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LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST A Magazine from the Heart of Western Pennsylvania

trolleys in our

neighborhood A Latrobe Art Center Community Project

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE:

The Importance of Being Earnest Gourmet Promoting the Deeper Magic All for Abbey Alfresco Dining Swimming Against The Tide:

The Unpredictable Life of Eleanor Schano

JULY/AUGUST 2008 cover photo by Gabi Nastuck; inset photo by Harry Giglio Productions Every Story Begins At Home.

FREE July/August 2008 - 1


Indiana County, PA ENJOY OUR FESTIVALS AND CELEBRATIONS! July 4: Indiana Lions Club 4th of July Celebration July 13: Hoodlebug Summerfest July 18-20: Black Lick Fire Company Summerfest August 14-17: Blairsville Diamond Days August 16-17: Thunder Mountain Lenapé Nation Native American Festival August 16-17: Blairsville Underground Railroad’s Rescue of 1858: Newman’s Escape August 24-30: 146th Indiana County Fair

Stop by our Visitor Center or Call us for your Complimentary Visitor Guide

INDIANA COUNTY TOURIST BUREAU 2334 Oakland Avenue – Indiana Mall – Indiana, PA 15701 1-877-7INDIANA – WWW.VISITINDIANACOUNTYPA.ORG 2 - July/August 2008

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


W

JULY/AUGUST 2008

“What is a weed? A plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

elcome . . . MOUNTAIN VIEWS

(Volume V, Issue 4)

The Laurel Mountain Post is a bimonthly publication designed to focus on the people, places and events of Westmoreland County and the surrounding areas in the heart of western Pennsylvania. We print stories about real people and their daily lives; feature local merchants, craftsmen and professionals; present short pieces of art & literature; and never lose sight of what makes this area a great place to call home. Most of our writers are not professional reporters, but accomplished local practitioners with years of experience in their respective fields who bring credibility and personality to every article. In October 2006, the BBC News quoted us as “the voice of Pennsylvania.”

Laurel Mountain Post P.O. Box 227 Latrobe, PA 15650 advertising: 724-331-3936 editorial: 724-689-6133 Office Hours by Appointment at 137 East Main Street in Ligonier, Pennsylvania

Cathi Gerhard Williams Editor & Publisher editor@laurelmountainpost.com

Briana Dwire Tomack Marketing Director & Business Manager advertising@laurelmountainpost.com Proud members of the Latrobe, Ligonier, and Strongland Chambers of Commerce, The Pittsburgh Advertising Federation, and The Pennsylvania Newspaper Assocation Special thanks to our advertisers for supporting this community publication!

www.LaurelMountainPost.com

Our distribution of 15,000 reaches beyond Westmoreland County into the neighboring counties of Allegheny, Washington, Armstrong, Bedford, Cambria, Indiana, Somerset and Fayette. In 2006 our web traffic increased by 53% and continues to grow. Every day, more and more readers and advertisers across western Pennsylvania are discovering the Laurel Mountain Post.

Every Story Begins At Home.

Cathi Gerhard Williams

Optimist Prime Several years ago, Briana and I formed a business partnership in order to create the Laurel Mountain Post. I was the creative one, and she was the business woman. I’m blonde and tall, she is brunette and petite. Briana talks a lot, and I am usually very quiet. In almost every way we are total but complimentary opposites. What I can’t do, she can. Her weaknesses seem to be my strengths. And my often negative attitude is countered by her vivacious enthusiasm for life. I tend to look for ways to slow down, but Briana is usually finding ways to speed up – like an energetic hummingbird. A few months ago, she decided to start running, and headed out the door. With the same level of determination, I would have first contemplated my shoes, route, distance, time, weather, health, and everything else I could think of. After a few weeks, I’m still sitting in a chair with my apprehensive thoughts, and she just placed in her first 5K. Talent is nothing without a positive attitude, and a bad one can ruin even the most gifted among us. Unfortunately my first instinct is to enumerate the ways in which someone has failed me. Briana thanks them for D, E and F, and then encourages them to try again on points A, B, and C. Yet to many, I appear strong, and she seems weak. It’s easy to be mean and destructive. Encouragement takes practice and a lot of patience, especially when things are looking down.

Cheerleading is indeed a thankless job. We’re willing to go into therapy and pay lots of money for a professional to tell us we’re worthy, while we walk all over our supportive everyday friends.

advertising@LaurelMountainPost.com

Briana Dwire Tomack Cathi Gerhard Williams editor@LaurelMountainPost.com

Sometimes friends ask why Briana’s picture is always in “my” column. I have never thought of it as mine, but rather ours. Just because I write, design and physically create this magazine doesn’t mean I am more important or powerful. The Laurel Mountain Post would not exist if Briana had not first encouraged advertisers to take a chance on us five years ago. Each new issue would never be released on time if Briana didn’t make the schedule, coordinate the ads, and pay the bills. She is the organized yin to my chaotic yang. I’ll let our friends decide which one of us is tweedle dee and which is tweedle dum, but I’m guessing they’ll say we take turns at playing those roles. Regardless, Briana is my best friend, and I wish I could be more like her. She continues to inspire me to stay positive and treat each day as an opportunity rather than an obligation. I will never run a marathon – or even jog at all. But I promise to face the next new adventure with an optimistic and enthusiastic smile on my face.

July/August 2008 - 3


REPARTEE FOR TWO Barbara M. Neill

Swimming Against The Tide: The Unpredictable Life of Eleanor Schano Long before Sally Wiggin, Patrice King Brown and Peggy Finnegan informed us daily on Pittsburgh networks Eleanor Schano was dazzling the tri-state area with her brains and beauty. In on the ground floor of the fledgling genre of television when female reportage was almost nonexistent, she was a hometown girl who was definitely in the right place at the right time. Yet, as her 2006 autobiography Riding the Air Waves (JMF Publishing) explains, the ride was often more grit than glamour. While still a teenager with youthful enthusiasm and moxie to spare, she parlayed her early modeling experience into her dream career. An original “Broadcast Babe,” her mental ability was initially underestimated, as is so often common with attractive women. (The camera has always loved Eleanor Schano, but she is so much more than photogenic. The term “mediagenic” seems to better define her.) Rising through the ranks despite the gender bias of the times, she holds the title for many broadcast “firsts”: first female commercial announcer, first TV weather girl, first general assignment female news reporter and one of the very first women to serve as solo anchor on a major prime-time TV news program. On a personal level Ms. Schano has weathered her share of storms. She married in 1955 and in 1956 lost a daughter several days after her birth. (Subsequently, she and her first husband had two more daughters.) After her divorce in 1967 she was a single mom until she married her WTAE colleague, sportscaster Ed Conway, in 1970. Several years into their marriage Conway was diagnosed with esophageal cancer. After an operation for that condition, he went into cardiac arrest and suffered irreparable brain damage. He died in 1974 at the age of 48. Today Schano is married to Pittsburgh attorney and former Common Pleas Judge John “Jack” Feeney. 4 - July/August 2008

Their combined family includes 6 children and 16 grandchildren. I was born the year Eleanor Schano had her first TV audition. When I wasn’t playing Cigarette Girl (“Cigars, cigarettes, Tipparillos?”), Ocean Voyage or Shoe Store, I also posed as a Roving Reporter with makeshift microphones as she did in her childhood. Naturally, I was eager to connect with the knowledgeable broadcast pioneer and Pittsburgh icon that I had always considered to be as dropdead gorgeous as Grace Kelly (but with even more sex appeal). Still a presence to be reckoned with, the lady didn’t disappoint.

small percentage of American women were working mothers you had a high-profile occupation. Did you tire of justifying your life choices to others? ES: My decision was simply a practical one. I began my broadcasting career as a teenager still in college and by the time I was married I had been appearing on daily television as Eleanor Schano for over 5 years. It just made sense to keep my professional identity. Furthermore, it allowed me to maintain a balance between career and family – something I protect to this day.

********** LMP: You emphasized in Riding the Air Waves that the “eye candy” tag got old fast, so let’s get the physical attributes issue out of the way early on. Have you ever in your entire lifetime taken a bad photograph? ES: It’s no secret most people enjoy watching lovely looking women reading the news…but, believe me; they didn’t get the job based on looks alone. It’s a very competitive market place and you better have strong journalist skills or shiny hair, big blue eyes and a dazzling smile won’t get you in the door. So, to any aspiring young women dreaming of becoming a news reporter, I have some simple, sound advice – begin by becoming a good writer. (Have I ever taken a bad photograph? You MUST be joking.) LMP: In the 1950s it was a bold identity statement to continue to use your maiden name once you married and in an era when only a

DOUBLE R STARS: Roving Reporter and Robert Redford.

LMP: With a dash of daring you managed an unscheduled interview with the notoriously private Jackie Kennedy – a major coup by any standard. How significantly did the

willingness to take risks impact your career? ES: Getting an exclusive interview with Jackie Kennedy was indeed a coup. But, the job of a good news reporter is to get a “scoop” on the competition. In those days I was the only female general assignment news reporter in town and I had to earn my stripes by proving I could get the story as well as any of my male colleagues. LMP: You are personally acquainted with countless celebrities and media personalities. Was the late Peter Jennings as well-informed and savvy as he seemed? (Before his death in 2005 I often remarked that if Peter Jennings told his viewers on any given evening that the world was going to end in 15 minutes, I could accept the fact calmly. In my totally unbiased opinion he had the best delivery and the classiest look of any newsman in “modern” television history.) ES: I share your opinion of Peter Jennings. He will always be remembered as one of the best communicators and journalists of our time. I was privileged to get to know the “real” Peter Jennings. Off camera he had the same commanding presence and I cherish the memories of the times we were able to just sit and chat in the lunch room at WTAE-TV sharing good conversation sprinkled with his acerbic sense of humor. LMP: When reading the chapter of your book that explained the death of your second husband, Ed Conway, I was saddened to think that he missed the early glory days

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


of the Pittsburgh Steelers. Are you of the same mind? ES: Ed Conway didn’t miss much. He lived life large. Of course, his premature death was before the Steelers sent shockwaves around the sports world with their Super Bowl wins. He did, however, know the guys who made up the Steel Curtain very well. Terry Bradshaw, Rocky Blier, Andy Russell, Lynn Swann, Franco Harris … they were all good friends. Ed was a hero to local sports fans, not only as sports director at WTAE, but also as the voice of the Pitt Panthers and the Penguins. The same kind of communication skills that Peter Jennings brought to news, Ed Conway brought to sports.

go on and on. Truthfully, if I were a news director I would have a solo anchor. We get most of our information from the field reports and if you add up the brief amount of face time given to the anchor reading the news, it can easily be handled by one person. More

viewers can immediately apply to their own lives in order to live a vibrant life full of good health, vitality and energy. Our field-based programs will tackle a wide range of subjects – nutrition, fitness, legal, financial, health care, travel, entertainment – all news you can use to make life better than ever. We will be taking our cameras to where the action is with tips to motivate, educate, inspire and empower. It’s Eleanor Schano moving out of the TV studio and into action.

Eleanor and daughters Jennifer (l) and Lorie - Mother’s Day 1960

LMP: In 1978 you accepted a position as a solo prime-time TV news anchor in Palm Beach, FL, only to return to Pittsburgh as KQV’s first primetime female radio news anchor in 1982. Do you think you’re just a Yankee at heart? ES: No, I’m just a homegrown girl with roots to Pittsburgh that couldn’t be transplanted. My broadcasting colleagues thought I was crazy when I gave up the post of solo anchor at the ABC station in West Palm Beach, FL. It was a dream job where on any given day I might interview luminaries like Ted Kennedy, Alan Greenspan or Robert Redford. But all the glamour and excitement of Palm Beach can’t hold a candle to the rich texture of this great region. LMP: Last season’s Fox show Back to You was based on the premise that a news team needs chemistry to be successful. (The program concerning a fictional Pittsburgh TV channel starring Kelsey Grammar and Patricia Heaton was surprisingly canceled in May.) In your estimation which news team of your career had the best interpersonal mix? ES: Wow, that’s a tough one. Let’s face it, the anchors of a newscast have to have just the right chemistry or it doesn’t work. There have been so many great teams – Adam Lynch and Ray Tannehill, Bill and Patty Burns – the list could Every Story Begins At Home.

importantly, that would eliminate all the silly chit chat that I find really annoying. LMP: Throughout your autobiography you reiterated the concept that different eras lend different perspectives. With that in mind, do you think the men of this generation are more comfortable being married to an influential and independent woman than men were 50 years ago? ES: Fifty years ago there were so few women in prominent professional positions that it’s hard to answer that question. I would like to think both men and women can be “comfortable” together in a meaningful personal relationship despite their status in the world of business, law, medicine, science or politics, etc.

LMP: The industry has undergone unimaginable changes since your broadcast days began. Do you ever wax nostalgic for the much simpler time when you were writing “kickers” for the Pitt Parade?

ES: Of course, we all are nostalgic about memories of the past, but as far as the broadcast industry is concerned the changes have been staggering – beyond what any of us would have dreamed 4 or 5 decades ago. I lived thru the arrival of color TV, videotape, satellites, the internet, high def and digital (providing instant global communication). Technology will continue to change our world and I can’t wait to learn what’s next. LMP: What is one of Eleanor Schano’s guilty pleasures?

ES: You want me to name just one????? I have so many pleasures and I try really hard not to feel guilty about any of them. After all, guilt is the gift that keeps on giving. Of course, at midnight when I have scraped the last bit of peanut butter out of the jar and plopped it on top of a left over brownie, I might have a twinge of guilt. But then, it tasted so good I can’t feel sorry I ate it. LMP: You have done it all and you have done it well. What compass has served as your guide? ES: Oh that’s easy – my parents, Eleanor and Joe Schano. They were such strong people with the highest morals and ideals who taught me the values I live by today. I had a wonderful early childhood with a lot of support. My father instilled in me a work ethic that has served me well and my mother gave us the love to surround us, the vision to guide us and the power to protect us. I have truly been blessed. ********** Eleanor Schano obviously took the advice she heard long ago – “Look like a lady, think like a man, act like a woman and work like a dog.” She has the bearing of a confident woman, as well as the grace and poise of a highly intelligent woman who possesses an open heart and mind. She swam against the tide, stayed the course and rose to the top professionally and personally. Not an easy feat for any human being – onscreen or off.

LMP: Now that the well-received and much-lauded Lifequest (a WQED infotainment program targeting senior adults and hosted by Schano) has come to an end, what professional projects have you got in your sights? ES: I have big news for my viewers. I will be returning to WTAE Television early in September with a first-of-its-kind series of miniprograms that will air as a regular part of the Channel 4 Noon News. “Live Well – Live Long with Eleanor Schano” will be packed with demonstration and information July/August 2008 - 5


What Is True Wellness? by Jerry D. Felton, P.T.

Heather & Bob Kuban Owners

SALES ASSOCIATE, RECS/ASR

Having practiced as a physical therapist for 22 years, the concept of wellness is a topic that I address on a daily basis-both personally and professionally. Although I work on “physical” issues during rehabilitation, true wellness has a much deeper meaning and directly affects how a particular person may recover from an injury, illness or surgery. Definitions of wellness vary depending upon who is promoting it. Wellness can be defined as the pursuit of a healthy, balanced lifestyle. Wellness, as an alternative concept, is generally thought to mean more than the mere absence of disease; rather it is an optimal state of health or being. In either case, it is important to give attention to and harmonize the various determinants of wellness which include: family, work, health practices, social support, spirituality, environment, money and security, relationships, emotional issues, and leisure-to name a few. What I’d like for us to consider here is the idea of overall health as consisting of an attitude of wellness in ALL areas of your life. By doing so, I believe that you can achieve an overall sense of well-being, fulfillment, unity and joy. Stress is a part of life, but, the healthier you are, the better able you are to manage stress when it happens. Chronic stress can impact your immune system, which lowers your resistance to getting sick. Here are some tips that can be easily incorporated as part of a wellness lifestyle approach. • Attitude: “Attitude is everything.” The way you think about things can make the difference

in how you react to events. It is not what happens to you, it is how you react to it. • Healthy Eating: Eating well will increase your physical, mental and emotional stamina as well as boost your immune system. Good nutrition and healthy eating habits are a must. • Water: Drinking plenty of pure, clean water is a guaranteed method to promote health and wellbeing. • Physical Activity: Physical activity provides immediate stress relief as well as long-term stress management. Just 20-30 minutes of walking a day, for example, can give you more energy, help you put things in perspective, improve your sleep, sharpen your mental productivity, and boost your self-confidence. Our bodies are made to move and everyone can find some type of activity that is enjoyable. • Sleep: Consistent sleep is critical for a healthy life. Sleep is as important as nutrition and exercise when preparing for peak performance. • Healthy Relationships: Changes in relationships can be a source of stress. At the same time, talking to a supportive friend, family member, or a licensed counselor/professional can be helpful in coping with stress. • Relaxing Your Body and Mind: There are numerous methods that can help you manage stress and also improve your concentration, productivity and overall well-being. By incorporating these healthy habits on a daily basis you will start to notice positive changes in many areas of your life. You can look at wellness as adding years to your life, however, I”d rather look at it as adding life to your years.

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LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


STUDENT SPOTLIGHT by Paula J. Forte

Derry Area Academic Quiz Team On April 25th, the Derry Area Academic Quiz team embarked on a trip to Harrisburg to participate in the annual state qualifier for the National Quiz Bowl. Franklin Regional High School had actually won the Westmoreland Quiz Bowl in March. However, the date of the State Bowl coincided with Franklin Regional’s prom, and the students did not want to give up that oncein-a-lifetime experience. Therefore, Derry, who took second place at the Westmoreland Quiz Bowl, was given the opportunity to participate. The students were chaperoned by Mrs. Pat Houpt, the secondary gifted coordinator and quiz team coach, and Ms. Carol Croll, secondary math teacher and National Forensics team advisor, on their trip to Harrisburg. The students who participated were Derek Clawson, Katie Greene, Philip Johnston, Zack Quidetto, Danielle Salandro, and Jason Sheppard. Mrs. Debbie Johnston, Philip’s mother, served as an assistant coach for the team; however, she did not accompany the team to Harrisburg. Katie Greene is the President of Student Council. Katie is also a member of the Mock Trial team, concert choir and the ensemble. An avid reader, she volunteers at Adams Memorial Library. Because she enjoys reading and public speaking, she plans to major in Communications at California University of Pennsylvania in the fall. She would like to work in public relations or as a journalist for the Discovery or History channels. Katie says that her experiences with the quiz bowl have helped her to build confidence in herself and taught her that “winning isn’t everything.” In a similar vein, Derek Clawson’s favorite quote is from Rocky Balboa who said that, “ . . .it ain’t about how hard you hit, it’s about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward. . . That’s how winning is done!” Derek Clawson is planning to major in art at Juniata College this fall because “I love to draw and to paint, and I am decent at the task.” He would like to work someday as a concept or wildlife artist. He is the president of the Art Club this year; however, he also enjoys going fishing, watching football and reading. In addition to art, his favorite courses are earth and environmental sciences. Danielle Salandro is also planning a career in art. She is majoring in photography at the Rochester Institute of Technology in New York this fall. She chose photography as a major because it was one of her favorite courses in high school. She worked with the stage crew throughout high school and said that she will miss her friends most when Every Story Begins At Home.

she graduates this year. Danielle said that she has learned to “think fast” through her experiences with the quiz bowl. Jason Sheppard said that he has learned that “teamwork is essential for a successful team.” He is planning to attend the Altoona campus of Penn State University majoring in accounting in the fall. His favorite class is AP calculus; however, he said that he enjoyed all of his math and business classes in high school. He is a member of the Sugarloaf 4-H Club and Boy Scout Troop 304. He is also a member of the Academic Excellence Society, the World Languages Honor Society and the varsity soccer team. Zack Quidetto and Philip Johnston were also members of the science team that won this year’s Carnegie Science Center’s Chain Reaction Contraption competition. The boys have already won many accolades for their Rube Goldberg-style contraption. However, each has learned from this competition as well. Zack Quidetto said that he has learned to trust his instincts and be true to himself in high school. Since he enjoys working with his hands to build things, he has decided to matriculate at the Behrend College at Penn State to study mechanical engineering technology with a goal of becoming an engineer. Not surprisingly, his favorite subjects are chemistry and physics. He enjoys sports and was a member of the varsity golf team. He plays hockey and football for fun. He is also a member of the stage crew and the jazz band at school. He credits their team’s comradery for the success that they have achieved. He also was grateful to Mrs. Houpt and Mrs. Johnston for their help in training for the event. Philip Johnston is planning to major in aerospace engineering at the main campus of Penn State University this fall. In addition to being on the quiz team and science team, Philip is a member of the National Forensics League, the Academic Excellence Society, the French Honor Society, the varsity boys’ volleyball team, the varsity boys’ golf team and the jazz band. Philip especially enjoys studying math, science and history in high school. He felt that he learned a lot about time management in high school. He said that he also learned “not to give up even if we aren’t doing well.” Philip is a team player who feels that there were no leaders on their team because “everyone was important.” The team did not win a trip to Disney World in Florida to compete in the national event; however, they did represent our district well. Katie, Derek, Danielle, Jason, Zack and Philip learned that it’s the competing, the trying, and the learning that keep us going.

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Alfresco Dining Recently I met some friends after work to join in a birthday party at a restaurant I’d never been to before, the Spitfire Grill in Greensburg. The weather was absolutely perfect for finally getting to enjoy an evening on our front porch, although I love my friends I was feeling a little noblesse oblige about driving to South Greensburg after a split shift. All was made better when I called for directions and found out my friends were sitting outside having drinks on the patio! I adore alfresco dining. Food always seems to taste better when you eat it outside. I didn’t make it in time to have anything to eat, but did have a superlative time with my friends. The music was great, everyone’s drinks were tasty, and the chairs very comfortable. It looked as if there was seating for nearly 60-70 people — very nicely landscaped including a fountain and the requisite tree lighting. They told me I got there just after the outdoor grill shut down for the evening… I vowed I’d be back for dinner. We recently had an unexpected Saturday night to go to dinner and a movie, so we decided to go to Vallozzi’s outdoor area for wine and appetizers, see the movie, and then have dinner outside at the Spitfire. Naturally it poured down rain so the alfresco appetizers were nixed. Not long after the storms ended we decided to go to the Spitfire for dinner and then see the movie. When we arrived they were just opening up the outdoor bar and drying off the tables and chairs. We ran into a couple of other friends so we ordered several appetizers instead of dinner. Everything was quite tasty. There are few things more enjoyable than spending some time with friends over good food. There is a smattering of restaurants in our area that do offer some form of out door dining. Being a chef I tend to be overly critical when I’m dining out. I’ve said repeatedly in my column that there is no excuse for bad food. More often than not it seems that most places don’t seem to put forth much of an effort anymore. For us it’s often more enjoyable I think to have a barbe-que at home. I recently caught an episode of Good Eats with Alton Brown featuring kebabs. (Episode EA0903: Dis-Kabob-Ulated) Alton is probably the best thing that the food network has going for it. I love that he tells you the scientific reason why you should be doing what he tells you to do. The last segment of the episode

featured a brick trench lined with sand and hot coals for your guests to sit beside and cook their own kebabs! Interactive meals like that make for an event that people will remember and talk about for years. I already have my bricks and sand gathered to set up. I’m going to assemble my trench on paving slabs on top of the old picnic table so that no one has to sit on the

ground. The party isn’t for two more weeks and every single R.S.V.P. has already come back accepting. Make it a point this summer to enjoy some alfresco dining as often as you can; whether it be at your favorite restaurant offering it, or simply taking your bowl of cereal and a coffee out on the porch for breakfast. I swear it can even make a Monday seem more palatable when you feel the warmth of the sun on your face and see the hummingbirds glimmering in the light while they have their breakfast too. A couple of points to remember when you’re grilling: • Take your meat out a little bit ahead of time so it’s not ice cold. • Don’t move and fiddle around with your meat too much or you won’t get the attractive markings. • Place your charcoal pile at the side of the grill so you can have temperature zones. Sear over the coals and move away accordingly. • A dry rub marinate with spices and oil tends not to allow the meat to stick to the grill as much as a liquid marinate. • Use natural charcoal instead of old fashioned. The old fashioned has actual coal in it. Knowing all the filters needed for the coal burning power plants because of the toxic emissions from burning coal, I simply can’t imagine coating your food with them. • Both charcoal and propane grills have their perks, so if you can, have one of each. LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


All Aboard for Reading! We’ve got it all and we’re bringing it close to home! Climb on board when we roll into your neighborhood as you visit the fully stocked bookmobile. “Mo,” (as we call her) began making her rounds in July 2001, bringing almost 30,000 items to your community in 2007 alone! That equals the circulation total of our Caldwell Memorial (Derry) and Unity branches combined. Mo stops at day care centers, facilities for seniors, and various other stops in the Greater Latrobe area. Check out the schedule below or visit our automatically-updating website to see Mo’s exact location at any given moment. The bookmobile runs year-round, and participates in the Summer Reading Program for adults and children of all ages. With over 8,000 items in stock, Mo also has easy access to materials at our bricks and mortar branch locations. These include books in regular and large print, audiobooks on cassette and CD,

movies on VHS and DVD, and music CDs. Borrowers also have full access to the county-wide services so that books or dics from any of the 20 member libraries of the Westmoreland Information Network (WIN) can be delivered by Mo just by requesting them– either through the website or by speaking to a staff member! Anyone with a WIN card from any WIN library or an ACCESS PA card from non-WIN libraries can use the bookmobile. Our loan period is two weeks for all items. This includes books, movies, music, toys and software. After two weeks, you may renew the items as long as no one is waiting for them (this is called a reserve. Items “on reserve” may not be renewed.) For more information about Mo, summer reading programs, WIN, or anything else about library services, please call Adams Memorial Library at 724-539-1972, or visit www.adamslib.org.

Your monetary donations help us in the following ways: • With the steadily-rising costs of fuel, the bookmobile needs your contributions to pay for gasoline. • Mo will soon need six new tires, costing $350 each! • It’s time to buy eight to ten new $20 bins used to transport materials to and from the bus.

• Each year we use about five to six reams of paper to print out schedule and event fliers a a cost of $8-10 per ream. • We also use about four full sets of $70 ink cartridges every year. Please let us know if you can help support your community!

Summer 2008 Bookmobile Schedule

Every Story Begins At Home.

July/August 2008 - 9


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10 - July/August 2008

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August 16, 1994. Two weeks before summer vacation would morph into their freshman year, Marty Luchsinger of Derry Township had slipped next door to recruit some buddies to ride dirt bikes in the waning days of carefree abandon. The ride was a Go, but first Marty had to return home to retrieve his helmet. There was a strict rule in the Luchsinger household –NO RIDING WITHOUT A HELMET– a mantra mom Jacki insisted Marty recite every morning. Hustling to comply, Marty raced his bike at the far edge of the road. It hit loose gravel, veered sharply, and slammed Marty headfirst into a metal pole used to support a young sapling. His passenger was uninjured but Marty lay unconscious. Life-flighted to Allegheny General, he remained in a coma for four weeks. Still comatose he was transferred to Erie Rehabilitation where the coma persisted another two weeks. The severe, traumatic brain injury Marty had sustained in the original crash altered forever his life and his life connections to family and friends. Beavis and Butthead - Cartoonland’s infamous No-Goods - were Marty’s favorite TV characters. Their faces on the front of a T-shirt brought the first sign from Marty that he was coming out of the coma -– his face lit up and he smiled in recognition. The severe brain injury, however, had left him with minimal physical movement and only non-verbal means of communication. Marty was now dependent on a different set of wheels for mobility; his world, retooled with special schooling, an alphabet and communication charts for pointing out letters or symbols, most inquiries were reduced to allow yes/no responses, and a Dynavox Communication System arrived which he refused to use. Officially Marty became a client in the PA Head Injury Program whose caseworker met with Jacki approximately every six weeks. When the caseworker introduced Jacki to the network of contacts which would eventually lead to Canine Assistants she was unaware of the ultimate importance of that suggestion and the consequences that would follow. Although limited, Marty maintained contact with the world around him. He was the only one in the Luchsinger household who could remember on which day the garbage needed to be set out for collection. It was Marty who knew that flying after 9/ 11 was now a dangerous thing to do, even if the news for which the Luchsingers had waited for two years had finally come. A canine assistant dog could be matched to Marty’s needs and would become his, free of charge, but he would have to go to their headquarters in Alpharetta, Georgia, for the training. Marty refused to fly. Jacki and Marty’s sister Cara had successfully lured him to the airport but Marty was not about to board a plane willingly. In desperation Jacki made a mom’s executive decision - and Marty later awoke from a heavenly sedation 30,000 feet above the ground. Canine Assistants’ headquarters lies just outside Atlanta, Georgia. It was started in 1991 by Jennifer Arnold in answer to her own unmet need of a canine companion. Jennifer had contacted MS and was put on an impossibly long waiting list. Instead of passively waiting, she started her own training program and has ever since been successively placing dogs.

One of the most important tenets of the program is to remind the recipients that the dogs are already fully trained. The dogs know what to do. It is the recipients that must now be temperamentally matched and trained to work with the dog. This is the purpose of umbilical training where the matched pairs of dog and owner are physically connected for 48 hours. If the two complete this aspect successfully they are graduated to begin their joint journey. Marty was matched with a quiet, steadfast Monty who had a gentle, accepting humor. The team - Marty and Monty, Mom, and Cara were on their way home. Back home, Jacki saw immediately that Monty brought much more into Marty’s life in addition to physical assistance. This soft and gentle non-verbal friend connected to the nonverbal Marty with an inexplicable bonding. Marty gained confidence with this new adult responsibility. Monty was his and his alone. When Marty started taking seizures, Monty would react and protect him whatever the need. A few weeks later Marty died. But in that precious last weeks, Jacki knew Marty had been the happiest he’d been in seven years. Monty had worked the deeper magic, the emotional bonding so vital to life. With Marty’s passing and the subsequent placement of Monty with another recipient, the Luchsingers’ ties to Canine Assistants might have ended. However, a casual remark on the drive home from an event planning session stirred to life another possibility. • The Event was the annual animal blessing held at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Blairsville, PA. • The Suggestion - wouldn’t it be nice if there would be a representative from Canine Assistants present to be honored? • The Value-added Suggestion - Would it be possible to sponsor a Canine-trained goodwill ambassador dog for educating others to the work that they do? The Mission Materialized In Memory of Marty Luchsinger, Noah’s Team of Western PA was formed for educational outreach and to raise the $15,500 cost of placing a trained Canine Assistant with a recipient in western PA. Indy is that Goodwill Ambassador. He came to live with the Luchsingers three years ago and has since showcased his skills during appearances at the Westmoreland Mall, Clelian Heights School for Exceptional Children, various community festivals, and most recently at Derry Middle School. Noah’s Team holds an annual Basket Party fundraiser. This year’s event will be held in September at DiSalvo’s Station in Latrobe. Total funds collected so far are nearing the $15,500 cost to place a Canine Assistant dog with a western PA recipient. Noah’s Teams, named after their originator Noah Elliott Stowers, is the Canine Assistants’ educational outreach unit. In establishing the first branch in Western Pennsylvania, Jacki Luchsinger, her friends and family hope to share with others the insight and support they encountered from personal tragedy. When there seemed no ‘best’ in the worst of times, a quiet, friendly, golden retriever padded into their Marty’s heart, enriching his life beyond words.

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


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Greener Living On Friday, May 23, 2008, Cheryl Walters, Derry Area Middle School principal, and Jacqueline Luchsinger, a certified canine handler, presented a program about canine assistants for eighth grade students at Derry Area Middle School. This spring, all of the eighth graders read the novel Stuck in Neutral by Terry Trueman in their English classes. The book is about a child with a disability. Canine assistants are trained to work with disabled people to raise their quality of life. The canine assistant program was presented to the students to raise awareness of Noah’s Team of Western Pennsylvania, a local chapter of Canine Assistants.

by Vanessa Kolberg Green is the hottest new color for the season, but not to wear. Green is the latest trend for living. It seems that every day a new company is touting their latest “green” product as one more essential tool to help the universe. Hybrid cars use less gas, solar panels can heat a house, and eating organic cuts out harmful pesticides. And yet the highly sought after green title often comes with a high price tag to match. Not everyone can afford a $32,000 hybrid or to solar panel their house, so how can the average person embrace the green lifestyle? Luckily, since “going green” is so popular, it’s easier than ever to find green products locally and at customerfriendly prices. Major discount retailers, such as WalMart and Target are making sure everyone can do their part to help the environment, no matter what the budget. One easy and inexpensive method is to ditch the disposable plastic water bottles, which are usually not biodegradable and are rarely recyclable. Instead, opt for a reusable one, which can be found at most discount retailers for as little as a few dollars and in a variety of sizes and colors. Instead of picking up, and then throwing away, another disposable container, just refill the reusable bottle and take comfort in knowing that this little step will be helping to elevate environmental waste. Another green trend is the use of reusable shopping bags. Rather than bringing home groceries or other items from the store in plastic bags, which do not biodegrade, environmentally conscious consumers are toting their goods in reusable shopping bags. While some upscale retailers are charging up

to $100 for the simple mesh or linen bags, affordable ones can be found locally. WalMart, Target, and even Giant Eagle are selling their own versions for about $1.50 each. Just about any tote bag will do the trick though and provides an eco-friendly (and stylish) alternative to plain old plastic. Even household cleaners are claiming to be going green. However, just because it carries the ubiquitous green label, it doesn’t necessarily mean the products are all natural. Look for cleaners that come in biodegradable containers, are made from natural renewable products (like plants), and use a reduced amount of harmful petroleum-based chemicals. Clorox has a line of green cleaners called, what else, Green Works, that meet the criteria above and can be found at most discount stores for the price of regular cleaners. Target also carries a line of specialty all natural cleaners, called Method, that use a reduced amount of chemicals. If you have to clean anyway, why not make it green? Great all natural cleaning products can even be made from common ingredients around the house, such as lemon juice and baking soda. Look for recipes online. While it may not seem like much, these simple lifestyle changes can really add up. Going green doesn’t mean drastic and costly changes; just try to pick natural and renewable products when shopping. WalMart and Target even have entire sections of their stores dedicated to the latest green products. This, however, is just a start when it comes to the green craze. Check online or look for books that have other great green ideas for everything from food to organic makeup.

Clean & Green At Home: Recipes! Homemade Spray Cleaner Mix in a sprayer bottle: 1 cup white vinegar 1 cup water Furniture Polish Mix in a sprayer bottle: 1 cup olive oil 1/2 cup lemon juice

Every Story Begins At Home.

Lime and mineral deposits – Lime and mineral deposits can build up on bathroom and kitchen faucets. To remove them, soak cloths in vinegar and wrap the cloth around the affected faucet. Leave the cloth to sit for about an hour (depending on how tough the deposits are). This will soften the deposits so they can be easily wiped away.

July/August 2008 - 11


The Harvey Award was created by Indiana County sculptor John McCombie and resembles the lamppost where Elwood P. Dowd first met the inimitable and invisible white rabbit, “Harvey.”

It’s Been a Wonderful Century! Indiana Honors Favorite Native Son Jimmy Stewart

James Maitland Stewart was born in Indiana, PA on May 20, 1908 and died on July 2, 1997 at the age of 89. As a golden era movie star of the highest magnitude, the self-effacing Stewart often portrayed just the sort of character that the city is memorializing during its centenary celebration of his birth, “One Hundred Years of Our Hometown Hero.” The culmination of the Centennial Festival Day on May 24 was The Harvey Award Dinner held at the Indiana Country Club. First given in 1995, the honor acknowledges distinguished achievement, integrity and high personal standards in the motion picture industry. This year’s tribute was presented posthumously to H.S.H. Princess Grace of Monaco and accepted by her nephew, John B. Kelly III (representing H.S.H. Prince Albert of Monaco). Kelly and Stewart co-starred in Rear Window, the Alfred Hitchcock classic, before she left the US and her film career behind in 1956 to become the bride of Monaco’s Prince Rainier III. Stewart provided a eulogy for his onscreen partner after her untimely death in 1982. Serving as emcees for the evening were Rich Little, the well-known impersonator and JMS Museum Foundation member, and Nick Clooney, former AMC host. Both gentlemen were accompanied by their wives Clooney’s spouse, Nina Warren, and Marie Little.The two friends provided a running commentary and conducted a Q&A session with the twin daughters of Stewart and his wife, Gloria – Kelly Stewart Harcourt and Judy Stewart Merrill. Also in attendance was Starr Smith, fellow WWII serviceman and author of Jimmy Stewart: Bomber Pilot, and UK resident Martin Kelly (no relation to the award recipient), the guest who traveled the greatest distance to attend the 100th year gala. Rounding out the yearlong 2008 commemoration will be a visit to the JS Museum by Karolyn Grimes (Zuzu in “It’s A Wonderful Life”) on June 22 for a photograph and autograph session and a Centennial Fall Film Festival on October 1, 8 and 22 (reservations necessary). To learn more about the Jimmy Stewart Centennial and Museum visit www.jimmy.org – Story & Photos by Barbara M. Neill

TOP: (left to right): Rich Little, Judy Stewart Merrill, Carson Greene, Jr., (JMS Museum Foundation President), John B. Kelly III, Kelly Stewart Harcourt, and Nick Clooney. The LMP asked the very approachable and personable Clooney (brother of Rosemary, father of George) if there is an actor in the movie industry today who is as deserving of the title of “America’s Everyman,” as Jimmy Stewart once was. His reply, “Actually, there are 2 – Tom Hanks and my son!”

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LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


Greater Latrobe Community Network Joins GigaPan Beta Project by Jack Doherty The Greater Latrobe Community Network is preparing to give you and the rest of the world a unique opportunity to explore the Latrobe area in greater detail than has ever been possible online before. As one of only about three hundred organizations worldwide chosen to participate in the first public beta phase of the GigaPan project, the GLCN is gearing up to begin publishing a series of super-high definition, gigapixel panoramic images of Latrobe and the surrounding area. Photos taken with digital cameras are measured in megapixels. One megapixel equals one million pixels (or dots) of resolution. A highend consumer digital camera may take 10MP (ten megapixels) resolution pictures. The GigaPan system will create photos which are more than a gigapixel - or 1,000 megapixels - in size, producing pictures with 100 times the resolution and detail of the top cameras on the market, turning a simple photograph into a panoramic experience which viewers can explore on their computers. GigaPan is a development of the Global Connection Project, a joint initiative of Carnegie Mellon University, NASA's Ames Research Center, Google and National Geographic, with the goal of bringing the world closer together by making it possible for global citizens to become familiar with their distant neighbors, learning about local communities through images that have so much detail that the pictures, themselves, become objects of exploration, discovery and wonder. Working with NASA, Carnegie Mellon scientists developed the GigaPan camera system, a consumer-level version of the space agency's PanCam technology that allowed the Mars Rover to begin sending back expansive 3D pan-

orama photos of our neighboring planet in 2003. The GigaPan system is a robotic device that attaches to a standard consumer digital camera, enabling it to rapidly take hundreds of high resolution digital photos of a scene which are then electronically "stitched" together to create an interactive, multi-billion pixel panoramic computer image. When published online, visitors can examine the pictures in great detail, moving freely around the scene and even zooming in for intricate, 3D close-up views.

The GigaPan camera system, developed by Carnegie Mellon.

"The pictures can really be breathtaking," said an enthusiastic Dr. John Parker, Chairman of the GLCN Board of Directors. "They aren't just pictures to look at," he said. "They invite you to step inside and discover what's waiting to be found. We're proud to be included during the first beta phase of public testing and can't wait to begin welcoming the world to explore the beauty and the history of our area." GigaPan combines three technological developments: the robotic camera mount for capturing very high-resolution (gigapixel and up) panoramic images using a standard digital camera; custom software that constructs the very highresolution gigapixel panoramas;

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and a special website that allows visitors to explore, share and comment on the panoramas and the details that are waiting to be discovered within them. The Greater Latrobe Community Network's first GigaPan project will involve capturing several aspects of the Saint Vincent Basilica and the Saint Vincent College campus. Coordinating the project with the GLCN is Jarod Trunzo, Coordinator of Service Learning and Outreach Programs at the college. "We already have a lot of interest here, both from the Basilica and from the College," said Trunzo. "We're very excited at the prospect of sharing Saint Vincent's rich history with the world in a way that will make it almost tangible for even the most distant visitor." In addition to Saint Vincent, the GLCN plans to build a growing online album of virtual gigapixel panoramas of Latrobe, capturing the spirit of the community and the surrounding area. Future GigaPan studies being considered include downtown Latrobe before, during and after the current Revitalization program, Legion Keener park, the Greater Latrobe High School campus, the Latrobe Country Club where local golfing legend Arnold Palmer learned his strokes, Keystone State Park, Kingston dam, and several others. They hope the project will involve area seniors, students, local history buffs, and other interested citizens. The first GigaPan pictures of Latrobe should be published online sometime in August. In the meantime, you can follow the project's progress on the GLCN website at http://www.greaterlatrobe.net where you'll also find more information about the GigaPan system and links to some sample GigaPan panoramas.

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Sun. 12:00 pm to 8:00 pm Monday -Thurs. 11:30 am - 9:00 pm Fri. & Sat 11:30 am - 10:00 pm 724-238-4831 • 137 West Main Street in Ligonier, PA July/August 2008 - 13


271 Frye Farm Rd.

Latrobe Art Center Neighborhood Trolley Project There are “trolleys in Our Neighborhood,” and you are being invited to join in the fun of owning one inside or outside your business or office. Latrobe Art Center members and artists from “our Neighborhood” (including students from Greater Latrobe Senior High School, Seton Hill University and St. Vincent College) have been working very hard on this wonderful opportunity to spread the word about our wonderful “Neighborhood.” Our “Neighborhood” includes all of southwestern Pennsylvania – which means that a “Trolley” stop may end up outside a store in Ligonier or a hotel in Greensburg. In other words, anyone is welcome to become a sponsor and buy a “Trolley.” The wooden trolleys are approximately 4’ x 4’ and made of pressed wood particle board (compliments of Lowe’s in Latrobe – Jason Probst, manager, and Kevin Branken, operations manager). Larry Wallish of Latrobe Pattern & K Casting cut the boards according to the trolley pattern. Each one will be painted and sealed so they are waterproof and stand like a picture frame with a prop hinged on the back. No

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two are alike! A small plaque will be attached to each wheel acknowledging the artist and sponsor. Sponsors will have the option of including their names or “In memory of/In honor of” on the small plaque. This is a great opportunity to fill the town with beautiful artwork and show your support and enthusiasm for our wonderful and unique art-loving community. If you are interested in sponsoring a trolley, pick up a sponsor form at the Latrobe Art Center on Ligonier Street in Latrobe and return with your tax deducible gift of $125 by Friday, August 1. “Trolleys” will be delivered during the week of August 25-29. Please visit the Art Center’s website at www.LatrobeArt Center.org to choose yours, or stop in to see them in person. Latrobe Art Center is open M-F 10 am to 5 pm, and Saturdays from 10 am to 3 pm. For more information, please contact Jackie (Director) or Gabi (Graphic Designer) at 724-537-7011. The September-October issue of the Laurel Mountain Post will include information about all the artists, and a regional map with the locations of all the sponsors and their trolleys!

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


THE REC ROOM Jim Kasperik

The Coaching Tree In 1988, I was a sophomore in high school when I was trying to decide what spring sport to play. Would it be baseball or volleyball? Would it be the sport that I enjoyed very much, the one that I had played since Little League and 9 years old, or would it be the new sport, the one that was quite different than baseball. As I thought about my decision, it came down to the fact that I could still play baseball in the summers and that I really wanted to try something new. Not only that, but some of my best friends were playing volleyball and I wanted to be involved. Oh yeah, and it did not hurt that the team always won and that they had just won the first state title in a team sport for Derry a couple years back. But what was really a selling point for me was the fact that Coach Rich Schall was the Head Coach. Coach Schall was a great coach, but a better teacher of lessons. What I learned from Coach Schall still sticks with me today and it sticks with some of his other former players as well. A couple months ago in talking to Dave Albaugh and Brock Smith, both friends and former players for Coach Schall, we started to think about the influence that Coach Schall has had on volleyball in Western PA and in fact, volleyball across the country. We were able to come up with around fifteen former players at Derry who played for Coach Schall who were coaching volleyball today at some level…some at the very top! At the Top of the Coaching Tree It is a classic case of “local boy done good.” Mark Pavlik is a graduate of Derry High School and volleyball alumni who played under Coach Schall. After playing for Derry, “Pav” realized that he had a passion for coaching and was an assistant coach at Derry from 1985-1988. During that time Derry Volleyball had its most successful years with two state titles, one runner up and a third place finish. His attention to detail was recognized, but his passion for the game and for the players was quite evident. He was a great teacher, who knew how to get people to respond. About a month ago, Pav reached one of the tops of the volleyball world leading the Penn State University Men’s Volleyball team to the national title. A great accomplishment for any coach, but especially sweet to see for alumni of the Derry Volleyball program and Coach Schall. Being a fan of volleyball and any PSU athletics, it was great to see the Nittany Lions win the national title, but really quite cool to see a “Derry Guy” leading them on the sidelines. Recently I was able to talk to Pav and get his feelings on being a national championship winning coach and what is important to him as a coach and person.

Every Story Begins At Home.

Coach Pavlik Fourteen years ago Coach Pav took over the helm at PSU, as the head coach of the men’s volleyball program. He earned that. Pav had put his time in and learned from some of the very best volleyball coaches around, both at the high school and college level. His influences are many and we talked about that a bit. Coach Pav sites several coaches as big influences in his rise to the top of the volleyball world. Of course we discussed the aforementioned Coach Schall. There is always a good story or two that every volleyball alumnus can recall when playing for Coach Schall. The tournaments, the travel, the games and the practices always produced great volleyball, but great stories too! Coach Schall always taught his players that “practice makes permanent” not perfect…there was always room to get better. As Pav and I discussed Coach Schall, he remembers the lessons learned from him and what he was able to teach players and young men. In particular Pav recalled that Coach Schall was able to teach you “things that you don’t think about” when it comes to volleyball. Teaching the players those intangibles that make good players better. Always remembering to “better the ball” when you are the next player to make contact. It may seem simple, but Coach Schall was able to break down the game and make it easy to play for the players. Coach Pav had a couple other big influences on his coaching life and they are Coach Tait, for whom he played for at PSU, and Coach Bock, the head coach of the women’s volleyball program at Juniata College. He mentioned that he learned from Coach Tait that he should be a teacher. Being the head coach is not about being the boss, but about being the calm leader. Coach Bock, who is one of the most recognizable names in the sport with over 1,200 victories in his coaching career, helped Pav learn the intangibles of the sport. Coaching in the Big Time When Pav took over the reigns at PSU after five years of being top assistant to then head coach Tom Peterson, he took over a program that had already built success in the volleyball world. He took over a program that was well respected in the volleyball community at one of the largest Universities in the world. This could be a daunting task, or could be seen as an opportunity of a lifetime. Pav has seized this opportunity and ran with it. We talked about what is expected from the student athlete at PSU. Pav was quick to say that the student part is taken very seriously at PSU. Being a student first is “part of the PSU experience, it is not a balance” Pav stated. “Just look at the numbers” regarding the academic

achievements of our athletes. In fact PSU produced a school record of over 260 academic All-Big Ten Honors in 2007-2008. Pav continued by saying that “We expect hard work on the court, in the weight room and of course, in the class room.” But he also stressed the fact that the student athletes are under great pressure to get the job done on the court. Because of this he feels it is very important that the players be afforded the chance to be just college students when they can. Pav stated that the real world is only several years away, and that a chance to be a college student is so important to have . . . it lasts a limited time. Working at Success As our conversation wound down, we discussed about how he got to where he is now. This was a very interesting topic and Pav has great insight on this topic. He discussed success is “not just one defining moment, but rather a sum of situations and challenges you either meet or do not meet.” You can learn as much from situations where you do not succeed as well as the ones where you do. But the important thing is that you do indeed learn. Looking Towards a Bright Future… Personally and Professionally When I talked with Pav, it was on the day his son Jack was finishing the school year. Pav talked about picking his son up at school and taking him to lunch and the pool to kick off summer. Oh yeah and I almost forgot to mention that his wife, Heather, was a threetime All-American setter for Juniata College and current assistant coach under Coach Bock at Juniata. Pav mentioned how Heather and he juggle the volleyball schedules and always have time for family. You cannot help but root for people like Pav and his family…great people first and professionals second. Volleyball in the Laurel Highlands So the next time you have a chance to see a volleyball match here in the Laurel Highlands, make it happen. Enjoy the game and the teams. Enjoy the coaching too. You never know where those players and coaches will end up. It was one of my best decisions to play volleyball at Derry for Coach Schall. The memories are still vivid today…they still make me smile. Thanks to Pav for talking with me and providing such a great perspective on volleyball and life. I wish all the coaches from Mr. Schall’s coaching tree the best of luck…and to all remember always in volleyball or in life “practice makes permanent!”

July/August 2008 - 15


T Rex Returns to the Carnegie Science Center LEFT: In one of the most dramatic paleontological confrontations ever displayed, two Tyrannosaurus rex skeletons are poised mid–battle over the remains of a plant-eating dinosaur. Photo credit: Joshua Franzos for Carnegie Museum of Natural History.

RIGHT: Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s Tyrannosaurus rex as it looked in the late 1990s. The skeleton was the centerpiece of former Dinosaur Hall but it was posed in the out–of–date upright “kangaroo” position. Paleontologists now believe that T. rex walked with its tail held aloft and its back parallel to the ground. Photo courtesy of Carnegie Museum of Natural History. ABOVE: Pittsburgh area school children gaze in awe at Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s holotype Tyrannosaurus rex. The museum’s T. rex was purchased in 1941 from American Museum of Natural History for $7,000. Today, $7,000 is worth about $100,000 but the T. rex skeleton is worth millions. Photo courtesy of Carnegie Museum of Natural History.

16 - July/August 2008

The first phase of Dinosaurs in Their Time—the premier dinosaur exhibit in the world to immerse visitors in the environments in which dinosaurs lived, surrounded by scientifically accurate re-creations of the Earth’s Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous Periods—opened to the public in November 2007. The June opening of the final phase completed the three-year, $36 million project that renovated and expanded the museum’s former Dinosaur Hall and now features the third largest collection of real mounted dinosaurs in the country. “The dinosaurs at Carnegie Museum of Natural History have been some of Pittsburgh’s most beloved icons for more than a century. It is thrilling to think that this project’s completion presents us with a modern, updated exhibition ready for another century of educating and captivating dinosaur lovers of all ages,” said Dr. Samuel Taylor, Director of Carnegie Museum of Natural History. T. rex returns to the museum, but is not alone. In one of the most dramatic paleontological displays ever constructed, Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s original T. rex is joined by a second T. rex, with the two frozen in a confrontation over the remains of an Edmontosaurus. This new display not only reflects the most current scientific thinking on Tyrannosaurus but also conveys its historical and cultural significance as one of the world’s most popular and thrilling dinosaurs. “Nowhere else in the world will you be able to see a display quite like this,” said Dr. Matthew Lamanna, the museum’s Assistant Curator of Vertebrate Paleontology, principal dinosaur researcher, and lead scientific advisor for Dinosaurs in Their Time. “These two T. rex, each longer than a bus and weighing as much as an elephant, are posed as if about to do serious damage to each other. People will see T. rex as it really was: a gigantic, formidable carnivore that often didn’t get along with others of its own kind. But when visitors see this display, we hope they will think about this singular animal and really use their imaginations. Was T. rex a scavenger, a hunter, or both? Which of them will win this fight and take the spoils? Will both survive the battle?”

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


The Palace Theater: The House That Manos Built by Barbara M. Neill Incorporated as a municipality in 1799 the city of Greensburg has seen any number of venerable “houses” disappear. The Greensburg Seminary, the Lomison Opera House, the Hotel Zimmerman and the pair of houses that comprised the original Westmoreland Hospital are no longer. Gone are other churches, schools, theaters, hotels, businesses, banks, mansions and homes of note too numerous to mention – many as victims of obsolescence. Nevertheless, examples of historic architecture remain from Greensburg’s prosperous gilded era. The Westmoreland County Courthouse with lustrous dome and the Jacobean clock tower-topped Greensburg Train Station are undoubtedly the most familiar and iconic of the structural images that come to mind. The Masonic Temple Building, one of the oldest downtown buildings, is now an office complex. There are a number of imposing houses of worship still standing proudly as well as stately houses of finance and commerce. Contemporaneous mansions like those of William A. Huff and prominent industrialist Thomas Lynch are in use today as the YWCA of Westmoreland County and offices of Old Republic Insurance Company, respectively. Smaller vintage homes have also survived and in some cases have been painstakingly transformed (e.g. those of Academy Hill Historic District). And then there’s The Palace. As is the case with most vaudevillecinema houses, The Palace Theatre has traveled a circuitous path to its present prestigious position. In the mid 1920s the Greensburg-based Manos Enterprises decided to develop a chain of theatres with an eye to selling the family’s candy confections therein. Designed by the architect Leon H. Lempert & Son of Rochester, NY and built for the princely sum of $750,000, the largest of these constructions was established at the former site of Greensburg’s Rialto Theatre. The Manos Theatre opened in 1926 and in the parlance of the day it was “crackerjack.” The most extravagant and elegant edifice of the Manos show business chain, it was decorated in the French Renaissance style with no expense spared. Its exterior accoutrements included a golden marble ticket booth and unique overhead marquee. A Grecian marble balustrade, Vermont marble staircase, floral-detail candlelight chandelier, brass railings, black & white checkerboard tile flooring and goldfish-filled fountain graced the interior (and, amazingly, are all intact today). A grand Wurlitzer theatre organ accompanied the silent films that were originally shown while a red, blue and green light show twinkled on the ceiling dome. (When the organ was dismantled, some of its parts were shipped to be used in San Mateo, CA and Thurmont, VA.) Anticipating today’s one-stop entertainment venues, the lower level had a bowling alley, billiard parlor and

Every Story Begins At Home.

production facility which readied the newsreels of the day for onscreen viewing. (Currently displayed on the mezzanine level are several antique movie projectors. Complementing them are photographs of early projectionists and union charters from the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees donated by the late Paul Jennings.)

Following the advent of “the talkies” in 1927, Warner Bros. Theatres, Inc. of New York assumed ownership in 1930. (Warner Bros. eventually became RKO-Stanley Warner Theaters, Inc.) As the movie industry prospered, so did The Manos Theatre. But, as the old saying and the modern day Nelly Furtado song says “all good things come to an end.” The development of film distribution made it unnecessary for film production companies to own theatres and in 1973 The Manos was sold to Cinemette Theatres of Pittsburgh, PA. When multiplex mania overtook the nation, Greensburg was no exception to its frenzied business dealings. With the opening of the Westmoreland Mall Cinema IV, Cinemette sold the theatre to Carl V. Marinelli and his business partner Adelaide Delvitto in 1977. (Delvitto sold her interest a year later back to Marinelli.) After a valiant effort to keep the renamed Palace Theatre an active venue during the difficult 1980s, Marinelli considered selling to a buyer inclined toward razing the building for future development. After Marinelli’s death his family, visionary city leaders, and Greensburg Area Cultural Council worked together to save the historic structure from demolition. Bought in 1990 by the non-profit Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, Inc. (later The Westmoreland Trust and now Westmoreland Cultural Trust), the theatre was earmarked to become a selfsupporting performing arts center. Since the 1990 acquisition the WCT has implemented more than $10,000,000 worth of improvements to The Palace. Early renovations upgraded the outdated wiring and plumbing systems. Phase II begun in 1996 saw the addition of air-conditioning, new stage lighting and a state-of-the-art sound system with infra-red hearing-assist. Installation of more spacious and comfortable seating has greatly enhanced the entire upper level. The theatre’s original opera boxes have been replicated with finishing touches to the handcast decorative moldings and hanging swags to be added at a later date. Discovered adjacent to the loge seating were two murals depicting French fairy tales and painted by Louis Grell of United Studios of Chicago. The murals (hidden for years by tapestry) were badly marred by furring strips, but have since been refurbished by renowned conservator Christine Daulton. A third remains unseen under a coat of paint and it is not yet known if the paint can safely be removed without damaging the mural underneath. Phase III came to an end in September 2004 with the dedication of Megan’s Suite, named in memory of

the late GSHS musical performer Megan Smith. An expanded 2-level area overlooking a landscaped courtyard, the suite provides table seating for the enjoyment of refreshments during casual gatherings or formal receptions. Also available for functions independent of theatre shows, it is utilized for private parties, meetings, press conferences and classes. In addition new restrooms, an elevator and drinking fountains have been added for the convenience of patrons and guests. Future theatre improvements being considered include replacement of orchestra level seating, interior repainting that will more closely realize the original color scheme, renovation of dressing rooms and the restoration or replacement of the ornately-trimmed velvet main stage curtain. For sheer variety of programming the schedule of events at The Palace is hard to top. National touring shows and celebrity performances sponsored by the WCT and popular entertainers brought in by concert promoters are all very well attended. In the last decade patrons have seen the likes of such varied entertainers as Neil Sedaka, Irish Tenor Ronan Tynan, Connie Francis, Judy Collins, Bill Cosby, Craig Ferguson, Bernadette Peters, Alison Krauss, The Glenn Miller Orchestra and The Oak Ridge Boys. A February 2008 set of two shows turned into a trio when sales for the national tour of Stomp surpassed all expectations. Teresa Baughman, Director of Marketing and Programming, believes diversity should rule when considering program planning for the 1345 seat Palace. She states, “Westmoreland Cultural Trust is booking a variety of shows to add nationally known talent to the entertainment mix and to complement shows produced and presented by other groups. We’re working to include more comedy, more family programming and more shows that appeal to an under 40 audience.”

Concert series performances by Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra and River City Brass Band are huge community favorites. Other local groups incorporated into the 80+ yearly performance slate are Laurel Ballet, Stage Right, various area dance companies, Greensburg Central Catholic High School (musicals) and Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Laurel Region (benefit concerts). The Palace calendar has even included no less an international figure than the Dalai Lama. There is an indefinable quality that “makes a house a home” – a magical touch that transforms the mundane into the memorable. Considering the enchantment she has brought to the city in the form of melody, dance, drama and discourse for over 80 years, you might say The Palace Theatre (The House that Manos Built) is home to the Fairy Godmother of Greensburg! To learn more about The Palace Theatre visit www.thepalacetheatre.org. Anyone with interior photographs, past Palace performer photographs, memorabilia or entertaining anecdotes pertaining to the theatre, please contact Teresa Baughman at 724-8368000 or email her at palace@earthlink.net.

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DERRY REMEMBRANCES Ruth Richardson

Heirloom Memories I just finished planting my little vegetable garden. It looks so pretty, with all my herbs and flowers mixed together in my version of a Martha Stewart design. This year I planted three kinds of parsley, two different sage, some French tarragon, three kinds of peppers and a few heirloom tomatoes. “Heirloom Tomatoes”, that label had me remembering my Grandma Huldy Stewart’s garden in West Derry in the 1950’s, where the ‘heirlooms’ originated. Her first name was Hulda, and we most always called her by her first name, shortened to Huldy. I think Grandma Huldy would have loved sitting with me on the swing in my little fenced garden, having a glass of Mogan David, her second favorite choice of wine. Her first choice was the occasional bottle of homemade ‘dago red’, a welcome gift from a generous neighbor. I remember her serving it in little juice glasses that had originally held Welch’s jelly, some with Looney Toon cartoon characters painted on. These glasses were just one example of the many things that her generation would use and re-use. Huldy had the greenest thumb I had ever seen and I know she would be asking me just what exactly I had planted and how was I going to use it in my kitchen. There is no doubt she would have been curious about some of my herbs, since most of them were nowhere to be found in HER garden. I’m sure she never even heard of tarragon. My garden design is mostly style with a little function thrown in. Hers was all function, and beautifully styled as well. The fruits of that garden would fill her pantry come fall, and, in her younger days, would have fed her family until the following spring. Everything was canned and stacked lovingly on shelves in the basement, waiting to offset the howls of winter with a little reminder of summer’s bounty. Every spring West Derry School would have a fundraiser. I have no idea what they were raising funds for, but we each got a little box of seed packets to sell door to door, 5 cents a pack. It included all the vegetables you would expect, the lettuces and spinach, the radishes, and lots of annual flower seeds. I remember marigolds, zinnias, bachelor buttons and snap dragons. We never had any trouble selling these seeds. Back then, most everyone’s grandparents had huge gardens, and they could always use a few fill-ins. I don’t remember our parents having big gardens so much, maybe a few tomatoes and a row of lettuce and onions, but not like the old timers. That generation

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had lived through the depression, and knew how to be self sufficient, a skill they never lost. After working hard all their lives, usually at a meager wage, most all of them had managed to save up a tidy little sum. Of course, that money was never spent; it was left to their children. Our grandparents seemed content just knowing that a little extra money was there for them, no matter what emergency would occur, but they never saw the need to spend it. They made do; they didn’t need to accumulate lots of ‘stuff.’ They were content with their lives. My Grandma also was gifted when it came to growing flowers. I remember her planting a row of marigolds around the outside perimeter of her garden, but that was just to keep the rabbits out. Her real pride and joy was her porch box and flower bed out front. I don’t ever remember seeing a hanging basket on anyone’s’ porch when I was a kid. They must have been introduced sometime later. No, the porch boxes and window boxes were the real stars of West Derry’s summer

Daddy and Me in front of the honeysuckles. Can you find the secret clubhouse door?

floral display. I remember both Grandma and my Mom’s porch boxes overflowing with their two favorites, geraniums and petunias. I also recall my Mom having honeysuckles planted by our front porch that clung to the banisters, and climbed the porch posts. There was a little opening under the porch where we could sneak in and have a secret playhouse. That

playhouse hung heavy with the sweet fragrance of honeysuckle. Each little brown or white flower had a pistil where a drop of honey would gather. If you carefully pulled this center part out, you could drop that honey on your tongue. Of course, you had to dodge the bumblebees to get close enough to pick the flowers. Grandma didn’t have to buy very many geraniums, because she would cut them back every fall, dig them out and hang them upside down in the basement for the winter. Come spring, she would plant them again and they would be even more beautiful than the previous year. She also potted a few and sat them on her kitchen window sill where we enjoyed their blossoms all winter. Grandma’s spare bedroom window had a table in front of it, and that table held a spectacular display of African Violets. They were her specialty, and she could root them by pinching off a leaf and leaving it in a little glass of water. After the roots appeared, she would plant it and expand her collection endlessly. She shared one of her violet secrets with me, and I will share it with you. When she finished her cup of black coffee every morning, she would stir a little water into the few remaining drops, and fill the saucers under those violets, a trick she had learned from her grandmother. Come mid-may, Mom and Aunt Margie would stop and get Grandma and take her to Gundakers green house in Derry and buy the flats of annuals for their yards and for the graves. Every year, the Saturday before Memorial Day, or Decoration Day as we called it then, we would head over to Coles Cemetery to plant mounds of beautiful flowers on the family graves. Coles was the protestant cemetery and St. Joes was the Catholic cemetery. I don’t know what would happen to you if you disobeyed this rule, but I seem to recall it being pretty strictly enforced. Decorating the graves was a family affair. My dad or grandpap would pile us all into the car with the shovels, watering cans, and a little peat moss, the finishing touch that would keep the ground from drying out so fast. Doug and I planted all those graves last Memorial Day and realized when we are gone, that long standing custom will most likely go with us. None of our family is left in Derry to keep up those old traditions. I don’t think we realized just what horticulturists we kids from the 50’s were. We could identify poison ivy and poison oak from 20 feet away. We knew from experience to avoid the jagger bushes, and we knew just how difficult

it was to get every last Spanish needle out of our socks. We could always find the sassafras trees so we could snap off a twig and chew on it. We were aware of every garden in the neighborhood, and whose tomatoes were ready to ripen first. None of us felt the need to run back home for a snack in the middle of the day. No sir, our neighborhoods held a bonanza of snacks, and we knew exactly whose yard held the newly ripened snack of the day. An essential accessory for every kid in the summer was a tiny, individual Morton’s salt shaker. The label had a picture of a little girl in a yellow dress carrying a blue umbrella. These little containers were about the size of a big thimble and fit perfectly into our pockets. On those lazy summer days, we didn’t leave home in the morning without one. When the first early shoots of rhubarb would sprout, we would snap them off, give them a lick, and sprinkle the salt on. Same thing with the first onions of the season. When the ground was damp, I remember gently tugging on the bright green tops and up would come a lovely little scallion. After peeling off the mud covered outer layer and pinching off the roots, that salt shaker was the perfect seasoning for this wonderful treat. We would sit right in the garden eating them, along with the first of the radishes, and those fat little carrots. Later in the season, we would sit under the apple trees eating green apples, seasoning each bite with a little shake of Morton’s. Remember – When It Rains, It Pours! Every neighborhood had a plum tree or two, and as they would ripen and fall to the ground, we had to compete with the honey bees for the ripest and sweetest ones. You could get stung if you weren’t careful choosing that one with the perfect shade of purple. We could tell just by the softness if it would be deliciously sweet or tart enough to make your eyes scrunch up and send a shiver down your spine. It was always a race to see who could salvage a few cherries before the birds got them. I remember the wonderful big yellow cherries with a blush of pink, they were called Maydukes, according to my dad. We would greatly anticipate the ripening of the grape harvest in West Derry, too. Especially the neighbors who created that wonderful concord wine. Mrs. Herald had an arbor that stretched the length of her yard on Ruby Street, with great big bunches of fat purple concord grapes and a few sugary sweet white varieties on either end. You had to be careful when you ventured under those arbors, because you could easily wind up with a fist full of spider webs, or even worse, a face full! This is where those giant yellow spiders liked to live, as well as a lot of other littler versions And then there were the ‘berries of summer’ – blackberries, huckleberries (today we call them blueberries), raspberries, elderberries, and mul-

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


berries. Mom could always tell when we found a patch by our stained mouths and hands. The best treat of all was when the corn was ready. How I remember those first ears of speckled corn lathered with butter and sprinkled with salt. If that’s not one of the highlights of summer, I don’t know what is. Daddy called them roast-n-ears, I guess for ‘roasting ears’. And for a midsummer dessert, what could possibly be better than a freshly cut, local cantaloupe, Daddy called these musk melons. Once again, have the Morton’s salt ready! We also put the great outdoors to use supplying us with all sorts of make-shift toys. We would make pea shooters out of the reeds that grew near the swamps, and steal a handful of our moms’ navy beans to shoot each other with. Choke cherries would also do in a pinch. The crab apples in the trees beside our house made wonderful ammo if you knew how to shoot them. We would sharpen a long sturdy stick, skewer a crabapple, and whip it overhead. My goodness, did they make a loud ding if they happened to accidentally hit a passing car door. We were always on the lookout for smoke bombs to stomp on. They were little round mushroom type plants that held some sort of powder and when you stepped on it, the powder would blow out like smoke. Then there were the cat tails in the swamp. After they turned dark brown and started to get a little fuzzy, you could pull one out of the mud and smack it on a tree trunk. This would create a blizzard like effect as the little fuzzy seeds would float all over the neighborhood. And talking about fuzzies, remember when the dandelions would go to seed and a breeze would send them floating through the air. We called them Santa Clauses and if we caught one, we would hold it tight and make a wish. Then we would open our hands and with a little puff of air, send it back on its way. We loved to grab a big fistful of weeping willow branches and swing from them. When we weren’t using them as swings, we were climbing them. Willows were terrific climbers. I find myself filling my gardens with all the plants I remember from my

childhood. I have half a dozen bleeding hearts, lots of peonies, just like my grandma’s, and irises, although she called them ‘flags’. I have a hydrangea, which was a snowball bush to her, and my front window boxes are stuffed with petunias and geraniums. Grandma sure would have loved the new ‘wave’ petunias. I even tucked a gazing ball, just like hers, under my cherry tree. I remember what joy it gave her when I asked her to teach me how to can vegetables one August. I bought vegetables from Lydick’s little garden stand at their farm just north of New Derry, because I never had a big enough garden to be able to can my own. We spent several days canning lovely quarts of tomatoes, Harvard and pickled beets, and little half pints of grape jelly. She taught me how to melt wax on top to seal the jars instead of using lids. She told me she thought canning was becoming a lost art. I hope she was wrong, but I don’t know. My daughter, Nicole, has taken up that art and loves the all natural dishes she can make from her own preserved treasures. And even in the heart of San Francisco, she has a little vegetable garden. I know this would make Huldy smile. I also feel her guiding hands every time I pinch back the petunias on her grave. I have some beautiful new species of flowers in my gardens, and as lovely as they are, they don’t hold a candle to the beauty of the calloused, hardworking hands of my Grandma. Like hers, my manicure is never very perfect in the summertime, and I usually have to scrub pretty hard to get all the dirt from under my fingernails. Grandma would nod her head and laugh at that. While I’m glad she passed a little of her green thumb on to me, I’m even more thankful to feel the same contentment Huldy felt. It’s the contentment of sitting quietly in the garden, with the sun on my face, and all those sweet memories meandering through my mind, just like the trailing honeysuckles on that little front porch all those years ago. Ruth loves to share memories with you. Email her at: Ruth-Elaine@comcast.net

Fourth Fourth Annual Annual

HEIRLOOM TOMATO

FESTIVAL AUGUST 23, 2008 10 am – 4 pm RAIN OR SHINE WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS - WEST OVERTON VILLAGE SCOTTDALE, PA 15683

heirloom tomato tasting (OVER 20 VARIETIES)

gourmet food & savory samplings Presented by the West Overton Garden Club Meet Local Authors FOR A BOOK SIGNING Enjoy Fine Arts Displays Herbs, Perennials, Cactus, Candles, Jewelry, COUNTRY COLLECTIBLES $10.00 Adults $6.00 Children and Students w/ Id ( Kids under 5 FREE ) For advanced ticket sale discount visit us on www.westoverton.org For directions call us at (724) 887-7910

Grandma Huldy and her famous porch box.

Every Story Begins At Home.

St. Vincent Grist Mill (flour, cornmeal, grains, coffee), Carlo’s Garage Winery, The Enrico Biscotti Company, Sand Hill Berries, Greendance (The Winery at Sand Hill), Colaizzi Brothers (Gourmet Cakes), Maggie’s Mercantile, Main Street Cafe & Gelateria (Homemade Italian Ice Cream), Jamison’s Farm (Lamb), Backyard Gardens (Mustards), Soap Creek Mill (Homemade Soap), The Mountain Herb Shoppe, Morris Farm (Pick your own organic vegetables), The Cheesecake Caffe (Gourmet Cheesecakes), Miss Martha’s Tea Room, Shadowwood Garden (Herbs & Perrenials), Sunny Sprouts (Bonsai Plants), Mary Ann Chisko (Photography), Sharon Yoder (Artist), Wildlife Works (Bake Sale, non-profit organization), Amandari Company (Cupola Cookies), Clementine (Handmade Jewelry), Marian Ash (Sketch Artist), Helen Alt (Watercolors), Local Authors (Book Signing), Remnants Dulcimer Group

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FOCUS ON CHILDREN Nicole Vitale Smith, MSW

“Oh Brother!”

Sibling Relationships “You are the bows from which your children as living arrows are sent forth.” – Khalil Gibran As parents, you realize what a difficult and yet wonderful job you have in raising your children. I believe one of the most challenging aspects of that incredible job is helping your children to have a positive connection with their siblings. My boys, Owen (5) and Austin (8), have a dynamic relationship. One minute, they may be the best of friends, playing together so well then, the next minute; they will be whining, arguing or crying! If your family consists of more than one child, I expect that you witness the same ambivalence between your children. Even as negative behaviors transpire between siblings, a healthy relationship will be established through the years. In your lifetime, it is likely that you will know your sibling more years than your parents, spouse or children. Developing a positive connection with a sibling is a lifelong experience. Recently, Owen asked me “Mommy, when did we start to fight?” Goodness, out of the mouths of babes!! He was talking about his older brother, the one he sometimes antagonizes and others times, the one who provokes him. Although it is amazing how many different ways they can annoy each other, I tried to answer Owen’s question simply and truthfully, yet offer some guidance. I told Owen that he and his brother started to bother each other from a young age, usually over silly stuff too. I explained that when he and Austin fight, it upsets me and his daddy and we like it much better if they play nicely together and are good buddies! Owen just shrugged and went off to find Austin. In the January 2005 issue of The Journal of Adolescent Research, the author stated that the following characteristics should be considered when looking at sibling relationships: birth order, ages and number of children, and gender. The article reported that sibling relationships will run a typical course of: warmth, involvement, conflict and rivalry. Further, Newman (1994) explains this complex relationship by noting that conflict between siblings is a common occurrence and coexists with periods of positive interactions and with periods of relative calm. While it is reassuring to know that arguments between siblings are normal, it is still frustrating to see and hear! When your children are screaming, nagging, or wrestling, it may seem natural to step in and stop the ruckus. However, Vicki Lansky, author of “Practical Parenting Tips for The First Five Years” states that parents should not always interfere but suggests that rules be established between siblings. An example is no “put-downs”. Ms. Lansky explained that telling your sibling “you make me mad” is ok, but saying “you’re a stupid baby” is not. My boys’ pediatrician agrees. I remember shortly after Owen’s birth, he was talking about our sons/ the new brothers. Our pediatrician noted that while parents would like their children to develop a strong bond; difficult times are to be expected! He recommended that as the boys learn about themselves and each other and begin the

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typical battles, they should figure it out themselves. He stated that as long as neither boy is hurting the other and no weapons are being used; let your children make an effort to work through their differences. In our family, I keep in mind our pediatrician’s advice, but I also attempt to teach our sons empathy by saying to one of them “would you like to be called that or be treated that way?” And, if the yelling is too loud or the fighting is escalating, my husband and I try to distract the boys. I may divert one’s attention and my husband will try and entertain the other. At times when you feel like crying, try to laugh! Kids Development, a U.K. organization, noted that the need for competition between siblings will decrease if parents recognize and celebrate the individual strengths of each child. In addition, you may consider spending one-on-one time with each child. For example, one Saturday a month, your child will choose a restaurant to have lunch or pick a special activity. Each child will look forward to that time and cherish the tradition. When you and your children make it through the toddler and elementary years, there are encouraging reports. In a 1989 study (by Furman et al) 5th and 6th graders were questioned about sibling relationships. The majority of the students listed companionship as the first quality they find with their siblings. Moreover, in a 1991 study (by Cicirelli), two thirds of adults report they are close to their siblings and 78% noted that they get along well. Due to their shared pasts, siblings tend to support each other through adulthood. To end, while clashes are common among siblings, great friendships may also develop. As you and your children work through their struggles with siblings, be patient and try to recall the bumpy road you took with your siblings. As I watch my boys get on each others nerves and drive me crazy with yet another argument, I reflect on a recent beautiful spring day as they found joy in playing together, chasing each other like they were the only two people in the world. I think about that moment and the smiles on their faces…..that makes my heart smile! As you navigate the complex job of parenthood, remember what the wonderful, late Fred Rogers often said- “children always need to know they are loved.” If you would like further insight or more information, the following books are good resources: • Siblings Without Rivalry: How To Help Your Children Live Together so You Can Live Too by Adele Faber (1998) • From One Child to Two by Judy Dunn (1995) • Understanding Sibling Rivalry by T. Berry Brazelton and Joshua D. Sparrow (2005) • Loving each one best: A caring and practical approach to raising siblings by Nancy Samalin (1996) • The Secure Child by Stanley Greenspan (2002) • I’d Rather Have an Iguana by Heidi Stetson Mario (1998)

First Aid for Fido from the Amercian Red Cross The American Red Cross is known for helping to keep friends, neighbors and their families healthy and safe. Now with “Dog First Aid,” its guide to preventing, preparing for and responding to emergencies, the Chestnut Ridge Chapter (CRC) is spreading the word that it can do the same for four-legged loved ones as well. “The Chestnut Ridge Chapter has a pet first aid course, a three-hour and thirty minute session that provides hands-on training for some of the issues the book addresses”, said Tessie Amaranto, Health and Safety Services Director for the CRC Chapter. Dog First Aid explains emergency care procedures for dogs in simple terms the 116-page full-color book also includes a companion DVD and features step-by-step directions for topics from giving medication to administering CPR and rescue breathing. The book retails for $16.95 and can be ordered from the Chestnut Ridge Chapter. There are 44 million dog owners in the U.S. “This guide is a must-have for pet lovers—homes with dogs really should not be without it,” points out Amaranto, “We know pet owners enjoy a very special bond with their pets—they’re a part of the family. Just like with people, accidents and emergencies can happen and being prepared by knowing what to do could make a lifesaving difference.” Guidance from “Dog First Aid” includes: • The best way to recognize and respond to an emergency is to know what is normal for your dog and know how to recognize and emergency. • To determine dehydration, pull up on the skin at the back of your dog’s neck; it should spring back to the normal position immediately. • It is crucial to keep your pet’s vaccinations up to date. Puppies require a series of inoculations. Take your adult dog to the veterinarian at least yearly. “This manual is another lifesaving resource that supports our mission of keeping friends, neighbors and their families healthy and safe,” said Amaranto “It’s a perfect addition to home reference libraries and makes a great gift!” The Chestnut Ridge Chapter has a Pet First Aid class scheduled for Wednesday August 8th, from 6:00PM – 9:30PM at the Chapter office. For more information or to register for August 8th, contact the Chestnut Ridge Chapter at 724537-3911 or email to tamaranto@covad.net. Information can also be found on the chapter website, www.redcrosscrc.org under the Health and Safety Services tab.

Barkley’s Derry King Route 217 Derry • 724-694-8552 Named Best Hot Fudge Sundae by The Ligonier Chef!

KIDS CARE PEDIATRICS Kids Are Our Priority

CHRISTINE C. FLORENDO, MD MELANIE B. SEMELKA, DO 5927 Route 981, Suite 8 • Latrobe, PA 15650 Phone: 724-537-2131 • Fax: 724-537-2153 Hours: Monday–Friday 9 AM to 6 PM

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


SHOPS AROUND THE CORNER Getting To Know Unique Local Businesses and the People Behind Them

The Importance of Being Earnest Gourmet It’s fairly easy to separate those “who do” from those “who love what they do.” Linda Earnest, co-owner of Greensburg’s Earnest Gourmet (together with Margaret DiVirgilio), is definitely one of the latter. Her sincerity of purpose shines through in everything from her winning personality to the presentation of her wares. Unassuming by nature, this proprietor nevertheless stands front and center when it comes to laying out a glorious spread. Whether it is filling the prepared foods case in her establishment, presiding at the private cocktail parties and dinners that are EG’s specialty, overseeing the Lotus Brunch fundraiser for The Westmoreland or catering a backyard wedding reception, Linda and her staff have provided the region with culinary confidence and expertise for more than 17 years.

can be purchased by the cup, bowl, pint or quart. Renowned for her appetizers, the mind boggles just reading the choices. Salads are also an EG specialty and also seem to come in endless varieties – chicken, tuna, pasta, grain, bean, vegetable and, of course, the ever-popular fruit. Sweet potato salad with cranberries and pecans is a personal favorite. Nature’s Way Market (located around the corner at 796 Highland Avenue) carries EG salads and more outside salad sales to local coffee shops and food stores is a possibility Linda would like to pursue. Though desserts don’t come with a guarantee to lower cholesterol, I still manage to force down an occasional (but generous) portion of strawberry/rhubarb cobbler or stone fruit tart from time to time. Aside from the prepared offerings, EG stocks name brand edible treats galore! Items such as specialty snacks, chocolates, herbal teas, bread mixes, jams and chutneys are available for your own enjoyment or make for great gift giving. Glad to accommodate our readers, Earnest Gourmet has supplied the following recipe. (Please do attempt this food feat at home!) Chilled Roasted Red Beet Soup

Earnest Gourmet foods are made on the premises in small batches with healthful ingredients that include no preservatives or chemicals. A great enthusiast of fresh produce, Linda revels in the bounty of the seasons. Using many of the fruits and vegetables available in our area (often provided by local organic farmer Paul Sarver), she seemingly without effort creates inventive savories and sweets to die for and is ever on the lookout for more local growers to provide her with ingredients for her signature items. “I always enjoy incorporating all the fresh local produce into my summer and fall menus. It is such a joy to work with and indulge in such great-tasting items,” says Ms. Earnest. Providing a personalized touch EG will even create dishes that are not on the menu if given advance notice. There is something for everyone at Earnest Gourmet – including the vegan – and I am continually impressed by Linda’s ability to make “comfort food” elegant. The home-made soups and sandwiches on the Café Menu are mouthwatering customer favorites. There are stacked and stuffed sandwiches for all taste buds: The Urania (roast beef), The Santé Fe (turkey) and The Mediterranean Pita (veggie) among them. Cool to hearty soups of the day Every Story Begins At Home.

1½ lb. beets, trimmed and scrubbed 4 garlic cloves, unpeeled zest of 1 orange few sprigs of fresh thyme salt & pepper 2T. olive oil ********** 2½ C. chicken stock 2 t. honey 1/3 C. orange juice 2 T. wine vinegar Heat oven to 375 degrees. Place beets, garlic, orange zest, thyme, salt & pepper and olive oil on a large piece of foil and wrap as a packet. Place on a baking sheet and bake approximately 45-60 minutes. Set aside to cool, saving juices. Peel beets and garlic. Blend all ingredients with juices. Season again if necessary. Cover and chill thoroughly. Garnish with horseradish sauce. Although Linda Earnest tells me she doesn’t think she’s destined to be The Next Food Network Star due to her avoidance of the limelight, her heavenly gastronomic creations are worthy of superstar status. Go gaze and sample for yourself. You’ll find that Earnest Gourmet is indeed out of this world! To learn more about Earnest Gourmet visit 646 S. Urania Avenue, www.earnestgourmet.com or call 724-834-2020. Stop by and give us a try – it’s good for you! – Story and Photos by Barbara M. Neill

ABOVE: A tower of tasty treats at Greensburg’s Earnest Gourmet. LEFT: Edible art! - Linda’s Mixed Berry Tart. BELOW: Proud proprietor Linda Earnest.

38th Annual Antique Show on the streets of SOMERSET, PA PA Turnpike exit 110

Saturday, August 9 8 am to 4 pm FREE ADMISSION over 100 dealers! sponsored by Somerset Trust Co. and Somerset County Chamber of Commerce For info: www.somersetpa.net or 814-445-6431

July/August 2008 - 21


He’s All About the “F” Words: Family, Fun & Food . . . Guy Fieri As the host of Diners, Drive-ins and Dives, the #1-rated show on the Food Network, Guy Fieri reigns as America’s “King of the Greasy Spoon Road.” (He is also the star of the FN cooking slot Guy’s Big Bite.) In town for a set of road series tapings at Pittsburgh area eateries in May, the season 2 winner of The Next Food Network Star also did several cooking demos for Giant Eagle Market District. Present at the Shadyside event, this LMP reporter and relentless recipe collector caught Guy at his zaniest and “off the hook” best. Knowing that Fieri greatly admired Pittsburgh Steeler Jack Lambert growing up, I asked what “kick butt” dish he would create in his honor. Fieri replied, “That’s an excellent question. It would have to be something really meaty – thick, meaty and spicy. I think a chorizo-seasoned beef sandwich with onions and red bell peppers. I’d cook the beef on a hot grill until medium rare and also dredge some onions in a little paprika and cayenne and fry them. Put it all on a Wentworth bun or a sourdough roll, throw on some Muenster, press it together – a Pittsburgh cheese steak!” (Like my mother and her twin sister, I tamper with even the most proven of recipes; I may substitute “Pepper Jack” cheese.) – Story and photos by Barbara M. Neill

Interested in Monarch Butterflies? The Winnie Palmer Nature Reserve will be conducting a Monarch Butterfly Training on July 16th from 9:00 am - noon at the Reserve in Latrobe. The training will prepare individuals of all ages to monitor a plot of milkweed, collect larvae (caterpillars) and report findings to the Monarch Larval Monitoring Project (MLMP) (www.mlmp.org) Volunteers will be trained to conduct weekly monarch and milkweed surveys, measure per plant densities of monarch eggs and larvae and milkweed quality. Find your own milkweed plot, or assist with the plot at Saint Vincent College. To register, contact Beth Bollinger at 724-537-5285 or beth.bollinger@email.stvincent.edu

Chorus Call, Inc. Donates Used Computers for Seniors

ABOVE: Fieri with his Mom and her twin sister, Aunt Polly. BELOW: Interrupted when a cell phone rang in row 1 of the audience, Fieri answered the phone to the surprise of the caller and the amusement of the demonstration viewers.

In support of a local initiative that offers computers and training to qualifying recipients, Chorus Call, Inc. has donated PCs, monitors and speaker sets to Senior Computer Associates. Ms. Sabina Coraluppi, Director of Operations, Chorus Call says “I’m pleased to be able to contribute our computers to Senior Computer Associates. We’re pleased that they will be used to provide opportunities to senior citizens who might not otherwise have access to the technology.” Mr. Joe Heuler, Technical Director, added “It makes good corporate sense. We gain valuable storage space and help create good will within the community.” John Senko, Co-Director of Senior Computer Associates, says “Senior Computer Associates will refurbish the computers and make them available free of charge to qualifying senior citizens and other applicants in the Greater Latrobe area.” Chorus Call is a world-class teleconferencing service provider with headquarters in Monroeville and offices in Canada, Europe, South America, Australia, India, and South Africa. As a pioneer of high quality conferencing, Chorus Call

offers a broad spectrum of audio, video, data, and web-based conferencing services. Senior Computer Associates is an association of retired volunteers whose mission is to bring senior citizens of the Greater Latrobe Area into the computer world through computer education and free computers. SCA has taught over 750 senior citizens “The Introduction to Computers for Seniors Course” since 1999 and has installed over 150 PC free systems for seniors. The computers are cleaned, checked and upgraded for use by seniors. Any senior 55 years or older (or physically-challenged persons under 55) who: 1) Knows how to operate a computer or 2) Has enrolled and/or finished a beginner’s computer course given by the Senior Computer Associates and 3) Does not now own a computer, is eligible for a FREE computer. No strings attached. No hidden costs for the computer. Computers come with operating modems for Internet access, speakers, games and Windows 2000 operating system. Senior Computer Associates will set up the computer in your home or apartment at no charge. Call 724-537-6888, 724-539-7199 or visit GreaterLatrobe.net for more information.

Neighbors Helping Neighbors 724-539-4357 www.laurelfia.org

22 - July/August 2008

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


All For Abbey A Unity Parent’s Dream for Their Autistic Daughter by Jennifer Smoker When Scott and Sandy Etling’s second At Herminie, we now have 47 good eater. If she really wants that little attend the student must have an Autism child Abbey was born they knew from students and are “bursting at the seams!” piece of licorice, we learned that she is diagnosis and be referred to the school. the start that something just wasn’t quite We need more space. To that end capable. We just have to teach her and “There was a wonderful unexpected right. Sandy recalls, “She would just Northwestern has committed 2 million then expect it from her. The key is to be twist to all of this! Many of our higher scream all the time and never, never, dollars and the school’s parents raised consistent, repetitive and structured.” functioning kids came from mainstream never sleep! Doctors said she was “just an additional 75 thousand to build our Abbey started kindergarten at schools where they had issues. There, colicky” but then she started not reaching own facility. We are now in the search Baggaley Elementary School outside of they were the low-man on the totem pole. her milestones. We were told she’s for property! We’re looking for Latrobe. “Mrs. Banker (her kindergarten They could never quite catch up or fit in delayed. She’ll be fine, let her catch up. approximately 40 acres somewhere teacher) was absolutely wonderful with with the group. They came here We tried everywhere! Everywhere that between Greensburg and her…but, by first grade, you we thought was “the best” and no one Delmont. The school is slated could really see the difference could tell us anything.” to open in July of 09! in social skills (compared to “That’s where my dream first began. Finally, at the age of 3, Abbey was But there is more! The the other kids). Public schools Scott and I helped open a school.” diagnosed with a seizure disorder. school is just the first phase just aren’t equipped to deal – Sandy Etling Medication helped control the episodes. of the project! We would like with autistic children so we “Three solid years of not sleeping and there to be a pre-school and a went to Clelian (Clelian she actually slept through the night! It resource center for parents of Heights School for Exceptional was wonderful...but she still wasn’t newly diagnosed autistic children staffed Children in Greensburg). (understanding autistic issues) and developing. When I asked, do you think with people who have been there. I loved Clelian because they have started helping the lower functioning this is autism? People would say, Oh, “Parents need to know that they are not the whole setup. They have everything: kids to succeed. The higher functioning No, No, No, because Abbey loved us alone in this! They should be spared the the school, the workshop and the students gained self-esteem (because hugging her and tickling her and she struggle that we went through!” assisted living but, again, their they are now the cool kids) and the would interact with us in the ways she “Realistically, kids like Abbey will curriculum is not Autism specific. The satisfaction of helping others. The lower could. At the time people didn’t never be able to be on their own.” To functioning students exthink autistic kids wanted that that end the new facility would provide perience the social interaffection.” sheltered workshops and have a action and acceptance of their Abbey was in early transition to work program with a work peers. It really is beautiful!” intervention (services which buddy, if need be, to help our kids become Sandy, along with the may include speech therapy, contributing members of society. We school’s director, Sharon occupational therapy and would have assisted living for autistic Greene, invited me to come physical therapy). A adults. With statistics like 1 in every and see for myself. At the end Greensburg physical therapist 150 people being autistic there is a of each school year the suggested the Etlings meet growing necessity for such a place. I’ve students have a “Field Day”. another family dealing with found that once people are made aware Promoted as “the BEST day of similar issues. “That’s when of a need they can be very generous! If the year” it is an opportunity we really got the ball rolling. we all pull together there is nothing that for friends and family to gather We finally received a diagnosis we can’t do!” and cheer the kids on as they of Pervasive Developmental Someday, I would love for there to participate in a gamut of Disorder – Not otherwise be a farm with an orchard. It would be events from shooting hoops to specified (PDD-NOS, a Classigreat if the kids could grow their own putting golf balls. Although, fication within the Autism food and generate income for this autistic for Abbey, I think the madeSpectrum. She was 4, drinking community. In that way, they would be to-order balloon hats and from a bottle. She wasn’t verbal. self-contained and self-sufficient! Each animals were the hands She had braces on her legs person would have a task designed to down favorite. We also because she couldn’t walk or contribute to the household. It would be enjoyed the awesome art even stand alone. There were hard for Abbey to learn but once she did exhibit showcasing the works no self-feeding skills, her life she would be very good at it! Autism is of the school’s many talented skills… She had none. She an ugly disease but it doesn’t have to be students. The day was topped was a baby” the devastating life sentence that some off with lunch in the cafeteria. Although receiving serthink it is. With the right help, schooling In many ways it felt more like vices, they weren’t Autism and therapies these kids can come along a family reunion than a school specific. “After the diagnosis, way and some can even recover from it! function as old friends stopped therapists started appliedFrom the very beginning, when Scott to chat and families, staff and behavioral analysis. They and I knew that there was a problem, students worked together to come into your home for so we were determined to maintain a make sure that it was, indeed, many hours a week and they positive attitude no matter what and a fun filled day! do very specific repetitive create the best possible life for our family. Right now Abbey is set drills with her to teach her I admit, I’ve wondered, “Why our family? at the school. She has good skills. In one of the first drills, Why Abbey? “ We started this all for people with her. The staff is they had her sit at the table Abbey, with her in mind, but what I’ve excellent with her but what and “put in”. So, we would come to realize is, that ultimately, it’s for happens when she turns 21? have a bin and a block and the all the kids so that they have some place The schools will no longer be therapist would say, “Abbey, to be safe… that’s all their own. I feel liable for her education at that put in.” When they told me truly blessed to be able to do this for point and the therapies are so Abbey and Mom, Sandy “Enjoying the Moment” at Field Day. what they were going to do, I her…for all of them! expensive that most people thought, all Abbey does is Thanks to NHS Autism School Director, can’t afford them. There’s watch (the television show) Sharon Greene and Heather Plassio Director nothing out there. Of course, Barney…she doesn’t know, of Program Development for taking the time Abbey will remain with us but she won’t respond. She is in her own to talk with me and allowing me to tour your autistic need a very structured, zeroed what about after we’re gone? little safe spot…her own world. I wasn’t school. Abbey thanks to you and your family in curriculum to help deal with behaviors Abbey has two sisters and a brother even sure she would be able to sit up at for sharing Field Day with me. You truly are and to teach them. That’s where my who love her. They are great with her the table by herself because we were a delightful young lady! And to Abbey’s dream first began. Scott and I helped and would be more than willing to stepalways helping her.” Mom, Sandy, Many, Many Thanks for telling open a school”. up and take on the responsibility of her “It was amazing! We started the Abbey’s story! Through all our laughter and The Northwestern Human Services direct care. But we (Scott and I) don’t want therapy on November 8 and by Christmas tears, you did great! I have no doubt you (NHS) Autism School, in Herminie. Now, that. We realized that we have to plan for she was walking! We had to find the will achieve this dream! in its third year, is currently located at her future. So we approached NHS with right motivators. Fortunately, Abbey is a the old St. Edwards School. In order to our concerns and they listened.

Every Story Begins At Home.

July/August 2008 - 23


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David Conrad, Actor, Director, Producer and 1985 Kiski Graduate, Documents Life of Legendary Kiski Teacher and Coach, Tamas Szilagyi David Conrad has a genuine respect and appreciation for The Kiski School, its dedication to the mission of educating young men and leaders as well as the rewarding direction he received throughout his high school years at Kiski. In particular, Conrad holds an appreciation for the rewarding life-long friendship he developed with Kiski’s legendary teacher and coach, Tamas Szilagyi. To honor this friendship, Conrad created a documentary about the life and times of Tamas Szilagyi entitled, Tamas. The documentary contains information about Kiski during the 45 years that Tamas and his wife, Brigitta Szilagyi, have been associated with the school. It highlights Szilagyi’s life growing up in Hungary and his escape from

24 - July/August 2008

his homeland during the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, when Russian soldiers and tanks occupied Hungary. The documentary depicts Szilagyi’s life as a student and a junior national soccer player in Hungary and his experiences as a player for the United States Army’s military team competing against soccer teams around the world. It also portrays Szilagyi’s years of teaching and coaching at Kiski and his classes including World Politics, Russian History, Modern European History, The World Since 1945, as well as the current class he created and teaches about Political Geography. Conrad is currently co-starring with Jennifer Love Hewitt in the hit television series, Ghost Whisperer.

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LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


Platinum Anniversary Ponderings (4) My Twenty Years with The Young and the Restless The final installment of PAP will elucidate decorative details and encapsulate the #1 Daytime Drama.

I’m Gonna Work, Work, Work That Makeup & Hair Bronze Your Beautiful Hide – Hasn’t anyone heard of carcinoma in WI? Alabaster-skinned Victoria and albino wannabe Amber look so out of place amongst the bronzed babes, but they will hopefully be spared radiation or chemo down the line. (I’ve often wondered what tanning methods the stars employ. The risks of rays and salon tanning are obvious, but even “tan in a can” might provide a future “coulda, woulda, shoulda” moment.) All That Gel – Hair stylists get a lot of OT on this set. A coiffure du jour is common for women; a style a decade is the norm for men. Any hair removal can be jolting. Though a man seen unexpectedly without his beard or mustache is hair-raising (or hair-erasing?), the sight of a bald Ashley was positively chilling. Flossed Whitenin’ – These smiles give new meaning to the preface “million dollar.” The business of refining pearly whites could make teeth the new oil. Look at Me, I’m Shadow-Free – It’s refreshing to know that many Lava Land celebs look as boring as the rest of us in the morning. (Hospital stays, disaster scenes and nightmare sequences account for this insider knowledge.) Don’t Rain on My Charade – The winners are… 1st place: Phyllis – Never one to follow Plan A, disguised as a man she was mind-boggling. 2nd place: Sheila – The Shady Lady of Soap Flake Lane always had a few stylish wigs in tow. 3rd place: David Kimball (as Danny Romalotti) – Granted, this wasn’t much of camo stretch, since they had on the same beastly wolf man costume at 1992’s masquerade ball.

On the Set Where You Live Castle on a Budget – GC residents live large, but dwell small. The estates are vast by all accounts, but as a rule we see just a room or two. Many residences are recycled with casting changes and remodeling only occurs at 15 year intervals. (Hard to believe the top daytime series is “soap-on-a-tight-rope.”) In the interest of frugality outbuildings are put to good use as trysting places and temporary homes. Nick and Phyllis got off to a rollicking start in the Newman stables, the Abbott pool house has often served as a Habitat for Insanity and the Chancellor garage was once occupied by Larry Warton. (There is one interesting dude. Once considered soap scum, he was later made over as Jill’s boy bath toy. A saving of sorts?) Open a New WI Door – Some of the best entrances and exits on television are made through these distinctive doors. Shutterbug Daniel really must be commissioned to create a “Doors of Genoa City” poster. I feel a set of elevator doors should be placed centrally, since they have soap-operatically introduced and ushered out countless characters. There’s No Business Like Jabot Business – As a rule, companies are ahead of the corporate curve; sadly, the office suites are woefully behind the bend. The “bored room” at Jabot needs to have those bargello-patterned chairs reupholstered at the very least. Don’t Cry for Me, I am Gina – Everyone’s favorite ristorante, Gina’s, was torched when Kevin tried to flambé Colleen in his pre-life. Proprietor Gina Roma bounced back from that tragedy and is now expertly managing the Genoa City Athletic Club. The Colonnade Room, The Lodge

Every Story Begins At Home.

and Emilio’s are sometimes mentioned, but no one seems to actually go there anymore. (It’s a pity about the Colonnade Room, given that many a romantic dinner was held in its private dining room. If those soap-centric walls could talk.) Crimson Lights coffeehouse and Neil’s nightclub, Indigo, are the present day hot spots. You’ve Got to Pick a Psych Class or Two – Very few characters are over-educated on Y&R, so we don’t often visit campuses. Nevertheless, GCU, Walnut Grove Academy, GCHS, and several toney Swiss and NYC boarding schools have been attended. Trouble (In Genoa City) – GC’s police station, courthouse and hospital are kept quite busy, since stints, splits and splints happen. There is also a shelter for the homeless (and Katherine, when necessary). Sunrise, No Set – Once in a blue moon we are taken on location. Normally, grand panoramas are alluded to while a loving couple looks out a balcony door framed in palm fronds as the sound of waves are heard in the distance. (Such is shammy soap life.)

Props are the Tops I’ve Grown Accustomed to Your Plates – Ah, the trappings of power. I simply cannot imagine Y&R without Katherine’s wall safe, china cups and sterling tea set. As furniture, Nikki’s baby grand seems to provide surface space for photos of family and Victor’s rotating love interests; as an instrument, it comes in handy for a little melancholic Debussy. Nick and Sharon had a lamp that always reminded me of those favored by that nasty dame at Buchenwald, but it still said “home” to me. On the other hand, Diane didn’t do anyone a favor when she had that God-awful portrait of Victor painted for his office at Newman Towers. And although I appreciate the concept of well-worn furniture, Brad absolutely has to lose that plaid couch; it’s been there since his home was the Rawlins mansion. (Cheap rich men get on my last nerve.) You’ll Never Lack a Phone – Cell phone have long been a part of GC life, but Amber has taken the craze to a whole new nauseating ringtone zone. It’s just a matter of unused minutes until there is a cell-related car crash. (DON’T TEXT ME, BRO!) Pick-a-Lily, Tuck-a-Lily – Y&R does attend to detail. Blossoms like these would make Georgia O’Keefe droll. If I received just one of the floral arrangements viewed daily, I would die an extremely happy woman.

With One Last Look The Improbable Theme – Originally called “Cotton’s Dream” and written for the 1971 film Bless the Beasts and the Children, the melody was lent to Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci for her medal-winning performance during the 1976 Summer Olympics. As “Nadia’s Theme,” it has been GC Gold for 35 years. This Is the WRONG Moment – Pittsburgh network affiliate KDKA is so out of touch with its audience. Why the station thinks a downtown water main break, a Route 28 landslide, a motorcade of dignitaries or the misadventures of Brittany Spears should call for a breaking news alert between 12:30-1:30 pm on a weekday is way beyond my powers of comprehension. Big Daddy CBS preempts for what some consider major sporting events (i.e. March Madness, U.S. Open) and on occasion even more outlandish reasons (e.g. the suspending of the Mitt Romney presidential campaign). The powers that be need to get their priorities straight: Y&R viewers cannot in good conscience accept preemption unless a national emergency of catastrophic proportion has taken place.

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An Old Deal at Christmas – Luckily, there are very few holidays that preclude the broadcasting of Y&R. When this does happen, I especially enjoy the vintage episodes that air. These retro blasts reinforce the theory that time waits for no “Newman” or woman. (It also helps to pinpoint when cosmetic surgeries occurred.) If you do go tubeside or online to view Y&R, you will find that it can make you laugh, and cry. It can even give you hope. When you feel overwhelmed with life, you are safe in the knowledge that you are not alone. Undoubtedly, someone always has it worse in Genoa City, WI. If the denizens of daytime can overcome their obstacles, you can certainly overcome yours. But be forewarned.You may fall victim to that media tease of all teases: “Next on The Young and the Restless…” To conclude, I would like to add as that great communicator Victor Newman would say, “You have a nice day.” Now Gone, Farewell Dedicated to the memory of William J. Bell and all those who were once a part of Y&R. (They faced life as it was and death when it came.) – by Barbara M. Neill

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July/August 2008 - 25


EARTH TALK Questions and Answers About Our Environment

“What are some on-toxic alternatives to DEET for keeping mosquitoes at bay?”

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26 - July/August 2008

DEET is commonly known as the king of mosquito repellents, though not everyone is keen to slather it on their skin. A study conducted in the late 1980s on Everglades National Park employees to determine the effects of DEET found that a full one-quarter of the subjects studied experienced negative health effects that they blamed on exposure to the chemical. Effects included rashes, skin irritation, numb or burning lips, nausea, headaches, dizziness and difficulty concentrating. Duke University pharmacologist Mohamed Abou-Donia, in studies on rats, found that frequent and prolonged DEET exposure led to diffuse brain cell death and behavioral changes, and concluded that humans should stay away from products containing it. But other studies have shown that while a few people have sensitivity to DEET applications, most are unaffected when they use DEET products on a sporadic basis according to the instructions on the label. The upside of DEET is that it is very effective. A 2002 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that DEETbased repellents provided the most complete and longest lasting protection against mosquitoes. Researchers found that a formulation containing 23.8 percent DEET completely protected study participants for upwards of 300 minutes, while a soybean-oilbased product only worked for 95 minutes. The effectiveness of several other botanical-based repellents lasted less than 20 minutes. But a number of new concentrations of botanical repellents that have hit the market since are reportedly better than ever. In 2005, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) granted approval to two healthier alternatives to DEET—picaridin and oil of lemon eucalyptus—for protection from mosquitoes. Picaridin, long used to repel mosquitoes in other parts of the world, is now available in the U.S. under the Cutter Advanced brand name. Oil of lemon eucalyptus, which is derived from eucalyptus leaves and is the only plant-based active ingredient for insect repellents approved by the CDC, is available in several different forms, including Repel Lemon Eucalyptus, OFF! Botanicals, and Fight Bite Plant-Based Insect Repellent. Some other good choices, according to the nonprofit National Coalition against the Misuse of Pesticides, include products containing geraniol (MosquitoGuard or Bite Stop), citronella (Natrapel), herbal extracts (Beat It Bug Buster) or essential oils (All Terrain). The group also gives high marks to oil of lemon eucalyptus, such as that found in Repel’s Lemon Eucalyptus Insect Repellent. Another leading nonprofit, Pesticide Action Network North America (PANNA), likes Herbal Armor, Buzz Away and Green Ban, each containing citronella and peppermint as well as various essential oils (cedar wood, lemongrass, etc.). PANNA also lauds Bite Blocker, a blend of soybeans and coconut oils

that provides four to eight hours of protection and, unlike many other brands, is safe to use on kids.

CONTACTS: “Comparative Efficacy of Insect Repellents against Mosquito Bites,” http:// content.nejm.org/cgi/content/full/347/1/13; National Coalition Against the Misuse of Pesticides (NCAMP), www.beyondpesticides.org; Pesticide Action Network North America, www.panna.org. GOT AN ENVIRONMENTAL QUESTION? Send it to: EarthTalk, c/o E/The Environmental Magazine, P.O. Box 5098, Westport, CT 06881; submit it at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalk/ thisweek/, or e-mail: earthtalk@emagazine.com. Read past columns at: www.emagazine.com/ earthtalk/archives.php.

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


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Every Story Begins At Home.

July/August 2008 - 27


JULY/AUGUST 2008 COMMUNITY CALENDAR Through July 19 Around The World In 80 Days Summer Theater Program, St. Vincent College Latrobe, PA. 724-537-8900 www.stvincent.edu Through August 29 Thank Goodness It’s Summer Megan Suite & Courtyard, The Palace Theatre Greensburg, PA. 724-836-1123 www.westmorelandcultraltrust.org

July 11 Summer Sounds Greensburg’s Concert Series Presents “The David Bach Consort” St. Clair Park, Robertshaw Amphitheater Greensburg, PA. 724-838-4323 www.summersounds.com July 12 Court Days Reenactment Historic Hanna’s Town. www.starofthewest.org July 12 Family Fun Day Laurelville. Mt. Pleasant, PA. 800-839-1021 www.laurelville.org

July 18-20 Somerfest-Laurel Arts Somerset, PA 814-443-2433. www.laurelarts.org July 19 Elko Concerts Presents “Mickey Hart Band” 8 PM The Palace Theatre. Greensburg, PA 724-836-8000. www.thepalacetheatre.org July 19 Murder Mystery Dinner Theater Christian W. Klay Winery. Chalk Hill, PA 724-439-3424 www.cwklaywinery.com July 19-20 Civil War Encampment by Keystone Regiment Historic Hanna’s Town. www.starofthewest.org

Through August 30 Exhibit of French & Indian War Paintings Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art Ligonier, PA. 724-238-6015 www.sama-art.org

July 12-13 St Benedict Parish Festival Marguerite, PA. Sat: Outdoor Mass at 5. Food, family and fun 6-11 pm. Entertainment by Joe Maloy. Sun: noon-10 pm, games start at 1pm, entertainment by Primo and the Time Before.

July 2-6 34th Annual Polka Fest 6 PM Seven Springs Mountain Resort. Champion, PA. 866-437-1300 www.7springs.com

July 13, 27 Free Concerts in the Park Gazebo Area, Downtown. Mt. Pleasant, PA 724-547-6745. www.mtpleasantboro.com

July 19-20 Olde Overholt Days West Overton Museums. Scottdale, PA 724-887-7910 www.westoverton.org

July 3 Charlie Daniels Volunteer Jam Grey Amphitheater , Seven Springs Mountain Resort. Champion, PA. 7 PM. 866-703-7625 www.7springs.com

July 13 Antiques & Collectibles Sale Historic Hanna’s Town. www.starofthewest.org

July 19 Parent-Wise Ice Cream Blast 12-4 PM Nevin Arena. Greensburg, PA

July 13 Sunday Pool Party Mountain View Inn. Greensburg, PA 724-834-5300 www.mountinviewinn.org

July 20 Lobster & Clambake Christian W. Klay Winery. Chalk Hill, PA 724-439-3424. www.cwklaywinery.com

July 13- August 9 Western PA Open Art Exhibition The Palace Theatre. Greensburg, PA 724-837-5592

July 21-25 Tech-GYRLS: Digital Video/PSA (girls 11-14) YWCA Mansion. Greensburg, PA. Registration: 724-834-9390 www.ywcawestmoreland.org

July 14-18 KDKA “For Kids Sake” Days Bring a canned food item to Idlewild to receive $6 off regular admission (1 can per person) 724-238-3666. www.idlewild.com

July 21-25 Colonial Camp for 7-12 year-olds Historic Hanna’s Town. www.starofthewest.org

July 3-6 Westmoreland Arts & Heritage Festival Twin Lakes Park. Greensburg, PA 724-834-7474 www.artsandheritage.com July 4 Summer Sounds Greensburg’s Concert Series Presents “The Mary Ann Redmond Band” St. Clair Park, Robertshaw Amphitheater Greensburg, PA. 724-838-4323 www.summersounds.com July 5 Ribs, Run & Family Fun Streets of Somerset, PA. 814-443-1748 www.somersetincpa.org July 6, 13, 30, 27 Sunday Evening Band Concert Ligonier Area Chamber of Commerce Diamond Area, Ligonier, PA 724-238-4200. www.ligonier.com July 6-7 Just for the fun of it: Scouting camp-over open to boy/girl scouts and their families Idlewild Park. Ligonier, PA. 724-238-3666 www.idlewild.com July 6-12 Derry Ag. Fair Rt.982 New Derry, PA. 724-836-8693 or 724-459-7018. www.derrytwpagfair.com July 7-11 Eat n Park/ Mister Rogers’ Neighbor 40th Anniversary Celebration Of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood Television Program Idlewild Park. Ligonier, PA. 724-238-3666 www.idlewild.com July 7-10 Tech-GYRLS: Microsoft Office Summer Camp (boys & girls Ages 11-14) 10 AM – 3 PM YWCA Mansion. Greensburg, PA Pre-Registration Required 724-834-9390 www.ywcawestmoreland.org July 7-11 Art Assortment-Summer Art Camp For Ages 10-12 Space Limited 8:45 AM -3 PM Westmoreland Museum of American Art. Greensburg, PA. To Register 724837-1500 Ext. 10. www.wmuseumaa.org July 8-10 Survivor Camp (for kids Ages 9-13) 10:30 AM- 3 PM Mammoth Park. Mammoth, PA To Register 724-830-3950 www.co.westmoreland.pa.us July 10 Water & The Natural World Free Event 7PM Westmoreland Museum of American Art. Greensburg, PA. 724-724-837-1500 www.wmuseumaa.org July 10-12 Little Ligs Summer Camp Ligonier Camp & Conference Center Ligonier, PA. 724-238-6428. www.ligoniercamp.org

28 - July/August 2008

July 14-16 “CSI: Camp” (kids ages 10-14) 10 AM-3 PM Twin Lakes Park. Greensburg, PA To Register: 724-830-3950 www.co.westmoreland.pa.us July 14-18 3-D Potpourri For Ages 10-12. Space Limited. 8:45 AM -3 PM Westmoreland Museum of American Art. Greensburg, PA. To Register: 724-837-1500 Ext. 10. www.wmuseumaa.org July 15 Westmoreland Cultural Trust Presents “Golden Dragon Acrobats from China” 7 PM The Palace Theatre. Greensburg, PA 724-836-8000. www.thepalacetheatre.org July 16 The Art Of The 1940’s: Styles & Influences Free Brown Bag Lecture.12 PM Westmoreland Museum of American Art. Greensburg, PA 724-837-1500. www.wmuseumaa.org July 17 Epilepsy Education & Support Group 6:30-8 PM. Excela Health Latrobe. Register: 1-877-771-1234 July 17, 23-24 A Tribute to Nat King Cole Featuring Walt Maddox (Dinner & Show) Mountain View Inn. Greensburg, PA 724-834-5300 ext.453 www.mountainviewinn.org July 18 Family Fun Friday Historic Hanna’s Town. www.starofthewest.org July 18 Summer Sounds Greensburg’s Concert Series Presents “See-I” St. Clair Park, Robertshaw Amphitheater Greensburg, PA. 724-838-4323 www.summersounds.com

July 19-20 Living History Weekend Compass Inn Museum. Laughlintown, PA 724-238-4983 www.compassinn.com

July 21-25 WPXI- Old Fashion Days Crafts, Classic & Antique vehicles Bring a canned food item to Idlewild to receive $6 off regular admission (1 can per person). All items donated to the Salvation Army Food Bank 724-238-3666. www.idlewild.com

July 25-26 Sleepover Camping Adventure (Kids ages 8-12) 7 PM-11 AM Twin Lakes Park. Greensburg, PA To Register: 724-830-3950. www.co.westmoreland.pa.us July 26 Five Star Trail Poker Run Lynch Field. Greensburg, PA. Register: 724-830-3950 www.co.westmoreland.pa.us/parks July 26 6th Anniversary of the Quecreek Rescue Rescue Site, Dormel Farms. Somerset, PA 814-445-4876. www.9for9.org July 26 Weird Al Yankovic Straight Outta Linwood 2008 Tour 8 PM Palace Theatre. Greensburg, PA 724-836-8000. www.thepalacetheatre.org July 26 Follow That Trail! Treasure Hunt Sponsored by Action For Animals Ramada Historic Ligonier. Ligonier, PA To Register 724-309-0015. www.afa.petfinder.org July 26 Red, White & Blues at Stone Villa Featuring Randy Eugene Duo & the Mystic Knights Stone Villa Wine Cellars. Acme, PA 724-723-5604. www.stonevilla.com July 27 Nostalgic Nights Car Cruise 5 PM Oakhurst Tea Room. Somerset, PA 814-443-2897 or 724-961-3085 www.oakhursttearoom.com July 27 Sunday Evening Band Concert Ligonier Area Chamber of Commerce Diamond Area. Ligonier, PA 724-238-4200. www.ligonier.com July 27 Uncorked & Unplugged Featuring the acoustic trio Backstreets Stone Villa Wine Cellars. Acme, PA 724-723-5604. www.stonevilla.com

July 22- Aug.3 Mountain Playhouse Presents “Stonewall’s Bust” Mountain Playhouse. Jennerstown, PA 814-629-9201. www.mountainplayhouse.org

July 31 Painting In The United States Gallery Tour Free Event 7 PM. Westmoreland Museum of American Art. Greensburg, PA 724-724-837-1500. www.wmuseumaa.org

July 23 Disabilities Family Retreat Laurelville. Mt. Pleasant, PA 800-839-1021. www.laurelville.org

July 31, Aug 1-2 Portersville Steam Show Show Grounds, US Route 19. Portersville, PA www.portersvillesteamshow.homestead.com

July 24- Aug. 2 Fayette County Fair Fayette County Fairgrounds. Dunbar, PA 724-628-3360. www.fayettefair.com

July 31- August 3 Stoystown Lions Antique Tractor Festival Stoystown Lions Park. Stoystown, PA 814-893-6144 or 814-701-1378 www.stoystownlions.org

July 24 – August 17 Be My Baby Summer Theater Program. St. Vincent College, Latrobe PA. 724-537-8900. www.stvincent.edu

August 1 Family Fun Friday Historic Hanna’s Town. www.starofthewest.org

July 25 Summer Sounds Greensburg’s Concert Series Presents “The Lloyd Dobler Effect” St. Clair Park, Robertshaw Amphitheater Greensburg, PA. 724-838-4323 www.summersounds.com

August 1 Summer Sounds Greensburg Concert Series Presents “The Cast of Beatlemania” St. Clair Park, Robertshaw Amphitheater Greensburg, PA. 724-838-4323 www.summersounds.com

July 25 Babysitter Training Course Sponsored by The Red Cross For ages 11-15 (Bring a Lunch) 9 AM-3PM American Red Cross Building, 1816 Lincoln Ave, Latrobe. To register: 724-537-4331 www.latroberecreation.org

August 2 Step Back In Time at Stone Villa Stone Villa Wine Cellars. Acme, PA 724-723-5604. www.stonevilla.com

July 25-26 Summer In Ligonier - Arts & Crafts Diamond Area. Ligonier, PA 724-238-4200 www.ligonier.com

August 2-3 245th Anniversary Reenactment of the Battle of Bushy Run 10 AM- 5 PM Bushy Run Battlefield. Harrison City, PA 724-527-5584. www.bushyrunbattlefield.com August 3 Live Music with The Elliots Stone Villa Wine Cellars. Acme, PA 724-723-5604. www.stonevilla.com August 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 Sunday Evening Band Concerts Ligonier Area Chamber of Commerce Diamond Area. Ligonier, PA 724-238-4200. www.ligonier.com

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


August 5-17 Mountain Playhouse Presents “Be My Baby” Mountain Playhouse. Jennerstown, PA 814-629-9201. www.mountainplayhouse.org

August 15-17 Blairsville Diamond Days Downtown Blairsville, PA. 724-459-6252 www.blairsvillepa.net

August 23-24 Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival 10 AM- 6:30 PM. West Newton, PA 724-872-1670. www.pittsburghrenfest.com

August 6 Westmoreland Cultural Trust Presents Edwin McCain Acoustic Trio 7:30 PM Palace Theatre. Greensburg, PA 724-836-8000. www.thepalacetheatre.org

August 15-24 Westmoreland County Fair 11 AM- 11 PM Westmoreland Fairgrounds Greensburg, PA. 724-423-5005 www.westmorelandfair.com

August 23-24 Seven Springs Wine & Food Festival Seven Springs Mountain Resort. Champion, PA 814-352-7777 or 800-452-2223 www.7springs.com

August 7-10 Man Of LaMancha Geyer Performing Arts Center. Scottdale, PA 724-887-0887. www.geyerpac.com

August 16 Birthday Barbeque 11 AM- 8PM Stone Villa Wine Cellars. Acme, PA 724-723-5604. www.stonevilla.com

August 24 Live Music with 706 Union 12:30- 4:30 PM. Stone Villa Wine Cellars. Acme, PA. 724-723-5604 www.stonevilla.com

August 8 Summer Sounds Greensburg Concert Series Presents “Stephanie’s Id” St. Clair Park, Robertshaw Amphitheater Greensburg, PA. 724-838-4323 www.summersounds.com

August 16-17 Living History Weekend Compass Inn Museum. Laughlintown, PA 724-238-4983. www.compassinn.com

August 26 A Tribute to Nat King Cole Featuring Walt Maddox (Dinner & Show) Mountain View Inn. Greensburg, PA 724-834-5300 ext. 453. www.mountainviewinn.org

August 8 The Stroll 50’s Theme: sidewalk sales, classic cars & entertainment. 5-9 PM. Downtown Ligonier, PA 724-238-4200. www.ligonier.com August 8-9 Pittsburgh Area Jitterbug Club’s Annual Beach Bash Seven Springs Mountain Resort. Champion, PA 866-837-1300 www.7springs.com August 9 38th Annual Somerset Antique Show Streets of Somerset, PA. 814-445-6431 www.somersetpa.net August 9 Live Music at Stone Villa 1PM -5 PM Stone Villa Wine Cellars, Acme, PA 724-723-5604. www.stonevilla.com August 9 Murder Mystery Dinner Theater Christian W. Klay Winery Chalk Hill, PA. 724-439-3424 www.cwklaywinery.com August 10, 24 Free Concerts in the Park 6:30 PM – 9 PM Gazebo Area. Mt. Pleasant, PA 724-547-6745. www.mtpleasantboro.com August 10 Jazz Up Your Sunday at Stone Villa 1-4 PM Stone Villa Wine Cellars. Acme, PA 724-723-5604. www.stonevilla.com August 10 Antiques & Collectibles Sale Historic Hanna’s Town. www.starofthewest.org August 10 August Fun Fest (Free Admission) 11 AM – 7 PM Cedar Creek Park. Rostraver Township, PA. 724-830-3950 www.co.westmoreland.pa.us/parks August 14 Film: Samuel Rosenberg: Pittsburgh’s Painter Laureate Free Event 7 PM Westmoreland Museum of American Art. Greensburg, PA. 724-837-1500 www.wmuseumaa.org August 15 Babysitter Training Course Sponsored by The Red Cross For ages 11-15 (Bring a Lunch) 9 AM-3PM American Red Cross Building, 1816 Lincoln Ave, Latrobe. To register: 724-537-4331 www.latroberecreation.org August 15 Italian Day Festa Ethnic Food, Entertainment , Dancing, Colavita Cup Bocci Tournament & Fireworks Idlewild Park. Ligonier, PA. 724-238-3666 www.idlewild.com August 15 Mt. Pleasant Cruise Night 5:30-10:30 PM Frick Park. Mt. Pleasant, PA 724-830-7544 www.mtpleasantglassandethnicfestival.com August 15 Summer Sounds Greensburg Concert Series Presents “Moonalice” St. Clair Park, Robertshaw Amphitheater Greensburg, PA. 724-838-4323 www.summersounds.com

Every Story Begins At Home.

August 16-17 National Encampment of the Brigade of the American Revolution Fort Ligonier. Ligonier, PA. 724-238-9701 www.fortligonier.com August 16-23 Somerset County Fair Somerset County Fairgrounds. Meyersdale, PA 814-634-5619. www.somersetcountyfairpa.com August 17 Shades of Blue & Green Featuring “The Jades” Performing Blues and Classic Rock 12:30-4:30. Stone Villa Wine Cellars. Acme, PA 724-723-5604. www.stonevilla.com August 18 Elko Concerts Presents Robert Cray Band & Keb’Mo 7:30 PM Palace Theatre. Greensburg, PA 724-836-8000. www.thepalacetheatre.org August 18 Pirate Game Bus Trip 724-834-2153. www.aerobiccenter.org August 19-31 Mountain Playhouse Presents “Glorious” Mountain Playhouse. Jennerstown, PA 814-629-920.1 www.mountainplayhouse.org August 22 Gary Latshaw Presents “An American Journey” featuring 100 years of music. Dinner & Show Mountain View Inn. Greensburg, PA 724-834-5300 ext. 453 www.mountainviewinn.org August 22 Summer Sounds Greensburg Concert Series “The Greencards” St. Clair Park, Robertshaw Amphitheater Greensburg, PA. 724-838-4323 www.summersounds.com August 23 10th Annual Over the Falls Festival Ohiopyle State Park. Ohiopyle, PA 724-329-8591. www.fallsrace.com August 23 7th Annual Bocce Ball Tournament 5 PM Greensburg Garden & Civic Center, Greensburg, PA. 724-836-1123 www.westmorelandculturaltrust.org August 23 Antiques On The Diamond 8 AM- 4 PM Downtown Ligonier, PA. 724-238-4200. www.ligonier.com August 23 Stone Villa Summer Entertainment Featuring acoustic music by John Kerr Duo 1-5 PM Stone Villa Wine Cellars. Acme, PA 724-723-5604. www.stonevilla.com August 23 4th Annual Heirloom Tomato Festival 10 AM – 4 PM West Overton Village, Scottdale, PA 724-887-7910. www.westoverton.org August 23 Twilight Tour at Fallingwater Mill Run, PA. 724-329-8501 www.fallingwater.org August 23-24 16th Annual Wine & Food Festival 11 AM – 6 PM Seven Springs Mountain Resort, Champion, PA. 800-452-2223. www.7springs.com

August 27- October 19 Intimate Landscapes: The Gouache Paintings of Thomas Paquette Westmoreland Museum of American Art Greensburg, PA. 724-837-1500 www.wmuseumaa.org August 29 Summer Sounds Greensburg Concert Series Presents “Guggenheim Grotto” St. Clair Park, Robertshaw Amphitheater Greensburg, PA. 724-838-4323 www.summersounds.com August 29-31 Johnstown Folk Fest Johnstown New Festival Park. Johnstown, PA 814-539-1889 or 888-222-1889 www.johnstownfolkfest.org August 29-September 1 Pennsylvania’s Arts & Crafts Colonial Festival Westmoreland County Fairgrounds. Greensburg, PA. 724-863-4577. www.familyfestivals.com August 30-31 20th Annual Music in the Mountains Ohiopyle State Park. Ohiopyle, PA 724-329-8591. www.friendsofohiopyle.info August 30 Live Music with Erin Burkett Trio 1-5 PM Stone Villa Wine Cellars. Acme, PA 724-723-5604. www.stonevilla.com August 30 Lobster & Clam Bake Christian W. Klay Winery. Chalk Hill, PA 724-439-3424. www.cwklaywinery.com August 30-31 Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival 10 AM- 6:30 PM. West Newton, PA 724-872-1670. www.pittsburghrenfest.com August 30-31 Subaru 24-Hour Champion Challenge Relay Race 12 PM Seven Springs Mountain Resort Champion, PA. 800-452-2223 ext. 7757 rshaffer@7springs.com August 31 Catch the Blues at Stone Villa featuring rhythm & blues band Mystic Knights 12:30-4:30 PM Stone Villa Wine Cellars. Acme, PA. 724-723-5604 www.stonevilla.com August 31 Nostalgic Nights Car Cruise at Oakhurst Tea Room. 5 PM. Somerset, PA 814-443-2897 or 724-961-3085 www.oakhursttearoom.com August 31- Sept. 2, 7-9 The Fantasticks Philadelphia Street Playhouse. Indiana, PA 724-463-7122. www.indianaplayers.com September 1 Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival 10 AM- 6:30 PM. West Newton, PA 724-872-1670. www.pittsburghrenfest.com Septemner 13 Historic House Tour Westmoreland County Historical Society www.starofthewest.org August 10 Antiques & Collectibles Sale Historic Hanna’s Town. www.starofthewest.org

BARN HOURS Spring/Summer (MAY-October) Tuesday, Thursday and Friday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Wednesday 10 a.m. – 8 p.m. 1st Saturday ONLY of each month 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. CLOSED Monday and Sunday

Monarch Butterfly Monitoring Training Session Wednesday, July 16, 9:00 a.m. - Noon Interested in Monarch Butterflies? The Winnie Palmer Nature Reserve will be conducting a Monarch Butterfly Training on July 16th from 9:00 am - noon at the Reserve in Latrobe. The training will prepare individuals, kids and adults alike, to monitor a plot of milkweed, collect larvae (caterpillars) and report findings to the Monarch Larval Monitoring Project (MLMP). Visit www.mlmp.org for more information about the Project. Volunteers will be trained to conduct weekly monarch and milkweed surveys, measure per plant densities of monarch eggs and larvae and milkweed quality. Training will teach you how to handle the larva and butterflies. Find your own milkweed plot, or assist with the plot at Saint Vincent College. To register, contact Beth Bollinger at 724-537-5285 or beth. bollinger@email.stvincent.edu Minimum:10, Maximum: 40

Outdoor Family Yoga For All Ages Saturday, August 2, 9:00 - 10:00 a.m. Come stretch to the call of a Red-winged Blackbird and the rustling of leaves; feel the grass beneath your feet and the crisp morning air against your feet while you relax and unwind to yoga led by an instructor from Wisdom and Wellness Studio. Bring a towel and wear comfortable clothes. All aged bare feet welcome. Free, but please call to register at 724-537-5284.

Volunteer Open House Wednesday, August 20, 3:00 - 5:00 p.m. Enjoy nature, outdoors, wildlife, history, or children? Are you creative, a conversationalist, or a gardener that wants to donate their time and talent to environmental education, natural history, or land conservation a few hours a week? We would love for you to become a Volunteer Docent for the 1800 Reconstructed Barn or the historic Blockhouse; a naturalist educator, or gardener for the new Winnie Palmer Nature Reserve at Saint Vincent College. All ages and skill levels welcome. Join us for a Volunteer Open House at the Barn for information sharing and refreshments. Please call to register or for additional information at 724-537-5284.

Trails Open Year Round 7 Days a Week, Dawn to Dusk

To submit your community event to this calendar, please email complete information to: advertising@LaurelMountainPost.com Event listings received after the deadline will be added to our online edition as needed. Questions? Call 724-331-3936

July/August 2008 - 29


Springs Farmers Market

Featured Price

MOST CARS

29

INCLUDES: 5 Qts Oil, Filter for Most Domestic & Foreign Cars and 12-Point Check

95

Saturdays through September 13

+Tax

A wide selection of fresh produce, home baked goods (fresh donuts made Saturday mornings!), quilts, antiques, plants, tools, etc.

Valvoline® All-Climate® Motor Oil 5W-30 Valvoline® All-Climate® Motor Oil 10W-30

Taking Care of the Family Vehicle for Over 18 Years!

Angelo Caruso, Jr. and James Deglau, Owners

L&L Quik Lube,

Inc.

www.springspa.org Route 669 Springs, PA

100-1/2 Depot Street • Latrobe, PA Behind Domino’s 724-537-9329

39th Annual Mountain Craft Days September 5-7, 2008 Somerset Historical Center - Somerset, PA Celebrate PA History with 125 Crafts Persons, Interpreters and Entertainers! 814-445-6077 www.somersethistoricalcenter.org

56TH ANNUAL

Farmers & Threshermens Jubilee September 3-7, 2008 New Centerville, PA

Contact : SueAnn Zippi Independent Consultant

724-681-3184

Steam Engines, Antique Cider Mill, Tractors, Quilt Show, Truck & Tractor Pulling Crafts, Good Food and Live Entertainment! For more information call 814-926-3142 or visit www.ncrvfc.com

sueannzippi@comcast.net 30 - July/August 2008

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST


Equine Chic For Horse, Home & You! 100 East Main Street Ligonier, PA 15658 724-238-7003 www.EquineChic.com Full line of Vintage Western Candles North American made Organic Tee’s Bella Sera’s Newest products Expanded Ass Whisperer Gear Tee’s Zack & Olive Cards

Celtic Culture

Goods from Ireland and the British Isles

724-238-2420

137 East Main St in Ligonier, PA 15658 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 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1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 Contact Our Sales Office Today . . . Mandisa or Mike: 724-205-7033 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 Managed by Concord Hospitality Enterprises. 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 *Quality *Community *Integrity *Profitability www.concordhotels.com 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 Every Story Begins At Home. July/August 2008 - 31

Courtyard by Marriott Marriott Greensburg Greensburg 700 700 Power Power Line Line Drive Drive •• Greensburg, Greensburg, PA PA 15601 15601

Host your next successful meeting in one of our state of the art meeting rooms. Experience the Courtyard by Marriott Pittsburgh Greensburg, the newest and friendliest of Greensburg hotels.


Cruise into Ligonier this Summer! Summer in Ligonier Arts and Crafts - July 25th & 26th

9 am to 5 pm. We will have Arts and Crafts on the Diamond, entertainment, food, sidewalk sales, (buggy rides Sat. only) and fun activities for children.

Stroll Through Ligonier - August 8th

50s Theme - Sidewalk Sales - Classic Cars - Entertainment

Antiques on the Diamond - August 23rd

8am to 4pm - 60 quality antique dealers set up shop around the center of town

Sponsored by the Ligonier Valley Chamber of Commerce 120 East Main Street • Ligonier, PA 15658 • 724-238-4200 • www.ligonier.com

32 - July/August 2008

LAUREL MOUNTAIN POST

Laurel Mountain Post July-August 2008  

Laurel Mountain Post July-August 2008

Laurel Mountain Post July-August 2008  

Laurel Mountain Post July-August 2008

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