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Home of

ANOUSHKA SHANKAR

APRIL-MAY


SEASON

IS DEDICATED TO

CONRAD PREBYS & DEBBIE TURNER

“Music is my connection with the sublime.” - Conrad Prebys Thank you Conrad Prebys and Debbie Turner for your extraordinary kindness and generosity. Conrad you are deeply missed. We could not be more humbled, proud and honored to know that your legacy will live on in The Conrad Prebys Performing Arts Center.

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Thank you for joining us in celebrating La Jolla Music Society’s new home, The Conrad Prebys Performing Arts Center, with 16 concerts featuring an incredible lineup of internationally acclaimed musicians and ensembles, all of whom are deeply connected to LJMS and to San Diego. Celebrate this homecoming with a range of genres, including dance, film, chamber music, jazz, orchestra, and world music.

JERUSALEM QUARTET

GARRICK OHLSSON: BRAHMS EXPLORATION I

Revelle Chamber Music Series

Piano Series

Tuesday, April 9, 2019 · 8 PM

Friday, May 3, 2019 · 8 PM

The Baker-Baum Concert Hall

The Baker-Baum Concert Hall

MIDORI & JEAN-YVES THIBAUDET

STORM LARGE & LE BONHEUR

Revelle Chamber Music Series

Special Event

Friday, April 12, 2019 · 8 PM The Baker-Baum Concert Hall

NPR'S FROM THE TOP

Saturday, April 13, 2019 · 6 PM

Special Event

The Baker-Baum Concert Hall

GEORGE LI

Sunday, April 14, 2019 · 3 PM Discovery Series

The Baker-Baum Concert Hall

DANIIL TRIFONOV

Wednesday, April 17, 2019 · 8 PM Piano Series

The Baker-Baum Concert Hall

Saturday, May 4, 2019 · 8 PM The Baker-Baum Concert Hall

THE TRIPLETS OF BELLEVILLE (CINE-CONCERT) BENOIT CHAREST, composer-conductor Thursday, May 9, 2019 · 8 PM Jazz Series

The Baker-Baum Concert Hall

DAVID FINCKEL & WU HAN Friday, May 10, 2019 · 8 PM

Revelle Chamber Music Series The Baker-Baum Concert Hall

STORM LARGE'S CRAZY ENOUGH Saturday, May 11, 2019 · 8 PM Sunday, May 12, 2019 · 3 PM

ANOUSHKA SHANKAR

Special Event

Special Event

RICHARD LIN & CHIH-YI CHEN

Thursday, April 18, 2019 · 8 PM The Baker-Baum Concert Hall

CHRIS THILE

Wednesday, April 24, 2019 · 8 PM

The Baker-Baum Concert Hall

Sunday, May 19, 2019 · 3 PM Discovery Series

The Baker-Baum Concert Hall

Special Event

The Baker-Baum Concert Hall

GIL SHAHAM & AKIRA EGUCHI Thursday, April 25, 2019 · 8 PM Revelle Chamber Music Series The Baker-Baum Concert Hall

SAN DIEGO SYMPHONY Friday, April 26, 2019 · 8 PM Special Event

The Baker-Baum Concert Hall

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We are grateful to our generous Founding Donors whose leadership and gifts have built The Conrad Prebys Performing Arts Center and we applaud their vision to enrich the quality of life for everyone in our community. Conrad Prebys and Debbie Turner The Conrad Prebys Foundation Brenda Baker and Steve Baum Joan and Irwin Jacobs Clara Wu and Joseph Tsai The Abello Family Sumi Adachi Erica Arbelaez Alexander Willis Allen John Amberg Sue Andreasen Arleene Antin and Leonard Ozerkis Abrahame and Debbie Artenstein Nancy Assaf Thomas Bache and Ann Kerr Marnie Barnhorst Rusti Bartell Christopher Beach and Wesley Fata Maurine Beinbrink Emily and Barry Berkov Holly Berman Edgar and Julie Berner Joan Jordan Bernstein Bjorn Bjerede and Jo Kiernan Barbara Bloom Helen Bloomfield Joye Blount and Jessie Knight, Jr. Robert and Virginia Black Joyce and Robert Blumberg Bill Boggs and Marilyn Huff Karen and Jim Brailean Benjamin Brand Gordon Brodfuehrer Wendy Brody Ellen Brown Sedgwick Browne Fay Bullitt Janice and Nelson Byrne Peter Cacioppo

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Raffaella and John Belanich Rita and Richard Atkinson The Beyster Family Brian and Silvija Devine Joy Frieman

Carol and Jim Carlisle Robert Caplan and Carol Randolph R. Park and Louise Carmon Lisa and David Casey Katherine and Dane Chapin Ric and Barbara Charlton Linda Chester and Kenneth Rind Bobbi Chifos Linda Christensen and Gonzalo Ballon-Landa Lee Clark Ashley Clark Jim and Patty Clark Ryan Clark Greg Clover and Kathleen Webber Charles and Monica Cochrane Sharon Cohen Karen and Don Cohn Peter Cooper in honor of Norman Blachford Valerie and Harry Cooper Julie and Bert Cornelison Hugh Coughlin Ruth Covell Elaine and Dave Darwin Una Davis Family Doug Dawson Mr. and Mrs. Richard Dean Ted DeDee and Pamela Hinchman Caroline DeMar Tallie and George Dennis Martha and Ed Dennis Linda and Rick Dicker Brian and Susan Douglass The Dow Divas Sue H. Dramm

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Peggy and Peter Preuss Noni and Drew Senyei Debbie Turner

Robert and Ann Parode Dynes Barbara and Dick Enberg Jennifer and Kurt Eve John and Linda Falconer Thompson and Jane Fetter Elliot and Diane Feuerstein Monica Fimbres Socorro Fimbres Teresa and Dr. Merle Fischlowitz Wain and Debbie Fishburn Elisabeth Eisner Forbes and Brian Forbes David Fox Jorgina Franzheim Barbara Freeman Brandon and Paula Freeman Paul and Claire Friedman Ronald Friedman Georges & Germaine Fusenot Charity Foundation Tom Gable Ira Gaines and Cheryl J. Hintzen-Gaines Elaine Galinson and Herbert Solomon Susan Galluccio Sarah and Michael Garrison Ferdinand Marcus Gasang Clyde Gillespie Dawn Gilman Peggy and Buzz Gitelson Lisa Braun Glazer and Jeff Glazer Tom Gleich in memory of Martin and Enid Gleich Lehn and Richard Goetz Brenda and Michael Goldbaum Lee and Frank Goldberg


THANK YOU! Grande Colonial Clyde Gonzales Jennifer and Richard Greenfield Ronald and Deborah Greenspan Carol Lynne Grossman Margaret Stevens Grossman and Michael Grossman David Guss Teresa Haas Helga Halsey Judith Harris and Robert Singer George Hauer / George’s at the Cove Bo Hedfors Nancy Heitel Edvard and Barbara Hemmingsen Dr. Jeanne Herberger in loving memory of Gary Kierland Herberger Kay and John Hesselink Nellie High Paul and Barbara Hirshman Sue Hodges Susan and Bill Hoehn Alan Hofmann Mark Holmlund Vivian and Greg Hook Eliot Horowitz in honor of Carol Fink Liz and Robert Jackson Linda and Edward Janon Theresa Jarvis Arthur Q. Johnson Foundation Sheila Johnson Wilbur Johnson Jeanne Jones and Don Breitenberg Patricia and Lewis Judd Michael and Nancy Kaehr Linda Kanan Sofia Kassel Nan and Buzz Kaufman Dwight Kellogg Richard and Ruth Kelly Lynda Kerr Karen and Warren Kessler Katherine Killgore and Glen Bourgeois Helen and Keith Kim Jenelle Kim Carrie Kirtz

David Kitto and Aristides Gonzales Angelina and Fredrick Kleinbub James Kralik and Yunli Lou Jane Kolar La Jolla Beach & Tennis Club La Valencia Hotel Carol Lam and Mark Burnett Bill and Sallie Larsen Las Patronas The LeCourt Family Sharon LeeMaster Teddie Lewis Vivian Lim and Joseph Wong Lawrence Lindberg and Marilyn Adler Lindberg Sheila and Jeffrey Lipinsky Ann and Gerald Lipschitz in honor of Selma Malk Norman and Mayumi Lizt Terri Lundberg Kathleen and Ken Lundgren Mary Keough Lyman Sue and John Major Brian Malk in honor of Selma Malk Linda and Michael Mann Patsy and David Marino Betty and James Martin Michel Mathieu and Richard MacDonald Dennis A. McConnell and Kimberly A. Kassner Matt McCormick in memory of Joel McCormick Margaret McKeown and Peter Cowhey Dan McLeod Virginia Meyer Betsy Mitchell Hans and Ursula Moede Daphne Nan Muchnic Bridget Musante Esther Nahama Arlene and Lou Navias The Nelson Family Paula Noell Robin and Hank Nordhoff Janet and John Nunn Virginia Oliver John and Nancy O'Neal Neil Osborne Pacific Sotheby's Real Estate

Renee Levine Packer Catherine and Bob Palmer Rafael and Marina Pastor Pamela Peck in honor of the Peck Pugh Family Dan Pearl in memory of Julius Pearl Marty and David Pendarvis Rachel Perlmutter in memory of Marion and Lester Perlmutter Betty Jo Petersen Ursula Pfeffer Phyllis and Stephen Pfeiffer William Pitts and Mary Sophos Gary Poon Ellen Potter and Ronald Evans William Propp and Anna Covici The ProtoStar Foundation Robert Bob and Joyce Quade The Klaus Radelow Family Evelyn and Ernest Rady Sylvia and Steven RĂŠ Catherine and Jean Rivier Jeannie and Arthur Rivkin Jessica and Eberhard Rohm Stacy and Don Rosenberg Colette Carson Royston and Ivor Royston Noel Rufo David and Mary Ruyle Leigh P. Ryan Rita Ryu in memory of Sam Ryu Arlene and Peter Sacks Eric and Jane Sagerman Julie and Jay Sarno Eric Sasso Sheryl and Bob Scarano Adrienne and Richard Schere Jay and Torrie Schiller Clifford Schireson and John Venekamp Marge and Neal Schmale Marilies Schoepflin in honor of Axel Schoepflin Emily and Tim Scott Patricia Shank Maureen and Thomas Shiftan Gigi and Joseph Shurman Karen and Christopher Sickels continued on the next page

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ANNIVERSARY SEASON 2018-19 |

C o m i n g H o m e F E S T I VA L 5


THANK YOU!

Rob Sidner Simon | Krichman Family Ethna Sinisi Rodney and Dolores Smith Rewa Colette Soltan Alan and Beverly Springer Martin Stein Jeanette Stevens Iris and Matthew Strauss Elizabeth Taft Michael Takamura Haeyoung Kong Tang William Tong Shannon Turner

Susan and Richard Ulevitch N.B. Varlotta Yvonne Vaucher Sue and Peter Wagener Richard H. Walker Bill and Lori Walton Nell Waltz Margie Warner and John H. Warner, Jr. Maureen and Dean Weber Cathy and John Weil Abby and Ray Weiss Linda and Steve Wendfeldt Doug and Jane Wheeler Sheryl and Harvey White

Suhaila White Lisa Widmier Joan and Howard Wiener Faye Wilson Joseph and Mary Witztum Dolly and Victor Woo Katrina Wu Anna and Edward Yeung Carolyn Yorston-Wellcome and Bard Wellcome Howard and Christy Zatkin Barbara and Michael Zelnick Bebe and Marvin Zigman Anonymous Listing as of March 11, 2019

We have so much to celebrate today, but just think of where we might be 50 years from now? There are creative endeavors yet to be imagined: young musicians now in training who could defy our highest expectations; and scores of young students that could be introduced to the joy of music for the first time. An endowment makes that possible. Please join us in ensuring that The Conrad, a cultural and community treasure, remains a vital resource to our generation and all those to follow. Make a gift today by contacting: Ferdinand Gasang, Director of Development, at 858.459.3724, ext. 204 or FGasang@LJMS.org. You can also make a gift online at www.LJMS.org.

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For 50 years, La Jolla Music Society has helped nurture a love of music by keeping one vision in mind: To present diverse programs of great music performed by the best musicians in the world. Today, that vision has reached beyond the intimate beauty of the chamber music ensemble and into new and diverse offerings such as orchestras, jazz ensembles, dance companies, and robust education programs. This impressive growth has been carefully conducted by an active and highly committed volunteer board of directors and a dedicated staff. But most importantly, La Jolla Music Society’s progress has been sustained by the generosity of the community and ticket buyers. We hope you, too, will join the La Jolla Music Society family and help present unforgettable performances in the concert hall, the classroom, and community spaces. Your financial support will enable LJMS to build on a long history of artistic excellence and community engagement. Through your patronage, you are setting the tone for the future. Your participation is critical to the success of our 50th Anniversary and for 50 more years to come.

JOIN OUR FAMILY LJMS.org/donate You can also speak to our Development Team at 858.459.3724, ext. 216 to make a gift.

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C o m i n g H o m e F E S T I VA L 7


Dear Friends of La Jolla Music Society: You are personally witness to a new era in the cultural life of San Diego. I am so honored to join you as we celebrate together two historic occasions— the La Jolla Music Society’s 50th Anniversary and the opening of the new Conrad Prebys Performing Arts Center – all situated at the center of the San Diego community, which has welcomed and sustained LJMS since its inception in 1969. The opening of The Conrad—as it is already known both in San Diego and among the many great artists who will come to San Diego to perform during its opening weeks—marks the end of one journey and the beginning of another in which LJMS will take arts presenting in Southern California to a new level of quality and technical execution. Many of those spectacular performers—among them, violinists Gil Shaham and Midori, pianists Daniil Trifonov and Garrick Ohlsson, former SummerFest artistic directors cellist David Finckel and pianist Wu Han—have been partners on our journey already. On April 9th, the famed Jerusalem Quartet will present the first of the remaining 2018-19 concert series. Others—such as mandolin virtuoso Chris Thile, pianist George Li, sitarist Anousha Shankar, vocalist Storm Large and her ensemble Le Bonheur and Indianapolis Violin Competition winner Richard Lin—will be joining us for the first time as we set out to make the next fifty years even more outstanding than the preceding fifty. For the remainder of April and on into May, we will present an array of performances that celebrate the Society’s remarkable growth over five decades, its dedication from the very beginning to present the world’s most renowned artists in chamber music, symphonic ensembles, dance, and the great artists of popular song and jazz. In August, our annual—and internationally-acclaimed—chamber music festival, SummerFest, will welcome a new Music Director, as pianist Inon Barnatan launches a series of wideranging and ground-breaking presentations that will take SummerFest in new directions and celebrate that amazing arts form’s continuing relevance and impact on contemporary culture. LJMS has reached this significant inflection point in its existence thanks to supporters who were and are generous donors. I also want to personally thank David Kitto, LJMS’s Director of Marketing and Interim President for laying the groundwork and leading an outstanding staff for The Conrad’s opening before my arrival. Thank you for your support of the La Jolla Music Society and for being here for this performance. I look forward to personally welcoming you to all the programs we have planned for you in The Conrad and throughout San Diego in the coming years.

Ted DeDee President/CEO

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BOARD OF DIRECTORS · 2018-19

STAFF

Katherine Chapin – Chair Rafael Pastor – Vice Chair H. Peter Wagener – Treasurer Jennifer Eve – Secretary

Ted DeDee – President/CEO Inon Barnatan – SummerFest Music Director David J. Kitto – Consultant

Stephen Baum Gordon Brodfuehrer Wendy Brody Ric Charlton Linda Chester Sharon Cohen Brian Douglass Debby Fishburn Stephen Gamp Lehn Goetz Susan Hoehn Lynelle Lynch Sue Major Robin Nordhoff HONORARY DIRECTORS Brenda Baker Stephen Baum Joy Frieman, Ph.D. Irwin M. Jacobs Joan K. Jacobs Lois Kohn (1924-2010) Helene K. Kruger Conrad Prebys (1933-2016) Ellen Revelle (1910-2009) Leigh P. Ryan, Esq.

LA JOLLA MUSIC SOCIETY at THE CONRAD 7600 Fay Ave. La Jolla, California 92037 Admin: 858.459.3724 | Fax: 858.459.3727

Peggy Preuss Sylvia Ré Donald J. Rosenberg Sheryl Scarano Clifford Schireson Marge Schmale Maureen Shiftan Jeanette Stevens Haeyoung Kong Tang Debra Turner Lisa Widmier Clara Wu Katrina Wu Bebe L. Zigman

ADMINISTRATION Chris Benavides – Director of Finance Debra Palmer – Executive Assistant and Board Liaison Kate Medley – Administrative Assistant PROGRAMMING Leah Rosenthal – Director of Programming Allison Boles – Education and Community Programming Manager Sarah Campbell – Programming Coordinator Brady Stender – Programming Assistant/Administrative Assistant John Tessmer– Artist Liaison Eric Bromberger – Program Annotator Serafin Paredes – Community Music Center Director Xiomara Pastenes – Community Music Center Administrative Assistant Community Music Center Instructors: Noila Carrazana, Marcus Cortez, Armando Hernandez, Cesar Martinez, Michelle Maynard, Eduardo Ruiz, Rebeca Tamez DEVELOPMENT Ferdinand Gasang – Director of Development Rewa Colette Soltan – Business Development and Event Manager Landon Akiyama – Development Coordinator Maureen Weber – Special Events Coordinator MARKETING & TICKET SERVICES Hilary Huffman – Marketing Manager Hayley Woldseth – Marketing and Communications Project Manager Jediah McCourt – Marketing Coordinator Angelina Franco – Graphic and Web Designer Jorena de Pedro – Ticket Services Manager Shannon Haider – Ticket Services Assistant Janine Ponce – Ticket Services Representative Arik Lemon – Ticket Services Representative Shaun Davis – House Manager THE CONRAD PREBYS PERFORMING ARTS CENTER Travis Wininger – Director of Theatre Operations Leighann Enos – Production Manager Scott Amiotte – Technical Director Anthony LeCourt – Events Manager Josh Lemmerman – Facility Manager Jonnel Domilos – Piano Technician Erica Poole – Page Turner LEGAL COUNSEL Paul Hastings LLP AUDITOR Leaf & Cole, LLP

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C o m i n g H o m e F E S T I VA L 9


Come Celebrate Education and Community Programming at The Conrad! Community Arts Open House Saturday, April 27th, 2019 · 2 PM – 6:30 PM The Conrad Prebys Performing Arts Center

La Jolla Music Society is opening our doors for a free, family-friendly open house event showcasing the talents of some of our Education and Community Partners.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS CALENDAR

3

LA JOLLA MUSIC SOCIETY BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND STAFF

9

GRAND OPENING WEEKEND

12

JERUSALEM QUARTET

14

MIDORI & JEAN-YVES THIBAUDET

18

NPR'S FROM THE TOP

22

GEORGE LI

24

DANIIL TRIFONOV

28

ANOUSHKA SHANKAR

32

CHRIS THILE

33

GIL SHAHAM & AKIRA EGUCHI

34

SAN DIEGO SYMPHONY

39

GARRICK OHLSSON: BRAHMS EXPLORATION I

42

STORM LARGE & LE BOHNEUR

46

THE TRIPLETS OF BELLEVILLE

47

DAVID FINCKEL & WU HAN

48

STORM LARGE'S CRAZY ENOUGH

52

RICHARD LIN & CHIH-YI CHEN

53

ARTIST BIOGRAPHIES

58

SUPPORT

67

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FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 2019 · 8 PM THE BAKER-BAUM CONCERT HALL

J.S. BACH Selection of Partitas (1685-1750) Hilary Hahn, violin

Debbie Turner, Jubilee Chair

SCHUBERT Ave Maria (arr. for ukulele) (1797-1828)

MERCURY Bohemian Rhapsody (arr. by Jake Shimabukuro) (1946-1991) Jake Shimabukuro, ukulele SAINT-SAËNS The Swan from Carnival of the Animals (1835-1921) Lil Buck, dancer; Joshua Gindele, cello; Inon Barnatan, piano PROKOFIEV Precipitato from Piano Sonata No. 7 in B-flat Major, Opus 83 (1891-1953) Inon Barnatan, piano BRAHMS Rondo alla Zingarese from Piano Quartet No. 1 in G Minor, Opus 25 (1833-1897) Cho-Liang Lin, violin; Heiichiro Ohyama, viola; David Finckel, cello; Wu Han, piano LALO SCHIFRIN Letters to My Father WORLD PREMIÈRE (b. 1932) Cho-Liang Lin, violin; Osman Koç, creative technologist CHOPIN Nocturne in E-flat Major, Opus 9, No.2 (1810-1849) LISZT Consolation No. 3, S.172 (1811-1886) Jean-Yves Thibaudet, piano STRAVINSKY Danse Russe from Petrushka (1882-1971) Lil Buck, dancer; Inon Barnatan, piano HARRISON While My Guitar Gently Weeps (arr. by Jake Shimabukuro) (1943-2001) Jake Shimabukuro, ukulele; William Fedkenheuer, violin MENDELSSOHN Allegro moderato ma con fuoco from Octet for Strings in E-flat Major, Opus 20 (1809-1847) Cho-Liang Lin, Hilary Hahn, violins; Heiichiro Ohyama, viola; David Finckel, cello; Miró Quartet Daniel Ching, William Fedkenheuer, violins; John Largess, viola; Joshua Gindele, cello ARLEN/HARBURG Over the Rainbow (arr. by Ryan Beard) (1905-1986) Jake Shimabukuro, ukulele; Hilary Hahn, Cho-Liang Lin, violins; Miró Quartet; (1896-1981) Students from La Jolla Music Society’s Community Music Center; San Diego Youth Symphony Chamber Orchestra; Bravo! International Music Academy

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Grand Opening Weekend SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2019 · 8 PM THE BAKER-BAUM CONCERT HALL

Seal

Sheryl Scarano, Jubilee Chair

SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2019 · 8 PM THE JAI

Susan Hoehn, Jubilee Chair

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PRELUDE 7 PM

The Beginning of the End Lecture by Michael Gerdes Tonight’s performance features string quartets that represent the beginning of the end in these composers’ output. Haydn’s Opus 76 are the very last complete series he ever composed. Beethoven’s Opus 127 is the first of the incredible collection known as the late quartets, and Debussy’s String Quartet in G Minor was the only piece he ever completed in this genre. As you listen, delve deeply into the way these brilliant composers manipulated form and expectation to craft some of the most influential string quartets ever written.

JERUSALEM QUARTET TUESDAY, APRIL 9, 2019 · 8 PM THE BAKER-BAUM CONCERT HALL

HAYDN String Quartet in G Major, Opus 76, No. 1 (1732-1809) Allegro con spirito Adagio sostenuto Menuetto: Presto Allegro ma non troppo DEBUSSY String Quartet in G Minor (1862-1918) Animé et très décidé Scherzo: Assez vif et bien rythmé Andantino doucement expressif Très modéré; Très mouvementé; Très animé I N T E R M I S S I O N

La Jolla Music Society’s 50th Anniversary Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, National Endowment for the Arts, Banc of California, Vail Memorial Fund, Thomas C. Ackerman Foundation, David C. Copley Foundation, D’Addario Foundation, ProtoStar Foundation, ResMed Foundation, Bright Event Rentals, US Bank, The Dow Divas, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, La Valencia Hotel, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, Joy Frieman, Brian and Silvija Devine, Gordon Brodfuehrer, Jeanette Stevens, Bebe and Marvin Zigman, and an anonymous donor.

Artists’ Manager: David Rowe Artists

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BEETHOVEN String Quartet in E-flat Major, Opus 127 (1770-1827) Maestoso; Allegro Adagio, ma non troppo e molto cantabile Scherzando vivace Finale Jerusalem Quartet Alexander Pavlovsky, Sergei Bresler, violins; Ori Kam, viola; Kyril Zlotnikov, cello

Jerusalem Quartet last performed for La Jolla Music Society in the Revelle Chamber Music Series on February 21, 2015.

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JERUSALEM QUARTET - PROGRAM NOTES

Program notes by Eric Bromberger

String Quartet in G Minor

CLAUDE DEBUSSY

String Quartet in G Major, Opus 76, No. 1

FRANZ JOSEPH HAYDN

Born August 22, 1862, Saint Germain-en-Laye, France Died March 25, 1918, Paris Composed: 1893 Approximate Duration: 27 minutes

Born March 31, 1732, Rohrau, Austria Died May 31, 1809, Vienna Composed: 1796-97 Approximate Duration: 20 minutes

Haydn composed the six string quartets of his Opus 76 in 1796-97, very near the end of the sequence of his 83 quartets. These quartets, in fact, come near the end of all Haydn’s purely instrumental music. In 1795 he had returned to Vienna from his second extended (and triumphant) stay in London. He was 63, he had written his final symphony, and he would soon turn exclusively to vocal music—Haydn was already working on his oratorio The Creation when he completed the Opus 76 quartets. It should come as no surprise, then, that these quartets come from a master of the form at the zenith of his powers. The Opus 76 quartets were commissioned by the Hungarian nobleman Count Joseph Erdödy, and Haydn dedicated the set to him. Several of these quartets have nicknames (the set includes the “Emperor,” “Fifths,” and “Sunrise” Quartets), but the agreeable first quartet of the set does not. Its Allegro con spirito opens with three bright chords, and viola and cello in turn sing the long, lyric opening line; only when they have completed the melody are the violins allowed to take up the theme themselves. This sonata-form movement, full of gloriously graceful writing for the four instruments, features some unusual canonic writing in the recapitulation. The Adagio sostenuto, a moving slow movement that looks ahead to the slow movements of Beethoven (who would publish his first quartets only two years after these appeared), offers distinctive cadenza-like passages for the first violin in its closing pages. The third movement is marked Presto, and scholars have debated whether this movement is still in the traditional minuet-and-trio form or whether it is actually a scherzo that anticipates Beethoven’s scherzos. The outer sections have a one-to-the-bar pulse that suggests that the movement is a scherzo, while the trio’s more stately tread seems to look back to earlier uses of the form. A remarkable feature of the movement is Haydn’s use of sudden and powerful accents, which almost explode out of the music. Here, certainly, is where a kinship with Beethoven is most strongly felt. The Allegro ma non troppo finale brings a surprise, for it opens solemnly in G minor. The music then moves through a complicated harmonic progression to radiant G major, and a movement that had begun so darkly sails along to an almost bubbly conclusion.

Early in 1893 Debussy met the famed Belgian violinist Eugene Ysaÿe. Debussy was at this time almost unknown (Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun was still a year in the future), but he and Ysaÿe instantly became friends—though Ysaÿe was only four years older than Debussy, he treated the diminutive Frenchman like “his little brother.” That summer Debussy composed a string quartet for Ysaÿe’s quartet, which gave the first performance in Paris on December 29, 1893. Debussy was already notorious with his teachers for his refusal to follow musical custom, and so it comes as a surprise to find him choosing to write in this most demanding of classical forms. Early audiences were baffled. Reviewers used words like “fantastic” and “oriental,” and Debussy’s friend Ernest Chausson confessed mystification. Debussy must have felt the sting of these reactions, for he promised Chausson: “Well, I’ll write another for you…and I’ll try to bring more dignity to the form.” But Debussy did not write another string quartet, and his Quartet in G Minor has become one of the cornerstones of the quartet literature. The entire quartet grows directly out of its first theme, presented at the very opening, and this sharply rhythmic figure reappears in various shapes in all four movements, taking on a different character, a different color, and a different harmony on each reappearance. What struck early audiences as “fantastic” now seems an utterly original conception of what a string quartet might be. Here is a combination of energy, drama, thematic imagination, and attention to color never heard before in a string quartet. Debussy may have felt pushed to apologize for a lack of “dignity” in this music, but we value it today just for that failure. Those who think of Debussy as the composer of misty impressionism are in for a shock with his quartet, for it has the most slashing, powerful opening Debussy ever wrote: his marking for the beginning is “Animated and very resolute.” This first theme, with its characteristic triplet spring, is the backbone of the entire quartet: the singing second theme grows directly out of this opening (though the third introduces new material). The development is marked by powerful accents, long crescendos, and shimmering colors as this movement drives to an unrelenting close in G minor. The Scherzo may well be the quartet’s most impressive movement. Against powerful pizzicato chords, Debussy sets

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JERUSALEM QUARTET - PROGRAM NOTES

the viola’s bowed theme, a transformation of the quartet’s opening figure; soon this is leaping between all four voices. The recapitulation of this movement, in 15/8 and played entirely pizzicato, bristles with rhythmic energy, and the music then fades away to a beautifully understated close. Debussy marks the third movement “Gently expressive,” and this quiet music is so effective that it is sometimes used as an encore piece. It is in ABA form: the opening section is muted, while the more animated middle is played without mutes— the quartet’s opening theme reappears subtly in this middle section. Debussy marks the ending, again played with mutes, “As quiet as possible.” The finale begins slowly but gradually accelerates to the main tempo, “Very lively and with passion.” As this music proceeds, the quartet’s opening theme begins to appear in a variety of forms: first in a misty, distant statement marked “soft and expressive,” then gradually louder and louder until it returns in all its fiery energy, stamped out in double-stops by the entire quartet. A propulsive coda drives to the close, where the first violin flashes upward across three octaves to strike the powerful G major chord that concludes this most undignified—and most wonderful—piece of music.

String Quartet in E-flat Major, Opus 127

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Born December 16, 1770, Bonn Died March 26, 1827, Vienna Composed: 1824-25 Approximate Duration: 39 minutes

When Russian prince Nikolas Galitzin wrote to Beethoven in the fall of 1822 to commission three string quartets, his request met a sympathetic response: the composer had been thinking about writing string quartets for some time and promised to have the first done within a month or two. After seven years of intermittent activity he had resumed sustained composing in 1820 with a set of three piano sonatas, but other projects now intervened, and despite the prince’s frequent inquiries Beethoven had to complete the Missa Solemnis, Diabelli Variations, and Ninth Symphony before he could begin work on the first of the three quartets in the summer of 1824. This quartet—in E-flat major—was not complete until February 1825. Performed immediately by the string quartet of Ignaz Schuppanzigh, the music was a failure at its premiere on March 6, 1825. Furious, Beethoven quickly had it rehearsed and performed by a quartet led by Joseph Böhm. The composer attended their rehearsals and supervised their interpretation (though deaf, he could follow their performance by watching the movement of their bows).

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The second performance was successful, and this quartet was performed publicly at least ten more times in 1825—an extraordinary number of performances for a new work—and always to great acclaim. That fact is important because it undercuts the notion that Beethoven’s late quartets were far ahead of their time. Certain features of the late quartets did defy quick comprehension, but this was not true of the Quartet in E-flat Major. At first glance, this is the most traditional of Beethoven’s late quartets. It has a relatively straightforward structure: a sonata-form first movement, a variation-form slow movement, a scherzo in ABA form, and a dance-finale. But to reduce this music to such simplicity is to miss the extraordinary originality beneath its appealing and gentle surface. In the first movement, Beethoven seems to set out intentionally to blur the outlines of traditional sonata form, which depends on the opposition of material. Contrast certainly seems to be implied at the beginning, which opens with a firm chordal Maestoso, but this Maestoso quickly melts into the flowing and simple main theme, marked Allegro (Beethoven further specifies that he wants this melody performed teneramente—“tenderly”—and sempre piano e dolce). The powerful Maestoso returns twice more, each time in a different key, and then drops out of the movement altogether; Beethoven builds the movement almost exclusively out of the opening melody and an equallygentle second subject. Here is a sonata-form movement that does not drive to a powerful climax but instead remains understated throughout: the movement evaporates on a wisp of the opening Allegro theme. Two softly-pulsing measures lead to the main theme of the Adagio, a gently-rocking and serene melody introduced by the first violin and repeated by the cello. There follow six melodic variations, each growing organically out of the previous one until the music achieves a kind of rhapsodic calm—and the original theme has been left far behind. Four sharp pizzicato chords introduce the scherzo, and these four chords then vanish, never to re-appear. The fugue-like opening section, built on a dotted figure and its inversion, leads to a brief—and utterly different—trio section. In E-flat minor, this trio whips past in a blistering blur: Beethoven’s phrase markings here stretch over twenty measures at a time. Beethoven brings back the opening section, then offers a surprise at the ending by including a quick reminiscence of the trio just before the cadence. The last movement has proven the most difficult for commentators, perhaps because of its apparent simplicity. Marked only Finale (there is no tempo indication), it opens with a four-measure introduction that launches off in the wrong direction before the true main theme appears in

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the first violin. Of rustic simplicity, this melody has been compared to a country-dance, and the second theme—a jaunty march-tune decorated with grace notes—preserves that atmosphere. The tunes may be innocent, but Beethoven’s treatment of them in this sonata-form movement is quite sophisticated, particularly in matters of modulation and harmony. The ending is particularly striking. At the coda Beethoven rebars the music in 6/8, moves to C major, and speeds ahead on violin trills, chains of triplets, and shimmering textures. The very end, back in E-flat major, is calm, resounding—and perfect.

We hope you’ll DIG DEEPER INTO THE MUSIC by exploring our Education and Community Programming activities! We offer pre-concert lectures and interviews, master classes and workshops with artists, and so much more. For more information please visit: LJMS.org/Free-Events

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PRELUDE 7 PM

The Sonata for Violin and Piano in Four Acts Lecture by Kristi Brown Montesano We will explore four very different “takes” on a favorite pairing of the chamber-music repertoire: violin and piano. Spanning nearly 70 years, the sonatas by Schumann, Fauré, Debussy, and Enescu move the listener through a fascinating stylistic history, from the language of German Romanticism to French Neo-classicism and Impressionism and finally to Enescu’s interwar sonata “in the Romanian folk style.”

MIDORI & JEAN-YVES THIBAUDET FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2019 · 8 PM THE BAKER-BAUM CONCERT HALL

SCHUMANN Violin Sonata No. 1 in A Minor, Opus 105 (1810-1856) Mit leidenschaftlichem Ausdruck Allegretto Lebhaft FAURÉ Violin Sonata No. 1 in A Major, Opus 13 (1845-1924) Allegro molto Andante Allegro vivo Allegro quasi presto I N T E R M I S S I O N

La Jolla Music Society’s 50th Anniversary Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, National Endowment for the Arts, Banc of California, Vail Memorial Fund, Thomas C. Ackerman Foundation, David C. Copley Foundation, D’Addario Foundation, ProtoStar Foundation, ResMed Foundation, Bright Event Rentals, US Bank, The Dow Divas, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, La Valencia Hotel, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, Joy Frieman, Brian and Silvija Devine, Gordon Brodfuehrer, Jeanette Stevens, Bebe and Marvin Zigman, and an anonymous donor.

http://www.jeanyvesthibaudet.com/ Mr. Thibaudet’s worldwide representation: HarrisonParrott Mr. Thibaudet records exclusively for Decca Records

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DEBUSSY Sonata for Violin and Piano in G Minor (1862-1918) Allegro vivo Intermède: Fantasque et léger Finale: Très animé ENESCU Violin Sonata No. 3 in A Minor, Opus 25 (1881-1955) Moderato malinconio Andante sostenuto Allegro con brio, ma non troppo mosso Midori, violin; Jean-Yves Thibaudet, piano

Midori last performed for La Jolla Music Society in the Celebrity Recital Series on April 25, 2014. Jean-Yves Thibaudet last performed for La Jolla Music Society in the Grand Opening Weekend on April 5, 2019.

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Program notes by Eric Bromberger

and an exposition repeat. This movement shows subtle points of contact with the first movement that run beyond their joint key of A minor and impassioned mood: the rhythm of the sonata’s opening theme underlies much of the finale, and near the close that theme actually makes a fleeting appearance. But the finale’s forceful main subject quickly shoulders this aside and drives the sonata to an almost superheated close.

Violin Sonata No. 1 in A Minor, Opus 105

ROBERT SCHUMANN Born June 8, 1810, Zwickau, Germany Died July 29, 1856, Endenich, Germany Composed: 1851 Approximate Duration: 18 minutes

Schumann’s relation with the violin was never wholly comfortable. A pianist himself, Schumann found the prospect of writing for stringed instruments intimidating, and he appears to have been threatened most of all by the violin— he wrote a number of pieces of chamber music for viola and for cello before he was finally willing to face writing for the violin. Then that music came in a rush—during the final years of his brief creative career Schumann wrote three violin sonatas, a violin concerto, and a fantasy for violin and orchestra. The Violin Sonata in A Minor was the first of these. Schumann composed it very quickly—between September 12 and 16, 1851—during a period of personal stress. The previous year he had become music director for the city of Düsseldorf, and by the time he wrote this sonata his tenure there had already become mired in clashes with local authorities and in his own suspicions of plots against him. Schumann himself reported that when he wrote this sonata, he was “very angry with certain people,” though the music should not be understood as a personal reaction to artistic squabbles. Instead, Schumann’s first engagement with the violin produced a compact sonata in classical forms. The sonata is in three movements that offer Schumann’s customary mixture of German and Italian performance markings. The opening Mit leidenschaftlichem Ausdruck (“With passionate expression”) bursts to life with the violin’s forceful, surging main idea over the piano’s shimmer of constant sixteenths. This busy motion is punctuated by great swooping flourishes that lead to gentle secondary material; it is the opening theme, however, that dominates the development, and Schumann rounds off the movement with a lengthy coda that drives to a dramatic close. Relief arrives in the central Allegretto, which treats the violin’s innocent opening melody in rondo form. Tempos fluctuate throughout, with the music pulsing ahead, then reining back; some of these episodes become animated before the movement winks out on two pizzicato strokes. Marked Lebhaft (“Lively”), the finale returns to the tonality and mood of the opening movement. The violin’s steady rush of sixteenths makes this feel at first like a perpetual-motion movement, but it is in fact another sonataform movement, complete with a jaunty little secondary tune

Violin Sonata No. 1 in A Major, Opus 13

GABRIEL FAURÉ Born May 13, 1845, Pamiers, France Died November 4, 1924, Paris Composed: 1876 Approximate Duration: 20 minutes

One of Fauré’s students, the composer Florent Schmitt, described his teacher as an “unintentional, unwitting revolutionary.” The term “revolutionary” hardly seems to apply to a composer best-known for his gentle Requiem, songs, and chamber works. But while Fauré was no heavenstorming radical bent on undoing the past, his seeminglyquiet music reveals enough rhythmic, harmonic, and melodic surprises to justify Schmitt’s claim. The Violin Sonata in A Major, written in the summer of 1876 while Fauré was vacationing in Normandy, is dedicated to his friend, the violinist Paul Viardot. Following its first performance, the sonata was praised by Fauré’s teacher Saint-Saëns for its “formal novelty, quest, refinement of modulation, curious sonorities, use of the most unexpected rhythms…charm [and]…the most unexpected touches of boldness.” This is strong praise, but close examination of the sonata shows that Saint-Saëns was right. One of the most interesting features of the opening Allegro molto occurs in the accompaniment, which is awash in a constant flow of eighth-notes. The first theme appears immediately in the piano, and already that instrument is weaving the filigree of accompanying eighth-notes that will shimmer throughout this movement: one of the challenges for performers is to provide tonal variety within this continual rustle of sound. The movement is in sonata form, and the descending second theme, introduced by the violin, is accompanied by a murmur of triplets from the piano. The movement concludes on a fiery restatement of the opening theme. Distinguishing the Andante is its rhythmic pulse: a 9/8 meter throbs throughout the movement, though Fauré varies its effect by syncopating the accents within the measure. The third movement, a scherzo marked Allegro vivo, goes like a rocket. Fauré chooses not the expected triple meter of the traditional scherzo but a time signature of 2/8, an extremely short rhythmic unit, particularly when his metronome

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marking asks for 152 quarter-notes per minute. He further complicates the rhythm by writing in quite short phrases, so that the effect is of short phrases rapidly spit out, then syncopated by sharp off-beats. A lovely, graceful trio gives way to the opening material, and the movement suddenly vanishes in a shower of pizzicato notes. The tempo marking for the finale—Allegro quasi presto—seems to suggest a movement similar to the third, but despite its rapid tempo the last movement flows easily and majestically. Or at least it seems to, for here Fauré complicates matters harmonically. The piano opens in the home key of A major—but the violin seems always to prefer that key’s relative minor, F-sharp minor, and the resulting harmonic uncertainty continues throughout the movement until the sonata ends in unequivocal A major. To emphasize this sonata’s originality may have the unhappy effect of making the music sound cerebral, interesting only for its technical novelty. That is hardly the case. Fauré’s Sonata in A Major is one of the loveliest violin sonatas of the late nineteenth century, full of melodic, graceful, and haunting music.

Sonata for Violin and Piano in G Minor

CLAUDE DEBUSSY

Born August 22, 1862, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France Died March 25, 1918, Paris Composed: 1917 Approximate Duration: 14 minutes

Debussy’s final years were wretched. He developed colon cancer in 1909 and underwent a painful operation, radiation therapy, and drug treatment. It was all to no avail, and the disease took its steady course. The onslaught of World War I in 1914 further depressed him, but it also sparked a wave of nationalistic fervor, and he set about writing a set of six sonatas for different combinations of instruments. It may seem strange that the iconoclastic Debussy would return in his final years to so structured a form as the sonata, but he specified that his model was the French sonata of the eighteenth century and not the classical German sonata. To make his point—and his nationalistic sympathies—even more clear, Debussy signed the scores of these works “Claude Debussy, musicien français.” Debussy lived to complete only three of the projected six sonatas: a Cello Sonata (1915); a Sonata for Flute, Viola, and Harp (1916); and the Violin Sonata, completed in April 1917. It was to be his final work, and it gave him a great deal of difficulty. From the depths of his gloom, he wrote to a friend: “This sonata will be interesting from a documentary viewpoint and as an example of what may be produced by a sick man in time of war.” Debussy played the piano at the premiere on May 5, 1917, and performed it again in September at what

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proved to be his final public appearance. His deteriorating health confined him to his room thereafter, and he died the following March. For all Debussy’s dark comments, the Violin Sonata is a brilliant work, alternating fantastic and exotic outbursts with more somber and reflective moments. In three concise movements, the sonata lasts only about thirteen minutes. Debussy deliberately obscures both meter and key over the first few measures of the Allegro vivo, and only gradually does the music settle into G minor. The haunting beginning of the movement feels subdued, almost ascetic, but the dancing middle section in E major is more animated. Debussy brings back the opening material and rounds off the movement with a con fuoco coda. The second movement brings a sharp change of mood after the brutal close of the first. Debussy marks it fantasque et léger (“Fantastic [or fanciful] and light”), and the violin opens with a series of leaps, swirls, and trills before settling into the near-hypnotic main idea. The second subject, marked “sweet and expressive,” slides languorously on glissandos and arpeggios, and the movement comes to a quiet close. Over rippling chords, the finale offers a quick reminiscence of the very opening of the sonata, and then this theme disappears for good and the finale’s real theme leaps to life. It is a shower of triplet sixteenths that rockets upward and comes swirling back down: the composer described it as “a theme turning back on itself like a serpent biting its own tail.” There are some sultry interludes along the way, full of glissandos, broken chords, rubato, and trills, but finally the swirling energy of the main theme drives the music to its animated close. Debussy may have been unhappy about this music while working on it, but once done he felt more comfortable with it, writing to a friend: “In keeping with the contradictory spirit of human nature, it is full of joyous tumult…Beware in the future of works which appear to inhabit the skies; often they are the product of a dark, morose mind.”

Violin Sonata No. 3 in A Minor, Opus 25

GEORGES ENESCU Born August 19, 1881, Liveni Virnav, Romania Died May 4, 1955, Paris Composed: 1926 Approximate Duration: 24 minutes

The greatest musician to come from Romania, Georges Enescu was also one of the finest violinists of the twentieth century. Enescu trained in Vienna and Paris and then had an international career, performing and conducting throughout the world; he kept Paris and Bucharest as his two homes and spent a significant amount of time in his native country, where he did much for Romanian music. As a composer, Enescu is unfortunately remembered for one just work, the

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Romanian Rhapsody No. 1, and its over popularity has obscured the rest of his achievement, which includes the impressive opera Oedipe, five symphonies, and a large amount of chamber music. Enescu composed his Violin Sonata No. 3 in 1926, dedicating it to the memory of violinist Franz Kneisel—longtime concertmaster of the Boston Symphony—who had died earlier that year. The key to this striking music can be found in its subtitle: “in the popular Romanian character.” Enescu sets out here to wed Romanian folk music with the classical violin sonata: the result is a virtuoso violin sonata and a very exotic piece of music. Though the sonata contains no specific folk tunes, Enescu—like Bartók in his Violin Rhapsodies, composed at almost exactly the same time—assimilates a folk idiom so completely that it becomes the raw material for his own music. Romanian folk music inevitably suggests a gypsy character, and listeners will hear that in this sonata, as well as characteristic Romanian melodic patterns and Enescu’s attempt to mirror the sound of native instruments such as the cimbalon and lautar. He notates the score with unusual precision, specifying notes to be played slightly sharp or flat, how the piano is to be pedaled, and so on. The Third Violin Sonata has become one of Enescu’s most popular works, recorded by such violinists as Yehudi Menuhin and Isaac Stern. While it is much better to listen to such a work as pure music, something of its emotional character can be understood in a remark Enesco made to one of his students: he described the sonata as “a fantasy on the life and soul of the gypsy fiddler, the kind of musical vagabond who roamed about Europe in the old days, playing at campfires, imitating not only the sounds of nature but also the techniques and stunts of other gypsy players.” The sonata is in the standard three movements but is quite free in structure and expression. The opening Moderato malinconico does indeed have a melancholy air. Its first themegroup consists of a series of brief thematic ideas, all riding along a very supple rhythmic pulse; these will be combined and developed across the span of the movement. The dancing second group quickly turns passionate and soaring; the brief development leads to a modified return of earlier material and a quiet close. The Andante sostenuto opens with the strange sound of a one-note piano ostinato—a high B—sounding obsessively; over this constant pulse the violin sings the first idea entirely in harmonics. That opening ostinato sets a pattern that will characterize this movement: it is full of recurrent pedal sounds—some of these are like gypsy bagpipes, and at other times the piano mimics the jangling sound of the cimbalon. This movement is quite varied, with moments of calm giving way to more ebullient episodes. The finale dances to life on the piano’s sharp-edged chords, and quickly the violin leads the way through a series of varied sections. This movement is particularly

sonorous: there are extended passages played in pizzicato chords, tumultuous waves of piano sound, and striking tremolo and harmonic effects from the violin. The sonata drives to a dramatic—and resounding—conclusion, marked triple forte.

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LIVE FROM THE CONRAD SATURDAY, APRIL 13, 2019 · 6 PM THE BAKER-BAUM CONCERT HALL Presented by La Jolla Music Society

Vijay Gupta, Guest Host Michelle Cann, Pianist/Co-Host PROGRAM

Please see insert for program information. There will be no intermission.

This episode of From the Top will air on participating stations during the week of June 10, 2019. Tune in Sundays at 6 PM on Classical KUSC. To listen online or download the podcast, visit www.fromthetop.org. Support for this recording of From the Top is provided by The Volgenau Foundation. La Jolla Music Society’s 50th Anniversary Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, National Endowment for the Arts, Banc of California, Vail Memorial Fund, Thomas C. Ackerman Foundation, David C. Copley Foundation, D’Addario Foundation, ProtoStar Foundation, ResMed Foundation, Bright Event Rentals, US Bank, The Dow Divas, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, La Valencia Hotel, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, Joy Frieman, Brian and Silvija Devine, Gordon Brodfuehrer, Jeanette Stevens, Bebe and Marvin Zigman, and an anonymous donor.

From the Top is an independent non-profit organization that supports, develops, and shares the artistic voices and stories of young musicians — thanks to the charitable gifts made by many individuals and institutions each year. From the Top’s programs are made possible in part by an award from the National Endowment of the Arts, a grant from the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, and partnerships with radio stations nationwide. Learn more at www.fromthetop.org.

This performance marks From the Tops’s La Jolla Music Society Debut.

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FROM THE TOP AT THE CONRAD - PROGRAM NOTES

Board of Directors Jeffrey Rayport, Chair • John L. Pattillo, Vice Chair & Treasurer • Elizabeth Sikorovsky, Clerk • Corinne Ferguson • Elaine Lindley LeBuhn • Soo Youn Lee • Kevin Olusola • Peter Ross • Peter Segal • Inmaculada Silos-Santiago • Michael Thurber• In memoriam: Francis O. Hunnewell, Founding Chair Directors Emeriti Jennifer Hurley-Wales • Gerald Slavet Board of Overseers Elaine Lindley LeBuhn, Chair • Natalie Baker • Susan Beckerman • Phil Griffin • John Humphrey • Laura Kelsey • Jordan Kretchmer • Nancy Lubin • Linda Dyer Millard • Anthony K. Tjan • Gabrielle Wolohojian From The Top Staff Executive Director, Gretchen Nielsen Director of Content & Production, Tim Banker Senior Radio Producer, Tom Voegeli Music and Admissions Director, Erin Nolan Tour Producer, David Balsom Video Producer & Production Manager, Matt Dykeman Technical Director, R. Berred Ouellette Sound Engineers, John Escobar, Chris Rando Scholarship & Recruitment Manager, Javier Caballero Recruitment & Alumni Relations Assistant, Janet Fagan Admissions Assistant, Abbi Rienzo Scholarship Assistant, Kalen Ratzlaff Director of Development & External Affairs, Emily Borababy Associate Director of Board & Donor Relations, Cullen Bouvier Associate Director of Institutional Giving, Nicole Leonard Annual Fund & Events Manager, Rebecca Reiner Development Assistant, Carmen Johnson-Pajaro National Tour Marketing Manager, Erin MacCurtain Marketing & Communications Manager, Austin Boyer Senior Graphic Designer & Radio Show Announcer, Joanne Robinson Director of Finance & Administration, Dianne Collazo Database Administrator, Nicole Wittlin Staff Accountant, Peg O’Connell Finance Assistant, Hannah Emmert

COMMUNITY MUSIC CENTER Celebrating 20 Years! La Jolla Music Society has operated the Community Music Center, a free afterschool music education program in Logan Heights, San Diego, since 1999. Each year, the program provides instruments and valuable instruction to more than 100 students. For more information please visit: LJMS.org/Education

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PRELUDE 2 PM

Musical Prelude by young artists from the San Diego Youth Symphony and Conservatory

GEORGE LI, piano SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2019 · 3 PM THE BAKER-BAUM CONCERT HALL

BEETHOVEN Andante favori in F Major, WoO 57 (1770-1827)

Piano

Sonata in C Major, Opus 53 “Waldstein” Allegro con brio Introduzione: Adagio molto Rondo: Allegretto moderato; Prestissimo The Discovery Series is sponsored by:

Jeanette Stevens Gordon Brodfuehrer

La Jolla Music Society’s 50th Anniversary Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, National Endowment for the Arts, Banc of California, Vail Memorial Fund, Thomas C. Ackerman Foundation, David C. Copley Foundation, D’Addario Foundation, ProtoStar Foundation, ResMed Foundation, Bright Event Rentals, US Bank, The Dow Divas, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, La Valencia Hotel, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, Joy Frieman, Brian and Silvija Devine, Gordon Brodfuehrer, Jeanette Stevens, Bebe and Marvin Zigman, and an anonymous donor.

George Li is a Steinway Artist Exclusive Representation: Opus 3 Artists

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LISZT Sonetto 104 del Petrarca, S.161/5 (1811-1886)

Les

jeux d’eaux à la Villa d’Este, S.163/4

Réminiscences de Don Juan, S.418

George Li last performed for La Jolla Music Society in a Special Event on Saturday, April 13, 2019.

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Program notes by Eric Bromberger

Piano Sonata in C Major, Opus 53 “Waldstein”

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN

Andante favori in F Major, WoO 57

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Born December 16, 1770, Bonn Died March 26, 1827, Vienna Composed: 1803 Approximate Duration: 8 minutes

Between May and November 1803, Beethoven composed the Eroica, a symphony on a scale never before imagined. Nearly half an hour longer than his Second Symphony, Beethoven’s Third thrust the conception of the symphony— and sonata form—into a new world, a world in which music became heroic struggle and sonata form the stage for this drama rather than an end in itself. It was a world of new dimensions, new sonorities, new possibilities of expression, and with the Eroica behind him Beethoven began to plan two new piano sonatas. These sonatas, later nicknamed the Waldstein and the Appassionata, would be governed by the same impulse that had shaped that symphony. Beethoven began the “Waldstein” Sonata in November 1803, immediately after finishing the Eroica, and completed it in December. Proud of the new work, he played it to a friend. The friend replied that he thought the middle movement—a spacious Andante grazioso con moto—was too long. Beethoven exploded, as he often did in the face of such criticism, but once he calmed down, he began to sense that his friend was right. And so he pulled the Andante out of the sonata and replaced it with a new central movement marked Introduzione, Adagio molto. The new movement, quite short, functioned as an expectant bridge between the tense first movement and the powerful finale, and it helped make the “Waldstein” Sonata even more focused and compact. In its new (and final) form, that sonata was published in 1805 and was promptly recognized as the masterpiece that it is. But Beethoven remained fond of the rejected slow movement from that sonata. He played it at social gatherings in Vienna and eventually published it under the title Andante favori (“favorite andante”). Hearing this Andante, we quickly recognize two things: first, that it was all wrong as the central movement of that powerful sonata, and second, that it is lovely music, fully worthy of Beethoven’s affection for it. His marking grazioso con moto is exactly right: this is indeed graceful music, and it needs to keep moving. The principal idea, a rocking, dotted little tune in 3/8, returns throughout, and Beethoven embellishes it as it proceeds. He introduces several subordinate ideas, but the gentle opening melody always returns in ever richer colors and accompaniment. The music remains in character throughout—it never turns animated or tense—and eventually it reaches a poised and nicely understated conclusion. No wonder Beethoven liked to play this music at parties.

Composed: 1803 Approximate Duration: 25 minutes

The Waldstein has so much of the Eroica’s dramatic manner and scope that it has been called “a heroic symphony for piano. We can even sense a thematic kinship between sonata and symphony: the opening of the Allegro con brio first movement is remarkably similar to the opening of the scherzo of the Eroica: a quietly-insistent rhythmic pounding in the lower register is answered by a falling figure in the upper voice. The second subject, a poised chorale, arrives in the unexpected key of E major, yet it offers scant relief from the driving power of the sonata’s opening. The first movement of the Eroica had proceeded on discord, conflict, and resolution, but here the driving impulse is an almost headlong forward impetus. The second and third movements are connected. Titled Introduzione and marked Adagio molto, the second movement is intended not just as a bridge between the outer movements but as a subtle preparation for the final movement. The dynamic remains pianissimo almost exclusively, but the tempo—while slow—seems to be coiling up the rhythmic energy that will be unleashed in the final movement. This finale, a lengthy rondo marked Allegretto moderato, begins with a flowing main theme marked sempre pianissimo. Its noble simplicity has suggested folk origins to some observers, but—whatever its provenance—its flowing shape is ideal for rondo treatment; Beethoven breaks this smooth motion with more agitated episodes and even offers some transformation of the rondo theme itself. A Prestissimo coda, using the rondo theme at a much faster tempo, brings the sonata to a fiery close. This sonata, which has become one of Beethoven’s most popular, takes its nickname from its dedicatee, Count Ferdinand von Waldstein, Beethoven’s patron in Bonn. It was Count Waldstein who had sent the young man off to Vienna in 1792 with a powerful exhortation: Dear Beethoven: You are going to Vienna in fulfillment of your long-frustrated wishes. The Genius of Mozart is still mourning and weeping over the death of her pupil. She found a refuge but no occupation with the inexhaustible Haydn; through him she wishes once more to form a union with another. With the help of assiduous labor you shall receive Mozart’s spirit from Haydn’s hands. Your true friend, Waldstein. Beethoven did not simply take up the spirit of those earlier master. In this sonata (and in the symphony that preceded it) he took music into territory that neither Mozart nor Haydn—nor could Waldstein— have imagined.

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GEORGE LI - PROGRAM NOTES

though it was not published until 1883, shortly before his death. The Villa d’Este is a handsome sixteenth-century villa built on a steep hillside in Tivoli. It is famous for its gardens and particularly for its fountains, which are of many different Born October 22, 1811, Raiding, Hungry and elaborate designs and which stretch down the hillside. By Died July 31, 1886, Bayreuth the time Liszt lived there, the Villa had fallen into disrepair (it Composed: 1840 Approximate Duration: 7 minutes has since been renovated), but the fountains and gardens were intact, and they made a profound impression on the composer. Liszt and his mistress Marie d’Agoult made an extended By far the most famous of the pieces in the third book visit to Italy in 1838-39, and they fell in love with the country, of the Années de pèlerinage are those that were in some its people, its art. While in Italy, Liszt began to sketch a way inspired by the Villa d’Este. Two were inspired by the second collection of piano pieces in the manner of the first cypresses on the grounds of the estate and certainly Respighi book of Années de pèlerinage. But where the first collection must have been aware of this music when, half a century had been devoted to physical locations in Switzerland, now later, he wrote his own music inspired by the pines and Liszt changed his focus, and a set of seven pieces inspired by other aspects of Rome. The finest of the Villa d’Este pieces, varied works of Italian art began to take shape. however, is Les jeux d’eaux à la Villa d’Este (“Play of the In Italy Liszt and Marie d’Agoult read through the Waters at the Villa d’Este”), a musical evocation of one sonnets of Petrarch together, and Liszt was so struck by of the sparkling fountains on the estate. This shimmering these poems that the following year he wrote three songs music would have a powerful influence a generation later that set Petrarch’s sonnets 104, 47, and 123. These appear on two young French composers who would write a great to have been the first songs composed by Liszt, who was 28 deal of similar “water” music: Debussy and Ravel (one at the time. These dramatic songs have been described as of whose pieces is called Jeux d’eau). Liszt’s portrait of operatic, for they were written for high tenor and go up to sunlight sparkling off the waters of the fountain seems high C-sharp. Liszt immediately transcribed the three songs pure impressionism: the swirling beginning gives way to as piano pieces, and these transcriptions were published as more lyric ideas in the middle section. In the score at this a set—in a slightly different order—in 1846. Several years point Liszt includes a quote from St. John: “But whosoever later, Liszt returned to these piano pieces and revised them for drinketh of the water that I shall give him shall never thirst; inclusion in the second book of Années de pèlerinage. but the water that I give him shall become in him a fountain While the impulse behind these three pieces is lyric, of water springing up into eternal life.” Liszt turned the piano versions into virtuoso keyboard works: moments of melting lyricism will give way to bravura Réminiscences de Don Juan, S.418 writing that demands an absolutely first-class pianist simply to get the notes. The famous Sonetto 104 opens powerfully Composed: 1841 (Agitato assai), as befits the troubled topic of this sonnet, Approximate Duration: 17 minutes but this abrupt beginning quickly gives way to the melody of the song, which is then extended at length. The writing for The “Don Juan” of this French title is actually Don piano is particularly impressive here, with difficult chordal Giovanni of Mozart’s great opera. Liszt wrote this paraphrase passages, powerful writing in octaves, great cadenza-like on themes from Don Giovanni in 1841, just as he turned flourishes, and chains of thirds. After all this energy, the 30 and was at the crest of his fame as a touring virtuoso. peaceful main theme returns to draw the music to its close on Unlike some of Liszt’s paraphrases, which string together quietly-arpeggiated chords. tunes from an opera, the Réminiscences de Don Juan is a

Sonetto 104 del Petrarca, S.161/5

FRANZ LISZT

FRANZ LISZT

much more carefully conceived composition. Liszt chose three characteristic scenes from the opera and treated each in turn and at some length. The result is a very serious piece of music—it has been described as “symphonic”—which is Composed: 1867-77 Approximate Duration: 8 minutes remarkable not just for the virtuosity of the writing but for imagination of Liszt’s treatment of Mozart’s ideas. Liszt gave up the post of kapellmeister in Weimar in 1859 The three scenes Liszt chose are quite different, and and moved the following year to Rome, where he took minor each shows us a different face of Mozart’s opera. The orders in the Catholic Church and lived for part of each year opening section is a powerful extension of the music that in the Villa d’Este in Rome. Liszt composed the third book of accompanies one of the most dramatic moments in the opera, his Années de pèlerinage at the Villa between 1867 and 1877,

Les jeux d’eaux à la Villa d’Este, S.163/4

FRANZ LISZT

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GEORGE LI - PROGRAM NOTES

the appearance of the statue at Don Giovanni’s dinner party at the very end of the final act, when the Don is dragged down into hell. Liszt then turns to Don Giovanni and Zerlina’s great duet from Act I, Là ci darem la mano, as he attempts to seduce her. This is one of the best-loved melodies in all music (Chopin and others have also written variations on it), and here Liszt evolves two long variations. The extended final section is based on what has been called the “champagne aria”—Don Giovanni’s Finch’han dal vino from Act I, when he orders Leporello to prepare a party at which he plans to seduce as many women as possible. It is a sparkling aria in the opera, and Liszt uses its drive to energize his own virtuoso treatment. It all comes to a brilliant close, and it is no surprise that Liszt performed this music so often (or that it proved so popular with nineteenth-century audiences). In our own day, when it may seem sacrilegious to “tamper” with a masterpiece like Don Giovanni, it is important to remember that we do not come to this music to hear Mozart but to hear what Liszt does with Mozart: Humphrey Searle has remarked that this piece is “MozartLiszt and not Mozart, and one should appreciate it for what it is.” And what it is, is quite impressive: over its nearly twentyminute span this paraphrase reminds not just of the greatness of Mozart but of Liszt’s own powerful musical personality.

WORLD-CLASS PERFORMANCES La Jolla Music Society cultivates and inspires the performing arts scene in San Diego through presenting world-class musicians, jazz ensembles, orchestras, and dance companies year round.

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PRELUDE 7 PM

Virtuoso and Understatement Lecture by Seth Lerer What does it mean to be a virtuoso? Does it always mean composing, and performing, difficult work? Or does it embrace, too, the simple, the understated, and the intimate? This is a virtuoso program in both senses, ranging from lyrical pieces by Schumann and Beethoven (including his deceptively straightforward Sonata in E-flat Major), to the dazzling Presto of Schumann and the rhythmically propulsive Sonata of Prokofiev. This is a program of dazzlement as well as depth.

DANIIL TRIFONOV, piano WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2019 · 8 PM THE BAKER-BAUM CONCERT HALL

BEETHOVEN Andante favori in F Major, WoO 57 (1770-1827)

Piano Sonata in E-flat Major, Opus 31, No. 3 Allegro Scherzo: Allegretto vivace Menuetto: Moderato e grazioso Presto con fuoco SCHUMANN Bunte Blätter, Opus 99 (1810-1856)

The Piano Series is sponsored by:

Conrad Prebys and Debbie Turner

La Jolla Music Society’s 50th Anniversary Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, National Endowment for the Arts, Banc of California, Vail Memorial Fund, Thomas C. Ackerman Foundation, David C. Copley Foundation, D’Addario Foundation, ProtoStar Foundation, ResMed Foundation, Bright Event Rentals, US Bank, The Dow Divas, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, La Valencia Hotel, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, Joy Frieman, Brian and Silvija Devine, Gordon Brodfuehrer, Jeanette Stevens, Bebe and Marvin Zigman, and an anonymous donor.

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Exclusive Representation: Opus 3 Artists

Presto

Passionato, WoO 5

I N T E R M I S S I O N

PROKOFIEV Piano Sonata No. 8 in B-flat Major, Opus 84 (1891-1953) Andante dolce Andante sognando Vivace

Daniil Trifonov last performed for La Jolla Music Society in the Frieman Family Piano Series on February 28, 2016.

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DANIIL TRIFONOV - PROGRAM NOTES

Program notes by Eric Bromberger

Andante favori in F Major, WoO 57

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Born December 16, 1770, Bonn Died March 26, 1827, Vienna Composed: 1803 Approximate Duration: 8 minutes

Between May and November 1803, Beethoven composed the Eroica, a symphony on a scale never before imagined. Nearly half an hour longer than his Second Symphony, Beethoven’s Third thrust the conception of the symphony— and sonata form—into a new world, a world in which music became heroic struggle and sonata form the stage for this drama rather than an end in itself. It was a world of new dimensions, new sonorities, new possibilities of expression, and with the Eroica behind him Beethoven began to plan two new piano sonatas. These sonatas, later nicknamed the Waldstein and the Appassionata, would be governed by the same impulse that had shaped that symphony. Beethoven began the “Waldstein” Sonata in November 1803, immediately after finishing the Eroica, and completed it in December. Proud of the new work, he played it to a friend. The friend replied that he thought the middle movement—a spacious Andante grazioso con moto—was too long. Beethoven exploded, as he often did in the face of such criticism, but once he calmed down, he began to sense that his friend was right. And so he pulled the Andante out of the sonata and replaced it with a new central movement marked Introduzione, Adagio molto. The new movement, quite short, functioned as an expectant bridge between the tense first movement and the powerful finale, and it helped make the “Waldstein” Sonata even more focused and compact. In its new (and final) form, that sonata was published in 1805 and was promptly recognized as the masterpiece that it is. But Beethoven remained fond of the rejected slow movement from that sonata. He played it at social gatherings in Vienna and eventually published it under the title Andante favori (“favorite andante”). Hearing this Andante, we quickly recognize two things: first, that it was all wrong as the central movement of that powerful sonata, and second, that it is lovely music, fully worthy of Beethoven’s affection for it. His marking grazioso con moto is exactly right: this is indeed graceful music, and it needs to keep moving. The principal idea, a rocking, dotted little tune in 3/8, returns throughout, and Beethoven embellishes it as it proceeds. He introduces several subordinate ideas, but the gentle opening melody always returns in ever richer colors and accompaniment. The music remains in character throughout—it never turns animated or tense—and eventually it reaches a poised and nicely understated conclusion. No wonder Beethoven liked to play this music at parties.

Piano Sonata in E-flat Major, Opus 31, No. 3

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Composed: 1802 Approximate Duration: 22 minutes

Beethoven spent the summer of 1802 in the small town of Heiligenstadt outside Vienna. It was a miserable time for Beethoven the man: at age 31, he had to face the fact that he was going deaf, and evidence suggests that his despair had him near suicide that summer. Yet this was a fertile time for Beethoven the composer. At Heiligenstadt he wrote his Second Symphony and six sonatas (three for violin and three for piano), and this is for the most part quite genial music: Beethoven was too great an artist to let the details of his personal life intrude on his music. The three violin sonatas of Opus 30 broke new ground for the composer, particularly in his evolution toward a more dramatic style. The pattern of these three violin sonatas—a straightforward first, a stormy second, and a genial third—is repeated in the three piano sonatas of Opus 31. The first of these is somewhat conservative, the second (nicknamed “The Tempest”) is dramatic, and the third is relaxed after the stress of the second. Yet the Piano Sonata in E-flat Major shows some interesting features of its own, particularly in its classical poise and the structuring of the inner movements. Beethoven keeps listeners off-balance at the opening of the Allegro with music of uncertain tonality and ambiguous pulse: the frequent ritards seem to imply several different tempos, and Beethoven contrasts the solemnity of these slow chords with the flowing high spirits of his main theme once it is launched. The falling dotted figures from the beginning will reappear in many forms across the span of this movement. One normally expects a slow middle movement at this point, but this four-movement sonata lacks a true slow movement. The second movement is a scherzo marked Allegretto vivace and full of rustic energy. In sonata form rather than the expected ternary form, this scherzo moves along fluidly and with rhythmic point; the quiet ending—full of good humor—is particularly effective. The third movement is the minuet-and-trio of the classical sonata; here the minuet is a graceful slow waltz, and the chordal trio shows some relation to the minuet. Beethoven writes out the return of the opening material, specifying that all repeats must be taken the second time, and appends a brief coda that trails into silence. The final movement, Presto con fuoco, sails easily along its galloping 6/8 meter. Beethoven’s con fuoco marking might seems a little fierce for this essentially relaxed music—one feels not so much fire here as amiable spirits rolling along happily. In sonata form, this movement is—like the scherzo— particularly effective for its controlled dynamic.

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DANIIL TRIFONOV - PROGRAM NOTES

Bunte Blätter, Opus 99

ROBERT SCHUMANN Born June 8, 1810, Zwickau. Germany Died July 29, 1856, Endenich, Germany Composed: 1836-1849 Approximate Duration: 35 minutes

In June 1851, just a few months after conducting the premiere of his “Rhenish” Symphony in Düsseldorf, Robert Schumann entered into negotiations with the music publisher F.W. Arnold of Elberfeld to publish a collection of thirty short piano pieces. Schumann at first planned that this collection would be published under the title Spreu, which translates as “Chaff.” But the published version, which appeared in 1852, contained only fourteen pieces and was collectively titled Bunte Blätter, or “Many-Colored Leaves,” a title that reflects Schumann’s original plan to publish each individual piece with a cover of a separate color. That did not happen, but Schumann’s title and his plan for a many-colored collection makes clear that he was aware that there is no unifying principle in this collection: Bunte Blätter simply gathers fourteen short pieces that he had composed between 1836 and 1849. The overall collection actually combines several smaller collections. The first three pieces had been composed in 1838-9 and assembled under the title Drei Stücklein (“Three Little Pieces”), while the next five—composed between 1836 and 1841—were collected under the title Fünf Albumblätter (“Five Album Leaves”). Some listeners may recognize the first piece of the latter set, as the young Brahms used its theme as the basis of his Variations on a Theme of Schumann, Opus 9, composed in 1854. The third is a brief waltz that was apparently originally intended as one of the movements of Schumann’s Carnaval: it is based on the same A-E-flat-C-B motif that underlies all the pieces in Carnaval (that sequence spells “ASCH” in German musical notation, and Asch was the hometown of Ernestine von Fricken, to whom Schumann was briefly engaged when he wrote Carnaval). The final six pieces of Bunte Blätter, all somewhat longer than the first eight, were drawn together from different sources. Novelette was apparently intended for Schumann’s set of eight Novelettes of 1838, but rejected. The Präludium dates from 1839; Schumann then wrote to Clara Wieck that he had been “chewing for eight days at a stupid prelude and fugue”; he gave up on that project, but salvaged this prelude, which is full of furious energy. The Marsch (1843) is in ternary form with a triplet-based trio; Schumann embellishes the original march upon its return. Abendmusik seems to have very little of the nocturne about it— it is in minuet tempo, with a contrasting trio in G-flat major. The Scherzo was originally part of Schumann’s projected Symphony No. 3 in C Minor, sketched in 1841 and abandoned; all that survives is this scherzo movement, here in B-flat major.

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The concluding Geschwindmarsch (“Quick March”) was the most recent music in Schumann’s collection: inspired by republican sentiments during the Dresden uprising of 1849, he had written a set of five marches. He published four of these as his Opus 76, holding back the Geschwindmarsch. Now he went back and retrieved the manuscript and used this sturdy march to round off Bunte Blätter. All this talk of rejected works and random pieces has the unfortunate cumulative effect of making Bunte Blätter sound like a second-rank composition, and one should not approach it that way. Rather, a much better approach to this music is to accept the fact that there absolutely no unity here and instead to enjoy each piece individually: for Schumann’s wonderful writing for the piano, for the character of each piece, and for the variety that such a compilation inevitably provides.

Presto passionato, WoO 5

ROBERT SCHUMANN Composed: 1835 Approximate Duration: 6 minutes

In 1833 Robert Schumann set to work on a new piano sonata. As always, classical sonata form gave him trouble, and the composition of the sonata took a long time. Schumann got two movements done, then set it aside. He came back to it in October 1835 and composed a finale for the sonata, titling it Presto passionato. He showed the finale to Clara Wieck, then only 16, and her reaction was swift: she thought it much too hard and recommended that he replace it with a new finale. Clara, who would marry Schumann five years later, was already one of the finest pianists in Europe, and Schumann took her advice. He discarded the Presto passionato and composed a new finale while on a visit to Vienna in December 1838. What was now his Second Piano Sonata was published in 1839 as his Opus 22, and the Presto passionato went on the shelf. It remained there until it was finally published in 1866, ten years after Schumann’s death. Clara was right. The Presto passionato may be brilliant music, but it is fiendishly difficult. Schumann sets it in the unusual meter 6/16 and then creates all sorts of technical hurtles for the pianist: cross-rhythms, complex textures, quick leaps between staccato and legato playing—all at a blistering tempo. This is mercurial music, shimmering with a quicksilvery brilliance one moment, thundering out with quasiorchestral violence the next. Schumann moves to 2/4for a brief, march-like episode along the way, but it is the 6/16 meter and the myriad ways Schumann accents it that gives this music its distinction. At the end, the music seems spent and murmuring into silence when Schumann wrenches it to a close marked fortissimo and energico. The Presto passionato was a great favorite of Vladimir Horowitz. His recording, made in 1932 when he was only 28,

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DANIIL TRIFONOV - PROGRAM NOTES

is so fast that a listener is left wondering how fingers can move that quickly.

Piano Sonata No. 8 in B-flat Major, Opus 84

SERGE PROKOFIEV Born April 23, 1891, Sontsovka, Ukraine Died March 5, 1953, Moscow Composed: 1944 Approximate Duration: 31 minutes

In 1939 Serge Prokofiev planned and began to sketch three piano sonatas—his Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth. He completed the first of these the following year, but the other two took a great deal more time, and before he could finish them the Soviet Union had been plunged into war with Nazi Germany. He completed the Seventh in 1942, but the Eighth had to wait until the summer of 1944, five years after its initial conception. Prokofiev spent that summer at a composers’ retreat at Ivanovo, 150 miles northeast of Moscow, working on two pieces: this sonata and his Fifth Symphony. The heroic symphony was to some extent inspired by the war (“I conceived it as a symphony of the greatness of the human spirit,” said Prokofiev), but the relation between the sonata and the war is elusive. Some Soviet commentators claimed to hear the tread of soldiers and other martial sounds in this sonata, but that must remain supposition. What we can say is that if Prokofiev’s Eighth Sonata is in no sense programmatic, it is nevertheless a very serious and longspanned work, and it is hard to feel that the distant war did not have an influence on this often somber music. The Eighth Sonata is conceived on a large scale: a huge first movement (longer than the other two combined) is followed by a brief slow movement before concluding with a dynamic finale. Throughout, Prokofiev’s performance markings provide unusual insight into the music’s character. The sonata opens not with the expected fast movement but with a moderately-paced movement significantly marked Andante dolce. There is a wistful quality in the steady pace of the opening section, which proceeds through a series of variations on its two principal themes. The middle rushes ahead, but this is not violent music; instead, it is characterized by a nervous quality (Prokofiev marks it inquieto). The opening material returns at some length, and—after a brief reminiscence of the turbulent middle section—this massive movement concludes quietly. Some relief is necessary at this point, and it comes in the second movement, also marked Andante, but now Prokofiev specifies Andante sognando (“dreamily”). Some commentators have called this movement, set in 3/4, a minuet, but it resolutely refuses to dance and remains subdued throughout; Prokofiev repeatedly reminds the pianist to play dolce and tranquillo. After the moderate pace of the first two

movements, the Vivace rips to life on its 12/8 meter, and the nice spring of the opening theme animates much of the finale. There are quiet interludes along the way, including a return of material from the first movement, before the music drives to a powerful close that Prokofiev marks both sonoramente and con brio. Emil Gilels gave the first performance of the Eighth Sonata in Moscow on December 29, 1944, two weeks before the premiere of the Fifth Symphony. The relation of the symphony—with its heroic, public character—to the war was quite clear (some even referred to it as a “Victory Symphony”). The Eighth Sonata may well register a reaction to the devastating war, but here Prokofiev speaks in much more somber, more personal terms.

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ANOUSHKA SHANKAR THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2019 · 8 PM THE BAKER-BAUM CONCERT HALL

Anoushka Shankar, sitar Ojas Adhiya, tabla Pirashanna Thevarajah, mridangam Ravichandra Kulur, flute Danny Keane, cello, piano Kenji Ota, tanpura Dennis Fernandez, front of house sound engineer Dylan Bate, tour manager Saloni Thakkar, personal assistant PROGRAM

Works to be announced from stage. There will be no intermission.

La Jolla Music Society’s 50th Anniversary Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, National Endowment for the Arts, Banc of California, Vail Memorial Fund, Thomas C. Ackerman Foundation, David C. Copley Foundation, D’Addario Foundation, ProtoStar Foundation, ResMed Foundation, Bright Event Rentals, US Bank, The Dow Divas, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, La Valencia Hotel, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, Joy Frieman, Brian and Silvija Devine, Gordon Brodfuehrer, Jeanette Stevens, Bebe and Marvin Zigman, and an anonymous donor.

ABOUT In her new program, Anoushka Shankar reflects on her journey so far; drawing on classical ragas, referencing some of the experiences she’s built along the way and experimenting with new ideas in a cross-cultural dialogue that showcases the versatility of the sitar across musical genres.

This performance marks Anoushka Shankar’s La Jolla Music Society debut.

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AN EVENING WITH CHRIS THILE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2019 · 8 PM THE BAKER-BAUM CONCERT HALL

PROGRAM

Works to be announced from stage. There will be no intermission.

La Jolla Music Society’s 50th Anniversary Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, National Endowment for the Arts, Banc of California, Vail Memorial Fund, Thomas C. Ackerman Foundation, David C. Copley Foundation, D’Addario Foundation, ProtoStar Foundation, ResMed Foundation, Bright Event Rentals, US Bank, The Dow Divas, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, La Valencia Hotel, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, Joy Frieman, Brian and Silvija Devine, Gordon Brodfuehrer, Jeanette Stevens, Bebe and Marvin Zigman, and an anonymous donor.

ABOUT Multiple GRAMMY© Award-winner and MacArthur Fellow Chris Thile is a mandolin virtuoso, composer, and vocalist. With his broad outlook that encompasses classical, jazz, rock, and bluegrass, Thile transcends the borders of conventionally circumscribed genres, creating a distinctly American canon and a new musical aesthetic for performers and audiences alike. Also a member of Punch Brothers and Nickel Creek, Chris Thile grew up in Oceanside, California.

Chris Thile last performed for La Jolla Music Society in a Special Event on November 7, 2015. 5 0 th A N N I V E R S A R Y S E A S O N 2 0 1 8 - 1 9 |

C o m i n g H o m e F E S T I V A L 33


PRELUDE 7 PM

Nigunim: Songs Beyond Time and Words Lecture by Kristi Brown Montesano Two contemporary works on this program— Scott Wheeler’s The Singing Turk and Avner Dorman’s Nigunim—connect to global musical traditions and practices that both enrich and expand the category of “classical music.” This presentation will look more closely at the fascinating musical and cultural inspirations behind these two compositions— from eighteenth-century opera representations of the Turk to traditional Jewish music to Macedonian dance.

GIL SHAHAM & AKIRA EGUCHI THURSDAY, APRIL 25, 2019 · 8 PM THE BAKER-BAUM CONCERT HALL

KREISLER Praeludium and Allegro (In the Style of Pugnani) (1875-1962)

SCOTT WHEELER The Singing Turk (Violin Sonata No. 2) (b. 1952) Sù la sponda O vous, que Mars rend invincible In Italia AVNER DORMAN Nigunim (Sonata No. 3) (b. 1975) Adagio religioso Scherzo Adagio Presto Gil Shaham, violin; Akira Eguchi, piano I N T E R M I S S I O N

La Jolla Music Society’s 50th Anniversary Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, National Endowment for the Arts, Banc of California, Vail Memorial Fund, Thomas C. Ackerman Foundation, David C. Copley Foundation, D’Addario Foundation, ProtoStar Foundation, ResMed Foundation, Bright Event Rentals, US Bank, The Dow Divas, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, La Valencia Hotel, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, Joy Frieman, Brian and Silvija Devine, Gordon Brodfuehrer, Jeanette Stevens, Bebe and Marvin Zigman, and an anonymous donor.

Exclusive representation: Opus 3 Artists

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J.S. BACH Partita No. 3 in E Major for Unaccompanied Violin, BWV 1006 (1685-1750) Preludio Bourrée Gigue Loure Menuet I and II Gavotte en Rondeau Gil Shaham, violin FRANCK Violin Sonata in A Major (1822-1890) Allegretto ben moderato Allegro Recitativo—Fantasia Allegretto poco mosso Gil Shaham, violin; Akira Eguchi, piano Gil Shaham last performed for La Jolla Music Society during SummerFest on August 15, 2018. Akira Eguchi last performed for La Jolla Music Society in the Celebrity Series on October 10, 2003.

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do most musicians. The Singing Turk examines the popularity of Turkish characters in European opera; between the 1680s and the 1820s there were over 100 of these operas written. Larry Wolff’s book doesn't belabor either the similarities or Praeludium and Allegro (In the Style of Pugnani) the differences with today’s relations between Europe and the Muslim lands to the east. He shows how the shifting nature Born February 2, 1875, Vienna of the threat of the Ottoman Empire caused telling shifts in Died January 29, 1962, New York City Composed: 1910 the way these Turkish operatic characters were portrayed Approximate Duration: 5 minutes in the European operatic theatre. The intellectual history is fascinating and the music of these operas is so enchanting that Fritz Kreisler has always been acknowledged one of I decided to feature one Singing Turk in each movement of the great violinists, a musician so natural that he almost my violin sonata, and to borrow Larry’s title for the work as a did not need to practice. He is remembered today for a whole. number of ingratiating short pieces he wrote for violin and The first movement, Sù la sponda, draws on Handel’s piano—Schon Rosmarin, Caprice Viennois, Tambourin 1724 opera Tamerlano. The noble Turkish ruler Bajazet is Chinois, and many others—but during his long career he imprisoned by the title character Tamerlane (also known also performed a number of violin pieces composed in what historically as Timur). Before his suicide, Bajazet sings to his he called the “olden style”—the style of eighteenth-century beloved daughter “on the banks of Lethe, wait for me there.” composers—and which he claimed to have discovered among The second movement is the aria of Roxelana, from the old manuscripts. In 1935, after many years of performing 1761 The Three Sultanas, by librettist Charles Simon Favart these pieces, Kreisler admitted that he had actually composed and composer Paul-César Gibert. This aria was famously sung them himself, much to the outrage of certain critics and the by the librettist’s wife Marie Favart, who accompanied herself amusement of those who had sensed the truth all along. on the harp. In the opera, Roxelana sings to the “invincible” These pieces composed in the “olden style” are—phony warrior Suleiman the Magnificent to “defend yourself, if pedigree or not—such good violin music that they remain possible/ From becoming the slave of two beautiful eyes.” firmly in the violin repertory. One of the most famous of My third singing Turk is the handsome prince Selim these is the Praeludium and Allegro, first published in 1910. from Rossini’s Il Turco in Italia. In this comic opera, Selim Kreisler tried to lead the suspicious off his trail by subtitling falls in love with the Italian Fiorilla. In their duet, she sings, the piece “in the style of Pugnani.” Gaetano Pugnani (1731“In Italy certainly one doesn’t make love like that.” Selim 1798) was one of the great violinists of the eighteenth century responds that “In Turkey certainly one doesn’t make love like and an able composer for that instrument, but he had nothing that.” Rossini’s music makes it clear that they make love in at all to do with the Praeludium and Allegro—this music is exactly the same way. The music of the singing Turks doesn’t pure Kreisler. quite guide the music, which has its own structure; rather, The noble Praeludium, marked Allegro, is built on the earlier music forms a subterranean vein that colors the a steady quarter-note pulse that takes the violin soaring piece in varying degrees, occasionally emerging more clearly. to the top of its range. The concluding Allegro, which is The first movement is a two-part structure in which the poise actually marked Allegro molto moderato in the score, is full and tragic nobility of Handel’s Bajazet informs the entire of technical hurdles for the violin: rapid string crossings, movement, with his aria quoted most clearly at the end of multiple stops, runs, and trills. At the close, Kreisler gives the the first half. The second movement begins as a passacaglia, violinist a florid cadenza over piano tremolo and a dramatic which then alternates with variations on Favart and Gibert’s final statement high on the violin’s G-string. tender aria. The finale is a moto perpetuo for the violin, from which Rossini’s deliciously joyful duet emerges with The Singing Turk (Violin Sonata No. 2) increasing clarity and giddy violinistic virtuosity. Program notes by Eric Bromberger, unless otherwise indicated.

FRITZ KREISLER

SCOTT WHEELER

—Scott Wheeler

Born February 24, 1952, Washington, D.C. Composed: 2017 Approximate Duration: 15 minutes

Larry Wolff’s book The Singing Turk, published in the fall of 2016, is that rare work by a non-musician that provides a new perspective on music. Larry is a European historian and the sort of opera buff who knows far more about opera than 5 0 th A N N I V E R S A R Y S E A S O N 2 0 1 8 - 1 9 |

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Nigunim (Sonata No. 3)

AVNER DORMAN Born April 14, 1975, Tel Aviv Composed: 2011 Approximate Duration: 20 minutes

The Nigun is a fundamental musical concept of traditional Jewish music. According to Habbad literature, the Nigun serves as a universal language; it ascends beyond words and conveys a deeper spiritual message than words can; a Nigun sung in Yiddish will reach and affect someone who only speaks Arabic and vice versa. The Nigun may be short but since it begins and ends on the same pitch it may be repeated over and over. In this sense, the Nigun has no beginning and no end and is eternal. Nigunim (the plural of Nigun) may be secular or religious, fast or slow, and may be sung and played in a variety of social events and circumstances. When the 92 Street Y and Orli and Gil Shaham approached me to write a new piece for their Jewish Melodies program, my first thought was to write a piece that would explore the music of the ten lost tribes (the Hebrew tribes that were exiled after the first temple was destroyed). Since we know very little about the whereabouts of these tribes, I decided to explore the music of various Jewish traditions from different parts of the world and how they relate to larger local musical traditions. To my surprise, after researching Jewish music from different parts of the world, I found that there are some common musical elements to North African Jewish cantillations, Central Asian Jewish wedding songs, Klezmer music, and Ashkenazy prayers. Though I did not use any existing Jewish melodies for Nigunim, the main modes and melodic gestures of the piece are drawn from these common elements. Moreover, different sections of the piece draw upon local non-Jewish musical traditions of each of these regions: for example, the second movement uses principles found in Georgian folk rhythms and harmonies, and the fourth is inspired by Macedonian dances. —Avner Dorman

Partita No. 3 in E Major for Unaccompanied Violin, BWV 1006

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH Born March 21, 1685, Eisenach, Germany Died July 28, 1750, Leipzig Composed: 1720 Approximate Duration: 19 minutes

Bach’s six sonatas and partitas for unaccompanied violin date from about 1720, when Bach was music director at the court of Anhalt-Cöthen. The three sonatas are in sonata di chiesa form, employing a slow-fast-slow-fast sequence of

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movements, but the structure of the three partitas is more complex. The term partita—which suggests a collection of parts—refers to a suite of dances, and Bach wrote his three partitas for unaccompanied violin as sets of dance movements. While each of the sonatas has four movements, of which the second is always a fugue, the partitas have more movements (five to seven) and are somewhat freer in form, as Bach adapted a number of old dance forms to the capabilities of the solo violin. In his final partita for unaccompanied violin, Bach virtually dispenses with the standard allemandecourante-sarabande-gigue sequence of the partita and instead creates an entirely original structure consisting of a stunning opening movement, a varied series of dances, and a concluding gigue (the only survivor from the traditional sequence). The title Preludio suggests music that is merely an introduction to something else, but this Preludio is a magnificent work in its own right, in some ways the most striking of the seven movements of this partita. Built on the jagged, athletic opening theme, this movement is a brilliant flurry of steady sixteenth-notes, featuring complicated string-crossings and racing along its blistering course to an exciting conclusion. Among the many pleasures of this music is Bach’s use of a technique known as bariolage, the rapid alternation between the same note played on stopped and open strings, which gives this music some of it characteristic glinting brilliance. It is no surprise that this Preludio is among the most popular pieces Bach ever wrote, and those purists ready to sneer at Leopold Stokowski’s arrangement for full orchestra should know that Bach beat him to it: in 1731, ten years after writing the violin partita, Bach arranged this Preludio as the opening orchestral movement of his Cantata No. 29, “Wir danken dir, Gott.” Bach follows this striking beginning with a sequence of varied dances. The term Loure originally referred to a form of French bagpipe music and later came to mean a type of slow dance accompanied by the bagpipe. Bach dispenses with the bagpipe accompaniment, and in this elegant movement the violin dances gracefully by itself. Bach was scrupulously accurate in his titles, and the Gavotte en Rondeau (gavotte in the form of a rondo) conforms to both these forms: a gavotte is an old French dance in common time that begins on the third beat, while rondo form asks that one section recur throughout. This vigorous and poised movement features some wonderful writing for the violin as the original dance theme repeats in many guises. The two minuet movements are sharply contrasted: Menuet I takes its character from the powerful chordal beginning, while Menuet II, dancing gracefully, is more subdued. The Bourrée drives along its lively course, energized by a powerful upbeat, and the Gigue (an old English dance related to the jig) brings the work to a lively close.

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Violin Sonata in A Major

CÉSAR FRANCK

Born December 10, 1822, Liege, Belgium Died November 8, 1890, Paris Composed: 1886 Approximate Duration: 28 minutes

Composed in 1886, the Violin Sonata in A Major is one of the finest examples of Franck’s use of cyclic form, a technique he had adapted from his friend Franz Liszt, in which themes from one movement are transformed and used over subsequent movements. The Violin Sonata is a particularly ingenious instance of this technique: virtually the entire sonata is derived from the quiet and unassuming opening of the first movement, which then evolves endlessly across the sonata. Even when a new theme seems to arrive, it will gradually be revealed as a subtle variant of one already heard. The piano’s quiet fragmented chords at the beginning of the Allegretto ben moderato suggest a theme-shape that the violin takes over as it enters: this will be the thematic cell of the entire sonata. The piano has a more animated second subject (it takes on the shape of the germinal theme as its proceeds), but the gently-rocking violin figure from the opening dominates this movement, and Franck reminds the performers constantly to play molto dolce, sempre dolce, dolcissimo. The mood changes completely at the fiery second movement, marked passionato, and some critics have gone so far as to claim that this Allegro is the true first movement and that the opening Allegretto should be regarded as an introduction to this movement. In any case, this movement contrasts its blazing opening with more lyric episodes, and listeners will detect the original theme-shape flowing through some of these. The Recitativo—Fantasia is the most original movement in the sonata. The piano’s quiet introduction seems at first a re-visiting of the germinal theme, though it is— ingeniously—a variant of the passionato opening of the second movement. The violin makes its entrance with an improvisation-like passage (this is the fantasia of the title), and the entire movement is quite free in both structure and expression: moments of whimsy alternate with passionate outbursts. After the expressive freedom of the third movement, the finale restores order with pristine clarity: it is a canon in octaves, with one voice following the other at the interval of a measure. The stately canon theme, marked dolce cantabile, is a direct descendant of the sonata’s opening theme, and as this movement proceeds it recalls thematic material from earlier movements. Gradually, the music takes on unexpected power and drives to a massive coda and a thunderous close.

Franck wrote this sonata for his fellow Belgian, the great violinist Eugene Ysaÿe, who gave the premiere in Brussels in November 1886. The composer Vincent D’Indy recalled that premiere: “The violin and piano sonata was performed… in one of the rooms of the Museum of Modern Painting at Brussels. The seance, which began at three o’clock, had been very long, and it was rapidly growing dark. After the first Allegretto of the sonata, the performers could scarcely read the music. Now the official regulations forbade any light whatever in rooms which contained paintings. Even the striking of a match would have been matter for offense. The public was about to be asked to leave, but the audience, already full of enthusiasm, refused to budge. Then Ysaÿe was heard to strike his music stand with his bow, exclaiming [to the pianist], “Allons! Allons!” [Let’s go!] And then, unheard-of marvel, the two artists, plunged in gloom… performed the last three movements from memory, with a fire and passion the more astounding to the listeners in that there was an absence of all externals which could enhance the performance. Music, wondrous and alone, held sovereign sway in the darkness of night.”

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SAN DIEGO SYMPHONY MATTHEW HALLS, conductor FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 2019 · 8 PM THE BAKER-BAUM CONCERT HALL

HANDEL Suite No. 1 in F Major from the Water Music, HWV 348 (1685-1759) Overture Adagio e staccato [Allegro]—Andante—Allegro da Capo Air Bourrée Hornpipe Minuet J.S. BACH Orchestral Suite No. 3 in D Major, BWV 1068 (1685-1750) Ouverture Air Gavotte I & II Bourrée Gigue La Jolla Music Society’s 50th Anniversary Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, National Endowment for the Arts, Banc of California, Vail Memorial Fund, Thomas C. Ackerman Foundation, David C. Copley Foundation, D’Addario Foundation, ProtoStar Foundation, ResMed Foundation, Bright Event Rentals, US Bank, The Dow Divas, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, La Valencia Hotel, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, Joy Frieman, Brian and Silvija Devine, Gordon Brodfuehrer, Jeanette Stevens, Bebe and Marvin Zigman, and an anonymous donor.

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J.S. BACH Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 in D Major, BWV 1050 Allegro Affetuoso Allegro HANDEL Music for the Royal Fireworks, HWV 351 Ouverture Bourrée La Paix La Réjouissance Minuet; Trio This performance marks San Diego Symphony’s La Jolla Music Society debut.

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Program notes by Eric Bromberger

Suite No. 1 in F Major from the Water Music, HWV 348

GEORG FRIDERIC HANDEL Born February 23, 1685, Halle, Germany Died April 14, 1759, London Composed: 1717 Approximate Duration: 28 minutes

In 1714 Georg Ludwig, the Elector of Hanover (and Handel’s employer in Germany) became King George I of England. Though he spoke no English, the new king quickly learned that one of the forms of opulent recreation in London was a boating trip on the Thames and that these excursions were sometimes accompanied by music. In the first years of his tenure, King George made several such trips, and they were grand occasions indeed. One of the most famous took place on July 15, 1717, and two days later the London Courant ran a lengthy description of the festivities: On Wednesday Evening, at about 8, the King took Water at Whitehall in an open Barge…and went up the River towards Chelsea…A City Company’s Barge was employ’d for the Musick, wherein were 50 instruments of all sorts, who play’d all the way from Lambeth (while the Barges drove with the Tide without rowing, as far as Chelsea) the finest Symphonies, compos’d express for this Occasion, by Mr. Hendel; which his Majesty liked so well, that he caus’d it to be plaid over three times in going and returning. At Eleven his Majesty went a-shore at Chelsea, where a Supper was prepar’d, and there was another very fine Consort of Musick, which lasted till 2; after which, his Majesty came again into his Barge, and return’d the same way, the Musick continuing to play till he landed. Friedrich Bonet, a Prussian diplomat serving in London, wrote an account that provides details of the instrumentation and differs slightly on the times that things happened: Next to the King’s barge was that of the musicians, about 50 in number, who played on all kinds of instruments, to wit trumpets, horns, hautboys, bassoons, German flutes, French flutes, violins and basses; but there were no singers. The music had been composed specially by the famous Handel, native of Halle, and His Majesty’s principal Court Composer. His Majesty approved of it so greatly that he caused it to be repeated three times in all, although each performance lasted an hour—namely twice before and once after supper…In order to make this entertainment the more exquisite, Mad. De Kilmaseck had arranged a choice supper in the Late Lord Ranelagh’s villa at Chelsea on the river, where the King went at one in the morning. He left at three o’clock and returned to

St. James’s about half past four. This river excursion began in Whitehall, near the Houses of Parliament and still the center of British government—it is home to 10 Downing Street, the Foreign Office, and the Treasury. The musicians began to play at Lambeth, across the river from Whitehall—it is the residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury. The royal party, surrounded by hundreds of boats full of people who wished to hear Handel’s music, then was borne by the evening tide to Chelsea, about four miles upriver from Whitehall and today a posh shopping area. (San Diegans who wish to understand the scale of such an excursion might imagine a trip that begins at Harbor Island, crosses the harbor to North Island, and continues south to the Coronado Bridge.) The tide on the Thames that evening must have been slow if the first half of the trip allowed two performances of Handel’s hourlong music over a four-mile span. Handel’s manuscript to the Water Music has disappeared, but numerous copies and arrangements have survived, and it has been possible to recreate fairly accurately the music he composed to accompany the king’s river excursions. That music has been divided into three separate suites of varying instrumentation, and this concert offers excerpts from the Suite No. 1 in F Major. It opens with an Overture that could have come from a concerto grosso: it features a concertino of three solo instruments (oboe and two violins) set in contrast to the main body of strings; its vigorous opening, full of trills, gives way to a fugal episode led by the soloists. The Adagio e staccato does indeed offers staccato string attacks over which the solo oboe sings its long melodic line. The next movement is in ternary form: its opening section features great writing for horns and oboes, while the central Andante is introduced by a poised oboe duet, soon taken up by the full orchestra. Next comes the Air, one of the most famous pieces Handel ever wrote—it is invariably included in recorded compilations of Classical Music’s Greatest Hits; heard with fresh ears, it remains as lovely now as it was three centuries ago. The remaining movements are all dances, and they can be performed in different orders. The Bourrée is performed three times: the first time by violins, the second by oboes, and the third by their combination. The sprightly Hornpipe, which has also become famous on its own, dances nimbly along its 3/2 meter. The concluding Minuet is introduced by powerful writing for the horns, and it makes a festive conclusion to the Suite No. 1.

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Orchestral Suite No. 3 in D Major, BWV 1068

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH Born March 21, 1685, Eisenach, Germany Died July 28, 1750, Leipzig Composed: 1731 Approximate Duration: 20 minutes

If Bach were to attend this concert, he would not recognize this music by its title on the program page. The name “suite” is the invention of scholars and musicians who came a century later, when Bach’s four works in this form were given a name that corresponded to later musical practices. Bach himself called these four works ouvertures, a spelling that makes clear the French origin of the form. The French ouverture was an instrumental work in one movement divided into a slow-fast-slow sequence: a slow introduction led to an extended fast section, usually in fugal form, and then a conclusion on an abbreviated return of the slow opening material. The ouverture movement was followed by a collection of dance movements, but Bach used the title to refer to the entire work. It is impossible to date the Suite No. 3 accurately. While Bach’s instrumental music is usually assigned to his years at the court of Anhalt-Cöthen (1717-1723), recent evidence suggests that the Third Suite may actually have been written around 1730, when Bach—then 45—was serving as Cantor at the Thomaskirche in Leipzig. The previous year he had taken on the directorship of the Leipzig Collegium Musicum, a small orchestra that gave weekly concerts, and it may be that he composed the Third Suite—which is scored for three trumpets, timpani, two oboes, and strings—for the use of this orchestra. The opening Ouverture, with its ringing trumpets and pounding timpani, is impressive music. When the young Mendelssohn played this movement on the piano for the aged Goethe, the poet is said to have commented: “The opening is so pompous and dignified that one can really envision an assemblage of important people descending a grand flight of steps.” The slow dotted rhythms of the opening section give way to a blistering fugue introduced by the strings; the movement is rounded off by the return of its grand, ceremonial opening. The second movement, marked simply Air, is the oddman-out in the Third Suite. It is not a dance movement, and this movement is the only one in the suite scored for strings along. And it may also be that this music—so simple, so spare, so moving—is the most beautiful Bach ever wrote. Certainly it has become some of the most famous—it has been arranged for many different instruments and was bestknown a century ago in an arrangement for violin and piano by August Wilhelmj called Air on the G-String. One of the most impressive things about the Air is how Bach creates so

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beautifully proportioned a work in so short a span: without repeats, the Air is only nineteen measures long. Over a quietly walking bass line, Bach spins a long-lined melody that begins simply but grows in power and complexity, then subsides to end quietly. The stately quality of this music has made it something of a memorial piece: the strings of the Cleveland Orchestra played it—without conductor—in memory of their longtime conductor George Szell immediately after his death in 1970. The remaining three movements do conform to expectation, for they are all dance movements. The Gavotte actually offers two dances in this old French form: the jubilant opening section frames an equally-vigorous second gavotte in the center. The brief Bourrée, also of French origin, is in binary form, and the concluding Gigue rides powerfully along its 6/8 meter.

Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 in D Major BWV 1050

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH Composed: 1721 Approximate Duration: 21 minutes

Bach served as Kapellmeister at the court of AnhaltCöthen from 1717 until 1723, an unusually happy period for the composer; Prince Leopold was an enthusiastic and informed amateur musician who put the full resources of his court—including a seventeen-piece orchestra—at Bach’s disposal. Early in his tenure at Cöthen, Bach had journeyed to Berlin to order the construction of a new organ at Cöthen. While in Berlin, he played for Christian Ludwig, the younger brother of King Wilhelm I of Prussia; as a member of the royal family, Christian Ludwig enjoyed the official title of Margrave of Brandenburg. He expressed some interest (perhaps simply polite) in Bach’s music, and the composer promised to send him some. Bach, however, was in no hurry to get around to this, and it was not until several years later, in March 1721, that he finally sent off a handsomely-copied manuscript of six orchestral concertos—with a flowery letter of dedication—to the Margrave in Berlin. The manuscripts were later found among the Margrave’s papers (he apparently never had them performed), and the nickname Brandenburg Concertos was attached to them long after the composer’s death. The Fifth Brandenburg is a true concerto grosso: a small band of soloists (the concertino) is contrasted with string orchestra and continuo (the ripieno). But in this concerto Bach avoids the expected combination of solo violins in the standard concerto grosso, instead offering an unusual set of soloists: flute, violin, and harpsichord. The flute in this case is the modern flute, the transverse (or horizontal) flute, and Bach gives the harpsichord so prominent a part that many feel that this is the first harpsichord concerto: the first movement

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brings a harpsichord cadenza of unusual brilliance and length (65 measures). The Allegro opens with a joyous and vigorous orchestral outburst; the orchestra is unusual in that it has only one violin part, rather than the standard two. This movement features bright sounds—rippling trills and harpsichord runs— punctuated by the return of the opening refrain, though Bach often abbreviates this figure when it returns. Near the end of the movement comes the huge harpsichord cadenza; an earlier version of this concerto had a cadenza only 19 measures long, and Bach significantly lengthened it when he prepared the handsome presentation copy of the manuscript for the Margrave of Brandenburg. The slow movement, marked Affetuoso (“affectionate” or “tender”) is a lovely chamber music interlude for the three soloists with continuo accompaniment, while the finale, marked Allegro, begins with fugal entries from the three soloists; as it proceeds, this dance-like movement shows some similarity to the gigue. All three soloists have music of high spirits and unusual brilliance in this movement.

at the celebration, so perhaps Handel was able to sneak a few “fidles” into his orchestra. News of the upcoming spectacle spread through London, and Handel’s open-air rehearsal of the music in Vauxhall Gardens on April 21 attracted a crowd of 12,000. Traffic to this rehearsal was so heavy that it took some carriages three hours just to make it across London Bridge, and there were reports of scuffles and injuries among the footmen of these carriages (commuter gridlock and road rage are not strictly modern phenomena, apparently). The actual celebration on April 27 turned into a wonderful fiasco. Things began as planned, but the fireworks went awry, setting the “Machine” on fire. A stiff wind blowing across the park quickly turned this into a conflagration, the crowd panicked and fled, and the gaudy pavilion burned to the ground. Servandoni was so outraged that he drew his sword on one of the king’s representatives and was promptly arrested; he was released the next day only after an apology. There is no record of Handel’s reaction to all this, but the following month he performed this music—with the number of winds reduced and “fidles” increased—at a benefit concert for his favorite charity, the Foundling Hospital Music for the Royal Fireworks, HWV 351 of London, and that occasion produced a profit of 2575 pounds for the orphanage. Since that time, the Music for the Royal Fireworks, as it has come to be known, has remained Composed: 1749 one of Handel’s most popular works. Approximate Duration: 18 minutes That popularity is no mystery. This is wonderful The English and the French signed the Treaty of Aixmusic—festive, bright, and strong—and it continues to excite la-Chapelle on October 27, 1748, bringing to a close the audiences long after the occasion for which it was composed War of Austrian Succession. That war, which had dragged has faded into history. Handel opens with a grand Ouverture, on for eight years, had proven so exhausting and costly that somewhat in the French manner but without the fugal writing eventually all the parties were relieved to have it over. Both of the normal French overture. The music begins with a sides immediately began planning victory celebrations, and ringing slow introduction, full of dotted rhythms and fanfares the English plans were elaborate indeed. George II’s staff that must have been particularly pleasing to George II’s brought in the designer Florentine Servandoni, who the desire for a martial sound; the overture then rushes ahead following April erected what was called a “Machine” in on rapid exchanges between brass and strings that overflow Green Park, directly across from Buckingham Palace. This with energy. Handel pauses for a brief slow interlude, then structure, over four hundred feet long and a hundred feet returns to the fast music to rush the overture to its close. At high, took the form of a Doric-style pavilion with elaborate this point in the original celebration came the salute by a wings and a viewing stand. The royal “victory” celebration on hundred cannons, and Handel then offered a series of dance April 27, 1749, was to be a real show in every sense of that movements that were separated by fireworks. First comes term: over a hundred cannons would fire a thunderous salute, an agile Bourrée, and Handel specifies that the oboes are to followed by a massive fireworks show, and Handel was have the first statement here, then they are to drop out and commissioned to write music to accompany all this. allow the strings the second. There follow two movements George II, whose family had had music lessons from with titles appropriate to the occasion. Le Paix (“Peace”) Handel, took an active interest in the music to be performed, takes the form of a slow Siciliana, which rocks gently and and he made clear that he preferred the strident sound of gracefully along its 12/8 meter, while La Rejouissance martial instruments; specifically, his staff told Handel, the (“Rejoicing”) returns to the manner of the opening Ouverture king “hoped there would be no fidles.” Handel was loathe with racing fanfare-like figures for brass and timpani. Handel to do without stringed instruments, but he tried to satisfy rounds matters off with a pair of minuets, varying their the king’s tastes by writing for a massive military band of instrumentation as they repeat until they conclude with the 18 brass instruments, 37 woodwinds, and three timpani. sound of rolling drums and resounding brass. Contemporary accounts speak of over a hundred musicians

GEORG FREDRIC HANDEL

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PRELUDE 7 PM

Brahms Exploration Lecture by Seth Lerer Was Johannes Brahms an innovator, working with new harmonic structures and exploring the boundaries of form? Or was he largely a traditionalist, privileging earlier genres and deeply engaged with counterpoint and convention? Of course, he was both, and this program explores the range of Brahms’s piano works—from his first to his last—to show the arc of his career and his deep commitment to music history. The brilliant short, late pieces anticipate Debussy. The Sonata and the Variations and Fugue on a Theme by Handel recall Beethoven and back to the Baroque.

The Piano Series is sponsored by:

Conrad Prebys and Debbie Turner

La Jolla Music Society’s 50th Anniversary Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, National Endowment for the Arts, Banc of California, Vail Memorial Fund, Thomas C. Ackerman Foundation, David C. Copley Foundation, D’Addario Foundation, ProtoStar Foundation, ResMed Foundation, Bright Event Rentals, US Bank, The Dow Divas, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, La Valencia Hotel, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, Joy Frieman, Brian and Silvija Devine, Gordon Brodfuehrer, Jeanette Stevens, Bebe and Marvin Zigman, and an anonymous donor.

Exclusive representation: Opus 3 Artists

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GARRICK OHLSSON, piano : BRAHMS EXPLORATION I FRIDAY, MAY 3, 2019 · 8 PM

THE BAKER-BAUM CONCERT HALL

BRAHMS Piano Sonata No. 2 in F-sharp Minor, Opus 2 (1833-1897) Allegro ma non troppo, ma energico Andante con espressione Scherzo: Allegro Finale: Introduzione; Allegro non troppo e rubato Six Piano Pieces, Opus 118 Intermezzo in A Minor Intermezzo in A Major Ballade in G Minor Intermezzo in F Minor Romance in F Major Intermezzo in E-flat Minor I N T E R M I S S I O N

BRAHMS Three Intermezzi, Opus 117 No. 1 in E-flat Major: Andante moderato No. 2 in B-flat Minor: Andante non troppo e con molto espressione No. 3 in C-sharp Minor: Andante con moto Variations and Fugue in B-flat Major on a Theme by Handel, Opus 24 Garrick Ohlsson, piano Join us for the conclusion of the Brahms Exploration on November 9, 2019 Garrick Ohlsson last performed for La Jolla Music Society in the Revelle Chamber Music Series on March 24, 2018.

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Program notes by Eric Bromberger

for the dramatic opening gesture of the first movement and for the main theme of the third movement, a scherzo: he works outward from the slow movement as he builds the rest of this Piano Sonata No. 2 in F-sharp Minor, Opus 2 sonata. A quick tour of that sonata: the opening movement Born May 7, 1833, Hamburg is extremely dramatic, with hammered octaves and much Died April 3, 1897, Vienna Composed: 1852 chordal writing. It proceeds almost unremittingly to its Approximate Duration: 27 minutes powerful coda and then closes (surprisingly) with two quiet chords. The slow movement follows, leading without pause In his famous article in the October 1854 Neue Zeitschrift into the scherzo, which is in many respects the most attractive für Musik that hailed Brahms as “a young eagle,” Robert of the four movements. Its basic theme-shape is drawn Schumann described the effect of watching the young man directly from the melodic theme of the slow movement; here play his music: “Sitting at the piano he began to disclose it rushes nimbly along a 6/8 meter. The trio section—quite wonderful regions to us. We were drawn into even more long—is also impressive: the mood changes sharply here as enchanting spheres. Besides, he is a player of genius who the music dances with an unexpected elegance, then makes can make of the piano an orchestra of lamenting and loudly a dark and dissonant return to the opening section. The last jubilant voices. There were sonatas, veiled symphonies movement shows similar imagination. It opens with a long rather…“Schumann helped Brahms publish these sonatas, and introduction—full of swirls, trills, and runs—before launching the young man was astonished by the experience of seeing into the main section, a smoothly-flowing Allegro non troppo his own music in print—and by his sudden respectability. To e rubato. Some of the opening movement’s explosive manner Schumann he wrote: “I still cannot accustom myself to seeing returns here, but at the end Brahms springs another surprise: these guileless children of nature in their smart new clothes.” the movement’s florid introduction now returns, and the For the first of his works to be published, Brahms chose sonata spirals to its close in a great shower of arabesques and the two piano sonatas he had played for the Schumann family; delicate runs. both had been composed while he was still a few months short of his twentieth birthday. Published as his Opus 2, the Six Piano Pieces, Opus 118 Piano Sonata in F-sharp Minor was actually the first to be Composed: 1892 composed: Brahms had written it in November 1852. This Approximate Duration: 23 minutes is a big-boned and dramatic piece of music—at moments it Brahms had a curious relation with the piano. As a young feels very much like “a veiled symphony”—and throughout its span one feels the young composer attempting to constrain man, he made his reputation as a virtuoso pianist and in those early years composed huge works in classical forms: of his his own impetuous and spirited music within the frame of first five published works, three are massive piano sonatas, all the piano sonata as handed down by Beethoven. The result written before he was 21, and there are sets of variations from can feel like a hybrid: this sonata gives the impression this period that rank among the most difficult piano music of wildness, of a free and rhapsodic spirit caught almost unwillingly within classical form. This is also a very unusual ever written. The composer—described in these years by a friend as “the young, heaven-storming Johannes”—seemed piano sonata, and one of its most distinctive features is the on the verge of creating a vast and heroic literature for solo young composer’s effort to unify it around one controlling piano. But then an unexpected thing happened: at age 32 theme-shape. Brahms simply stopped writing music for solo piano. Over This shape appears at the beginning of the second the final three decades of his life, he returned to the genre movement, marked Andante con espressione. Brahms in fact only twice: in 1878-9, when he composed ten brief pieces, composed this movement first, and it may be useful to begin and at the very end of his life, when he wrote the twenty a discussion of this violent sonata with this gentle theme. pieces that make up his Opp. 116, 117, 118, and 119. Brahms drew the shape of the theme from the song Mir ist Leide by the Minnesinger Kraft von Toggenberg; in the song, The twenty pieces of these four final sets are all very brief (they may accurately be described as miniatures, for all last this theme sets the words: “It makes me sad, that winter has only a few minutes), and Brahms gave them a range of titles: bared the wood and heath.” Brahms uses this theme as the capriccio, intermezzo, ballade, romance, and rhapsody. But basis of a variation movement: he offers three variations, these are general titles, and their use can seem arbitrary— the last of which grows into a huge extension of the melody Brahms himself did not distinguish carefully between (Brahms marks it con molt’ agitazione) before fading to the quiet close. But the interesting thing is that Brahms then takes them. Almost all are in ABA form: an opening theme, a the initial four notes of this theme and uses them as the basis countermelody usually in a contrasting tempo and mood, and

JOHANNES BRAHMS

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a return to the opening material, which is always varied on its reappearance. This is intensely personal music, as if Brahms were distilling a lifetime of experience and musical refinement into these pieces as he returned one last time to his own instrument. Brahms composed the six pieces of his Opus 118 in the years 1892-3 and published them under the utterly neutral title Klavierstücke (“piano pieces”) that makes clear that this is a gathering of six different pieces rather than a unified set. The sequence begins with two pieces he calls intermezzos. Brahms specifies that the Intermezzo in A Minor should be molto appassionato, and passionate it certainly is, with the right-hand melody soaring over rolling accompaniment. The structure of this particular piece is unusual: rather than setting it in ternary form, Brahms repeats two separate sections, then allows the music to trail off to a quiet close. The Intermezzo in A Major is like a lullaby (Brahms’ marking is Andante teneramente: “tenderly”), and that gentle mood prevails throughout, though the center section is elaborate and varied before the subtle reintroduction of the opening material. The thunderous beginning of the Ballade in G Minor seems to bring back the world of “the young, heaven-storming Johannes,” who in fact had written a collection of four Ballades for piano at the age of 21. Now, at age 60, Brahms fuses that powerful earlier manner with a greatly refined technique. The Allegro energico opening moves easily into the gorgeous middle section in B major; Brahms constantly reminds the pianist here to play dolce and espressivo. The return of the opening plunges briefly into a “wrong” key, but matters quickly recover, and the music pounds ahead with all its original strength. Brahms gives the Intermezzo in F Minor the marking Allegretto un poco agitato, and much of this music’s atmosphere of disquiet and agitation comes from Brahms’ blurring of meter. He sets this piece in 2/4 but then writes so continuously in triplets that the actual meter feels like 6/8; at points, the duple and triple pulses pull against each other as the music moves insistently forward. The Romance in F Major is built on a dignified chordal melody that makes its way with a disarming simplicity, but the real surprise comes in the center section, which Brahms marks Allegretto grazioso. He moves to D major here, and the music rocks along cheerfully. The concluding Intermezzo in E-flat Minor offers some of the bleakest—and most beautiful—music Brahms ever wrote. His marking is largo e mesto (“slow and sad”), and the pianist’s hands seem to inhabit different worlds at the beginning: the right hand has the spare melodic line while the left accompanies with quiet flurries of 32nd-note runs. The central section—staccato, muttering, dark— suddenly flares to power and incorporates the somber melody from the very beginning. Gradually Brahms returns

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to his opening material and draws the music to its stark conclusion on a slowly-arpeggiated E-flat minor chord.

Three Intermezzi, Opus 117 Composed: 1892 Approximate Duration: 15 minutes

Brahms wrote the Three Intermezzi of his Opus 117 during the summer of 1892, spent at his favorite summer retreat, Bad Ischl, in the Alps near Salzburg. Brahms’ titles for his piano pieces were sometimes a little loose, but for him the term “intermezzo” seemed to imply music of a quiet, almost introspective nature. It is a cliché to call Brahms’ late music “autumnal,” but there is something darker still about these three intermezzi: they are spare, haunting, moving—almost bleak. Brahms himself called them “lullabies of my pain.” The first intermezzo in fact is a lullaby. At the top of the music Brahms wrote two lines of a German translation of the old Scottish ballad Lady Anne Bothwell’s Lament: Balou, my boy, lye still and sleep, it grieves me sore to hear thee weep. The calm outer section (Brahms marks it “sweet, simple”) gives way to a more agitated middle episode in E-flat minor before the return of the opening material and the quiet close. The second intermezzo (Brahms stresses that he wants it played con molta espressione) hides its theme inside a quiet cascade of arpeggios—only gradually does the ear make out the long line of melody within this flow. The outer section offers some of the most wistful music Brahms ever wrote, and the mood changes little in the middle section: Brahms’ biographer Karl Geiringer suggests that this music portrays a “man as he stands with the bleak, gusty autumn wind eddying round him.” The final intermezzo opens with the ominous tread of the quiet main theme in C-sharp minor octaves. It has been compared to a funeral march, and the more animated middle section lightens the mood only briefly before the return of opening theme, now skillfully set as a middle voice within a complex harmony. Verbal description does these three pieces no justice. This quiet and somber music may well be dark. It is also endlessly beautiful.

Variations and Fugue in B-flat Major on a Theme by Handel, Opus 24 Composed: 1861 Approximate Duration: 27 minutes

Brahms was fascinated by variation form throughout his life. From his early piano works through the magnificent passacaglia that concludes his final symphony, he returned

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continually to what was for him one of the most demanding and rewarding of musical forms. Among his works one finds Variations on an Original Theme, Variations on a Hungarian Song, Variations on a Theme of Robert Schumann, Variations on a Theme of Haydn, and Variations on a Theme of Paganini (two sets). The Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Handel, one of Brahms’ finest sets of variations, was written in Hamburg in 1861, when the composer was 28. Brahms chose the original theme from the last movement of the Suite No. 1 in B-flat Major from Handel’s Suites de pièces de clavecin, published in London in 1733. Handel’s theme falls symmetrically into two four-bar phrases and naturally presents great opportunities for variation: Handel himself wrote five variations on it. In his version, Brahms first states Handel’s theme (like Handel, Brahms titles it “Aria”), creates twenty-five variations, then concludes with a tremendous fugue derived from Handel’s original theme. The variations themselves are extremely ingenious, and Brahms complicates his task by composing some of them not just as variations on Handel’s themes but also to conform simultaneously with other music forms: Variation 6, for example, is a baroque canon, No. 19 a siciliana. Brahms stays in the home key of B-flat major almost exclusively: only three of his variations are not in that key. Nearly everyone who has written about the Handel Variations has commented on the “orchestral texture” of the piano writing and has professed to hear the orchestral instruments Brahms “must” have had in mind when he composed each variation. In fact, the Handel Variations have been orchestrated—in 1938 by the English composer Edmund Rubbra—and that version is occasionally performed and has been recorded. Comparison of the two versions inevitably reveals, however, that the music makes best sense on the instrument for which Brahms wrote it. The Handel Variations figured prominently in a very unusual context. On February 6, 1864, three years after this music was written, Brahms and Wagner spent an evening together at the villa the latter had rented outside Vienna. Wagner later had derisive things to say about Brahms (as he did about virtually everyone else), but this evening at least proved cordial, and on that occasion Brahms played his Handel Variations for Wagner. One would expect the proponent of Zukunftmusik—“the music of the future”—to have no use for so ancient and constrained a form as the theme-and-variations, but in fact Wagner was generous enough on this occasion to recognize what the younger composer had accomplished. “It shows what can still be done with the old forms by somebody who knows how to handle them,” he said.

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STORM LARGE & LE BONHEUR SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2019 · 8 PM THE BAKER-BAUM CONCERT HALL

Storm Large, vocals James Beaton, piano Scott Weddle, guitar Matt Brown, bass Greg Eklund, drums PROGRAM

Works to be announced from stage. There will be a 20-minute intermission.

La Jolla Music Society’s 50th Anniversary Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, National Endowment for the Arts, Banc of California, Vail Memorial Fund, Thomas C. Ackerman Foundation, David C. Copley Foundation, D’Addario Foundation, ProtoStar Foundation, ResMed Foundation, Bright Event Rentals, US Bank, The Dow Divas, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, La Valencia Hotel, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, Joy Frieman, Brian and Silvija Devine, Gordon Brodfuehrer, Jeanette Stevens, Bebe and Marvin Zigman, and an anonymous donor.

Exclusive representation: Opus 3 Artists

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ABOUT Singer, actor, author, and playwright Storm Large makes a triumphant return to La Jolla Music Society with her band Le Bonheur. Storm Large and her band perform American songbook classics, Broadway tearjerkers, and rock anthems with ferocity and a wicked sense of humor. Enjoy an eclectic mix of sublime and subversive interpretations of classic songs from the rock and roll canon and the Great American Songbook.

Storm Large & Le Bonheur last performed for La Jolla Music Society at the WinterFest Gala on April 2, 2016.

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PRELUDE 7 PM

Conversation with Benoît Charest hosted by Robert John Hughes

THE TRIPLETS OF BELLEVILLE A CINE-CONCERT

BENOÎT CHAREST, composer-conductor THURSDAY, MAY 9, 2019 · 8 PM THE BAKER-BAUM CONCERT HALL

FEATURING a film by Sylvain Chomet conducted by the composer Benoît Charest Le Terrible Orchestre de Belleville Dan Thouin – keyboard, accordion Alain Bastien – drums Michael Emeneau – percussion, electric vibraphone Bruno Lamarche – saxophone, clarinet, flute Maxime St-Pierre – trumpet Edouard Touchette- trombone Zack Lober - double bass, bass La Jolla Music Society’s 50th Anniversary Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, National Endowment for the Arts, Banc of California, Vail Memorial Fund, Thomas C. Ackerman Foundation, David C. Copley Foundation, D’Addario Foundation, ProtoStar Foundation, ResMed Foundation, Bright Event Rentals, US Bank, The Dow Divas, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, La Valencia Hotel, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, Joy Frieman, Brian and Silvija Devine, Gordon Brodfuehrer, Jeanette Stevens, Bebe and Marvin Zigman, and an anonymous donor.

Booking Direction by: David Lieberman/Artist Representatives

Paget Williams – tour manager Guillaume Briand – sound and technical director PROGRAM

There will be no intermission.

The Story

Adopted by his near-sighted grandmother, Madame Souza, Champion is a lonely little boy. Noticing that the lad is never happier than on a bicycle, Madame Souza puts him through a rigorous training process. Years go by and Champion becomes worthy of his name. Now he is ready to enter the world-famous cycling race, the Tour de France. However during this cycling contest two mysterious, square-shouldered henchmen in black kidnap Champion. Madame Souza and her faithful dog Bruno set out to rescue him. This performance marks The Triplets of Belleville’s La Jolla Music Society debut. 5 0 th

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PRELUDE 7 PM

The Unfolding of Music: Tradition and Innovation Lecture by Kristi Brown Montesano The tension between tradition and innovation pervades much of Western classical-music history. Five celebrated sonatas for cello (or its cousin, the viola da gamba) trace this creative balancing act, revealing links that extend over centuries but also an astounding degree of fresh invention. We will delve especially into how each of these works showcases the cello’s immense expressive range while making new technical demands on the performer.

DAVID FINCKEL & WU HAN FRIDAY, MAY 10, 2019 · 8 PM

THE BAKER-BAUM CONCERT HALL

THE UNFOLDING OF MUSIC J.S. BACH Sonata No. 1 in G Major for Viola da Gamba and Keyboard, (1685-1750) BWV 1027 Adagio Allegro non tanto Andante Allegro moderato BEETHOVEN Sonata for Pianoforte and Cello in C Major, Opus 102, No. 1 (1770-1827) Andante; Allegro vivace Adagio: Allegro vivace MENDELSSOHN Cello Sonata No. 2 in D Major, Opus 58 (1809-1847) Allegro assai vivace Allegretto scherzando Adagio Molto allegro e vivace I N T E R M I S S I O N

La Jolla Music Society’s 50th Anniversary Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, National Endowment for the Arts, Banc of California, Vail Memorial Fund, Thomas C. Ackerman Foundation, David C. Copley Foundation, D’Addario Foundation, ProtoStar Foundation, ResMed Foundation, Bright Event Rentals, US Bank, The Dow Divas, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, La Valencia Hotel, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, Joy Frieman, Brian and Silvija Devine, Gordon Brodfuehrer, Jeanette Stevens, Bebe and Marvin Zigman, and an anonymous donor.

Artists’ Manager: David Rowe Artists

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DEBUSSY Sonata in D Minor for Cello and Piano (1862-1918) Prologue: Lent Sérénade:Modérément animé Finale: Animé BRITTEN Sonata for Cello and Piano in C Major, Opus 65 (1913-1976) Dialogo Scherzo-pizzicato Elegia Marcia Moto perpetuo David Finckel, cello; Wu Han, piano David Finckel and Wu Han last performed for La Jolla Music Society in the Grand Opening Weekend on April 5, 2019.

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Program notes by Eric Bromberger

Sonata for Pianoforte and Cello in C Major, Opus 102, No. 1

Sonata No. 1 in G Major for Viola da Gamba and Keyboard, BWV 1027

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH Born March 21, 1685, Eisenach, Germany Died July 28, 1750, Leipzig Composed: 1720 Approximate Duration: 13 minutes

A viola da gamba was—and still is, for that matter—a viol held between the legs when it is played. It is the counterpart of the viola da braccia, which was held beneath the chin or against the chest. Eventually the viola da braccia grew somewhat smaller and became the modern viola (its original name survives in the German word for viola: Bratsche). As a performing instrument, the viola da gamba essentially disappeared, to be kept alive only by enthusiasts for performances on original instruments, and most modern performances of Bach’s three sonatas for viola da gamba and harpsichord are given by either viola or cello with piano accompaniment. It has been difficult to date the three sonatas Bach wrote for this combination of instruments. Are they from his years as Kapellmeister at the court of Anhalt-Cöthen (1717-1723), when he wrote the greater part of his secular music and served a prince who played the viola da gamba? Or do they come from his tenure as cantor at the Thomaskirche in Leipzig? No one is sure. Perhaps sensibly, the editors of The New Grove Dictionary throw up their hands and play it safe, noting that these sonatas were written sometime between 1720 and 1739. These sonatas are notable for the liberation of the keyboard part: no longer is it relegated to providing a simple bass line beneath the melodic instrument, and here the two instruments become equal partners in the musical enterprise. In the Sonata in G Major, Bach adopted the sequence of movements of the Italian sonata di chiesa, or church sonata: slow-fast-slow-fast. The stately opening Adagio gives the keyboard a distinctive role, with the melodic line moving between cello and the pianist’s right hand. In the spirited Allegro ma non tanto, the keyboard leads the way into a movement full of imitative writing. The somber Andante is set in E minor, and its closing moments the piano has a sustained solo passage as the cello holds a pedal E; the buoyant finale, marked Allegro moderato, once again features imitative part-writing.

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Born December 16, 1770, Bonn Died March 26, 1827, Vienna Composed: 1815 Approximate Duration: 15 minutes

Beethoven composed the two cello sonatas of his Opus 102 during the summer of 1815, which he spent with the family of Countess Erdödy at the Jedlersee. At age 44, Beethoven was approaching a critical point in his career. The previous year had seen the Congress of Vienna and Beethoven’s triumph before the assembled diplomats with his musically-inferior Wellington’s Victory. Though financially profitable for him, such music illustrated dramatically the end of what has been called—for better or worse—his “Heroic Style,” and now Beethoven plunged into a period of musical uncertainty. This uncertainty was marked by a sharp decrease in productivity, and over the next five years Beethoven would write very little music. Compounding this problem were health troubles and Beethoven’s nearly-obsessive concern for his nephew Karl, and much of the composer’s energies during this period went to getting legal custody of the boy and caring for him. When Beethoven’s creative energies returned in full force—in about 1820—he had developed an entirely new style. When it finally arrived, however, that late style was not a complete surprise, for there had been hints of new directions in the music Beethoven was writing before his creative energies diminished. The intimate and inward mood that marks the late work was already apparent in the Violin Sonata in G Major (1812) and the Elegiac Song (1814), and it is certainly a feature of the two cellos sonatas composed during the summer of 1815 for Joseph Linke, cellist of the Schuppanzigh Quartet, who was also spending that summer with the Erdödy family. The Opus 102 sonatas were Beethoven’s last for any instrument except piano, and already in this music he was experimenting with sonata form and moving away from the “Heroic Style” of the previous decade. The first movement of the Sonata in C Major opens with a slow introduction, and Beethoven’s instructions to both performers are crucial. The cello’s entrance is marked teneramente (“tenderly”) and dolce cantabile; Beethoven stresses to the pianist dolce, and throughout the introduction the marking is sempre dolce. This lyric prelude gives way to a vigorous Allegro vivace full of dotted rhythms and scurrying triplets. Beethoven had a great deal of trouble writing slow movements for cello—only his final sonata has a genuine slow movement—and in the present sonata the Adagio is not a true movement. Only nine measures long, it is merely a florid interlude between the fast outer movements. Of particular interest, though, is the transition between this Adagio and the

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finale, for here Beethoven brings back the gentle theme of the very beginning, and this intimate melody now serves to introduce the blistering Allegro vivace that closes the sonata.

Cello Sonata No. 2 in D Major, Opus 58

FELIX MENDELSSOHN Born February 3, 1809, Hamburg Died November 4, 1847, Leipzig Composed: 1843 Approximate Duration: 25 minutes

In the early 1840s, Mendelssohn found himself trapped between competing obligations. He was the young conductor of the superb Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, and with that group he had resurrected music by forgotten masters, given important premieres, extended the season, and raised players’ salaries. But the newly-crowned king of Prussia, Frederick William IV, wished to open a new Academy of Arts in Berlin and named Mendelssohn head of the music school. Reluctant to leave his excellent situation in Leipzig but anxious for the Berlin appointment, Mendelssohn found the situation in Berlin complicated. Despite a generous salary, his duties were not clear, the orchestra was not nearly as good as his own in Leipzig, and the Academy’s plans always seemed mired in red tape. As a further complication, Leipzig opened a new conservatory and asked Mendelssohn to become its head. Reluctant to disappoint the king but anxious to return to Leipzig, Mendelssohn was soon trying to get out of the Berlin appointment. With great tact—getting free involved an interview with the king—Mendelssohn finally won a reduction of his duties and was able to assume the directorship of Leipzig Conservatory. But life in Leipzig brought its own stresses, including the death of the composer’s mother in December 1842. In February 1843 Mendelssohn led the first performance of the revised version of his cantata Die erste Walpurgisnacht and later that month played host to Berlioz, who led concerts of his own music. In April the Conservatory opened, and Mendelssohn was occupied with hiring faculty and establishing a curriculum. Not until summer did he find time to compose. Two works came from the summer of 1843: the superb incidental music for Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream and the Cello Sonata No. 2 in D Major. Some have heard in the dramatic sonata a reflection of the tensions the composer felt at this time, but that must remain conjecture. Taken on its own terms, the sonata is cheerful music, energetic and vital. The opening of the Allegro assai vivace has been compared to the opening of Mendelssohn’s Italian Symphony, written ten years earlier: over a pulsing 6/8 accompaniment, the main theme sails easily on a long flow of melody. A quieter second idea arrives quickly, but the opening theme

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dominates the movement. The second movement, a scherzo marked Allegretto scherzando, is the finest in the sonata. Deft scherzos were a Mendelssohn specialty (think of the scherzo he wrote that same summer for A Midsummer Night’s Dream), and this is one of his most imaginative. The piano alone has the quietly jaunty first theme, which the cello then plays pizzicato. The middle of this fleet movement flows easily, but the opening theme returns to bring the scherzo to its effective—and quiet—close. The brief (46-measure) Adagio has an unusual structure. It consists of a chorale for the piano, built on arpeggiated chords, and a dramatic recitative for the cello. Mendelssohn concludes with a brilliant touch: the two sections are combined and played simultaneously. The concluding Molto allegro e vivace, with its soaring cello melody, is the most virtuosic of the sonata.

Sonata in D Minor for Cello and Piano

CLAUDE DEBUSSY

Born August 22, 1862, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France Died March 25, 1918, Paris Composed: 1915 Approximate Duration: 11 minutes

Debussy’s Cello Sonata is a product of his difficult final years, which were darkened by the steady advance of cancer and the demoralizing onslaught of World War I. The composer took refuge in planning a set of six sonatas, but he specified that his model was the French sonata of the eighteenth century and not the classical German sonata. To make his point—and his nationalistic sympathies—even more clear, Debussy signed the scores of these works “Claude Debussy, musicien français.” He lived to complete only three of the projected six sonatas: a Cello Sonata (1915); a Sonata for Flute, Viola, and Harp (1916); and the Violin Sonata (1917). The three sonatas that Debussy completed have never achieved the popularity of his earlier works, and the composer himself deprecated them with the self-irony that marked his painful final years. Of the Violin Sonata, he remarked: “This sonata will be interesting from a documentary viewpoint and as an example of what may be produced by a sick man in time of war.” But this music has a power all its own, and listeners who put aside their preconceptions about what Debussy should sound like (and about what a sonata should be) will find this spare music moving and—in its austere way— painfully beautiful. One of the most impressive things about the Cello Sonata is its concentration: it lasts less than twelve minutes. Further intensifying this music’s severity is Debussy’s refusal to develop—or even to use—themes in a traditional sense: this is music not of fully-developed themes but of thematic

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fragments appearing in various forms and shapes. The opening movement, Prologue—Lent, is only 51 measures long, but Debussy alters the tempo every few measures: the score is saturated with tempo changes and performance instructions. The piano’s opening three-measure phrase recurs throughout, contrasting with the cello’s agitato passages in the center section. At the end, the cello winds gradually into its highest register and concludes hauntingly on the interval of a perfect fifth, played in harmonics. The second and third movements are performed without pause. The second is marked Sérénade, but this is unlike any serenade one has heard before: there is nothing lyric about this song. The cello snaps out grumbling pizzicatos (Debussy considered calling this movement Pierrot Angry at the Moon), and when the cello is finally given a bowed passage, it is marked ironique. The finale—Animé—opens with three quick pizzicatos and then races ahead. As in the first movement, there are frequent changes of tempo, a continuing refusal to announce or develop themes in traditional senses, and sudden changes of mood: at one point the performer is instructed to play a brief lyric passage con morbidezza, which means “gently,” yet another passage is marked arraché, or “ripped out.” The sonata concludes on an abrupt pizzicato. Such a description makes the sonata sound fierce, abstract, even mocking. But beneath the surface austerity of this sonata lies music of haunting emotional power.

Sonata for Cello and Piano, Opus 65

BENJAMIN BRITTEN

whiskies we finally sat down and played through the sonata. We played like pigs, but we were so happy.” The premiere performance—a great success—took place at the Aldeburgh Festival on July 7, 1961. The sonata is in five movements, rather than the expected three or four, and much of its thematic material is based on the interval of a second, either rising or falling. The opening movement, Dialogo, begins with a tentative cello figure that revolves around this interval; Britten marks its first appearance lusingando (“intimate, coaxing”). The second subject, marked dolce, is a slow extension of that opening theme; the animated development leads to a close on fragments of the original theme. In the brief Scherzo, Britten has the cello play pizzicato throughout—the composer called this movement “guitar-like”—and the piano’s staccato accompaniment mirrors the cello’s pizzicatos. The piano’s introduction to the Elegia again revolves around the interval of a second; the cello’s grieving opening melody rises to a full-throated climax before falling away to end quietly. The fourth movement, a sardonic march, whips past in barely two minutes; Britten accentuates the aggressive quality of this music by having the cello at moments play ponticello (bowing on top of the bridge to produce a grainy, disembodied sound) and giving it stinging glissandos. The finale is a perpetual motion movement based on the cello’s opening theme. Britten marks the theme saltando, which means “leaping”—that is, played with a springing bow. This opening subject will recur in a great range of moods, forms, and registers in the breathless finale.

Born November 22, 1913, Lowestoft, England Died December 4, 1976, Aldeburgh, England Composed: 1961 Approximate Duration: 20 minutes

In 1960 Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich introduced two of his close friends, cellist Mstislav Rostropovich and composer Benjamin Britten. These two in turn became good friends, and theirs was a creative relationship: over the next few years the English composer wrote five works for the Russian cellist. The first of these was the Sonata for Cello and Piano, begun in December 1960 and completed the following month. It was scheduled for its premiere the following summer, and Britten and Rostropovich gathered to rehearse it. As might be expected, the two new friends—both creative artists—were a little nervous about the prospect of trying it out for the first time. Rostropovich later described the scene: “Ben said, ‘Well, Slava, do you think we have time for a drink first?’ I said, ‘Yes, yes,’ so we both drank a large whisky. Then Ben said: ‘Maybe we have time for another one?’ ‘Yes, yes,’ I said. Another large whisky. After four or five very large 5 0 th A N N I V E R S A R Y S E A S O N 2 0 1 8 - 1 9 |

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STORM LARGE’S CRAZY ENOUGH SATURDAY, MAY 11, 2019 · 8 PM SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2019 · 3 PM THE BAKER-BAUM CONCERT HALL

Storm Large, vocals James Beaton, piano Scott Weddle, guitar Matt Brown, bass Greg Eklund, drums PROGRAM

There will be no intermission.

La Jolla Music Society’s 50th Anniversary Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, National Endowment for the Arts, Banc of California, Vail Memorial Fund, Thomas C. Ackerman Foundation, David C. Copley Foundation, D’Addario Foundation, ProtoStar Foundation, ResMed Foundation, Bright Event Rentals, US Bank, The Dow Divas, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, La Valencia Hotel, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, Joy Frieman, Brian and Silvija Devine, Gordon Brodfuehrer, Jeanette Stevens, Bebe and Marvin Zigman, and an anonymous donor.

Exclusive Representation: Opus 3 Artists

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ABOUT An autobiographical musical written and performed by Storm Large, Crazy Enough is about staying alive and living fully in the moment. Part cabaret, part confessional, and part comedy, this workshop performance reveals how she grew up with a schizophrenic mother and the way music helped her to overcome heartache. Celebrating the show’s 10th anniversary this season, Storm Large takes her audience on a gritty journey, in painful and humorous detail,showing us what it takes sometimes just to survive. Storm Large last performed for La Jolla Music Society in a Special Event on May 4, 2019.

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PRELUDE 2 PM

Musical Prelude by young artists from the San Diego Youth Symphony and Conservatory

RICHARD LIN & CHIH-YI CHEN SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2019 · 3 PM

THE BAKER-BAUM CONCERT HALL

GRIEG Violin Sonata No. 3 in C Minor, Opus 45 (1843-1907) Allegro molto ed appassionato Allegretto espressivo alla Romanza Allegro animato

POULENC Sonata for Violin and Piano (1899-1963) Allegro con fuoco Intermezzo Presto tragico I N T E R M I S S I O N

The Discovery Series is sponsored by:

Jeanette Stevens Gordon Brodfuehrer

La Jolla Music Society’s 50th Anniversary Season is supported by The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, County of San Diego Community Enhancement Program, National Endowment for the Arts, Banc of California, Vail Memorial Fund, Thomas C. Ackerman Foundation, David C. Copley Foundation, D’Addario Foundation, ProtoStar Foundation, ResMed Foundation, Bright Event Rentals, US Bank, The Dow Divas, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, La Valencia Hotel, The Westgate Hotel, Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner, Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum, The Beyster Family, Joan and Irwin Jacobs, Joy Frieman, Brian and Silvija Devine, Gordon Brodfuehrer, Jeanette Stevens, Bebe and Marvin Zigman, and an anonymous donor.

Artists’ Manager: David Rowe Artists

BRAHMS Violin Sonata No. 3 in D Minor, Opus 108 (1833-1897) Allegro Adagio Un poco presto e con sentimento Presto agitato RAFF Cavatina, Opus 85, No. 3 (1822-1882)

SARASATE Zigeunerweisen, Opus 20 (1844-1908) Richard Lin, violin; Chih-Yi Chen, piano

This performance marks the La Jolla Music Society debut for Richard Lin and Chih-Yi Chen.

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Program notes by Eric Bromberger

Violin Sonata No. 3 in C Minor, Opus 45

EDVARD GRIEG Born June 15, 1843, Bergen, Norway Died September 4, 1907, Bergen Composed: 1886-87 Approximate Duration: 24 minutes

Grieg was never especially attracted to the sonata form so favored by nineteenth-century German composers like his good friend Johannes Brahms. While his most popular composition is his Piano Concerto, Grieg was happiest—and most successful—in smaller forms such as songs and pieces for solo piano. It should come as no surprise, then, that Grieg wrote so little chamber music: one cello sonata, one string quartet, and three violin sonatas. But despite its comparative rarity in his output, Grieg was interested enough in chamber music to write it throughout his career: his First Violin Sonata dates from 1865, when Grieg was only 22; the Third is one of his final works. Grieg’s violin sonatas are heard less often today than they were even a few decades ago, and this is unfortunate, for their combination of lyricism and passion should make them attractive to both the professional and amateur performer, as well as to audiences. Only the Sonata in C Minor has remained steadily in the repertory, and many record collectors today treasure a historic recording of this sonata by Kreisler and Rachmaninoff, made in 1928. Grieg wrote his third—and last—violin sonata in the years 1886-87, when he was 43; the first performance took place in Leipzig in December 1887 with Adolph Brodsky as violinist and Grieg himself at the piano. In contrast to the more amiable first two sonatas, the Third is full of fire, and one feels this from the first instant of the Allegro molto ed appassionato, where the motto-like opening theme bursts out with no introduction. The second idea is more lyric, but the overall impression this movement creates is of continuous drama, particularly as the opening theme dominates the development, appearing in many registers and guises. Grieg’s tendency to develop a movement through repetition rather than through the growth of his thematic material is evident here. The movement arrives at its close on a fierce restatement of the opening theme. After the seething drama of the opening movement, the second brings welcome calm. As its title indicates, the Allegretto espressivo alla Romanza is a romance, an expressive movement in free form (here ternary form). Its opening subject, given entirely to the piano, is Grieg at his most intimate and lyric, and the violin repeats the entire section verbatim. An Allegro molto center section, sometimes

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characterized as a folk-dance, provides animated contrast before violin and piano together restate the opening section. The beginning of the Allegro animato brings a surprise, for the violin’s opening theme is a variation of the Allegro molto center section of the previous movement. The stamping, dance-like rhythm of this theme is never absent for long in the final movement. At the climax, the music relaxes into a Cantabile passage for the violin over great arpeggios in the piano before the sonata concludes with a Prestissimo rush.

Sonata for Violin and Piano

FRANCIS POULENC Born January 7, 1899, Paris Died January 30, 1963, Paris Composed: 1942-43 Approximate Duration: 18 minutes

Poulenc loved the sound of wind instruments. When he composed his Sextet for Piano and Woodwind Quintet, he referred to it as “an homage to the wind instruments I have loved from the moment I began composing,” and he wrote wonderfully for winds throughout his life. About stringed instruments, however, Poulenc was much less sure. In particular, the combination of a stringed instrument with piano—a combination that had seemed very natural to Beethoven and Brahms—gave Poulenc trouble. He noted that he did not like the sound of “the violin in the singular,” and he wrote only two string sonatas, the present violin sonata and one for cello. Yet both of these are impressive works. A dark atmosphere hangs over the Violin Sonata. Poulenc composed it in Paris in 1942-43, during the German occupation, and dedicated it to the memory of the Spanish poet Frederico García Lorca, who had been murdered by the Fascists during the Spanish Civil War. Poulenc was the pianist at the premiere of the Violin Sonata, and the violinist on that occasion was the young French violinist Ginette Neveu. When she was killed in an air crash in 1949, Poulenc went back and revised the last movement of this sonata, which is pointedly marked Presto tragico. One should not approach this sonata thinking that it is all darkness and gloom, for it is not. The sonata is in the expected three movements, and Poulenc treats the piano and violin as equals. The aptly-marked Allegro con fuoco is indeed full of fire. Its agitated beginning rides along a spiky energy that gives way to a more relaxed central episode, full of an unexpected sweetness; the opening material returns to drive the movement to a violent close. Poulenc attached a fragment of a quotation from Lorca to the slow movement—“The guitar makes dreams weep”—and we may hear something of the guitar, an instrument Lorca played, in the violin’s pizzicato strokes here. This music has an exotic character,

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its long lyric lines full of dark swirls. The concluding Presto tragico returns to the manner of the opening movement, with a bristling energy and brilliant violin passages, including some for left-handed pizzicato. The ending is striking, and perhaps this is the section Poulenc re-fashioned after Neveu’s death: the energy dissipates on a cadenza-like flourish for violin, and the sonata vanishes on sharp strokes of sound.

Violin Sonata No. 3 in D Minor, Opus 108

JOHANNES BRAHMS Born May 7, 1833, Hamburg Died April 3, 1897, Vienna Composed: 1886-88 Approximate Duration: 21 minutes

Brahms spent the summer of 1886 at Lake Thun in Switzerland. He had just completed his Fourth Symphony, and now—in a house from which he had a view of the lake and a magnificent glacier—he turned to chamber music. That summer he completed three chamber works and began the Violin Sonata in D Minor, but he put the sonata aside while he wrote the Zigeunerlieder (“Gypsy Songs”) and Double Concerto for Violin and Cello, grumbling that writing for stringed instruments should be left to “someone who understands fiddles better than I do.” He returned to Lake Thun and completed his final violin sonata in the summer of 1888. Despite Brahms’ customary self-deprecation, his writing for stringed instruments could be very convincing, and the Third Violin Sonata is brilliant music—not in the sense of being flashy but in the fusion of complex technique and passionate expression that marks Brahms’ finest music. The violin’s soaring, gypsy-like main theme at the opening of the Allegro is so haunting that it is easy to miss the remarkable piano accompaniment: far below, the piano’s quiet syncopated octaves move ominously forward, generating much of the music’s tension. Piano alone has the second theme, with the violin quickly picking it up and soaring into its highest register. The development of these two ideas is disciplined and ingenious: in the piano’s lowest register Brahms sets a pedal A and lets it pound a steady quarter-note pulse for nearly 50 unbroken measures—beneath the powerful thematic development, the pedal notes hammer a tonal center insistently into the listener’s ear. Its energy finally spent, this movement gradually dissolves on fragments of the violin’s opening melody. The heartfelt Adagio consists of a long-spanned melody (built on short metric units—the meter is 3/8) that develops by repetition; the music rises in intensity until the doublestopped violin soars high above the piano, then falls back to end peacefully. Brahms titled the third movement Un poco presto e con sentimento, though the particular sentiment he

had in mind remains uncertain. In any case, this shadowy, quicksilvery movement is based on echo effects as bits of theme are tossed between the two instruments. The movement comes to a shimmering close: piano arpeggios spill downward, and the music vanishes in two quick strokes. By contrast, the Presto agitato finale hammers along a pounding 6/8 meter. The movement is aptly titled: this is agitated music, restless and driven. At moments it sounds frankly symphonic, as if the music demands the resources of a full symphony orchestra to project its furious character properly. Brahms marks the violin’s thematic entrance passionato, but he needn’t have bothered—that character is amply clear from the music itself. Even the noble second theme, first announced by the piano, does little to dispel the driven quality of this music. The complex development presents the performers with difficult problems of ensemble, and the very ending feels cataclysmic: the music slows, then suddenly rips forward to the cascading smashes of sound that bring this sonata to its powerful close.

Cavatina, Opus 85, No. 3

JOACHIM RAFF

Born May 27, 1822, Lachen, Switzerland Died June 24/25, 1882, Frankfurt Composed: 1859 Approximate Duration: 4 minutes

Joachim Raff was one of the most prolific and successful composers of the nineteenth century, yet today virtually all of his music has vanished. The son of a musician, Raff was a prodigy as a child, teaching himself to play the violin, piano, and organ. His early compositions drew the attention of Mendelssohn, who arranged their publication, and Liszt, who invited Raff to become his assistant. Raff spent the years 1850-53 as Liszt’s assistant in Weimar and may have helped Liszt orchestrate some of his tone poems. From there Raff moved on to found a conservatory in Frankfurt, where he not only brought Clara Schumann onto the faculty but also established a course for women composers. Raff was unbelievably prolific as a composer. His list of opus numbers, which runs to well over 200, includes six operas, eleven symphonies, five concertos, a vast amount of chamber music (including eight string quartets and five violin sonatas), as well as songs, choral music, and keyboard works. In these works Raff attempted to fuse the great Germanic classical tradition with “the music of the future,” particularly the program music of his colleague Liszt: of Raff’s eleven symphonies, eight have subtitles that indicate a programmatic content. Raff’s music has had champions (among them Bernard Herrmann) but today, nearly a century and a half after his death, almost none of it is performed. An exception is his Cavatina, published in 1859 as one

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of Raff’s Six Pieces, Opus 58. This is a gentle little piece for violin and piano, and it might be easy to write it off as an example of the salon music so typical of the nineteenth century, except that it is continuously lovely and charms across its brief span. The Cavatina is based on one theme, heard at the opening and marked Larghetto, quasi Andantino. This melody repeats, growing more complex as it proceeds, and finally rises to a soaring climax, then subsides to the murmuring conclusion.

Zigeunerweisen, Opus 20

PABLO DE SARASATE Born March 10, 1844, Pamplona, Spain Died September 20, 1908, Biarritz, France Composed: 1878 Approximate Duration: 11 minutes

Spanish violinist Pablo de Sarasate was one of the great performers of the nineteenth century. Trained in Paris, he toured throughout Europe and the western hemisphere; he also lived long enough to make some of the earliest recordings (in 1904), and these confirm that he was a violinist of superb technique. Maybe the truest measure of Sarasate’s greatness as a violinist is the music composed specifically for him: Bruch’s Scottish Fantasy, Lalo’s Symphonie Espagnole, Saint-Saëns’ Violin Concerto No. 3 and Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso, and Wieniawski’s Violin Concerto No. 2. Like so many virtuosos of centuries past, Sarasate was also a composer, and he enlivened the literature with a number of brief works for violin and piano (or orchestra). Many of these reflect his own Spanish heritage: Navarra, Jota Aragonesa, Caprice Basque, and Eight Spanish Dances. Sarasate’s Zigeunerweisen, composed in 1878, reflects quite a different heritage. That German title means “Gypsy Airs,” and this music is a violin showpiece in the style of Hungarian gypsy music. It opens with a slow introduction, full of sobbing gypsy melodies and florid figuration, followed by a razzle-dazzle Allegro molto vivace to close things out. With its boundless energy, quick modulations and short repeated phrases, this final section inhabits the same musical world as Brahms’ Hungarian Dances. Throughout, Sarasate supplies the violinistic pyrotechnics—artificial harmonics, left-hand pizzicatos, one-finger glissandos, and sustained high-position work—that are just as impressive now as they were a century ago.

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JJ @

JAZZ AT

THE JAI ANAT COHEN QUARTET

THURSDAY, MAY 16, 2019 · 7 PM & 9 PM TICKETS START AT $25 THE JAI

“With the clarinet she becomes a singer, a dancer, a poet, a mad scientist, laughing — musically — with the sheer delight of reaching that new place, that new feeling, with each chorus.” -JazzTimes

JAZZMEIA HORN, jazz vocalist SATURDAY, JUNE 8, 2019 · 7 PM & 9 PM TICKETS START AT $25 THE JAI

Winner of the Theloneous Monk Institute of Jazz International Vocals Competition

858.459.3728 | LJMS.org

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BIOGRAPHIES Chih-Yi Chen, piano

Pianist Chih-Yi Chen’s versatile qualities as a collaborative pianist, chamber musician and soloist have distinguished her as a rarity amongst pianists. Her work with the talented young violinists of the Indiana University Violin Virtuosi directed by Mimi Zweig garnered her recognition as a specialist in violin repertoire and she has since become a sought-after collaborative pianist. Since 2003, she has been performing with International Violin Competition of Indianapolis Laureates on the annual Laureate Series and on tour. She was also one of the official pianists for the 9th and 10th Quadrennial Competitions. At the 10th Quadrennial, she was awarded special recognition for “Best Performances” of the Beethoven and Mozart sonatas. Born in Taipei, Ms.Chen is on the faculty of the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music where she teaches collaborative piano.

Akira Eguchi, piano

Born in Tokyo, Akira Eguchi received a degree in Music Composition from Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music, where he subsequently served as a faculty member. Mr. Eguchi received his Master's Degree in Piano Performance from The Juilliard School. He has studied with Herbert Stessin, Samuel Sanders, Hitoshi Toyama, Shin Sato, Akira Kitamura, Ichiro Mononobe, and Akiko Kanazawa. Currently living in New York City and Tokyo, on the faculty of CUNY Brooklyn College. Recently, he was appointed as an Associate Professor at Tokyo National University of the Arts. He also is a guest professor of Senzoku-Gakuen Music College in Japan. Since making his highly acclaimed New York recital debut at Alice Tully Hall in 1992, Mr. Eguchi has performed in the foremost music centers of the United States, Europe, and the Far East.

David Finckel, cello and Wu Han, piano

David Finckel and Wu Han are among the most esteemed and influential classical musicians in the world today. Recipients of Musical America’s Musicians of the Year award, the energy, imagination, and integrity they bring to their concert performances and artistic projects go unmatched. Season highlights include performances with The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center (CMS); a seven-city U.S. tour with violinist Daniel Hope and violist Paul Neubauer; trio performances with violinist Philip Setzer; and Far East appearances in Taipei, Hsinchu, and Shanghai. The duo will also be the subject of two television features to be broadcast on PBS stations across the country. Mr.Finckel and Ms.Han, Artistic Directors of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, are also the founders and Artistic Directors of Music@Menlo. The founders and Artistic Directors of South Korea’s Chamber Music Today festival, this season the duo inaugurates an immersive, week-long festival in Palm Beach. Ms. Han also currently serves as Artistic Advisor of Wolf Trap’s Chamber Music at the Barns for two seasons. Leaders of the classical recording industry, they created ArtistLed in 1997, the first musician-directed and internet-based classical recording company. Mr.Finckel and Ms.Han have also overseen the multiple media projects at CMS, and the Music@Menlo LIVE label, which has been praised as “the most ambitious recording project of any classical music festival in the world” (San Jose Mercury News). Dedicated to the next generation of artists, under their leadership at CMS Two Program identifies and inducts the finest young chamber artists into the entire spectrum of CMS activities. Music@Menlo’s Chamber Music Institute has provided hundreds of students with incomparable, immersive musical experiences. Mr.Finckel and Ms.Han direct the LG Chamber Music School in South Korea, and from 2013 to 2018, led an intensive chamber music studio at the Aspen Music Festival and School.

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BIOGRAPHIES

From the Top From the Top is a national non-profit organization that supports, develops, and shares young people’s artistic voices and stories. Its national platform and leadership programs amplify the hope, passion, and discipline of today’s extraordinary young musicians. From the Top provides young musicians with live performance opportunities in premier concert venues across the country; national exposure to over a half million listeners on its weekly NPR show; leadership and community engagement preparation; and nearly three million in scholarships since 2005.

Vijay Gupta, violin and host

Vijay Gupta is a violinist and social justice advocate. An esteemed performer, communicator, educator, and citizen-artist, Mr. Gupta is a leading advocate for the role of the arts and music to heal, inspire, provoke change, and foster social connection. He is the founder and Artistic Director of Street Symphony, a non-profit organization providing musical engagement, dialogue, and teaching artistry for homeless and incarcerated communities in Los Angeles. Mr. Gupta is a 2018 John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellow. A passionate and dedicated educator, he serves on the faculty of the Colburn School and the Longy School of Music. He also serves on the board of directors of the D.C.-based national arts advocacy organization Americans for the Arts, as well as Los Angeles’ beloved 24th Street Theatre. Mr. Gupta made his solo debut with the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra under the baton of Zubin Mehta at age 11, and has been an acclaimed international performer since the age of eight. Mr. Gupta joined the Los Angeles Philharmonic at age 19, and served as member of the first violin section through 2018. He has appeared as a guest concertmaster with the Los Angeles Opera and the Philharmonia Orchestra of London, and is an active recitalist, soloist, and chamber musician.

Michelle Cann, piano and co-host

Michelle Cann made her orchestral debut at age 14 and has since performed with various well-known orchestras throughout the U.S. and abroad. She recently performed the New York City premiere of Concerto in One Movement by composer Florence Price, the first African-American woman to be recognized as a symphonic composer. Her performance was well received by the audience and press alike. The Boston Musical Intelliger wrote "Michelle Cann...was a compelling, sparkling virtuoso, bringing this riveting work to life in its first New York performance."  Ms. Cann received her Bachelor and Master degrees in piano performance from the Cleveland Institute of Music and an Artist Diploma from the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. She appeared on From the Top at age 18.

Michael Gerdes, prelude presenter

Michael Gerdes is the Director of Orchestras at San Diego State University where he conducts the San Diego State Symphony Orchestra, Chamber Orchestra, and Opera Orchestra. He earned his Bachelor of Music degree in Music Education and Bachelor of Arts degree in Philosophy from Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota. He also holds a Master’s degree in Orchestral Conducting from James Madison University. Selected by The San Diego Union-Tribune as one of three “Faces to Watch” in Classical Music during his first year as Director of Orchestras, Mr. Gerdes is focused on creating a thriving orchestral community at San Diego State University.

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BIOGRAPHIES

Robert John Hughes, prelude presenter

Journalist, broadcaster, musician, author, record producer. During his ownership at San Diego FM station, 102.1 KPRi, Mr.Hughes interviewed hundreds of musical artists including Sting, Adele, Don Henley and Glenn Frey (Eagles), Bonnie Raitt, B.B. King, Paul Simon, and Peter Gabriel. As a record producer and member of the GRAMMY® Academy, Robert created the five disk KPRi Live Tracks CD series that offered over 130 live performances recorded in his home studio and at KPRi studios and events.

Jersualem Quartet “Passion, precision, warmth, a gold blend: these are the trademarks of this excellent Israeli string quartet.” Such was the New York Times’ impression of the Jerusalem Quartet. Since the ensemble’s founding in 1993 and subsequent 1996 debut, the four Israeli musicians have embarked on a journey of growth and maturation. This journey has resulted in a wide repertoire and stunning depth of expression, which carries on the string quartet tradition in a unique manner. The ensemble has found its core in a warm, full, human sound and an egalitarian balance between high and low voices. This approach allows the Quartet to maintain a healthy relationship between individual expression and a transparent and respectful presentation of the composer’s work. It is also the drive and motivation for the continuing refinement of its interpretations of the classical repertoire as well as exploration of new epochs.

Storm Large, vocals

Storm Large: musician, actor, playwright, author, awesome. She shot to national prominence as a contestant on the CBS show Rock Star: Supernova, where despite having been eliminated in the semifinals, she built a fan base that continues to follow her around the world. Since then, career highlights include performances with the San Francisco, Pittsburgh, Houston, Toronto, Baltimore, BBC, Phoenix, and Vancouver Symphonies, and her Carnegie Hall debut singing Weill’s Seven Deadly Sins with the Detroit Symphony. Ms. Large debuted with the band Pink Martini in 2011, singing four sold-out concerts with the National Symphony Orchestra at the Kennedy Center. She continues to tour internationally with the band and was featured on their album Get Happy. She also continues to tour the country as a special guest on Michael Feinstein’s Shaken & Stirred tour Her musical memoir, Crazy Enough, played to packed houses during its unprecedented 21-week sold out run and celebrates its ten-year anniversary this season. Her memoir, Crazy Enough, was named Oprah’s Book of the Week and awarded the 2013 Oregon Book Award for Creative Nonfiction.

Seth Lerer, prelude presenter

Seth Lerer is Distinguished Professor of Literature and former Dean of Arts and Humanities at UC San Diego. He has published widely on topics ranging from the Middle Ages to science fiction, from children’s books to the history of English. A devoted amateur musician, Mr.Lerer has studied piano and music history throughout his life. His most recent work has been on Shakespeare and music, and his book, Shakespeare’s Lyric Stage, has just been published by the University of Chicago Press.

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BIOGRAPHIES

George Li, piano

Praised by The Washington Post for combining “staggering technical prowess, a sense of command, and depth of expression,” pianist George Li possesses brilliant virtuosity and effortless grace far beyond his years. He captured the Silver Medal at the 2015 International Tchaikovsky Competition and was the recipient of the 2016 Avery Fisher Career Grant. He gave his first public performance at Boston’s Steinert Hall at the age of ten and in 2011, performed for President Obama at the White House in an evening honoring Chancellor Angela Merkel. Among Mr.Li’s many prizes, he was the First Prize winner of the 2010 Young Concert Artists International Auditions and a recipient of the 2012 Gilmore Young Artist Award. He is currently in the Harvard University / New England Conservatory joint program, studying with Wha Kyung Byun. Mr.Li is an exclusive Warner Classics recording artist and his debut album, which was recorded live from the Mariinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg, was released in October 2017.

Richard Lin, violin

Taiwanese-American violinist Richard Lin is the newly crowned Gold Medalist of the 10th Quadrennial International Violin Competition of Indianapolis which took place in September of 2018. Highlights of Mr. Lin’s 2018-2019 season include recitals in Chicago, La Jolla and throughout Indiana. He will make debut concerto appearances with the North Carolina and Muncie symphonies in the United States and will perform with the Singapore Symphony Orchestra, Yomiuri Nippon Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra Ensemble Kanazawa and the Taiwan Philharmonic in multiple performances in Kaohsiung, Taipei, Tokyo and Osaka. Mr.Lin’s first album on the Fontec label in 2013 features works by Beethoven, Bartók and Brahms with the Sendai Philharmonic and conductor Pascal Verrot. He has also recorded the complete Brahms Sonatas with his brother, pianist Robert Lin. Mr.Lin’s startling collection of top prizes includes 1st Prize at the Sendai International Violin Competition; 3rd Prize in the Joseph Joachim International Violin Competition in Hannover; and 2nd Prize at the Singapore and Michael Hill International Violin competitions. He is a graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music and The Juilliard School where he studied with Aaron Rosand and Lewis Kaplan respectively.

Midori, violin

Midori was born in Osaka, Japan in 1971 and began her violin studies with her mother, Setsu Goto, after displaying a strong aptitude for music at an early age. In 1982, conductor Zubin Mehta invited the then 11-year-old Midori to perform with the New York Philharmonic in the orchestra’s annual New Year’s Eve concert. The standing ovation that followed her debut spurred Midori to pursue a major musical career at the highest level. Midori is a visionary artist, activist and educator whose unique career has transcended traditional boundaries through her relentless drive to explore and build connections between music and the human experience. Never at rest, Midori brings the same dynamic innovation and expressive insight that has made her a top concert violinist to her other roles as a leading global cultural ambassador and a dedicated music educator. A leading concert violinist for over 30 years, Midori regularly transfixes audiences around the world, bringing together graceful precision and intimate expression that allows the listening public to not just hear music but to be personally moved by it.

Kristi Brown Montesano, prelude presenter

Chair of the Music History Department at the Colburn Conservatory of Music in Los Angeles, Kristi Brown Montesano is an enthusiastic “public musicologist.” She is an active lecturer for the LA Philharmonic, the Opera League of Los Angeles, the Salon de Musiques series, and Mason House Concerts. Her book, The Women of Mozart’s Operas (UC Press, 2007), offers a detailed study of these fascinating roles; more recent scholarly interests include classical music in film, women in classical music, and opera for children. 5 0 th A N N I V E R S A R Y S E A S O N 2 0 1 8 - 1 9 |

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BIOGRAPHIES

Garrick Ohlsson, piano

Pianist Garrick Ohlsson has established himself worldwide as a musician of magisterial interpretive and technical prowess. Although long regarded as one of the world’s leading exponents of the music of Chopin, Mr. Ohlsson commands an enormous repertoire ranging over the entire piano literature and he has come to be noted for his masterly performances of the works of Mozart, Beethoven and Schubert, as well as the Romantic repertoire. To date he has at his command more than 80 concertos, ranging from Haydn and Mozart to works of the 21st century. A native of White Plains, New York, Mr.Ohlsson began his piano studies at the age of eight, at the Westchester Conservatory of Music; at 13 he entered The Juilliard School, in New York City. He has been awarded first prizes in the Busoni and Montreal Piano competitions, the Gold Medal at the International Chopin Competition in Warsaw (1970), the Avery Fisher Prize (1994), the University Musical Society Distinguished Artist Award in Ann Arbor, MI (1998), the Jean Gimbel Lane Prize in Piano Performance from the Northwestern University Bienen School of Music (2014), and the Gloria Artis Gold Medal for cultural merit from the Polish Deputy Culture Minister.

The San Diego Symphony Orchestra The San Diego Symphony Orchestra performed its first concert on December 6, 1910, making it the oldest orchestra in the state of California. In the 100-plus years since its inception, the San Diego Symphony Orchestra has become one of the finest orchestras in the United States. The San Diego Symphony Orchestra offers a wide range of concert experiences and performs over 120 concerts annually, including the Jacobs Masterworks series of classical concerts. The Orchestra's Music Director Designate is Rafael Payare, who becomes Music Director in the 2019-20 season. The Orchestra’s Conductor Laureate is Jahja Ling, who led the SDSO as Music Director for 13 years. Notable featured guest conductors include Christoph von Dohnanyi, Edo De Waart and Charles Dutoit as well as today’s emerging conducting talent. In addition, some of the finest guest soloists regularly appear with the orchestra; these include Lang Lang, Pinchas Zukerman, Midori, Gil Shaham, Yefim Bronfman and Itzhak Perlman. The Orchestra also performs a wide range of music including film concerts, family concerts and other special presentations.

Mathew Halls, conductor

The word “versatile” is an apt description for British conductor Matthew Halls. He first came to prominence as a keyboard player and early music conductor, but Mr.Halls is now better known for his dynamic and intelligent work with major symphony orchestras and opera companies, and for his probing and vibrant interpretations of music of all periods. He was educated at Oxford University and subsequently taught at the university for five years. Passionately committed to education and working with young musicians, he regularly teaches at summer schools and courses. Oregon’s Berwick Academy for Historically Informed Performance launched under his leadership in 2015. Mr.Halls is represented on disc with Handel’s Parnasso in Festa, winner of the Stanley Sadie Handel Recording Prize, released by Hyperion. On Linn Records, he has recorded a set of four Bach Harpsichord Concertos conducted from the keyboard, which Gramophone welcomed as “joyful and invigorating”, and Bach’s Easter and Ascension oratorios, as well as awardwinning discs of Purcell’s Sonatas in Three and Four Parts.

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BIOGRAPHIES

San Diego Youth Symphony and Conservatory Under the leadership of President and CEO Dr. Michael Remson and Music Director Jeff Edmons, San Diego Youth Symphony and Conservatory (SDYS) instills excellence in the musical and personal development of students ages eight to 25 through rigorous and inspiring musical training experiences. Since 1945, SDYS has given thousands of musicians the opportunity to study and perform classical repertoire at a highly advanced level. SDYS serves 600 students annually through its twelve ensembles in the Conservatory Program. Its vision to “Make Music Education Accessible and Affordable to All” has led to restoring and strengthening music education in public schools. The organization’s preeminent ensemble, the SDYS Chamber Orchestra, is comprised of the principal and assistant principal musicians from the advanced Ovation Program. Provided the finest training, the Chamber Orchestra is given the opportunity to perform professional-level repertoire from multiple historic periods for both string orchestra and full chamber orchestra on a national and international stage. In June of 2015, the San Diego Youth Symphony and its Musicians participated in their 18th International invitational Concert Tour, in honor of the 70th Anniversary of SDYS, performing concerts in the Forbidden City in Beijing, San Diego's Sister City Yantai, and a special 4th of July closing Concert at the Oriental Arts Center in Shanghai.

Gil Shaham, violin

Gil Shaham is one of the foremost violinists of our time: his flawless technique combined with his inimitable warmth and generosity of spirit has solidified his renown as an American master. He is sought after throughout the world for concerto appearances with leading orchestras and conductors, and regularly gives recitals and appears with ensembles on the world’s great concert stages and at the most prestigious festivals. Mr. Shaham has more than two dozen concerto and solo CDs to his name, earning multiple GRAMMY® Awards, a Grand Prix du Disque, Diapason d’Or, and Gramophone Editor’s Choice. His most recent recording in the series 1930s Violin Concertos Vol. 2 was nominated for a GRAMMY® Award. Mr. Shaham was awarded an Avery Fisher Career Grant in 1990, and in 2008, received the coveted Avery Fisher Prize. In 2012, he was named “Instrumentalist of the Year” by Musical America. He plays the 1699 “Countess Polignac” Stradivarius, and lives in New York City with his wife, violinist Adele Anthony, and their three children.

Anoushka Shankar, sitar

Sitar player and composer Anoushka Shankar is a singular figure in the Indian classical and progressive world music scenes. Her dynamic and spiritual musicality has garnered several prestigious accolades, including six GRAMMY® Award nominations, recognition as the youngest - and first female - recipient of a British House of Commons Shield, credit as an Asian Hero by TIME Magazine, an Eastern Eye Award for Music and a Songlines Best Artist Award. Most recently, she became one of the first five female composers to have been added to the UK A-level music syllabus. In 2011 she signed to Deutsche Grammophon heralding a fertile creative period with a series of exploratory CDs: Traveller (produced by Javier Limon) examines the relationship between Indian Classical music and Spanish flamenco, Traces of You (produced by Nitin Sawhney and featuring Ms.Shankar's half-sister Norah Jones on vocals), and Home, a purely Indian Classical album where she returned to the Ragas her father had taught her. Her most recent album Land of Gold was written in response to the humanitarian trauma of displaced people fleeing conflict and poverty. 5 0 th A N N I V E R S A R Y S E A S O N 2 0 1 8 - 1 9 |

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BIOGRAPHIES

Jean-Yves Thibaudet, piano

For more than three decades, Jean-Yves Thibaudet has performed world-wide, recorded more than 50 albums, and built a reputation as one of today's finest pianists. From the very start of his career, he delighted in music beyond the standard repertoire, from jazz to opera, which he transcribed himself to play on the piano. Mr.Thibaudet expresses his passion for education and fostering young musical talent as the first-ever Artist-in-Residence at the Colburn School in Los Angeles, where he makes his home. The school has extended the residency for an additional three years and has announced the Jean-Yves Thibaudet Scholarships to provide aid for Music Academy students, whom Mr.Thibaudet will select for the merit-based awards, regardless of their instrument choice. His recording catalogue has received two GRAMMY® nominations, the Preis der Deutschen Schallplattenkritik, the Diapason d'Or, the Choc du Monde de la Musique, the Edison Prize, and Gramophone awards. He was the soloist on the Oscar-winning and critically acclaimed film Atonement, as well as Pride and Prejudice, Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close, and Wakefield.

Chris Thile, mandolin

Multiple GRAMMY® Award-winner and MacArthur Fellow Chris Thile, a member of Punch Brothers and Nickel Creek, and now the host of the radio program, Live from Here, is a mandolin virtuoso, composer and vocalist. With his broad outlook, Mr. Thile transcends the borders of conventionally circumscribed genres, creating a distinctly American canon and a new musical aesthetic for performers and audiences alike. A child prodigy, he first rose to fame as a member of Grammy Award-winning trio Nickel Creek, with whom he released four albums and sold over two million records. In 2014, along with a national tour, the trio released a new album, A Dotted Line, their first since 2005. As a soloist, Mr. Thile has released several albums including his most recent, Thanks for Listening, a collection of recordings, produced by Thomas Bartlett, originally written as Songs of the Week for Live from Here. In February 2013, Mr. Thile won a GRAMMY® for his work on The Goat Rodeo Sessions, collaborating with Yo-Yo Ma, Edgar Meyer, and Stuart Duncan. In September 2014, Mr. Thile and Edgar Meyer released their latest album collaboration, Bass + Mandolin, which won the GRAMMY® for Best Contemporary Instrumental Album. Punch Brothers released their latest album, the GRAMMY®-winning All Ashore, in July 2018 with the Pop Matters describing the album as "a call to savor, to pay attention, to step back from the hustle and bustle and remember the importance of being calm.”

Daniil Trifonov, piano

Russian pianist Daniil Trifonov has made a spectacular ascent in the world of classical music as a solo artist, champion of the concerto repertoire, chamber and vocal collaborator, and composer. Born in Nizhny Novgorod, Russia in 1991, Mr,Trifonov began his musical training at the age of five, and went on to attend Moscow’s Gnessin School of Music as a student of Tatiana Zelikman, before pursuing his piano studies with Sergei Babayan at the Cleveland Institute of Music. He has also studied composition, and continues to write for piano, chamber ensemble, and orchestra. When he premiered his own piano concerto in 2013, the Cleveland Plain Dealer marveled: “Even having seen it, one cannot quite believe it. Such is the artistry of pianist-composer Daniil Trifonov.” Combining consummate technique with rare sensitivity and depth, his performances are a perpetual source of awe. “He has everything and more … tenderness and also the demonic element. I never heard anything like that,” marveled pianist Martha Argerich. Mr.Trifonov recently added a first GRAMMY® Award to his already considerable string of honors, winning Best Instrumental Solo Album of 2018 with Transcendental, a double album of Liszt’s works that marks his third title as an exclusive Deutsche Grammophon artist. As The Times of London notes, he is “without question the most astounding pianist of our age.”

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BIOGRAPHIES

Triplets of Belleville In 2003, the animated French feature The Triplets of Belleville swept the globe, racking up dozens of awards and nominations—not to mention the hearts of countless admirers—along the way. Much of it came down to the Oscar-nominated score by Benoit Charest, which grabbed audiences by the ears and dragged them into the streets of 1920s Paris and Le Jazz Hot. Benoit is back; with Le Terrible Orchestre de Belleville he recreates live the original score as the film itself is beamed onto the big screen. Saddle up for the misadventures of a kidnapped Tour de France cyclist, his would-be rescuer grandmother and the titular trio of larger-than life divas, all accompanied by the speakeasy slick sounds of un orchestre sans pareil.

Benoît Charest, composer and conductor

Benoît Charest is an Oscar nominee composer from Montreal. He has written over 20 film scores. He is mostly known for his 2004 Triplets of Belleville score that has earned him many awards. Besides being a versatile composer, Ben is an accomplished jazz guitarist and performs regularly with some of Montreal's finest musicians. Like many teenagers of his time, Mr. Charest picked up the guitar at age 13 learning Beatles and Led Zeppelin tunes. He then took on private guitar lessons and went on to further his musical studies at McGill and Montreal universities. He then learned his trade touring as a sideman with various bands in Quebec and abroad. Mr. Charest wrote his first score in 1992 for an NFB documentary. He is presently involved in writing music for his jazz organ trio and touring with the "Terrible orchestre de Belleville". A cine-concert in which an eight-piece band play in-sync the score to the Triplets of Belleville movie.

PHOTO CREDITS: Cover: A. Shankar © Anushka Menon; Pg. 12: H. Hahn © Dana Van Leeuwen, Lil Buck © Tim Salaz, J. Shimabakuro courtesy of artist; Pg. 13: Seal © Jan Welters, The Hot Sardines © Joseph Cultice; Pg. 14 & 60: Jerusalem Quartet © Felix Broede; Pg. 18 Midori © Timothy Greenfield-Sande, J.Y. Thibaudet © Andrew Eccles; Pg 22: From the Top courtesy of From the Top; Pg. 24 & 61: G. Li © Simon Fowler; Pg. 28 & 64: D. Trifonov © Dario Acosta; Pg. 32 & 63: A. Shankar © Anushka Menon; Pg.33: C. Thile courtesy of artist; Pg. 34: G. Shaham © Ratray, A. Eguchi courtesy of artist; Pg. 38 & 62: San Diego Symphony courtesy of San Diego Symphony; Pg. 42 & 62: G. Ohlsson © Bartek Sadowski; Pg. 46, 52, & 60: S. Large © Laura Domela; Pg. 47 & 65: Triplets of Belleville; Pg. 48 & 58: D. Finckel & W. Han © Lisa Marie Mazzucco; Pg. 53: R. Lin © Sophie Zhai, C.Y. Chen © Denis R. Kelly Jr.; Pg. 57: A. Cohen © Shervin Lainez, J. Horn © Jacob Blickenstaff; Pg. 58: C.Y. Chen © Denis R. Kelly Jr., A. Eguchi courtesy of artist; Pg. 59: From the Top, M. Cann courtesy of artist, V. Gupta courtesy of artist, M. Gerdes courtesy of artist; Pg. 60: R. J. Hughes courtesy of presenter, S. Lerer courtesy of presenter; Pg. 61: R. Lin © Sophie Zhai, Midori © Timothy Greenfield-Sande, K. B. Montesano courtesy of presenter; Pg. 63: G. Shaham © Ratray; Pg. 64: J.Y. Thibaudet © Andrew Eccles, C. Thile © Devid Pedde; Pg. 65: B. Charest courtesy of artist; Pg.67: R. Carter © Christopher Drukker, D. Liebman © David Ochoa, J. Green © Paul Kolnik, Y. Ma © Todd Rosenberg, J. Pizzarelli courtesy of artist.

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L A JOLL A MUSIC SOCIETY’S COMMUNITY MUSIC CENTER Celebrating 20 years of Service to the Community!

For the past 20 years, La Jolla Music Society’s Community Music Center has given thousands of children their first experience in music-making. Over 100 students from roughly 40 different elementary, middle, and high schools take part each year in our bilingual after-school music program located in San Diego’s Logan Heights neighborhood. The Community Music Center provides free instruments and instruction to all our students with group lessons three days each week for piano, violin, woodwind, brass, voice, guitar, and percussion. We’ve also expanded our program this year and now offer a fourth day of instruction focused on ensemble performance practice.

PLEASE JOIN US IN CELEBRATING THE COMMUNITY MUSIC CENTER’S 20TH ANNIVERSARY AT OUR SPRING RECITAL ON THE EVENING OF WEDNESDAY, MAY 15TH! To learn more about the Community Music Center and to support our Education and Community Programming, please contact: Allison Boles, Education and Community Programming Manager 858.459.3724, ext. 221 or ABoles@LJMS.org.

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THANK YOU! The wonderful array of musical activity that La Jolla Music Society offers would not be possible without support from its family of donors. Your contributions to La Jolla Music Society help bridge the gap between income from ticket sales and the total cost to present the finest musicians and the best chamber music repertoire in San Diego. Your generosity also supports our programs in the local schools and throughout the community.

On the following pages La Jolla Music Society pays tribute to you, the leading players who make it possible to share the magic of the performing arts with our community. 5 0 th A N N I V E R S A R Y S E A S O N 2 0 1 8 - 1 9 |

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SE ASON SPONSORS Underwriters make it possible for La Jolla Music Society to showcase the greatest artists of our day in performances that thrill, inspire and unite our incredibly diverse audiences. We are profoundly grateful to our Season Sponsors who enable us to serve our community.

Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner Brenda Baker and Stephen Baum The Beyster Family Joan and Irwin Jacobs Joy Frieman

Brian and Silvija Devine Gordon Brodfuehrer Jeanette Stevens Bebe and Marvin Zigman Anonymous

Thomas C. Ackerman Foundation

David C. Copley F o u n d at i o n

The Dow Divas

vail memorial fund MEDIA PAR TNERS

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THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPOR T

FOUNDER

($250,000 and above)

ANGEL

($100,000 - $249,999)

Brenda Baker & Stephen Baum The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture Conrad Prebys & Debra Turner Raffaella & John Belanich The Dow Divas Joy Frieman Joan & Irwin Jacobs

Sheryl & Bob Scarano Debbie Turner

BENEFACTOR

Gordon Brodfuehrer Silvija & Brian Devine Stephen Gamp / Banc of California Susan & Bill Hoehn Steven & Sylvia RĂŠ

GUARANTOR

Anonymous Bob Barth & Nicole Frank Mary Ann Beyster Katherine & Dane Chapin Ric & Barbara Charlton Linda Chester & Ken Rind Julie & Bert Cornelison Anne Daigle Martha & Ed Dennis Barbara Enberg Jennifer & Kurt Eve Debby & Wain Fishburn Sarah & Michael Garrison Jeff Glazer & Lisa Braun Glazer Lehn & Richard Goetz Kay & John Hesselink

($50,000 - $99,999)

($25,000 - $49,999)

Jeanette Stevens Haeyoung Kong Tang Bebe & Marvin Zigman

Sue & John Major Arlene & Lou Navias Robin & Hank Nordhoff Marina & Rafael Pastor Peter & Peggy Preuss Don & Stacy Rosenberg Clifford Schireson & John Venekamp Marge & Neal Schmale Tina Simner Twin Dragon Foundation Vail Memorial Fund Clara Wu & Joseph Tsai Sue & Peter Wagener

We are grateful to all of our contributors who share our enthusiasm and passion for the arts. Please join them today and make a gift online at www.LJMS.org/donate or by contacting Ferdinand Gasang, Director of Development, at 858.459.3724, ext. 204 or FGasang@LJMS.org. 5 0 th A N N I V E R S A R Y S E A S O N 2 0 1 8 - 1 9 |

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THAN K YOU FOR YOU R SU PPOR T

SUSTAINER

($15,000 - $24,999)

Anonymous (2) Ginny & Robert Black Wendy Brody Sharon L. Cohen Susan & Brian Douglass Andrew B. Dumke Sue & Chris Fan Brenda & Michael Goldbaum Angelina & Fredrick Kleinbub Lynelle & William Lynch Beverly Scarano Maureen & Thomas Shiftan UC San Diego / Chancellor Pradeep Khosla Abby & Ray Weiss Lisa Widmier Dolly & Victor Woo Katrina Wu Carolyn Yorston-Wellcome & H. Bard Wellcome

SUPPORTER ($10,000 - $14,999)

Anonymous (2) Betty Beyster County of San Diego / Community Enhancement Program Karen & Don Cohn Nina & Robert Doede Ann Parode Dynes & Robert Carr Dynes Anne Evans Monica Fimbres Socorro Fimbres Hanna & Mark Gleiberman Buzz & Peg Gitelson Keith & Helen Kim Vivian Lim & Joseph Wong Diane & Ron Mannix Jack McGrory & Una Davis Betty-Jo Petersen William Pitts & Mary Sophos Sandy Redman / California Bank & Trust Leigh P. Ryan Beverly Frederick Springer & Alan Springer Iris & Matthew Strauss Margie & John H. Warner, Jr. Anna & Edward Yeung

AMBASSADOR ($5,000 - $9,999)

Anonymous (4) Anna Maria Abbott John Amberg Judith Bachner & Dr. Eric L. Lasley Carson Barnett & Tom Dubensky Joan Jordan Bernstein

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Diane & John Berol Carolyn Bertussi Bjorn Bjerede & Jo Kiernan Boretto + Merrill Consulting, LLC- Angela Merill and Colleen Boretto George & Laurie Brady Dr. James C. & Karen A. Brailean Stuart & Isabel Brown Jian & Samson Chan Elaine & Dave Darwin Robert & Tatiana Dotson Eleanor Ellsworth Jeane Erley Jill Esterbrooks & James Kirkpatrick Robbins Olivia & Peter Farrell Elliot & Diane Feuerstein Richard & Beverly Fink Sara & Jay Flatley Wendy & Dave Frieman Pam & Hal Fuson Michael Grossman & Margaret Stevens Grossman Rita & Mark Hannah Gail Hutcheson Theresa Jarvis & Ric Erdman Jan Ann Kahler William Karatz & Joan Smith Amy & William Koman Carol Lam & Mark Burnett Carol Lazier Sharon LeeMaster, CFRE Arleen & Robert Lettas Richard J. Leung, M.D. Kathleen & Ken Lundgren Donna Medrea Marilyn & Stephen Miles Elaine & Doug Muchmore Pat & Hank Nickol Taffin & Gene Ray Catherine & Jean Rivier Ivor Royston & Colette Carson Royston Emily & Tim Scott Susan Shirk & Samuel Popkin Rob Sidner Joyce & Ted Strauss Elizabeth Taft Mary & Bill Urquhart Gianangelo & Mera Vergani Ronald Wakefield Nell Waltz Judy White Sheryl & Harvey White Karin Winner Hanna Zahran / Pacific Premier Bank

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AFICIONADO ($2,500 - $4,999)

Anonymous Arlene Antin & Leonard Ozerkis Rusti Bartell Edgar & Julie Berner Jim Beyster Barry Bielinski & Seonaid McArthur Johan & Sevil Brahme Benjamin Brand Ralph & Gail Bryan R. Nelson & Janice Byrne Trevor Callan / Callan Capital Carol & Jim Carlisle Lee Clark Bradley Comp & Christine Ellis-Comp Lori & Aaron Contorer David Cooper & Joanne Hutchinson Valerie & Harry Cooper Ann Craig Stacie & Michael Devitt Diana Lady & J. Lynn Dougan Mr. & Mrs. Ernie Dronenburg Mr. & Mrs. Michael Durkin Siri & Lars Ekman Ruth & Ed Evans Teresa & Merle Fischlowitz Ingrid & Ted Friedmann Elaine Galinson & Herbert Solomon Dawn Gilman Lee & Frank Goldberg Lynn Gorguze & The Hon. Scott Peters Jennifer & Richard Greenfield Ingrid Hibben Reena & Sam Horowitz Joan Hotchkis Jeanne Jones & Don Breitenberg David & Susan Kabakoff Lynda Kerr Leonard & Betty Kornreich Barry & Hema Lall Jeffrey & Sheila Lipinsky Sylvia & Jamie Liwerant Cindy & Jay Longbottom Mary Keough Lyman Larry Marcus Patsy & David Marino M. Margaret McKeown & Peter Cowhey Diane McKernan & Steve Lyman Dan McLeod & Sumi Adachi Bill Miller & Ida Houby Gail & Ed Miller Howard & Barbara Milstein Hans & Ursula Moede Alexandra Morton Virginia Oliver Pam Palisoul Marty & David Pendarvis


THAN K YOU FOR YOU R SU PPOR T

Vicki & Art Perry William Purves & Don Schmidt John Rebelo & Sarah Marsh-Rebelo Jessica & Eberhardt Rohm Sandra & Robert Rosenthal Hector Salazar-Reyes, MD Doreen & Myron Schonbrun Susan & Stephen Schutz Suzan & Gad Shaanan Mao & Dr. Bob Shillman Jean Sullivan & David Nassif Drs. Gloria & Joseph Shurman Dagmar Smek & Arman Oruc Leland & Annemarie Sprinkle Erika & Fred Torri Mary Walshok Bill & Lori Walton Joan Warren-Grady Jo & Howard Weiner Pat & Chris Weil Faye Wilson

Cynthia & George Mitchell Glenn Montgomery Micki Olin & Reid Abrams Jeff Patrick Gary Poon Jill Porter Mary Pringle John Renner John P. & Lynnsay Rogers Patty Levaur Rome Cynthia Rosenthal Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute Seltzer | Caplan | MacMahon | Vitek Pam Shriver Gerald & Susan Slavet Anastasia Thomas Norma Jo Thomas Helen Wagner Joseph & Mary Witztum Bart Ziegler

ASSOCIATE

FRIEND

Chris & Craig Andrews Fara Ashandi Ginger & David Boss June Chocheles Drs. Anthony F. Chong & Annette Thu Nguyen Marjorie Coburn Marilyn Colby Dr. Ruth Covell Susan Crutchfield Linda & Richard Dicker Sue H. Dramm Arlene & Richard Esgate Beverly Freemont Tom & Laura Gable Lola & Walter Green Bryna Haber Norma Hidalgo-Del Rio Ann Hill Linda Howard Robert & Patricia Hughes Selwyn Isakow Elisa & Rick Jaime Annette & Arthur Johnson Roger & Tamara Joseph Dwight Kellogg Jeanne Larson Theodora Lewis Polly Liew Grace H. Lin Papa Doug Manchester John Matty Andrea Migdal Dr. Sandra Miner

Anonymous Barry & Emily Berkov LaVerne & Blaine Briggs Luc Cayet & Anne Marie Pleska Elizabeth Clarquist George & Cari Damoose Caroline DeMar Douglas & Robin Doucette Paul & Clare Friedman Sally Fuller Carrie Greenstein Phil & Kathy Henry A.S. & Elsie Hirshman Paul & Barbara Hirshman Emmet & Holly Holden Nancy Hong Lulu Hsu Louise Kasch Helene K. Kruger Toni Langlinais Dr. Greg Lemke Lynda Fox Photography Jennifer Luce Sally & Luis Maizel Eileen A. Mason Winona Mathews Ted McKinney Joel Mogy Dr. Chandra Mukerji Barbara Rosen Ronald Simon Randall Smith Edward Stickgold & Steven Cande

($1,000 - $2,499)

($500 - $999)

Susan Trompeter Yvonne Vaucher Suhaila White Linda Wilson Olivia & Marty Winkler

ENTHUSIAST ($250 - $499)

Anonymous Sibille Alexander Lynell Antrim Nancy Assaf & George Wafa Rita Foegal Bell Stefana Brintzenhoff Marc Brown Candace Carroll Robert & Jean Chan Kathleen Charla Yau-Hung Chow Geoffrey Clow Hugh Coughlin Edith & Edward Drcar Roccio & Mike Flynn Richard Forsyth Bruce Galanter Karol Galkowsky & Brian Worthington Ferdinand Marcus Gasang Russel Ginns Carolyn Greenslate Dr. & Mrs. Jimmie Greenslate Richard Hsieh Ed & Linda Janon Rebecca Kanter Julia & George L. Katz Gladys & Bert Kohn Robert & Elena Kucinski Las Damas de Fairbanks Marion Mettler Joani Nelson Aghdas Pezeshki Carol Plantamura Gustavo Romero Dr. Aron Rosenthal Paula & Manuel Rotenberg Peter & Arlene Sacks Alice& Brad Saunders Denise & Sydney Selati Patricia Shank William Smith Bob Stefanko Eli & Lisa Strickland Monica & Richard Valdez Dr. & Mrs. Robert Wallace Terry & Peter Yang Debra Youssefi

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THAN K YOU FOR YOU R SU PPOR T

HONORARIA & MEMORIAL GIFTS In Honor of Gordon Brodfuehrer: Hugh Coughlin Richard & Katherine Matheron Jeanette Stevens

In Honor of Martha Dennis: Christine Andrews Mary Ann Beyster Karen & Jim Brailean Gordon Brodfuehrer Katherine & Dane Chapin Linda Chester & Kenneth Rind Ed Dennis Silvija & Brian Devine Thompson & Jane Fetter Joy Frieman Ferdinand Gasang Joan & Irwin Jacobs Sylvia & Steven Ré Stacy & Don Rosenberg Dolly & Victor Woo

In Memory of Dick Enberg: Marcia Asasi Brenda Baker & Steve Baum Christopher Beach & Wesley Fata Chris Benavides Allison Boles Gordon Brodfuehrer Sarah Campbell Elaine & Dave Darwin Jorena de Pedro Martha & Ed Dennis Leighann Enos Angelina Franco Joy Frieman Ferdinand Gasang Sarah & Michael Garrison Robert Gould Phil & Kathy Henry Sue & Steve Hesse Shannon Haider Susan & Bill Hoehn Joan Hotchkis Hilary Huffman Dr. and Mrs. Richard Kahler and family Anthony LeCourt Sue & John Major Stuart & Lisa Lipton Papa Doug Manchester Joel Mogy Debra Palmer Marina & Rafael Pastor Sylvia & Steven Ré Leah Rosenthal Leigh P. Ryan Sheryl & Bob Scarano Clifford Schireson & John Venekamp

Marge & Neal Schmale Maureen & Tom Shiftan Pam Shriver Rewa Colette Soltan Sue & Peter Wagener Travis Wininger Corinne Wohlforth Dolly & Victor Woo Hayley Woodseth Katelyn Woodside

In memory of Jennifer "Jendy" Dennis: Rewa Colette Soltan

In Honor of May L. Hsieh: Yau-Hung Chow Richard Hsieh

In Memory of Lois Kohn: Ingrid Paymar

In Memory of Richard MacDonald: Ferdinand Gasang

In Honor of Maggie Meyer’s Birthday: Martha and Ed Dennis

In Honor of Betty-Jo Petersen: Chris Benavides

In memory of Jeremiah "Jere" Robins: Rewa Colette Soltan

In Memory of Carleton and Andree Vail: Vail Memorial Fund

In Honor of Abby and Ray Weiss: Lynn Stern

SUPPORT To learn more about supporting La Jolla Music Society’s artistic and education programs or to make an amendment to your listing please contact Landon Akiyama at 858.459.3724, ext. 216 or LAkiyama@LJMS.org. This list is current as of March 11, 2019. Amendments will be reflected in the next program book in August 2019.

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MEDALLION SOCIETY

CROWN JEWEL

TOPAZ

Brenda Baker and Steve Baum Conrad Prebys and Debbie Turner

Anonymous Joan Jordan Bernstein Mary Ann Beyster Virginia and Robert Black Dr. James C. and Karen A. Brailean Dave and Elaine Darwin Eleanor Ellsworth Barbara and Dick Enberg Jeane Erley Pam and Hal Fuson Buzz and Peg Gitelson Drs. Lisa Braun-Glazer & Jeff Glazer Margaret and Michael Grossman Theresa Jarvis Angelina and Fred Kleinbub Elaine and Doug Muchmore Hank and Patricia Nickol Rafael and Marina Pastor Don and Stacy Rosenberg Leigh P. Ryan Neal and Marge Schmale Jeanette Stevens Elizabeth Taft Gianangelo and Mera Vergani Joseph Wong and Vivian Lim Dolly and Victor Woo Carolyn Yorston-Wellcome and H. Bard Wellcome Bebe and Marvin Zigman

DIAMOND Raffaella and John Belanich Joy Frieman Joan and Irwin Jacobs

RUBY Silvija and Brian Devine

EMERALD Arlene and Louis Navias

GARNET Julie and Bert Cornelison Peggy and Peter Preuss

SAPPHIRE Kay and John Hesselink Keith and Helen Kim

Listing as of March 11, 2019

In 1999, the Board of Directors officially established the Medallion Society to provide long-term financial stability for La Jolla Music Society. We are honored to have this special group of friends who have made multi-year commitments of at least three years to La Jolla Music Society, ensuring that the artistic quality and vision we bring to the community continues to grow. 5 0 th A N N I V E R S A R Y S E A S O N 2 0 1 8 - 1 9 |

C o m i n g H o m e F E S T I V A L 73


DANCE SOCIETY

GRAND JETÉ

PIROUETTE

DEMI POINTE

Jeanette Stevens Marvin and Bebe Zigman

Elaine Galinson and Herbert Solomon Larry Marcus Annie So

Beverly Fremont Saundra L. Jones

ARABESQUE Ellise and Michael Coit June and Dr. Bob Shillman Carolyn Bertussi

POINTE Teresa O. Campbell Katherine and Dane Chapin

PLIÉ Rebecca Kanter Joani Nelson Elizabeth Taft

Listing as of March 11, 2019

DANCE SERIES OUTREACH La Jolla Music Society hosts dance master classes and open rehearsals throughout the winter season. Participating companies have included MOMIX, Joffrey Ballet, New York City Ballet MOVES, and many more.

La Jolla Music Society is the largest present of major American and great international dance companies in San Diego. In order for LJMS to be able to fulfill San Diego’s clear desire for dance and ballet performances by the very best artists around the world, the Dance Society was created. We are grateful for each patron for their passion and support of our dance programs.

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PL ANNED GIVING Anonymous (2) June L. Bengston* Joan Jordan Bernstein Bjorn Bjerede and Jo Kiernan Dr. James C. and Karen A. Brailean Gordon Brodfuehrer Barbara Buskin Trevor Callan Geoff and Shem Clow Anne and Robert Conn George and Cari Damoose

Jack* and Joan Salb Johanna Schiavoni Patricia C. Shank Drs. Joseph and Gloria Shurman Karen and Christopher Sickels Jeanette Stevens Elizabeth and Joseph* Taft Norma Jo Thomas Dr. Yvonne E. Vaucher Lucy and Ruprecht von Buttlar Ronald Wakefield

Elaine and Dave Darwin Teresa and Merle Fischlowitz Ted and Ingrid Friedmann Joy and Ed* Frieman Sally Fuller Maxwell H. and Muriel S. Gluck* Dr. Trude Hollander* Eric Lasley Theodora Lewis Joani Nelson Maria and Dr. Philippe Prokocimer Bill Purves Darren and Bree Reinig Jay W. Richen Leigh P. Ryan

John B. and Cathy Weil Carolyn Yorston-Wellcome and H. Barden Wellcome Karl and Joan Zeisler Josephine Zolin

*In Memoriam Listing as of March 11, 2019

The Legacy Society recognizes those generous individuals who have chosen to provide for La Jolla Music Society’s future. Members have remembered La Jolla Music Society in their estate plans in many ways — through their wills, retirement gifts, life income plans, and many other creative planned giving arrangements. We thank them for their vision and hope you will join this very special group of friends.

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CORPOR A TE PAR TNERS

BENEFACTOR

GUARANTOR

SUSTAINER

SUPPORTER

AMBASSADOR

AFICIONADO

ASSOCIATE

Members of our Corporate Honor Roll are committed to the LJMS community. For information on how your business can help bring world-class performances to San Diego, please contact Rewa Colette Soltan at 858.459.3724, ext. 206 or RSoltan@LJMS.org.

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FOUNDA TIONS Thomas C. Ackerman Foundation

David C. Copley F o u n d at i o n

Ayco Charitable Foundation: The AAM & JSS Charitable Fund The Vicki & Carl Zeiger Charitable Foundation Bettendorf, WE Foundation: Sally Fuller The Blachford-Cooper Foundation The Catalyst Foundation: The Hon. Diana Lady Dougan The Clark Family Trust Enberg Family Charitable Foundation The Epstein Family Foundation: Phyllis Epstein The Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund: Drs. Edward & Martha Dennis Fund Sue & Chris Fan Don & Stacy Rosenberg Shillman Charitable Trust Richard and Beverly Fink Family Foundation Inspiration Fund at the San Diego Foundation: Frank & Victoria Hobbs The Jewish Community Foundation: Diane & Elliot Feuerstein Fund Galinson Family Fund Lawrence & Bryna Haber Fund Joan & Irwin Jacobs Fund Warren & Karen Kessler Fund Theodora F. Lewis Fund Liwerant Family Fund Jaime & Sylvia Liwerant Fund The Allison & Robert Price Family Foundation Fund John & Cathy Weil Fund The Stephen Warren Miles and Marilyn Miles Foundation The New York Community Trust: Barbara & William Karatz Fund

Rancho Santa Fe Foundation: The Fenley Family Fund The Susan & John Major Fund The Oliphant Fund The Pastor Family Fund The San Diego Foundation: The Beyster Family Foundation Fund The M.A. Beyster Fund II The Karen A. & James C. Brailean Fund The Valerie & Harry Cooper Fund The Hom Family Fund The Ivor & Colette Carson Royston Fund The Scarano Family Fund The Shiftan Family Fund Schwab Fund for Charitable Giving: Ted McKinney & Frank Palmerino Fund The Shillman Foundation Silicon Valley Community Foundation: The William R. & Wendyce H. Brody Fund Simner Foundation The Haeyoung Kong Tang Foundation The John M. and Sally B. Thornton Foundation Vail Memorial Fund Thomas and Nell Waltz Family Foundation The John H. Warner Jr. and Helga M. Warner Foundation Sheryl and Harvey White Foundation

SERVING OUR COMMUNITY La Jolla Music Society reaches over 11,000 students and community members annually. LJMS works with students from more than 60 schools and universities, providing concert tickets, performance demonstrations, and master classes. Thanks to the generous support of our patrons and donors, all of our outreach activities are free to the people we serve.

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PUBLIC SUPPOR T La Jolla Music Society thanks all of our generous patrons and supporters– including government funding – who support our artistic, education and community engagement programs.

Support of our 50th Anniversary is provided by:

Thank you to The City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture for promoting, encouraging and increasing support for the region's artistic and cultural assets, integrating arts and culture into community life and showcasing San Diego as an international tourist destination.

The National Endowment for the Arts has awards grants to strengthen the creative capacity of our communities by providing opportunities for arts participation. Thank you NEA for your commitment to make the arts a vital part of the lifeblood of this nation.

Support from the County of San Diego’s Community Enhancement Program is vital to our SummerFest programs. Thank you for supporting programs that promote and generate tourism and economic development in San Diego.

Thank You! 78 L A

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News that matters, from a source you trust. Every day, 24/7.

Serving and reflecting the San Diego community since 1868

READ: SanDiegoUnionTribune.com | SUBSCRIBE: online or call 1.800.533.8830 | ADVERTISE: 866.411.4140

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WE ARE

CALIFORNIA’S BANK. Proud Partner and the Official Bank of

$

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Every day, business owners, entrepreneurs, executives and community leaders are being empowered by Banc of California to reach their dreams and strengthen our economy. With more than $10 billion in assets and over 30 banking locations throughout the state, we are large enough to meet your banking needs, yet small enough to serve you well.

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© 2019 Banc of California, N.A. All rights reserved.

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NC

A OF C LIFOR

A NI

BA

Learn more about how we’re empowering California through its diverse businesses, entrepreneurs and communities at bancofcal.com


Foundation

The ResMed Foundation is pleased to support your excellent programs in musical arts education. Board of Trustees Edward A. Dennis, PhD Chairman

Mary F. Berglund, PhD Treasurer

Peter C. Farrell, PhD, DSc Secretary

Charles G. Cochrane, MD Michael P. Coppola, MD Anthony DeMaria, MD Sir Neil Douglas, MD, DSc, FRCPE Klaus Schindhelm, BE PhD Jonathan Schwartz, MD Kristi Burlingame Executive Director

7514 Girard Avenue, Suite 1-343 La Jolla, CA, USA, 92037

Tel 858-361-0755

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ResMedFoundation.org

C o m i n g H o m e F E S T I V A L 81


THE EVOLUTION OF THE LIFESTYLE ENTERTAINMENT EXPERIENCE. ACROSS THE STREET FROM THE CONRAD!

Come try our new menu! Bring your Conrad ticket before or after the show to receive a 25% discount on your dinner. 7611 FAY AVENUE, LA JOLLA, CA 92037 Visit www.thelotent.com to see what’s happening every day at each of our locations:

LA JOLLA / LIBERTY STATION / FASHION ISLAND / CITY CENTER

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(858) 777- 0069


CUSTOM SOLUTIONS FOR WEALTH Family-Owned Boutique Wealth Management Firm • Independent expert advisors • Sophisticated wealth management strategies • Creating a legacy for generations to come • Comprehensive family office services

LA JOLLA, CA • (858) 551-3800 • WWW.CALLANCAPITAL.COM 5 0 th A N N I V E R S A R Y S E A S O N 2 0 1 8 - 1 9 |

C o m i n g H o m e F E S T I V A L 83


Timeless Culinary Creations

Lunch | Dinner | Weekend Brunch | Wine Bar Introducing Candor by Giuseppe, a local eatery within walking distance of The Conrad, and the latest addition to the family. Perfect for your pre or post concert dinner!

DineCandor.com

Catering for Any Event Our approach to catering blends the freshest seasonal ingredients from local sources with unparalleled service and a beautiful presentation. Whether it’s a large wedding, holiday party or informal business lunch, our culinary experience pairs perfectly with any occasion. Call us at 858.581.2205 or visit us online at grnfc.com.

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WHEN THE BEAUTY OF NATURE IS COMBINED WITH EXCELLENT DESIGN, IT’S LIKE MUSIC TO OUR EARS.

FLORAL FANTASIES REALIZED BLOOMERS OF LA JOLLA • 7520 EADS AVENUE • LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA 92037 • (858) 454-3913 5 0 th A N N I V E R S A R Y S E A S O N 2 0 1 8 - 1 9 |

C o m i n g H o m e F E S T I V A L 85


LIVE THE WELLNESS

MOVEMENT

START TODAY WITH A 5 DAY FREE TRIAL: 858 456 2595 • • • •

23,000 square feet Latest equipment Infrared Saunas Steam rooms

• • • •

Personal training Cryotherapy Bodywork services Group classes

• • • •

Child care options Spa amenities Massage services Validated parking

• • • •

Concierge medicine IV infusions Glutathione injections Vitamin B12 injections

7825 Fay Ave | La Jolla, CA 92037 | lajollasportsclub.com

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WHISKNLADLE.COM 858.551.7575 1044 WALL ST. LA JOLLA

CATANIASD.COM 858.551.5105 7863 GIRARD ST. LA JOLLA

GRAVITYHEIGHTS.COM 858.283.8206 9920 PACIFIC HEIGHTS BLVD. SORRENTO VALLEY

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PARKCOMMONS.COM COMING SOON SORRENTO VALLEY

C o m i n g H o m e F E S T I V A L 87


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GIRARD GOURMET From Our Garden To Your Plate La Jolla’s Premier Deli-Bakery-Restaurant & Caterer for 25 Years

We specialize in providing catering for all occasions serving the fresh, delicious, and finest cuisine our customers expect but with an extensive menu that surprises our regular Girard Gourmet customers. Add a special touch with birthday cakes, wedding cakes, one of a kind creations, and designer cookies.

7837 Girard Avenue La Jolla, CA 92037 | (858) 454-3325 | www.girardgourmet.com

PROUDLY SUPPORTS THE LA JOLLA MUSIC SOCIETY

Jimbo’s…Naturally! supports over 130 local businesses, and the list is growing! Just look for this logo throughout the store to easily identify a San Diego business and/or product. FIVE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS

VISIT US ONLINE AT WWW.JIMBOS.COM

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A

ďż˝

I •

Nurturing Potential String Players to Musical Reality in partnership with La Jolla Music Society's Outreach Program

858.909.0319 by appointment 10505 Sorrento Valley Rd., Suite 400, San Diego, CA 92121 www.theviolinshopsandiego.com 5 0 th A N N I V E R S A R Y S E A S O N 2 0 1 8 - 1 9 |

C o m i n g H o m e F E S T I V A L 91


Timeless Grandeur EST. 1926

ON PROSPECT IN LA JOLLA (877) 698-3788 • LAVALENCIA.COM

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LIKE NO OTHER

Representing unique properties requires unique skills. Our agents have innovative marketing tools and relationships with some of the most qualified buyers in the world. They also have a love for getting to know a house down to its most intimate detail. So that in the end, we don’t so much sell a home as part with it.

Proud community partner in support of The Conrad Property shown: 9828 La Jolla Farms Road, La Jolla. MLS #180055087 Sotheby’s International Realty® is a registered trademark licensed to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. DRE #01767484

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A SYMPHONY O F TA S T E George’s at the Cove is a Proud Community Partner in support of

THE CONRAD The Conrad Prebys Performing Arts Center

experience g e o rg e s a t t h e co v e . co m •

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858.454.4244 •

1 2 5 0 P ro s p e c t S t re e t , L a J o l l a , C A 9 2 0 3 7

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LAZ Parking is a proud supporter of La Jolla Music Society’s THE CONRAD Visit www.lazparking.com or call 1-888-WE-PARK-U to find a location near you.

Steel seahorse, Jennifer Lannes, diner since 1978

some traditions just keep getting richer. Located along the shores of La Jolla, the elegance and sophistication of your dining experience is matched only by the power and drama of the ocean just inches away. At The Marine Room, every meal is a special occasion. 858.459.7222

MarineRoom.com

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Rediscover The Westgate Hotel From the elegantly appointed guest rooms to the contemporary cuisine of the award-winning Westgate Room, guests truly experience a relaxing urban oasis in the heart of downtown San Diego. The Westgate Hotel is proud to introduce a new amenity, AquaVie, a state-of-the-art, all-encompassing fitness, spa and wellness escape. Guests of The Westgate Hotel may experience this wonderful facility during their stay. Visit our website for exclusive packages. WESTGATEHOTEL.COM

619.238.1818

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1055 second avenue, san diego

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Breathtaking Views, Uniquely California Cuisine For Every Occasion

ARValentien.com | 858.777.6635

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C o m i n g H o m e F E S T I V A L 97 9/18/2018 2:20:21 PM


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Book your event at The Conrad

Recitals · Chamber Music · Amplified Concerts · Dance · Film · Theater · Conferences · Lectures · Receptions · Fundraisers · Weddings and more...

San Diego's hub for cultural, arts education, community, and special events. THE BAKER-BAUM CONCERT HALL

THE JAI

A intimate 513 seat performance space with superb acoustics ideally suited for chamber music and classical recitals. Its design incorporates stateof-the-art technology and adjustable acoustics, making it a world-class space for amplified concerts, film, dance, theater, lectures, and more.

A 2,000 square foot performance space with a contemporary look. Because of its flexible lighting, audio, and video system capabilities, this space can be configured for many types of events.

THE ATKINSON ROOM An ideal room for meetings or lectures with audiovisual capabilities. The space can be rented in conjunction with The Baker-Baum and The JAI.

For more information please contact Events Manager, Anthony LeCourt: 858.459.3724 x217 or visit TheConrad.org 5 0 th A N N I V E R S A R Y S E A S O N 2 0 1 8 - 1 9 |

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Profile for La Jolla Music Society

Season 50 / Coming Home Festival Vol. 3  

Season 50 / Coming Home Festival Vol. 3  

Profile for ljms