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Cho-Liang Lin, Music Director

SUNDAY

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MONDAY COACHING WORKSHOPS

PRELUDE

10 - 11 AM · 11 - 12 PM · LA JOLLA RIFORD LIBRARY

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TUESDAY COACHING WORKSHOPS

10 - 11 AM · 11 - 12 PM · LA JOLLA RIFORD LIBRARY

12:50 - 2 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

MUSICAL PRELUDE

3 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

7 PM

AN EVENING WITH ZUKERMAN TRIO

8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

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PREMIÈRES & REPRISES

free PUBLIC

Special Guest: Yura Lee

FROM MOZART TO MAHLER

SUNDAY

10 - 11 AM · 11 - 12 PM · LA JOLLA RIFORD LIBRARY

SUMMERFEST

Under the Stars 6:30 PM · SCRIPPS PARK (LA JOLLA COVE)

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COACHING WORKSHOPS

10 - 11 AM · 11 - 12 PM · LA JOLLA RIFORD LIBRARY

OPEN REHEARSAL

2 PM

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Calendar of Events 7

WEDNESDAY

10 - 11 AM · 11 - 12 PM · LA JOLLA RIFORD LIBRARY

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COACHING WORKSHOPS

10 - 11 AM · 11 - 12 PM · LA JOLLA RIFORD LIBRARY

RESTAURANT NIGHT 5:45 PM

PRELUDE 7 PM

1824-1942: RICHARD, ROBERT & LUDWIG

8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

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COACHING WORKSHOPS

10 - 11 AM · 11 - 12 PM · LA JOLLA RIFORD LIBRARY

OPEN REHEARSAL Special Guest: Kristin Lee

2:20 - 3:30 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

3 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

RESTAURANT NIGHT 5:45 PM

MUSICAL PRELUDE 7 PM

A SPIRITUAL JOURNEY

8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

MUSICAL PRELUDE 7 PM

AN EVENING WITH PAQUITO D’RIVERA

8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

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WEDNESDAY

10 - 11 AM · 11 - 12 PM · LA JOLLA RIFORD LIBRARY

MUSICAL PRELUDE 2 PM

GREAT QUINTETS

3 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

RESTAURANT NIGHT 5:45 PM

MUSICAL PRELUDE 7 PM

VIRTUOSO WINDS

8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

PRELUDE 7 PM

AN EVENING WITH MARC-ANDRÉ HAMELIN 8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

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10 - 11 AM · 11 - 12 PM · LA JOLLA RIFORD LIBRARY

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OPEN REHEARSAL Special Guest: Cho-Liang Lin

12:50 - 2 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

RESTAURANT NIGHT

COACHING WORKSHOP

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PRELUDE 7 PM

OPENING NIGHT

A Bohemian Rhapsody

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MUSIC TRANSFIGURED

8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

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EVENT KEY

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ENCOUNTER OPEN REHEARSAL PRELUDE

SATURDAY

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OPEN REHEARSAL Special Guest: Felix Fan

9:50 - 11 AM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

ENCOUNTER

See pg 66 - 67 for more information PUBLIC about our other free events.

free

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Lecture by Nuvi Mehta 12:30 - 2 PM · ATHENAEUM MUSIC & ARTS LIBRARY

SUMMERFEST GALA MUSICAL PRELUDE 7 PM

30th Anniversary 6 PM · RANCHO DEL ARTE

VIENNESE GIANTS

8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

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7946 Ivanhoe Ave., La Jolla (El Patio Building, First Floor)

COACHING WORKSHOPS

10 - 11 AM · 11 - 12 PM · LA JOLLA RIFORD LIBRARY

ENCOUNTER

OPEN REHEARSAL Special Guest: Shai Wosner

Special Performance Encounter

1:20 - 2:30 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

12:30 - 2 PM · ATHENAEUM MUSIC & ARTS LIBRARY

PRELUDE 7 PM

BACH CELLO SUITES WITH MISCHA MAISKY Part 1 8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

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FRIDAY

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BACH CELLO SUITES WITH MISCHA MAISKY Part 2 8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

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LA JOLLA MUSIC SOCIETY BOX OFFICE

SATURDAY

ATHENAEUM MUSIC & ARTS LIBRARY 1008 Wall St., La Jolla

ELLEN BROWNING SCRIPPS PARK (LA JOLLA COVE) 1150 Coast Blvd., La Jolla

LA JOLLA RIFORD LIBRARY 7555 Draper Ave., La Jolla

MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM 700 Prospect St., La Jolla

ENCOUNTER

A Conversation with Marc-André Hamelin 12:30 - 2 PM · ATHENAEUM MUSIC & ARTS LIBRARY

PRELUDE 7 PM

FINALE WITH JAMES CONLON & GIL SHAHAM

8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

COVER: Miriam Schapiro, Natalia, 1986. Paper and acrylic on paper, 79 x 50 1/4 in. (200.7 x 127.6 cm). Collection Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego Gift of Doris and Rolfe Wyer, 2004.27. Photographer: Pablo Mason © The Estate of Miriam Schapiro, courtesy of Eric Firestone Gallery.

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Map & Policies

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SCRIPPS PARK (LA JOLLA COVE) 1150 Coast Blvd., La Jolla lvd ast B

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THE CONRAD PREBYS PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 7600 Fay Ave., La Jolla

PARKING

Valet parking is available for performances at MCASD Sherwood Auditorium. For street parking, please remember to observe all parking signs and regulations when attending SummerFest events, especially those during the day. Please allow ample time for traffic delays and parking.

SEATING POLICY

All concerts begin promptly at the time stated on admission tickets. Latecomers will be seated after the first work has been performed or at the first full pause in the program as designated by the performing artists. Patrons leaving the hall while a performance is in progress will not be readmitted until the conclusion of the piece. Those who must leave before the end of a concert are requested to do so between complete works and not while a performance is in progress. If you require special seating or other assistance please notify the House Manager.

4 LA JOLLA MUSIC SOCIETY SUMMERFEST

Fay Ave

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LA JOLLA MUSIC SOCIETY BOX OFFICE 7946 Ivanhoe Ave., La Jolla

CONCERT COURTESIES

Unauthorized photography (with or without flash), audio and video recordings are strictly prohibited. Please silence all electronic devices during the performance. SummerFest concerts are being recorded for archival and broadcast use, and we ask for your assistance in assuring high quality sound on these recordings.

IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO ATTEND A PERFORMANCE

We encourage any patron who is unable to attend a performance to return tickets to La Jolla Music Society Ticket Office so that someone else may use them. In order to ensure that returned tickets can be allocated appropriately, La Jolla Music Society Ticket Office must receive notification and proof of destroyed tickets no later than 24 hours prior to the performance.

MAP IS NOT TO SCALE

CHILDREN AT SUMMERFEST

Children under the age of 6 (six) are not permitted in the concert hall.

PROGRAM NOTES

All La Jolla Music Society’s program notes are protected under copyright by the authors. For permission and information on use of contents of this publication contact Marketing@LJMS.org.

All programs, artists, dates, times, and venues are subject to change. La Jolla Music Society is unable to offer refunds for SummerFest performances.


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Calendar of Events ...........................…........………..…...…...2 Map & Policies ..….........……..............................…...........…4 Welcome Letters ......….......................…...........….................6 30th Anniversary SummerFest Collage ................…............8 Essay: SummerFest, it took a village and a vision .......…12 5 Questions from the Music Director .................................16 Program Notes ……......…….......……...................….….....18 Artist Roster ..……..........…..….....……..….......………......65 Musical Preludes .................................................................66 Community Engagement Activities ........….......................68 Artist Biographies ................…......…......……......……......70 SummerFest Grand Tradition ..........….….........................80 SummerFest Commission History ….................................85 SummerFest Support ..........................................................86 COVER: Miriam Schapiro, Natalia, 1986. Paper and acrylic on paper, 79 x 50 1/4 in. (200.7 x 127.6 cm). Collection Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego Gift of Doris and Rolfe Wyer, 2004.27. Photographer: Pablo Mason © The Estate of Miriam Schapiro, courtesy of Eric Firestone Gallery.

ABOUT THE ARTWORK

As part of our ongoing partnership with the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, the artwork featured on the SummerFest 2016 - 30th Anniversary promotional materials is from MCASD’s permanent collection. This year’s selected artwork was created in 1986, the same year as the first SummerFest by Miriam Schapiro, an artist known for her pioneering work in the Feminist Art and Pattern and Decoration movements.

SummerFest 2016 Committee ......................…..................88 Board of Directors & Staff Listing ................…..................90 Season Support ....................................................................91 Business Society ............................................…..................98

MISSION STATEMENT

To enhance the vitality and deepen the cultural life of San Diego by presenting and producing a dynamic range of performing arts for our increasingly diverse community.

LA JOLLA MUSIC SOCIETY

7946 Ivanhoe Avenue, Suite 309 La Jolla, California 92037 Admin: 858.459.3724 - Fax: 858.459.3727 858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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Dear SummerFest 2016 Attendees,

As the Co-Chairs of SummerFest 2016 we heartily welcome you to the 30th Anniversary presentation of La Jolla Music Society’s summer festival. SummerFest is a long tradition in La Jolla, and whether you are a veteran attendee or are brand new to SummerFest, you’re in for a treat. Our three-week musical feast along with the camaraderie of those who make the music and those who listen to it is rare and extraordinary to experience. This year the festival is again under the musical direction of Cho-Liang (Jimmy) Lin, continuing in his 16th year in this role. Also, this year we are thrilled to introduce La Jolla Music Society’s new President and Artistic Director, Kristin Lancino, who joined us last fall. We are overjoyed to have the combination of experienced leadership and new blood in our organization which adds to the excitement of this year’s SummerFest. This summer our fifteen concert series celebrates a broad variety of musical periods, composers and chamber formats. We also take deep dives by presenting all of Bach’s cello suites in two concerts played by Mischa Maisky as well as focusing close-in on some of our favorite artists in “Evening With” concerts featuring the Zukerman Trio, Paquito D’Rivera and Marc-André Hamelin. The formal concert series is enriched by the addition of less formal activities including coaching workshops, open rehearsals, and “Encounters” enabling our patrons to observe the process of creating music performances. Please attend these free events as well as the pre-concert lectures to enhance your SummerFest experience even further. For the 9th year in a row, we kicked off this SummerFest with a free family concert called “SummerFest Under the Stars” on the grass at Scripps Park in La Jolla Cove as a gift to the community of San Diego. It is always packed and is a wonderful way to introduce San Diegans and visitors to the level of excellence characteristic of the programs La Jolla Music Society presents. Helene Kruger, a local and devoted centenarian leads the community in raising support every year to make this concert possible. We will also hold our annual SummerFest Gala on August 13th in the middle of SummerFest as is our tradition. This year we will be celebrating our “pearl” (30th) anniversary under the creative talent of our gala chair, Sue Wagener. Thank you to Sue and to Iris and Matt Strauss who will host this elegant event at their home and to our Presenting Sponsors Conrad Prebys and Debbie Turner. And, of course SummerFest would not be successful without our major underwriters. We want to especially recognize their wonderful generosity – in particular, Brenda Baker and Steve Baum for being the Title Sponsors and Raffaella and John Belanich for underwriting our Music Director, Jimmy Lin. In addition, thank you to the many other underwriters and sponsors, artist housing hosts and other contributors who enable us to consistently provide the concerts and educational programs of the unsurpassed quality that characterize SummerFest. Finally, we’d like to recognize the Board of La Jolla Music Society and the SummerFest Committee of loyal volunteers who make the running of the festival incredibly smooth year after year. It is these people who are the keepers of the tradition of warmth and community between the artists and audience that creates the “magic of SummerFest”. We cannot express enough gratitude for their hard work. You may be enjoying just a glimpse of SummerFest or you may be at every concert and event, but whatever your level of involvement, we want to thank you for participating in this special La Jolla offering. It is your participation and enjoyment, now and in the future, that motivates La Jolla Music Society’s donors, volunteers and staff to continue to work together to present the best of the world’s music right here in our own backyard. Most Sincerely,

Martha Dennis

Dolly Woo

SummerFest 2016 Co-Chair

SummerFest 2016 Co-Chair

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Anniversaries like this one offer special opportunities to celebrate the past and launch an exciting future. This 30th Anniversary Season stands on an impressive foundation. Many artists from our early seasons will be with us. Heiichiro Ohyama, founding SummerFest Music Director in 1986, will conduct the SDYS International Youth Symphony in our traditional Outdoor Concert on August 3, leading the Youth Symphony with guest soloist, violinist Luke Hsu, SummerFest 2016 Fellowship Artist. Special guests Time for Three then take the stage with their special blend of Bach, Brahms, bluegrass and today’s hip tunes. Fifteen great concerts follow, featuring an outstanding roster of players, many of whom have been festival favorites from the very beginning: violinists Chee-Yun, Gil Shaham and Sheryl Staples; violist Cynthia Phelps and cellists Carter Brey and Felix Fan. The list could go on and on, including clarinetists Paquito D’Rivera and John Bruce Yeh, and oboist Liang Wang. The 2016 roster also includes the most ensembles ever to perform in a single SummerFest: the Danish and Escher String Quartets, FLUX, The Montrose Trio, the Zukerman Trio—as well as our two Fellowship Artist ensembles, the Verona Quartet and the Beacon Street Trio. A special season demands special programming. Here are just a few to anticipate: • Giants of Vienna’s great musical eras—Mozart, Schubert, Beethoven, Zemlinsky, Schoenberg and even Mahler • SummerFest-commissioned premières by Richard Danielpour, Marc-André Hamelin, David Lang and Sean Shepherd • Cellist Mischa Maisky, in his SummerFest debut, climbs the Everest of the cello repertory, Bach’s six Unaccompanied Suites over two evenings. • A star-powered Finale with the SummerFest Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Los Angeles Opera Artistic Director James Conlon, playing Schubert and Mozart symphonies, and Gil Shaham as soloist in Prokofiev’s Violin Concerto No. 2. It has been a special privilege to be part of this exceptional artistic endeavor, and I extend many thanks to the untiring efforts of our visionary founding supporters, our faithful audiences, and an ever-increasing number of generous contributors, as well as the dedication of a great professional staff. Enjoy the Festival.

Cho-Liang Lin SummerFest Music Director

Welcome to SummerFest’s 30th Anniversary Season! When I joined the La Jolla Music Society family last October, I was already looking forward to this extraordinary festival and the experiences that make it so special: the carefully curated programs that are the trademark of SummerFest Music Director Jimmy Lin; the outstanding roster of great chamber musicians and internationally-known soloists that assemble each season to play the programs; and our wonderful location on the shore of the Pacific. And now here it is. But it’s not just the concerts that give SummerFest so much depth and texture. Its educational components open portals into greater understanding of music, both for our audiences and for the young instrumentalists in our Fellowship Artists program, as well as for the emerging artists who join already-established stars of international stature in concerts. Prelude events (short Fellowship Artist concerts as well as talks by composers, scholars and performers), Coaching Workshops open to the public, and Open Rehearsals amplify the impact of well-known masterworks as well as premières of works commissioned by SummerFest. This anniversary season is also an inspiring capstone to a distinguished past. Thirty years ago this August, a brave band of volunteers and an intrepid group of musicians determined that they would create and sustain something important for their community. From that launching pad, an essential San Diego arts institution has emerged, one that will soon welcome you into a new home, The Conrad Prebys Performing Arts Center, just a few blocks away on Fay Avenue in downtown La Jolla. Your support – as a donor, volunteer, ticket-buyer, artist host, business or community partner – is an important ingredient in making it all possible, not only for the present but also for the future. I hope you will take a moment to introduce yourself to me and our dedicated staff during the Festival. Happy SummerFest!

Kristin Lancino President & Artistic Director

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Heiichiro Ohyama prides himself on being open to new possibilities, but before the distinguished Japanese violist and conductor agreed to create a summer music festival for the La Jolla Music Society, he had a single question for the leaders of the community-based organization. “I wanted to know: Are you seeking for this festival to become the best in the United States?” Ohyama recalled. The answer was an unqualified yes. “To me, that was the most important commitment,” Ohyama said. “We were going to create the premier chamber music festival on the west coast,” perhaps even in North America. As SummerFest celebrates its 30th anniversary and ventures into its fourth decade with the 2016 festival, it holds an esteemed position among summer chamber music festivals which now extend from Santa Fe to Cape Cod, Aspen to Burlington. Former SummerFest co-directors Wu Han and David Finckel, now co-artistic directors of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, point to SummerFest’s loyal audience, its community support, and its “huge contribution” to San Diego’s cultural life. But they are also unequivocal about the festival’s high artistic aspirations, which were not only the foundation of Ohyama’s success, but also critical to their artistic success (in the 1998, 1999 and 2000 festivals) and the achievements of Cho-Liang “Jimmy” Lin (director since 2001). For Ohyama, those aspirations go beyond the musical: “The greatest success of La Jolla, from my viewpoint as (founding) artistic director, is it has kept this very strong spiritual tradition,” said Ohyama, who will be on stage at the Museum of Contemporary Art’s Sherwood Auditorium as SummerFest opens, marking his 20th appearance at the festival. “Obviously I feel like a grandfather now. I love each time I come back.”

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While Ohyama’s creation of SummerFest seems audacious―especially given the support system the Music Society was able to provide him: a tiny staff and some enthusiastic volunteers―Ohyama points out that its roots are deeper than you might expect. His own background included four summers and several tours and recordings with Music at Marlboro, and eight years performing with the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival (in addition to his role at the time as principal violist and assistant conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic). The Music Society (which has gone through several name changes over the years) considered a summer festival as early as 1980. Peter Erös, music director of the La Jolla Chamber Orchestra, which at that time was the Music Society’s primary endeavor, pointed out the dearth of classical music in San Diego during the summer and suggested that the Music Society could fill it. That idea didn’t gain credence until the arrival of Sharon LeeMaster as the first executive director in 1981, but the gap wouldn’t be filled by the Music Society’s own musicians (that ensemble was soon disbanded as the focus was put on presenting visiting artists). With the aid of a cadre of volunteers, LeeMaster brought in a touring component of the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival in 1982, 1983 and 1984. That experience convinced LeeMaster and the volunteers they could do it themselves, and they invited Ohyama, who had played in the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival concerts in San Diego, to form a similar festival in La Jolla. With the demise of its own ensemble, a summer festival offered the Music Society, on a relatively modest scale, the opportunity to present an event of its own, something that


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would have its own distinct signature, even as its emphasis the rest of the year focused on presenting visiting artists. “I love the winter season where we bring in the great orchestras and jazz ensembles, and recitalists,” said Kristin Lancino, who became president and artistic director of La Jolla Music Society in 2015. “But when you are actually producing something as we do with SummerFest, where you put all the pieces together, there’s something special about that; you can’t help but have your thumbprint on it. That’s why it was, it is, and it always will be our signature event.” By the time the festival was inaugurated in 1986, the staff had expanded to four and Geoffrey Brooks was named executive director (he was succeeded by Neale Perl in 1988). Still, it was the volunteers who primarily put on the festival. Everything from housing the musicians in private homes, which remains a defining element of the festival, to promoting SummerFest and raising money was largely handled by dozens, if not hundreds, of volunteers. “It was all volunteer,” said Peggy Preuss. “Brenda Baker and I were SummerFest chair several times (Baker in 1986, 1995, 1996 and 1997; Preuss in 1996, 1999, 2000, 2003 and 2015; both have also served as chair of the Music Society’s board of directors). “That meant finding a home for the SummerFest gala and planning all the pre-concert dinners and post-receptions. It was a lot of work, but it was also a lot of fun.” In 1986 Preuss was a member of the development (fundraising) committee that was headed by Lois Kohn and Kenneth Poovey. There were also committees for “image & marketing” (co-chaired by Joan Bernstein and Marie Olesen), hospitality (chaired by Ewa Robinson) and artistic (chaired by Cynthia Rushing, who would succeed Baker as SummerFest chair in 1987). In the case of the artistic committee, however, its role was largely advisory, as Ohyama’s primary responsibility was choosing repertoire and finding musicians. “You can’t just pick home run hitters from everywhere and assemble a group and make chamber music,” Ohyama said. “It doesn’t work that way. It’s like a baseball team. Every person has his task, the first hitter, or the fourth hitter… “Assembling a good chamber music group is very complicated, but you have to know really each player’s intention and why they play certain things in certain ways. I was fortunate to be able to gather players who shared the same values, more or less.”

1986 - Brenda Baker 1987 - Cynthia G. Rushing 1988 – Joan Bernstein 1989 – Joan Bernstein 1990 – Lois Kohn 1991 – Marie Olesen 1992 – Marie Olesen 1993 – Viviane Warren 1994 – Maggie and Paul Meyer 1995 – Co-Chaired by past SummerFest Chairs

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(1986 -1994, see above)

1996 – Brenda Baker & Peggy Preuss 1997 – Brenda Baker 1998 – Rosalyn Hewertson, Joan Bernstein, Alexa Kirkwood Hirsch 1999 – Kay Hesselink & Peggy Preuss 2000 – Kay Hesselink & Peggy Preuss 2001 – Margaret Stevens Grossman 2002 – Margaret Stevens Grossman 2003 – Ioana Partovi & Peggy Preuss 2004 – Kay Hesselink & Silvija Devine 2005 – Kay Hesselink & Silvija Devine 2006 – Dolly Woo 2007 – Dolly Woo 2008 – Terri Bourne 2009 – Martha Dennis 2010 – Eleanor Ellsworth 2011 – Dolly Woo 2012 – Martha Dennis 2013 – Barbara Enberg 2014 – Barbara Enberg 2015 – Peggy Preuss 2016 – Martha Dennis & Dolly Woo

Collaborative spirit

The inaugural festival in 1986 included names still familiar to SummerFest audiences: violinists Miriam Fried and Donald Weilerstein, pianists David Golub and Jeffrey Kahane, cellists Ralph Kirshbaum and Ronald Leonard, and clarinetist David Shifrin among others. As the festival continued, the repertoire (which tended toward the conventional) and the roster both expanded. For the 1989 festival, a then 29-year-old violinist, Cho-Liang Lin, whom Ohyama approached when Lin was soloist with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, was added to the list. “That moment really made an impression on me,” recalled Lin of meeting Ohyama. “Heiichiro is kind of this inscrutable person, but he was very, very excited about SummerFest. For him to be so animated about a project was very unusual, so it really registered.” What struck Ohyama about Lin was his playing. “I was stunned by how great a musician he was,” said Ohyama, who invited Lin to his house to play chamber 858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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music informally with a few of his friends. “You know, despite how young he was, he really was an example of how music is something to share with everybody. And his respect toward other players really showed not only in his dealing with people, but in his playing too.” For Lin’s first SummerFest appearance, Ohyama asked him to perform Beethoven’s Piano Trio in E-flat Major, Opus 70, No. 2, a work Lin had never played. Given Lin’s relative unfamiliarity with the piece, Ohyama placed him with two musicians who had played it numerous times (with their own trios), cellist Ralph Kirshbaum and pianist David Golub. Lin learned about more than just the music. Golub and Kirshbaum disagreed on how to approach the piece and argued (albeit on a very refined level) throughout the rehearsal process. “I basically told Ralph and David, ‘Look, you guys figure out how you want this piece’,” Lin said. “‘I’ll do whatever you want’.” The performance, according to Lin, went well. Golub and Kirshbaum agreed to disagree and found a middle ground, at least for one evening, and Lin found himself responding to both. “If I heard an idea, let’s say, played by Ralph, I’d do what Ralph did,” Lin said. “Then David would do his thing, and I’d pick up on David’s idea. “So it was a wonderful experience. I was like a kid in a candy store, except the two chefs were arguing about how to make candy.” That give-and-take is the essence of chamber music. There’s a constant conversation taking place and the audience is invited to listen in. “There’s such an intimacy with chamber music,” said Martha Dennis, the 2016 SummerFest co-chair and a former chair of the Music Society’s board. “There’s this tremendous sense of collaboration and communication you can’t experience any place else.

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later, Perl left and Mary Lou Aleskie became president and CEO. By all accounts, Lin handled the transitions gracefully. “With David and Wu Han, it was a contentious departure,” Lin said. “And I really respected them and still do to this day. But there was a lot of hand wringing over it at the La Jolla [Chamber] Music Society. “So I came into a situation where I could have said I’m going to throw everything out and start anew, but I thought the tradition of the festival supersedes everything else and should be unencumbered by personal feelings. What the audience gets is the most important thing, and I went by that.” Lin built on the foundation of excellence and education established by Ohyama, and continued the diversification of programming and educational programs Wu Han and Finckel had initiated. Although in its earlier incarnation as the Musical Arts Society of La Jolla (1949-68) the organization had a distinguished record of commissioning new works, it was not a priority for the Music Society until Wu Han and Finckel took over SummerFest. “We felt our most important role in serving chamber music was to supply new and innovative ideas in programming,” said Wu Han and Finckel in an email. “The composer is the reason we have any music to play, so the first thing that came to mind (when they became SummerFest co-directors) was to commission new works as a way to contribute to the wealth of chamber music literature and as a way to propel the art form forward in a healthy way.” Lin decided there was still more to be done, and went about enlarging the commissioning program. “With the support of the board and the administration, I tried to do as much as I could, and of course it gained more and more momentum,” Lin said. “The publishers and the composers found out about this important venture so I got a lot more feedback, solicitations, and ideas thrown at me. The whole process really came alive.” SummerFest deserves credit for enhancing the chamber music repertoire with works by nearly 40 composers (some contributing multiple pieces) from composers of the stature and diversity of John Williams (“Quartet La Jolla,” 2011), Chick Corea (“The Adventures of Hippocrates,” 2004) and Aaron Jay Kernis (“Perpetual Chaconne,” 2012). [See a complete SummerFest Commission history on page 85] Underwritten by Chris and Sue Fan, who also support the contemporary music programming at the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival, the 2016 festival will reprise commissions from Augusta Read Thomas (“Bells Ring Summer,” 2000) and George Tsontakis (“Stimulus Package,” 2009), in addition to new works by Richard Danielpour, Marc-André Hamelin, David Lang and Sean

“SummerFest deserves credit for enhancing the chamber music repertoire”

Commissioning priorities

Lin was a regular participant at SummerFest through the 1990s, first at the insistence of Ohyama, and then by invitation of co-directors Wu Han and David Finkel, who succeeded Ohyama in 1998. “I came because I loved the place,” Lin said. “I loved the whole idea behind the festival, Heiichiro’s dream of having a first class festival in San Diego, the camaraderie with friends, the people who lived there in San Diego, and the music making; it was just tremendous. I loved rehearsing and playing concerts in La Jolla.” When Wu Han and Finckel left after the 2000 festival, the board invited Lin to take over starting in 2001. A year

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Shepherd. “Originally we were not too fond of contemporary music,” said Chris Fan, who credits his son (and frequent SummerFest musician) cellist Felix Fan for enlightening him (Fan will perform on the Aug. 14 “Premières & Reprises” program). “But right now, really, I think it makes sense. If I go to a concert and they only play Mozart, Beethoven, too many times the music starts and I know what’s going to happen. Contemporary music, you don’t know what’s going to happen and if you are open minded, it can be very exciting. It can even be something better than Mozart,” and it is the music of our time.

High aspirations

Lin also started quietly talking to the board about the limitations of Sherwood Auditorium, a topic that had been raised repeatedly throughout the Music Society’s history. Although Sherwood Auditorium was the Music Society’s primary venue, as a tenant­­­— albeit a significant one—it had no control over the hall's scheduling. And given Sherwood’s design as a multi-purpose hall, its dry acoustics are better suited to film or lecture rather than chamber music. “For a long time I was stuck in a really awkward place,” Lin said. “Sherwood was never great, but I couldn’t say that publicly, because then the audience would say: ‘Gee, Sherwood is not good, the music director said so, so why should we go to a concert?” “In the meantime, if I don’t actively promote the idea that we need a better hall, nobody is going to step forward and build a new hall. I am very glad, in hindsight, that the Museum of Contemporary Art’s plans prompted us consider other options.” The Museum’s intent to reconfigure Sherwood into gallery space as part of an upcoming expansion and renovation forced the Music Society to seriously think about building its own concert hall. Under the leadership of the La Jolla Music Society’s former president and artistic director, Christopher Beach (he replaced Aleskie in 2005 and remains as a consultant on the building project), the organization raised the capital to build a new venue at 7600 Fay Avenue, named The Conrad Prebys Performing Arts Center. Designed by Epstein Joslin Architects, Inc., with Yasuhisa Toyota, president of Nagata Acoustics America, serving as a consultant, its 500-seat primary venue aspires to be a recital hall “internationally recognized for its excellent acoustics.” Groundbreaking is scheduled for August 2016 and construction is expected to be finished in time for SummerFest 2018. “Having an acoustically excellent environment is really important,” Lin said. “That’s what allows excellent musicians to really show what they can do. So I can’t wait.”

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EST Lancino, La Jolla Music Society’s president and artistic director, expects the move into The Conrad, as the Music Society is calling it, to transform SummerFest, as well as La Jolla Music Society itself. In addition to the main concert hall, the facility will have a 150-seat multiuse space, rehearsal spaces, offices and a donor room. “We can really play to the hall’s attributes, “ Lancino said. “We’ll have all these different capabilities that we should be taking advantage of. “SummerFest could include even more educational and community programs, I think it could include certain types of music that are regional, whether it’s Central and South American, or Asian, or we could start in our own region and have a weekend that’s devoted to that. It could include dance and more song, visual arts, multimedia, multi-arts, and anything to do with projections, whether it’s film or music.” However SummerFest evolves, look for Ohyama to be there. Not as some ancient musical oracle, but someone still learning about music and striving for excellence. “It’s so great to have contact with younger generations,” said Ohyama, now 69-years-old. “It’s so great to share their talent, as well as their concerns, and also what they contribute towards me. It’s very great medicine for me. “I’m open to anything they want to try.” No questions asked.

James Chute has been an arts journalist for nearly four decades. A Pittsburgh native and a graduate of the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (were he earned a Doctor of Musical Arts degree), he has served as music critic for The Cincinnati Post, The Milwaukee Journal, The Orange County Register and the San Diego Union-Tribune. A Pulitzer Prize finalist in criticism (for his reviews of the Milwaukee and Chicago symphonies) and a winner of an ASCAP-Deems Taylor Award, Penney Missouri Award, Best of the West award and a California Newspaper Publishers award, he has contributed articles to the New Grove Dictionary of Music, New Grove Dictionary of American Music and other publications.

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e h t m fro

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questions for

MISCHA MAISKY

1. It is said your August 19 concert will be your debut in San Diego. Is there any place you are eager to play for the first time? Sure, quite a few - and right now San Diego is certainly on the top of my list! 2. Are you a water person? When you finish performing the Six Bach Suites, will you hit the beach or take surfing lessons? Well, not exactly... But I am certain that as usual after a complete Bach recital I will be soaking wet and could use a good shower! 3. Can you tell us something about your cello? It was built by the great Domenico Montagnana in Venice around 1720 - which is exactly the time that Bach wrote his Cello Suites, so when people speak about playing “period instruments” - it does not come more “period” than that!!! 4. Given the challenges of the Bach Suites, do you prepare each concert differently from, say, a concerto performance? I treat each and every concert as the most important concert of my life and no matter what I play - Bach or Shostakovich or Schubert or Tchaikovsky - or whatever! - is my favorite Music at the moment! 5. If a time-machine is invented and you get a ride, whom would you like to meet? Probably Mozart - to ask him why he wrote for every instrument in existence except the cello!

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FELIX FAN

1. FLUX Quartet plays Morton Feldman’s 2nd Quartet which lasts 5 hours and 30 minutes. It is played without pause. Have you run a marathon? Is playing this quartet akin to running a marathon? Is stamina a real issue here? The last time we played it (in Boston), we clocked in at around 5 hours and 25 minutes. We obviously rushed that particular performance. Maybe one of us needed to go to the bathroom. I don’t run marathons. In fact, I don’t run at all. But Conrad (Harris), our violinist, does run marathons so I guess Conrad is the only human who has done both. Hopefully, he runs marathons faster than he plays Feldman 2. 2: Having just mentioned the Feldman quartet, can you tell me what is the most challenging work you ever had to perform? And was it worth the effort?

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1. What’s your favorite pastime while in La Jolla? And is that different from when you are home? I’ve taken some of the best yoga/Pilates classes in La Jolla. I’m really into barre classes these days, and hope to find a great place in La Jolla this summer. Recommendations are welcome! 2. Some conductors conduct with a score or from memory. What should soloists do? My teachers have always encouraged me to memorize than to use music when performing concertos and I’ve wished that I was born with the photographic memory all my life!!

Feldman 2 is easily the most challenging piece I’ve ever played. Spoiler: no, it’s not worth the effort. But I do it because I like seeing what happens to my colleagues when they have to hold up violins and a viola for an obscene amount of time.

3. Female musicians, especially soloists, seem to diverge greatly on concert wardrobe nowadays. They go from pantsuits, formal gowns to dresses that cannot be any shorter. Do you have your views?

3. You were a Rising Star at SummerFest 25 years ago. Do the SummerFest young artists today seem younger or are you just getting older?

I’m all about looking your best and attractive on stage! Common sense should rule, though. If the audience talks more about your attire than your music-making, you probably shouldn’t wear it. Plus, I can only imagine how embarrassing it’d be to have wardrobe malfunctions or unintended exposure of your underwear on stage!!

I realize that I’m now twice as old as some of the younger artists at SummerFest. That being said, I can always take comfort in the fact that many current, longtime, returning SummerFest musicians (yourself included) are much older than me. 4. Your FLUX colleague Tom Chiu used to be my student (at Juilliard). Does he need any violin fundamentals reminders while in La Jolla? My question is: what did you tell Tom 22 years ago to make him play in such an unorthodox way? Your playing styles couldn’t be more different. To answer your question, yes, I think violin fundamental lessons are in order (laughter). But this time, perhaps you should tell him the opposite of what you want him to achieve and then, maybe, you’ll get the result you were looking for 22 years ago. 5. You are a loyal Boston Red Sox fan. If you have a time machine, which Red Sox player would you like to meet other than Babe Ruth? Why do you, a Yankee fan, need to take Babe Ruth off the list? Did he actually pour concrete for “The House that Ruth Built?” He was a Red Sox player too! If I had a time machine, I would shuttle myself back to the Red Sox dugout right before the bottom of the 10th inning of game 6 of the 1986 World Series. I would distract Bill Buckner. When he’s not looking, I’d replace his glove with a slightly oversized glove, about 2 inches longer in the web. Then I could truly take credit for ending the Curse of The Bambino.

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4. Can you tell us a bit about your violin? Made in Cremona, Italy in 1669 by Francesco Ruggeri. Rumored to have been buried with one of its owners for almost a century. Perhaps that explains its pristine condition (with the original varnish intact!) with no visible wear and tear. 5. If time travel can be possible, whom would you like to meet? Ah there are so many!! But if I had to choose one, it’d be Michael Rabin, an American violinist who tragically died at the very young age of 35. Apparently almost all of his recordings were made in just one take! I remember tearing up listening to his Zigeunerweisen when my oldest sister, who was a pianist, bought me his recording for my 12th birthday gift.

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TIME FOR THREE

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Under the Stars

free

Tonight’s concert is made possible by a:

PUBLIC

SummerFest Under the Stars Chair:

TO THE

featuring SDYS International Youth Symphony and Time for Three WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3 · 6:30 PM · SCRIPPS PARK (LA JOLLA COVE) VIVALDI Selections from The Four Seasons (1725) (1678-1741) Autumn Winter SDYS International Youth Symphony; Luke Hsu, violin; Heiichiro Ohyama, conductor

Community of Donors Helene Kruger La Jolla Music Society’s 2015-16 Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, the National Endowment for the Arts, ResMed Foundation, San Diego Gas & Electric, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, The Frieman Family, Rita and Richard Atkinson, Raffaella and John Belanich, Brian and Silvija Devine, John and Kay Hesselink, Jeanette Stevens, Gordon Brodfuehrer, and two anonymous donors.

BEETHOVEN Allegro ma non troppo from Symphony No. 4, Op. 60 (1806) (1770-1827) SDYS International Youth Symphony;

Jeff Edmons, conductor

Program to be announced from stage An entertaining mix of virtuosity and showmanship, the trio performs music from Bach, Brahms and beyond – including their own arrangements of everything from bluegrass, to hip tunes of today. Time for Three Nicolas Kendall, Nikki Chooi, violins; Ranaan Meyer, bass

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'FEST FACT:

A New Tradition Introduced in 2008, this year’s SummerFest Under the Stars marks our 9th free outdoor concert at Scripps Park.


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SUMMERFEST SLIDESHOW During the intermission watch a special 30th Anniversary slideshow

Opening Night:

A Bohemian Rhapsody

FRIDAY, AUGUST 5 · 8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM JANÁCˇEK String Quartet No. 2, “Intimate Letters” (1928) (1854-1928) Andante Adagio Moderato Allegro Danish String Quartet Frederik Øland, Rune Tonsgaard Sørensen, violins; Asbjørn Nørgaard, viola; Fredrik Schøyen Sjölin, cello

SMETANA Piano Trio in G Minor, Opus 15 (1854-5) (1824-1884) Moderato assai Allegro, ma non agitato Finale: Presto Jon Kimura Parker, piano; Chee-Yun, violin; Ben Hong, cello INTERMISSION

DVORˇÁK Sextet for Strings in A Major, Opus 48 (1878) (1841-1904) Allegro moderato Dumka (Elegia): Poco allegretto Furiant: Presto Finale: Tema con variazioni Martin Beaver, Cho-Liang Lin, violins; Che-Yen Chen, Heiichiro Ohyama, violas; Carter Brey, Eileen Moon, cellos

PRELUDE 7 PM Lecture by Scholar-inResidence Nicolas Reveles Tonight’s concert is sponsored by Medallion Society members:

Joan Jordan Bernstein Alexa Kirkwood Hirsch Many thanks to our Partner:

Grande Colonial Hotel and NINE-TEN Restaurant La Jolla Music Society’s 2015-16 Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, the National Endowment for the Arts, ResMed Foundation, San Diego Gas & Electric, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, The Frieman Family, Rita and Richard Atkinson, Raffaella and John Belanich, Brian and Silvija Devine, John and Kay Hesselink, Jeanette Stevens, Gordon Brodfuehrer, and two anonymous donors. RECOMMENDED LISTENING Janácˇek / Smetana. Janácˇek: String Quartets Nos.1 & 2. Jerusalem Quartet. Harmonia Mundi. ASIN: B00G6OJXOI, [2014] Mendelssohn, Felix. Smetana Piano Trios. Beaux Arts Trio. Polygram Records. ASIN: B00000E4T7, [1992] Dvorˇák, Antonín. Music@Menlo LIVE 7 Around Dvorˇák. Sunmi Chang,Anthony McGill, Arnaud Sussman. Menlo Live. ASIN: B0172ODNKK, [2014] 858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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Program Notes By Eric Bromberger

String Quartet No. 2, “Intimate Letters”

LEOŠ JANÁCˇEK Born July 3, 1854, Hukvaldy, Moravia Died August 12, 1928, Ostrava

In the summer of 1917 Leoš Janáček, a 63-year-old composer little known outside his homeland, met Kamila Stösslová, a 25-year-old married woman with a small child, and fell madly in love. Over the final eleven years of his life, she was the inspiration for a volcanic outpouring of masterpieces by the aging composer: four operas, two string quartets, a mass, tremendous orchestral works, and numerous choral and chamber pieces–as well as 600 letters written to her. Janáček’s love for Kamilla Stösslová was entirely platonic–and one-sided. Mystified by the composer’s passion, she responded with affectionate friendship and encouragement, content to serve as muse for a creator she did not fully understand (Kamila was lucky to have an understanding husband–Janáček had a furiously jealous wife). Janáček said that all his late works were, at some level, an expression of his love for Kamila, and one piece made that love explicit. During the winter of 1928, he took three weeks (January 29-February 19) off from work on his opera From the House of the Dead to compose his String Quartet No. 2, which he subtitled “Intimate Letters.” Janáček’s original nickname for the quartet had been “Love Letters,” but he decided against that, telling Kamila that he did not want “to deliver [his] feelings up to the discretion of stupid people.” To underline the latent meaning of the quartet, he at first intended to replace the viola with the viola d’amore; when the older instrument proved to have insufficient power, he returned to the modern viola, which is given a very prominent role in this quartet. Janáček noted that each movement had a particular program. The opening movement was inspired by his first meeting Kamila at the Luhačovice Spa during the summer of 1917; the second depicts events of that summer; the third he described as “gay, but melting into a vision of you”; the last expressed Janáček’s “fear for you–however it eventually sounds not as fear, but as longing and its fulfillment.” After hearing a private performance of the first two movements, the exultant composer wrote: “Kamila, it will be beautiful, strange, unrestrained, inspired, a composition beyond all the usual conventions! Together I think that we’ll triumph! It’s my first composition that sprang from directly experienced feeling. Before then I composed only from things remembered; this piece, ‘Intimate Letters,’ was written in fire.” This passionate, intense music is in Janáček’s extremelycompressed late style. Themes tend to be short, there are countless abrupt tempo shifts, and the music is tightly unified–even accompaniment figures have thematic importance, and there is some cyclic use of themes. The

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full-blooded beginning of the Andante gives away suddenly to the true first theme: an eerie, unsettling melody played ponticello by the viola–Janáček said that it reflected Kamila’s disquieting arrival in his life. This theme recurs in many forms in this movement, which pitches between the lyric and harshly dramatic. By contrast, the Adagio is based largely on the viola’s opening melody; this rises to a climax marked Maestoso before closing over flautato mutterings from viola and second violin. The Moderato begins with a lilting dance in 9/8, followed by a lyric violin duet. The climax of this movement is a stunner: the music comes to a stop, then the first violin rips out a stabbing entrance on its highest E–marked appassionato, this is an explosive variation of the preceding duet tune. The concluding Allegro, a rondo, gets off to a good-natured start with a theme that sounds as if it might have folk origins (actually it was Janáček’s own). Once again, there are frequent mood and tempo changes, and–driven by furious trills and mordants–the music drives to its impassioned close. The 74-year-old Janáček was very pleased with this music. To Kamila, he wrote that it was “like a piece of living flesh. I don’t think I ever shall be able to write anything deeper or more truthful.” Six months later, the creator of this passionate music was dead.

Piano Trio in G Minor, Opus 15

BEDRˇ ICH SMETANA Born March 2, 1824, Litomšyl, Czech Republic Died May 12, 1884, Prague

Smetana wrote very little chamber music–two quartets, this trio, and a set of pieces for violin and piano–but that chamber music is particularly intense and personal. It was as if he poured his enthusiastic Czech nationalism into works like The Moldau and reserved a more personal kind of expression for chamber music. His best-known chamber work, the autobiographical String Quartet No. 1 (appropriately subtitled “From My Life”) reaches its climax when the first violin’s high E comes stabbing through the closing moments of the last movement–it was the sound of that high E piercing Smetana’s head that signaled the onset of his deafness and the insanity that led to his death. The Piano Trio in G Minor springs from a similar personal tragedy. Smetana and his wife had four daughters in rapid succession, and just as rapidly three of them died. The greatest blow for Smetana was the death of the eldest, Bedřiška, a spirited little girl who showed promise of unusual musical talent. Her death from scarlet fever at the age of four on September 5, 1855, nearly drove Smetana mad. He plunged into a deep depression and was able to rescue himself only through his work. By the end of that month he had begun to compose the Piano Trio in G Minor, and he worked steadily for two months, completing it on November 22.


Sextet for Strings in A Major, Opus 48

ANTONÍN DVORˇ ÁK Born September 8, 1841, Mühlhausen, Bohemia Died May 1, 1904, Prague

Dvořák dated his manuscripts very carefully, and so we know that he wrote his Sextet for Strings in the space of only fourteen days: May 14-27, 1878. This was a crucial moment in Dvořák’s career. After a long and trying apprenticeship, the 37-year-old composer found himself suddenly famous that year when his Slavonic Dances created an international sensation. But some of the finest musicians of the era were already alert to Dvořák’s talent, and chief among these was Brahms, who had offered the unknown Czech composer his friendship, found him a publisher, and introduced him to his friends. The importance of the connection with Brahms can hardly be overstated, for it gained Dvořák performances by some of the finest musicians of the day. The Sextet for Strings had a private performance at the Berlin home of Brahms’ good friend, the violinist Joseph Joachim, and Dvořák–the son of a small-town butcher–was flabbergasted by his good fortune, writing to a friend: “after being here [in Berlin]

ER for only a few hours I had spent so many enjoyable FE ST moments among the foremost artists, that they will certainly remain in my memory for the rest of my life.” Music for string sextets–two violins, two violas, and two cellos–is comparatively rare. Dvořák certainly knew Brahms’ two sextets, composed during the previous decade, but the other two famous sextets–Tchaikovsky’s Souvenir de Florence and Schoenberg’s Verklärte Nacht–were still in the future. Dvořák makes use of the resources available with six players, yet takes care to keep textures clear throughout. Longest of the four movements, the sonataform Allegro moderato contrasts its flowing first melody with a rhythmically-sprung second idea in the unexpected key of C-sharp minor. The development makes ingenious use of bits of rhythm from both these ideas before this amiable movement fades out on a broad restatement of the opening theme. The real gem of this sextet is the second movement, which Dvořák marks dumka–the use of this old folk-form is further evidence of the composer’s growing awareness of his distinctly Czech identity. Derived from Ukrainian folk music, a dumka is elegiac in character and often features sections at quite different tempos. The main theme of this movement, at a slow polka rhythm, is full of dark flashings in its melodic turns and key shifts; the two distinct contrasting episodes preserve the movement’s somber character. Dvořák marks the third movement Furiant, but numerous commentators have noted that it lacks the crossrhythms and changing meters that define this old Bohemian dance form. In any case, this movement–which returns to the home key of A major–offers sparkling outer sections and a busy trio. The finale is in theme-and-variation form. Lower strings present the somber theme, and six variations follow. The final variation in fact forms an exuberant (and lengthy) coda that makes its way back to A major only in the final bars.

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As might be expected, the mood of this music is dark: all three movements are in G minor. What might not be expected is that this trio has no true slow movement: a sonata-form opening movement and a rondo-finale frame a central fast movement. The Moderato assai first movement opens with the stark sound of the violin alone, playing the grieving idea that will dominate the entire movement; the chromatic descent of a fifth that shapes this theme will be felt throughout the first two movements. The second subject, announced by the cello, is somewhat gentler, but the development is anguished, and the opening theme returns to drive the movement relentlessly to its close. Despite its minor tonality, the second movement is not so intense as the first. It is a scherzo-like polka, and some commentators have felt that the polka theme depicts Bedřiška at play (the first movement’s stark opening subject makes a ghostly reappearance within this opening statement). Smetana interrupts this movement twice with trio sections (he calls them Alternativos); the first of these is lyric and heartfelt, the second powerfully inflected on dotted rhythms. The end of this movement is particularly effective: the return to the opening material at the close of the second Alternativo is halting and uncertain, and the movement is suddenly choked off. The beginning of the finale, a rondo marked Presto, drives ahead on pulsing energy; Smetana took this opening theme from his own Piano Sonata in G Minor of 1846. The cello’s somber, lyric episode may break the energetic pulse of the opening, but it preserves the intense atmosphere that marks the entire trio, and at its close, this music remains–despite a move into G major–dark and grieving.

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'FEST FACT:

Perfect Attendance Program Annotator and Scholar-in-Residence Eric Bromberger has researched and written the program notes for SummerFest since the first festival in 1986.

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CHEE-YUN CHO-LIANG LIN

CARTER BREY

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Music Transfigured

SATURDAY, AUGUST 6 · 8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM MOZART Sonata for Piano and Violin in G Major, K.379 (1781) (1756-1791) Adagio; Allegro Thema con variazioni: Andantino cantabile Cho-Liang Lin, violin; Jon Kimura Parker, piano

SCHOENBERG Verklärte Nacht, Opus 4 (1899) (1874-1951) Martin Beaver, Cho-Liang Lin, violins; Che-Yen Chen, Heiichiro Ohyama, violas; Carter Brey, Eileen Moon, cellos INTERMISSION

SCHUBERT String Quintet in C Major, D.956 (1828) (1797-1828) Allegro ma non troppo Adagio Scherzo: Presto Allegretto Chee-Yun, Frederik Øland, violins; Asbjørn Nørgaard, viola; Fredrik Schøyen Sjölin, Ben Hong, cellos

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PRELUDE 7 PM Lecture by Scholar-inResidence Nicolas Reveles Tonight’s concert is sponsored by Medallion Society members:

Brenda Baker and Steve Baum La Jolla Music Society’s 2015-16 Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, the National Endowment for the Arts, ResMed Foundation, San Diego Gas & Electric, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, The Frieman Family, Rita and Richard Atkinson, Raffaella and John Belanich, Brian and Silvija Devine, John and Kay Hesselink, Jeanette Stevens, Gordon Brodfuehrer, and two anonymous donors. RECOMMENDED LISTENING Mozart, Wolfgang. Violin Sonatas String Duos & Trios. Academy of Saint Martin-in-the-Fields Chamber Ensemble, Grumiaux Trio, Arthur Grumiaux, Walter Klein, Gerard Poulet, Blandine Verlet, Isabelle van Keulen, Ronald Brautigan. Philips. ASIN: B00004YSBH, [2006] Schoenberg, Arnold. Transfigured Night, Op. 4 / Trio, Op. 45. Juilliard String Quartet, Walter Trampler, Yo-Yo Ma. Sony Classical. ASIN: B0000027PI, [1993] Schubert, Franz. String Quintet D.956, Quartettsatz D.703. Tokyo String Quartet, David Watkin. Harmonia Mundi. ASIN: B00LPXCDJ2, [2011]


Verklärte Nacht, Opus 4

Sonata for Piano and Violin in G Major, K.379

ARNOLD SCHOENBERG

Born January 27, 1756, Salzburg Died December 5, 1791, Vienna

Mozart was called to Vienna in March 1781 along with the rest of Archbishop Colloredo’s party to attend the festivities surrounding the accession of Emperor Joseph II. Relations between the composer and the Archbishop had been strained for some time, and after several stormy scenes in Vienna Mozart was finally given his release “with a kick on my arse . . . by order of our worthy Prince Archbishop” Before his release, however, Mozart had been required to compose music for a party the archbishop gave in Vienna on April 8. In a letter to his father that day, he described the Sonata in G Major as “a sonata with violin accompaniment for myself, which I composed last night between eleven and twelve (but in order to be able to finish it, I only wrote out the [violin part] and retained my own part in my head).” The way the rest of us stay up an extra hour to pay the bills, Mozart stayed up and dashed off this masterful music. The Sonata in G Major has an unusual form: it is in only two movements, but the Allegro is preceded by a slow introduction so long that it almost becomes a distinct movement of its own. Given the fact that Mozart wrote the keyboard part for himself, it comes as no surprise that that instrument plays so important a role, even if Mozart played the entire part from memory at the Archbishop’s party. The introduction itself is full of florid writing–rolled chords, turns, grace notes–but the mood changes sharply at the Allegro, which moves into G minor. The keyboard again takes the lead, but this time the theme, motto-like in its shortness, is full of snap, of Beethovenian drive. The second subject of this sonata-form movement is canonic, with fragments tossed between the two instruments. Following a dramatic development, the movement draws to a close on its opening theme. After the fury of the Allegro, the final movement returns to the serene G major of the introduction. This a themeand-variation movement, with a graceful opening melody marked Andantino cantabile followed five variations. At the close of the fifth variation Mozart repeats the theme verbatim and closes with a brief coda. Each variation is in two parts, with the second section generally the more dramatic. Throughout this movement–by turns gentle and brilliant–the keyboard retains its prominence, as if Mozart were keeping himself firmly at center stage, protesting the Archbishop’s strictures on him even as he served them.

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Program Notes By Eric Bromberger

WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART

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Born September 13, 1874, Vienna Died July 13, 1951, Los Angeles

Verklärte Nacht was one of Schoenberg’s first successes, and it remains his most popular work. He wrote this thirtyminute piece for string sextet (string quartet plus extra viola and cello) in the final months of 1899, when he was 25, but could not get it performed. When he submitted it for performance to the Tonkünstlerverein (Vienna’s chamber music society), the judges rejected it because the score contained a chord they could not find in their harmony textbooks. Referring to its unusual tonalities, one of the judges made a now-famous crack, saying that Verklärte Nacht sounded “as if someone had taken the score of Tristan when the ink was still wet and smudged it over.” Verklärte Nacht was finally performed in 1903 in Vienna by the Rosé Quartet. The leader of that quartet, Arnold Rosé, was Mahler’s brother-in-law, and Mahler met Schoenberg at rehearsals for Verklärte Nacht and became his champion, though he confessed that some of Schoenberg’s music was beyond him. The first performance brought howls from conservatives, but this music made its way quickly into the repertory. In 1917, Schoenberg arranged Verklärte Nacht for string orchestra, and he revised this version in 1943; at this concert, the music is heard in its original form. Verklärte Nacht–the title translates Transfigured Night–is based on a poem of the same name by Richard Dehmel (1863-1920), a German lyric poet. The subject of Dehmel’s poem may have been as difficult for early Viennese audiences as Schoenberg’s music. It can be summarized briefly: a man and a woman walk together through dark woods, with only the moon shining down through the black branches above their heads. The woman confesses that she is pregnant, but by another man–her search for happiness led her to seek fulfillment in physical pleasure. Now she finds that nature has taken vengeance on her. The man speaks, and–instead of denouncing her–accepts her and the child as his own: their love for each other will surround and protect them. The man and woman embrace, then continue their walk through the dark woods. But the night has now been transfigured, or transformed, by their love. The first line of Dehmel’s poem–“Two people walk through bleak, cold woods”–is transformed in the last line: “Two people walk through exalted, shining night.” Musically, Schoenberg’s Verklärte Nacht can be understood as a tone poem depicting the events of Dehmel’s poem, and it falls into five sections: Introduction, Woman’s Confession, Man’s Forgiveness, Love Duet, and Apotheosis. Verklärte Nacht may look forward to the music of the twentieth century, but its roots are firmly in the nineteenth: the influences are Brahms (in the lush, dramatic sound), Wagner (in the evolving harmonies), and Richard Strauss (whose tone poems served as models). The music 858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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is dark and dramatic, and Schoenberg drives it to several intense climaxes. Particularly interesting are the harmonies: this music begins in dark D minor and evolves through troubled and uncertain tonalities to the bright D major of the Man’s Forgiveness and the concluding walk through the transfigured night.

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String Quintet in C Major, D.956

FRANZ SCHUBERT Born January 31, 1797, Vienna Died November 19, 1828, Vienna

Schubert’s String Quintet in C Major, universally acknowledged as one of the finest creations in all chamber music, dates from the miraculous final year of that composer’s brief life, 1828. That year saw the revision of the “Great” Symphony in C Major and the composition of the three final piano sonatas, the songs of the Schwanengesang collection, this quintet, and the song “Der Hirt auf Dem Felsen,” completed in the weeks just prior to Schubert’s death on November 19. The date of the Quintet is difficult to pin down, but it was probably composed at the end of the summer–on October 2 Schubert wrote to one of his publishers that he had “finally turned out a Quintet for 2 violins, 1 viola, and 2 violoncellos.” Many have been quick to hear premonitions of death in this quintet, as if this music–Schubert’s last instrumental work–must represent a summing-up of his life. But it is dangerous to read intimations of mortality into music written shortly before any composer’s death, and there is little basis for such a conclusion here–although he was ill during the summer, Schubert did not know that he was fatally ill. Rather than being death-haunted, the Quintet in C Major is music of great richness, music that suffuses a golden glow. Some of this is due to its unusual sonority: the additional cello brings weight to the instrumental texture and allows one cello to become a full partner in the thematic material, a freedom Schubert fully exploits. Of unusual length (over 50 minutes long), the Quintet also shows great harmonic freedom–some have commented that this music seems to change keys every two bars. The opening Allegro ma non troppo is built on three theme groups: the quiet violin theme heard at the very beginning, an extended duet for the two cellos, and a little march figure for all five instruments. The cello duet is unbelievably beautiful, so beautiful that many musicians (certainly many cellists!) have said that they would like nothing on their tombstone except the music for this passage. But it is the march tune that dominates the development section; the recapitulation is a fairly literal repeat of the opening section, and the movement closes with a brief coda. Longest of the four movements, the Adagio is in ABA form. The opening is remarkable. The three middle

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voices–second violin, viola, and first cello–sing a gentle melody that stretches easily over 28 bars; the second cello accompanies them with pizzicato notes, while high above the first violin decorates the melody with quiet interjections of its own. The middle section, in F minor, feels agitated and dark; a trill leads back to the opening material, but now the two outer voices accompany the melody with runs and swirls that have suddenly grown complex. The third movement is a scherzo-and-trio, marked Presto. The bounding scherzo, with its hunting horn calls, is fairly straightforward, but the trio is quite unusual, in some surprising ways the emotional center of the entire Quintet. One normally expects a trio section to be gentle in mood, sometimes even a thematic extension of the scherzo. But this trio, marked Andante sostenuto and in the unexpected key of D-flat major, is spare, grave, haunting. Schubert sets it in 4/4 instead of the expected 3/4, and its lean lines and harmonic surprises give it a grieving quality quite different from the scherzo. The lament concludes, and the music plunges back into sunlight as the scherzo resumes. Many have heard Hungarian folk music in the opening of the Allegretto, with its evocation of wild gypsy fiddling. The second theme is one of those graceful little tunes that only Schubert could write; both themes figure throughout the movement, until finally another cello duet leads to a fiery coda ingeniously employing both main themes. The Quintet in C Major is one of the glories of the chamber music repertory and one of Schubert’s finest works. Yet he never heard a note of it. It lay in manuscript for years and was not performed until 1850, twenty-two years after his death.

'FEST FACT: So, who’s counting? Over the last 29-plus years, through all of the performances, workshops, pre-concert dinners, and post-concert receptions, La Jolla Music Society staff has thrived through a collective total of 165 SummerFests. From Jordanna Rose’s inaugural to Ferdinand Gasang’s twentieth, we acknowledge and celebrate them and everyone in-between.


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THE MONTROSE TRIO

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Mozart to Mahler

SUNDAY, AUGUST 7 · 3 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM MAHLER Piano Quartet in A Minor (c. 1876) (1860-1911) Jon Kimura Parker, piano; Frederik Øland, violin;

SUMMERFEST SLIDESHOW During the intermission watch a special 30th Anniversary slideshow

Asbjørn Nørgaard, viola; Fredrik Schøyen Sjölin, cello

MOZART Viola Quintet in C Major, K.515 (1787) (1756-1791) Allegro Menuetto: Allegretto Andante Allegro Cho-Liang Lin, Chee-Yun, violins; Asbjørn Nørgaard, Che-Yen Chen, violas; Fredrik Schøyen Sjölin, cello INTERMISSION

SCHUBERT Trio in B-flat Major for Violin, Cello, and Piano, D.898 (1828) (1797-1828) Allegro moderato Andante un poco mosso Scherzo: Allegro Rondo: Allegro vivace The Montrose Trio Jon Kimura Parker, piano; Martin Beaver, violin; Clive Greensmith, cello

PRELUDE 2 PM Lecture by Scholar-inResidence Nicolas Reveles Today’s concert is sponsored by:

Sylvia and Steven Ré La Jolla Music Society’s 2015-16 Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, the National Endowment for the Arts, ResMed Foundation, San Diego Gas & Electric, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, The Frieman Family, Rita and Richard Atkinson, Raffaella and John Belanich, Brian and Silvija Devine, John and Kay Hesselink, Jeanette Stevens, Gordon Brodfuehrer, and two anonymous donors. RECOMMENDED LISTENING Berg, Mahler, Schoenberg, Webern. Kremerata Musica. Kremerata, Gidon Kremer, Oleg Maisenberg. Deutsche Grammophon. ASIN: B0000012WL, [2007] Mozart, Wolfgang. String Quintet in C Major, K. 515. The Orion String Quartet, Paul Neubauer. Music@Menlo LIVE. ASIN: B004HLX1CW, [2006] Schubert, Franz. The Piano Trios. Vladimir Ashkenazy, Pinchas Zukerman, Lynn Harrell. London / Decca. ASIN: B0000042HH, [1997]

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Program Notes By Eric Bromberger

Piano Quartet in A Minor

GUSTAV MAHLER Born July 7, 1860, Kalischt, Bohemia Died May 18, 1911, Vienna

One of the most remarkable aspects of the career of Gustav Mahler is that he composed in so narrow a range– here is a major composer whose creativity found expression in only two forms: symphony and song. In his catalog of works, there is no piano music, no chamber music, no opera, nor even any concertos. During his years as a student at the Vienna Conservatory (1875-78), however, Mahler did write several works for chamber ensembles, apparently as composition exercises. These works, most of which have vanished, are known to have included a violin sonata, a piano quintet, and at least a fragment of another piano quintet. But one work from Mahler’s student years has survived, a Piano Quartet in A Minor, probably written by the teenaged composer in either 1876 or 1877. There is no record of a performance during Mahler’s lifetime. The manuscript was in the possession of the composer’s wife Alma, and the first known performance took place in New York City on February 12, 1964, nearly a century after it was written. The quartet consists of one movement, apparently intended as a first movement, and there is also a sketch (only 24 measures) of a scherzo movement. Nothing in this student piece suggests that it is the work of the man who would later compose a magnificent cycle of ten symphonies. There is nothing distinctively Mahlerlike here, and in fact anyone hearing this music without knowing its composer might guess that it is the work of either Schumann or Brahms. Yet the young composer clearly has an instinctive grip of sonata form, and he manipulates his three themes deftly over the twelve-minute span of the movement. The opening, marked Nicht zu schnell (“not too fast”), moves somberly over the piano’s quiet triplets, and the movement’s main theme-shape is introduced by the cello. The powerful second idea, marked Entschlossen (“resolute”), climbs fiercely, then falls back on long chromatic lines, while the third theme is a gentle lyric idea introduced by the violin. The development is quite long, and just before the quiet close Mahler offers the violinist a brief–and very florid–cadenza.

Viola Quintet in C Major, K.515

WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART Born January 27, 1756, Salzburg Died December 5, 1791, Vienna

Many regard the string quartet as the summit of chamber music, and Haydn, Beethoven, and Bartók found it ideal for some of their finest music. But that form gave Mozart

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unusual problems, and he struggled with all his mature quartets. The addition of one extra instrument, however– the instrument Mozart preferred to play in chamber music– unlocked some of his greatest music, for chamber groups or any other ensemble. Perhaps the richer instrumental texture stirred his creative powers in unusual ways. Perhaps it was the distinctive sound of the violas. Perhaps it was the new possibilities for playing combinations of instruments off against each other. Who knows? Mozart spent most of 1787 composing Don Giovanni, which would be premièred that October. During the spring of that year he composed two string quintets, one in April and one in May. It has often been noted that Mozart composed works in groups and that specific key signatures had particular expressive significance for him. His last two symphonies, composed within a month of each other, are a perfect example: the symphony in G minor is dark, intense, tragic; the other–in C major–is spacious, noble, and heroic. One sees exactly the same pattern in these two quintets. The String Quintet in G Minor, K.516 is powerful and dark, while the String Quintet in C Major, K.515 is marked by breadth and grandeur. Both these quintets are also unusually long-spanned works: if all its repeats are taken, the String Quintet in C Major can stretch out to more than 35 minutes, making it longer than any of Mozart’s string quartets (and in fact longer than any of his symphonies). The Quintet in C Major opens with something rare in Mozart’s music: a leading theme played by the cello. This powerful figure begins with a rasping sound of the cello’s lowest note–the open C-string–and rises sturdily, but then it will not stop. This simple chordal theme recurs constantly, modulating through a series of unexpected keys: G major, E major, C minor, and finally D major. Mozart is opening up the widest possible tonal palette as he begins, and only after the initial figure has been repeated six times does he allow the first violin to sing the long and flowing second subject. It is a further mark of this music’s breadth that there is a third theme–a genial, syncopated little tune–just before the close of what is one of Mozart’s longest and most focused expositions. The development is brief, and then Mozart plunges back into an extended recapitulation and an equally remarkable coda. After all the expansive power of this movement, the music winks out on fragments of the second theme. Debate continues about the correct sequence of the inner movements. Apparently Mozart himself was unsure about their order, and the quintet has been published and recorded with these movements in alternate positions. The opening section of the Allegretto brings a surprise: the opening idea spans ten measures rather than the expected eight, with the violins in pairs, answered by pairs of lower instruments. At the trio, however, the music heads off in new directions entirely. Mozart modulates into F major, and now begins an odd and haunting dance, a sort of wistful waltz on winding chromatic lines. This trio goes


Trio in B-flat Major for Violin, Cello, and Piano, D.898

ER the confines of sonata form. Also noteworthy is FE ST Schubert’s handling of the three voices: he distributes thematic material so imaginatively that one always feels this music marked by a genuine partnership of its three performers. The Allegro moderato is built on two beautifullycontrasted theme groups: the opening string melody and a wistful second subject first heard in the cello. This amiable music is remarkable for its rhythmic variety: in the course of the development, Schubert presents both themes simultaneously. The glowing Andante un poco mosso features a main theme that, in its warm lyricism, might almost be called “Brahmsian,” were that not absurd; perhaps it does suggest why, half a century later, Brahms held Schubert in such reverence. This lullaby-like idea develops with luxuriant richness, the simple theme gradually growing very complex. The Scherzo feels almost restrained, perhaps because Schubert makes the music start and stop throughout the chromatic outer sections; by contrast, the trio is calm and stately. The finale is marked “Rondo,” but Schubert introduces a terse second idea, and the movement actually proceeds in sonata form. Many have thought the violin’s dancing opening melody the essence of Viennese music, and certainly it moves with cheerful lightness. Schubert varies the pulse of the movement with an ingenious touch: he re-bars the music from its original 2/4 to 3/2 and combines his principal themes at this relaxed new tempo. It is a wonderful stroke, and Schubert himself liked it so much that he brings it back once again before the energetic conclusions of this genial music.

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on for some length–Mozart clearly liked the possibilities he found here–then winds its way back to order with the return of the minuet. The Andante is an extraordinary movement–and not the sort of movement one expects in chamber music. In effect, it belongs to just two instruments, the first violin and the first viola, which sing a duet that is more like a joint cadenza by two virtuoso soloists than chamber music, and it recalls–in sound, spirit, and instrumentation–Mozart’s Sinfonia Concertante for Violin and Viola, composed eight years earlier in Salzburg. There is something almost jarring about the range of expression here, for this music is by turns consoling, fiery, gentle, furious, brilliant, as Mozart ranges easily between the high, silvery sound of the violin and the darker sound of the viola. The concluding Allegro takes wing as the first violin soars off with a cheerful eight-bar theme that will clearly be the basis of a rondo. Yet Mozart is Mozart, and quickly the unexpected begins to happen: this cheerful tune develops, grows more complex, and is treated in some rich counterpoint–what had seemed a simple rondo in the opening measures now edges toward sonata form, particularly with the arrival of a second subject, announced by the pair of violins. The writing for the first violin in this movement quite extroverted: much of the part is high and difficult, and it is on that concerto-like brilliance that the Quintet in C Major–some of the most striking and powerful chamber music Mozart ever wrote–sails to its conclusion.

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FRANZ SCHUBERT Born January 31, 1797, Vienna Died November 19, 1828, Vienna

Schubert’s two piano trios stand among the finest of his chamber works, showing a masterly command of both content and technique. But the surprising thing is that no one knows when the Trio in B-flat Major was composed; the Trio in E-flat Major was begun in November 1827, only a year before the composer’s death, but scholars are at a loss when trying to date the trio performed on this concert. It was not published until 1836, nearly a decade after the composer’s death, and the manuscript has disappeared; students of Schubert’s life are left trying to date this music by looking for references to it in his correspondence (there are virtually none) or by stylistic resemblances to other works. Some have placed it as early as 1825, some in 1827, while others date it 1828, the year of Schubert’s death. The question may never be resolved, and finally it doesn’t matter. What does matter is that this is glorious music, a favorite of audiences and performers–and for good reason. It contains some of Schubert’s most lyric ideas, yet these themes do not–as is sometimes charged of Schubert’s music–remain static; instead, they develop logically within

'FEST FACT: Behind the Scenes For the 30th Anniversary Festival, SummerFest artists are scheduled to rehearse a combined total of 170 hours.

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ZUKERMAN TRIO

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an evening with Zukerman Trio

TUESDAY, AUGUST 9 · 8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM Pinchas Zukerman, violin; Amanda Forsyth, cello; Angela Cheng, piano

BRAHMS Scherzo in C Minor for Violin and Piano (Sonatensatz) (1853) (1833-1897) Pinchas Zukerman, violin; Angela Cheng, piano DVORˇÁK Piano Trio in E Minor, Opus 90, “Dumky” (1890-1) (1841-1904) Lento maestoso; Allegro quasi doppio movimento Poco adagio; Vivace non troppo Andante; Vivace non troppo Andante moderato; Allegretto scherzando Allegro; Meno mosso Lento maestoso; Vivace Zukerman Trio INTERMISSION

GLIÈRE Duets for Violin and Cello, Opus 39 (1909) (1875-1956) No. 1 Prelude (Andante) No. 2 Gavotte (Allegretto) No. 3 Berceuse (Tranquillo) No. 4 Canzonetta (Moderato) No. 5 Intermezzo (Andantino) No. 6 Impromptu (Poco Animato) No. 7 Scherzo (Vivace) Pinchas Zukerman, violin; Amanda Forsyth, cello

MENDELSSOHN Piano Trio No. 1 in D Minor, Opus 49 (1839) (1809-1847) Molto allegro ed agitato Andante con molto tranquillo Scherzo: Leggiero e vivace Allegro assai appassionato Zukerman Trio

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MUSICAL PRELUDE 7 PM Verona Quartet performs Mendelssohn’s String Quartet in E Minor, Op. 44, No. 2 - See page 66 La Jolla Music Society’s 2015-16 Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, the National Endowment for the Arts, ResMed Foundation, San Diego Gas & Electric, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, The Frieman Family, Rita and Richard Atkinson, Raffaella and John Belanich, Brian and Silvija Devine, John and Kay Hesselink, Jeanette Stevens, Gordon Brodfuehrer, and two anonymous donors. RECOMMENDED LISTENING Brahms, Johannes. Sonatensatz “FAE sonate” Op.5 – Scherzo. Daniel Barenboim, Pinchas Zukerman. Deutsche Grammophon. ASIN: B002HJYPU8, [2009] Mendelssohn, Felix. Piano Trios, Op. 49 & Op. 66. Isaac Stern, Leonard Rose, Eugene Istomin. Sony Classical. ASIN: B00138JBZ8, [1995]


Scherzo in C Minor for Violin and Piano (Sonatensatz)

JOHANNES BRAHMS Born May 7, 1833, Hamburg Died April 3, 1897, Vienna

The brief Scherzo in C Minor for violin and piano is the earliest surviving piece of chamber music by Brahms–he wrote it in 1853, when he was only 20. That fall, Robert Schumann put together a collaborative sonata as a gift for the young violin virtuoso Joseph Joachim, then on tour. Schumann’s student Albert Dietrich (1829-1908) contributed the first movement, Schumann himself wrote the second and fourth, and Brahms composed the third. All four movements were to be based on the sequence of three notes F-A-E, the initials of Joachim’s personal motto, “Frei aber Einsam”: “Free but lonely.” (Scholars, it must be admitted, have had a tough time locating that particular sequence of notes in Brahms’ movement.) Presented with the sonata on his arrival in Düsseldorf, Joachim was asked to play the four movements and to identify the composer of each. He is reported to have played the music easily at sight and to have guessed correctly the authorship of all four movements. The F-A-E Sonata, as it came to be called, was not published until 1935, long after everyone involved in the project was dead. Joachim, however, had liked Brahms’ scherzo movement enough that he had it published separately in 1906, nine years after the composer’s death. It has become part of the repertory, for while it is a very early work and Brahms did not choose to publish it, this music already shows a powerful individual style and a firm command of scherzo form. It is in the expected ABA form. The outer sections are built on a pounding 6/8 meter, sounded first on the violin’s open G string and quickly answered by hammering piano chords. The brief 2/4 trio section, lyric but somber, leads quickly back to the opening material. Brahms provides a surprise at the close by building a huge cadence on a reminiscence of the trio theme. This music has appeared under several titles. It is sometimes called Sonatensatz (“Sonata Movement”), a name that apparently originated with Joachim at the time of its publication in 1906. For his part, Brahms simply marked this powerful music Allegro.

Piano Trio in E Minor, Opus 90, “Dumky”

ANTONÍN DVORˇ ÁK Born September 8, 1841, Mühlhausen, Bohemia Died May 1, 1904, Prague

Dumky is the plural form of the Russian dumka, a type of Slavonic ballad–perhaps of Ukrainian origin–characterized by a dark and elegiac character. In his “Dumky” Trio,

ER Dvořák makes an important change in this form: FE ST to the melancholy music of the traditional dumka, he adds fast and jubilant music, so that each of his movements consists of sharply-contrasted parts. Dvořák began work on the “Dumky” Trio in November 1890 and completed it on February 12, 1891. When he played the piano part at the first performance in April 1891, Dvořák was a few months short of his fiftieth birthday and at the height of his powers. During the previous year, he had conducted the première of his Eighth Symphony, and in June 1891 would come double honors: he received an honorary degree from Cambridge and was invited to become director of the National Conservatory of Music in New York. Dvořák played the piano in a series of farewell concerts featuring the “Dumky” Trio before departing in the fall of 1892 for his new position in the New World. The last of Dvořák’s four piano trios, the “Dumky” has an unusual form, consisting of six dumka movements, each with slow and fast sections. The first three are played without pause, the fourth dumka is primarily a slow movement, the fifth primarily a fast one, and the sixth shows some elements of the rondo-finale, and so Dvořák’s highly unusual structure may be said–if one needs or wants to understand it that way–to conform to the four-movement shape of the standard piano trio. Far better, though, to take this highly original music, which annihilates sonata form, on its own terms. The “Dumky” Trio is powerfully expressive music, ranging in emotional extremes from fragmentary, grieving slow phrases that often sound right out of Janáček to fast sections much like Dvořák’s own buoyant Slavonic Dances. The odd combination of dark music side-by-side with bright is curiously satisfying, the elegiac and festive sides of Dvořák’s soul flashing out by turns in this intense music. The Lento maestoso opens with falling piano triplets that soon give way to ascetically lean and beautiful string lines; at the Allegro vivace, quasi doppio movimento the music leaps brightly forward, and these two sections alternate before leading directly into the second dumka: Poco Adagio. Here the somber and steady opening pulse gradually leads to a dancing Vivace non troppo, where the violin flies quietly but brilliantly over staccato piano accompaniment; along the way Dvořák offers a brief cello cadenza. The third–Andante–is built on the piano’s chaste opening melody, played at first only by the right hand; the fast section–as in the second dumka–belongs to the violin. The fourth dumka–Andante moderato–has the feel of a slow movement because the fast sections are brief and restrained, almost a part of the fabric of the overall slow tempo. In a similar way, the fifth–Allegro–functions as the work’s fast movement because it opens at a fast tempo and, despite some slow interludes, remains largely at this pace. The opening of the Lento maestoso is dark, grieving, painful, as are the Lento interludes; Dvořák binds them together with vigorous dance sections.

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Duets for Violin and Cello, Opus 39

REINHOLD GLIÈRE

Born January 11, 1875, Kiev Died June 23, 1956, Moscow

The music of Reinhold Glière has almost disappeared from concert life in the West. There was a time when his epic Ilya Murometz Symphony was regularly performed, and his Russian Sailors’ Dance was once a pops concert staple, but even these seem to have drifted off our radar, and performances of his music today are rare. Trained at the Moscow Conservatory, he taught there from 1920 until 1941; among his students were Prokofiev and Miaskovsky. As a composer, Glière was particularly drawn to the folk music of the Transcaucasus region, and his work often has an epic, heroic character (the Ilya Murometz Symphony being one of the best examples). Glière composed five operas, seven ballets, three symphonies, and a number of concertos and other works for orchestra, as well as vocal and chamber music. Glière composed his Eight Duets for Violin and Cello, Opus 39 in 1909, shortly after he had taken up a position as professor at the Gnessin Institute in Moscow. Glière intended these duets as Hausmusik: music–not too difficult–that amateur musicians could play at home simply for enjoyment. That did not prevent his writing technically demanding music, and these duets have been performed and recorded by some of the greatest virtuosos. This recital offers the first seven of the eight duets of Opus 39. The Prelude, which has been recorded by Heifetz and Piatigorsky, has the instruments exchanging roles: one sings the melodic line while the other offers steady accompaniment. The jaunty Gavotte has a musette as its central section: the violin and cello take turns providing this drone accompaniment. The Berceuse (sometimes titled “Cradle Song”) is muted throughout, while in the vigorous Canzonetta the violin sings the main theme over brisk triplet accompaniment from the cello. The Intermezzo is based on an ungainly (but pleasing) dance tune, while in the Impromptu the instruments exchange the long principal melody. This set concludes with the vigorous Scherzo; its Tranquillo center section brings a subtle variant of the vigorous opening theme. Glière’s duets may be Hausmusik, but they are nevertheless difficult enough and appealing enough to attract even the greatest virtuosos–and to give pleasure to all who hear them.

Piano Trio No. 1 in D Minor, Opus 49

FELIX MENDELSSOHN Born February 3, 1809, Hamburg Died November 4, 1847, Leipzig

From 1835 until 1846 Mendelssohn was conductor of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra. Not only were these

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the happiest and most productive years of the composer’s life, but they also marked one of the most distinguished associations ever between a conductor and an orchestra. During his tenure in Leipzig, Mendelssohn raised both performance standards and the salaries of the players, lengthened the season, and worked hard to introduce unfamiliar music to new audiences, seeking out the music of both contemporary and forgotten composers. Once the busy concert season was over, Mendelssohn would use the summer to rest and compose. In the summer of 1839– shortly after he had conducted the première of Schubert’s “Great” Symphony in C Major–Mendelssohn took his wife and young children to Frankfurt for a rest. He had long intended to write chamber music that would include piano, and on June 6 he set to work on the Trio in D Minor. The score was finished on July 18, but Mendelssohn continued to tinker with it until the end of the summer. From the moment of its première, this trio has been a great favorite of both audiences and performers. Passionate, songful, gracefully written for all three instruments, it is one of Mendelssohn’s finest works, and both the trio and its composer were extravagantly praised in Robert Schumann’s review of the première: It is the master trio of today, as in their day were those of Beethoven in B flat and D, as was that of Schubert in E flat; a wholly fine composition, that, when years have passed away, will delight grandchildren. Mendelssohn is the Mozart of the nineteenth century, the brightest among musicians, the one who looks most clearly of all through the contradictions of time, and reconciles us to them. What Schumann meant by that final line has been open to some debate–Mendelssohn’s music hardly seems to admit the existence of contradictions, let alone resolve them–but there is no denying this music’s popularity. The opening Molto allegro ed agitato does not sound especially agitated to twentieth-century ears, which are more likely to be struck by the movement’s continuous flow of melody. In sonata form, this movement is a special favorite of cellists, for the cello introduces both themes. The real glory of the Trio in D Minor lies in the middle two movements. The serene Andante con molto tranquillo belongs largely to the piano, which has the movement’s main theme; the violin and cello are frequently cast in supporting roles here, decorating and embellishing the piano’s music. The scherzo–Leggiero e vivace–is one of those fleet and graceful fast movements that only Mendelssohn could write, and which he could apparently write at will. Though built on two themes, this scherzo lacks the trio section of the classical scherzo. The finale–Allegro assai appassionato–returns to the mood and manner of the opening movement. It is in ABABA form, with a quietly driving first section and a lyric central episode.


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1824-1942:

Richard, Robert & Ludwig WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10 · 8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM R. STRAUSS Sextet for Strings from Capriccio, Opus 85 (1940-1) (1864-1949) Heiichiro Ohyama, viola; Eileen Moon, cello; Verona Quartet Jonathan Ong, Dorothy Ro, violins; Abigail Rojansky, viola; Warren Hagerty, cello

SCHUMANN Piano Quartet in E-flat Major, Opus 47 (1842) (1810-1856) Sostenuto assai; Allegro ma non tanto Scherzo: Molto vivace Andante cantabile Vivace Juho Pohjonen, piano; Kristin Lee, violin; Yura Lee, viola; Clive Greensmith, cello INTERMISSION

BEETHOVEN String Quartet in E-flat Major, Opus 127 (1823-24) (1770-1827) Maestoso; Allegro Adagio, ma non troppo e molto cantabile Scherzando vivace Finale Danish String Quartet Frederik Øland, Rune Tonsgaard Sørensen, violins; Asbjørn Nørgaard, viola; Fredrik Schøyen Sjölin, cello

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PRELUDE 7 PM Lecture by Steven Cassedy Tonight’s concert is sponsored by Medallion Society members:

Vivian Lim and Joseph Wong Many thanks to our Partner:

Whisknladle Hospitality / Catania La Jolla Music Society’s 2015-16 Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, the National Endowment for the Arts, ResMed Foundation, San Diego Gas & Electric, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, The Frieman Family, Rita and Richard Atkinson, Raffaella and John Belanich, Brian and Silvija Devine, John and Kay Hesselink, Jeanette Stevens, Gordon Brodfuehrer, and two anonymous donors. RECOMMENDED LISTENING Beethoven/ Schumann. Beethoven - Schumann: Piano Quartets. Emanuel Ax, Jaime Laredo, Yo-Yo Ma, Isaac Stern. Sony Classical. ASIN: B0000028YP, [1994] Beethoven, Ludwig van. Quartet, Op. 127 in E-Flat: Quartet, Op. 127 in E-Flat: Musettes; Allegro. Tokyo String Quartet. RCA Red Seal. ASIN: B0013ARQ6W, [1992]

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Program Notes By Eric Bromberger

Sextet for Strings from Capriccio, Opus 85

RICHARD STRAUSS

Born June 11, 1864, Munich Died September 8, 1949, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany

Richard Strauss composed Capriccio, his final opera, in 1942 at the age of 78. Far from the expressionistic horror of Salome and Elektra and even from the romantic opulence of Der Rosenkavalier, Capriccio is instead a civilized exploration of the question of which is more important in opera: the words or the music. A composer who had already written fourteen operas might well have thought about this issue in some detail, and Strauss makes clear the essentially philosophic nature of Capriccio by subtitling it “Conversation-Piece for Music.” He then focuses the issue by having a composer (Flamand) and a poet (Olivier) compete for the hand of the widowed Countess Madeleine–each must advance his artistic claims while simultaneously pursuing her romantically. Capriccio begins with a string sextet played from the pit by the orchestra’s principal players. In the opera, this music is simultaneously the overture and Flamand’s latest composition (and most recent love-offering to the Countess–he watches her reactions as it is being performed). Even as it proceeds, Flamand and Olivier begin the debate about the primacy of words or music– their conversation is of course eliminated when the Sextet is performed separately. This is very elegant music, flowing and smooth. It is also music of unusual rhythmic suppleness, with phrases extending across barlines and rhythms often subdivided into quintuplets–it is the sort of music that requires superb players and a great deal of effort to make it sound as effortless as it should. The relaxed atmosphere of the opening gives way to a brief (and somewhat melodramatic) outburst before the opening material returns to lead the Sextet to its polished close. So–what does Countess Madeleine finally decide? Music or words? Flamand or Olivier? Her decision is a surprise. To find out what it is, go see this very pleasing opera.

turned to chamber music. He quickly wrote three string quartets that summer, then the Piano Quintet in October. Working at white heat and assailed by “constant fearful sleepless nights,” Schumann pressed on to complete the Piano Quartet at the end of November. The Quartet has always been overshadowed by the Quintet, one of Schumann’s greatest chamber works, but this is a strong work in its own right. It is one of the finest of all piano quartets–a form that presents composers with numerous problems of voicing, texture, and the balance between piano and strings–and its slow movement is one of the glories of chamber music. The Quartet opens with a slow introduction, marked Sostenuto assai (“Very sustained”); this quiet music will return twice during the course of the movement. The main section of the movement, Allegro ma non tanto, leaps out brightly on four sharp chords, and Schumann gives some idea of his conception of this music in his marking sempre con molto sentimento. The second subject is a big singing tune for cello (marked espressivo), and Schumann develops both themes across the span of this sonata-form movement. The very brief Scherzo: Molto vivace hurries along its steady pulse; Schumann offers two trio sections, both related thematically to the scherzo itself. The third movement is appropriately marked Andante cantabile, for this music does indeed sing. It is in ABA form, and the cello’s lyric main subject dominates the opening section. But the really impressive part of this movement comes in the middle section, which moves into the unexpected key of G-flat major. In the childlike simplicity of its melodic line and the intensity of its expression, this music sounds very much like the slow movements of Beethoven’s late string quartets. The cello does not play during the ornate return of the opening material, for Schumann asks here that the cellist retune the C-string down to B for the closing measures of the movement; this section outlines very slowly the themeshape of the final movement, marked Vivace. Full of fugal entries based on this three-note shape, the finale gives the impression of never-ending energy–even its lyric episodes seem touched with vitality.

String Quartet in E-flat Major, Opus 127 Piano Quartet in E-flat Major, Opus 47

ROBERT SCHUMANN Born June 8, 1810, Zwickau, Germany Died July 29, 1856, Eisenach, Germany

Robert Schumann’s marriage on September 12, 1840, to the young piano virtuosa Clara Wieck–a match that had been bitterly opposed by her father–brought joy to the young couple, and it also marked the beginning of the most productive three years of the composer’s career. From the first year of their marriage came a great outpouring of song, from 1841 came symphonic works, and in 1842 Schumann

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LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Born December 16, 1770, Bonn Died March 26, 1827, Vienna

When Russian prince Nikolas Golitsyn wrote to Beethoven in the fall of 1822 to commission three string quartets, his request met a sympathetic response: the composer had been thinking about writing string quartets for some time and promised to have the first done within a month or two. After seven years of intermittent activity he had resumed sustained composing in 1820 with a set of three piano sonatas, but other projects now intervened,


ER offers a surprise at the ending by including a quick FE ST reminiscence of the trio just before the cadence. The last movement has proven the most difficult for commentators, perhaps because of its apparent simplicity. Marked only Finale (there is no tempo indication), it opens with a four-measure introduction that launches off in the wrong direction before the true main theme appears in the first violin. Of rustic simplicity, this melody has been compared to a country-dance, and the second theme–a jaunty march-tune decorated with grace notes– preserves that atmosphere. The tunes may be innocent, but Beethoven’s treatment of them in this sonata-form movement is quite sophisticated, particularly in matters of modulation and harmony. The ending is particularly striking. At the coda Beethoven rebars the music in 6/8, moves to C major, and speeds ahead on violin trills, chains of triplets, and shimmering textures. The very end, back in E-flat major, is calm, resounding–and perfect.

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and despite the prince’s frequent inquiries Beethoven had to complete the Missa Solemnis, Diabelli Variations, and Ninth Symphony before he could begin work on the first of the three quartets in the summer of 1824. This quartet–in E-flat major–was not complete until February 1825. Performed immediately by the string quartet of Ignaz Schuppanzigh, the music was a failure at its première on March 6, 1825. Furious, Beethoven quickly had it rehearsed and performed by a quartet led by Joseph Böhm. The composer attended their rehearsals and supervised their interpretation (though deaf, he could follow their performance by watching the movement of their bows). The second performance was successful, and this quartet was performed publicly at least ten more times in 1825–an extraordinary number of performances for a new work–and always to great acclaim. That fact is important because it undercuts the notion that Beethoven’s late quartets were far ahead of their time. Certain features of the late quartets did defy quick comprehension, but this was not true of the Quartet in E-flat Major. At first glance, this is the most traditional of Beethoven’s late quartets. It has a relatively straightforward structure: a sonata-form first movement, a variation-form slow movement, a scherzo in ABA form, and a dance-finale. But to reduce this music to such simplicity is to miss the extraordinary originality beneath its appealing and gentle surface. In the first movement, Beethoven seems to set out intentionally to blur the outlines of traditional sonata form, which depends on the opposition of material. Contrast certainly seems to be implied at the beginning, which opens with a firm chordal Maestoso, but this Maestoso quickly melts into the flowing and simple main theme, marked Allegro (Beethoven further specifies that he wants this melody performed teneramente–“tenderly”–and sempre piano e dolce). The powerful Maestoso returns twice more, each time in a different key, and then drops out of the movement altogether; Beethoven builds the movement almost exclusively out of the opening melody and an equally-gentle second subject. Here is a sonataform movement that does not drive to a powerful climax but instead remains understated throughout: the movement evaporates on a wisp of the opening Allegro theme. Two softly-pulsing measures lead to the main theme of the Adagio, a gently-rocking and serene melody introduced by the first violin and repeated by the cello. There follow six melodic variations, each growing organically out of the previous one until the music achieves a kind of rhapsodic calm–and the original theme has been left far behind. Four sharp pizzicato chords introduce the scherzo, and these four chords then vanish, never to re-appear. The fugue-like opening section, built on a dotted figure and its inversion, leads to a brief–and utterly different–trio section. In E-flat minor, this trio whips past in a blistering blur: Beethoven’s phrase markings here stretch over twenty measures at a time. Beethoven brings back the opening section, then

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'FEST FACT: Lights, Camera, Action! UCSD-TV SummerFest videos have received over 3 million views online. Tonight’s performance is the first of three performances to be filmed during SummerFest 2016. See SummerFest performances dating back to 1999 and experience past festival highlights at: www.ucsd.tv/lajollamusicsociety

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Viennese Giants

FRIDAY, AUGUST 12 · 8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM MOZART Piano Quartet in G Minor, K.478 (1785) (1756-1791) Allegro Andante Allegro moderato John Novacek, piano; Kristin Lee, violin; Yura Lee, viola; Clive Greensmith, cello

ZEMLINSKY String Quartet No. 4, Opus 25 (1936) (1871-1942) Präludium: Poco Adagio Burleske: Vivace Adagietto Intermezzo: Allegretto Thema mit Variationen: Barcarolle Finale–Doppelfuge: Allegro molto, energico Escher String Quartet Adam Barnett-Hart, Aaron Boyd, violins; Pierre Lapointe, viola; Brook Speltz, cello

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MUSICAL PRELUDE 7 PM Beacon Street Trio performs Beethoven’s Piano Trio in E-flat Major, Op. 70, No. 2 - See page 66 Tonight’s concert is sponsored by:

Sue and Chris Fan La Jolla Music Society’s 2015-16 Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, the National Endowment for the Arts, ResMed Foundation, San Diego Gas & Electric, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, The Frieman Family, Rita and Richard Atkinson, Raffaella and John Belanich, Brian and Silvija Devine, John and Kay Hesselink, Jeanette Stevens, Gordon Brodfuehrer, and two anonymous donors.

INTERMISSION

WEBERN Six Bagatelles for String Quartet, Opus 9 (1913) (1883-1945) Mässig Leicht bewegt Ziemlich fliessend Sehr langsam Äusserst langsam Fliessend Verona Quartet Jonathan Ong, Dorothy Ro, violins; Abigail Rojansky, viola; Warren Hagerty, cello

KORNGOLD Quintet for Piano and Strings in E Major, Opus 15 (1921) (1897-1957) Mässiges Zeitmass, mit schwungvoll blühenden Ausdruck Mit grösster Ruhe, stets auserst gebundend und ausdruckvoll Finale: Gemessen, beinahe pathetisch; Allegro giocoso Juho Pohjonen, piano; Escher String Quartet

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RECOMMENDED LISTENING Mozart, Wolfgang. Mozart: The Piano Quartets. Andre Previn, Young Uck Kim, Heiichiro Ohyama, Gary Hoffman. RCA Legacy. ASIN: B00000E6MQ, [1993] Zemlinsky, Alexander. Zemlinsky: String Quartets, Vol. 1. Escher String Quartet. Naxos. ASIN: B00DOQBUWE, [2013] Berg / Schoenberg / Webern / Zemlinsky. Webern: 6 Bagatelles For String Quartet, Op.9 - 2 Leicht bewegt. LaSalle Quartet. Deutsche Grammophon. ASIN: B00FRF82L2, [2013] Korngold, Erich. Violin Sonata, Op. 6 / Piano Quintet, Op. 15. Ilona Prunyi, András Kiss, Danubius Quartet. Marco-Polo. ASIN: B007TP5JV4, [1993]


Piano Quartet in G Minor, K.478

WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART Born January 27, 1756, Salzburg Died December 5, 1791, Vienna

Did Mozart invent the piano quartet? He is generally credited with creating the form, but in fact he did not. Other composers–including the fourteen-year-old Beethoven–had previously written quartets for piano and strings, but it was Mozart who first grappled with the central problem of this difficult form–the opposition of such different resources as piano and string trio–and not only solved it but wrote great music in the process. In his piano trios, Mozart sometimes wrote what are essentially piano sonatas with string accompaniment (the piano has the musical interest, while the strings play distinctly subordinate roles), but in the piano quartets he went straight to the difficulties–and the possibilities–of the new form and resolved them by liberating the string voices and making them genuine partners in the musical enterprise. Mozart completed the Piano Quartet in G Minor in Vienna on October 16, 1785, during a particularly rich period for the composer: he was just beginning work on The Marriage of Figaro, and the same year saw the completion of three magnificent piano concertos: Nos. 20-22. Hearing the beginning of this piano quartet without knowing its composer, one might guess not Mozart, but Beethoven. Mozart seems to have reserved the key of G minor for his most intense music (the Symphonies No. 25 and 40 and the Viola Quintet, K.516, for example), and at the first instant of the Allegro all four instruments spit out the brusque opening theme, a six-note phrase very much like the powerful mottos Beethoven would later use as thematic material. A lyrical second subject is introduced by the piano, and the extended development treats both themes fully. The fierce, Beethoven-like motto recurs throughout, with the concluding cadence growing directly out of it. Piano alone sings the poised beginning of the Andante, with strings entering after the statement of the first theme group. Now the melody moves easily between instrumental groups, as piano and strings trade phrases and share the development. The concluding Allegro moderato, which moves to G major rather than back to the opening key of G minor, is a rondo. Once again the piano launches the movement and is quickly joined by the strings. The genial atmosphere of the finale, however, is broken by a lengthy interlude that returns to the stormy manner of the opening movement. At the close, the sunny spirits of the rondo’s opening prevail, and the quartet concludes exuberantly.

String Quartet No. 4, Opus 25

ALEXANDER ZEMLINSKY Born October 14, 1871, Vienna Died March 15, 1942, Larchmont, NY

Alexander Zemlinsky’s career spanned several musical

ER worlds: born and trained in the Vienna of Brahms FE ST (who as an old man admired his works), he died– almost forgotten–in a suburb of New York City during World War II. Early in his life, Zemlinsky became close friends with Schoenberg (who married his sister) and with him formed a new-music society in Vienna; Mahler conducted the première of his opera Es war einmal at the Staatsoper. Zemlinsky made his own career largely as a conductor, first in Prague (where he led the première of Schoenberg’s Erwartung) and later at the Kroll Opera in Berlin, where he was an assistant to Otto Klemperer. When the Nazis came to power in 1933, Zemlinsky fled first to Vienna and then to the US in 1938. Like many composers at the turn of the century, Zemlinsky found himself trapped between the heritage of Viennese classicism and the new directions Schoenberg and his followers were taking in the first decades of this century. Zemlinsky struggled with this conflict: he could be attracted by the new ideas in music, but his own music remained firmly anchored in tonality. His output is small (only 27 opus numbers), and of these, four are string quartets. Zemlinsky’s final quartet was written in response to a devastating event: Alban Berg, aged only 50, died on Christmas Day 1935 from overwhelming sepsis, the result of a bee sting. Zemlinsky began to plan a memorial work, and in the fall of 1936 he composed a work for string quartet. But what he wrote is not a quartet in the traditional sense. Rather, the Fourth String Quartet is a suite-like work in six movements, and these are subdivided into three pairs of two movements each; all three of these pairs are in a slowfast sequence. The late 1930s was a turbulent moment in Austrian history, and Zemlinsky could not find a publisher for his new quartet, nor he could find a string quartet interested in playing it. He never heard a note of his Fourth Quartet: he fled to America at the Anschluss in 1938 and died four years later. The Fourth Quartet was not premièred until April 21, 1967, more than thirty years after it was composed. Its structure may be described briefly. The opening of the Präludium is dark and somber, but gradually the music unfolds and the mood is somewhat lightened by playful violin lines. In sharp contrast, the Burleske is full of energy–spiky pizzicatos and strong unisons drive the music forward; the central episode is lyric and grieving, and the movement closes with an emphatic pizzicato chord. The second pair opens with an Adagietto somewhat in the manner of the opening Präludium, and this gives way to a dancing Intermezzo. This music flows gracefully at first, but soon blazes out, driven along powerful triplet rhythms. The final pair begins with an unusual variation movement, opening with a long cello solo in the manner of a gentlyrocking barcarole, and then Zemlinsky creates a series of variations on this melody over shimmering, murmuring accompaniment. The Finale is a double fugue: its first subject is spiky and hard-edged, the second more sinuous. This movement is quite brief–Zemlinsky works these fugues out concisely–and the Fourth Quartet drives to a sonorous, full-throated conclusion.

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Six Bagatelles for String Quartet, Opus 9

ANTON WEBERN

Born December 3, 1883, Vienna Died September 15, 1945, Mittersill

Listeners should always be wary of works entitled Bagatelles. In French, that title means “trifles,” and a bagatelle is a short piece of seemingly-insignificant music (Beethoven’s Für Elise is one of the most famous examples). But that title need not always refer to simple or insignificant music, as Webern’s extremely concentrated Six Bagatelles make clear. This music dates from 1913, when the thirtyyear-old Webern had completed his studies with Schoenberg and was attempting to make a career as a conductor. As a composer, Webern had at this point moved beyond tonality, though he had not yet moved to the twelve-tone techniques of his famous teacher. His Six Bagatelles might best be described as instrumental miniatures of extraordinary compression: the longest is 13 measures long, the shortest only 8. Webern himself said of this music’s unusual focus: “While working on them I had the feeling that once the 12 notes had run out, the piece was finished . . . It sounds grotesque, incomprehensible, and it was immensely difficult.” Yet listeners should not expect abrasive or unpleasant music–these brief pieces all breathe the air of turn-of-the-century romanticism: Webern’s only expressive marking is sehr zart (“Very tender”), and this appears in four of the six pieces. These are evocative pieces, usually very quiet and sometimes eerie in their effects. Webern’s score is littered with performance instructions, specifying where on the bow and string he wants passages played and exactly how he wants them to sound; he uses the full palette of string sound in this work, which lasts a total of barely four minutes: harmonics, pizzicatos, spiccatos, as well as contrasted muted and unmuted lines. When the Six Bagatelles were published in 1924, Schoenberg offered a typically cryptic introduction to the printed score that does get at the essence of this music: “Consider what moderation is required to express oneself so briefly. You can stretch every glance out to a poem, every sigh into a novel. But to express a novel in a single gesture, a joy in a breath–such concentration can only be present in proportion to the absence of self-pity. “These pieces will only be understood by those who share the faith that music can say things which can only be expressed by music.”

Quintet for Piano and Strings in E Major, Opus 15

ERICH WOLFGANG KORNGOLD Born May 29, 1897, Brno Died November 29, 1957, Hollywood

Few child composers have been as precocious as Erich Wolfgang Korngold. His cantata Gold, composed when he was ten, amazed Mahler, who pronounced the boy a “genius.” Those impressed by his talents included Richard Strauss and Puccini, who said: “That boy’s talent is so great, he could

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easily give us half and still have enough left for himself!” Korngold’s opera Die tote Stadt had simultaneous premières in Hamburg and Cologne on December 4, 1920, when the composer was all of 23, and in the 1920s Korngold was one of the most admired composers in Europe. And then his career took an unexpected turn. Invited to Hollywood to help score a film, Korngold found his romantic idiom ideally suited to film music, and when Hitler came to power Korngold moved his family to Hollywood, where he achieved his greatest success with swashbuckling music for Errol Flynn movies like Captain Blood, Robin Hood, and The Sea Hawk. As soon as the war was over, Korngold put films behind him to return to “serious” music but could never escape his Hollywood reputation, particularly since he used themes from many of his film scores in his classical works; the most successful of these is the 1945 Violin Concerto, championed by Heifetz. Korngold wrote his Piano Quintet in 1920-21, shortly after completing Die tote Stadt, and dedicated it to the Austrian sculptor Gustinus Ambrosi (1893-1975); the work was premièred in Hamburg in February 1923 with the composer at the piano. This was a period of tremendous ferment in Europe, both politically and musically and Korngold’s music reflects it at one moment it can sing with a creamy Viennese voluptuousness, and the next it can almost tear at itself with a sort of expressionistic intensity. Something of the music’s force can be sensed from Korngold’s extremely long and detailed performance marking for each movement. He marks the first movement Mässiges Zeitmass, mit schwungvoll blühenden Ausdruck (“Moderate tempo, with energetically blossoming expression”). The music opens with a soaring unison passage for strings of a distinctly Viennese complexion, and this full-throated expression will characterize much of the work. Much of the writing, full of glissandos and trills, verges on the violent, and as the movement drives to a huge climax, it offers dark interludes along the way. Korngold gives the Adagio second movement the marking Mit grösster Ruhe, stets auserst gebundend und ausdruckvoll (“With the greatest calm, always extremely legato and expressive”). This movement is a set of variations on Korngold’s song “Mond so gehst du wieder”. Some have detected secretly-coded messages of love from Korngold to his fiancée in this movement, but one need not know this to enjoy the music. Korngold offers nine variations on his fundamental theme, which concludes on a massive and very quiet chord that has all the strings playing harmonics and extends across much of the range of the keyboard. The finale, a rondo, opens with a powerful introduction marked Gemessen, beinahe pathetisch (“Measured, almost pathetic”), before the music leaps ahead at the Allegro giocoso. Korngold concludes with a fast coda that includes a fleeting recall of the opening theme of the first movement.


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30 Anniversary Gala SATURDAY, AUGUST 13, 2016 AT

Rancho delArte

HOME OF IRIS AND MATTHEW STRAUSS 6:00 PM CHAMPAGNE RECEPTION 7:00 PM CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERT

BARTÓK Selections from 44 Duos for Two Violins, Sz.98 (1931)

(1881-1945) Adam Barnett-Hart, Cho-Liang Lin, violins WOLF Italian Serenade (1887) (1860-1903) Escher String Quartet

Beatriz Milhazes O Guitarrista (The Guitarist), 2000 acrylic on canvas 110 x 62 1/2in. (279.4 x 158.8cm) Collection of Matthew and Iris Strauss © Beatriz Milhazes. Photo: Pablo Mason

Adam Barnett-Hart, Aaron Boyd, violins; Pierre LaPointe, viola; Brook Speltz, cello

SummerFest 2016 30th Anniversary Gala Chair:

DVORˇÁK Terzetto in C Major for Two Violins and Viola Opus 74 (1887) (1841-1904) Introduzione; Allegro ma non troppo Larghetto Scherzo: Vivace Tema con variazioni: Poco adagio; Moderato; Molto allegro

Sue Wagener

Aaron Boyd, Yura Lee, violins; Pierre LaPointe, viola

La Jolla Music Society’s 2015-16 Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, the National Endowment for the Arts, ResMed Foundation, San Diego Gas & Electric, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, The Frieman Family, Rita and Richard Atkinson, Raffaella and John Belanich, Brian and Silvija Devine, John and Kay Hesselink, Jeanette Stevens, Gordon Brodfuehrer, and two anonymous donors.

7:45 PM SEATED DINNER 9:00 PM AFTER-PARTY DESSERT AND DANCING

Presenting Sponsor:

Conrad Prebys and Debbie Turner

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SEAN SHEPHERD

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SUNDAY, AUGUST 14 · 3 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM THOMAS Bells Ring Summer (2000)

(b. 1964) Felix Fan, cello Commissioned by Joan and Irwin Jacobs for La Jolla Music Society SummerFest.

SHEPHERD String Quartet No. 2 (2015) West Coast Première (b. 1979) FLUX Quartet

Tom Chiu, Conrad Harris, violins; Max Mandel, viola; Felix Fan, cello Commissioned by La Jolla Music Society SummerFest and Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival.

TSONTAKIS

Stimulus Package (2009)

(b. 1951) Felix Fan, cello; John Novacek, piano; Aiyun Huang, percussion Commissioned by La Jolla Music Society SummerFest and Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival for Real Quiet. INTERMISSION

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(b. 1957)

String Quartet “almost all the time” (2014) California Première

PRELUDE 2 PM Conversation with Composerin-Residence Sean Shepherd hosted by Marcus Overton Today’s concert is sponsored by Medallion Society members:

Silvija and Brian Devine La Jolla Music Society’s 2015-16 Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, the National Endowment for the Arts, ResMed Foundation, San Diego Gas & Electric, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, The Frieman Family, Rita and Richard Atkinson, Raffaella and John Belanich, Brian and Silvija Devine, John and Kay Hesselink, Jeanette Stevens, Gordon Brodfuehrer, and two anonymous donors.

FLUX Quartet Commissioned by La Jolla Music Society SummerFest, Sage Gateshead and Chamber Music Northwest for the FLUX Quartet.

DANIELPOUR Clarinet Quintet “The Last Jew in Hamadan” (2015) California (b. 1956) Burt Hara, clarinet;

Première

Verona Quartet Jonathan Ong, Dorothy Ro, violins; Abigail Rojansky, viola; Warren Hagerty, cello Commissioned by La Jolla Music Society SummerFest and Chamber Music Northwest, with generous support from the CMNW Commissioning Fund.

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RECOMMENDED LISTENING Tsontakis, George. Mirologhia; October; Violin Concerto No. 1. David Alan Miller, Albany Symphony Orchestra, Colin Currie, Eleni Calenos, Cho-Liang Lin. Koch Int’L Classics. ASIN: B001EQP9XW, [2008] Danielpour / Kirchner / Rouse. Premieres - Cello Concertos. Philadelphia Orchestra, Yo-Yo Ma, David Zinman. Sony Classical. ASIN: B000002AQA, [1996]


AUGUSTA READ THOMAS Born 1964, Glen Cove, New York

Bells Ring Summer is a short fanfare for solo cello. The music starts with bold and relentless ringing tones, like a carillon blowing in the wind. The same pitches are played on adjacent strings, celebrating the vast color fields of the cello itself. Little by little, the bells climb higher in register, while athletic and dramatic lower register events interrupt their flow. Finally, as if only a fragile echo remains, the bells ring off into silence with battuto, col legno, pizzicato, in the highest register of the instrument. Dedicated with admiration and gratitude to David Finckel. The work was made with David’s powerful, musical and exquisite sound in my ear. - Augusta Read Thomas

String Quartet No. 2

SEAN SHEPHERD Born 1979, Reno, Nevada

The string quartet, as composers love to say, is a heavy medium. Sturdy; imposing. Daunting. Going back to Haydn, it’s been a realm and repository of big, serious ideas. For some, it served as the proving ground for their most radical (or depending on one’s perspective, poetic) thoughts [Beethoven, Bartók, Dutilleux]. For some, it was a playground for refining techniques and a place to assert one’s aesthetic priorities [Brahms, Schoenberg]. For some [Debussy, Ravel], their music for string quartet is simply the perfect, distilled essence of the full breadth and depth of their work, nothing more and nothing less. For my (well, now: First) string quartet, written exactly ten years ago, in 2005, this was my chance to dump everything I’d ever thought or known about music into one sprawling piece. 32 minutes of lots and lots of stuff. Sadly(?), the young group I wrote it for disbanded the week before the scheduled premiere, and I was left feeling as though I’d poured my heart into the bottom of a bucket. I never heard the piece performed live, and always felt that I really missed out on a big chance to experience it and to learn from what I did. But as the years passed, I realized that growth was in the stretching, and that I had actually applied those lessons to other works with much better acumen and result. I also learned that setting out to say something important can be presumptuous once one realizes that the artist is often not the best judge of what’s really important in their work. I’m now glad I missed hearing that piece; it made it much easier to cut the wild hedges back to the one movement, the eleven minutes that I’ve let remain. For my second quartet, I decided to take a different tack. My head was full of ideas from the start, but I aimed very directly toward design, toward abstraction, toward the notions of absolute music that, for many, is the essence of

ER the medium of the quartet. I’ve taken this part of the FE ST namesake of the piece, the number two, and used it in broad and simple ways to plan the arc and structure: two movements; two sections in each: slow/fast, then fast/slow.

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Stimulus Package

GEORGE TSONTAKIS Born 1951, Astoria, New York

The inspiration for the title of my work, Stimulus Package might seem more than obvious now, but I am hoping that in a short time, the phrase will have but an anachronistic if not nostalgic ring to some and the universal meaning to others. While I don’t think that this piece for Real Quiet will in any way allay the world’s current economic woes, it’s fun to be a part of current events creatively, if only in title. I must report however that the commission for this work, for the La Jolla and Santa Fe music festivals, has certainly stimulated my own package and I have all the commissioning principals (not Congress nor even the president) to thank for it. As one might imagine, I am often asked what kinds of music have influenced my composing style. Among the many idioms I could point to, the music of Crete – which I grew up hearing as a Cretan (Greek) American – stands out among the most vivid and most powerful. It is also, instrumentally, the most economical, as it is formed, in almost all cases, by two instruments – the Lyra (Lyre) and the Lauto (Lute, or Oud) – with vocals, as sung by one or the of the other players. Traditionally played by two men dressed in Cretan garb – black outfits which include baggy pantaloons and a headband of tassels – the music is driving and incessantly repetitive, surging in short, looping melodic fragments which reoccur in myriad fragments. The lauto creates the fanciful dance rhythms, similar to a rhythm guitar while the lyra (played on the knee with a bow, similar to a viola da gamba but with a much brighter tone and a “whine” which reminds me of a folk clarinet as much as it does a violin) prances with the vocal line, a seemingly strophic setting of text on the surface, but with most intriguing rhythmic inventions, following the text faithfully and poetically in a kind of chant-song. There is no other music I have heard quite like it. While this music has always informed an aspect of my music, in Stimulus Package, it comes to the forefront, especially in Part One. When I was asked to write for Real Quiet, the idea of their unique trio combination of cello, piano and percussion had me thinking immediately of “them” as an abstraction of the Cretan essential duo. I “heard” the cello as a rather oversized lyra and the piano as the lauto. The percussion jockeys back and forth between the two, adding at once, the bright lyra-like overtones to the cello and then, coloring the piano attacks with a glint or ping here and there. And of course, the piano gets to strum 858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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a bit and the musicians get to chant. In “What Papou Heard,” I might be trying to imagine what my very Cretan, old world grandfather and namesake “really heard” when he listened to me improvising my earlier, more abstract and modernist music on the piano; that some would call angular, atonal and a-rhythmical. Glancing backward, I might catch him strangely involved in a Zorba-like Greek dance while holding high a shot of Metaxa. It begins with an “Ison” (a sustained-pedal “chant tone”) over which the cello floats a “melismatic” melody in the tradition of a moaning “tahimi.” With the super-wide vibrato I’ve called for (as well as a tuning down an interval to loosen the tension of the A string) the result might be more like the sound of the “yiali-tambour” than the lyra, another bowed instrument sounding in the violin family. In “Cheer Me Up.” and for this section I indulged myself, writing something that would do me just that – although I think my papou would like it just as well. The temperament shifts in the second part, “Odyssey.” A less Cretan, but essentially “eastern” ambience remains. Rhythms broaden, time coasts in a harmonic liquid but swell up in undulating waves of arpeggios and tremolos. Verging on eastern “new age,” perhaps, but hopefully steering clear of it (this is not Yianni) the movement features a middle section of a more active and quixotic nature before it returns to its aquatic voyage, ending with a hint of Cretan music. Stimulus Package was co-commissioned by Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival and La Jolla Music Society SummerFest for Real Quiet and I am ever grateful for the opportunity to write the work. - George Tsontakis

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String Quartet “almost all the time”

DAVID LANG

Clarinet Quintet “The Last Jew in Hamadan”

RICHARD DANIELPOUR Born 1956, New York City, New York

My father was born in the city of Hamadan, a city northwest of Teheran in Iran which for years had a rather large Jewish population, in what was then and is now considered an essentially Islamic country. My maternal grandfather was also born in the same city – the city in which Esther, the Jewish queen in ancient Persia, is buried. While I had never visited Hamadan myself, I lived in Teheran as a child, for nearly a year when I was 7½ years old. The memories are still very vivid, and while I was there with my family for only 11 months, I saw a city that, while seeming far more primitive than the United States, was a place of great vitality and had among its people a deep enthusiasm for art, music, literature, and film. It had also become a country of great excess among the rich, which probably contributed in a large part to the revolution that followed. In the immediate years following the revolution of 1979, I remembered stories about one of my uncles being executed by the regime of the Ayatollah Khomeini, another uncle who escaped from the Evin prison, and a third family member who escaped to Turkey disguised as a mullah. A few years ago I was reading in the New York Times that there were at the time 13 Jews left in the city of Hamadan; I realized that one day there would be no more Jewish people living in the biblical city of Esther. The first movement of my Clarinet Quintet was composed with the memory that I had as a child of Iran as it was then. The second movement is a reflection of my sense of what it has become now. The work, which was written in the first three months of 2015, is dedicated to David Shifrin. - Richard Danielpour

Born 1957, Los Angeles, California

Sometimes I like to pose little compositional questions to myself, while I write. How slowly can a line fall? How quietly can a certain instrument play? My string quartet ‘almost all the time’ began with a similar question. Can you build a piece of music the way a person is built? In other words, can a piece begin as identical little microscopic cells that then differentiate into other functions across time? For my piece the ‘cell’ would be a little 10 note strand of musical DNA, and no matter how the functions changed or how the individual parts separated, the core of each musical gesture would be the little 10 note strand. For this to work the way it works in a person, the DNA would have to present in every gesture, in every phrase, in every instrument, all the time. To make it musical I ended up cheating a little bit, so I called it ‘almost all the time.’ - David Lang

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'FEST FACT: Mission to Commission Carrying forward a tradition reaching back to the Musical Arts Society of La Jolla, SummerFest has commissioned 55 new works from 46 living composers. See the complete listing of SummerFest’s Commission History on page 85.


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Spiritual Journey

TUESDAY, AUGUST 16 · 8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM DUTILLEUX Ainsi la nuit (1973-6) (1916-2013) Introduction I. Nocturne Parenthèse 1 II. Miroir d’espace Parenthèse 2 III. Litanies Parenthèse 3 IV. Litanies 2 Parenthèse 4 V. Constellations VI. Nocturne 2 VII. Temps suspendu Escher String Quartet Adam Barnett-Hart, Aaron Boyd, violins; Pierre Lapointe, viola; Brook Speltz, cello

FAURÉ Piano Trio in D Minor, Opus 120 (1922-3) (1845-1924) Allegro, ma non troppo Andantino Allegro vivo Beacon Street Trio Sophie Scolnik-Brower, piano; Luke Hsu, violin; Rainer Crosett, cello INTERMISSION

MESSIAEN Quatuor pour la Fin du Temps (1940-1) (1908-1992) Liturgie de cristal Vocalise, pour l’Ange qui annonce la fin du temps Abîme des oiseaux Intermède Louange à l’Éternité de Jésus Danse de la fureur, pour les sept trompettes Fouillis d’arcs-en-ciel, pour l’Ange qui annonce la fin du temps Louange à l’Immortalité de Jésus

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MUSICAL PRELUDE 7 PM Verona Quartet performs Bartók’s String Quartet, No. 5 - See page 66 Tonight’s concert is sponsored by Medallion Society members:

Helen and Keith Kim Many thanks to our Partner:

La Valencia Hotel and The MED Restaurant La Jolla Music Society’s 2015-16 Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, the National Endowment for the Arts, ResMed Foundation, San Diego Gas & Electric, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, The Frieman Family, Rita and Richard Atkinson, Raffaella and John Belanich, Brian and Silvija Devine, John and Kay Hesselink, Jeanette Stevens, Gordon Brodfuehrer, and two anonymous donors. RECOMMENDED LISTENING Debussy / Ravel / Dutilleux. String Quartets: Ainsi La Nuit For String Quartet/Ainsi La Nuit. Juilliard String Quartet. Sony Classical. ASIN: B001V6K4XA, [2009] Faure, Gabriel. Piano Trio, Op. 120; Piano Quartet No. 1, Op. 15. Beaux Arts Trio, Kim Kashkashian. Philips. ASIN: B00000E3UY, [1990] Messiaen, Olivier. Quartet for the End of Time. Tashi Quartet, Peter Serkin, Richard Stolzman, Ida Kavafian, Fred Sherry. Sony Classical. ASIN: B000003ERU, [1988]

Burt Hara, clarinet; Kristin Lee, violin; John Sharp, cello; John Novacek, piano 858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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Program Notes By Eric Bromberger

Ainsi la nuit

HENRI DUTILLEUX Born January 22, 1916, Angers, France Died May 23, 2013, Paris

Henri Dutilleux was one of the most careful of craftsmen. Ideas for a piece might germinate for years, the process of composition was slow, and a piece might be revised over a course of years before the composer was satisfied. As a result, Dutilleux’s body of work is very small, and–not surprisingly–he often missed deadlines, sometimes by a number of years. Such was the case with the composer’s only string quartet, which he titled Ainsi la nuit (“Thus the Night”). In the early 1970s the Koussevitzky Foundation commissioned a work for the Juilliard String Quartet from Dutilleux. Dutilleux had written nothing for string quartet since some student pieces while at the Paris Conservatory forty years earlier, and now he began cautiously, going back and studying works for quartet by Webern, Berg, Beethoven, and Bartók. Then Dutilleux composed three short movements, which he titled Nuit (“Night”), and sent them to the Juilliard in 1974. They were not in any sense finished compositions, but Dutilleux wanted to give the Juilliard some sense of his writing for quartet. Once the Juilliard had played through those pieces and approved, Dutilleux resumed work and over the next two years reworked and combined those movements into Ainsi la nuit, which was premièred by the Parenin Quartet in Paris on January 6, 1977. The Juilliard gave the American première the following year at the Library of Congress, and over the last forty years Ainsi la nuit has become one of Dutilleux’s most frequently-performed compositions–it is now available in over a dozen recordings. Despite its evocative title, Ainsi la nuit is not based on a literary text, nor does it in any way offer a program. Dutilleux preferred to remain silent about the meaning of his title, and he would not explain the significance of the titles of individual movements, saying only that the music offers “a sort of nocturnal vision . . . a series of ‘states’ with a somewhat impressionist side to them.” Dutilleux did not like breaks between movements, feeling that they impeded the steady unfolding of musical ideas across the span of a complete work, and as a result Ainsi la nuit has an unusual structure. Only about twenty minutes long, it consists of seven principal movements, but Dutilleux also wrote an Introduction and then joined together the first five movements with what he called “parentheses”: brief linking passages that nevertheless serve important thematic functions. One observer has called these “nests”: they gather up ideas that have been previously introduced and present material that will continue to develop Only the final two movements are separate–that is, not linked by parentheses.

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Ainsi la nuit is music of stupefying difficulty for the performers, and it challenges audiences as well. It has been observed that much of the musical material for the quartet grows out of a wide hexachord first heard very quietly at the close of the first measure of the Introduction–Dutilleux will proceed to build Ainsi la nuit on intervals and cells derived from that chord. But listeners coming new to this music may be best advised not to try to follow those thematic cells or even to try to make out the divisions between movements and parentheses. Instead, they might best approach Ainsi la nuit through the incredible soundworld Dutilleux creates (this truly is a “nocturnal vision”) and by following the arc of this musical journey across its twenty-minute span. Dutilleux requires every type of string technique from his performers–artificial harmonics, pizzicato, sul tasto (playing over the fingerboard), ponticello (playing on top of the bridge), glissandos, and so on. These are normal enough, certainly, but Dutilleux employs them within music of extraordinary rhythmic complexity and extraordinary rhythmic freedom. The writing is often very high (frequently at the very top of the performers’ fingerboards), and while there are certainly animated and loud moments here, much of this music is extremely quiet. Misterioso is a frequent marking, and Dutilleux will specify “Very mysterious and distant” and at one point lontanissimo: “as distant as possible.” Dutilleux was pleased with Ainsi la nuit and often expressed a desire to write a second quartet. He was 60 when he completed it, and though he lived until age 97, he never wrote another.

Piano Trio in D Minor, Opus 120

GABRIEL FAURÉ Born May 12, 1845, Pamiers, France Died November 4, 1924, Paris

In the final years of his long life, Fauré turned to chamber music, producing six major works between 1916 and 1924. This was an extremely difficult time for the composer, for it brought not only the First World War but also the serious decline of his health. He had begun to suffer from deafness about twenty years earlier, and the gradual decay of his hearing was accompanied by a neural distortion that caused him to hear notes at incorrect pitches. Fauré also suffered from difficulty breathing (perhaps the result of his heavy smoking), and for extended periods in the early 1920s he lived as a virtual recluse, never leaving his room in Paris. It was during this difficult period that Fauré wrote his only piano trio. He began work on it in September 1922 while on vacation in the village of Annecy-le-Vieux, in one of his favorite places, the mountains of Savoy near the Swiss border; the score was completed following his return to Paris in October. It is not surprising that music written under such conditions should be so expressive, and


Quatuor pour la Fin du Temps

OLIVIER MESSIAEN Born December 10, 1908, Avignon Died April 28, 1992, Paris

Called up during World War II, Olivier Messiaen was serving as a medical auxiliary when the Germans overran France in the spring of 1940. He was taken prisoner and sent to a POW camp east of Dresden, where he discovered among his fellow prisoners a violinist, a clarinetist, and a cellist. A sympathetic German camp commander supplied Messiaen with manuscript paper and arranged to have an upright piano–old and out of tune–brought in for his use. That fall, Messiaen wrote an extended work called Quartet for the End of Time for the four musicians, who gave the première performance at that prison camp–Stalag VIII A– on January 15, 1941. Their audience consisted of 5000 fellow POWs, who sat outside in sub-freezing temperatures to hear the performance. “Never have I been listened to with such attention and understanding,” said Messiaen of that occasion. It would be incorrect, however, to assume that the Quartet for the End of Time was written in response to the seemingly-endless existence of prisoners of war. Rather, Messiaen–a devout Christian–took his inspiration from the Revelation of St. John the Divine in the Apocrypha, specifically from the tenth chapter: “I saw a mighty angel, descending from heaven, clothed in a cloud, having a rainbow on his head. His face was as the sun, his feet as columns of fire. He placed his right foot on the sea and his

ER left foot on the earth, and, supporting himself on FE ST the sea and on the earth, he raised his hand towards Heaven and swore by Him who lives forever and ever, saying: There will be no more Time; but on the day of the trumpet of the seventh angel, the mystery of God will be completed.” The Quartet is an expression of faith in the resurrection from temporal existence, a faith expressed in many ways. For example, the work is in eight movements because while seven is “the perfect number” (the number of days of the creation), the music here “extends into eternity and becomes the eighth, of unfailing light, of immutable peace.” The notion of the dissolution of time is further reflected in the metrical notation of the music itself. Messiaen sometimes uses traditional meters and bar lines, but the actual metric flow of the music often has nothing to do with the prescribed measures; at other points he dispenses with an established meter altogether. The instrumentation varies (only in certain movements do all four instruments play simultaneously), and the Quartet also marks the first appearance of birdsong in Messiaen’s music–he was fascinated by the songs of individual birds, carefully notated these songs, and used them as an important thematic feature of his music from this point on. Messiaen himself prepared a detailed and colorful description of the eight movements, worth quoting at length: - Liturgie de cristal (Liturgy of Crystal): Between the hours of three and four in the morning, the awakening of the birds: a thrush or a nightingale soloist improvises, amid notes of shining sound and a halo of trills that lose themselves high in the trees. Transpose this to the religious plane: you will have the harmonious silence of heaven. - Vocalise, pour l’Ange qui annonce la fin du temps (Vocalise, for the angel who announces the end of time): The first and third parts (very short) evoke the power of that mighty angel, his hair a rainbow and his clothing mist, who places one foot on the sea and one foot on the earth. Between these sections are the ineffable harmonies of heaven. From the piano, soft cascades of blue-orange chords, encircling with their distant carillon the plainchant-like recitativo of the violin and cello. - Abîme des oiseaux (Abyss of the birds) Clarinet solo. The abyss is Time, with its sadnesses and tedium. The birds are the opposite of Time; they are the desire for light, for stars, for rainbows and for jubilant outpourings of song! - Intermède (Intermezzo). Of a more outgoing character than the other movements but related to them, nonetheless, by various melodic references. - Louange à l’Éternité de Jésus (Praise to the Eternity of Jesus) Jesus is here considered as one with the Word. A long phrase, infinitely slow, by the cello expatiates with love and reverence on

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the gentle Piano Trio has been hailed as one of Fauré’s masterpieces. At the heart of this music is its wonderful slow movement, marked simply Andantino–Fauré actually wrote this movement first. Longest of the three movements, the F-major Andantino is based on its radiant, lyric opening idea, which passes seamlessly between violin and cello while the piano offers simple chordal accompaniment. The movement is in ternary form, with a more animated middle section before the return of the opening material, altered on its reappearance. Fauré frames the Andantino with two fast movements. The opening Allegro ma non troppo, in D minor, is in sonata form. The concluding Allegro vivo opens with a conversation between strings and piano and finally drives to an animated, exuberant close in D major. The Trio received a private hearing at the home of a friend of the composer before its official première. Following this music’s sunny conclusion, the composer turned to the woman who had been his hostess at Annecy-le-Vieux and said: “That’s what your hospitality leads to.” The public première of the Piano Trio took place at a Societé Nationale concert on May 12, 1923, Fauré’s 78th birthday. The composer, however, was too ill to attend and remained in his room.

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the everlastingness of the Word, mighty and dulcet, “which the years can in no way exhaust.” Majestically the melody unfolds itself at a distance both intimate and awesome. “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.” - Danse de la fureur, pour les sept trompettes (Dance of fury for the seven trumpets) Rhythmically the most idiosyncratic movement of the set. The four instruments in unison give the effect of gongs and trumpets (the first six trumpets of the Apocalypse attend various catastrophes, the trumpet of the seventh angel announces the consummation of the mystery of God). Use of extended note values, augmented or diminished rhythmic patterns, non-retrogradable rhythms–a systematic use of values which, read from left to right or from right to left, remain the same. Music of stone, formidable sonority; movement as irresistible as steel, as huge blocks of livid fury, of icelike frenzy. Listen particularly to the terrifying fortissimo of the theme in augmentation and with change of register of its different notes, toward the end of the piece. - Fouillis d’arcs-en-ciel, pour l’Ange qui annonce la fin du temps (Clusters of rainbows, for the angel who announces the end of time) Here certain passages from the second movement return. The mighty angel appears, and in particular the rainbow that envelops him (the rainbow, symbol of peace, of wisdom, of every quiver of luminosity and sound). In my dreamings I hear and see ordered melodies and chords, familiar hues and forms; then, following the transitory stage, I pass into the unreal and submit ecstatically to a vortex, a dizzying interpenetration of superhuman sounds and colors. These fiery swords, these rivers of blue-orange lava, these sudden stars: Behold the cluster, behold the rainbows! - Louange à l’Immortalité de Jésus (Praise to the Immortality of Jesus) Expansive violin solo balancing the cello solo of the fifth movement. Why this second glorification? It addresses itself more specifically to the second aspect of Jesus–to Jesus the man, to the Word made flesh, raised up immortal from the dead so as to communicate His life to us. It is total love. Its slow rising to a supreme point is the ascension of man toward his God, of the Son of God toward his Father, of the mortal newly made divine toward paradise – And I repeat anew what I said above: All this is mere striving and childish stammering if one compares it to the overwhelming grandeur of the subject!

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'FEST FACT: Home Away from Home It has been a long-standing tradition to house SummerFest artists in private homes throughout La Jolla. This festival, our generous hosts have opened their homes to over 65 musicians! See the complete list of SummerFest Hosts on page 87.

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an evening with Paquito D’Rivera:

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Jazz Meets the Classics

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17 · 8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM PIAZZOLLA Concierto para Quinteto (1981) (1921-1992) Paquito D’Rivera, clarinet;

Pablo Aslan, bass Escher String Quartet Adam Barnett-Hart, Aaron Boyd, violins; Pierre Lapointe, viola; Brook Speltz, cello PAQUITO D'RIVERA

D’RIVERA Fiddle Dreams for Violin and Piano (2001) (b. 1948) Andrew Wan, violin; Alex Brown, piano

Four Pieces from the South Preludio & Merengue (2003) Vals Venezolano (1990) Bandoneón (2012) La Fleur de Cayenne (2014) Paquito D’Rivera, clarinet; Escher String Quartet; Pablo Aslan, bass; Alex Brown, piano INTERMISSION

SENANES Contratango (2016) World Première

MUSICAL PRELUDE 7 PM Beacon Street Trio performs Ravel’s Piano Trio in A Minor - See page 67

(b. 1956) Escher String Quartet; Pablo Aslan, bass

ASLAN Tangua (2016)

(b. 1962) Paquito D’Rivera, clarinet; Escher String Quartet;

Pablo Aslan, bass

G.M. RODRIGUEZ La Cumparsita (1917)

(1897-1948) Paquito D’Rivera, clarinet; Escher String Quartet;

Pablo Aslan, bass

D’RIVERA Ladies in White (2010)

Paquito D’Rivera, clarinet; Brook Speltz, cello;

Alex Brown, piano

Improvisations for Clarinet and Piano

Paquito D’Rivera, clarinet; Alex Brown, piano

La Jolla Music Society’s 2015-16 Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, the National Endowment for the Arts, ResMed Foundation, San Diego Gas & Electric, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, The Frieman Family, Rita and Richard Atkinson, Raffaella and John Belanich, Brian and Silvija Devine, John and Kay Hesselink, Jeanette Stevens, Gordon Brodfuehrer, and two anonymous donors. RECOMMENDED LISTENING D’Rivera, Paquito. Paquito & Manzanero. Sunnyside Records. ASIN: B015PD2HVQ, [2016] D’Rivera, Paquito. Paquito & Quinteto Cimarron in Aires Tropicales. Sunnyside Records. ASIN: B00VUVDHXK, [2015]

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Concierto para Quinteto

ASTOR PIAZZOLLA

Born March 11, 1921, Mar del Plata, Argentina Died July 4, 1992 Buenos Aires

Around 1981, Astor Piazzolla composed this impressive piece for his own violin, bandoneón, piano, electric guitar and contrabass quintet, and later on the multi-talented porteño composer-oncologist-journalist Gabriel Senanes arranged for clarinet and string quintet as part of my 2005 Latin-Grammy® award-winning CD Riberas. - Paquito D'Rivera

Fiddle Dreams for Violin and Piano

as in English, the prefix “contra” means “against”. But it doesn’t mean in this case that Contratango is against the tango, as the name of the Contrabass doesn’t mean “against the bass”. On the contrary, the piece includes many of the melodic and rhythmic characteristics and “special” effects of the Argentine Genre. Among others, the “sand paper,” “drum” and “whip” sounds, the “strapatta” percussion effect of the contrabass, and of course, the typical syncopated patterns of the tango. Similar doses of lyricism and violence make Contratango a genuine composition in favor of the tango and the bass. This piece was commissioned by and is dedicated to Pablo Aslan, and this is going to be its world première. - Pablo Aslan

Tangua

PAQUITO D’RIVERA Born June 4, 1948, Marianao, Cuba

PABLO ASLAN

There are only two kinds of music: good and…the other stuff – used to say the great Duke Ellington, trying to get away from the useless divisions so often applied to musical genres. Commissioned by the Library of Congress for a traditional violin-piano format, but using some elements of Be-Bop and Latin-American music, Fiddle Dreams pretends to eliminate those stylistic barriers, combining the virtuoso approach of the classical soloists with the improvisational skills and sense of swing inherent to the jazz players. - Paquito D'Rivera

Tangua (2016) is the first part of Tanguajira, a piece I wrote for Paquito D’Rivera and that we premièred (and recorded) together at Jazz @Lincoln Center in 2011 with an eight piece tango jazz ensemble. It works the relationship between tango and the Cuban guajira, two Afro-Latin American cousins, in rhythm and in melody. This version was arranged by Gabriel Senanes, and it allows me to improvise a musical dialogue with Paquito. - Pablo Aslan

La Cumparsita

Four Pieces from the South

PAQUITO D’RIVERA Four Pieces from the South are the result of my passion from the huge rhythmic and melodic variety to be found in the music south of the U.S. border. In this case, using the dynamic Merengue and Joropo from Venezuela in contrast with the melancholic Argentinean slow Milonga. - Paquito D'Rivera

Contratango

GABRIEL SENANES Born April 16, 1956, Buenos Aires

Gabriel Senanes is a composer and conductor whose works have been recorded extensively and have received numerous awards. He has written for film, TV and theater. He was awarded a Latin Grammy® for Best Classical Album in 2005 for his work with Paquito D’Rivera and Cuarteto Buenos Aires, Riberas. Contratango is a little concert for Contrabass and String Quartet that speaks in Tango language. In Spanish,

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Born May 5, 1962, Buenos Aires

GERARDO MATOS RODRIGUEZ Born March 28, 1897, Montevideo, Uruguay Died April 25, 1948, Montevideo, Uruguay

Arguably the most famous tango in the world, La Cumparsita was originally written by the young Uruguayan architect and composer Gerardo Matos Rodriguez as a student march. Argentine bandleader and pianist Roberto Firpo transformed it into a tango and added a third section to create this emblematic tango. The première was in 1917, when tango was starting to abandon it’s relationship with the old habanera (tango) rhythm, and becoming a march-like rhythm more suitable to accompany the dance that taken over the world. La Cumparsita, with it’s straight quarter note melody, was the perfect embodiment of this transformation. - Pablo Aslan


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Ladies in White

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In the early hours of March 18, 2003, after a cruel and violent crackdown, the Cuban political police incarcerated a group of 75 independent journalists, pacific dissidents and human rights activists. They were sentenced to serve from 2 to 28 years in prison, just for the “crime” of writing, informing or even speaking their minds openly. These sad events are known as “The Cuban Black Spring”, and ever since, wearing all white clothes and carrying gladiolus flowers in their hands, in spite of the threats, beatings and harassments against them, a group of mothers, wives and sisters of these prisoners of conscience, calling themselves “Las Damas de Blanco,” or “Ladies in White,” march regularly on the streets of the city of La Habana, claiming amnesty for their unjustly incarcerated relatives. This work, commissioned by the Graduate Center of CUNY (City University of New York), and premièred at the same spot by the author on clarinet, Alex Brown on piano and cellist Dana Leong in May of 2010, is a tribute to those brave women and their families. - Paquito D'Rivera

'FEST FACT: Frequent Flyers By the end of the SummerFest 2016, eight musicians will have performed in 15 or more festivals. Most Appearances: 1986-2016 Cho-Liang Lin* – 26 times Heiichiro Ohyama* – 20 times Gary Hoffman- 20 times Felix Fan* – 19 times Paul Neubauer – 19 times Carter Brey* – 18 times Nico Abondolo* – 16 times Cynthia Phelps* – 15 times *Performing at SummerFest 2016

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MISCHA MAISKY

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 19 · 8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

SUMMERFEST SLIDESHOW During the intermission watch a special 30th Anniversary slideshow

Mischa Maisky, cello

J.S. BACH Suite No. 1 in G Major for Unaccompanied Cello, BWV 1007 (1720) (1685-1750) Praeludium Allemande Courante Sarabande Menuet I and II Gigue Suite No. 4 in E-flat Major for Unaccompanied Cello, BWV 1010 (1720) Praeludium Allemande Courante Sarabande Bourrée I and II Gigue INTERMISSION

J.S. BACH Suite No. 5 in C Minor for Unaccompanied Cello, BWV 1011 (1720) Praeludium Allemande Courante Sarabande Gavottes I and II Gigue

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PRELUDE 7 PM Lecture by Scholar-inResidence Eric Bromberger Tonight’s concert is sponsored by the:

Twin Dragon Foundation La Jolla Music Society’s 2015-16 Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, the National Endowment for the Arts, ResMed Foundation, San Diego Gas & Electric, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, The Frieman Family, Rita and Richard Atkinson, Raffaella and John Belanich, Brian and Silvija Devine, John and Kay Hesselink, Jeanette Stevens, Gordon Brodfuehrer, and two anonymous donors. RECOMMENDED LISTENING Bach, J.S. 6 Cello Suites. Mischa Maisky. Deutsche Grammophon. ASIN: B00003ZA6D, [2000]


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Program Notes By Eric Bromberger

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BACH: Six Suites for Unaccompanied Cello, BWV 1007-1012 Bach’s Six Suites for Unaccompanied Cello date from about 1720, when the composer was serving as Kapellmeister at the court of Anhalt-Cöthen, about thirty miles north of Leipzig. Bach did not play the cello, and it may well be that he wrote these suites for one of the cellists in the small professional orchestra that Prince Leopold maintained at court and which Bach conducted. Bach may not have played the cello, but his knowledge of that instrument appears to have been profound–the writing for cello in these suites is idiomatic and assured, and he makes full use of the instrument’s lower register. These suites are also extremely difficult and demand a topflight performer: like the sonatas and partitas for solo violin, written at this same period, they represent the summit of the music written for these unaccompanied instruments. Bach’s suites for solo cello remained for years the property of a handful of connoisseurs–they were not published until 1828, over a century after they were written. Bach understood the term “suite” to mean a collection of dance movements in the basic sequence of allemande, courante, sarabande, and gigue, which is the same sequence of movements of his instrumental partitas. But Bach added an introductory prelude to all six cello suites, and into each suite he interpolated one extra dance movement just before the final gigue to make a total of six movements. All movements after the opening prelude are in binary form. Bach’s cello suites have presented performers with a host of problems because none of Bach’s original manuscripts survives. The only surviving copies were made by Bach’s second wife and one of his students, and–lacking even such basic performances markings as bowings and dynamics–these texts present performers with innumerable problems of interpretation. In a postscript to his edition of these suites, János Starker playfully notes that one of the pleasures of going to heaven will be that he will finally be able to discuss with Bach himself exactly how the composer wants this music played. In the meantime, individual performers must make their own artistic decisions, and these suites can sound quite different in the hands of different cellists.

Suite No. 1 in G Major for Unaccompanied Cello, BWV 1007

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH Born March 21, 1685, Eisenach, Germany Died July 28, 1750, Leipzig

The noble Prelude of the Suite No. 1 in G Major rides along a steady pulse of sixteenth-notes, and it is the responsibility of the performer to breathe musical life– manipulation of tempo, contrasts of dynamics within phrases, the gradual building to a great climax–into these otherwise bare sequences of steady notes. Bach makes full use of the resonant sound of the cello’s open G-string that underlies so much of this movement, and–in a nice touch–the movement’s concluding line is effectively an inversion of its opening line. The Allemande (that title originally meant “German dance”) moves along a similar sequence of steady sixteenths, though here the tempo feels slower and more dignified; in this and the other binary movements, the performer has the option to take or ignore the repeat of the second section. The Courante (French for “running”) sails along somewhat harder-edged rhythms, while the Sarabande dances with a grave dignity; Bach makes effective contrast here between the resonance of great chords and the steady flow of the melodic line.

The interpolated movement in the First Suite is a pair of minuets. Their sprightly rhythms remind us that the minuet had its origins in a quick dance rather than the stately tempo we have come to associate with the court dance; the second minuet is the only section in the suite not in G major–Bach moves to D minor here, though even this continually edges back toward the home tonality. The concluding Gigue is an athletic and quite brief dance in 6/8 that flows smoothly to its brisk close.

Suite No. 4 in E-flat Major for Unaccompanied Cello, BWV 1010 The Fourth Suite in E-flat Major is one of the most difficult of the cycle, not just for its technical hurdles but also because the key of E-flat major is awkward for stringed instruments. The opening Praeludium proceeds sturdily on a steady flow of eighth-notes that continues for nearly fifty measures; a quasi recitativo, full of sixteenthnotes and chords, provides a brief interlude before the return of opening material, now varied rhythmically and harmonically. The gentle Allemande leads to a more energetic Courante; this movement is full of rhythmic variation, as Bach switches between progressions of eighths, sixteenths, and then triplets. The grave and 858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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graceful Sarabande is the suite’s slow movement, built on double-stops and dotted rhythms; despite the slow tempo, the movement’s roots in dance are clear. The “extra” movement in this suite is a pair of bourrées, which form one ABA movement. The opening Bourrée is athletic and long, while the second is quite brief, virtually a double-stopped transition passage in the cello’s lower register before the return of the opening bourrée. The concluding Gigue is by far the most difficult for the cellist. It is in 12/8, giving the effect of flying triplets, and the movement becomes a non-stop tour de force.

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Suite No. 5 in C Minor for Unaccompanied Cello, BWV 1011 The Suite No. 5 in C Minor has long been regarded as one of the finest of the cycle: the somber minor tonality gives the music a dark, expressive quality, and Bach himself appears to have been taken with this music–several years after writing it, he arranged it for solo lute. An unusual feature of the cello version is that Bach asks the cellist to re-tune his instrument, tuning the A-string (the top string) down one full step to G; this makes possible certain chord combinations impossible with normal tuning. The lengthy opening Praeludium has been compared to French overture form, though the relation is distant. The Praeludium does open with the dotted figures characteristic of the French overture and does introduce fugal-sounding material, but the opening section never returns. The slow Allemande retains the dotted rhythms of the opening movement, while the Courante is in a quick 3/2 meter, full of multiple-stopping. The grave Sarabande is entirely linear–there is no chording at all here–and this ancient dance form (the sarabande was originally a sung dance) proceeds with great dignity. Two gavottes form the “extra” movement in this suite. The first is athletic and graceful and full of double-stopping, while the second is quick and built on flowing triplets; Bach asks for a da capo repeat of the first gavotte. The gigue is of British origins, but Bach’s concluding Gigue seems far removed from its ancestor, the merry jig. Here the metric and phrase units are short (a quick 3/8), and the movement ends with the somber gravity that has marked the entire suite.

'FEST FACT: Welcome to the Family Tonight’s performance not only marks Mischa Maisky’s San Diego debut, but also his debut at SummerFest. We welcome him to the Grand Tradition of over 1,000 artists and ensembles that have performed at SummerFest since 1986. See the Grand Tradition, listing all festival artists, on pages 80-84.

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bach cello suites with Mischa Maisky part 2

SATURDAY, AUGUST 20 · 8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

PRELUDE 7 PM Conversation with Mischa Maisky hosted by Scholarin-Residence Eric Bromberger

Mischa Maisky, cello

J.S. BACH Suite No. 3 in C Major for Unaccompanied Cello, BWV 1009 (1720) (1685-1750) Praeludium Allegmande Courante Sarabande Bourrée I and II Gigue Suite No. 2 in D Minor for Unaccompanied Cello, BWV 1008 (1720) Praeludium Allemande Courante Sarabande Menuet I and II Gigue INTERMISSION

J.S. BACH Suite No. 6 in D Major for Unaccompanied Cello, BWV 1012 (1720) Prelude Allemande Courante Sarabande Gavotte I and II Gigue

Tonight’s concert is sponsored by:

Jian and Samson Chan La Jolla Music Society’s 2015-16 Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, the National Endowment for the Arts, ResMed Foundation, San Diego Gas & Electric, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, The Frieman Family, Rita and Richard Atkinson, Raffaella and John Belanich, Brian and Silvija Devine, John and Kay Hesselink, Jeanette Stevens, Gordon Brodfuehrer, and two anonymous donors. RECOMMENDED LISTENING Bach, J.S. 6 Cello Suites. Mischa Maisky. Deutsche Grammophon. ASIN: B00003ZA6D, [2000]

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Program Notes By Eric Bromberger

BACH: Six Suites for Unaccompanied Cello, BWV 1007-1012 For the general introduction about Bach’s Suites for Unaccompanied Cello, please read the note from the August 19 program on page 48.

Suite No. 3 in C Major for Unaccompanied Cello, BWV 1009

Suite No. 6 in D Major for Unaccompanied Cello, BWV 1012

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH

The Sixth Suite is unique within the cycle because it appears to have been conceived originally for an instrument other than cello. Bach’s manuscript notates the part in soprano and alto clefs, and scholars have guessed that he may have written this suite for the now-obsolete viola pomposa or the violoncello piccolo: both these instruments had a fifth string–an E a fifth above the cello’s A-string– though the viola pomposa was played under the chin. For performance on the cello, the part has been transposed to the tenor and bass clefs; the range of the part, however, is still high in the cello’s register. The Prelude of the Sixth Suite is set in 12/8, and the effect is of an energetic rush of triplets; near the end, however, Bach moves from the eighth-note pulse to sixteenth-notes, and the music seems to rush ahead at twice its opening speed. The stately main idea of the Allemande is decorated with ornate swirls of 64th-notes as it proceeds, while the Courante is brisk and propulsive–it grows increasingly athletic and chromatic in its second half. The Sarabande, in a broad 3/2 meter, is based on double-stopping, much of it high in the cello’s range. The interpolated movements in this suite are a pair of gavottes. Vigorous and spirited, this music may be familiar because it has been arranged for other instruments; in the second strain of the second gavotte, Bach creates a drone-like effect on the cello’s open D-string as the melodic line dances above it. Not only is the concluding Gigue very fast, but much of it is built on doublestops, and Bach’s final suite comes to its close in a great cascade of energy.

Born March 21, 1685, Eisenach, Germany Died July 28, 1750, Leipzig

The Suite No. 3 is notable for its broad, heroic character, which comes in part from Bach’s choice of key: C major allows him to make ample use of the cello’s C-string, and the resonance of this lowest string echoes throughout the suite. The preludes of all the suites have an intentionally “improvisatory” quality: though the music is carefully written out, Bach wishes to create the effect that the performer is improvising it on the spot. The Prelude of the Third Suite is built on a virtually non-stop sequence of sixteenth-notes, though at the end a series of declamatory chords draws the music to its climax. The Allemande is an old dance of German origin; that name survives today in square dancing terminology (“Allemando left with the old left hand”); in this movement Bach enlivens the basic pulse with turns, doublestops, and thirty-secondnotes. The Courante races past, while the Sarabande is dignified and extremely slow. Many listeners will discover that they already know the first Bourrée, for this graceful dance has been arranged for many other instruments; Bach presents an extended variation of it in the second Bourrée. The concluding Gigue dances quickly on its 3/8 meter; Bach offers the cellist some brisk passagework as well as extended doublestopping in this good-spirited dance.

Suite No. 2 in D Minor for Unaccompanied Cello, BWV 1008 The D-minor tonality gives the Second Suite a dark and somber spirit–only in the second minuet does the music move briefly into the sunlight of D major. The stern opening Praeludium is built on a steady pulse of sixteenthnotes, while the Allemande dances gravely, its progress enlivened by dotted rhythms and turns. The Courante moves along swiftly, while the noble Sarabande makes its dignified way at a slower pace. After this, the two minuets offer some relief, with the sunny second dance serving as the trio section. A Gigue (derived from the Irish jig) usually swings along easily on a 12/8 meter, but here Bach sets it in a much shorter metric unit (3/8), and this Gigue dances sternly, with strong accents cutting into the rhythmic flow.

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'FEST FACT: And the award for Most Popular goes to. . . Tomorrow’s performance of Schumann’s Piano Quintet in E-flat Major, Opus 44 will mark its 12th SummerFest performance, taking the title of “most performed work” (previously held by Mendelssohn’s Octet for Strings in E-flat Major, Opus 20.) This piece is also special because it was performed last on the Closing Concert (Sunday, August 10, 1986) of the very first SummerFest.


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Great Quintets

SUNDAY, AUGUST 21 · 3 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM BOLCOM Three Rags for String Quartet (1989) (b. 1938) Poltergeist Graceful Ghost Incineratorag Paul Huang, Cho-Liang Lin, violins; Robert Brophy, viola; Rainer Crosett, cello

MOZART String Quintet in E-flat Major, K.614 (1791) (1756-1791) Allegro di molto Andante Menuetto: Allegretto Allegro Andrew Wan, Luke Hsu, violins; Cynthia Phelps, Abigail Rojansky, violas; John Sharp, cello INTERMISSION

SCHUMANN Quintet for Piano and Strings in E-flat Major, Opus 44 (1842) (1810-1850) Allegro brillante In modo d’una Marcia Scherzo: Molto vivace Allegro, ma non troppo

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MUSICAL PRELUDE 2 PM Verona Quartet performs Beethoven’s String Quartet in E Minor, Op. 59, No. 2 - See page 67 La Jolla Music Society’s 2015-16 Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, the National Endowment for the Arts, ResMed Foundation, San Diego Gas & Electric, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, The Frieman Family, Rita and Richard Atkinson, Raffaella and John Belanich, Brian and Silvija Devine, John and Kay Hesselink, Jeanette Stevens, Gordon Brodfuehrer, and two anonymous donors. RECOMMENDED LISTENING Mozart, Wolfgang. Complete String Quintets. Grumiaux Trio, Arpad Gerecz, Max Lesueur. Decca. ASIN: B000065TV7, [2002] Dvorˇák / Schumann. Rubinstein Collection 66: Schumann: Piano Quintet. Guarneri Quartet Arthur Rubinstein. RCA. ASIN: B01A7U97RO, [2001]

Shai Wosner, piano; Sheryl Staples, Paul Huang, violins; Robert Brophy, viola; John Sharp, cello

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Program Notes By Eric Bromberger

Three Rags for String Quartet

WILLIAM BOLCOM Born May 26, 1938, Seattle

William Bolcom has had an eminently successful career as a “serious” composer. He has composed nine symphonies, four operas, and numerous instrumental and vocal works. He won the Pulitzer Prize for Music in 1988 for his Twelve New Etudes for Piano. In 2006 his Songs of Innocence and Experience earned three Grammy Awards. Musical America named him “Composer of the Year” in 2007. He taught at the University of Michigan from 1973 until 2008 and served as chairman of the composition faculty for part of that time. Yet Bolcom has always been interested in popular music (if we can make a distinction between “serious” and “popular” music), and his discovery of the music of Scott Joplin in the early 1970s led to a passion for ragtime music. Ragtime grew out of African-American music at the end of the nineteenth century, when pianists developed a style of music based on a sharply-syncopated melody in the right hand over steady accompaniment in the left. The syncopated (hence, “ragged”) right-hand rhythm earned this style the name “ragtime,” and in the hands of Scott Joplin, Jelly Roll Morton, Eubie Blake, and others ragtime became a popular feature of American musical life (Joplin’s Maple Leaf Rag of 1899 sold a million copies). Charmed by this music, Bolcom recorded a number of Joplin’s rags and began writing ragtime music of his own. His rags, which now number well over twenty, have been collected and recorded, and Bolcom has referred to them as “my mazurkas.” Bolcom composed his Three Rags for String Quartet in 1989, though the first two movements–Poltergeist and Graceful Ghost–had originally been written for piano and were published in 1970 as part of his Three Ghost Rags. The Lark String Quartet gave the official première of the Three Rags for String Quartet at the Grand Canyon in 1994. Music as attractive as these three pieces requires little introduction. Poltergeist powers its way along an obsessive, perpetual-motion-like energy, while the beautiful Graceful Ghost, written in memory of the composer’s father, has become one of Bolcom’s most popular pieces. Bolcom marks the opening both cantabile and smoothly, and this evocative music sings a wistful song that is enlivened by its sunnier central episode. Incineratorag, composed specifically for string quartet, is in ternary form. Its opening section is full of energy, while the middle episode, introduced by the viola, slows down a bit before the vigorous return of the opening material.

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String Quintet in E-flat Major, K.614

WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART Born January 27, 1756, Salzburg Died December 5, 1791, Vienna

In the manuscript of the Quintet in E-flat Major Mozart noted the location and date of its completion–Vienna, April 12, 1791–placing this quintet at the beginning of the final creative burst of his brief life. Over the next eight months he would write two operas–Die Zauberflöte and La clemenza di Tito–and the Clarinet Concerto, and he would begin the Requiem, left unfinished at his death on December 5. Though he did not know it as he set aside the manuscript on that spring day, this quintet would be his final chamber work. This is an unusual composition, in many ways representative of the increasingly rarefied musical language of Mozart’s final years. Unlike his earlier viola quintets, the Quintet in E-flat Major does not play groups of different instruments off against each other, nor does it exploit the characteristic “middle” sonority of the viola quintet. Rather, this music is remarkable for the brilliance of the first violin part in its outer movements, where that instrument sails above the other four with a concerto-like virtuosity. And, as we shall see, it incorporates some unusual formal features. The Allegro di molto opens with a passage for the two violas that sounds exactly like a pair of hunting horns. That effect was clearly intentional, and that fanfare returns throughout the movement, giving the music a somewhat festive air and thrusting it forward on the energy of its trills. These “horn-calls” dominate the opening measures, but quickly the first violin breaks free with a series of runs, difficult string-crossings, and writing high in the instrument’s register (at one point Mozart sends the first violin up to a high D, almost at the upper extreme of its fingerboard). At the end, the horn fanfare and its trills drive this movement to its energetic close. The real glory of this quintet is the Andante. Its form is simple enough on the surface–a theme with variations–but what is unusual here is what Mozart does in the course of varying his opening melody. That melody, sung initially by the first violin, sounds like an aria, and in fact it has been compared to Belmonte’s aria “Wenn der Freude Thränen fliessen” from Die Entführung aus dem Serail. Mozart does some astonishing things with this gentle little theme. The development is a series of repetitions, each becoming more complex and more chromatic until strange dissonances come stinging out of this music. The effect, over two centuries later, is still surprising, and it is a movement like this that helps us understand what a Viennese critic meant when he complained that Mozart’s music was “too highly spiced.” Spiced it may be, but it is also extraordinarily beautiful and expressive. The minuet is more conventional, though the outer sections proceed on canonic phrases, while the trio is a ländler that dances comfortably along its easy swing. The final movement, a rondo marked Allegro, is built entirely on one theme, announced immediately by the first violin. Building


Quintet for Piano and Strings in E-flat Major, Opus 44

ROBERT SCHUMANN Born June 8, 1810, Zwickau, Germany Died July 29, 1850, Endenich, Germany

Robert Schumann established himself as a composer with his pieces for piano and his songs, but in 1841, the year after his marriage to the young Clara Wieck, Schumann wrote for orchestra, and during the winter of 1842 he began to think about chamber music. Clara was gone on a month-long concert tour to Copenhagen in April of that year, and–left behind in Leipzig–the always-fragile Schumann suffered an anxiety attack in her absence (he took refuge, in his words, in “beer and champagne”). But he also used the spring of that year to study the quartets of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. After recognizing what those masters had achieved in their quartets, Schumann felt even more assaulted. His language from that summer betrays his anxiety–so threatened was Schumann that he almost could not say the word “string quartet.” Instead, he said only that he was having “quartetish thoughts” and referred to the music he was planning as “quartet-essays.” Finally he overcame his fears, and in June and July of 1842 Schumann quickly composed three string quartets. While there is much attractive music in those quartets, no one would claim that they are idiomatically written for the medium. Schumann did not play a stringed instrument, and those three quartets–however sound their musical logic–often sit uneasily under the hand. But at this point Schumann, still enthusiastic about chamber music, made a fertile decision: he combined the piano–his own instrument– with the string quartet. In the process he created the first great piano quintet–and his finest piece of chamber music. After struggling to write the three quartets, Schumann found that the Piano Quintet came easily: he made the initial sketches at the end of September and had the score complete by October 12. The first performance, a private reading with Clara at the piano, took place in November. A second performance was scheduled in the Schumann home on December 8, but Clara was sick, and so Mendelssohn replaced her and sightread the piano part; the members of the Gewandhaus Quartet (whose first violinist Ferdinand David would three years later give the first performance of Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto) were the other performers. That would have been an evening to sit in on, not just for the distinction of the performers but also to watch two composers at work. At the end of the read-through, Mendelssohn suggested several revisions, including replacing the second trio section of the scherzo, and Schumann followed his

ER advice. Clara, however, was the pianist at the public FE ST première at the Gewandhaus in Leipzig on January 8, 1843. The Piano Quintet may be Schumann’s most successful chamber work, but this music sometimes stretches the notion of the equality of all players that is central to chamber music. Schumann’s quintet has a clear star: the piano is the dominant force in this music–there is hardly a measure when it is not playing–and Schumann uses it in different ways, sometimes setting it against the other four instruments, sometimes using all five in unison, rarely allowing the quartet to play by itself. The addition of his own instrument to the string quartet clearly opened possibilities for Schumann that he did not recognize in the quartet. The first movement, aptly-named Allegro brillante, bursts to life as all five instruments in octaves shout out the opening idea, a theme whose angular outline will shape much of the movement. Piano alone has the singing second subject: Schumann marks this dolce as the piano presents it, then espressivo as viola and cello take it up in turn. This second theme may bring welcome calm, but it is the driving energy of the opening subject that propels the music–much of the development goes to this theme–and the movement builds to nearly symphonic proportions as it drives to its energetic close. The second movement–In modo d’una Marcia–is much in the manner of a funeral march, though Schumann did not himself call it that. The stumbling tread of the march section–in C minor–is interrupted by two episodes: the first a wistful interlude for first violin, the second–Agitato–driven by pounding triplets in the piano. Schumann combines his various episodes in the final pages of this movement, which closes quietly in serene C major. The propulsive Scherzo molto vivace runs up and down the scale, and again Schumann provides two interludes: the first feels like an instrumental transcription of one of his songs, while the second powers its way along a steady rush of sixteenth-note perpetual motion. The last movement is the most complex, for it returns not just to the manner of the opening movement but also to its thematic material and then treats that in new ways. This Allegro, ma non troppo begins in a “wrong” key (G minor) and only gradually makes its way to E-flat major, while its second theme, for first violin, arrives in E major. At the climax of this sonata-form structure, Schumann brings matters to a grand pause, then re-introduces the opening subject of the first movement and develops it fugally, ingeniously using the first theme of the finale as a countersubject. The Quintet comes to its triumphant close on this brilliant writing. Clara Schumann, perhaps not the most unbiased judge of her husband’s work, was nevertheless exactly right in her estimation of this music. In her diary she described it as “Magnificent–a work filled with energy and freshness.” As a measure of his wife’s affection for the Piano Quintet, Schumann dedicated it to her.

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an entire movement on one theme was nothing new–Haydn had written many such movements–but what makes this movement remarkable is the concentrated polyphonic writing. Mozart treats his amiable opening theme to some complex fugal development, and–pushed along by more brilliant writing for the first violin–his final piece of chamber music flies to its energetic close.

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Virtuoso Winds

TUESDAY, AUGUST 23 · 8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM HAYDN String Quartet in B-flat Major, Opus 50, No. 1 (1787) (1732-1809) Allegro Adagio non lento Poco Allegretto Finale: Vivace Verona Quartet Jonathan Ong, Dorothy Ro, violins; Abigail Rojansky, viola; Warren Hagerty, cello

NIELSEN Wind Quintet in A Major, Opus 43 FS100 (1922) (1865-1931) Allegro ben moderato Menuett Praeludium; Adagio; Tema con variazioni; Andante festivo Catherine Ransom Karoly, flute; Laura Griffiths, oboe; John Bruce Yeh, clarinet; Keith Buncke, bassoon; Jennifer Montone, horn INTERMISSION

BRITTEN Six Metamorphoses for Solo Oboe, Opus 49 (1951) (1913-1976) Pan Phaeton Niobe Bacchus Narcissus Arethusa Liang Wang, oboe

FAURÉ Piano Quartet in C Minor, Opus 15 (1876-9) (1845-1924) Allegro molto moderato Scherzo: Allegro vivo Adagio Allegro molto

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MUSICAL PRELUDE 7 PM Beacon Street Trio performs Brahms’ Piano Trio in B Major, Op. 8 - See page 67 Tonight’s concert is sponsored by:

Haeyoung Kong Tang Many thanks to our Partner:

Grande Colonial Hotel and NINE-TEN Restaurant La Jolla Music Society’s 2015-16 Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, the National Endowment for the Arts, ResMed Foundation, San Diego Gas & Electric, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, The Frieman Family, Rita and Richard Atkinson, Raffaella and John Belanich, Brian and Silvija Devine, John and Kay Hesselink, Jeanette Stevens, Gordon Brodfuehrer, and two anonymous donors. RECOMMENDED LISTENING Nielsen / Dean / Vasks / Tüür / Pärt. Winter Songs: Wind Quintet, Op. 43, FS 100: II. Menuet. Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet. BIS. ASIN: B0040RYD5M, [2009] Britten / Saunders / Jackman. Music for Solo Oboe: 6 Metamorphoses after Ovid, Op. 49: VI. Arethusa. Gordon Hunt. BIS. ASIN: B002WMFUY0, [1998] Fauré, Gabriel. Piano Trio, Op. 120; Piano Quartet No. 1, Op. 15. Beaux Arts Trio, Kim Kashkashian. Philips. ASIN: B00000E3UY, [1990]


FRANZ JOSEPH HAYDN Born March 31, 1732, Rohrau, Austria Died May 31, 1809, Vienna

During the 1780s, Haydn took a break from writing string quartets–between 1781 and 1787, he wrote only one. This was otherwise a fertile period for the composer (it saw the completion of fifteen symphonies, including the entire set of “Paris” Symphonies), but he was content to let the quartet form rest for awhile. When Haydn returned to it in the summer of 1787 with the six quartets that make up his Opus 50, he was writing with unusual concentration. He had become interested in these years in building his opening sonata-form movements not on the two separate theme-groups of classical form but instead on one principal theme. He would spin secondary material out of some subordinate feature of the theme–a tiny motif or a rhythmic pattern–and the entire sonata-form structure would grow out of that one seminal theme. It makes for a very concentrated–and imaginative–kind of music-making. The six string quartets of Opus 50 are sometimes known as the “Prussian” Quartets because Haydn dedicated the set to King Friedrich Wilhelm II, the cello-playing monarch in Berlin (this is the same king for whom Mozart is supposed to have written his “King of Prussia” Quartets). This first quartet of Haydn’s set, in B-flat major, is quite attractive music. The opening of the Allegro can seem deceptively simple: over the cello’s steady pulse of quarters (a pulse that will recur throughout much of the movement), the first violin lays out a simple rising-and-falling shape that Haydn’s stresses should be dolce. It hardly seems noteworthy, but this is the seminal shape of the movement, and instantly Haydn transforms it into a shower of triplets, and when the “second” subject arrives, it too is a variation of this shape, even though it has been transformed into something much more lyric. After an active development– much of it in energetic triplets–the movement closes quietly. The slow movement is in variation form, based on the first violin’s long opening melody. As the variations unfold, the music becomes more ornate, but the central theme remains clear, even in the second variation, which moves into the unusual key of E-flat minor. Haydn returns to the home key of B-flat major for the minuet; noteworthy here is the writing for cello, as it takes up the first violin’s opening line. The trio seems to pick up the same phrases as the minuet, but now with needlesharp violin attacks, and Haydn creates a nice effect by syncopating the two violin parts as the trio proceeds. The real glory of this quartet, however, is the finale, which is as good-natured a piece as Haydn ever wrote (and that is saying something). It is quite concentrated: the violin’s agreeable opening melody–eight bars long– seems to promise a rondo, but this movement is in sonata form. There are many wonderful little touches here: the way the two violin parts weave together, the use of the

ER opening phrase as the basis for the development, FE ST even a brief cadenza for the first violin at the center of the movement–but the principal impression is of the pleasure of making music, and the quartet speeds to its firm close on fragments of the finale’s opening theme.

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String Quartet in B-flat Major, Opus 50, No. 1

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Wind Quintet in A Major, Opus 43 FS100

CARL NIELSEN

Born June 9, 1865, Nørre Lyndelse, Denmark Died October 2, 1931, Copenhagen

Carl Nielsen made his living to the age of forty as a violinist, but he had a particular affection for wind instruments. He learned to play cornet, signal horn, and trombone as a boy, and for several years he was a member of a military band. Later he composed a good deal for wind instruments, including the present quintet and distinguished concertos for flute and for clarinet. Nielsen began his Wind Quintet in 1921 while at work on his conflicted and brutal Fifth Symphony, which critics have inevitably understood as a reaction to World War I. The need to relax while writing the intense symphony may have been one of the motivations for writing the gentle Wind Quintet. Another was hearing the Copenhagen Wind Quintet perform Mozart–Nielsen became good friends with those players and wished to write for them. This friendship inevitably affected the music he composed, since he wrote for the individual players as well as for their instruments. This was also a period when Nielsen was becoming interested in the sound and unique identity of individual instruments. While at work on his Sixth Symphony several years later, Nielsen made a remark about his use of instruments in the symphony that applies just as accurately to the Wind Quintet: “each instrument is like a person who sleeps, whom I have to wake to life.” The quintet is in three movements. The genial Allegro ben moderato is built on two contrasted ideas: the bassoon’s lyric opening melody and a chattering second theme, full of leaps and grace notes. The second movement is classical in shape, if not in all its details–it is a minuetand-trio with an eight-bar coda. Much of this movement is given to smaller instrumental combinations: clarinet and bassoon share the opening of the minuet, while flute, oboe, and clarinet launch the trio. Most memorable of the movements is the finale, which is longer than the first two movements combined. It opens with an ornate Praeludium (marked Adagio) for which the oboist switches to English horn. The main body of the movement, however, is a theme, eleven variations, and brief finale. The theme is Nielsen’s own–he took this poised and noble chorale tune from his “My Jesus, make my heart to love Thee” from his Hymns and Sacred Songs of 1912-16. The variations are concise, imaginative, and often witty: the fifth is a comic duet for clarinet and bassoon, the seventh is for bassoon solo, the ninth for horn 858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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solo, and the final variation is a little march. The movement concludes with a restatement of the choral tune, now re-barred in 4/4 (the original statement was in 3/4), and this finale, marked Andantino festivo, drives the quintet to a firm close. Nielsen completed the Wind Quintet in April 1922, three months after the première of the Fifth Symphony. Its sunny spirits belie the increasingly serious condition of the composer’s health–a few weeks later he was confined to bed with angina pectoris, and the remaining nine years of his life were clouded by heart trouble. The first performance of the Wind Quintet was given by the Copenhagen Wind Quintet on October 9, 1922.

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Six Metamorphoses for Solo Oboe, Opus 49

BENJAMIN BRITTEN Born November 22, 1913, Lowestoft Died December 4, 1976, Aldeburgh

Britten was one of the best-read of composers. He set texts from the Bible, English writers (Shakespeare, Donne, Blake, Crabbe, Keats, Tennyson, Hardy, Owen), French (Racine, Rimbaud, Hugo, Verlaine), American (Melville and James), continental (Pushkin and Brecht), as well as such classical sources as Virgil, Michelangelo, and the ancient Chinese, to name only a few. His Six Metamorphoses after Ovid, written in 1951, were inspired by one of the greatest of Roman poets. Ovid remains best known today for his Metamorphoses, fifteen books of mythological legends tracing the history of the world from its creation to Julius Caesar, who had been assassinated the year before Ovid was born. A recurrent theme in this massive work is suggested by its title: Ovid was struck by the instability of things and their tendency suddenly to turn into something else. Britten chose six of Ovid’s mythological tales and set them for solo oboe. He made no attempt to suggest Ovid’s words, and these brief pieces should be regarded as instrumental miniatures that offer character portraits of mythological figures. The idea of transformation is of course a very important concept musically, and the listener may enjoy following the way certain themes are transformed (or metamorphosed) in the course of these brief pieces. In the score Britten prefaces each piece with a line from Ovid. 1. “PAN who played upon the reed pipe which was Syrinx, his beloved.” This tells of the god Pan and his pursuit of the nymph Syrinx, who fled into a river and prayed to be transformed into a reed. When her prayer was granted, Pan made musical pipes from the reed. The oboe’s music offers an impression of that playing. 2. “PHAETON who rode upon the chariot of the sun for one day and was hurled into the river Padus by a thunderbolt.” Phaeton was the son of Helios, the sun. He stole his father’s sun-chariot and careened wildly through

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the sky, scorching Africa before Zeus blasted him with a thunderbolt. The galloping triplets of the beginning echo the pounding hooves. The music grows more dramatic as Phaeton swerves through the sky and finally fades into silence as he falls to his death. 3. “NIOBE who, lamenting the death of her fourteen children, was turned into a mountain.” Niobe was the queen of Thebes who bragged of her many children and was punished for her pride by the death of all of them. Weeping, she asked Zeus to turn her into a stone on a mountain, and he granted her wish. The flowing triplets mirror Niobe’s grief–Britten marks the music piangendo: “weeping.” 4. “BACCHUS at whose feasts is heard the noise of gaggling women’s tattling tongues and the shouting out of boys.” This exuberant music, with its pounding dotted rhythms, should remind us that the Romans believed Bacchus a handsome and powerful young man, rather than the fat old reprobate of subsequent legend. 5. “NARCISSUS who fell in love with his own image and became a flower.” Narcissus was the beautiful youth who pined away while staring at his own image in a pond, and Britten’s languid music mirrors the youth’s indolence. Full of wide melodic skips, it gradually fades into silence. 6. “ARETHUSA who, flying from the love of Alpheus the river god, was turned into a fountain.” The story is somewhat similar to the opening story of Pan, and the music concludes with another tale of transformation. Arethusa is bathing in a stream when Alpheus appears and tries to seduce her. She flees and is transformed into a fountain. Britten mirrors the sound of the water with trills and arpeggiated ripples of sound.

Piano Quartet in C Minor, Opus 15

GABRIEL FAURÉ Born May 13, 1845, Pamiers, France Died November 4, 1924, Paris

Fauré wrote the Piano Quartet in C Minor, one of the masterpieces of his early period, between 1876 and 1879, when he was in his early thirties. Despite the work’s success, the composer was dissatisfied with the final movement and rewrote it in 1883, making it–as he said– “new from top to toe.” In its completed form, the quartet is an extraordinary achievement, both for the range of its expression and for Fauré’s imaginative craftsmanship. The Allegro molto moderato opens with a sturdy theme in the strings, with off-the-beat accompaniment from the piano. The vigor and drive of this opening continue throughout the movement, and its rhythm–heard almost continuously in the piano–unifies the entire movement; the gentle second subject, announced by the viola and marked espressivo, gracefully sets off the energy of the opening episode. In the development Fauré brings back the opening theme, now slowed down and played gently, and the


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wonder is that a theme which moments before had moved forward martially can be so transformed and made to sing lyrically. In the coda, this opening theme recurs quietly in the viola as the movement draws to its calm conclusion. Fauré reverses the expected order of the interior movements and places the scherzo, marked Allegro vivo, second. The piano’s opening idea rocks along cheerfully above pizzicato accompaniment in the strings; alert listeners will recognize it as a variant of the espressivo second theme of the first movement. The scherzo reaches a cadence, and then in another pleasing surprise Fauré replaces the expected trio section with a graceful chorale for muted strings. Because of their many similarities, the final two movements should be considered together. The Adagio is built on the brief dotted phrase first heard in the cello: this rising figure will unify the final two movements. The lyric second episode, introduced by the violin, contains the same rhythm, and the opening theme of the finale–Allegro molto– rushes along on this same rising, dotted theme-shape. The energetic finale seems to be in motion throughout. Even when the viola sings the second theme, marked dolce e espressivo, this graceful melody assumes the rising shape that characterizes the final two movements. It is a measure of Fauré’s achievement in this music that so simple a figure can be made to yield such a range of expression. Given this music’s popularity today, it comes as a surprise to learn that Fauré had a great deal of trouble getting it published. No publisher wanted to take a chance on a little-known composer. The quartet was rejected by two of France’s major publishing firms and was accepted by a third only on the condition that composer surrender all his rights to it. Desperate to have his work published, Fauré could do nothing but accept those terms. He never made a penny on this music.

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MARC-ANDRÉ HAMELIN

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an evening with Marc-André Hamelin

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24 · 8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM HAMELIN Four Perspectives (2016) World Première

(b. 1961) Hai-Ye Ni, cello; Marc-André Hamelin, piano Commissioned by La Jolla Music Society SummerFest

LISZT Piano Sonata in B Minor, S.178 (1852-3) (1811-1886) Lento assai; Andante sostenuto; Allegro energico Marc-André Hamelin, piano INTERMISSION

TCHAIKOVSKY Piano Trio in A Minor, Opus 50 (1881-2) (1840-1893) Pezzo élégiaco Tema con variazioni Variazione finale e coda: Allegro risoluto e con fuoco Marc-André Hamelin, piano; Paul Huang, violin; Mischa Maisky, cello

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PRELUDE 7 PM Lecture by Scholar-inResidence Eric Bromberger La Jolla Music Society’s 2015-16 Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, the National Endowment for the Arts, ResMed Foundation, San Diego Gas & Electric, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, The Frieman Family, Rita and Richard Atkinson, Raffaella and John Belanich, Brian and Silvija Devine, John and Kay Hesselink, Jeanette Stevens, Gordon Brodfuehrer, and two anonymous donors. RECOMMENDED LISTENING Liszt, Franz. Piano Sonata in B Minor. Marc-André Hamelin. Hyperion. ASIN: B004NWHVD0, [2011] Tchaikovsky / Rachmaninov. Tchaikovsky: Piano Trios. Lang Lang, Vadim Repin, Misha Maisky. Deutsche Grammophon. ASIN: B002NACY2C, [2009]


Piano Sonata in B Minor, S.178

FRANZ LISZT

Born October 22, 1811, Raiding, Hungary Died July 31, 1886, Bayreuth

Liszt wrote his Sonata in B Minor in 1852-3 and dedicated it to Robert Schumann. The first public performance took place four years later in Berlin in 1857, when it was played by Liszt’s son-in-law Hans von Bülow. The Sonata in B Minor is in all senses of the word a revolutionary work, for Liszt sets aside previous notions of sonata form and looks ahead to a new vision of what such a form might be. Schumann himself, then in serious mental decline, reportedly never heard the piece but could not have been especially comfortable with the dedication of a piece of music that flew so directly in the face of his own sense of what a sonata should be. Another figure in nineteenthcentury music, however, reacted rapturously: Wagner wrote to Liszt to say, “The Sonata is beautiful beyond any conception, great, pleasing, profound and noble–it is sublime, just as you are yourself.” The most immediately distinctive feature of the sonata is that it is in one movement instead of the traditional three. Beyond this, it is built not on long and distinct melodic themes but on short phrases. These phrases undergo a gradual but extensive development–a process Liszt called “the transformation of themes”–and are often made to perform quite varied functions as they undergo these transformations. Despite the one-movement structure, Liszt achieves something of the effect of the traditional three-movement form by giving the sonata a general fastslow-fast shape. The entire sonata is built on just four brief theme-phrases: the slowly-descending scale heard at the very beginning; the leaping theme in octaves at the Allegro; a powerful theme over repeated eighth-notes marked Grandioso; and a lyric fourth phrase marked cantando espressivo, itself an expanded version of the martial repeated notes of the opening. The Sonata in B Minor is extremely dramatic music, so dramatic that many guessed that it must have a program, as so much of Liszt’s music does. But Liszt insisted that this is not descriptive or programmatic music. He wanted his sonata accepted as a piece of “pure music,” to be heard and understood for itself.

Piano Trio in A Minor, Opus 50

PETER ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY Born May 7, 1840, Votkinsk, Russia Died November 6, 1893, St. Petersburg

Nikolai Rubinstein, brother of the pianist Anton Rubinstein, had hired Tchaikovsky to teach composition at the Moscow Conservatory and later encouraged him as a composer, conducting and championing his music. When Nikolai died on March 23, 1881, at the age of 46,

ER Tchaikovsky resolved to write a work in his memory, FE ST but it was difficult for him to choose the form for such a piece. Nikolai had been a pianist, but a piano concerto did not seem a proper memorial piece. Tchaikovsky disliked the combination of piano and strings in chamber music but eventually overcame this aversion to write the Trio in A Minor as the memorial to Rubinstein; it was the only time Tchaikovsky used a piano in his chamber music. He began work on the trio in December 1881 while living in Rome and completed the score on February 9, 1882. The manuscript is inscribed: “In memory of a Great Artist.” A particular memory came back to Tchaikovsky as he worked on this music: in 1873, after the première of Tchaikovsky’s The Snow Maiden (which had been conducted by Rubinstein), faculty members from the Moscow Conservatory had gone on a picnic in the sunny, blossomcovered countryside. Here they were surrounded by curious peasants, and the gregarious Rubinstein quickly made friends and had the peasants singing and dancing. As he set to work on the trio, Tchaikovsky remembered how much Rubinstein had liked one of these songs. The trio as completed has a very unusual form: it is in two massive movements that last a total of almost 50 minutes. The first movement in particular has proven baffling to critics, who have been unable to decide whether it is in sonata or rondo form. It is built on two sharply contrasted themes: the cello’s somber opening melody–which Tchaikovsky marks molto espressivo–and a vigorous falling theme for solo piano, marked Allegro giusto. Tchaikovsky alternates these themes through this dramatic movement, which closes with a quiet restatement of the cello’s opening theme, now played in octaves by the piano. The second movement is a huge set of variations. The theme of these variations is the peasant melody Rubinstein had liked so much on the picnic in 1873, and Tchaikovsky puts this simple tune through eleven quite different variations. Particularly striking are the fifth, in which the piano’s high notes seem to echo the sound of sleigh bells; the sixth, a waltz introduced by the cello; the eighth, a powerful fugue; and the tenth, a mazurka introduced by the piano. So individual and dramatic are these variations that several critics instantly assumed that each must depict an incident from Rubinstein’s life and set about guessing what each variation was “about.” Tchaikovsky was dumbfounded when this was reported to him; to a friend he wrote: “How amusing! To compose music without the slightest desire to represent something and suddenly to discover that it represents this or that, it is what Moliere’s Bourgeois Gentilhomme must have felt when he learnt that he had been speaking in prose all his life.” The trio concludes with a final variation so huge that many have considered it a separate movement. It comes to a somber end: Tchaikovsky marks the final page Lugubre (“lugubrious”), and over a funeral march in the piano come fragments of the cello’s theme from the very beginning of the first movement, now marked piangendo: “weeping.” This theme gradually dissolves, and the piano marches into silence.

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finale with James & Gil Shaham

GIL SHAHAM

JAMES CONLON

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Conlon

FRIDAY, AUGUST 26 · 8 PM · MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM SummerFest Chamber Orchestra James Conlon, conductor

SCHUBERT Symphony No. 5 in B-flat Major, D.485 (1816) (1797-1828) Allegro Andante con moto Menuetto: Allegro molto Allegro vivace

PRELUDE 7 PM Conversation with James Conlon hosted by Scholar-in-Residence Eric Bromberger Tonight’s concert is sponsored by:

Brenda and Michael Goldbaum Clara Wu and Joseph Tsai Many thanks to our Partner:

The Lodge at Torrey Pines

INTERMISSION

PROKOFIEV Violin Concerto No. 2 in G Minor, Opus 63 (1935) (1891-1953) Allegro moderato Andante assai Allegro, ben marcato Gil Shaham, violin

MOZART Symphony No. 34 in C Major, K. 338 (c 1780) (1756-1791) Allegro vivace Andante di molto Finale: Allegro vivace SummerFest Chamber Orchestra Andrew Wan, concertmaster; Alyssa Park, associate concertmaster; Kathryn Hatmaker, Dorothy Ro, Paul Huang, Cho-Liang Lin, Jeanne Skrocki, Jonathan Ong, Luke Hsu, Bridget Dolkas, violins; Robert Brophy, Caterina Longhi, Abigail Rojansky, Travis Maril, violas; Hai-Ye Ni, Chia-Ling Chien, Warren Hagerty, Rainer Crosett, cellos; Nico Abondolo, Samuel Hager, basses; Catherine Ransom Karoly, Pamela Vliek Martchev, flutes; Liang Wang, Laura Griffiths, oboes; John Bruce Yeh, Teresa Reilly, clarinets; Keith Buncke, Ryan Simmons, bassoons; David Washburn, Jennifer Marotta, trumpets; Jennifer Montone, Mike McCoy, horns; Molly Yeh, percussion

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La Jolla Music Society’s 2015-16 Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, the National Endowment for the Arts, ResMed Foundation, San Diego Gas & Electric, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, The Frieman Family, Rita and Richard Atkinson, Raffaella and John Belanich, Brian and Silvija Devine, John and Kay Hesselink, Jeanette Stevens, Gordon Brodfuehrer, and two anonymous donors. RECOMMENDED LISTENING Schubert, Franz. The Symphonies: No. 5. Claudio Abbado, The Chamber Orchestra of Europe. Deutsche Grammophon. ASIN: B003W16T9K, [2010] Prokofiev, Sergey. Complete Concertos: Violin Concerto No. 2. London Symphony Orchestra, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Joshua Bell, Lynn Harrell, Andre Prévin, Charles Dutoit. Decca. ASIN: B000076GYI, [2003] Mozart, Wolfgang. Jupiter Symphony: Symphony in C Major, K. 338 with Menuetto K. 409. Ivan Fischer, Budapest Festival Orchestra. Hungaroton. ASIN: B000PHD0FK, [1988]


Symphony No. 5 in B-flat Major, D.485

FRANZ SCHUBERT Born January 31, 1797, Vienna Died November 19, 1828, Vienna

Schubert composed his Fifth Symphony in September and October 1816 under very particular conditions, and those conditions did much to shape how this music sounds. Schubert wrote the symphony for a tiny informal orchestra that played in the homes of a group of music lovers in Vienna. That orchestra had begun as the Schubert family string quartet, to which a few winds and extra string players were added, and the modest scoring of the Fifth reflects this: one flute, pairs of oboes, bassoons, horns, and strings. Schubert omits clarinets, trumpets, and timpani, and their absence gives the music an unusually gentle character and makes for a very particular sonority, almost chamber-like in its textures. Schubert often sets the two violin sections in octaves (further contributing to the transparency of textures) and writes with great clarity for solo winds. In particular, the glowing, silvery sound of the single flute gives this symphony much of its clear, pure sound, a sonority quite appropriate to a piece of music conceived for performance in a living room rather than a 3000-seat concert hall. The intimacy of the Fifth Symphony may come from a further reason as well: earlier that same year, under the strong influence of Beethoven, Schubert had written his Fourth Symphony, which he gave the somewhat inflated nickname “Tragic.” But several months later Schubert had come to feel that Beethoven’s style–however right it may have been for Beethoven–was not right for him, and now he turned away sharply from that dramatic manner. Perhaps in the effort to cleanse his palate of that taste, he went back to an earlier style for his model: the spirit of Mozart hovers over this gentle symphony. At first glance, Schubert’s Fifth Symphony certainly seems to be of Mozartean proportion and manner: it is built on the outlines of the classical symphony, which are here wed to Schubert’s lyric gift and sometimes to his penchant for unexpected harmonic shifts. A four-bar introduction, full of glowing woodwind sound and scurrying violins, alights gracefully on the buoyant, dancing main idea in the violins, which also have the sprightly second subject. This sonata-form movement, full of youthful energy and bright spirits, proceeds normally until near the end, where the 19-year-old composer is willing to break the rules and start that recapitulation in the “wrong” key of E-flat major instead of the home key of B-flat. The Andante con moto sings throughout, from its melting opening violin phrase through the broader, chorale-like second subject. Schubert almost certainly turned to Mozart for his model in the minuet: its key-structure and theme-shape come directly from the third movement of Mozart’s great Symphony No.

ER 40 in G Minor. Schubert wears these influences FE ST lightly, and this movement does not sound nearly so implacable as its predecessor; both composers move to sunny G major for the trio section. Schubert defies expectations slightly in the finale, offering another sonataform movement instead of the customary rondo (the model may again have been the Mozart Symphony No. 40). Here Schubert offers a series of irresistible tunes, of which the flowing second is a real beauty. A teenaged composer could do worse than choose Mozart as his model, but one of the great pleasures of the Fifth Symphony is that–despite the model–it sounds like Schubert in every bar. The young man who wrote this symphony– and who was still feeling his way with symphonic form– was already a sophisticated composer of lieder. In fact, at exactly the same time he wrote this symphony Schubert composed a series of magnificent songs on texts by Goethe: Sehnsucht and the three Harfenspieler songs on texts from Wilhelm Meister. If the Fifth Symphony does not reach the same heights as those songs, its glowing melodies and youthful charm have nevertheless made it the popular favorite among Schubert’s early symphonies.

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Violin Concerto No. 2 in G Minor, Opus 63

SERGEI PROKOFIEV Born April 23, 1891, Sontsovka, Ukraine Died March 5, 1953, Moscow

Like many other Russian musicians, Prokofiev fled to the West in the aftermath of the Communist Revolution of 1917, and he eventually made his home in Paris, where he wrote brilliant–and often abrasive–music. The young composer appeared to take delight in assaulting audiences: when one of his early premières was roundly booed, Prokofiev walked onstage, bowed deeply to the jeering audience, and sat down and played an encore of equally assaultive music. As the years went by, though, Prokofiev began to feel homesick for Russia. He made the first of many return visits in 1927, and after 1933 he kept an apartment in Moscow and divided his time between that city and Paris. Prokofiev knew that if he returned to Russia, he would have to relax his style. Socialist Realism demanded music that was lyric and attractive to a mass audience, and the Soviet government would not for an instant have tolerated some of the music he had written in the West. Perhaps Prokofiev himself was ready to relax his style, but as the composer made the decision to return to Russia (which he did in 1936), his music grew more lyric and accessible: among the first works he wrote after his return were Peter and the Wolf and the ballet Romeo and Juliet. The Second Violin Concerto also dates from these years and from this evolution toward a more lyric style. In 1935 friends of the French violinist Robert Soetens asked Prokofiev to write a violin concerto for him. Prokofiev 858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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had already been thinking of writing a new work for the violin when the commission arrived, and he noted how the unsettled circumstances of his life caused this music to be written in many different places: “the principal theme of the first movement was written in Paris, the first theme of the second movement in Voronezh, the orchestration I completed in Baku, while the first performance was given in Madrid, in December 1935.” Prokofiev and Soetens then took the concerto on an exotic tour, performing it in Portugal, Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia. Prokofiev had at first not planned to write a concerto and intended instead to compose a smaller-scaled work, which he described as a “concert sonata for violin and orchestra.” As completed, though, the work is clearly a violin concerto, though one conceived on a somewhat intimate scale: Prokofiev scores it for what is essentially Mozart’s orchestra (pairs of woodwinds, horns, and trumpets, plus strings), but that classical sound is enlivened by some unusual percussion instruments, including castanets and a variety of drums. The intimate scale and lyric nature of this concerto are evident from the first instant of the Allegro moderato, where the solo violin–all alone–lays out the opening theme. This concerto veers between extremes–it can be murmuring and muted one instant, full of steely energy the next–and such a contrast arrives with the bittersweet second subject, also announced by solo violin. The development of this sonata-form movement is extremely energetic, and the movement finally snaps into silence on abrupt pizzicatos. Pizzicato strings also open the second movement, where they provide a pointillistic accompaniment to the violin’s long cantilena. This melody, which changes meters smoothly between 12/8 and 4/4, evolves through a series of variations until a pair of clarinets introduces the singing central episode. The opening material returns, and Prokofiev closes with an imaginative touch: he has the solo violin take over the pizzicato figure from the opening and “accompany” the orchestra to the quiet close. Briefest of the movements, the concluding Allegro ben marcato demands virtuoso playing from both soloist and orchestra, who must solve complex problems of coordination and balance. This is the most exotic-sounding of the movements, for here Prokofiev makes distinctive use of his percussion instruments, particularly the castanets. The closing pages–which alternate measures of 7/4, 5/4, 2/2, and 3/2 with the basic pulse of 3/4–are particularly exciting.

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Symphony No. 34 in C Major, K.338

WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART Born January 27, 1756, Salzburg Died December 5, 1791, Vienna

Mozart completed his Symphony No. 34 on August 29, 1780. The previous year he had returned to Salzburg

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from an extended–and utterly unsuccessful–effort to find a position in Mannheim or Paris, and in the following year would come his violent rupture from the Archbishop of Salzburg and his move to Vienna. But now the 24-yearold composer settled into the routine of serving as court organist to an employer he hated in a city he hated. The symphony as a form did not interest Mozart much in these years, but the key he chose for this symphony–C major–is the one he reserved for his most ceremonial music, and it may well be that this symphony was written for some grand occasion in Salzburg. This symphony is remarkable for the sharp contrasts between its three movements–each has a quite distinct character. The Allegro vivace gets off to a brilliant beginning, ringing with the sound of trumpets and drums and martial fanfares, and this energy–borne along by trills, syncopations, and long crescendos–propels the entire movement. Alfred Einstein has shown how this movement depends for much of its power on Mozart’s use of differing keys to highlight the music’s C-major brilliance. Only in the recapitulation does the opening material return, and the movement drives to a dramatic close on the bright spirits of the very beginning. The Andante di molto takes us into a completely different world. Gone are the festive fanfares of the opening movement, and now Mozart writes only for strings and bassoons, though he enriches the texture by dividing the violas and marking all parts sotto voce. In its endless lyricism, this movement sounds very much like an opera aria. The first violins sing the opening melody, full of graceful turns, and also have the flowing second idea, heard above chirping accompaniment from the second violins. The Allegro vivace finale returns to the C-major tonality of the opening. It explodes to life with a great orchestral attack, and off the music goes, sparkling and dancing along on its 6/8 meter. Mozart calls for a repeat of the entire opening section before this music sails home on the infectious and propulsive energy that bursts out of each measure.

'FEST FACT: Mostly Mozart We close the 30th Anniversary Festival with Mozart, the most performed composer at SummerFest to date. With the addition of six more works this festival, Mozart has been performed 124 times at SummerFest. (Beethoven and Brahms are a close 2nd and 3rd.)


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Artist Roster

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Cho-Liang Lin, MUSIC DIRECTOR VIOLIN

Adam Barnett-Hart Martin Beaver Aaron Boyd Chee-Yun Bridget Dolkas Kathryn Hatmaker Luke Hsu Paul Huang Kristin Lee Yura Lee Cho-Liang Lin Frederik Øland Jonathan Ong Alyssa Park Dorothy Ro Gil Shaham Jeanne Skrocki Sheryl Staples Andrew Wan

VIOLA

Robert Brophy Che-Yen Chen Pierre Lapointe Yura Lee Caterina Longhi Travis Maril Asbjørn Nørgaard Heiichiro Ohyama Cynthia Phelps Abigail Rojansky

CELLO

Carter Brey Chia-Ling Chien Rainer Crosett Felix Fan Clive Greensmith Warren Hagerty Ben Hong Mischa Maisky Eileen Moon Hai-Ye Ni John Sharp Fredrik Schøyen Sjölin Brook Speltz

BASS

CONDUCTOR

PIANO

COMMISSIONED COMPOSERS

Nico Abondolo Pablo Aslan Samuel Hager Alex Brown Marc-André Hamelin John Novacek Jon Kimura Parker Juho Pohjonen Shai Wosner

FLUTE

Catherine Ransom Karoly Pamela Vliek Martchev

OBOE

Laura Griffiths Liang Wang

CLARINET

Paquito D’Rivera Burt Hara Teresa Reilly John Bruce Yeh

BASSOON

Keith Buncke Ryan Simmons

HORN

Mike McCoy Jennifer Montone

TRUMPET

Jennifer Marotta David Washburn

James Conlon Jeff Edmons Heiichiro Ohyama

Richard Danielpour Marc-André Hamelin* David Lang Sean Shepherd*

FELLOWSHIP ARTIST ENSEMBLES

Beacon Street Trio Sophie Scolnik-Brower, piano Luke Hsu, violin Rainer Crosett, cello Verona Quartet Jonathan Ong, violin Dorothy Ro, violin Abigail Rojansky, viola Warren Hagerty, cello

SCHOLARSIN-RESIDENCE Eric Bromberger Nicolas Reveles

LECTURERS & GUEST SPEAKERS Steven Cassedy Nuvi Mehta Marcus Overton Leah Z. Rosenthal

ENSEMBLES

Danish String Quartet Frederik Øland, violin Rune Tonsgaard Sørensen, violin Asbjørn Nørgaard, viola Fredrik Schøyen Sjölin, cello Escher String Quartet Adam Barnett-Hart, violin Aaron Boyd, violin Pierre Lapointe, viola Brook Speltz, cello FLUX Quartet Tom Chiu, violin Conrad Harris, violin Max Mandel, viola Felix Fan, cello The Montrose Trio Jon Kimura Parker, piano Martin Beaver, violin Clive Greensmith, cello Time for Three Nicolas Kendall, violin Nikki Chooi, violin Ranaan Meyer, bass Zukerman Trio Pinchas Zukerman, violin Amanda Forsyth, cello Angela Cheng, piano SDYS International Youth Symphony SummerFest Chamber Orchestra

PERCUSSION Aiyun Huang Molly Yeh

* in Residence

PHOTO CREDITS: Cover: See page 5; Pg 16: C. Lin © Sophie Zhai, M. Maisky courtesy of artist; Pg 17: F. Fan © Paul Body, Chee-Yun © Youngho Kang; Pg 18: Time for Three © Shervin Lainez; Pg 19: H. Ohyama courtesy of artist, C. Lin © Sophie Zhai; Pg 22: Chee-Yun © Youngho Kang; C. Brey © Christian Steiner; Pg 25: The Montrose Trio © Jerry Zolynsky; Pg 28: Zukerman Trio by Cheryl Mazak; Pg 31: Danish String Quartet by Caroline Bittencourt, J. Pohjonen by J. Henry Fair; Pg 32: Escher String Quartet © Sophie Zhai, Y. Lee courtesy of artist; Pg 38: FLUX Quartet courtesy of artists, S. Shepherd courtesy of artist; Pg 41: B. Hara courtesy of artist, K. Lee courtesy of artist, J. Novacek © Peter Schaaf; Pg 45: P. D’Rivera © R. Andrew Lepley; Pg 48 & 51: M. Maisky by Hideki Shiozawa; Pg 53: A. Wan courtesy of artist, C. Phelps © Richard Bowditch, S. Wosner © Marco Borggreve; Pg 56: J. Yeh © Todd Rosenberg, K. Buncke © Todd Rosenberg Photography, L. Wang courtesy of artist; Pg 60: M. Hamelin by Fran Kaufman; Pg 62: J. Conlon © Dan Steinberg, G. Shaham © Luke Ratray; Pg 88: SummerFest 2016 Committee by Matthew Fernie; Back Cover: Twyla Tharp Dance © Ruven Afanador

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SummerFest Musical Preludes

TUESDAY, AUGUST 9 · 7 PM MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

MENDELSSOHN String Quartet in E Minor, Opus 44, No. 2 (1837) (1809-1847) Allegro assai appassionato Scherzo. Allegro di molto Andante Presto agitato Verona Quartet Jonathan Ong, Dorothy Ro, violins; Abigail Rojansky, viola; Warren Hagerty, cello

FRIDAY, AUGUST 12 · 7 PM MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

BEETHOVEN Piano Trio in E-flat Major, Opus 70, No. 2 (1808) (1770-1827) Poco sostenuto — Allegro ma non troppo Allegretto Allegretto ma non troppo Finale. Allegro Beacon Street Trio Sophie Scolnik-Brower, piano; Luke Hsu, violin; Rainer Crosett, cello

TUESDAY, AUGUST 16 · 7 PM MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

BARTÓK String Quartet No. 5 (1934) (1881-1945) Allegro Adagio molto Scherzo: alla bulgarese Andante Finale: Allegro vivace

Verona Quartet Jonathan Ong, Dorothy Ro, violins; Abigail Rojansky, viola; Warren Hagerty, cello

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WORK PREMIÈRED: October 1837 in Leipzig, by Ferdinand David and his quartet QUICK NOTE: Felix Mendelssohn’s String Quartet in E Minor, Op.44, No.2 is one of a surprisingly large number of excellent pieces he wrote while on his honeymoon. He also wrote a choral setting of Psalm 42 (Op. 42), the Piano Concerto in D Minor, and The Song Without Words, Op. 38/6. It was not a frantic or emotionally volatile outpouring of pieces, though. Mendelssohn seems simply to have found himself happily productive. — Tim Summers

WORK PREMIÈRED: December 1808, at the estate of Countess Marie von Erdödy QUICK NOTE: The Piano Trio in E-flat Major has been much admired, and with good reason. Some have claimed that in this trio Beethoven consciously wrote thematic material in the manner of Haydn and Mozart and then treated it in his own mature style–the music thus combines the elegance and restraint of an earlier era with Beethoven’s own powerful sense of form and musical evolution. Beyond this, the music is distinctive for its gentleness and for Beethoven’s many structural innovations. — Eric Bromberger

WORK PREMIÈRED: April 8, 1935 in Washington, D.C, by the Kolisch Quartet QUICK NOTE: Bartók’s penultimate quartet was composed in 1934 on a commission from Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge, at the time America’s most prominent musical patron. It represents a mellowing of Bartók’s quartet idiom; the sounds are less dissonant and less harsh than in his previous quartets. — Howard Posner


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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17 · 7 PM MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

RAVEL Piano Trio in A Minor (1914) (1875-1937) Modéré Pantoum (Assez vite) Passacaille (Très large) Final (Animé)

Beacon Street Trio Sophie Scolnik-Brower, piano; Luke Hsu, violin; Rainer Crosett, cello

SUNDAY, AUGUST 21 · 2 PM MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

BEETHOVEN String Quartet in E Minor, Opus 59, No. 2 (1806) (1770-1827) Allegro Molto Adagio. Si tratta questo pezzo con molto di sentimento Allegretto – Maggiore (Thème russe) Finale. Presto Verona Quartet Jonathan Ong, Dorothy Ro, violins; Abigail Rojansky, viola; Warren Hagerty, cello

TUESDAY, AUGUST 23 · 7 PM MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

BRAHMS Piano Trio in B Major, Opus 8 (1853-54) (1833-1897) Allegro con moto – Tempo un poco più Moderato – Schnell Scherzo: Allegro molto – Trio: Più lento – Tempo primo Adagio non troppo – Allegro – Tempo primo Finale: Allegro molto agitato – Un poco più lento – Tempo primo Beacon Street Trio Sophie Scolnik-Brower, piano; Luke Hsu, violin; Rainer Crosett, cello

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WORK PREMIÈRED: January, 1915 in Paris, by Alfredo Casella (piano), Gabriel Willaume (violin), and Louis Feuillard (cello) QUICK NOTE: In February 1914, Ravel went to Saint-Jeande-Luz, a small village on the French coast near the Spanish border, to work on two projects he had planned for some time: a piano concerto using Basque themes and a piano trio. He soon abandoned plans for the concerto, but the Piano Trio is one of Ravel’s finest chamber works, featuring brilliant writing for all three performers and a range of instrumental color rare in a piano trio. — Eric Bromberger

WORK PREMIÈRED: Commissioned by and dedicated to Count Andreas Kyrillowitsch Graf Razumovsky, by the Razumovsky Quartet. Published in Vienna in 1808 QUICK NOTE: The three quartets Beethoven wrote in 1806 were so completely original that in one stroke they redefined the whole conception of the string quartet. The first Razumovsky quartet is broad and heroic and the third extroverted and virtuosic, but the second has defied easy characterization. Such a description would seem to make the Quartet in E Minor a nervous work, unsettled in its procedures and unsettling to audiences. But the wonder is that–despite these many original strokes–this music is so unified, so convincing, and at times so achingly beautiful. — Eric Bromberger

WORK PREMIÈRED: October 13, 1855 in Danzig QUICK NOTE: The Trio in B Major had a curious genesis: Brahms composed it twice. In its original form, the Trio in B Major was performed quickly and widely: the première took place in Danzig on October 13, 1855, and the first performance in America took place the following month, on November 27, 1855, in New York City.  The première of the revised version took place in Budapest on January 10, 1890. Brahms had grown more adept not just at developing his material but also at creating themes capable of growth and change, and–as revised–the Trio in B Major combines some of the best features of early and late Brahms: his youthful impetuosity is wed to an enormously refined technique. — Eric Bromberger 858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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Community Engagement Activities COACHING WORKSHOPS

Free Admission · Limited Seating LA JOLLA RIFORD LIBRARY

Each year, SummerFest Music Director Cho-Liang Lin invites emerging ensembles and young professionals to participate in a 3-week series of master classes conducted by senior Festival Artists from the SummerFest roster. During SummerFest 2016 we welcome Fellowship Artists Verona Quartet: Jonathan Ong, Dorothy Ro, violins; Abigail Rojansky, viola; Warren Hagerty, cello and Beacon Street Trio: Sophie Scolnik-Brower, piano; Luke Hsu, violin; Rainer Crosett, cello. As part of La Jolla Music Society's active partnership with the San Diego Youth Symphony and Conservatory, SummerFest performers will coach SDYS students on select workshops.

OPEN REHEARSALS

Free Admission · Limited Seating MCASD SHERWOOD AUDITORIUM

free

TO THE PUBLIC

AUG 3 WED Coaching Workshops 10:00 - 10:50 AM 11:00 - 11:50 AM

AUG 4 THUR Coaching Workshops 10:00 - 10:50 AM 11:00 - 11:50 AM

Open Rehearsal 12:50 - 2:00 PM

AUG 5 FRI Coaching Workshops 10:00 - 10:50 AM 11:00 - 11:50 AM

AUG 8 MON Coaching Workshops 10:00 - 10:50 AM 11:00 - 11:50 AM

AUG 9 TUE Coaching Workshops 10:00 - 10:50 AM 11:00 - 11:50 AM

Open Rehearsal 12:50 - 2:00 PM

AUG 10 WED Coaching Workshops 10:00 - 10:50 AM 11:00 - 11:50 AM

AUG 11 THUR Coaching Workshops 10:00 - 10:50 AM 11:00 - 11:50 AM

Encounter 12:30 - 2:00 PM

AUG 12 FRI Coaching Workshops 10:00 - 10:50 AM 11:00 - 11:50 AM

Doors Open 10 Minutes Prior to Listed Start Time

AUG 13 SAT

Open Rehearsal

Five Open Rehearsals provide audiences with the rare opportunity to observe the intricate rehearsal process before the stage lights shine. These are working rehearsals and no entry is allowed once they have begun. LJMS Director of Artistic Planning and Education Leah Rosenthal, joined by special guests, will introduce each work prior to the start of the rehearsal.

AUG 15 MON Coaching Workshops 10:00 - 10:50 AM 11:00 - 11:50 AM

9:50 - 11:00 AM

Open Rehearsal 2:20 - 3:30 PM

AUG 16 TUE Coaching Workshops 10:00 - 10:50 AM 11:00 - 11:50 AM

AUG 17 WED Coaching Workshops 10:00 - 10:50 AM 11:00 - 11:50 AM

AUG 18* THUR Encounter 12:30 - 2:00 PM

ENCOUNTERS

Free Admission · Limited Seating ATHENAEUM MUSIC & ARTS LIBRARY

Featuring intriguing discussions, performances and diverse perspectives, SummerFest Encounters reveal fascinating insights into the ways in which music is created, influenced, interpreted and performed.

AUG 19 FRI Coaching Workshops 10:00 - 10:50 AM 11:00 - 11:50 AM AUG 20 SAT

Open Rehearsal

1:20 - 2:30 PM

AUG 22 MON Coaching Workshops 10:00 - 10:50 AM 11:00 - 11:50 AM

AUG 25 THUR Encounter 12:30 - 2:00 PM *SPECIAL NOTE: AUG 18 - No Coaching Workshops

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Rune Tonsgaard Sørensen coaches the Verona Quartet on Mendelssohn’s String Quartet, Opus 44, No. 2 Jon Kimura Parker coaches Beacon Street Trio on Brahms’ Piano Trio in B Major, Opus 8

Carter Brey coaches the Beacon Street Trio on Fauré’s Piano Trio, Opus 120 Asbjørn Nørgaard coaches the Verona Quartet on Bartók’s String Quartet No. 5

Special Guest: Cho-Liang Lin - Martin Beaver, Cho-Liang Lin, Che-Yen Chen, Heiichiro Ohyama, Carter Brey and Eileen Moon rehearse Schoenberg’s Verklärte Nacht, Opus 4, for String Sextet

Martin Beaver coaches the Beacon Street Trio on Ravel’s Piano Trio in A Minor Heiichiro Ohyama coaches the Verona Quartet on Mendelssohn’s String Quartet, Opus 44, No. 2

Clive Greensmith coaches the Beacon Street Trio on Ravel’s Piano Trio in A Minor or Fauré’s Piano Trio, Opus 120 Fredrik Schøyen Sjölin coaches the Verona Quartet on Mendelssohn’s String Quartet, Opus 44, No. 2

Pinchas Zukerman coaches the Beacon Street Trio on Beethoven’s Piano Trio in E-flat Major, Opus 70, No. 2 Yura Lee coaches a student of the San Diego Youth Symphony

Special Guest: Yura Lee - Kristin Lee, Yura Lee, Clive Greensmith and Juho Pohjonen rehearse Schumann’s Piano Quartet in E-flat Major, Opus 47

Adam Barnett Hart coaches the Verona Quartet on Bartók’s String Quartet No. 5 or Beethoven’s String Quartet, Opus 59, No. 2 John Novacek coaches the Beacon Street Trio on Ravel’s Piano Trio in A Minor

Aaron Boyd coaches the Verona Quartet on Haydn’s String Quartet in B-flat Major, Opus 50, No. 1 Juho Pohjonen coaches the Beacon Street Trio on Beethoven’s Piano Trio in E-flat Major, Opus 70, No. 2

Sophie Scolnik-Brower coaches a student of the San Diego Youth Symphony Felix Fan and Tom Chiu coach the Verona Quartet on Ligeti’s String Quartet No. 1 “Metamorphoses nocturnes”

Special Guest: Felix Fan - John Novacek, Felix Fan and Aiyun Huang rehearse Tsontakis’ Stimulus Package

Cho-Liang Lin coaches the Verona Quartet on Bartók’s String Quartet No. 5 John Sharp coaches the Beacon Street Trio on Fauré’s Piano Trio, Opus 120

Kristin Lee coaches a student of the San Diego Youth Symphony Dorothy Ro coaches a student of the San Diego Youth Symphony

Pierre Lapointe coaches the Verona Quartet on Beethoven’s String Quartet, Opus 59, No. 2 Andrew Wan coaches the Beacon Street Trio on Brahms’ Piano Trio in B Major, Opus 8

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Special Guest: Kristin Lee - Burt Hara, Kristin Lee, John Sharp and John Novacek rehearse Messiaen’s Quartet for the End of Time

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Lecture by Nuvi Mehta - Vienna 1900: How the Past made the Future

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Special Performance Encounter hosted by Scholar-in-Residence Eric Bromberger: Verona Quartet and Pierre Lapointe perform Mozart’s String Quintet in G Minor, K.516 followed by Beacon Street Trio, Andrew Wan and Robert Brophy performing Dvorˇák’s Piano Quintet No. 2 Cho-Liang Lin coaches the Beacon Street Trio on Brahms’ Piano Trio in B Major, Opus 8 Cynthia Phelps coaches the Verona Quartet on Beethoven’s String Quartet, Opus 59, No. 2 Special Guest: Shai Wosner - Shai Wosner, Sheryl Staples, Paul Huang, Robert Brophy and John Sharp rehearse Schumann’s Piano Quintet in E-flat Major, Opus 44 Shai Wosner coaches the Beacon Street Trio on Brahms’ Piano Trio in B Major, Opus 8 Sheryl Staples coaches the Verona Quartet on Haydn’s String Quartet in B-flat Major, Opus 50, No. 1 Scholar-in-Residence Eric Bromberger hosts a discussion with Composer-in-Residence, pianist Marc-André Hamelin

858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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Artist Biographies

Cho-Liang Lin, Music Director & violin

Born in Taiwan, Cho-Liang Lin began violin studies at age 5. As a 7th grader in Sydney, Mr. Lin played for Itzhak Perlman in a master class, and learned of Dorothy DeLay, Perlman’s teacher. Two years later, Mr. Lin began six years of study with Ms. DeLay at The Juilliard School. He launched his thirty-plus year concert career in a debut playing the Mendelssohn concerto with the New York Philharmonic and Zubin Mehta in 1980, and has performed as a soloist with virtually every major orchestra in the world. Apart from SummerFest, he is also Artistic Director of the Hong Kong International Chamber Music Festival. He has been on Juilliard’s faculty and is currently Professor of Violin at Rice University’s Shepherd School of Music in Houston. Mr. Lin has long championed commissioning new works. A diverse list of composers including John Harbison, Christopher Rouse, Tan Dun, John Williams, Steven Stucky, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Bright Sheng, Paul Schoenfield, Joan Tower and many more have commissioned works for him. Mr. Lin performs on either the 1715 “Titian” Stradivarius or a 2000 Samuel Zygmuntowicz. His recordings for Sony Classical, Decca, BIS, Ondine and Naxos have been recognized with two Grammy® nominations, a Gramophone and Record of the Year award.

Nico Abondolo, bass

Internationallyrecognized leading double bassist, chamber musician and professor, Nico Abondolo debuted at 14 with the Los Angeles Philharmonic and in 1983 became the first double bassist ever to win first place in the International Competition for Musical Performers in Switzerland. Mr. Abondolo regularly performs at La Jolla Music Society SummerFest, the St. Bart’s Festival and at The Music Academy of the West. He

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is also a composer, and wrote the score for the PBS documentary series, “Half the Sky.”

Pablo Aslan, bass

Argentine-born Pablo Aslan is in demand for his skills as a producer, bassist, and educator, and for his knowledge of tango. Currently a member of the Glass House Orchestra and the Astoria Tango Orchestra, he plays regularly with ensembles in New York City, including an ongoing residence at Zinc Bar with Grammy® nominee Emilio Solla. His CD, Tango Grill (Zoho Music), was nominated for a Latin Grammy® Award for Best Tango Album and a Grammy® for Best Latin Jazz Album.

Beacon Street Trio

Formed at the New England Conservatory, the Beacon Street Trio is a growing force, performing with luminaries such as Kim Kashkashian and the Borromeo String Quartet, among others. Having attended festivals including Yellow Barn, Aspen Music School, and Casals Festival at Prades, Beacon Street Trio has also toured throughout the U.S., Europe and Asia.

Sophie Scolnik-Brower, piano

Harvard University Magna Cum Laude graduate, Sophie Scolnik-Brower has performed across the United States and abroad at Aspen Music Festival and L’ Académie Internationale d’Eté in Nice.

Luke Hsu, violin

First prize winner of multiple international violin competitions, Luke Hsu is a celebrated soloist and chamber musician, and is currently playing on a Joseph Gobbetti violin made in 1713, loaned by the Colburn Foundation.

Rainer Crosett, cello

Winner of the 2015 New England Conservatory Concerto Competition, Rainer Crosett has appeared as a soloist, chamber musician, and principal cellist at Carnegie Hall with the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

Martin Beaver, violin

Former first violinist of the Tokyo String Quartet, Martin Beaver is a founding member of The Montrose Trio with pianist Jon Kimura Parker and cellist Clive Greensmith. Mr. Beaver has appeared as soloist with the orchestras of San Francisco, Indianapolis, Montreal and Sapporo, among others. A top prizewinner at the international violin competitions of Indianapolis, Montreal and Brussels, he has collaborated with artists such as Leon Fleisher, Pinchas Zukerman and Yefim Bronfman. Mr. Beaver is currently Professor of Violin and Co-Director of String Chamber Music Studies at the Colburn Conservatory of Music and plays a 1789 Nicolo Bergonzi violin.

Carter Brey, cello

Principal Cello of the New York Philharmonic, Carter Brey has appeared as soloist with virtually all of the major orchestras in the U.S., and performed under the batons of prominent conductors including Claudio Abbado, Riccardo Muti and Lorin Maazel. His chamber music career is equally distinguished; he has made regular appearances with the Tokyo and Emerson String Quartets as well as The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and at festivals such as Spoleto (both in the U.S. and Italy), Santa Fe, and La Jolla Music Society SummerFest. Mr. Brey is on faculty at the Curtis Institute.


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Eric Bromberger, scholar-in-residence

Eric Bromberger has been program annotator for the La Jolla Music Society since 1983, and is annotator for the Minnesota Orchestra, Washington Performing Arts Society, Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival, San Francisco Performances, University of Chicago Presents, San Diego Symphony, and others. He lectures frequently for the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s Upbeat Live series at Disney Hall.

Robert Brophy, viola

Los Angeles Philharmonic violist Robert Brophy also performs with the LA Opera, Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra and New Hollywood String Quartet, and is featured on Nigel Kennedy’s new release Greatest Hits on the EMI label. An advocate for new music and former member of the Ensō Quartet, Mr. Brophy has worked with many leading composers of the 20th and 21st centuries, including Joan Tower, William Bolcom and Tan Dun. Mr. Brophy holds degrees from England’s Royal Northern College of Music and Rice University.

Alex Brown, piano

Yamaha Artist Alex Brown has appeared worldwide at major venues and festivals that include the Blue Note clubs in New York and Tokyo and the Telluride Jazz Celebration. Featured in the January 2010 issue of Keyboard Magazine, Alex Brown has been a member of Paquito D’Rivera’s ensemble since 2007, performing and contributing arrangements to their Grammy®-award winning album Jazz Meets the Classics. Mr. Brown earned his Bachelor of Music degree from New England Conservatory of Music, studying with Danilo Pérez and Charlie Banacos.

Keith Buncke, bassoon

Keith Buncke began his tenure as Principal Bassoon of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in July 2015, having been appointed to the position by Music Director Riccardo Muti. Previously, he served as Principal Bassoon of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. He has participated in the summer festivals of Tanglewood, Pacific, Sarasota, Aspen, and the Music Academy of the West. Born in Orange, California and a native of Portland, Oregon, Mr. Buncke was a pupil of Daniel Matsukawa at the Curtis Institute of Music.

Steven Cassedy, lecturer

Steven Cassedy, Distinguished Professor of Literature and Associate Dean of Graduate Studies at UCSD, is a classically trained pianist who studied at The Juilliard School’s Pre-College Division and at the University of Michigan’s School of Music. With a B.A. and Ph.D in comparative literature from University of Michigan and Princeton, respectively, he has been a member of UCSD’s Department of Literature since 1980.

Chee-Yun, violin

Since her first public performance at age eight in her native Seoul, violinist Chee-Yun has enraptured audiences with her compelling artistry. After winning the Young Concert Artists International Auditions in 1989, she has performed regularly with the world’s foremost orchestras, including The Philadelphia Orchestra and the London Philharmonic among many others, and with such distinguished conductors as Hans Graf, James DePriest and Jesús López-Cobos. Chee-Yun is an Artist-in-Residence and Professor of Violin at Southern Methodist University.

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Che-Yen Chen, viola

TaiwaneseAmerican violist Che-Yen Chen is a founding member of the Formosa Quartet, the First Prize winner of the 2006 London International String Quartet Competition. Mr. Chen served as the Principal Violist of the San Diego Symphony Orchestra for eight seasons and has been described by San Diego Union Tribune as an artist whose “most impressive aspect of his playing was his ability to find not just the subtle emotion, but the humanity hidden in the music.”

Chia-Ling Chien, cello

Chia-Ling Chien was born in Taipei, Taiwan, and began playing the piano at age 6 and cello at age 9. She received both Bachelor and Master of Music degrees from the Cleveland Institute of Music and was appointed as the Associate Principal Cello of the San Diego Symphony Orchestra in 2008 by the Music Director Jahja Ling.

James Conlon, conductor

Since James Conlon's 1974 debut with the New York Philharmonic, he has conducted virtually every major American and European symphony orchestra. Currently Music Director of Los Angeles Opera and the Cincinnati May Festival, in 2017, he begins his tenure as Principle Conductor of the Orchestra Sinfonica Nazionale della RAI in Torino, Italy. In 2002, he received the Légion d’honneur from the French Republic. To raise awareness of the significance of lesser-known works by composers silenced by the Nazi regime, Maestro Conlon has devoted himself to extensive programming of this music throughout Europe and North America, for which he received the Crystal Globe Award from the Anti-Defamation League in 2007. 858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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Paquito D’Rivera, clarinet

Born in Havana, Cuba, fourteentime Grammy® Award winning Paquito D’Rivera defies categorization and is celebrated both for his artistry in Latin jazz and his achievements as a classical composer. He has been recognized with countless prestigious awards from the 2007 Kennedy Center’s Living Jazz Legend Award, to the 2005 NEA Jazz Masters Award, and two honorary doctorates from the Berkelee School of Music and University of Pennsylvania. He is currently the Artistic Director of Uruguay’s world-class Festival Internacional de Jazz de Punta del Este. National Endowment for the Arts website affirms “he has become the consummate multinational ambassador, creating and promoting a cross-culture of music that moves effortlessly among jazz, Latin, and Mozart.”

Richard Danielpour, composer

Recipient of the American Academy of Arts & Letters Charles Ives Fellowship and a Guggenheim Award, composer Richard Danielpour has established himself as a gifted and sought-after composer. His lists of commissions include Yo-Yo Ma, Jessye Norman, the New York City Ballet, the Vienna Chamber Orchestra, and many more. With Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison, Mr. Danielpour created Margaret Garner, his first opera, which premièred in 2005 and had a second production with New York City Opera. He is on the faculty of the Manhattan School of Music and Curtis Institute and his music is published by Lean Kat Music and Associated Music Publishers.

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Danish String Quartet

Frederik Øland, Rune Tonsgaard Sørensen, violins; Asbjørn Nørgaard, viola; Fredrik Schøyen Sjölin, cello

Having met as children at a summer music camp, the Danish String Quartet has established a reputation for integrated sound, impeccable intonation and judicious balance. Matching technical and interpretive talents with a joyous “rampaging energy,” (Alex Ross, The New Yorker) the Quartet is in demand worldwide by concert-goers and festival presenters alike. The Quartet was named as a BBC Radio 3 New Generation Artist for 2013-15. Their 2015-16 Season included a release of Adès, Nørgård & Abrahamsen on ECM Records as well as summer performances at the Mostly Mozart Festival and Ottawa Chamberfest. International highlights include a debut at the Louvre Museum in Paris and a first-time tour of China. The Quartet’s many awards include First Prize in the 11th London International String Quartet Competition in 2009 and the 2011 Carl Nielsen Prize, among others.

Bridget Dolkas, violin

Bridget Ann Dolkas is Principal Second Violin of Pacific Symphony. She co-founded the acclaimed Connections Chamber Music Series and is first violinist of the California Quartet. She also rocks out in the jazz/classical infused band Peter Sprague Consort. Ms. Dolkas made her directorial debut in the frighteningly funny mash-up music video, “Frite of Spring”, now on YouTube.

Jeff Edmons, conductor

Jeff Edmons is now in his 21st year with SDYS. Under his direction, SDYS has experienced tremendous growth, both in enrollment and in its level of musical achievement. Performing the most difficult repertoire, SDYS achieves the highest standard attainable by a youth orchestra. Mr. Edmons has been the subject of documentaries on CNN, Fox Television, National Public Radio, and more.

Escher String Quartet

Adam Barnett-Hart, Aaron Boyd, violins; Pierre Lapointe, viola; Brook Speltz, cello

The BBC Music Magazine observes, “They hold the listener spellbound from first to last.” The Escher String Quartet has received acclaim for its profound musical insight and rare tonal beauty. Championed by the Emerson String Quartet, the group was a BBC New Generation Artist from 2010-12, giving debuts at both Wigmore Hall and BBC Proms at Cadogan Hall. In its home town of New York, the ensemble serves as Artists of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. In 2013, the Quartet became one of the very few chamber ensembles to be awarded the prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant. Their most recent release is Mendelssohn Quartets Volume 1 on the BIS label. The Quartet takes its name from Dutch graphic artist M.C. Escher, inspired by Escher’s method of interplay between individual components working together to form a whole.


Felix Fan, cello

Felix Fan’s versatility has made him one of the most sought after cellists of his generation. As a chamber musician, he has performed with Yo-Yo Ma, Gil Shaham and János Starker, in venues such as Carnegie Hall, The Kennedy Center, Vienna's Musikverein and London's Royal Festival Hall. Mr. Fan is committed to the advancement of modern music and joined the FLUX Quartet in 2008. In 1994, he was honored by Bill Clinton as a Presidential Scholar. Mr. Fan plays the ‘Haussman’ Stradivarius of 1724.

FLUX Quartet

Tom Chiu, Conrad Harris, violins; Max Mandel, viola; Felix Fan, cello

The San Francisco Chronicle praised FLUX Quartet, “One of the most fearless and important new-music ensembles around.” FLUX has performed to rave reviews in venues of all sorts, from Kennedy Center and Carnegie’s Zankel Hall, to maverick art houses such as EMPAC, as well as to international music festivals in Australia, Europe and the Americas. FLUX’s radio appearances include NPR’s “All Things Considered”, among others. In addition to two critically-acclaimed releases on Mode Records the group’s discography includes recordings on the Cantaloupe, Innova, Tzadik and Cold Blue Music labels. Strongly influenced by the irreverent spirit and “anything-goes” philosophy of the fluxus art movement, violinist Tom Chiu founded FLUX to play repertoire that combines yesterday’s seminal iconoclasts with tomorrow’s new voices. Most recently, FLUX appeared both on film and the soundtrack of River of Fundament. For more information, please visit www.fluxquartet.com.

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Clive Greensmith, cello

Marc-André Hamelin,

Laura Griffiths, oboe

Marc-André Hamelin is ranked among the elite of world pianists for his unrivaled blend of musicianship and virtuosity in the great works of the established repertoire, as well as for his intrepid exploration of the rarities of the 19th and 20th centuries. Born in Montreal and a resident of Boston, Mr. Hamelin is the recipient of a lifetime achievement award from the German Record Critic’s Association. His discography includes 70-plus titles. Mr. Hamelin records exclusively for Hyperion Records, and in his most recent release Franck: Piano Quintet; Debussy: String Quartet, he collaberates with the Takács Quartet. He is an Officer of the Order of Canada, a Chevalier de l’Ordre du Québec, and a member of the Royal Society of Canada.

Cellist Clive Greensmith joined the Tokyo String Quartet in 1999 and performed in the most prestigious venues and concert series around the globe. Former Principal Cellist of London’s Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Mr. Greensmith has collaborated with distinguished musicians and appeared as a soloist with the London Symphony Orchestra, the Royal and Seoul Philharmonics, and the RAI Orchestra of Rome, among others. An international festival regular, he has performed at the Marlboro, Salzburg, Edinburgh and Sarasota music festivals. Mr. Greensmith is currently Professor of Cello and Co-Director of Chamber Music at the Colburn School and tours as a member of The Montrose Trio. Laura Griffiths is Principal Oboe of the San Francisco Ballet Orchestra and was previously Principal Oboe of the Cleveland Orchestra and the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra. She has been Guest Principal Oboe of the Boston Symphony and the Atlanta Symphony, among others. Ms. Griffiths was Principal Oboe and soloist with the Mainly Mozart Festival Orchestra in San Diego and the Britt Festival Orchestra. Ms. Griffiths graduated with honors from the Eastman School of Music, where she was a student of Richard Killmer.

Samuel Hager, bass

Bassist Samuel Hager has been a member of the San Diego Symphony Orchestra since October of 2006 and is 2015-16’s Acting Associate Principal. A native of Waukegan, IL, Mr. Hager studied Double Bass Performance at Indiana University and received a Graduate Certificate from University of Southern California in 2005. He plays a Modern Italian double bass circa 1930 made by Giuseppe Tarantino.

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piano & composer-in-residence

Burt Hara, clarinet

Burt Hara joined the Los Angeles Philharmonic as Associate Principal Clarinet after 25 seasons at the Minnesota Orchestra. He has served as Principal Clarinet of The Philadelphia Orchestra and the Alabama Symphony Orchestra, and has performed with the Chicago Symphony, New York Philharmonic, St. Louis Symphony, Seattle Symphony, Baltimore Symphony and St. Paul Chamber Orchestra. As a soloist, Mr. Hara has performed with orchestras in Philadelphia, Minnesota, and the Los Angeles Philharmonic. His is on faculty at the Aspen Music Festival and School, and is Principal Clarinet of the Aspen Chamber Symphony. Mr. Hara is a graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music.

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Kathryn Hatmaker, violin

Violinist Kathryn Hatmaker enjoys a multi-faceted career as performer, educator and entrepreneur. She is the Executive and Artistic Director of Art of Élan (www. artofelan.org), and has been a violinist with the San Diego Symphony since 2006. Ms. Hatmaker is an active soloist with a wide variety of North American orchestras and is a frequent chamber music recitalist and guest clinician.

Ben Hong, cello

Cellist Ben Hong performs frequently as a soloist, chamber and orchestral musician collaborating with such artists as Emanuel Ax, Yefim Bronfman and EsaPekka Salonen. Mr. Hong currently holds the position of Assistant Principal Cellist with the Los Angeles Philharmonic. He appeared with San Diego Symphony Orchestra as soloist in Tan Dun’s Crouching Tiger Concerto, conducted by the composer. Mr. Hong was the consultant to the film The Soloist, functioning as a technical advisor, teaching star Jamie Foxx to handle the cello.

Aiyun Huang, percussion

Born in Kaohsiung, a southern city of Taiwan, Aiyun Huang enjoys a varied musical life as a soloist, chamber musician, researcher, teacher and producer. Her recent highlights include solos with St. Lawrence String Quartet and Taiwan Symphony Orchestra as well as a new release on Naxos Canadian Classics featuring the works of Chris Paul Harman. Ms. Huang is also a researcher at the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music Media and Technology in Montreal and holds a Doctor of Musical Arts from UCSD.

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Paul Huang, violin

Born in Taiwan, Paul Huang has been proclaimed as “definitely an artist with the goods for a significant career” by The Washington Post. Recipient of the 2015 Avery Fisher Career Grant and Winner of the 2011 Young Concert Artists International Auditions, Mr. Huang is a frequent guest artist at music festivals worldwide. Mr. Huang’s recent recital appearances include Lincoln Center, the Kennedy Center, the Louvre in Paris, Seoul Arts Center, and National Concert Hall in Taiwan among others.

Catherine Ransom Karoly, flute

Associate Principal Flute of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Catherine Ransom Karoly has participated in numerous music festivals including Marlboro, Tanglewood, the Spoleto Festival (Italy) and has performed with La Jolla Music Society SummerFest since 1991. Before coming to Los Angeles, Ms. Karoly spent three seasons as principal flute of the New World Symphony under music director Michael Tilson Thomas. A Fulbright Grant recipient, Ms. Karoly received a Master of Music degree from The Juilliard School, where she studied with Carol Wincenc.

David Lang, composer

Recipient of the 2008 Pulitzer Prize in music for his composition The Little Match Girl Passion and his own rewriting of the libretto to Bach’s St. Matthew’s Passion, David Lang is one of the most highly-esteemed and performed American composers writing today. Mr. Lang has been the recipient of the Rome Prize, Le Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, and the 2010 Grammy® Award for Best Small Ensemble Performance for The Little Match Girl Passion. He held the 2013-14 Debs Composer's Chair at Carnegie Hall and is co-founder and co-

artistic director of New York’s legendary music collective Bang on a Can.

Kristin Lee, violin

Violinist Kristin Lee, winner of 2015 Avery Fisher Career Grant, has been praised by The Strad for her “mastery of tone,” and “one of the most satisfying concerts in years.” Recent highlights include solo performances with the Philadelphia, Milwaukee, and St. Paul orchestras. She is a member of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and concertmaster of The Metropolis Ensemble. Ms. Lee is on faculty at The Aaron Copland School of Music at Queens College.

Yura Lee, violin & viola

Violinist/violist Yura Lee, first prize winner of ARD Competition and recipient of the prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant, has appeared with the New York Philharmonic, the Chicago Symphony, the NDR Symphonieorchester and many others. As a chamber musician, Ms. Lee regularly plays in the Marlboro, Salzburg, Verbier, Caramoor, Ravinia and Kronberg festivals, among others. Ms. Lee is currently a member of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center in New York City, as both violinist and violist.

Caterina Longhi, viola

San Diego Symphony Orchestra violist Caterina Longhi has played with New Haven Symphony Orchestra and served as Principal Viola with The Juilliard Orchestra and New Juilliard Ensemble, among others. While receiving her bachelor's and master's at The Julliard School, where she studied with Heidi Castleman, Ms. Longhi was a recipient of the New York Viola Society’s Rosemary Glyde Scholarship and the Nancy A. Marks Chamber Music Scholarship.


Mischa Maisky, cello

Mischa Maisky has the distinction of being the only cellist in the world to have studied with both Mstislav Rostropovich and Gregor Piatigorsky. Rostropovich has lauded Mischa Maisky as “... one of the most outstanding talents of the younger generation of cellists. His playing combines poetry and exquisite delicacy with great temperament and brilliant technique.” Born in Latvia, educated in Russia, repatriated to Israel, he has been enthusiastically received in major music centers and considers himself a citizen of the world. As an exclusive Deutsche Grammophon artist and Grammy® nominee, he has made well over 30 recordings. A deep admirer of Bach, his 2000 world-wide Bach tour included over 100 concerts.

Travis Maril, viola

Violist Travis Maril was a top prizewinner at the Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition and Aspen Music Festival Concerto Competition. Recent festival appearances include Bravo! Vail Valley, SchleswigHolstein, Mainly Mozart and Ojai. Mr. Maril is on faculty at Point Loma Nazarene University and San Diego State University, where he also Co-Directs the String Academy for pre-college students.

Jennifer Marotta, trumpet

As a freelance musician, trumpeter Jennifer Marotta has performed with the San Diego Symphony and Los Angeles Philharmonic, among others. She was a member of “The President’s Own” United States Marine Band, and is currently a member of the Grand Teton Music Festival and the Music of the Baroque in Chicago. This year, Ms. Marotta is a visiting trumpet professor at UCLA.

Pamela Vliek Martchev, flute

Pamela Vliek Martchev served as principal flute with the Boulder Philharmonic for 10 seasons. She has performed with the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the San Diego Symphony Orchestra. Ms. Martchev can be heard in chamber series throughout Southern California and has performed with a wide range of musicians, from Andrea Bocelli to Mariah Carey. Ms. Martchev attended the Manhattan School of Music and teaches at San Diego State University.

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has been Principal Horn of The Philadelphia Orchestra, and an acclaimed soloist, chamber musician, and faculty member of the Curtis Institute of Music and The Juilliard School, from which she graduated. The New York Times heralded her “flawless horn solos … and warm and noble sound.” She is married to double bass player Timothy Ressler, and enjoys spending time with her two young sons, Max and Felix.

The Montrose Trio Jon Kimura Parker, piano; Martin Beaver, violin; Clive Greensmith, cello

Mike McCoy, horn

San Diego native Mike McCoy plays with the Presidio Brass, an internationallytouring brass quintet, and is 4th horn with the Las Vegas Philharmonic. When not performing with the San Diego Symphony Orchestra, San Diego Opera, and Pacific Symphony, Mr. McCoy teaches horn at local high schools and is the Horn Instructor at San Diego State University and Point Loma Nazarene University.

Nuvi Mehta, lecturer

San Diego Symphony Special Project Director, Nuvi Mehta, is widely considered one of the finest speakers on classical music. The LA Times likens him to a young Gary Cooper, saying, “… His old-fashioned Hollywood charisma extends to an eloquent and theatrical way of speaking that is almost entirely lost today.” Mr. Mehta’s conducting and violin performances have taken him across North America and Europe.

Jennifer Montone, horn

Since 2006, Grammy® Award and 2006 Avery Fisher Career Grant winner Jennifer Montone

The Washington Post raved, “absolutely top-notch music-making, as fine as one could ever expect to hear…they are poised to become one of the top piano trios in the world”(2015). Formed in 2014, The Montrose Trio is a collaboration stemming from a long, fruitful relationship between pianist Jon Kimura Parker and the Tokyo String Quartet members Martin Beaver and Clive Greensmith.

Eileen Moon, cello

California native Eileen Moon joined the cello section of the New York Philharmonic in 1998 and in 2007 was named Associate Principal Cello. She has won top prizes in numerous competitions, including Irving Klein (CA), ARTS (FL), the Geneva International Competition (Switzerland) and the Tchaikovsky International Competition (Moscow). She has enjoyed years of musical endeavors, including performing in some of the most prestigious festivals, as well as founding the Warwick Music Series in Warwick, New York. Ms. Moon has a music degree from The Juilliard School and has studied with Valentin Erben of the Alban Berg Quartet in Vienna, Austria. 858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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Hai-Ye Ni, cello

Praised by The Washington Post as “soulfully expressive” and the San Francisco Chronicle for possessing a “superbly focused sound,” cellist Hai-Ye Ni enjoys a distinguished career as Principal Cellist of The Philadelphia Orchestra, and as a soughtafter soloist and chamber musician. Recently, Ms. Ni has performed solos with such symphony orchestras as Chicago, San Francisco, the Orchestre National de Paris, Vienna Chamber Orchestra, among others and her festival credits include Ravinia, Marlboro, Santa Fe, Aspen, Spoleto (USA), La Jolla Music Society SummerFest, Kuhmo and Pablo Casals.

John Novacek, piano

Regularly touring the world, John Novacek performs as a recitalist, chamber musician and concerto soloist; in the latter capacity he has performed over thirty concerti with dozens of orchestras. He is a frequent guest artist at festivals, here and abroad, including New York City’s Mostly Mozart Festival and La Jolla Music Society SummerFest. He is frequently heard on radio broadcasts and NPR’s “Performance Today,” “St. Paul Sunday,” and “A Prairie Home Companion with Garrison Keillor,” as both featured guest composer and performer and seen on television’s “Entertainment Tonight” and “CNN International.”

Heiichiro Ohyama, viola & conductor

Heiichiro Ohyama holds positions as Music Director and Conductor of the Santa Barbara Chamber Orchestra, as well as Artistic Director of both Tokyo’s CHANEL Pygmalion Chamber Music Series and “Music Dialogue.” Born in Kyoto, Japan, Mr. Ohyama graduated from London’s Guildhall School of Music and Drama in 1970 and studied viola with William

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Primrose at Indiana University. Mr. Ohyama was the first Artistic Director of La Jolla Music Society SummerFest from 1986-97. He was a Professor of Music at University of California, Santa Barbara and Santa Cruz, from 1973 to 2003. In 2005, he received the Fukuoka City Cultural Prize and in 2008, Outstanding Performance Award from the Japanese Government. In 2014, he was recognized for his artistic contributions to the City of Santa Barbara.

Marcus Overton, lecturer

During a 50-year career in theatre, music, and dance, including stints as an actor, acting coach, music director, and teacher, Marcus Overton has held senior management positions at Lyric Opera of Chicago, the Ravinia Festival, and the Smithsonian Institution. Before relocating to San Diego for an unsuccessful attempt at retirement, he held the general manager’s post at Spoleto Festival USA.

Alyssa Park, violin

Hailed by the New York Times for “an unusually strong technique and a youthful sense of music making,” Alyssa Park became the youngest prizewinner in the history of the Tchaikovsky International Competition at 16. Ms. Park performs frequently throughout North America, Europe and Asia collaborating with composers Krystof Penderecki and Andrew Norman, and is a founding member of the Lyris Quartet in Los Angeles.

Jon Kimura Parker, piano

Known for his passionate artistry and engaging stage presence, pianist Jon Kimura Parker’s brilliant career has taken him from Carnegie Hall to the Sydney Opera House. Originally from Canada, Mr. Parker performs regularly with major North American orchestras, the Miró Quartet and is a

founding member of The Montrose Trio. He also appears in Off the Score, an experimental chamber group with legendary drummer and composer Stewart Copeland. A committed educator, he is Professor of Piano at the Shepherd School of Music at Rice University as well as Artistic Advisor of the Orcas Island Chamber Music Festival.

Cynthia Phelps, viola

New York Philharmonic’s Principal Violist since 1992, Cynthia Phelps’ solo appearances with that orchestra have included performances on there 2006 tour of Italy and the 1999 première of Sofia Gubaidulina’s Two Paths, which the Philharmonic commissioned for her and the orchestra’s Associate Principal Violist Rebecca Young. Other solo engagements have included the San Diego Symphony Orchestra and Orquesta Sinfónica de Bilbao, among others. Ms. Phelps performs with The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, Boston Chamber Music Society and Bargemusic. Her honors include the first prize in the Lionel Tertis International Viola and Washington International String Competitions. Recent recordings include a solo CD on Cala Records; and Air, on Telarc, which was nominated for a Grammy®. She has been on Juilliard’s faculty since 2014.

Juho Pohjonen, piano

Praised by The Washington Post as having “both impeccable technique and a clear-eyed approach to music,” Juho Pohjonen has attracted great attention as one of Finland's most intriguing and talented pianists. Recent concert highlights include performances with the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, debut performances with Tonhalle-Orchester Zürich performing Esa-Pekka Salonen’s Piano Concerto with conductor Lionel Bringuier, a stunning recital debut at the Ravinia Festival and performances of Mozart in Seoul with the KBS Symphony Orchestra.


Teresa Reilly, clarinet

After receiving her undergraduate degree from DePaul University, clarinetist Teresa Reilly, earned her master's degree from Northwestern University. Her concerts have been broadcast on NPR’s “Performance Today” and she has toured and recorded with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Her playing is featured on Naxos’ Synergy, with John Bruce Yeh, and she recorded Peculiar Plants, with her innovative, East-meets-West quartet Birds and Phoenix on Albany.

Nicolas Reveles, scholar-in-residence

Composer, pianist, and arts educator Nicolas Reveles has lectured for San Diego Opera since 1977. As a pianist and music director, he toured North and South America, Europe, and the Middle East for Mikhail Baryshnikov. Dr. Reveles holds a degree in piano from the Manhattan School of Music and is currently the Director of Education and Community Engagement for San Diego Opera.

Leah Z. Rosenthal, lecturer

Joining La Jolla Music Society in 2008, Leah Rosenthal is Director of Artistic Planning & Education. She has held positions with some of the most prestigious non-profit organizations in the country, including the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the Ravinia Festival and PBS. Ms. Rosenthal earned her Master’s Degree in Performing Arts Management at Columbia College of Chicago.

San Diego Youth Symphony International Youth Symphony

The annual International Youth Symphony (IYS) is a partnership between San Diego Youth Symphony (SDYS) and Rotary District 5340 International Youth Exchange that brings musicians from across the globe together with SDYS' most advanced musicians for a two-week intensive music experience. This year, we will celebrate the 12th annual IYS. Over twenty international musicians join eleven SDYS students to create a unique orchestra, comprised of exceptionally talented musicians led by SDYS Music Director Jeff Edmons for two weeks of rehearsals and a variety of performances.The 2016 IYS performances included Twilight in the Park at the Spreckels Organ Pavilion in Balboa Park and a Classical Concert at the Center Theater at California Center for the Arts in Escondido.

Gil Shaham, violin

Time praises Gil Shaham as “The outstanding American violinist of his generation.” His flawless technique combined with his inimitable warmth and generosity of spirit has solidified his renown as an American master. Mr. Shaham’s more than two dozen concerto and solo CDs have earned multiple Grammys®, a Grand Prix du Disque, Diapason d’Or and Gramophone Editor’s Choice. Mr. Shaham has most recently recorded 1930s Violin Concertos Vol. 2 for the Canary Classics label, which he founded in 2004. His many prizes include the 1990 Avery Fisher Career Grant and the 2008 Avery Fisher Prize. He plays the 1699 “Countess Polignac” Stradivarius and lives in New York City with his wife, violinist Adele Anthony, and their three children.

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John Sharp, cello

At age 27, John Sharp became one of the youngest principal players in the history of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in 1986. A top prize winner of the International Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow, he has appeared as soloist with the Chicago Symphony in performances of the Britten's Symphony for Cello and Orchestra, the Beethoven's Triple Concerto, and in concertos conducted by Sir Georg Solti, Pierre Boulez, and Bernard Haitink. Prior to his appointment in Chicago, he was a member of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra and later served as Principal Cello of the Cincinnati Symphony. John Sharp plays a rare cello made by Joseph Guarnerius in 1694.

Sean Shepherd, composer-in-residence

Proclaimed as “An exciting composer of the new American generation” by the New York Times, Sean Shepherd has been composing and performing for the New York Philharmonic; with several leading European ensembles; and at such festivals as Aldeburgh, Tanglewood and La Jolla Music Society's SummerFest. While completing his tenure as the Daniel R. Lewis Composer Fellow of the Cleveland Orchestra, culminating with the première of Tuolumne in April 2013, he also toured his most recent orchestral work, Magiya, written for Carnegie Hall’s newly established National Youth Orchestra of the United States of America, across the U.S. and Europe.

Ryan Simmons, bassoon

Graduate of the Curtis Institute, Ryan Simmons has been a member of the San Diego Symphony Orchestra since 2004. Mr. Simmons has performed with the Los Angeles Philharmonic and as principal bassoon, with the San Diego Chamber Orchestra and the Jacksonville Symphony in Florida. He is also a member of 858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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Camarada, and has participated in numerous festivals including Marlboro, Sararsota and Tanglewood.

Jeanne Skrocki, violin

Jeanne Skrocki, former student of the legendary Jascha Heifetz, debuted with the Los Angeles Philharmonic at 14. Currently she is Concertmaster of Redlands Symphony Orchestra and Assistant Concertmaster of the Pacific Symphony. Ms. Skrocki is also a member of the faculty at the Jascha Heifetz Symposium at Connecticut College. She plays a 1746 J.S. Guadagnini violin which belonged to her mother.

Sheryl Staples, violin

New York Philharmonic Principal Associate Concertmaster Sheryl Staples has been featured in over 25 performances with that orchestra, playing concertos of Mendelssohn, Mozart, Haydn, Bach and Vivaldi with conductors including Lorin Maazel and Sir Colin Davis. Ms. Staples has appeared as soloist with the Cleveland Orchestra, Los Angeles Philharmonic and San Diego Symphony Orchestra among others and summer festivals such as La Jolla Music Society SummerFest and Salt Bay Chamber Music Festival. She teaches at the Juilliard School and the Shanghai Orchestra Academy.

Time for Three Nicolas Kendall, Nikki Chooi, violins; Ranaan Meyer, bass

Violinists Nick Kendall and Nikki Chooi and double-bassist Ranaan Meyer collaborate in a group that defies any traditional genre classification, happily and infectiously. With an uncommon

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mix of virtuosity and showmanship, the American trio performs music from Bach to Brahms and beyond, giving world-premières by Pulitzer Prizewinners William Bolcom and Jennifer Higdon as well as playing originals and their own arrangements of everything from bluegrass and folk tunes to ingenious mash-ups of hits by the Beatles, Kanye West, Katy Perry, Justin Timberlake, and more. Time for Three, or Tf3 for short, has performed from Carnegie Hall and the famed jazz club Yoshi’s in San Francisco to European festivals, NFL games and the Indy 500. The ensemble’s hit YouTube bullyingprevention video, “Stronger,” has inspired students across the globe, eliciting features on CNN and the Huffington Post. Since 2009, Tf3’s residency with the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra has helped expand the orchestra’s audience with its innovative outreach.

Verona Quartet

Hailed for their “sensational, powerhouse performance” by Classical Voice America, the Verona Quartet has set themselves apart as one of the most compelling young quartets in chamber music since their inception just three years ago. Current Graduate Resident String Quatet at The Juilliard School and winner of the 2015 Concert Artists Guild Victor Elmaleh Competition, they have collaborated with artists such as Renée Fleming and the Tokyo String Quartet.

Jonathan Ong, violin

Jonathan has served as Assistant Instructor of Violin at Indiana University and plays a loaned Joseph Guanerius filius Andreae c. 1686 violin from the Rin Foundation, with a bow from the Juilliard Rare Instrument Collection.

Dorothy Ro, violin

A graduate of the Shepherd School of Music at Rice (M.M) and the Cleveland Institute of Music (B.M), Canadian violinist Dorothy Ro began training at the age of 5 in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Abigail Rojansky, viola

International Chamber music award winner Abigail Rojansky has performed across the globe and plays on a 1699 Giovanni Battista Grancino viola loaned through The Juilliard School.

Warren Hagerty, cello

Warren Hagerty is a former section cellist for the Evansville Philharmonic and Owensboro Symphony Orchestra and speant five semesters as the principal cellist of varying Jacobs School orchestras.

Andrew Wan, violin

In 2008, Andrew Wan was named Concertmaster of the Montreal Symphony Orchestra, making him one of the youngest leaders of a major symphony. He has concertized extensively, appearing in venues such as Carnegie Hall, Tonhalle Zürich, the Kennedy Center, Suntory Hall and Salle Gaveau under conductors such as JeanClaude Casadesus, Maxim Vengerov and Cho-Liang Lin. Mr. Wan received his Bachelor and Master of Music Degrees from The Juilliard School under the tutelage of Masao Kawasaki and Ron Copes. Andrew Wan performs on a 1744 Michel’Angelo Bergonzi violin, and gratefully acknowledges its loan from the David Sela Collection.

Liang Wang, oboe

Liang Wang is Principal Oboe for the New York Philharmonic. He has also held Principal’s positions with Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra and Santa Fe Opera. Mr. Wang made his Carnegie Hall debut in 2011 performing Chen Qigang’s Extase, and was invited by the Presidents of China and France to perform the work with the Orchestre Colonne de France at Versailles’s Royal Opera House in March 2014 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of France-China diplomacy. He has performed with the Santa Fe Music Festival; and for La Jolla Music Society SummerFest, he premièred Sean Shepherd’s Oboe Quartet in 2011.


David Washburn, trumpet

A much soughtafter musician in Los Angeles, David Washburn is the principle trumpet of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra and LA Opera Orchestra. Active in recording studios, he has played Principal Trumpet for: Godzilla, Avatar, A Beautiful Mind and Titanic, among others. Currently, Mr. Washburn is on the faculty at Biola University, University of California Irvine and Azusa Pacific University.

Shai Wosner, piano

Pianist Shai Wosner has attracted international recognition for his exceptional artistry, musical integrity and creative insight. He has appeared with major orchestras worldwide including the Chicago Symphony, Cleveland Orchestra, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Barcelona Symphony, Frankfurt Radio Symphony and Hamburg Symphony working with conductors such as Daniel Barenboim, James Conlon and Alan Gilbert. Mr. Wosner is the recipient of an Avery Fisher Career Grant and a Borletti-Buitoni Trust Award—a prize he used to commission Michael Hersch’s concerto Along the Ravines, which he then performed with the Seattle Symphony and Deutsche Radio Philharmonie-Saarbrücken.

John Bruce Yeh, clarinet

John Bruce Yeh joined the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in 1977 at the invitation of Sir Georg Solti, becoming the first and now longest-serving Asian musician ever appointed in CSO history. Born in Washington, DC, and raised in West Los Angeles, John attended UCLA where he won the Frank Sinatra Musical Performance Award and performed as Principal Clarinet of the American Youth Symphony under Mehli Mehta. A prizewinner at both the 1982 ARD

International Music Competition in Munich and the 1985 Naumburg Clarinet Competition in New York, Mr. Yeh continues to perform at competitions and festivals, such as La Jolla Music Society SummerFest, around the globe.

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the official launch of the Zukerman Trio in 2013. Having performed around the globe, this season The Trio returns for its second tour to South America, and also performs in Italy, Spain, Korea, Japan and Australia.

Molly Yeh, percussion

Molly Yeh lives on a sugar beet farm on the North Dakota-Minnesota border where she splits her time between playing percussion and blogging about food. She has performed with ensembles around the world, including the Knights, the Hong Kong Philharmonic, and the pop band San Fermin. Her blog, my name is yeh, was Saveur’s 2015 Blog of the Year, and her first cookbook, Molly on the Range, will be out in October.

Zukerman Trio Pinchas Zukerman, violin; Amanda Forsyth, cello; Angela Cheng, piano

A prodigious talent recognized worldwide for his artistry, Pinchas Zukerman has been an inspiration to young musicians throughout his adult life. In a continuing effort to motivate future generations of musicians through education and outreach, the renowned artist teamed up in 2002 with four protégés to form a string quintet called the Zukerman ChamberPlayers. The ensemble amassed an impressive international touring schedule with close to two hundred concerts and four discs on the CBC, Altara and Sony labels. Beginning in 2011 Zukerman, along with cellist Amanda Forsyth and pianist Angela Cheng, began offering piano trio repertoire by Mendelssohn, Beethoven, Dvořák and Shostakovich, and duo performances with various couplings including the Kodály Duo. Invitations from major Festivals and venues led to 858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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Grand Tradition: SummerFest Artists 1986-2016

VIOLIN

Allen, Isaac 2010*,’13 Almond, Frank 1988 Anthony, Adele 2001,‘03,‘05-‘06 Arvinder, Eric 2015 Ashikawa, Lori 1988◊ Barnett-Hart, Adam 2007*,‘16 Barston, Elisa 1992*◊,‘94 Batjer, Margaret 2001-‘03,‘07-‘11,‘13 Beaver, Martin 2011,‘14,‘16 Biss, Paul 1986-‘87 Blumberg, Ilana 1993*◊ Borok, Emanuel 2004 Borup, Hasse 1999* Boyd, Aaron 2003*,‘16 Cárdenes, Andrés 1986-‘89 Chan, David 1995◊-‘97*◊,2001,‘04-‘05,‘07-‘11,‘13,‘15 Chan, Ivan 1998 Chang, Sarah 2007 Chapelle, Corinne 1997* Chee-Yun 2000, ‘02,’06-’07,‘10,‘16 Chen, Jiafeng 2013* Chen, Robert 1990 Ching, Daniel 2014 Cho, Yumi 2007,‘09 Choi, Jennie 1997* Choi, Jennifer 1994*◊ Copes, Steven 2008 Cosbey, Catherine 2013* Coucheron, David 2010* Deutsch, Lindsay 2006* Dolkas, Bridget 2001-‘02,‘07, 09-‘10,‘12-‘16 Drucker, Eugene 1988-‘89, 2000 Emes, Catherine 1988◊ Englund, Meri 2013-‘14 Fedkenheuer, William 2014 Frank, Pamela 1994-‘95 Frankel, Joanna 2007* Frautschi, Jennifer 1990*-‘92*◊, ‘94*◊-‘95◊, ‘14 Frautschi, Laura 1990*-‘92*◊ Fried, Miriam 1986-‘87, 2006 Freivogel, J 2009* Fujiwara, Hamao 1992-‘94 Ganatra, Simin 1995◊ Gerard, Mary 1988◊ Georgieva, Mila 1996*◊ Gigante, Julie 2011 Goldstein, Bram 2010* Gringolts, Ilya 2001 Gruppman, Igor 1988◊ Gruppman, Vesna 1988◊ Gulli, Franco 1990 Hadelich, Augustin 2010-‘13, ‘15 Harasim, Sonja 2011* Hatmaker, Kathryn 2012-‘16 Hershberger, Amy 1997◊ Horigome, Yuzuko 1991 Hou, Yi-Jia Suzanne 2003* Hsu, Luke 2016* Hsu, Shu-Ting 2010 Huang, June 1988◊ Huang, Paul 2016 Hyun, Eileen 1988◊ Hyun, Katie 2012* Iwasaki, Jun 2005* Jacobson, Benjamin 2009 Jeong, Stephanie 2013 Jiang, Yi-Wen 2003 Josefowicz, Leila 2002,‘04,‘08 Kaplan, Mark 2001 Kavafian, Ani 1988,‘94,‘98, 2000,‘06 Kavafian, Ida 1998 Kerr, Alexander 2009, ‘14 Kim, Benny 1999

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Kim, Fabiola 2015* Kim, Helen Hwaya 1996*◊-‘97*◊ Kim, Michelle 1992◊, ‘93*◊-‘95*◊,‘96◊,‘08,‘12-‘13,‘15 Kim, SoJin 2008*-‘09* Kim, Young Uck 1990-‘91 Kitchen, Nicholas 2010 Koh, Jennifer 2008, ‘11 Koo, Daniel 2015* Kraggerud, Henning 2002 Kwon, Yoon 2002*,‘05,‘07,‘09 Kwuon, Joan 1996*◊, 2004,‘07 Laredo, Jaime 2011 Lee, Bryan 2011* Lee, Gina 1992◊,‘93*,‘94*◊-95*◊ Lee, Kristin 2014,‘16 Lee, Se-Yun 1999* Lee, Yura 2012, ‘14,‘16 Lin, Cho-Liang 1989-‘93,‘95-‘99, 2001-‘16 Lin, Jasmine 2008 Lin, Shih-Kai 2008* Ling, Andrew 2010 Link, Joel 2011* Lippi, Isabella 1993*◊ Lockwood, Kathryn 1993* Ma, Michael 2009 Martinson, Haldan 1993*◊-‘95*◊ McDermott, Kerry 2003,‘07,‘15 McDuffie, Robert 1999 McElravy, Sarah 2013* Meyers, Anne Akiko 2005 Midori 2011 Monahan, Nicole 1992◊ Namkung, Yuri 2004* Nelson, Maureen 2003* Nightengale, Helen 2005,‘07 Niwa, Sae 2009* Nosky, Aisslinn 2014-‘15 O‘Connor, Mark 2001,‘05,‘09 Øland, Frederik 2016 Ong, Jonathan 2016* Otani, Reiko 1996*◊ Park, Alyssa 2016 Park, Tricia 2003*-‘04* Pauk, György 1986-‘87, ‘90 Peskanov, Mark 1990 Phillips, Daniel 1992-’93,‘95-‘97, 2002,‘04 Phillips, Todd 1992-‘93, 2002,‘04 Place, Annaliesa 1999* Preucil, Alexandra 2005* Preucil, William 1999, 2000 Qiang, Xiaoxiao 2011*, ‘14 Quint, Philippe 2012-’13 Redding, Deborah 1990 Ro, Dorothy 2016* Robinson, Cathy Meng 1998 Roffman, Sharon 1999* Rosenfeld, Julie 1989-‘99 Setzer, Philip 1999, 2000,‘03,‘15 Shaham, Gil 2001,‘03,‘05-‘06,‘08, ‘11,‘16 Shay, Yvonne 2012-‘14 Shih, Michael 2003 Shimabara, Sae 1996◊ Sitkovetsky, Dmitry 2015 Skrocki, Jeanne 2009-‘16 Smirnoff, Joel 2004,‘07 Southorn, David 2012* Stanislav, Tereza 2003*,‘12, ‘14 Staples, Sheryl 1990*-‘91*,‘92◊-‘94◊,‘95, 2006-‘07,‘09, ‘11,‘14,‘16 Stein, Eddie 1988◊ Steinhardt, Arnold 2002,‘06 Sussmann, Arnaud 2014 Swensen, Joseph 1989, 2013 Takezawa, Kyoko 1998-‘99,2001,‘03,‘05-‘06,‘08-‘09, ‘11, ‘15

Thayer, Jeff 2005 Tognetti, Richard 2005 Tong, Kristopher 2010 Toyoshima, Yasushi 1997 Tree, Michael 2002 Trobäck, Sara 2002*, ‘05 Tursi, Erica 2014* Ung, Susan 2002 Urioste, Elena 2008* Ushioda, Masuko 1986-‘87,‘89 Vergara, Josefina 1993*◊,‘95◊,97◊ Wan, Andrew 2012, ‘14-‘16 Warsaw-Fan, Arianna 2012* Weilerstein, Donald 1986 Wilkie, Roger 1991,‘97 Wu Jie 2007* Wu, Tien-Hsin Cindy 2011 Yang, Jisun 2007 Yoo, Hojean 2015* Yoshida, Ayako 1991* Yu, Mason 2014* Zehetmair, Thomas 1988 Zehngut, Jeffrey 2010 Zelickman, Joan 2002 Zhao, Chen 1994*◊ Zhao, Yi 2014* Zhu, Bei 2006*,‘07,‘10 Zori, Carmit 1993

VIOLA

Ando, Fumino 1996*◊ Baillie, Helena 2011 Barston, Elisa 1994 Berg, Robert 1988◊ Biss, Paul 1986-‘87 Brophy, Robert 2003*,‘13, ‘15-‘16 Bulbrook, Andrew 2009 Carrettin, Zachary 2011* Chen, Che-Yen 2005,‘07-‘10,‘12-‘13, ‘15-‘16 Choi, En-Sik 1990* Choong, Angela 2010* Cook, Carol 2005 Dean, Brett 2010 Dirks, Karen 1986-‘87 DuBois, Susan 1993*,‘95*◊ Dunham, James 2007,‘09,‘12 Dutton, Lawrence 1999, 2003, ‘15 Frankel, Joanna 2007* Gilbert, Alan 2003 Gulkis, Susan 1992* Ho, Shirley 1994*◊,‘95*,‘96*◊,‘97*◊, 2006 Hoffman, Toby 1989-‘92,‘95-‘96,‘98, 2000-‘01,‘11-‘12, ‘15 Holtzman, Carrie 1988◊ Huang, Hsin-Yun 2008 Husum, Marthe 2015* Imai, Nobuko 1986 Isomura, Kazuhide 2011 Jacobson, Pamela 2009 Kam, Ori 2003, ‘14, ‘15 Karni, Gilad 1993*◊ Kavafian, Ida 1998 Kraggerud, Henning 2002 Lapointe, Pierre 2007*,‘16 Largess, John 1994*◊-‘96*◊, ‘14 Lee, Scott 1997*◊, 2002,’04,‘07 Lee, Yura 2014,‘16 Li, Honggang 2003 Lin, Wei-Yang Andy 2012* Liu, Yun Jie 1990* Lockwood, Kathryn 1995◊ LoCicero, Joseph 2014* Longhi, Caterina 2016 Martin, Francesca 1988-‘90 Maril, Travis 2009-‘14,‘16


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Moerschel, Jonathan 2009 Molnau, Michael 2012 Motobuchi, Mai 2010 Neubauer, Paul 1992-‘96,‘98-‘99, 2001,‘03-‘07,‘09-‘12, ‘15 Neuman, Larry 1991* Ngwenyama, Nokuthula 2000 Nilles, AJ 2014 Nolan, Erin 2005* Nørgaard, Asbjørn 2016 Ohyama, Heiichiro 1986-‘97, 2004, ‘06,‘08-‘09, ‘11, ‘14-‘16 O’Neill, Richard 2013-‘15 Pajaro-van de Stadt, Milena 2011* Phelps, Cynthia 1989-‘90,‘99- 2002, ‘05-’08,‘10-‘11, ‘13-‘14,‘16 Quincey, Brian 1992*◊-‘93*◊ Quintal, Sam 2009* Richburg, Lynne 1992*◊ Rojansky, Abigail 2016* Runde, Ingrid 1988◊ Sanders, Karen 1988 Strauss, Michael 1991* Suzuki, Leo 1994*◊,‘99* Tenenbom, Steven 2004 Thomas, Whittney 2005 Toyoshima, Yasushi 1997 Tree, Michael 2001-‘02,‘08, ‘11 Ung, Susan 2010 Vernon, Robert 1987-‘88 Walther, Geraldine 1993-‘95 Weyman, Elzbieta 2008* Wickert, Eve 2003* Wilson, Evan N. 2001-‘02 Wong, Eric 2013* Zehngut, Gareth 2010

CELLO

Belcher, Richard 2003* Braun, Jacob 2008 Brey, Carter 1990-‘91,‘93,‘95-‘96, ‘99-2001,‘03-‘06, ‘08-‘10,‘12-‘13,‘16 Bruskin, Julia 2003* Byers, Eric 2009 Canellakis, Nicholas 2014 Castro-Balbi, Jesús 2002* Chaplin, Diane 1989-‘90 Chien, Chia-Ling 2012, ‘15-‘16 Cho, Stella 2015* Cooper, Kristina 2003 Cox, Alexander 2014* Crosett, Rainer 2016* Curtis, Charles 2003,‘05,‘09 DeRosa, William 2002 Dharamraj, Yves 2008* Díaz, Andrés 1992,‘94,‘99, 2000 Drakos, Margo Tatgenhorst 2009-‘10 Eddy, Timothy 1993, 2004 Eldan, Amir 2004* Elliot, Gretchen 1999 Fan, Felix 1992*◊-‘96*◊,‘97◊,‘98-‘99, 2001,‘03, ‘06-‘13,‘16 Fiene, Sarah 1999 Fife, Stefanie 1988◊ Finckel, David 1992-‘96,‘98-2000,‘06 Geeting, Joyce 1999 Gelfand, Peter 1999 Gerhardt, Alban 1998 Gindele, Joshua 2014 Greensmith, Clive 2015-‘16 Haas, Natalie 2005 Hagerty, Warren 2016* Haimovitz, Matt 1986 Hammill, Rowena 1999 Han, Eric 2010* Handy, Trevor 2011-‘12

Harrell, Lynn 2005-‘07,‘10, ‘14 Henderson, Rachel 2009* Hoebig, Desmond 2010,‘12, ‘14 Hoffman, Gary 1987-‘93,‘95-‘97,‘99, 2001, ‘03-‘04,‘06-’07,‘10,‘12-‘13,‘15 Hong, Ben 1990*,2001,‘13-‘16 Hunt, Shirley 2014 Itzkoff, Coleman 2014* Iwasaki, Ko 1995 Janecek, Marie-Stéphanie 2007* Janss, Andrew 2007* Kabat, Madeleine 2009* Kalayjian, Ani 2008* Kang, Kristopher 2010 Karoly, Jonathan 2005,‘07 Karttunen, Anssi 2006 Kim, Eric 1998, 2004,‘06, ‘11,‘14 Kim, Yeesun 2010 Kirshbaum, Ralph 1986-‘89,‘91,2001-‘04,‘07-‘08,‘11,‘15 Kloetzel, Jennifer 1992*◊-’93*◊ Kostov, Lachezar 2011* Kudo, Sumire 1995*◊,‘96◊,‘97, 2006 Langham, Jennifer 1999 Lee, Daniel 2005 Lee, JeongHyoun "Christine" 2015* Lee, Jiyoung 2013* Leonard, Ronald 1986-‘88,‘90-‘91, 2002 Levenson, Jeffrey 1986-‘87 Little, Dane 1988◊ Liu, Yun Jie 1990* Ma, Yo-Yo 2005 Maisky, Mischa 2016 Marica, Mihai 2012* Mollenauer, David 1988◊ Moon, Eileen 2016 Moores, Margaret 1986-‘87,‘99 Myers, Peter 2011 Ni, Hai-Ye 2003-‘04,‘08, ‘11,‘14,‘16 Ostling, Kristin 1991* Ou, Carol 1993*◊-‘94*◊ Ou, Samuel 1994*◊ Pereira, Daniel 2002 Putnam, Dana 1994*◊ Rejto, Peter 1987,‘89 Roman, Joshua 2011-‘13,‘15 Rosen, Nathaniel 1994 Rubicz, Davin 2005* Saltzman, David 1999 Samuel, Brent 1996*◊-‘97*◊ Sharp, John 2015-‘16 Shaw, Camden 2011* Sherry, Fred 2000,‘09 Shulman, Andrew 2010,‘15 Sjölin, Fredrik Schøyen 2016 Smith, Ursula 1991* Smith, Wilhelmina 1990*,‘92*◊ Speltz, Brook 2016 Starker, János 1999 Sutherland, Wyatt 1999 Swallow, Gabriella 2013 Szanto, Mary 2001 Toettcher, Sebastian 1999 Tsan, Cecilia 1996 Tzavaras, Nicholas 2003 Umansky, Felix 2013* Vamos, Brandon 1995◊ Wang, Jian 2002, ‘05, ‘11 Weilerstein, Alisa 2006-‘08, ‘11 Weiss, Meta 2012* Wirth, Barbara 1999 Yoon, Han Bin 2012 Zeigler, Jeff 1999 Zhang, Yuan 2010* Zhao, Yao 2009

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Abondolo, Nico 1989-‘93,‘97◊, 2002–‘03,‘07,‘09, ‘11-‘16 Aslan, Pablo 2005,‘13,‘16 Cho, Han Han 2010 Coade, Sarah 1992◊ Danilow, Marji 1994◊-‘95◊,‘97◊ Dresser, Mark 2005,‘08 Finck, David 1996 Green, Jonathan 1986 Haden, Charlie 1995 Hager, Samuel 2011-‘16 Hanulik, Christopher 2007-‘10,‘15 Hermanns, Don 1994◊,‘96◊ Hovnanian, Michael 1988◊ Kurtz, Jeremy 2004-‘05 Magnusson, Bob 2001 Meyer, Edgar 1996 Meza, Oscar 1987 Palma, Donald 2000 Pitts, Timothy 2013-‘14 Ranney, Sue 1986 Revis, Eric 2012 Rickmeier, Allan 2001-‘03 Robinson, Harold 2011 Turetzky, Bertram 2002 Van Regteren Altena, Quirijn 1999 Wais, Michael 2000-‘01 Worn, Richard F. 1993* Wulff, Susan 2009-‘10 Zhang, DaXun 2004, ‘11,‘13-‘14 Zory, Matthew 1992◊

BARYTON

Hunt, Shirley 2014

THEORBO

Leopold, Michael 2014

PIANO

Adolphe, Bruce 2001 Asuncion, Victor Santiago 2010 Ax, Emanuel 1990, 2010 Ax, Yoko Nozaki 1990 Barnatan, Inon 2012-‘14 Battersby, Edmund 1994 Biss, Jonathan 2006,‘13 Blaha, Bernadene 1996-‘97 Bolcom, William 2003 Bookstein, Kenneth 1990* Bronfman, Yefim 1989,‘92, 2003,‘06, ‘14 Brown, Alex 2016 Brunetti, Octavio 2013 Chen, Weiyin 2006-‘07* Cole, Naida 2004 Corea, Chick 2004 Coucheron, Julie 2010 Denk, Jeremy 2012 Feltsman, Vladimir 2008,‘10,‘15 Fitzgerald, Kevin 1997 Fleisher, Katherine Jacobson 2008 Fleisher, Leon 2000, ’02-‘03,‘08 Follingstad, Karen 1986-‘87

◊ SummerFest Ensembles * Fellowship Artists, Workshop participant ^ in collaboration with the University Art Gallery, UCSD # in collaboration with the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego BOLD Newcomers to SummerFest 858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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France, Hal 2001 François, Jean-Charles 1987 Goldstein, Gila 1993* Golub, David 1986-‘93,‘95-‘97 Graffman, Gary 1999 Haefliger, Andreas 2009, ‘11 Hamelin, Marc-André 2011,‘16 Harris, John Mark 2002 Hewitt, Angela 2005 Hewitt, Anthony 1991* Higuma, Riko 2003*-‘04* Hsiao, Ching-Wen 2004* Hsu, Julia 2015 Huang, Helen 2001,‘06,‘09 Jablonski, Peter 2008 Jian, Li 2003 Julien, Christie 1997* Kahane, Gabriel 2012 Kahane, Jeffrey 1986-‘89,2002,‘04,‘06,‘12-‘13 Kalichstein, Joseph 1998, 2006-07,‘10,‘13,‘15 Kalish, Gilbert 1998-‘99 Karis, Aleck 2003 Kern, Olga 2011 Kern, Vladislav 2011 Kodama, Mari 2012 Kogan, Dr. Richard 2014 Kramer, Henry 2012* Kuerti, Anton 1986 Laredo, Ruth 1994 Lee, Jeewon 2008* Levinson, Max 1990*-‘91*,‘94-‘95◊, ‘97, 2000,‘06 Licad, Cecile 1998, 2005,‘07 Lifschitz, Konstantin 2000 Lin, Gloria 2002* Lin, Steven 2013* Lindberg, Magnus 2006 Ling, Jahja 2004 Litton, Andrew 2004 McDermott, Anne-Marie 2007-‘09 Montero, Gabriela 2010 Murphy, Kevin 2002, ‘07 Neikrug, Marc 2007 Newman, Anthony 2001-‘02,‘07,‘10,‘13 Noda, Ken 2008-‘10,‘12,‘14 Novacek, John 1992*, 2002,‘08-‘10,‘12,‘14-‘16 O‘Riley, Christopher 1999, 2000,‘02, ‘06,‘10 Ohlsson, Garrick 2003,‘08 Orloff, Edith 1986-‘88 Park, Jeongwon 1995* Parker, Jon Kimura 2002,‘06,‘09,‘12-‘13,‘16 Pohjonen, Juho 2016 Polonsky, Anna 2014 Pressler, Menahem 1998, 2009 Previn, André 1987,‘90-‘92,‘96 Russo, Andrew 2007 Schifrin, Lalo 2005 Schub, André-Michel 1990-‘91,2001, ‘04-‘07, ‘11 Serkin, Peter 2015 Shaham, Orli 2009 Sheng, Bright 1993 Staupe, Andrew 2014* Stepanova, Liza 2009* Strokes, Marija 2003,‘05 Taylor, Christopher 2008 Taylor, Ted 2007 Tramma, Marzia 1996* Trifonov, Daniil 2013 Watts, André 2005 Weilerstein, Vivian Hornik 1986 Weiss, Orion 2007-‘10,‘13-‘14 Woo, Alan 2015* Wosner, Shai 2005-‘08,‘16 Wu Han 1992-‘96,‘98-2000,‘06 Yrjola, Maria 2002 Yang, Joyce 2008-‘11,‘13,‘15 Ziegler, Pablo 2012

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HARPSICHORD

Beattie, Michael 2013-‘14 Koman, Hollace 1992◊-‘94◊,‘96 Kroll, Mark 1991 Mabee, Patricia 2007,‘14-‘15 McGegan, Nicholas 2011 McIntosh, Kathleen 1997◊ Newman, Anthony 2001-‘02,‘04-‘05, ‘07,‘09,‘12-’13 Novacek, John 1992◊ Zearott, Michael 1987-‘88◊

ORGAN

Beattie, Michael 2014 Newman, Anthony 2002,‘10,‘14

Liebowitz, Marian 1986 Livengood, Lee 1991*,‘93* Moffitt, James 2011 Palmer, Todd Darren 1999 Peck, David 1986-‘90 Reilly, Teresa 2004,‘14,‘16 Renk, Frank 1993,‘97, 2003-‘04,‘08-‘09 Renk, Sheryl L. 1993-‘95, 2001- ‘02, ‘04,‘08,‘11-‘13 Rosengren, Håkan 1995 Shifrin, David 1986-‘87,‘92-‘93,‘96-‘98, 2000,‘04-‘05,’13 Yeh, John Bruce 2001-‘02,‘04,‘08-‘14,‘16 Zelickman, Robert 2002–‘04

BASS CLARINET

Del Curto, Héctor 2013 Marconi, Nestor 2005

Howard, David 1990 Renk, Frank 2002,‘08-‘09 Renk, Sheryl 2002 Yeh, John Bruce 2002

FLUTE

BASSOON

BANDONEÓN

Anderson, Arpi C. 1994* Bursill-Hall, Damian 1986-‘89 Ellerbroek, Clay 2002 Giles, Anne Diener 1990 Karoly, Catherine Ransom 2001-‘02,‘04-‘05,‘07-‘09,‘11-‘16 McGill, Demarre 2007-‘08,‘10 Martchev, Pamela Vliek 2011-‘16 O‘Connor, Tara Helen 1997 Piccinini, Marina 1991 Sager, Marisela 2002-‘04 Tipton, Janice 1997,‘99, 2002-‘03 Wincenc, Carol 1990,‘92,‘94, 2000

Buncke, Keith 2016 Farmer, Judith 1997,‘99 Fast, Arlen 1993 Goeres, Nancy 1996 Grego, Michele 1991,‘94-‘95 Mandell, Peter 1993 Martchev, Valentin E. 2004-‘05,‘07-‘09, ‘11-‘15 Michel, Dennis 1986-‘90,‘92-‘95 Nielubowski, Norbert 1991 Simmons, Ryan 2001-‘04,‘08, ‘11-‘13,‘16 Zamora, Leyla 2009,‘14-‘15

RECORDER Petri, Michala 2012

Savedoff, Allen 2013 Zamora, Leyla 2008

OBOE

SAXOPHONE

Avril, Franck 2008 Barrett, Susan 2003 Boyd, Thomas 1988 Davis, Jonathan 2014-‘15 DeAlmeida, Cynthia 1996 Enkells-Green, Elizabeth 1986 Ghez, Ariana 2013 Gilad, Kimaree 1997 Griffiths, Laura 2016 Horn, Stuart 1997 Hove, Carolyn 1991 Huang, Zheng 2004-‘06 Janusch, J. Scott 2001-‘02 Kuszyk, Marion Arthur 2002 Michel, Peggy 1996◊ Overturf, Andrea 2009-‘15 Parry, Dwight 2007 Paulsen, Scott 1996◊ Pearson, Peggy 2013 Rapp, Orion 2007 Reed, Electra 2002 Reed, Leslie 1993,‘95 Resnick, Lelie 2014-‘15 Reuter, Gerard 1989-‘90 Vogel, Allan 1987-‘89,‘91-‘95,‘97-‘99, 2008-‘10 Wang, Liang 2011-‘12,‘14-‘16 Whelan, Eileen 1994* Wickes, Lara 2009-‘11 Woodhams, Richard 2003-‘04,‘07,‘09

ENGLISH HORN Hove, Carolyn 1991

CLARINET

Calcara, Tad 1994* D'Rivera, Paquito 2016 Hara, Burt 2003, ‘05,‘07, ‘11-‘16 Lechusza, Alan 2004 Levee, Lorin 2005-‘07

CONTRABASSOON

Marsalis, Branford 2012 Rewoldt, Todd 2007 Sundfor, Paul 2004

HORN

Bain, Andrew 2014 Drake, Susanna 1996◊ Folsom, Jerry 1987 Grant, Alan 2003 Gref, Warren 1986,‘93, 2001-‘02,‘04,‘07-‘10 Jaber, Benjamin 2012-’13 Landsman, Julie 1994-‘95◊,‘97,2009 Lorge, John 1990,‘93,‘95◊,2004 McCoy, Mike 2011,‘15-‘16 Montone, Jennifer 2005,‘16 Popejoy, Keith 2002-‘04, ‘07-‘11,‘13-‘15 Ralske, Erik 2012 Ruske, Eric 2013-‘14 Skye, Tricia 2009, ‘11 Thayer, Julie 2013 Todd, Richard 1988-‘89,‘92-‘94,‘99, 2004,‘07-‘09, ‘11 Toombs, Barry 2002

TRUMPET

Balsom, Alison 2014 Marotta, Jennifer 2016 Nowak, Ray 2009-‘12,‘14 Owens, Bill 2010-‘11 Perkins, Barry 2004,‘09 Price, Calvin 1993,‘95,‘97 Stevens, Thomas 1991 Washburn, David 2002-‘04,‘07,’09-‘10,‘12-‘14,‘16 Wilds, John 2001

TROMBONE

Buchman, Heather 1993 Gordon, Richard 2004 Hoffman, Mike 2001 Miller, James 2002


Panos, Alexander J. 2002 Reusch, Sean 2012,‘14

PERCUSSION

Aguilar, Gustavo 2006 Copeland, Stewart 2009 Cossin, David 2006-‘07,‘09-‘10,‘12 Donahue, Dustin 2012- ‘14 Dreiman, Perry 1993 Esler, Rob 2006 Ginter, Jason 2009-‘12 Huang, Aiyun 2002-‘03, ‘16 Mack, Tyler 1993 Nichols, Don 2006 Palter, Morris 2004 Pfiffner, Pat 2012 Plank, Jim 1995◊ Rhoten, Markus 2013 Schick, Steven 1997, 2002-‘04,‘06,‘13,‘15 Smith, Bonnie Whiting 2012 Stuart, Greg 2006 Szanto, Jonathan 2001 Takeishi, Satoshi 2005,‘13 Yeh, Molly 2014, ‘16

Plantamura, Carol 1987 Plenk, Matthew 2013 Putnam, Ashley 1996 Saffer, Lisa 1993 Trakas, Chris 2002 Trebnik, Andrea 2000 Wolfson, Sarah 2006 Zhang, Jianyi 2003

NARRATOR

Adolphe, Bruce 2001 Eichenthal, Gail 1988-‘89 Ellsworth, Eleanor 2009 Goldman, Kit 1988 McNair, Sylvia 2007 Rubinstein, John 1997, 2002 York, Michael 2009

CONDUCTOR

Jewell, Joe 2003

Adolphe, Bruce 2001 Beattie, Michael 2013 Conlon, James 2016 Edmons, Jeff 2010-‘13, ‘16 Gilbert, Alan 2003 Hermanns, Carl 1994-‘95 Huang Ruo 2008 Kahane, Jeffrey 2006 Kapilow, Robert 2002, ‘04 Laredo, Jamie 2011 Leppard, Raymond 2013 Lin, Cho-Liang 2011 Ling, Jahja 2006, ‘09 Litton, Andrew 2004 McGegan, Nicholas 2011 Mackey, Steven 2008 Mickelthwate, Alexander 2007 Nagano, Kent 1993,‘12 Neikrug, Marc 1997 Newman, Anthony ’09-‘10 Ohyama, Heiichiro 1988,‘90-‘97, 2006,‘09, ‘11,‘16 Previn, André 1990-‘91 Salonen, Esa-Pekka 2002 Schick, Steven 2008-‘09 Slatkin, Leonard 2014 Swensen, Joseph 2013 Tan Dun 2003,‘12

DIGITAL SAMPLER

ENSEMBLES

HARP

Allen, Nancy 2005,‘15 Hays, Marian Rian 1986-‘87 Hoffman, Deborah 1990,2001,‘10-‘12 Sterling, Sheila 2002-‘03,‘07

PIPA

Wu Man 2003,‘10,‘15

GUITAR

Isbin, Sharon 2003 Johnson, Art 2001 Kahane, Gabriel 2012 Mackey, Steven 2001 Romero, Celin 2001 Romero, Pepe 2001 Sprague, Peter 2001 Viapiano, Paul 2003

MANDOLIN Chen, Yuanlin 2012

VOICE

Boone, Sherri 2002 Bryant, Stephen 2012 Burdette, Kevin 2006 Cairns, Christine 1990 Cano, Jennifer Johnson 2013-‘14 Cooke, Sasha 2009 Dix, Marjorie Elinor 2003 Ferguson, William 2006 Hall, Cecelia 2014 Hellekant, Charlotte 2010 Hong, Haeran 2012-’13 Huang, Ying 2007,‘12 Hughs, Evan 2013 Kahane, Gabriel 2012 Kim, Young Bok 2006 Kuznetsova, Dina 2006 Leonard, Isabel 2006 Lindsey, Kate 2007 Markgraf, Kelly 2010 McNair, Sylvia 2001, ‘07 Molomot, Mark 2006 Morris, Joan 2003 Mumford, Tamara 2008 Murphy, Heidi Grant 2002, ‘04,‘07 Petrova, Lyubov 2015

Amelia Piano Trio 2000* American String Quartet 2007 Amphion String Quartet 2012 André Previn Jazz Trio 1991 Arioso Wind Quintet 1993 Arcadian Academy 2013 Assad Brothers 2011, ‘14 Australian Chamber Orchestra 2005 Avalon String Quartet 2000* Beacon Street Trio 2016* Bettina String Quartet 1996* BodyVox 2007 Borromeo String Quartet 2000-‘01,‘10,‘15 Calder Quartet 2005,‘09-‘10,‘12 Colorado String Quartet 1989-‘90 Coolidge String Quartet 1999* Danish String Quartet 2016 Éclat Quartet 2011* Enso String Quartet 2001*,‘03* Escher String Quartet 2007*, ‘15-‘16 Firebird Quartet 1998* FLUX Quartet 2014,‘16 Formosa Quartet 2008 Gemini Trio 1998* Goffriller Piano Trio 1999* Hausmann Quartet 2010* Huntington Quartet 2015* Igudesman & Joo 2012

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Imani Winds 2006 International Sejong Soloists 2006 Jacques Loussier Trio 2008 Jasper String Quartet 2009* Kalichstein-Laredo-Robinson Trio 2002, ‘11 KahaneSwensenBrey 2013 La Jolla Symphony 2008-‘09 Linden String Quartet 2013* Malashock Dance 2002 Miami String Quartet 1998,2003-‘04 Miró Quartet 2009,‘14 Montrose Trio, The 2016 Newbury Trio 2012 Old City String Quartet 2011* Omer Quartet 2014* Orion String Quartet 1992-‘93,2002, ‘04,‘06,‘10 Ornati String Quartet 2000* Pablo Ziegler Classical Tango Quartet 2012 Pacifica Quartet 1995* Pegasus Trio 2014* Phaedrus Quartet 2001* Real Quiet 2007-‘10 red fish blue fish 2004,‘08-‘09,‘15 Ridge String Quartet 1991 Rioult 2008 SACRA/PROFANA 2013 San Diego Chamber Orchestra 1987-‘88 San Diego Master Chorale 2012 San Diego Symphony 1990, 2004 SDYS’ International Youth Symphony 2010-‘13,‘16 Shanghai Quartet 2003,‘07,’13 Silk Road Ensemble 2005 Sonora String Quartet 2008* St. Lawrence String Quartet 1999 SummerFest Ensembles 1988,‘92-‘97 Sycamore Trio 2015* Time for Three 2015-‘16 Tokyo String Quartet 2008, ‘11,‘12 Trío Ágape 1998* Trio Vivo 2013* Turtle Island String Quartet 1998 Vega String Quartet 2001* Verona Quartet 2016* Wayne Shorter Quartet 2006 Westwind Brass 1994-‘95,‘97 Xando Quartet 1999* Zukerman Trio 2016

VISITING COMPOSER Adams, John 2002 Adolphe, Bruce 1998-2003,2005-‘06 Ali-Zadeh, Franghiz 2003 Anderson, Julian 2014 Assad, Clarice 2015 Assad, Sérgio 2014 Bermel, Derek 2015 Bolcom, William 2003 Chen Yi 2004 Copeland, Stewart 2009 Corea, Chick 2004 Dalbavie, Marc-André 2012 Dean, Brett 2010 Del Tredici, David 2013 Dutton, Brent 1997 Golijov, Osvaldo 1999

◊ SummerFest Ensembles * Fellowship Artists, Workshop participant ^ in collaboration with the University Art Gallery, UCSD # in collaboration with the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego BOLD Newcomers to SummerFest 858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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Hamelin, Marc-André 2016 Harbison, John 2002,’13 Hartke, Stephen 2014 Hoffman, Joel 2015 Huang Ruo 2008 Kahane, Gabriel 2012 Kapilow, Robert 2002,‘04 Kirchner, Leon 2006 Lindberg, Magnus 2006 Loussier, Jacques 2008 Mackey, Steven 2001,‘08 Meyer, Edgar 1996 Neikrug, Marc 1997, 2007 O‘Connor, Mark 2001,‘05,‘09 Powell, Mel 1989 Previn, André 1990,‘96 Rouse, Christopher 2005,‘10 Salonen, Esa-Pekka 2002 Schoenfield, Paul 2009 Schifrin, Lalo 2005 Schuller, Gunther 2009 Sheng, Bright 1993, 2004,‘06,‘10 Shepherd, Sean 2011,‘16 Shorter, Wayne 2006 Stucky, Steven 2013 Tan Dun 2003,‘12 Thomas, Augusta Read 2000 Tower, Joan 2000,‘07, ‘11 Tsontakis, George 2009 Wong, Cynthia Lee 2011 Ung, Chinary 2003,‘10 Zwilich, Ellen Taaffe 2011

CHOREOGRAPHER Malashock, John 1994, 2002 Greene, Allyson 2005-‘06

SCHOLAR-IN-RESIDENCE Bromberger, Eric 2014-‘16 Kogan, Dr. Richard 2014 Pollack, Howard 2013 Reveles, Nicolas 2016 Taruskin, Richard 2015

LECTURER & GUEST SPEAKER Adamson, Robert, M.D. 2001 Adolphe, Bruce 1999 Agus, Ayke 2003 Allison, John 2000 Amos, David 1994 Bell, Diane 2001 Brandfonbrener, Alice G. 2002 Bromberger, Eric 1988-‘96,‘98-2009,‘11-‘13 Brooks, Geoffrey 1988 Cassedy, Steve 2007-‘10,‘12-‘14,‘16 Chapman, Alan 1988 Child, Fred 2001-‘06 Davies, Hugh 2000 DeLay, Dorothy 2001 Eichenthal, Gail 1987 Epstein, Steven 2001 Erwine, Dan 2000-‘01 Fay, Laurel 1991 Feldman, Michael 1999-2000 Fiorentino, Dan 2003 Flaster, Michael 2001 Gatehouse, Adam 2000 Guzelimian, Ara 1987,‘89-‘90 Hampton, Jamey 2007 Hanor, Stephanie 2003 Helzer, Rick 2006 Hermanns, Carl 1997 Harris, L. John 2001 Lamont, Lee 2002 Longenecker, Martha W. 2003 Malashock, John 2000

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Mehta, Nuvi 2010, ‘16 Mobley, Mark 2001-‘03 Morel, René 2000 Noda, Ken 2000 O‘Connor, Sandra Day 2004 Overton, Marcus 2000-‘01,2004-‘16 Pak, Jung-Ho 2001 Perl, Neale 2000-‘01 Quill, Shauna 2005 Reveles, Dr. Nicolas 1994-‘95,‘99,2000, ‘11,‘13- ‘14 Roden, Steve 2007 Rodewald, Albert 1990 Roe, Benjamin K. 2001,‘04-‘05,‘10 Rosenthal, Leah Z. 2010-‘16 Roland, Ashley 2007 Ruggiero, Dianna 2011 Russell, Claudia 2008 Salzman, Mark 2001 Sanromán, Lucia 2007 Scher, Valerie 2000-‘01 Schick, Steven 2010 Schomer, Paul 2001 Schultz, Eric 2003-‘04 Shaheen, Dr. Ronald 2007-‘08 Silver, Jacquelyne 1994,‘96-‘97 Smith, Ken 2000 Stein, Leonard 1992 Steinberg, Russell 2007-‘11 Stevens, Jane R. 1991 Stokes, Cynthia 2011 Sullivan, Jack 2000 Sutro, Dirk 2001-‘04 Teachout, Terry 2000 Valenzuela, Ruben 2012 Varga, George 2004 Walens, Stanley 2007, ‘11 Wallace, Helen 2000 Willett, John 1991 Winter, Robert 1987, 2000 Yeung, Dr. Angela 2008 Youens, Susan 2012 Yung, Gordon, M.D. 2001

VISUAL ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE Chihuly, Dale 2000^ Curry, Stephen P. 2001 # Engle, Madelynne 1996 Farber, Manny 1997 Fonseca, Caio 1998-‘99^ Ohyama, Gail 1986-‘95 Roden, Steve 2007 # Scanga, Italo 2000^

SUMMERFEST MUSIC & ARTISTIC DIRECTORS Lin, Cho-Liang 2001– present Finckel, David and Wu Han 1998-2000 Ohyama, Heiichiro 1986-‘97

◊ SummerFest Ensembles * Fellowship Artists, Workshop participant ^ in collaboration with the University Art Gallery, UCSD # in collaboration with the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego BOLD Newcomers to SummerFest


BRUCE ADOLPHE Couple (1999) David Finckel, cello; Wu Han, piano Oceanophony (2003) Bruce Adolphe, conductor; Marisela Sager, flute; Frank Renk, clarinet; Ryan Simmons, bassoon; Aiyun Huang, percussion; Marija Stroke, piano; Tereza Stanislav, violin; Richard Belcher, cello; Allan Rickmeier, bass Into a Cloud (2005) Bruce Adolphe, narrator; Zheng Huang, oboe; Jun Iwasaki, violin; Erin Nolan, viola; Davin Rubicz, cello; Marija Stroke, piano Zephyronia (2006) Imani Winds

JOHN HARBISON String Quartet (2002) Orion String Quartet Crossroads (2013) Jennifer Johnson Cano, mezzo-soprano; Peggy Pearson, oboe; Linden String Quartet; Nico Abondolo, bass

PAUL SCHOENFIELD Sonata for Violin and Piano (2009) Cho-Liang Lin, violin; Jon Kimura Parker, piano GUNTHER SCHULLER Quintet for Horn and Strings (2009) Julie Landsman, horn; Miró Quartet

STEPHEN HARTKE Sonata for Piano Four-Hands (2014) Orion Weiss, Anna Polonsky, piano

BRIGHT SHENG Three Fantasies (2006) Cho-Liang Lin, violin; André-Michel Schub, piano Northen Lights, for Violon, Cello and Piano (2010) Lynn Harrell, cello; Victor Asuncion, piano

FRANGHIZ ALI-ZADEH Sabah (morning/tomorrow/in the future) (2003) Aleck Karis, piano; Cho-Liang Lin, violin; Felix Fan, cello; Wu Man, pipa

HUANG RUO Real Loud (2008) Real Quiet

JULIAN ANDERSON String Quartet No. 2 “300 Weihnachtslieder” (2014) FLUX Quartet CLARICE ASSAD Synchronous (2015) Liang Wang, oboe; Andrew Wan, Fabiola Kim, violins; Robert Brophy, viola; JeongHyoun "Christine" Lee, cello SÉRGIO ASSAD Candido Scarecrow (2014) The Assad Brothers DEREK BERMEL Death with Interruptions (2014) David Chan, violin; Clive Greensmith, cello; John Novacek, piano CHEN YI Ancient Dances (2004) I. Ox Tail Dance II. Hu Xuan Dance David Schifrin, clarinet; André-Michel Schub, piano Night Thoughts (2004) Catherine Ransom, flute; Keith Robinson, cello; André-Michel Schub, piano STEWART COPELAND Retail Therapy (2009) Kyoko Takezawa, violin; Nico Abondolo, bass; Frank Renk, bass clarinet; Stewart Copeland, drums; Joyce Yang, piano CHICK COREA String Quartet No. 1, The Adventures of Hippocrates (2004) Chick Corea, piano; John Benitez, acoustic bass; Tom Brechtlein, drums MARC-ANDRÉ DALBAVIE Quartet for Piano and Strings (2012) Yura Lee, violin; Paul Neubauer, viola; Felix Fan, cello; Jeremy Denk, piano RICHARD DANIELPOUR Clarinet Quintet “The Last Jew in Hamadan” (2015) Burt Hara, clarinet; Verona Quartet BRETT DEAN Epitaphs for String Quintet (2010) Brett Dean, viola; Orion String Quartet DAVID DEL TREDICI Bullycide (2013) Orion Weiss, piano; DaXun Zhang, bass; Shanghai Quartet MARC-ANDRÉ HAMELIN String Quartet (2016) Hai-Ye Ni, cello; Marc-André Hamelin, piano

JOEL HOFFMAN of Deborah, for Deborah (2015) Nancy Allen, harp; Cho-Liang Lin, violin; Toby Hoffman, viola; Gary Hoffman, cello

AARON JAY KERNIS Perpetual Chaconne (2012) John Bruce Yeh, clarinet; Calder Quartet LEON KIRCHNER String Quartet No. 4 (2006) Orion String Quartet DAVID LANG String Quartet “almost all the time” (2014) FLUX Quartet

WAYNE SHORTER Terra Incognita (2006) Imani Winds

MAGNUS LINDBERG Konzertstück for Cello and Piano (2006) Anssi Karttunen, cello; Magnus Lindberg, piano

STEVEN STUCKY Sonata for Violin and Piano (2013) Cho-Liang Lin, violin; Jon Kimura Parker, piano

JACQUES LOUSSIER Divertimento (2008) Jacques Loussier Trio; SoJin Kim, Shih-Kai Lin, violins; Elzbieta Weyman, viola; Yves Dharamraj, cello; Mark Dresser, bass

AUGUSTA READ THOMAS Bells Ring Summer (2000) David Finckel, cello

MARC NEIKRUG Ritual (2007) Real Quiet MARK O'CONNOR String Quartet No. 2 "Bluegrass" (2005) Mark O‘Connor, Cho-Liang Lin, violins; Carol Cook, viola; Natalie Haas, cello ANDRÉ PREVIN Vocalise (1996 Ashley Putnam, soprano; David Finckel, cello CHRISTOPHER ROUSE String Quartet No. 3 (2010) Calder Quartet KAIJA SAARIAHO Serenatas (2008) Real Quiet ESA-PEKKA SALONEN Lachen verlernt (Laughing Unlearnt) (2002) Cho-Liang Lin, violin PETER SCHICKELE Spring Ahead Quintet for Clarinet and String Quartet (2015) Burt Hara, clarinet; Huntington Quartet

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SEAN SHEPHERD Oboe Quartet (2011) Liang Wang, oboe; Jennifer Koh, violin; Cynthia Phelps, viola; Felix Fan, cello String Quartet No. 2 (2015) FLUX Quartet HOWARD SHORE A Palace Upon the Ruins (A Song Cycle) (2014) Jennifer Johnson Cano, mezzo-soprano; Catherine Ransom Karoly, flute; Coleman Itzkoff, cello; Andrew Staupe, piano; Julie Smith Phillips, harp; Dustin Donahue, percussion

JULIAN MILONE La Muerte del Angel (arr. movement from Piazzolla's Tango Suite) (2008) Gil Shaham, Kyoko Takezawa, Cho-Liang Lin, Margaret Batjer, violins; Chris Hanulik, bass

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JOAN TOWER Big Sky (2000) Chee-Yun, violin; David Finckel, cello; Wu Han, piano Trio La Jolla (2007) (Renamed Trio CAVANY) Cho-Liang Lin, violin; Gary Hoffman, cello; André-Michel Schub, piano White Granite (2011) Margaret Batjer, violin; Paul Neubauer, viola; Joshua Roman, cello; André-Michel Schub, piano GEORGE TSONTAKIS Stimulus Package (2009) Real Quiet CHINARY UNG AKASA: “Formless Spiral” (2010) Real Quiet JOHN WILLIAMS Quartet La Jolla (2011) Cho-Liang Lin, violin; Joshua Roman, cello; John Bruce Yeh, clarinet; Deborah Hoffman, harp CYNTHIA LEE WONG Piano Quartet (2011) Joyce Yang, piano; Martin Beaver, violin; Kazuhide Isomura, viola; Felix Fan, cello ELLEN TAAFFE ZWILICH Quintet for Violin, Viola, Cello, Contrabass and Piano (2011) The Kalichstein-Laredo-Robinson Trio; Michael Tree, viola; Harold Robinson, bass

LALO SCHIFRIN Letters from Argentina (2005) Lalo Schifrin, piano; David Schifrin, clarinet; Cho-Liang Lin, violin; Nestor Marconi, bandoneón; Pablo Aslan, bass; Satoshi Takeishi, percussion

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SummerFest Sponsors

With deep appreciation and affection, we are grateful to the following sponsors who have made SummerFest a strong, thriving and engaging festival.

FESTIVAL FOUNDERS

Steve Baum and Brenda Baker Since the inauguration of SummerFest in 1986, Steve Baum and Brenda Baker have been instrumental in making SummerFest an artistically-thriving and financially-strong festival. As the very first SummerFest Chair, Brenda created the atmosphere of a welcoming family for artists and audiences. Steve elevated the festival visibility and brought national attention to SummerFest through the support of our first nationwide radio broadcasts. Brenda and Steve’s wise counsel and unwavering support have guided and inspired us to continue to make SummerFest one of America’s greatest summer festivals and we are proud to acknowledge them as our Festival Founders.

FESTIVAL ANGELS

Raffaella and John Belanich

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FESTIVAL BENEFACTORS

Conrad Prebys and Debbie Turner


Judith Bachner and Dr. Eric L. Lasley Diane and Roy Bell Joan Jordan Bernstein Mary Ann Beyster Virginia and Robert Black Joye Blount and Jessie Knight, Jr. Johan and Sevil Brahme Wendy Brody Gordon Brodfuehrer Isabel and Stuart Brown Jian and Samson Chan Katherine and Dane Chapin Kathleen Charla, Ph.D. Linda Chester and Kenneth Rind Julie and Bert Cornelison Elaine and Dave Darwin Martha and Ed Dennis Silvija and Brian Devine Nina and Robert Doede Barbara and Dick Enberg Jill Esterbrooks and James Robbins Sue and Chris Fan Paul and Clare Friedman Jeff Glazer and Lisa Braun Glazer

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Brenda and Michael Goldbaum Bryna Haber Susan and Bill Hoehn Alexa Kirkwood Hirsch Lulu Hsu Joan and Irwin Jacobs Jeanne Jones and Don Breitenberg Helen and Keith Kim Angelina and Frederick Kleinbub Helene K. Kruger Joan Vivian Lim and Joseph Wong Leanne Hull MacDougall Maggie and Paul Meyer Bill Miller and Ida Houby Ann L. Navarra Joani Nelson Marina and Rafael Pastor Peggy and Peter Preuss Maria and Philippe Prokocimer William Purves Sylvia and Steven Ré Catherine and Jean Rivier Stacy and Don Rosenberg Sandra and Robert Rosenthal

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Leigh P. Ryan Marge and Neal Schmale Suzan and Gad Shaanan Jay and Minna Shah Pat Shank Maureen and Tom Shiftan Annemarie and Leland Sprinkle Jeanette Stevens Margaret Stevens Grossman and Michael Grossman Iris and Matthew Strauss Elizabeth Taft Haeyoung Kong Tang Norma Jo Thomas Sue and Peter Wagener Clara Wu and Joseph Tsai Eleanor tum Suden Twin Dragon Foundation Dolly and Victor Woo Bebe and Marvin Zigman Anonymous (2) Listing as of July 6, 2016

SummerFest Hosts Friends of La Jolla Music Society welcome SummerFest Artists by opening their homes for receptions, rehearsals, and housing artists during their visit. A host’s willingness to contribute to SummerFest in such a personal way is cherished and we are grateful for their generosity. Chris Andrews Brenda Baker and Steve Baum Raffaella and John Belanich Diane and Roy Bell Mary Ann Beyster Ginny and Bob Black Sherry and Marty Bloom Alicia and Rocky Booth Althea Brimm Wendy Brody Josie Burdick Linda Chester and Kenneth Rind Carol and Jim Carlisle Patty and Jim Clark Ann Craig Martha and Ed Dennis

Carol Diggs Nina and Robert Doede Barbara and Dick Enberg Sue and Chris Fan Caroline and Tony Farwell Diane and Elliot Feuerstein Joy Frieman Mell and Keiran Gallahue Debbie Gerber Lehn and Ritch Goetz Margaret Stevens Grossman and Michael S. Grossman Kay and John Hesselink Alexa Kirkwood Hirsch Joan and Irwin Jacobs Vivian Lim and Joseph Wong

Carol Manifold Elaine and Doug Muchmore Garna Muller Ann L. Navarra Joani Nelson Marie and Merrel Olesen Catherine and Jean Rivier Cassidy and Jere Robins Stacy and Don Rosenberg Jane and Eric Sagerman Neal and Marge Schmale Suzan and Gad Shaanan Shoba and Kumar Sharma Maureen and Tom Shiftan Susan Shirk and Sam Popkin Annie So

Annemarie and Lee Sprinkle Iris and Matthew Strauss Elizabeth Taft Diana Vines and John Malugen Sue and Peter Wagener Abby and Ray Weiss Mimi and Kai Wong Dolly and Victor Woo Su-Mei Yu Listing as of July 6, 2016

We are always looking for new hosts for our artists. Please call our office at 858.459.3724 if you are interested in learning more about hosting possibilities. 858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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SummerFest 2016 Committee

SummerFest Chairs:

Members:

Martha Dennis Dolly Woo

Christine Andrews Brenda Baker Raffaella Belanich Joan Jordan Bernstein Mary Ann Beyster Ginny Black Karen Brailean Wendy Brody Carol Carlisle Katherine Chapin Linda Chester Elaine Darwin Silvija Devine Nina Doede Eleanor Ellsworth Barbara Enberg Sue Fan Joy Frieman Sally Fuller Brenda Goldbaum Cindy Goodman

Gala Chair: Sue Wagener

Housing Chair: Robert Nelson

SummerFest Under the Stars Chair: Helene K. Kruger

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Judith Harris Singer Kay Hesselink Carol Hinrichs Alexa Kirkwood Hirsch Angel Kleinbub Susan Hoehn Lulu Hsu Joan Jacobs Carol Lam Teddie Lewis Vivian Lim Kuangyi Lou Leanne Hull MacDougall Joani Nelson Marina Pastor Betty-Jo Petersen Peggy Preuss Maria Prokocimer Bill Purves Silvia RĂŠ Cassidy Robins

Catherine Rivier Stacy Rosenberg Leigh P. Ryan Marge Schmale Suzan Shaanan Maureen Shiftan June Shillman Jack Sipe Annemarie Sprinkle Jeanette Stevens Margaret Stevens Grossman Elizabeth Taft Haeyoung Kong Tang Joanee Udelf Clara Wu Carolyn Yorston-Wellcome Bebe Zigman


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Media Partners ®

Venue Partners

MCASD, LA JOLLA

LA JOLLA RIFORD LIBRARY

858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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Board of Directors 2015-16

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Katherine Chapin – Chair Theresa Jarvis – Treasurer Susan Hoehn – Secretary Martha Dennis, Ph.D. – Past Chair Stephen Baum Karen A. Brailean Gordon Brodfuehrer Wendy Brody Ric Charlton Linda Chester Elaine Bennett Darwin Silvija Devine Brian Douglass Barbara Enberg Jennifer Eve Rebecca George Lehn Goetz Kristin Lancino Robin Nordhoff Rafael Pastor Ethna Sinisi Piazza Peggy Preuss Deirdra Price, Ph.D. Sylvia Ré Jeremiah Robins Clifford Schireson Marge Schmale Jean Shekhter Maureen Shiftan June Shillman Jeanette Stevens Debra Turner H. Peter Wagener Clara Wu HONORARY DIRECTORS

Brenda Baker Stephen Baum Joy Frieman, Ph.D. Irwin M. Jacobs Joan K. Jacobs Lois Kohn (1924-2010) Helene K. Kruger Conrad Prebys Ellen Revelle (1910-2009) Leigh P. Ryan, Esq. Listing as of July 15, 2016

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La Jolla Music Society Staff Kristin Lancino – President & Artistic Director Cho-Liang Lin – SummerFest Music Director ADMINISTRATION Chris Benavides – Finance Director Debra Palmer – Executive Assistant & Board Liaison Anthony LeCourt – Administrative Assistant Sarah Bauer – Intern ARTISTIC & EDUCATION Leah Z. Rosenthal – Director of Artistic Planning & Education Jordanna Rose – Artist Services Coordinator Allison Boles – Education Manager Marcus Overton – Consultant for Special Projects Serafin Paredes – Community Music Center Program Director Eric Bromberger – Program Annotator John Tessmer – Artist Liaison Juliana Gaona – Music Librarian / Artist Assistant DEVELOPMENT Ferdinand Gasang – Development Director Rewa Colette Soltan – Business Development & Event Coordinator MARKETING & TICKET SERVICES Kristen Sakamoto – Marketing Director Vanessa Dinning – Marketing Manager Hilary Huffman – Marketing Coordinator Matthew Fernie – Graphic & Web Designer Cari McGowan – Ticket Services Manager Shannon Haider – Ticket Services Assistant Caroline Mickle – Ticket Services Assistant Alex Gutierrez – Ticket Services Assistant Shaun Davis – House Manager Paul Body – Photographer PRODUCTION Travis Wininger – Director of Theatre Operations Leighann Enos – Production Manager Jonnel Domilos – Piano Technician Joel Britt – Assistant Stage Manager Ashley Martin – Assistant Stage Manager Megan Martin – Assistant Stage Manager Benjamin Maas – Recording Engineer Jacob Powell – Recording Assistant Erica Poole – Page Turner LEGAL COUNSEL Paul Hastings LLP AUDITOR Leaf & Cole, LLP HONORARY Christopher Beach – Artistic Director Emeritus

LA JOLLA MUSIC SOCIETY

7946 Ivanhoe Avenue, Suite 309 La Jolla, California 92037 Admin: 858.459.3724 - Fax: 858.459.3727


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The wonderful array of musical activities that La Jolla Music Society offers would not be possible without support from dedicated patrons. Individual gifts not only help LJMS present the finest musicians and the best of the chamber music repertoire in San Diego, but they reach beyond the concert hall by nurturing talents in young musicians each year. We are grateful to our individual contributors and businesses who share our enthusiasm and have partnered with us in supporting the artistic mission of La Jolla Music Society. Please join them today and make a gift online at www.LJMS.org/donate or by contacting Ferdinand Gasang at 858.459.3724, ext. 204 or FGasang@LJMS.org.

FOUNDER

($250,000 and above)

ANGEL

($100,000 - $249,999)

BENEFACTOR

($50,000-$99,999)

GUARANTOR

($25,000-$49,999)

Brenda Baker & Steve Baum Conrad Prebys & Debbie Turner The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture Joy Frieman Joan & Irwin Jacobs Raffaella & John Belanich Rita & Richard Atkinson Silvija & Brian Devine Anonymous Mary Ann Beyster Gordon Brodfuehrer Katherine & Dane Chapin Linda Chester & Ken Rind Dave & Elaine Darwin Kay & John Hesselink Susan & Bill Hoehn Peter & Peggy Preuss Steven & Sylvia RĂŠ Marge & Neal Schmale Jeanette Stevens Joe Tsai & Clara Wu Twin Dragon Foundation

COMMUNITY MUSIC CENTER Since 1999, La Jolla Music Society has operated the Community Music Center, a free afterschool music education program in southeast San Diego. Each year, the program provides instruments and valuable instruction to over one hundred students.

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SUSTAINER ($15,000-$24,999)

Anonymous Dr. James C. & Karen A. Brailean Wendy Brody Martha & Ed Dennis Barbara & Dick Enberg Jennifer & Kurt Eve Theresa Jarvis & Ric Erdman Sue & Chris Fan Brenda & Michael Goldbaum William Karatz & Joan Smith Keith & Helen Kim National Endowment for the Arts Robin & Hank Nordhoff Raphael & Marina Pastor Clifford Schireson & John Venekamp Gary & Jean Shekhter Maureen & Thomas Shiftan June & Dr. Bob Shillman Vail Memorial Fund

SUPPORTER ($10,000-$14,999)

Anonymous Joan Jordan Bernstein Betty Beyster Ric & Barbara Charlton County of San Diego / Community Enhancement Program Brian Douglass, digital OutPost Lehn & Richard Goetz Alexa Kirkwood Hirsch Sharon & Joel Labovitz Carol Lam & Mark Burnett Vivian Lim & Joseph Wong Ethan Sinisi Piazza Deirdra Price ResMed Foundation Don & Stacy Rosenberg Haeyoung Kong Tang Sue & Peter Wagener Abby & Ray Weiss Dolly & Victor Woo

AMBASSADOR ($5,000-$9,999)

Anonymous (2) Judith Bachner & Dr. Eric L. Lasley Norman Blachford & Peter Cooper Johan & Sevil Brahme 92 LA JOLLA MUSIC SOCIETY SUMMERFEST

Jian & Samson Chan Ellise & Michael Coit Karen & Don Cohn Anne & Robert Conn Julie and Bert Cornelison Nina & Robert Doede Jeane Erley Jill Esterbrooks & James Kirkpatrick Robbins Peter & Olivia Farrell Pauline Foster Elaine Galinson & Herbert Solomon Jeff Glazer & Lisa Braun-Glazer Michael Grossman & Margaret Stevens Grossman Warren & Karen Kessler Angelina & Fredrick Kleinbub Helene Kruger Carol Lazier & James A. Merritt Michel Mathieu & Richard MacDonald Kathlyn Mead, San Diego Foundation Morgan & Elizabeth Oliver Betty Jo Petersen Maria & Dr. Philippe Prokocimer Catherine & Jean Rivier Sandra & Robert Rosenthal Ivor Royston & Colette Carson Royston Leigh P. Ryan Susan Shirk & Samuel Popkin Iris & Matthew Strauss Elizabeth Taft Karen & Stuart Tanz Gianangelo Vergani Ronald Wakefield Margie & John H. Warner, Jr. Carolyn Yorston-Wellcome & H. Barden Wellcome Marvin & Bebe Zigman

AFICIONADOS ($2,500-$4,999)

Jim Beyster Josephine & Bjorn Bjerede Robert & Ginny Black Stuart & Isabel Brown Joye Bount & Jessie Knight, Jr. R. Nelson & Janice Byrne Trevor Callan, Callan Capital Leonard & Susan Comden Elliot & Diane Feuerstein Bryna Haber Judith Harris & Robert Singer, M.D. Jeanne Jones & Don Breitenberg

David & Susan Kabakoff Arleen & Robert Lettas Leanne Hull MacDougall Sue & John Major Gail & Ed Miller Howard & Sally Oxley Patty & Murray Rome Sheryl & Bob Scarano Annie So Leland & Annemarie Sprinkle Joyce & Ted Strauss Sheryl & Harvey White Jo & Howard Weiner Su-Mei Yu

ASSOCIATES ($1,000-$2,499)

Christopher Beach & Wesley Fata Carolyn Bertussi Teresa O. Campbell Marsha & Bill Chandler June Chocheles Victor & Ellen Cohn Drs. Anthony F. Chong & Annette Thu Nguyen Peggy Cravens Lori & Tony Demaria Dennis Dorman Mary & Hudson Drake Ernie & Marilyn Dronenburg Drs. Edward & Ruth Evans Nomi Feldman Richard & Beverley Fink Del Foit & Cynthia Bobin-Foit Karen S. Fox Paul & Barbara Hirshman Lulu Hsu Elisa & Rick Jaime Daphne & James Jameson Katherine Kennedy Kristen & Thierry Lancino Theodora Lewis Sylvia & Jamie Liwerant Maggie & Paul Meyer Bill Miller & Ida Houby Dr. Sandra Miner Anne Otterson Ann & Ken Poovey Jill Q. Porter Allison & Robert Price William Purves & Don Schmidt Dr. Jane Reldan Doreen & Myron Schonbrun Jay & Minna Shah


Barbara & Lawrence Sherman Tina Simner Juliette Singh Richard & Susan Ulevitch Nell Waltz Judith White Karin Winner Joseph Witztum & Mary Elinger Witztum Toby Wolf Anna & Edward Yeung Hanna Zahran, Regents Bank

FRIENDS ($500-$999)

Anonymous Barry & Emily Berkov Malin Burnham Luc Cayet & Anne Marie Pleska Jean & Robert Chan Peter B. Clark Sharon Cohen Douglas P. & Robin Douchette Paul & Clare Friedman Sally Fuller Carrie & Jim Greenstein Linda & Edward Janon Saundra L. Jones Louis Kasch Sally Maizel Winona Matthews Ted McKinney Robert Nelson & Jean Fujisaki Sandra Redman & Jeff Mueller Pat Shank Miriam Summ Susan & Jonathan Tiefenbrun Susan Trompeter

Yvonne Vaucher Suhaila White Olivia & Marty Winkler Faye Wilson

ENTHUSIASTS ($250-$499)

Lynell Antrim Fiona & Scott Bechtler-Levin Steven & Patricia Blostin Benjamin Brand Stefana Brintzenhoff Patrick Chapman, Accurate Printing and Mailing Kathleen Charla Elizabeth Clarquist Geoffrey Clow Dr. Ruth Covell Carol DeMar The Rev. Eleanor Ellsworth Marina & Igor Fomenkov Drs. Lawrence & Gartner Lynn Gordon Nancy Jones Nan & Buzz Kaufman Gladys & Bert Kohn Robert & Elena Kucinski Arlene LaPlante The Hon. M. Margaret McKeown & Dr. Peter Cowhey Robert Merryman Alan Nahum & Victoria Danzig Joani Nelson Aghdas Pezeshki Pam & Phil Palisoul Rejeuviné Medspa Becki Robbins

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Peter & Arlene Sacks Jonathan Scheff William Smith Joan Snider Kathryn Starr Edward Stickgold & Steven Cande Norma Jo Thomas Eleanor L. tum Suden Laurette Verbinski Terry & Peter Yang Josephine Zolin

Special Thanks Thank you to Joanee Udelf and Martha Dennis for the countless hours sorting through albums and boxes and helping to assemble the photo collage and slideshow for the 30th Anniversary of SummerFest. (An extra special thanks to Joanee who throughout the years has taken most of the photos!) Cheers and thank you to Sarah Bauer who has been indispensable to everyone in the office, and single-handedly scanned and edited all the photos used for the slideshow and collage. Tremendous gratitude to Ted McKinney for creating and sharing a database with all the works performed at SummerFest. Each year he updates and shares it with the staff, and it was enormously useful in calculating many of the ‘Fest Facts in the program book this year. Heartfelt appreciation to Robert Nelson, SummerFest Housing Committee Chair, for agreeing to take on the herculean task of securing host homes for all of our SummerFest artists since 2008. You make it look easy!

SERVING OUR COMMUNITY During our 2014–15 season, La Jolla Music Society was able to reach over 11,700 students and community members. We worked with students from over 60 different schools and universities, providing concert tickets, performance demonstrations, and master classes. Thanks to the generous support of our patrons and donors, all of our outreach activities are free to the people we serve.

858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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Annual Support

FOUNDATIONS The Atkinson Family Foundation Ayco Charitable Foundation: The AAM & JSS Charitable Fund The Vicki & Carl Zeiger Charitable Foundation Bettendorf, WE Foundation: Sally Fuller The Blachford-Cooper Foundation The Catalyst Foundation: The Hon. Diana Lady Dougan The Clark Family Trust Enberg Family Charitable Foundation The Epstein Family Foundation: Phyllis Epstein The Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund: Drs. Edward & Martha Dennis Fund Sue & Chris Fan Don & Stacy Rosenberg Shillman Charitable Trust Richard and Beverly Fink Family Foundation Inspiration Fund at the San Diego Foundation: Frank & Victoria Hobbs The Jewish Community Foundation: Diane & Elliot Feuerstein Fund Foster Family Foundation Galinson Family Fund Lawrence & Bryna Haber Fund Joan & Irwin Jacobs Fund David & Susan Kabakoff Fund Warren & Karen Kessler Fund Liwerant Family Fund Theodora F. Lewis Fund Jaime & Sylvia Liwerant Fund The Allison & Robert Price Family Foundation Fund Gary & Jean Shekhter Fund John & Cathy Weil Fund Sharon & Joel Labovitz Foundation The New York Community Trust: Barbara & William Karatz Fund Qualcomm Foundation Rancho Santa Fe Foundation: The Fenley Family Donor-Advised Fund The Susan & John Major Donor-Advised Fund The Oliphant Donor-Advised Fund

94 LA JOLLA MUSIC SOCIETY SUMMERFEST

ResMed Foundation The San Diego Foundation: The Beyster Family Foundation Fund The M.A. Beyster Fund II The Karen A. & James C. Brailean Fund The Valerie & Harry Cooper Fund The Hom Family Fund The Ivor & Colette Carson Royston Fund The Scarano Family Fund The Shiftan Family Fund Schwab Fund for Charitable Giving: Alexa Kirkwood Hirsch Fund Ted McKinney & Frank Palmerino Fund The Shillman Foundation Silicon Valley Community Foundation: The William R. & Wendyce H. Brody Fund Simner Foundation The Haeyoung Kong Tang Foundation The John M. and Sally B. Thornton Foundation The John H. Warner Jr. and Helga M. Warner Foundation Vail Memorial Fund Thomas and Nell Waltz Family Foundation Sheryl and Harvey White Foundation

HONORARIA & MEMORIAL GIFTS In Memory of J. Robert Beyster: Clifford Schireson & John Venekamp In Memory of Evelyn Brailean: Martha & Ed Dennis Ferdinand Gasang Helene Kruger In Honor of Brian Devine’s Birthday: Helene Kruger In Honor of Ferdinand Gasang’s Father: Dr. James C. & Karen A. Brailean In Honor of Alexa Hirsch: Todd Schultz In Honor of Susan and Bill Hoehn: Mary & Hudson Drake Tom & Loretta Hom In Honor of Irwin Jacobs’ Birthday: Martha & Ed Dennis In Memory of Lois Kohn: Ingrid Paymar


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In Honor of Helene Kruger: Anonymous Brian & Silvija Devine Ferdinand Gasang Benjamin Guercio Sharon & Joel Labovitz Patricia Manners Paul & Maggie Meyer Ann Mound Lonnie Ross Bryna Haber Ruth Herzog Debbie Horwitz & Paul Nierman Betty Jo Petersen Don & Stacy Rosenberg Clifford Schireson & John Venekamp Beverly Schmier Nell Waltz Pat Winter Bebe & Marvin Zigman In Honor of Carol Lam: QUALCOMM Incorporated In Honor of Peggy Preuss: Peggy Cravens In Honor of Kristen Sakamoto’s Grandmother: Ferdinand Gasang In Honor of Clifford Schireson: Kevin Tilden & Philip Diamond M.D. In Honor of Jean Shekhter: Morgan & Elizabeth Oliver In Honor of Jeanette Stevens: Todd Schultz In Memory of Fiona Tudor: Anonymous Frank Alessio Christopher Beach & Wesley Fata Mary Ann Beyster Elaine & Dave Darwin Lori & Tony Demaria Martha & Ed Dennis Barbara & Dick Enberg Ferdinand Gasang Theresa Jarvis Robin & Hank Nordhoff Marina & Rafael Pastor Peggy & Peter Preuss Carol Randolph & Bob Caplan In Memory of Carleton and Andree Vail: Vail Memorial Fund In Honor of Abby Weiss: Anonymous Jane & Michael Glick Lynn Stern

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MATCHING GIFTS Bank of America IBM, International Merck QUALCOMM, Inc. The San Diego Foundation Sempra Energy The Annual Support listing is current as of June 6, 2016.

SUPPORT

To learn more about supporting La Jolla Music Society’s artistic and education programs or to make an amendment to your listing please contact Ferdinand Gasang at 858.459.3724, ext. 204 or FGasang@LJMS.org. This list is current as of July 6, 2016. Amendments will be reflected in the next program book in October 2016.

858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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Medallion Society

In 1999, the Board of Directors officially established the Medallion Society to begin to provide long-term financial stability for La Jolla Music Society. We are honored to have this special group of friends who have made a multi-year commitment of at least three years to La Jolla Music Society, ensuring that the artistic quality and vision we bring to the community continues to grow.

CROWN JEWEL

TOPAZ

Brenda Baker and Steve Baum Conrad Prebys and Debbie Turner

Anonymous Joan Jordan Bernstein Mary Ann Beyster+ Dr. James C. and Karen A. Brailean Dave and Elaine Darwin Barbara and Dick Enberg Jeane Erley Dr. Lisa Braun-Glazer and Dr. Jeff Glazer Margaret and Michael Grossman Alexa Kirkwood Hirsch Theresa Jarvis Angelina and Fred Kleinbub Joseph Wong and Vivian Lim+ Michel Mathieu and Richard McDonald Rafael and Marina Pastor Maria and Dr. Philippe Prokocimer Don and Stacy Rosenberg Leigh P. Ryan+ Neal and Marge Schmale Jeanette Stevens Elizabeth Taft Gianangelo Vergani Dolly and Victor Woo Carolyn Yorston-Wellcome and H. Bard Wellcome Bebe and Marvin Zigman

DIAMOND Raffaella and John Belanich Joy Frieman+ Joan and Irwin Jacobs

EMERALD Rita and Richard Atkinson

RUBY Silvija and Brian Devine

GARNET Elaine Galinson Peggy and Peter Preuss

SAPPHIRE Kay and John Hesselink Keith and Helen Kim Sharon and Joel Labovitz

Note: + 5-year term Listing as of July 6, 2016

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La Jolla Music Society has quickly become the largest presenter of major American and great international dance companies in San Diego. In order for LJMS to be able to fulfill San Diego’s clear desire for dance and ballet performances by the very best artists around the world, the Dance Society was created. We are grateful to the following friends for their passion and support of our dance programs.

GRAND JETÉ

POINTE

PLIÉ

Anonymous

Teresa O. Campbell

ARABESQUE

DEMI POINTE

Katherine and Dane Chapin Ellise and Michael Coit June and Dr. Bob Shillman Jeanette Stevens

Innovative Commercial Environments Saundra L. Jones Gordana and Dave Schnider Susan Trompeter

Stefana Brintzenhoff Mara Lawrence Joani Nelson Rejeuviné Medspa Elyssa Dru Rosenberg Elizabeth Taft

PIROUETTE

Listing as of July 6, 2016

Elaine Galinson and Herbert Solomon Annie So Marvin and Bebe Zigman

Legacy Society The Legacy Society recognizes those generous individuals who have chosen to provide for La Jolla Music Society’s future. Members have remembered La Jolla Music Society in their estate plans in many ways – through their wills, retirement gifts, life income plans and many other creative planned giving arrangements. We thank them for their vision and hope you will join this very special group of friends. Anonymous (2) June L. Bengston* Joan Jordan Bernstein Bjorn and Josephine Bjerede Dr. James C. and Karen A. Brailean Gordon Brodfuehrer Barbara Buskin Trevor Callan Anne and Robert Conn George and Cari Damoose Elaine and Dave Darwin Teresa and Merle Fischlowitz Ted and Ingrid Friedmann Joy and Ed* Frieman Sally Fuller

Maxwell H. and Muriel S. Gluck* Dr. Trude Hollander Dr. Eric L. Lasley Theodora Lewis Joani Nelson Maria and Dr. Philippe Prokocimer Bill Purves Darren and Bree Reinig Jay W. Richen Leigh P. Ryan Jack and Joan Salb Johanna Schiavoni Patricia C. Shank Drs. Joseph and Gloria Shurman Jeanette Stevens

Elizabeth and Joseph* Taft Norma Jo Thomas Dr. Yvonne E. Vaucher Lucy and Ruprecht von Buttlar Ronald Wakefield John B. and Cathy Weil Carolyn Yorston-Wellcome and H. Barden Wellcome Karl and Joan Zeisler Josephine Zolin *In Memoriam Listing as of July 6, 2016

858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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Business Society

Members of our Business Society are committed to the LJMS community. For information on how your business can help bring world-class performances to San Diego, please call Rewa Colette Soltan at 858.459.3724, ext. 206 or email RSoltan@LJMS.org.

GUARANTORS The Lodge at Torrey Pines San Diego Gas & Electric

SUSTAINERS The Westgate Hotel

SUPPORTERS

digital OutPost The LOT NINE-TEN Restaurant Paul Hastings LLP Procopio, Cory, Hargreaves & Savitch LLP The Violin Shop Whisknladle Hospitality

AMBASSADORS

ACE Parking Management, Inc. Giuseppe Restaurants & Fine Catering La Jolla Beach and Tennis Club La Jolla Sports Club La Valencia Hotel Chef Drew Catering, Panache Productions Paul Body Photography Sammy’s Woodfire Pizza & Catering

AFICIONADOS Bloomers Flowers Callan Capital Girard Gourmet Gelson’s Market Monarch Cottages Sharp HealthCare UC San Diego Healthcare

ASSOCIATES Jimbo’s…Naturally! Romero Bow Shop Sprinkles Cupcakes

ENTHUSIASTS Nelson Real Estate

Listing as of July 14, 2016

Restaurant Nights DINNER WITH THE ARTISTS Please join us and your fellow concertgoers for dinners with the artists prior to a concert. These special three-course dinners are only $65 per person and begin at 5:45 PM with a champagne reception, and seated dinner at 6:15 PM. Guests will also receive complimentary parking for the concert.

For more information or to reserve your seat, please call Rewa Colette Soltan at 858.459.3724, ext. 206 or email RSoltan@LJMS.org.

98 LA JOLLA MUSIC SOCIETY SUMMERFEST

Friday, August 5

Wednesday, August 10

Tuesday, August 16

Tuesday, August 23


GET SOCIAL Share + Connect @LJMusicSociety #LJMSSF2016

facebook.com/ LaJollaMusicSociety

30 t h A n n i v e r s a r y

instagram.com/ LJMusicSociety

AUGUST 3 – 26, 2016

Enjoy specially curated clips for each concert program www.LJMS.org/ListenSF16

on Produced by La Jolla Music Society SummerFest and UCSD-TV, watch select performances, lectures, round table discussions, interviews and rehearsals.

Enjoy videos from past SummerFests www.LJMS.org/WatchSF16

NOW MORE THEN EVER TO DO AT LJMS.ORG 858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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Fi l l

r e m m u s r u o y

! c i s u m h t i w

Explore the musical riches and unique settings of these allied festivals of the Western United States.

California

Colorado

Oregon

Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music July 31 - August 13, 2016 Santa Cruz, CA cabrillomusic.org

Aspen Music Festival June 30 - August 21, 2016 Aspen, CO aspenmusicfestival.com

Chamber Music Northwest Summer Festival June 25 - July 31, 2016 Portland, OR cmnw.org

Bravo! Vail June 23 - August 6, 2016 Vail, CO bravovail.org

Carmel Bach Festival July 16 - 30, 2016 Carmel, CA bachfestival.org

Strings Music Festival June 25 - August 20, 2016 Steamboat Springs, CO stringsmusicfestival.com

La Jolla Music Society August 3 - 26, 2016 La Jolla, CA ljms.org

New Mexico

Mainly Mozart Festival June 2 - 18, 2016 San Diego, CA mainlymozart.org

Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival July 17 - August 22, 2016 Santa Fe, NM santafechambermusic.com

Music@Menlo July 15 - August 6 Atherton, CA musicatmenlo.org

Washington Seattle Chamber Music Society Summer Festival July 5 - 30, 2016 Seattle, WA seattlechambermusic.org

Wyoming Grand Teton Music Festival July 4 - August 20, 2016 Jackson Hole, WY gtmf.org

Ojai Music Festival June 9 - 12, 2016 Ojai, CA ojaifestival.org

CLASSICAL MUSIC FESTIVALS OF THE WEST 2016 100 LA JOLLA MUSIC SOCIETY SUMMERFEST


OPENING 2018 The Conrad will serve as a heart of cultural, community and arts education event activity in La Jolla, bringing world-class performances to San Diego and be the permanent home of La Jolla Music Society. The new performing arts center, located at 7600 Fay Avenue in La Jolla, will include a 500-seat concert hall, a 150-seat cabaret/multi-use space, new offices for La Jolla Music Society and a large open courtyard.

VISIT THECONRAD.ORG FOR MORE INFORMATION 858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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102 LA JOLLA MUSIC SOCIETY SUMMERFEST

By ASH LEy MAC The cons completi KiN truc on date lifeguard tion of for towe the La Jolla once r was agai this mon n to, idea pushed Cove th. Orig lly, the back to be end of complete inall unfo y sche resee in its com n dela Decembe duled ys initi r 2014 Now pletion ally push , date Myrna direc Dayton,to March ed tor 2015 the city of field depu . of San engineer ty depa ing with Dieg rtme o’s nt, is shou sayin public work ld early be complete g the s towe August. r by late The July new feet with or towe a steel r will be sidin 80 g fram e and square base. on a conc The $1.85 rete, cant wood bein g million ilevered capital funded by cost the bon is use impact ds fees and deve of deferred how lopm muc (it is the cost h the unknown ent of the delays will exactly add to SEE LiFE project). guA RD Tow ER, A3

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sharp applauds

La JoLLa Music society for its efforts to enrich the cultural life of san diego.

CORP580A ©2014 SHC

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Mention your support of La Jolla Music Society to enjoy FREE local delivery or a 10% discount on all purchases made in our shop

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GCA-2773-LJMS-ProgramAd

7.5"w x 4.75"h

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Celebrating 50 Years of Caring We’re shaping the future of medicine. Since 1966, UC San Diego has been a regional leader in academic medicine and clinical care. We’ve created a healthier world, one life at a time. As a thank you to our La Jolla neighbors, we invite you to join us on Saturday, September 24, 2016, for a special tour of Jacobs Medical Center before it opens later this fall. Space is limited, so please register at health.ucsd.edu/JMCcommunityopenhouse.

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WE CATER TO your CROWD Whether you’re planning a bridal shower or business lunch, our event specialists can help you design the perfect menu of Starters, Salads, Wraps, Pastas, and award winning Woodfired Pizzas.

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108 LA JOLLA MUSIC SOCIETY SUMMERFEST


Gelson’s Pacific Beach 730 Turquoise St. San Diego, CA 92109 858-488-0044 Open Daily 7am–10pm Gelson’s Del Mar 2707 Via De La Valle Del Mar, CA 92014 858-481-9300 Open Daily 7am–10pm Gelson’s La Costa 7660 El Camino Real Carlsbad, CA 92009 760-632-7511 Open Daily 7am–10pm

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Plus, you’ll find delicious, freshly prepared dishes at our famous Service Deli and a truly amazing variety of goods in our grocery aisles. No matter which department you’re in, you’ll be choosing from the best, freshest, and most flavorful foods — including locally sourced and organic offerings — at a fair price that won’t strain your budget.

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And if you need anything, just ask. That’s what we’re here for. ;)

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Come in soon and get to know us.

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Steel seahorse, Jennifer Lannes, diner since 1978

some traditions just keep getting richer. Located along the shores of La Jolla, the elegance and sophistication of your dining experience is matched only by the power and drama of the ocean just inches away. At The Marine Room, every meal is a special occasion. 858.459.7222

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110 LA JOLLA MUSIC SOCIETY SUMMERFEST


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We specialize in providing catering for all occasions serving the fresh, delicious, and finest cuisine our customers expect but with an extensive menu that surprises our regular Girard Gourmet customers. Add a special touch with birthday cakes, wedding cakes, one of a kind creations, and designer cookies.

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112 LA JOLLA MUSIC SOCIETY SUMMERFEST


2016 Summerfest Program Ad.pdf 1 06/01/2016 6:34:42 PM

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where is

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116 LA JOLLA MUSIC SOCIETY SUMMERFEST


Paul Hastings is Proud to suPPort la Jolla Music society

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Foundation

The ResMed Foundation is pleased to support your excellent programs in musical arts education. Board of Trustees Edward A. Dennis, PhD Chairman

Mary F. Berglund, PhD Treasurer

Peter C. Farrell, PhD, DSc Secretary

Charles G. Cochrane, MD Michael P. Coppola, MD Anthony DeMaria, MD Sir Neil Douglas, MD, DSc, FRCPE Klaus Schindhelm, BE PhD Jonathan Schwartz, MD Kristi Burlingame Executive Director

7514 Girard Avenue, Suite 1-343 La Jolla, CA, USA, 92037

118 LA JOLLA MUSIC SOCIETY SUMMERFEST

Tel 858-361-0755

ResMedFoundation.org


PROGRAM JUNE 2

SUNSET

POOLSIDE JAZZ SERIES

GILBERT CASTELLANOS HAMMOND B3 TRIO JUNE 9

GUY GONZALES TRIO JUNE 16

BESOS DE COCO

JUNE 23

Experience Southern California’s finest Jazz musicians against San Diego’s downtown skyline at sunset.

THURSDAYS 6:30 P.M - 9:30 P.M. | JUN 2-AUG 25 2016 ARTISTIC DRINKS | SAVORY APPETIZERS & TAPAS

CORAL MCFARLAND THUET JUNE 30

SACHA BOUTROS TRIO JULY 7

ROBERT DOVE QUARTET JULY 14

RUBY & HER TRIO JULY 21 No entertainment due to Comic Con JULY 28

CHARLIE ARBELAEZ QUARTET AUGUST 4

STEPH JOHNSON TRIO AUGUST 11

TRIO GADJO

AUGUST 18

HOLLY HOFMANN GROUP AUGUST 25

LEONARD PATTON & FRIENDS

.

     ,  

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120 LA JOLLA MUSIC SOCIETY SUMMERFEST


You’re music to our ears.

connected ••••• to the arts We applaud the La Jolla Music Society for their ongoing work that does so much to enrich our hearts and minds. As a sponsor of the arts, we’re strong believers in the power of self expression. And we proudly support those organizations that share our vision. Connect at sdge.com.

©2014 San Diego Gas & Electric Company. All copyright and trademark rights reserved. 1214

858.459.3728 • WWW.LJMS.ORG

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Enjoy a new dining experience complete with an expanded outdoor patio and lounge, custom-built wood-burning rotisserie, and re-imagined menu from Executive Chef Jeff Jackson.

LodgeTorreyPines.com | 858.777.6635 11480 North Torrey Pines Road | La Jolla, California 92037

122 LA JOLLA MUSIC SOCIETY SUMMERFEST


THE LOT La Jolla

TH E LOT is San Diego’s luxury cinema and dining destination. A high energy social hub for craft coffee, artisan pastries, elevated cuisine, premium spirits and sophisticated wines. THE LOT La Jolla, 7611 Fay Avenue, La Jolla, CA 92037 THE LOT Liberty Station, 2620 Truxtun Road, San Diego, CA 92106

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THE LOT Liberty Station

WHERE THE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAYS.

MOVIES/ RESTAURANT / BAR/CAFÉ

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123


SEASON 2016-17

OCTOBER

JA N UA RY

JAZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER ORCHESTRA WITH WYNTON MARSALIS

LOUIS LORTIE

Thursday, March 9, 2017 · 8 PM

Saturday, January 14, 2017 · 8 PM

Piano Series

Piano Series

MCASD Sherwood Auditorium

Jazz Series

MCASD Sherwood Auditorium

TAFELMUSIK BAROQUE ORCHESTRA

KRONOS QUARTET

Friday, March 10, 2017 · 8 PM

Revelle Chamber Music Series

MCASD Sherwood Auditorium

EDGAR MOREAU, cello

MALANDAIN BALLET BIARRITZ

Thursday, October 6, 2016 · 8 PM Balboa Theatre

BRAD MEHLDAU

Friday, January 20, 2017 · 8 PM

Revelle Chamber Music Series

Special Guests Roberto Fonseca, Anat Cohen & Regina Carter Friday, October 7, 2016 · 8 PM

MCASD Sherwood Auditorium

WINTERFEST GALA 2017

Balboa Theatre

The Auditorium at TSRI

From the Buena Vista Social Club:

OMARA PORTUONDO 85 TOUR

Jazz Series

TWYLA THARP DANCE

Saturday, October 22, 2016 · 8 PM Dance Series

Spreckels Theatre

RAPHAËL SÉVÈRE, clarinet

Sunday, October 30, 2016 · 3 PM Discovery Series

The Auditorium at TSRI

DECEMBER

Sunday, January 22, 2017 · 3 PM Discovery Series

Dance Series Civic Theatre

PRAGUE PHILHARMONIA

Emmanuel Villaume, music director Gautier Capuçon, cello Wednesday, January 25, 2017 · 8 PM Orchestra Series

Jacobs Music Center-Copley Symphony Hall

BRANFORD MARSALIS QUARTET

Piano Series

Balboa Theatre

CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

Jeff Edmons, music director & conductor Richard O’Neill, viola Friday, December 2, 2016 · 8 PM San Diego Youth Symphony Series MCASD Sherwood Auditorium

Jazz Series

Friday, March 31, 2017 · 8 PM Balboa Theatre

LEONIDAS KAVAKOS, violin & YUJA WANG, piano

APRIL

Special Event

Saturday, April 8, 2017 · 8 PM

Saturday, February 11, 2017 · 8 PM

BLACK GRACE

Balboa Theatre

Dance Series

Spreckels Theatre

BAMBERG SYMPHONY

Friday, December 9, 2016 · 8 PM MCASD Sherwood Auditorium

Jacobs Music Center-Copley Symphony Hall

Revelle Chamber Music Series

MAX RAABE & PALAST ORCHESTER Special Event

Christoph Eschenbach, conductor Ray Chen, violin Saturday, February 18, 2017 · 8 PM

TAKÁCS QUARTET

Fabio Luisi, conductor Deborah Voigt, soprano Thursday, March 30, 2017 · 8 PM Jacobs Music Center-Copley Symphony Hall

HÉLÈNE GRIMAUD

MCASD Sherwood Auditorium

DANISH NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Orchestra Series

FEBRUA RY

With Special Guest Kurt Elling Friday, February 10, 2017 · 8 PM

Thursday, December 1, 2016 · 8 PM

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST Saturday, March 18, 2017 · 8 PM

Orchestra Series

EMERSON STRING QUARTET

Saturday, April 22, 2017 · 7:30 PM Revelle Chamber Music Series La Jolla Presbyterian Church

NIKOLAY KHOZYAINOV, piano

THE UKULELE ORCHESTRA OF GREAT BRITAIN “HOLIDAY SHOW”

SEONG-JIN CHO, piano

Saturday, April 29, 2017 · 8 PM

Sunday, February 26, 2017 · 3 PM

Special Event

The Auditorium at TSRI

Special Event

Discovery Series

The Auditorium at TSRI

M AY

MARCH

JEREMY DENK

Friday, December 16, 2016 · 8 PM MCASD Sherwood Auditorium

THE UKULELE ORCHESTRA OF GREAT BRITAIN “HOLIDAY SHOW” Saturday, December 17, 2016 · 8 PM Special Event

MCASD Sherwood Auditorium

Friday, May 12, 2017 · 7:30 PM

CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

Jeff Edmons, music director & conductor Caroline Goulding, violin Friday, March 3, 2017 · 8 PM

Piano Series

La Jolla Presbyterian Church

San Diego Youth Symphony Series MCASD Sherwood Auditorium

All programs, artists, dates, times, and venues are subject to change. La Jolla Music Society is unable to offer refunds for SummerFest performances.

CAROLINE GOULDING, violin

Sunday, March 5, 2017 · 3 PM Discovery Series

The Auditorium at TSRI

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

858.459.3728 WWW.LJMS.ORG

TWYLA THARP DANCE

La Jolla Music Society SummerFest 2016 Program Book  
La Jolla Music Society SummerFest 2016 Program Book