the Diamond in Ligonier at 100 East Main Street • 724-238-7003 • www.EquineChic.com • Tuesday - Saturday, 10 am - 5 pm

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Mandisa or Mike: 724-205-7033 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 Managed by Concord Hospitality Enterprises. 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 *Quality *Community *Integrity *Profitability www.concordhotels.com 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 Every Story Begins At Home. May/June 2008 - 31

Courtyard by Marriott Marriott Greensburg Greensburg 700 700 Power Power Line Line Drive Drive •• Greensburg, Greensburg, PA PA 15601 15601

Host your next successful meeting in one of our state of the art meeting rooms. Experience the Courtyard by Marriott Pittsburgh Greensburg, the newest and friendliest of Greensburg hotels.


“Just George” & Brent Whigham with Westmoreland County News & Event Coverage Weekday mornings 6AM–10AM

Jukebox Saturday with Tony Michaels Saturday 10AM –2PM

Jazz Impressions with Jim DeCesare Sunday 9AM–11AM

and YOUR favorite music ALL DAY LONG!! 32 - May/June 2008

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST

Laurel Mountain Post - May/June 2008  

A Magazine from the Heart of Western Pennsylvania

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