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LMCAS elections

Concussion awareness

‘Breed greatness’

Results of the voting for LMCAS will be announced Wednesday, May 14 — page 3

Full page story on the risks concussions pose and the steps being taken to treat them — page 7

Volleyball head coach Lou Panzella is bringing his coaching success to LMC — page 8

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F.Y.I. Important Dates May is National Bike Month May 9

Student Success Ceremony and STELLAR Awards

May 21

Last Day of Instruction

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Accreditation quandary

Gaps in plan raise concerns By KELLIE McCOWN

kmccown@lmcexperience.com

The Los Medanos College battle for accreditation continued Monday with a third draft presented to campus faculty and staff for review before being forwarded to the Academic Senate May 12 for endorsement.

The gray, cool atmosphere of the community meeting room in the LMC Library was in stark contrast to the tensions of many who are now analyzing the work of those who have been writing and editing the report for the past two years. The college needs to move the self-study report into its final stages for the fall 2014 accreditation visit. “It’s a moving target because we are still editing what has come forward,” said LMC President Bob Kratochvil. The current draft, still in the works, is organized into different sections evaluating LMC against a common set of accreditation standards, as well

as responses to previous accreditation recommendations: Q institutional mission and effectiveness Q student learning programs Q leadership and governance While previous drafts have been made available, the current third revision posted on the LMC website was missing several sections of the accreditation standards. Some members of the audience raised questions about the problem that wasn’t solved until midnight of that day, after the review meeting. The entire third section only recently became available

Grads walk nearing

Free hugs experiment

Ceremony will be held May 21

Fall 2014 schedule out

By CHARLES POWELL

cpowell@lmcexperience.com

learn about Measure E. Head debate coach Kasey Gardner opened up the debate with an introduction about Measure E and the infrastructures of LMC and CCC. Then, three debaters from LMC, Jose Alvarez, Kathryn Lucido, Miguel Mauricio, and three debaters from CCC, Irvin Ramiro, Diamonique Spain, Hayley Callaway, presented their arguments. LMC debated for Measure E, while CCC debated against the bond. LMC debater Jose Alvarez started the debate with a story about Frank Trammell, who has a health condition and lives in Discovery Bay but goes to school at the Pittsburg campus. The distance of the school location makes it difficult for Trammell to

Past the sweat and aggravation of finals for some Los Medanos College students a figurative finish line is waiting just around the bend in the form of graduation day. The commencement ceremony will be Wednesday, May 21 at 6:30 p.m. at the LMC football stadium according to the college’s homepage section on the graduation ceremony. The event will honor students who have completed an Associate of Arts, Associate of Science or who are obtaining certificates of achievement or are considered pending by the office of Admissions and Records. Dave Belman, interim dean of student success, believes there is duality to the event. “Graduation is a significant educational milestone and a culminating event for both students and for the college,” said Belman. “The Commencement Ceremony is an opportunity to recognize and celebrate the accomplishments of our students.” LMC Spanish Professor Nancy Whitman shares many of Belman’s sentiments and sees herself as a cheerleader for those graduating from the college. “As an academic professor, I think it is important to honor those who are graduating. It’s a big thing to go to college,” said Whitman. “It’s an even bigger thing to graduate.” Jose Alvarez is one of the LMC students Whitman and others will be cheering on from the stands and the field as he walks in and stands to accept his diploma. “I am walking just for the experience. LMC has been so good to me and it is a good way to depart from this campus,” said Alvarez. LMC student Brianna Klipp who expects to finish up the requirements for a degree in the fall does not plan on taking part in the ceremony when she will have a chance. “I plan on celebrating and walking when I graduate from a four-year university. I feel like I don’t want to celebrate too soon,” said Klipp. If Whitman were able she might try to persuade Klipp and others who feel the way she does to participate in the ceremony. “It’s important to recognize and celebrate our successes — to applaud ourselves along the way,” said Whitman. “I see the A.A. or A.S. degree to not be a terminal degree, but a stepping stone because I am

See BOND, page 10

See GRAD, page 10

Check out the 2014 schedule of classes for this fall online at losmedanos.edu/schedule. Catalogs are also available at the LMC Bookstore.

Miles against violence event The Triple H Club is holding a Walking Miles Against Violence fundraising event May 17 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The cost is $5 for students and $10 for non-students. 100 percent of the profits from the event go to the WMAV Scholarship. For more information contact wmav@gmail.com Photo by Irvin Trigueros

Arion Choice embraces a fellow student while holding a “Free Hugs” sign in the outdoor quad Wednesday May 7. The activity was a social experiment conducted by student Gio Rajo (not pictured) attempting to sample who would hug whom based on gender.

Measure E worth weighed Coffee and conversation Voice questions and concerns to the officers and police services on campus May 19, 10 to 11 a.m. in Room L-109. Contact Officer Fernando Salamanca at fsalamanca@4cd.edu for more information.

Bookstore buybacks Return your used textbooks for cash to the LMC Bookstore at the Pittsburg campus only. Times are Thursday, May 15, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday May 16, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday/Tuesday May 19-20, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Wednesday/ Thursday May 21-22, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information go to lmcbookstore.net

See GAPS, page 10

To be voted on June 3

By SUZZANNE SPERRY

ssperry@lmcexperience.com

Measure E is a $450 million bond measure to improve aging Contra Costa Community College facilities. If the district wins the ballot, LMC will be looking at new Student Activities and Performing Arts buildings. Funding from the measure would be applied to a new campus and will expand already existing Contra Costa College buildings. LMC student Kathryn Lucido says, “A lot of people are against it because it is a new tax, but I think it is worth it. It is only like a 30 cent increase per day and means so much for the district.” Supporters, such as Lucido, say Measure E would help maintain quality career training programs and education for college districts. They believe it will also offset severe state budget cuts due to reduced revenue coming to the College District. It would further reduce the need for teacher layoffs and will limit increases in class size and provide improved technological devices, which are needed, for students to stay educationally competitive.

Photo by Cathie Lawrence

CCC Debator Diamonique Smith argues a point during a debate against LMC about Measure E May 1 at Pittsburg City Hall.

Award-winning teams debate bond By RATTANA KIM

rkim@lmcexperience.com

Los Medanos College’s debate team went up against Contra Costa College’s debate team about Measure E Thursday, May 1. Measure E would increase the districts debt by 450 million towards the modernizing of school facilities in the Contra Costa Community District that encompass Contra Costa College, Diablo Valley College, LMC and the Brentwood and San Ramon campuses. These award-winning debate teams debated from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. on the third floor of the Pittsburg City Council Chambers on 65 Avenue. Students, staff, faculty and LMC President Bob Kratochvil and Vice President Kevin See VOTE, page 10 Horan were in attendance on the debate to


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“Don’t cry because it’s over. Smile because it happened.”

— Dr. Seuss

Malik Lawson VII

Josh Wood

MO’S WORLD

GUEST COLUMNIST

Read about the side effects Antidepressants are making a killing. The promotion of depression as an illness treatable with drugs has become a scandalous enterprise with little or no merit. The psychiatric drug I have chosen to call to the stand is Cymbalta, which has been advertised numerous times with the promise to relieve its users from their symptoms of depression, but the side effects are worse than what the medicine promises to cure. The commercial for Cymbalta asks viewers brief questions on depression, and then leads in with a simple fact about how depression affects people. After that they just claim Cymbalta can help, followed by an endless list of side effects and medical issues no one has ever heard of. The most common side effect is Dystonia, sustained muscle contractions that cause twisting and repetitive movements or abnormal postures. Another is Tardive Dyskinesia, a difficult to treat and often incurable from the dyskinesia that results in uncontrollable movements of the face and tongue. Cymbalta also makes promises that patients taking the drug may experience a decrease in white blood cells, lowering the body’s ability fight infection. The possibility of developing any of these syndromes wouldn’t make me happier. According to Andrew W. Saul, a Therapeutic Nutrition Specialist and author of the book Doctor Yourself: Natural Healing That Works, “In 1992, the FDA’s drug evaluation process took two years before it was released to the public, but after 1994, it was changed to six months.” Doctors only know 50 percent of what a drug can do before it starts being sold to millions. In February 2004, college student Traci Johnson, 19, was involved in test group for Cymbalta, codenamed Duloxetine at the time. After only four days on the drug, she hanged herself with a scarf from a shower rod in an Indianapolis laboratory run by Drug Company Eli Lilly. The FDA was brought in to investigate whether the drug had anything to do with her death, but the results were inconclusive. Some clinical trial data are considered commercially protected information, and thus exempted from public release under the Freedom of Information Act. Since the FDA doesn’t routinely perform follow-ups of drugs once they are on the market, when uncommon but deadly side effects tend to appear, independent researchers are often the only hope of catching such flaws. The FDA approved Cymbalta to treat depression in August 2004. Today anyone may be taking psychiatric drugs unknowingly, just renamed and repackaged. Zyban, a pill to help people quit smoking is actually Wellbutrin, an anxiety drug. Yentrever, a medicine for urinary difficulties, is being marketed as Cymbalta behind the scenes. The American public is being treated like a mass test subject and the doctors who issue these medicines should be tried for crimes against humanity. I wish I could confront the people who ignore all these problems and take the drugs. Why take the risk? Were you really so unhappy to put your own well-being on the line? It’s all theory about what these drugs really do and it’s sad that now every emotional problem has been narrowed down to a label. If you’re a person who experiences depression, consider doing something you might find exciting or getting back in touch with something that used to bring you great joy rather than popping a pill and hoping all your problems will go away. Prevention is always the best cure. You never know what anti-depressants could do. it’s best to read the side effects on the labels.

Study before finals approach

Cartoon by Joey Fajardo

EDITORIAL

Students vote yes on ‘E’

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easure E has stirred quite some controversy over the proposal to raise property taxes from $13 for every $100,000 of assessed value to $26. While there are arguments on both sides that are valid, it is important for students at Los Medanos College to understand that the potential revenue from Measure E will improve campus-learning structures for future students. With Measure E, Contra Costa Community College District will be able to update learning facilities at all district campuses, including building at the site of the new Brentwood Center housed on Sand Creek Road. Most students here will only be affected through parental home ownership, and may brush off the importance of the measure as something “that doesn’t apply” to them. Frankly, it doesn’t apply to many staff members on the Experience either. However, the outdated college core structure, the routinely sluggish Internet connection in the math building, and the lack of WiFi access are daily campus struggles the LMC population can relate to. It touches everyone who travels to 2700 E Leland Road in search of an education that will prepare them for more sophisticated universities and employment. Owning a house is expensive, and adding more tax money to be paid on top of the Bay Area cost of living may seem like a lot to ask of Contra Costa County residents in a recovering economy, but the investment in student facilities at the community college level will help bring to a new generation the learning environment of the future. Measure E can be found on the bottom of your ballot when you go to the polls June 3. The Experience endorses the measure and encourages LMC students, faculty and staff to fulfill their civic duties to their communities and the colleges by exercising their right to vote, taking their number 2 pencils, and filling in the bubble for Yes on Measure E. #‘Merica

Technology brings new vision There is often talk about the change technology has brought us these last few years. Like other discussions of change, the concerns are only over the negative aspects, and none of the positive. As Bob Dylan put it, “the times, they are a changin’.” It comes as no surprise that texting has gone up every year for the last few years, with Business Insider reporting kids text an average of 67 messages per day. Internet lingo is quickly finding attention as well, with Oxford giving “selfie” the Oxford Dictionary’s 2013 Word of the Year Award. With social media gaining steam, is it a bad thing? Many are worried that the constant use of social media is detaching teens from the ability to socialize in a face-to-face manner. Parents worry that texting as a form of communication causes college and high school students alike to lack a sense of empathy, simply becoming shells craving a comment or upvote for their new selfie. This fear is even brought up in cinema and literature. “Warm Bodies,” “Romeo and Juliet” meets “Zombie Apocalyspe” film in 2013 asserts the zombie apocalypse came from social media turning people into mindless husks, before eventually craving human flesh. Surely, social media has brought nothing but negatives for us students, right? That we lack social skills now, more than ever, due to spending more time online? According to a report from the child advocacy group Common Sense Media, that could not be further from the truth. In a survey of more than 1,000 students between the ages of 13 and 17, more than 52% of the students agreed social media has improved the relationships they already have with their friends. Research from the Pew Research Center agrees: avid texters and social media users are more likely to spend time with their friends in person.

Voices

Tanner Johnson NEW PERSPECTIVE The research shows the same kinds of people who use social media sites and texting to communicate already have a bond with their peers and want to spend time communicating with them, both online and in person. This doesn’t replace spending time friends and loved ones. This is not the first time parents feared something new being brought to their children. Juvenoia is a slang term used to describe the fear of the effects of social change on the following generation. Ever y generation is certain the generation before them was too conservative and the generation after them is too out of control. Parents are concerned social media will replace real life communication, just like their parents feared the walkman would in the late 1980s. One can easily assume the same was said about radio by their grandparents as well. What every generation needs to accept is that this is, quite simply, a change. It is impossible to know what interesting piece of technology will be invented two decades from now. People will never cease to communicate with each other. If there is ever something teenagers will be known for, it’s their inability to stop talking. Today, times are different from what our parents grew up with. Different is not necessarily bad-- It’s simply different. “If your time to you is worth savin’, then you better start swimmin’ or you’ll sink like a stone, for the times they are a changin’.”

LOS MEDANOS COLLEGE

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We’ve all heard the rule, don’t cram, study over the course of the semester a little bit each day and you won’t have to worry. Unfortunately, many of us fall short of that expectation, including me. Whether it’s from an unforeseen event; baseball game, family visit or just shirking responsibilities, we all lose study time. However, hope is not lost. Studying at the last minute can help, if you do it correctly. These are some tips and tricks I’ve utilized in last minute studying that have helped me maximize the time I had left: 1. Is to know what will be on the exam. This is a vital part to maximizing that last-minute cram. Since you are cramming for a test, you don’t have time to study anything you don’t need to. Review your study guides, ask a classmate or meet with your professor during office hours so you can get a thorough idea of what will be on the exam. 2. If you are going to cram, cram with others. Remember that class you missed? If you study in a group, odds are that one of those people attended, so you’ll have someone there to teach you what you missed. The social interaction also helps the information stick more than if you were simply staring at your book or reading your notes for the hundredth time. Simply put, if you talk to someone about it, you’ll remember it better than if you just read it. 3. If you are going to make flash cards, use them wisely. If you know what’s on the other side of the flash card, stop using it. Keeping your entire deck of flash cards together is nice, but you’ll only keep floundering on the ones you don’t know. Instead, each time you come to a flash card you do know, take it out of your deck. When you run out of cards, start over with your full deck and do it again, this way you end up with more practice on the concept or term you’re struggling to learn. 4. Take breaks. As counter-intuitive as this can seem, your brain is only hardwired to handle a certain amount of information at a time (somewhere around two hours). I prefer to take a break for about 10 to 15 minutes every 90 minutes. Don’t just stand up and stretch, go on YouTube and watch a funny video, or something else fun. Reward yourself for those 90 minutes of study time. However, don’t go socialize. It’s very easy to lose track of time when you’re in a conversation. 5. Remember to get a good night of sleep. As tempting as it is to pull that all-nighter to study for that math final, you shouldn’t. Not only will you end up losing all of the information you studied from being tired, you won’t even have the mental capacity to take the exam. Try to get a few hours of sleep before the exam and wake up with an hour or two to study beforehand. Not to mention, get enough time to get to class and eat a good breakfast. 6. Make sure you eat and drink plenty, I cannot stress this enough. You must keep yourself full and hydrated while you study. If you’re hungry or thirsty, you’ll put unnecessary stress on your body, which will only hinder your ability to remember what you need to for the exam. It is especially important to eat before the test as well. Don’t skip breakfast or lunch just to study at the last minute. Bring your materials with you and give yourself a light refresher on information you know while you eat. 7. Try to find a quiet environment. Attempt to find a place free of distractions so you can focus on studying. The library is a great place to go for this, especially because they provide reference materials to help you. In addition, you can also reserve a study room at the front desk for your study group. As a student who has had to cram before, I can vouch for all these techniques. Good luck and get cramming!

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Member California Newspaper Publishers Association

“I’m taking statistics in the summer at Brentwood campus and taking a nice vacation to Mexico City.” — Natalie Hurtado

“I’m moving to San Francisco to get ready to attend SF state next fall.” — Mitchel Silva

“I’m gonna party “For my like it’s 1999.” summer — Lauren Dunn vacation I plan to visit Los Angeles to tour Universal Studios.” — Arnold Duncan

“My plans for “I’m preparing to the summer transfer to SJSU are to work this fall!” at my church — Andre Thompson and to go visit my brother in Nashville. He just graduated from Tennessee State University.” — Carleta Leonard

“Were it left for me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers, or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.” — Thomas Jefferson

Editor-in-Chief .................... BRENDAN CROSS Perspectives Editors...... AISHLING DOHERTY and JAZMINE GORDON Campus Editors .................. JOSEPH DELANO and ALEXANDRA TAGLIAMONTE Features Editors .......................RATTANA KIM and STEPHANIE PATTISON Sports Editors .......................LUKE JOHNSON and DAKOTAH ZABROSKI Photo Editor ....................... IRVIN TRIGUEROS Web Editor ..................STEPHANIE PATTISON Associate Editors...............BERTHA AGUILAR and STEVEN LUKE The LMC Experience is published Fridays by students in the Journalism Program. The newspaper serves both as a laboratory for journalism classes and as a First Amendment forum for campus communication. Opinions expressed in the Experience are solely those of the students and do not represent the views of the college.


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“I believe that voting is the first act of building a community as well as building a country.”

— John Ensign

Student senate voting is open

Cast your ballot for next year

Lopez-Thomas are running unopposed as the positions received just one applicant The Los Medanos College Associated independently. There is still the opportunity for write-in Senate is holding a vote to appoint members to three positions: president, vice president candidates to be elected. All of the candidates are currently and treasurer. Voting is being held currently, involved in the LMCAS, with Walker and and ends on May 9 at 5 p.m. On Wednesday, the LMCAS Senate hosted Tidwell being senators and Lopez-Thomas an election event in the outdoor quad in being the current treasurer. Walker, running for president, stated which students could cast their votes on laptops and receive a free lunch, lanyard that “I thrive on being the voice of others whom may not speak up because and an “I Voted” sticker. The candidates: Gary Simeon Walker, of many potential reasons: shy, timid or Candice Tidwell and Gilbert Alexander introverted. I have a loud and bold voice and can advocate for change by articulating the concerns of our constituents.” Tidwell, candidate for vice president, relayed her hopes for the future of her position as she stated, “As an active senator I have advocated and addressed the needs and concerns for the students. As Vice President I intend to enhance my existing skills and knowledge. I will continue to advocate for or against issues that affect the student body.” Lopez-Thomas, incumbent, believes that past experience, as LMCAS Treasurer will be beneficial. “Throughout the 2013-2014 in being the treasurer, I held the responsibilities in attending to the student government meeting, keeping up to date with the student government budget, and helping out in various events we held this semester.” Voting started Monday online and will run until 5 p.m. on Friday. To vote and read Photo by Irvin Trigueros the full statements from each Photo by Irvin Trigueros Gabriela Agramont-Justiniano puts in her vote candidate, visit the LMCAS site for the LMCAS election. Diona Shelbourne, Student Malik Lawson casts his vote on one of the laptops provided. The voting was via the college website, www. LMCAS senator, gives her a sticker for voting. losmedanos.edu held in the outdoor quad. Voters recieved a free lunch for their paticipation. By JOSEPH DELANO

jdelano@lmcexperience.com

LGBT meeting higlights future of course

Offering part of new certificate program By TANNER JOHNSON

tjohnson@lmcexperience.com

The upcoming Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transsexual course, which is part of a five-year plan for the LGBT Studies Certificate Program, was discussed in a round-table meeting on May 6 in the Student Life office The speaker and teacher of the course, Professor Jeffrey Mitchell Matthews, encouraged group think while divulging the details of the upcoming class. Also discussed was the background of Matthews’ 22 years at Los Medanos College. The certificate program is divided into three phases. A part of Phase One, being worked on in 2013 and 2014, is already complete as the Intro to LGBT Studies class was approved to be a part of the courses offered in the AS/AA Degree’s Ethnic/

Multicultural Studies Box. The course will work with more degree and certificate programs including: Administration of Justice, Anthropology, Ar t, Child Development, Communication Studies, Drama, Journalism, Liberal Arts, Music, Nursing, Psychology and Sociology. During Phase Two, beginning late 2014 and ending in 2016, more faculty hiring is planned in order to help create more LGBT courses, such as LGBT History and LGBT Art. Professor Mitchell would help with faculty interested in creating the courses. In Phase Three, LMC’s LGBT Resource Center, Q*Spot, will be institutionalized. The creation of a LGBT Studies certificate will also be completed. “Q*Spot has always literally been

my office and only open during my office hours. If I should suddenly die, Q*Spot would die with me,” says Mitchell. The creation of an official building for Q*Spot would help ensure referral services for its resources, such as counseling and support groups for LGBT youth, and offers a safe, supportive place for LGBT people to meet at LMC. The upcoming LGBT studies course will be listed as English 135-1277 and will be held on Thursdays from 7 to 9:50 p.m. in Room CC-296. “I think it should be a fun addition to the school,” said student Alyssa Johnson adding, “I might even take that class. It sounds like it would be really interesting.” Photo by Irvin Trigueros Jeffrey Mitchell Matthews can be reached at 439-2181 ext. 3259 for Professor Jeffrey Mitchell Matthews speaks to a small audience more information. about what to expect in his upcoming LGBT course.

SoCal tour helps expand horizons they are still accepting applications for the waitlist. You can The Los Medanos Transfer go to www.losmedanos.edu/ Center is hosting their annual transfer for more information Southern California University and to register. Transfer Center Tour, May 27-30. The tour intern Phoebe Balangan said will visit 5 universities, giving “with recent donations from attendees a chance to explore the LMC Associated Students, UC Los Angeles, University UMOJA and LMC Distinof Southern California, Occi- guished Brothers of Purpose, in addition to the dental college, generous doCalifornia State nations from University Los “With recent Angeles and donations...we are the HSI Exito Grant, MESA UC Santa Bar- excited to offer and the Transbara. fer Center, we Those who full scholarships are excited a t t e n d w i l l for students to of fer full lear n about scholarships a d m i s s i o n interested in the for students requirements SoCal University interested in and see if a Tour.” Southern Uni— Phoebe Balangan the SoCal University Tour.” versity will be a good fit for them; it is the Those who have already regperfect tour for someone who istered can apply for this is debating which University scholarship and it will cover the entire $175 for the tour. they would like to attend. The cost is $175 per student “The SoCal University Tour is a and includes: transportation by great opportunity for students bus, hotel accommodations for to broaden their perspective three nights, campus tours/ and explore options for higher presentations and most meals. education outside of the local Although they are at capacity, See SoCal, page 10 By BERTHA AGUILAR

baguilar@lmcexperience.com


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“Music happens to be an art form that transcends language.”

—Herbie Hancock

Ensemble sounds so ‘baroque’ A few bright spots in bland evening By BRENDAN CROSS

bcross@lmcexperience.com

The Los Medanos College Baroque Ensemble presented a lackluster “Evening of Baroque Music” Thursday, May 1. The program featured six different works of which separate portions of the ensemble played. Parts of those six pieces featured problems, the main one being they each sounded uninspired. The first piece, “Concerto for Four Violins,” was out of tune but picked up towards the end once the musicians gained some momentum together. “Sonata in A Minor,” followed and was on point musically, despite a few broken notes here and there. The trombone and harpsichord duo were just going through the motions and lacked an emotional uptick and crescendo to the piece. The third piece, “Trio Sonata in G Minor (parts one and four),” had to be restarted three times because the harpsichord player had the wrong music and did not play the rest of the song because of it. The viola, violin and violoncello melded with each other nicely, but the song needed to be restarted, which is sacrilege in live music and took the crowd’s focus from the piece. Parts two and three of the aforementioned “Sonata in G Minor” was the next piece and

REVIEW

Photos by Irvin Trigueros

served as the first time any of the groups had impressed. Despite a hectic beginning, the piece was performed well and featured many trills that were well executed. Piece five, “Concerto in D Minor,” sounded the best of all of them. The conductor of the ensemble Damian Ting played violin on the piece,

which is a large chunk of the reason as to the great flow of the song. The solo violins did not break any notes and the oboe accompanied well. After a brief intermission, the sixth and final piece “Concert in E-Flat Major for Two Trombe Selvatiche and Strings” featured the entire ensemble. Trombe Selvatiche directly

translates to “trumpets wild,” of which there were none. Instead, a trombone and a French horn replaced the trumpet parts. Not having any trumpet players as a part of the ensemble is unavoidable, but their replacements were not able to keep pace with the song. They unfortunately muddled the tune and brought

ever ything else down. The violas, violins and violoncellos were beautiful in the piece and each sounded as one, but the lack of trumpets took away from the piece. As a whole, the concert was a dud. The lack of instrument diversity and emotional flow made it a generally unpleasant “Evening.”

During the LMC Baroque Ensemble, Aileen Nichols (above) and Chris Lanzafame (bottom left) play viola and Rachel Dunzweiler (bottom right) plays the double bass as Damian Ting (middle) conducts.

‘Snare’ captures your soul

Aspiring Latinas

Audience is the winner at this casino By MALIK LAWSON

mlawson@lmcexperience.com

“Snare” is an original piece written by the Drama 52 ensemble, a play that you won’t want to pass up. “Snare” is the gripping tale of a young woman named Charlotte, played by Natalia Philbin, trying to chase her dream of being a world-renowned singer. She gets her first real gig working at a casino that is anything but ordinary. Charlotte starts to realize that this casino is different from others she has encountered. She is contacted by a paranormal entity, played by Katie Marcel, who reveals to her the dark underbelly beneath the blackjack tables. Gamblers check into the casino but never check out. The cast consists of various personas, one being a bellhop named Henry, played by Federico Bartolo, who in the past, made many mistakes but is now finally doing well at the casino. There is a card shark

REVIEW

Los Medanos College hosted an Aspiring Latinas Workshop Wednesday, May 7 in Library Room L-109, where Jacqlyn Jones (above) was served food by Annica Soto, Niciole Almassey and Myra Baez. Speaker Rosa Amendariz (right) talks of empowering Latinas by increasing awareness of powerful Latina role models.

Photos by Cathie Lawrence

Photo by Cathie Lawrence

In the play “Snare” Luna Garrison plays Delilah, who is the wife of Konnor Heredia’s character Phillip. named Ezra, played by Claudia Vasquez, who is in a category all by himself. He’s always watching with sinister eyes, but this enigmatic chap really knows how to make folks feel welcomed. Victoria, played by Tiffanie Moore, keeps things in order and is always on the prowl ready to seduce the life out of any desperate soul. Iris, played by Marina Ketchum, is a kleptomaniac drink handler with a heart

of gold. An alcoholic private investigator named Mills, played by Emmanual Anaya, just wants to do well in his line of work, but he’ll have to put down his flask. Other characters include, a high roller named Phillip, played by Konnor Heredia, and his wife Delilah, played by Luna Garrison. And the man that holds all of the cards in this game, the man See PLAY, page 10


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LMC music events

Los Medanos College is winding down its series of musical events this semester. The final events will be held in the Recital Hall located in the Music building, next to the Lot C parking lot. Q Gospel Celebration Concert, Saturday, May 10, 7 to 10 p.m. Admission $20 in advance and $25 at the door. Q Piano Honors Recital, Monday, May 12, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Free admission. Q Concert Band Performance, Tuesday, May 13, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. General admission $5 and seniors/students $3.

Comedy at its finest

Q Jazz Studio Concert, Wednesday, May 14, 7:30 to 9 p.m. Admission: TBA.

‘Esperanza Rising’

The Los Medanos College Drama Department will be performing the play “Esperanza Rising” on Friday, May 9 at 4 p.m. in the Little Theater at Los Medanos College. This play is directed by Hugo Carbajal, written by Lynne Alvarez, based on the story written by Pam Munoz Ryan. Call 439-2181 ext. 805 for more information and tickets.

By STEVEN LUKE

sluke@lmcexperience.com

The Los Medanos College Drama Department will be presenting the New Play Festival in the Little Theater on Monday, May 12 and Tuesday, May 13 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $10 for general admission and $7 for students.

‘Mousetrap’ is set

The California Theater is hosting an evening of classical piano and guitar, featuring the artistry of Carille Bruno-Thayer, Jim Coniglio, Grace Edwards, Good Shepherd Choir, Ronald A. Llenado, and Leandra Ramm. This event will take place Saturday, May 17 at 8 p.m. Tickets will cost $7 for students and $15 for adults. The California Theater is offering a dinner package for this night, adults cost $40 and children $20. Purchase tickets at www.pittsburgcaliforniatheatre.com. The California Theater is located at 351 Railroad Ave, Pittsburg.

Movies coming soon

Q “Godzilla” — May 16 Rated: PG-13, Genre: action, adventure, sci-fi Q “Million Dollar Arm” — May 16 Rated: PG, Genre: biography, drama, sport Q “The Immigrant” — May 16 Rated: R, Genre: drama, romance, thriller Q “X-Men: Days of Future Past — May 23 Rated: PG-13, Genre: action, adventure, sci-fi, fantasy Q “Blended” — May 23 Rated: PG-13, Genre: comedy Q “Maleficent” — May 30 Rated: PG, Genre: action, family, adventure — compiled from press releases and staff reports

Gabriel Iglesias, also known as Fluffy to his fans, made a stop in the Bay Area on his Unity Through Laughter world tour on Friday, Feb. 28 and Saturday, March 1. However, this wasn’t just another stop on the tour, it was the filming of his next special that will appear on the big screen on July 11, 2014. On the day of its release he will become the first Latino comic to have a stand up movie appear on the big screen. Iglesias broke onto the scene in 2007 with his Comedy Central special Hot and Fluffy and has been on the rise to the top ever since, and when this movie hits the big screen, it will be the culmination of it all. The movie was filmed in San Jose at the SAP Center and the stage set up had a very Bay Area feel to it with a replica of the Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco skyline in the background. To add to the Bay Area feel he had a special guest emcee along with his good friend and usual emcee Martin Moreno, disc docky for radio station Hot 105.7, Chuy Gomez. The final topping on the Bay Area cake was the opening act, a local comedian by the name of Dennis Gaxiola who has been touring with Iglesias and was featured in the first season of his Comedy Central show Stand Up Revolution. The movie began with a roar as Iglesias came out onto the stage and chants of “Fluffy” overtook the arena. He ran from one side of the stage slapping hands and greeting the fans seated in the front row before taking his place at center stage. From there he touched on the progress of his weight loss with a hilarious story about a consultation for weight-loss surgery, a show in India that took an interesting and hilarious turn from the norm, and touching events involving his family that of course had a comical side to them before exiting the stage to another roar from the crowd and more chants of “Fluffy.” The show wasn’t over yet though, as he came back out for an encore. For the encore he went back to his roots and told the jokes from his very first special, Hot and Fluffy, and what happened is a must see. This show is a must see for anyone who enjoys comedy. It doesn’t matter if you are a fan of comedy, a fan of stand up or just a fan of Iglesias, you will enjoy this show as he is not only funny, but his personal stories are easily relatable.

REVIEW

New Play Festival

‘Love of Classical’

— Rachel Gibson

‘Fluffy’ comes to the Bay Area

MARQUEE

Agatha Christie’s play “The Mousetrap” is the world’s longest running play. It is now celebrating its 60th year and will be performed at the California Theater. During a snow storm, a group of strangers are stranded in a boarding house, one of whom is a murderer. The suspects include a newlywed couple who run the boarding house, a spinster with a curious background, an architect who seems better equipped to be a chef, a retired Army major, a strange little man who claims his car has overturned in a drift and a jurist who makes life miserable for everyone. The performances will take place Friday, May 9 at 8 p.m., Saturday, May 10 at 2 and 8 p.m. and Sunday, May 11 at 2 p.m. Ticket costs are $20 for adults, $15 for seniors and students, $10 for children under age of 11. There is an additional $1.50 facility fee charge for all tickets. Purchase tickets at www.pittsburgcaliforniatheatre.com. The California Theater is located at 351 Railroad Ave, Pittsburg.

“Each time I reach a goal or read a great review, I am beyond blessed.”

Photo courtesy of Totalfilm.com

Andrew Garfield reprises his role as Spider-Man and hangs from his web in the first scene.

Spider-Man 2

Web shooter thrills viewers By BRENDAN CROSS

bcross@lmcexperience.com

The best thing about the rebooted Spider-Man is the fun the series has. While it does not delve as deep into the characters as the original trio of movies, it certainly provides loads of entertainment. “The Amazing Spider-Man 2,” starring Andrew Garfield as Peter Parker/Spiderman, Emma Stone as Gwen Stacy and Jamie Foxx as Max Dillon/ Electro, is visually stunning but at points gets too caught up in the thrills and is lacking in dialogue. Story wise, the emotional highs and lows were enjoyable. The downfall to the plot is the fact that there are three villains. It made the film over-saturated. Paul Giamatti, who played Aleksei Sytsevich/ Rhino, is respected as an actor but his part could have been entirely removed and not only would it have saved some time — the movie runs over two hours and 20 minutes — but would have also simplified the plot. Jamie Foxx plays Max Dillon, an engineer working for OsCorp, much better than Electro. While his powers are impressive and are the vessel for many stunning visuals, his one-liners and completely close-minded thought process as to why he is wreaking havoc makes it seem like almost no thought went into writing the his character into the script. It is difficult to not compare the original series to the reboot. The original films engrossed viewers with the characters more, which ultimately makes for a better film. The reboot strives to entertain more than anything else. Spider-Man fans should definitely enjoy this movie, at the very least for the grandiose action and thrills.

REVIEW

Photo courtesy of allgamesbeta.com

Spider-Man flies through the air from his webs.

Game is anything but ‘amazing’ By BRENDAN CROSS

bcross@lmcexperience.com

There is absolutely nothing amazing about “The Amazing Spider-Man 2” video game. Games based on movies are almost always bad, as companies just release something alongside the movie to further capitalize on the brand. This clunker, however, takes the cake. When you start the game you are given three level options, human, hero and superhero. The opening cutscene is the entirely overdone moment of Uncle Ben’s death. At this point, the realization set in that not only was I playing a terrible game, it was also following a predictable story line.

REVIEW

Each of the main components of the game is lacking. The graphics are appalling for a 2014 release. They are so square and clunky that if I told someone the game came out in 2006 it would be highly believable, and still probably be behind the times. There is zero detail to anything around the city of Manhattan, where it is set. The game is on such a large scale, as the entire city is available to fly through, which does not help the lack of any care in design. The way Spidey gets around the city is, of course, by flying via his webs. Graceful is a term I would use to describe how Spider-Man should fly. Haphazardly flailing is the phrase I would use to describe how See GAME, page 10

Sweet Child of Light paints a better realm By JOSEPH DELANO

Jdelano@lmcexperience.com

Photo courtesy of Ubisoft.com

Aurora (bottom left) works through puzzles with help from the end user in the forest.

Child of Light, the most recent release from Ubisoft, is a stellar game. The side-scrolling epic is visually exhilarating, while having a superb ambient soundtrack. From seeing the trailer for the game, I was excited to experience the world of Lumeria. The main character, Aurora, is an Austrian princess, who seemingly passes away one night, only to awake in a strange land. She must trust her new guides, specifically a firefly named Igniculus. As she travels the realm, she teams up with misfits of Lumeria to help

reveal her fate, why she ended up in Lumeria in the first place, and the fates of loved ones. These friends will also help her in battle. The game utilizes a variety of styles, from being a side-scroller to an RPG with an Active Time Battle system. The battle sequences are reminiscent of the Final Fantasy franchise, and realm travel is very fluid. Every element is stunning; the background and active items are all painted in a watercolor style, which lends itself to being beautifully crafted. I enjoyed the characters greatly; all of the playable characters are customizable with upgrades coming See LIGHT, page 6


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Features

FRIDAY,

MAY

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2014

6

“In this bright future you can’t forget your past.”

— Bob Marley

Pizarro molds her own future Engineering student thrives By CASSIE DICKMAN Staff Writer

Photo by Chris Chard

Fiona Pizarro stands in a dance line. While being a student at Los Medanos College, she was an active member of the dance team.

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Fiona Pizarro, who immigrated from Peru with her family in 2007, almost cried as she sat in front of their television when the announcement came through. Effective Jan 1, 2012, she would be allowed to apply for scholarships, the California Board of Governors waiver and the Dream Act. On July 15, 2011, California Bill AB 130 was passed, giving undocumented college students the ability to apply for private scholarships. AB 131 would be passed a few months later, also giving them access to state-funded financial aid. Pizarro, a mechanical engineering major, is a current recipient of the $8,000 Kennedy King scholarship, which is given to minority students under-represented at four year universities, an award she wouldn’t have been eligible for prior to the new legislation. Her story is similar to children of many immigrants. She didn’t know she was undocumented until she was ready to go to college. When she asked her father for her social security card for college paperwork, he told her she didn’t have one because they had come here on a six-month visa, which had long expired. “At first I was really shocked, and the word ‘illegal’ just made me feel as if I had committed a crime,” she said. “I felt like I was less than my friends because I did not hold any documents.” Pizarro explained it wasn’t her fault because she didn’t realize she was undocumented until she came to LMC. Her parents couldn’t afford tuition and because she didn’t have a social security card, she couldn’t get a state I.D. or license, financial aid, scholarships or even a job. That semester, she did everything she could to help pay for her own education -- asking for loans from other family members and even doing garage sales. “My grandma helped me as much as she could and also my step grandpa, who I wasn’t really close to, loaned me a good amount of money,” she said. After AB 130 and 131 were passed, she was given a special social security number that allowed her to get an I.D. and apply for financial aid, but to keep it she has to work and renew every two years. But getting permanent residence status is her top priority. It will open more doors, said Pizarro and added it would be especially helpful for getting internships. Even though she is legally allowed to work and go to school, a representative who came to one of her classes was reluctant to let her visit the engineering firm but after her teacher explained the situation, she was able to use her passport. Pizarro, who has been accepted into California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Opispo and the University of California, both Davis and Santa Barbara, is working two jobs while going to school part-time. She had hoped to get into Berkeley because it is closer to home but was not accepted. “Berkeley and Cal Poly were my top choices, so I’m not sad,” said Pizarro. Cal Poly has a good engineering program, so she was excited when she got the news. “I was so happy,” said Pizarro, adding she wanted to scream when she read the email. Her parents were just as thrilled. “We feel a great satisfaction to see how life gives to everyone what they deserve. We feel that Fiona deserves to be in those prestigious colleges and also those prestigious colleges deserve to have students like Fiona,” said Pizarro’s father Romeo, who studied engineering in Peru until dropping out to get married and have a family. Pizarro grew up in Lima with her parents and younger sister, where she studied ballet, played chess and discovered that she enjoyed math. “I just find it more challenging than any other classes,” she said. But becoming a female engineer in Peru is difficult. Men are the ones who usually receive their education and women are dependent on them. At 15, her parents told her they would be moving to the U.S. so she and her sister would have a better life with more opportunities. But she didn’t believe them at first. They had never mentioned wanting to move to America before and she just remembered feeling really sad and surprised. She kept asking, “Is this real?” After flying into and staying in West Palm Beach, Florida, for a week or two, they arrived in Antioch where they stayed in a room at her mom’s friend’s house. They lived there for

about a year before moving into an apartment and later to the house she lives in now. The first year was hard for her sister, but even though the culture was different and she didn’t speak English, Pizarro didn’t have trouble adjusting. “I wasn’t as depressed,” she said. “Everyone is nice here.” High school in America was easier compared to Peru, where she wore uniforms and studied six subjects a day. But she didn’t get good grades at Deer Valley High because, she said, she cared more about making friends, meeting guys and dancing. Then, after she graduated in 2010, she realized this was her future and needed to get serious. “Everyone gets surprised when I tell them that I am doing engineering,” said Pizarro. But she expected it to be that way. Nursing was actually her first choice when she started college, but she changed her major because nursing didn’t involve math or physics, which is her passion. “That’s why I picked engineering, but I wasn’t sure what kind of engineering I wanted to do,” said Pizarro. That is until her freshman year, when she used a 3-D software called SolidWorks, a program used by mechanical engineers. She doesn’t know what she wants to do with her degree but she knows she wants to stay in California. Groups like The American Society of Women Engineers exist because it’s harder for women to get engineering jobs. “They support only women engineers because we are kind of left out from the engineering world,” said Pizarro. In her dynamics class, she is the only woman out of six students. “And it’s been like that in all my engineering classes,” said Pizarro. It’s been hard for her and she wishes there were other female engineering majors she could relate to. “They are different from me,” said Pizarro about the men in the program and she often ends up sitting by herself, while the men sit together. She feels left out. “I don’t feel like men in my classes treat me bad or even care about me being sometimes the only woman in class,” said Pizarro. She thinks it is more of a psychological problem because, she said, most of the time when you think of an engineer, you picture a male. When she told her friends what she wanted to do, they said, “Isn’t that a male career?” “I guess you can compare it to a guy doing nursing,” she added. In the beginning, it lowered her confidence. When she goes to an engineering organization and sees only men, she said, it’s intimidating. Only 14 percent of engineers in the U.S. are female. Compared to 5.8 percent in the early 1980s, that is a big step forward. Kurt Crowder, Pizarro’s dynamics teacher, said, “My Introduction to Engineering class has 7 women in it; they make up a third of the class, which is a huge increase over past years, so I think that things are starting to change for the better.” He thinks Pizarro is an excellent student and likes having her in his course because she brings great intellect to the classroom. “She answers questions in my dynamics class that the guys cannot handle,” said Crowder. Not only are women engineers scarce but they are boring and ugly, at least that is what Pizarro said she has been told, but she doesn’t see herself that way and never has. Despite her interest in math, Pizarro has also been a dancer for most of her life. She studied ballet for years in Peru but left the country before going on to advanced levels. She continues to dance in the U.S., not only ballet, but contemporary, lyrical and hip hop -- almost any style. “When I transfer I would like to try out for the school’s cheerleading team,” said Pizarro, who has also been an active member of the LMC dance team. When people have doubts based on stereotypes about what she wants to do, it only makes her stronger and more determined because she is doing well right now and, she says with a smile, “I’m proud.” She acknowledges it may be harder for her in the engineering field because she is not only a woman but also a Latina. “But that’s what I want to do, so I’m just going to do it,” said an encouraged Pizarro. “I know that it is possible for a woman to get a decent job after graduating.” She is just going to give her best in every project during her time at Cal Poly so when recruiters come to the university they will see what she capable of.

LIGHT From page 5

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with each level increase. Each person and animal in the game is also depicted in the same artistic style as the rest of the realm. The dialogue between characters leaves a little to be desired at some points. The game is played out like a poem,

with almost every line rhyming. This inevitably leads to some discord between phrases in the goal of being consistent. Overall, the ethereal atmosphere that the graphics and sounds created is incredibly enjoyable to experience. I would definitely recommend that

people at least try this game; you will not be disappointed. Available on most platforms, including Xbox; Windows; PlayStation; Wii U, the game is accessible to the majority of gamers. Child of Light cost a paltry $14.99, which is a tremendous bargain.


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Sports

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7

“We all give up stiffness in knees, backs, joint pain stuff. You don’t want to give up your brain.”

— Jeff Saturday

BUTTING HEADS FRIDAY,

MAY

9,

2014

Story by Brendan Cross and Sean Tongson Photos, Photo Illustration & Graphics by Irvin Trigueros Page Design by Brendan Cross and Irvin Trigueros

C

Concussions in sports a long-term headache

ontact sports such as football have long ruled over the sporting landscape. It is partially due to the facets of the game itself, but gained true popularity because of the highlight reel hard hits.

As fun as they can be to watch, the checks into the boards are often those hits can be highly detrimen- the most exciting plays to watch. tal to players on both ends of it. In Of 130 students surveyed by the recent years, sports as a whole have LMC Experience staff, 102 (88 perattempted to take steps to nullify cent) said contact sports would not these injuries, but concussions still have the same appeal if the collisions hold true as the most potentially and hits were not a part of the games. dangerous of them all. Fans crave and enjoy watching Of the four major sports in the Unit- somebody get their brains knocked ed States, football and hockey are the in or put their bodies’ and lives on two where, game-to-game, there is a the line for our entertainment. but do high chance that a fans really know player will receive the true extent of CONCUSSION EDUCATION a concussion. what happens to In t he 2 01 2 the head during a NFL season, there violent collision? were 217 reported According to concussions in medical profes333 preseason and sionals, a concusregular season sion is defined as games according a traumatic brain to a CNN study. injury that alters According to a the way your PLOS ONE study, brain functions, during the 2011caused by either Of 136 LMC students asked, 12 NHL season, a direct blow to 65 percent said they were there were 6.83 the head or an not educated on the severity r epor ted conindirect blow to cussions per 100 the body. This and risks of concussions. games played. then causes the Graphic by Irvin Trigueros brain to either Even in spor ts such as baseball strike the inner and basketball, concussions can skull or head to rapidly rotate, rehappen by being hit with a pitch or sulting in the shearing and straining a hard line drive, or going up for a of brain tissues. dunk and hitting the court hard on ”You don’t get more brain cells,” the way back down. said Sutter Delta Vice The violent aspect of these sports, President of Medsuch as the helmet to helmet ical Affairs Dr. hits, the spine-shivering B r i o n D r. tackles, the outfield Pearson. or home plate col- “ Y o u r lisions and maxi-

Photo by Irvin Trigueros

A potential helmet-to-helmet hit in the Oct. 5 LMC vs. West Valley College game. mum brain capacity is teenage and early adulthood. And then it is a downhill slope from there. Every time you get a blow to the head, you are at risk of killing brain cells. You don’t replace those. Your brain is what makes you who you are, your ability to remember things, to reason, to plan, to imagine. Your imagination is the greatest gift you can have. Once they’re gone, they’re gone.” According to the Sports Concussion Institute’s report on concussions, a total of 1.6 to 3.8 million concussions occur each year. Additionally, five to ten percent of all athletes will receive a concussion at some point in every sports season with football being the most likely to occur with a 75 percent chance. Out of 137 students asked, 41 said they had suffered a concussion in the past. Only 35 percent of students surveyed said they had been properly educated on the severity of concussions and the risks they pose. 47 percent of the athletes who suffer concussive blows do not report feeling any symptoms. This can be due to players not suffering any immediate side effects, or by a blatant ignorance on the athlete’s part to stay in the game. However, the message should be loud and

clear; if a concussion is suffered, athletes must pay attention or risk suffering permanent ailments. “The culture of competitive sports is that athletes are going to minimize the effects on them while they are still trying to play,” said Pearson. “While no athlete wants to be on the bench, they are not thinking about their futures. There are a great many that go undiagnosed.” Former LMC football player Bryce Perez noted that coaches paid keen attention to players if they suffered a head injury of any kind. “Coaches don’t want players in the game with head injuries,” said Perez adding, “Players most definitely do not. A person with a concussion forgets ever ything for a bit and doesn’t remember play calls or job assignments. We would get guys out as soon as we noticed, although (it) could have taken a play or two to notice.” Of 122 students surveyed, 24 said they had their “bell rung” in a game but continued to play anyway due to fear of letting the team down. 34 percent of 123 surveyed said they witnessed someone else stay in the game after receiving a hard hit. Common side effects from concussions can range from physical ailments such as headaches, dizziness and nausea;

cognitive ailments such as difficulty with concentration, memor y and judgment; emotional problems such as irritability and depression, as well as balance and coordination issues. The seriousness of the concussion depends on the exact injur y that occurs to the brain. While the effects are usually temporary, doctors warn that even a single concussion can be one too many. “I believe it’s serious because these student athletes have the rest of their lives to grow and if you are injured at a young age it could affect you in your abilities in school and athletics,” said Freedom High School Basketball Coach Mike Pineda. “We, as high school coaches, are required to take courses concerning concussions to be able to recognize symptoms and how to treat them by removing from play and seeking medical attention.” In 2013, after years of extensive studies and research indicating the severity of concussions and its effects, the NFL reached a $765 million settlement with 4,500 former players who claimed to have suffered long-term disabilities as a result of head injuries sustained during their careers. The settlement was widely seen as a win-win for all parties; however, fans and certain players believe that athletes are smart enough to know what they are getting themselves into. “I don’t feel sorry for athletes,” said former LMC student Tyson Rochelle. “They know what they’re signing up for. Everything comes with a price. And if they’re not ready to deal with the consequences later on in life of being broken, then go get a 9 to 5 job.” Concussions are a serious and growing topic of debate, and it appears that the discussion is moving in the right direction. New rules and standards have been enforced, protective gear is getting better and medicine is advancing. “I think as they find out more, people become more aware of the cumulative nature of this over time, there will be more changes, more See HITS, page 10


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Sports 8 The Engelstad pedigree “This life is like a swimming. You dive into the water, but you can’t see how deep it is.”

FRIDAY,

MAY

9,

2014

— Dennis Rodman

3-point shooter is from family of over-achievers allowed to go out. Having our father as a personal coach and He is the Mustangs’ daring trainer was a blessing.” Pulling up long-range jumpthree-point shooter. He is known for fearlessly sniping ers at any given time isn’t the the ball from any region of the only daring thing Wayne Jr. court. He is Wayne Engelstad, does. Growing up in Los Anand he is no ordinary freshman geles, he became a die-hard Dodgers fan, and while living in basketball player. Standing at 6-foot-6, not only the Bay Area during the 2012 does he have the height to be World Series, he made a deal successful on the hardwood, with his friends that if his hated but he also has the pedigree Giants won, he would attend to go along with it. His father, the championship parade in Wayne Sr., spent nearly a San Francisco suited up in decade playing professionally Dodgers gear, and after the overseas, and during the 6-foot- Giants defeated the Tigers in 8 forward’s playing career, he a sweep, he stuck to his word. Fortunately for Engelstad, made it to the league, playing for the Denver Nuggets of the his friends made sure no one touched him during the celNBA for the 1988-89 seaso ebration, and Wayne Jr.’s being a rather sister, Sabrina, “[He] is a great large man, no has an impresone wanted to sive basketball teammate and mess with him. résumé of her is what I would Although no own. Towering consider a physical alterat 6-foot-3, she cations broke is cur r ently diamond in out, Engelstad a Division I the rough, who did get an earcenter at Saint is gradually ful from angry M a r y ’ s C o lfans, along with lege. During becoming multiple food her four years shinier and and beverages on Heritage shinier with pelted toward High School’s him. varsity team, each working After graduSabrina became day” the Patriot’s all— Wayne Engelstad Sr. ating from Heritage High in time leader in 2012, he decidblocked shots. “I have spent thousands of ed to focus on basketball before hours in the gym and in the furthering his education, and weight room trying to improve enrolled at Impact Basketball their skill and strength level. Academy in Las Vegas. There he got to play against I coached both Wayne and Sabrina and was extremely some of the best high schools demanding of them. I’m ex- and junior colleges in the tremely proud of their accom- country, including Finley Prep plishments,” Wayne Sr. said. in Henderson, Nev. Since it’s foundation in 2007, Although born in Los Angeles in 1994, Wayne Jr. spent Finley Prep has been ranked as the most of the first five years one of the top 10 high schools of his life in Europe. When he in the Nation, and has posted was five years old, he went to an eye-popping 189-13 record. shoot hoops during the half- In fact, 100 percent of Finley time intermission of one of his Prep’s basketball players have father’s games. Like most first earned Division I scholarships. In his first year at Los Medtimers, and toddlers would, he shot the ball unorthodox. anos College, he thrived in Wayne Sr. saw his five-year- coach Derek Dominichelli’s old son shooting without proper 3-point shooting offense, by form, sprinted across the court averaging 11 points with 3 and swatted Wayne Jr.’s shot three-pointers made per game, into the stands. He then told is while being 87.6 percent from son, “If you’re going to shoot, the free throw line. Engelstad’s ultimate goal you’re going to do it right.” That initial basketball lesson is to move back to Southern stuck, and shortly after Wayne California, and play Division I Jr. earned his nickname, “Make or II basketball. After his final It Wayne,” for being able to year of eligibility in college, he aims to play basketball in pour in shot after shot. “All me and Wayne knew Europe, and follow his father’s as children was basketball,” footsteps. “Wayne can really shoot the Sabrina said. “My first memories were being at my father’s ball well and has great range games in Portugal and playing on his jump shot,” Wayne Sr. on my brother’s Nerf hoop. I said. “[He] is a great teammate remember my dad working and is what I would consider a Wayne and I out for hours diamond in the rough, who is ever y day after school and gradually becoming shinier and on weekends before we were shinier with each working day.” By LUKE JOHNSON

ljohnson@lmvexperience.com

Top, Engelstad Jr. shows off his shooting form as he attempts a three with a defender in his face. Immediate Right, Engelstad just as he is about to release the ball for a long range shot. Far right, Wayne smiling before a game

Photos by Cathie Lawrence

Bringing the #PanzellaEffect to Los Medanos By DAKOTAH ZABROSKI

dzabroski@lmcexperience.com

Photo by Cathie Lawrence

(Above) Lou Panzella holds up CIF NorCal runner up plaque, (right) Panzella and Marcus Lee embrace each other after the loss.

The Los Medanos College volleyball team is in good hands with current head coach Lou Panzella racking up his fair share of wins. Between coaching boys and girls at Deer Valley High School and being the women’s coach at LMC, he has won over 500 games. Not to mention his 10 plus years of coaching experience in the United States Volleyball Association. On top of that, his Deer Valley boys’ squad is currently ranked 23th in the nation, 18th in the state and first in the North Coast Section. The Wolverines have not lost in the Bay Valley Athletic League since 2008. Panzella puts a huge emphasis on the team rather then the individual. “The team is bigger than one individual, the success and goals of the team take priority over the success and goals of an individual,” said Panzella. One of his most success athletes has been Marcus Lee, who was an All-American basketball player at

Deer Valley, and is now a freshman at Kentucky. Lee and the Wildcats reached the championship game of the NCAA Tournament last month, but fell short to the UConn Huskies. “His best coaching ability is being able to be tough as nails on you and also be a kind mentor. The best of both worlds,” Lee said. Lee added that Panzella has not only helped him with volleyball, but with basketball as well. The two remain close while living thousands of miles apart. In response to Deer Valley’s 27game winning streak this season, Lee took to Twitter, saying, “It’s a #dynasty. We breed greatness. #PanzellaEffect” Deer Valley’s cur rent team caption is outside hitter Jordan Ewert, who is ranked as one of the nation’s top juniors. Since Ewert has been on the varsity team his freshman year, the program has rallied up an eye-popping 115-8 record. Although he and Panzella butt heads sometimes, they still have a great deal of mutual respect.

“ We l l , a l though Coach Lou and I don’t agree all the time, I think overall his interpretation and understanding of the game is ver y well… He is a bit old fashioned in the game, but it still shows clearly that it doesn’t effect his coaching in his teams winning records. He has a good reputation in this sport, and has earned it from his countless successful players that he has coached, and he knows this,” Ewert said. Panzella is entering his third season as the Mustangs’ head coach and looks to build off last year. His first year as head coach LMC went 4-17, after recruiting some talent, he brought the team to 11-14 overall

but had a winning league record of 9-7. This year the team hopes to build off last year’s success and is optimistic, especially with several returning players. “He brings good vibes and he’s the kind of coach that makes players excited to come to practice, which leads to team success,” said LMC outside hitter Taylor Scriven. “I think Lou will help us get far next season.”


L O S

M EDAN OS

C OL L E G E

Sports

Quotable

E X P E R I E N C E

FRIDAY,

MAY

9,

2014

“Baseball was, is and always will be to me the best game in the world.”

9

— Babe Ruth

Nine Stangs earn awards

Photo by Cathie Lawrence

Shortstop Ryan Lacy and outfielder Cameron Darling share a high five after the final game of the season, a 12-0 win over Laney College.

Sophomore core key to successful year By STEVEN LUKE

sluke@lmcexperience.com

The Mustang’s 2014 baseball season was full of ups and downs. They went on long winning and losing streaks multiple times but not only made the playoffs, they became one of the closest teams that head coach Anthony D’Albora ever coached. The team was packed full of sophomores that have been with the program for at least two full years, and that time spent growing together created a bond. “There were definitely some days where this group frustrated us, but I think ultimately what made them so great and what frustrated us so much was this was a group that was as close as any group that I coached before,” D’Albora said. The bond initially frustrated him and his coaching staff because that bond stopped the players from holding each other accountable on the field. He said that in the middle of the season that changed as the leaders of the team realized that what is said on the field shouldn’t affect the relationships off of it. “The minute that those guys got to the point where the message didn’t have to come from us anymore that it could come from within was

Matt

Ryan

the point that we finally as a team really started to see what we were capable of doing,” he said. That changed about midway through the season, and when it did the team really started to take off, but the bond remained the same. Wyatt Forman was the starting catcher and closer for the Mustangs, and for him that bond led to one of his favorite memories of the season when the rain star ted Season Highlights coming down right before a Record home game Player of the Week Awards against Laney Bay Valley Player of the Year College. “We had to Bay Valley Defensive Pitcher of put the tarp on the Year and everyone Bay Valley All-Conference Players was running around with their heads going crazy and we had to take the tarp out but it was like a pretzel and we had to unroll it and put it together and had a blast as a team doing it,” he said. His fellow sophomore teammates seemed to agree that the moments that they will take away from this season were team efforts such as the game against Contra Costa College where

jacobson

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they rallied back from an early 7-0 deficit to win 12-11 in extra innings. In that game the entire team contributed something to get them back into the game. From second baseman Chaz Meadows recovering from two early errors to get four hits, third baseman Steven Otaguro’s rally starting double and outfielder Will George’s walk off hit, the game was a team effort. For outfield23-13 (14-7 Conference) er Matt Jacobson, that entire Two offensive and two pitching game will be Outfielder Matt Jacobson something he Starting Pitcher Ryan Petrangelo remembers from the seaThree first team, three second son, and not team, three honorable mentions for what he did in the game. “Our 11-12 win in extra innings, after being down 7-0, really stuck out to me because it was such a good quality team win,” he said. D’Albora also felt that that game was important because it reminded him of the entire season. Much like in that game, the Mustangs struggled with defense early and when they decided that they weren’t going to let that effect

wyatt

foreman

-

them, they really turned it around he said. The fact that this was a team rather than just a few great players was made clear in the Bay Valley postseason all-conference awards as nine LMC Mustangs were honored. Three players were recognized as first team all-conference, three were recognized as second team all-conference and three received honorable mention. In addition to the all-conference team Jacobson was honored as player of the year and starting pitcher Ryan Petrangelo was honored as defensive player of the year. “It’s pretty cool to get to say that nine of our guys were recognized for their accomplishments,” D’Albora said. “The simple fact is that there probably could’ve been 12, 13 or 14.” That shows that this was an all around team, and while the team was built off of sophomores the Mustangs still got contributions from freshmen. Outfielder Jerome Hill, starting pitcher Daniel Bodishbaugh and first baseman Ryan Welsh were all freshmen that contributed to the team with Welsh starting 36 of the 37 games and being named second team all-conference. Welsh was surprised initially that he was See TEAM, page 10

c/rhp

SEASON ACCOMPLISHMENTS

SEASON ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Named Bay Valley Player of the Year CCCBCA Offensive Player of the Week Led the Bay Valley in four statistical categories

Named first team All Conference CCCBCA Offensive Player of the Week Tied for first in Bay Valley in saves (6).

2014 MEMORABLE MOMENT

2014 MEMORABLE MOMENT

“Ben Polansky, the last three games he pitched was just dominant.”

“I hit a home run against Solano, that was pretty cool because I didn’t know if I even had a home run in me this year.”

petrangelo

-

rhp

Ben

polansky

-

rhp

SEASON ACCOMPLISHMENTS

SEASON ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Named first team All Conference Named Bay Valley Defensive Pitcher of the Year Tied for first in Bay Valley in wins (6).

Bay Valley All Conference Honorable Mention CCCBCA Pitcher of the Week twice Tied for first in Bay Valley in wins (6)

2014 MEMORABLE MOMENT

2014 MEMORABLE MOMENT

“The entire season and what we were able to accomplish. Being able to get back to the playoffs for the third straight year.”

´,·OOQHYHUIRUJHWP\ÀUVWFRPSOHWHJDPHVKXWRXW against Mendocino College”

chaz

Ryan

lacy

-

meadows

-

2B

Steven

otaguro

-

3b

SEASON ACCOMPLISHMENTS

SEASON ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Named second team All Conference Led team in at bats (147), fourth on team in batting average (.327).

Named second team All Conference Fourth on team in RBI (21) and tied for fourth on team in walks (11).

2014 MEMORABLE MOMENT

2014 MEMORABLE MOMENT

“A game against Contra Costa, I made two or three errors in one inning. Coach pulled me aside and had a talk and calmed me down, I ended up going 4-5.”

´:HZHUHSOD\LQJ&&DQGZHZHUHGRZQE\ÀYHLQ the bottom of the sixth and I came up, hit a double and started a rally.”

ss

john

mead

-

rhp

SEASON ACCOMPLISHMENTS

SEASON ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Struck out only four times in 36 games. Tied for second on team in stolen bases (19) and third on team in runs (33).

Bay Valley All Conference Honorable Mention Pitched in 25 of the 37 games. Finished with an ERA of 1.59.

2014 MEMORABLE MOMENT

2014 MEMORABLE MOMENT

“We were playing Solano and me and Chaz MeadRZVERWKVWROHKRPHLQWKHÀUVWLQQLQJµ

“Pretty much the entire season, being able to be the guy that threw almost every day and the team counted on.”


L O S

M E DA N O S

C O L L E G E

E X P E RI E N C E

HITS

SOCAL GRAD

restrictions,� said Dr. Pearson. “But, you don’t want to take the fun out of the game either.� Coach Pineda added, “I think there are always new ideas and equipment constantly being made to continue to protect our student athletes regardless of the sport whether it is contact or not,� said Pineda. “New rules and guidelines are always being brought forward to protect athletes.� In the NFL, if a player may have some sort of head trauma the team neuropsychologist performs a sideline concussion assessment which features tasks such as basic questions to test the players awareness. For example, they would ask what month it is and the quarter the game is in currently. There are also word recall trials which ask players to recall a list of five words spoken to them in any order. If a player is diagnosed with a concussion, they leave the field for the locker room and remain with medical personnel for the remainder of the game. If they are stable, the player will be sent home and will be re-evaluated the next day. Gradually, players will be tested again and will have to complete more advanced versions of the test, as well as building up physical activity. Once the team doctor says a player is good to go the next week, the player is evaluated by another physician who is not working for the team. That physician must also sign on the player’s return in order for him to play. The NHL policy is similar, although players who are thought to have a concussion are removed from the game and taken to a quiet place free of any distraction, as opposed to being tested in the bench area. In 2011, the MLB created a 7-day disabled list for players with concussions. Clubs also must submit a “Return to Play� form to the medical doctor of the MLB to request a player be able to play after having a concussion, regardless of being on the disabled list or not. The CCCAA (California Community College Athletic Association of which LMC is a par t of) guideline for student-athlete concussion treatment is similar: QRemove the student-athlete from play Q Ensure that the student-athlete is evaluated right away by an appropriate health care professional QAllow the student-athlete to return to play only with permission from a health care professional with experience in evaluation for concussion QDevelop a game plan for potentially longer time frames where the player cannot return to play For more information on the CCCAA concussion management guidelines, go to cccaaspor ts.org/working/ pdf/Constitution/E-Appendix_G_2013-14.pdf.

From page 3

From page 1

colleges and universities around the Bay Area,� said Balangan and continued, “students will also have free time to explore each of the campus based on their own personal interest.� This free time can be used to meet one-on-one with faculty around the campuses including: admissions representatives, professors, academic counselors and student ser vice coordinators. “This trip is one of the benefits of going to a community college that support the transfer culture,� said Balangan. This is the third year this tour has been available for all students and “we sell out every year,� said Balangan. The transfer center has received positive reviews and comments from students who have attended in the past and it has been a major success. This tour is not for transfer students only; it is available for all LMC students interested in the tour. Anyone who is thinking or hasn’t even thought about transferring can register for this tour, as it will serve as a great tool for students and possibly get them seriously interested in transferring. Whether you are unsure about your educational future, this tour will be a great fit as it offers a look inside the possible college life you can have beyond LMC and to take your education to the next level.

a lifelong learner.� She added that she thinks it is important for friends and family to be there to support the graduates. Beyond that she thinks it’s a chance to have fun and enjoy listening to the speakers. For Belman, the ceremony is an opportunity for vivid memories and a time for both a sense of personal accomplishment as well as gratitude for those who have helped him along the way. “A diploma is an educational outcome, but behind that diploma is an educational experience, and every student has their own unique experience,� said Belman. “I think that at the heart of a good commencement speech is a story about that educational journey — and I know that LMC students have amazing stories to tell.� Students who are graduating and whose names are on record can buy their caps and gowns at the LMC Bookstore for $16.80 plus tax. Qualifying students with a 3.5 grade point average or higher may purchase a gold tassel for an additional $4.60 plus tax. The list also denotes any clubs they are a part of. Students are advised by the graduation page to be at the stadium by six p.m. to begin lining up near the men’s locker room, and are prohibited from wearing high heel shoes or chewing gum because they can damage the field. In Belman’s view, somewhat like Whitman, the track running around the football field would not be apt representation of the event because he sees it not as the finish line of sprint but the first stage in a marathon. “Graduation is not an ending, it is a milestone on a lifelong jour ney of education and pursuing your dreams,� said Belman. For more information on the graduation visit losmedanos. edu and select graduation from within the A-Z index or call Admissions and Records at 439-2181 ext. 7500.

From page 7

VOTE From page 1

The bond proceeds would increase accessibility for those with disabilities, including major improvements to campus grounds, classrooms and lab technology. Measure E would generate $60.1 million dollars that can be matched by state funds to bring needed improvements to all district colleges over 10 years old, as well as relieve overcrowding by constructing classrooms. LMC President Bob Kratochvil said, “If passed, Measure E will improve our facilities to ensure that Los Medanos College can continue to provide quality, affordable education to the students of our community.� In total, Measure E will help fund over $120 million in modernization and new construction projects. Most of the community colleges around Contra Costa are over 55 years old and in need of major improvements. While the measure has generally produced positive feedback, some opposing the bond feel the proposal will put a financial squeeze on struggling homeowners and residents. These residents would have higher tax increases. Voting for or against the bond takes place June 3 and requires a 55 percent approval from the district.

healthy

FRIDAY,

GAPS recently became available for viewing last week, and some said they had not yet had a chance to review it. The lack of posted information caused some staf f members to speak out against management expectations of voting on accreditation materials before the chance to review them. “You sent out some emails suggesting that we should have been reviewing this and given you feedback sooner,� said math professor Erich Holtmann, who brought attention to the missing documents. “That’s cutting it last minute. You can’t blame us for missing the timeline. That’s not our fault.� Kratochvil and Kiran Kamath, senior dean of Planning and Institutional Effectiveness, took responsibility for the missing materials. “We acknowledge that there are two sections that are omitted. The co-chairs and the teams are doing the best they can,� said Kratochvil, underscoring the fact that the report deadline comes at the chaotic end of the semester.

Despite the missing standards, the meeting went on in an effort to wordsmith several of the Actionable Improvement Plans identified in the accreditation report. Diversity was the hot topic of conversation in an analysis of the improvement. After heated feedback from faculty and staff about the role of diversity on campus, Dave Belman clarified that the plan was centered around student awareness and not college awareness of diversity issues. He offered alternate wording, ending the debate. Other sticking points included the meaning of “validation� of program reviews and diversity in hiring practices. The Actionable Improvement Plans will be revised based on meeting feedback before the May 12 Academic Senate meeting. Kamath emphasized at the meeting the importance of Academic Senate approval of the document, but Holtmann said he will not support an accreditation report he has not reviewed in its entirety. “If they are not ready, we should not vote on it,� said Holtmann. “I don’t want to vote on something that isn’t ready.�

GAME

TEAM

From page 1

From page 9

From page 5

he flies in this game. The camera angles in the game while flying are atrocious. It is extremely difficult to go from one building to the next when half the time the camera is not actually looking towards what you are aiming at. Camera angles are often overlooked, but I cannot see how they would be in a game that relies on a man flying through the air covering massive ground at a time while weaving in and out of alleyways and between skyscrapers. The combat is easy to learn, which is not a compliment. Button-mashing the square button on my PS3 controller is all I needed to do to clobber anyone I was faced with. There is no sense of ever losing a battle as Spider-Man is so overpowered and easily defeats any foe without really trying. While this game is not fun by any means, there are a few redeeming qualities. A couple of the nice features From page 4 include talks with defeated foes the house always wins, the where you get to chose from a Casino Owner played by Jae- few options what you want to son Jones. say or ask them, which gives This play takes a lot of twists the impression of the player and turns in a visually stunning having a little bit of a say in the way that was unexpected in a direction of the game. Also, if college play. I found myself at you accomplish heroic deeds the edge of my seat multiple you earn bonuses for powering times and was impressed by up the Spidey Suit. Completactors’ authenticity. ing those deeds also reduces “Snare� is a vivid display of crime in the city while helping stage visuals and innovative Spider-Man’s public image and audio that adds to the effect reputation which harkens back of the show. to the “friendly neighborhood� ‘Snare’ will continue playing aspect to Spider-Man. May 9 and 10 at 7:30p.m. Ticket If you need your Spidey fix, cost is $10 general admission, this is not the place to get it. $7 for students and $5 for high The newly released film is a school and middle school much better way to spend time students. and money.

PLAY

lifestyles

healthy

HELPING YOU thrive

Put Time on Your Side By Andy Rodgers, MD

For more information on time management and stress reduction, check out the Kaiser Permanente Web site at www.kp.org. This article is proudly sponsored by Kaiser Permanente. Andy Rodgers, MD, is Physician Site Leader for the Livermore Medical Offices.

2014

10

BOND From page 1

go to school every day. This example appealed to students that go to LMC straight after high school from the Liberty Union High School District, which makes up the majority of enrollment. Alvarez stressed the importance of accessibility to location, promoting programs like math and sciences, and old and possibly dangerous infrastructure such as CCC’s campus that was built in the fifties. Although Alvarez gave examples and statistics to support his arguments, he also made the crowd erupt in laughter. Regarding students from the Brentwood and Oakley area, he said, “We must accommodate them. We can’t make them always drive all the way to Pittsburg, especially because since a lot of us students here are all hella broke so we can’t be here every day spending that much amount of gas money.� The LMC and CCC team each switched off when presenting their arguments with interruptions for clarification from each team when needed. LMC’s Kathryn Lucido and Miguel Mauricio argued for new buildings that will lead to more educational programs and classes, continued using Frank Trammell as an example, and stressed for the accessibility of the campus. As Miguel Mauricio mentioned in his speech concerning the 1.2 billion debt, “if we invest now, the future will have a better opportunity.� Diamonique Spain and Hayley Callaway from CCC expanded on the arguments Ramiro had previously laid out regarding the financial problems such as programs being cut to invest more money on buildings and the misleading information about the bond. Instead of adding new buildings, according to the CCC debate team, the bond will only ensure upgrades and repairs to the original buildings. Both the LMC and CCC teams were witty and presented empathy concerning their counterarguments when presenting their speeches. The debate closed with an audience round, in which the attendees were given the opportunity to ask questions. Both teams answered the questions with grace. However, Callaway from CCC, thinking that her microphone had turned off already, accidentally allowed profanity to slip out when speaking about the subject of programs being cut, such as the disabled program whom she worked closely with in the past. After the debate and questions ended, attendees and the debate teams mingled in the lobby with light refreshments served for the reception. For more information contact Kasey Gardner at kgardner@lmcexperience.com or visit the debate team meetings Tuesdays and Thursdays in CO-101 at 2:30 p.m.

lifestyles

HELPING YOU thrive

E

By Mary Klemm, DO

W

The key is to discover what’s really important to you and do those things well. Help stop your time struggles with these tips: t 3FDPHOJ[FQSJPSJUJFTIf our time is to have meaning, our personal vision must take priority. Every few months—or at least once a year—it is essential to step back and consider what is most important to you. t 4FUHPBMTWrite down some short, medium and long-term goals. Setting goals will influence your daily decisions on how to invest your time and energy. Reassess and revise these goals periodically. t -JWFJOUIFNPNFOUBreak the rushing habit and be present in the moment. Try driving 5-10 miles slower, try not wearing a watch, schedule some protected free time, or focus your full attention on the task at hand. t 5BLFĂ­WFTake a time out for fun, relaxation, daydreaming, contemplation, family, friends, and hobbies. Many “busyâ€? people find these moments refreshing and it enables them to be more productive.

9,

Fitness: Increasing Core Stability

e all have 24 hours in a day. Yet some of us feel like we have no time at all, while others manage to get their work done and have time to relax and enjoy life. The pressures of time can take its toll on your health creating tension and anxiety, loss of sleep, poor nutrition, and negative effects on your mood and self-esteem. An organized, relaxed life would not only be more pleasurable, but it’s healthier, too. Stress-free living isn’t realistic for most of us, however there are things you can do to manage your time, deal with procrastination, and accomplish important priorities in a more relaxed, enjoyable way.

named a starter on a team with so many sophomores, but what really struck him was that they wanted him to hit fourth because he never thought of himself as a power hitter. “They told me I was a power hitter and they want me to drive in runs,� he said. That’s what he did, ranking third on the team in runs batted in behind Jacobson and Foreman. The ability to have so many guys, sophomores and freshmen alike, contribute is what made the season great for D’Albora. “You’ve got 35 guys in the dugout that are locked in to winning for the right reasons and when you win it’s a good feeling,� he said. The season was great because of all of those on field team accomplishments, but the off the field stuff is what really stands out for D’Albora. “Petrang (Petrangelo) does a really good Jacobson impression,� he said. “I just remember I’m about to walk out to turn in the lineup card before the game and I turn back and he’s got 20 of them just in stitches because he goes through the whole routine. The pre-pitch, he asks the umpire for time, he swings, a bad strike call by the umpire and the body language that goes along with it, its just as good as it could get.� Moments like that he believes will be remembered, not the final scores. “Those are the things that you will remember way easier then what was the final score of that game against Laney where we clinched a playoff spot,� said D’Albora.

M AY

Â

very time we move, we depend on some muscles to hold us steady, and other muscles to actually move us. Core stabilization is how the muscles of your trunk keep your spine and body stable and balanced. Your trunk is the foundation for your posture, balance, and coordinated movement. The muscles of your trunk—your core—can be strengthened and trained to contract in the proper order to give you a stable foundation for movement. Core stabilization exercises are easy to do, and you don’t need any equipment or much space. You can do them almost anywhere, several times each day, to start increasing your core stability. Here are two simple stability exercises to get you started:

t 5SBOTWFSTFBCEPNJOVTDPOUSBDUJPOThe transverse abdominus is the muscle that wraps around the front of your body like a corset. It’s the muscle you feel when you cough. To contract the transverse abdominus, pull in your belly and imagine pulling your belly button back toward your spine. Hold this contraction for about 6 seconds, while breathing normally, then rest for up to 10 seconds. Repeat 8 to 12 times. You can do this exercise anywhere, in any position. Try it while sitting at your desk, driving, or standing in line at the store. t #SJEHJOHLie on your back with your knees bent and your feet flat on the floor. Tighten your transverse abdominus, then push with your feet and raise your buttocks up a few inches off the floor. Hold this position for 6 seconds as you continue to breathe normally, then lower yourself slowly to the floor and rest for up to 10 seconds. Repeat 8 to 12 times. Remember to consult your doctor before starting a new sport or exercise routine. For more information on core stability and fitness, visit the Kaiser Permanente Web site at www.kp.org/fitness. This article is proudly sponsored by Kaiser Permanente. Mary Klemm, DO, is a Physician Site Leader for the Antioch Medical Center.

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