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THEATRE ARTS 890

890-142

Introduction to Scenic Design

3 Cr.

Examination of contemporary scenic designs and execution of model settings. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 890路141 Introduction to Scenic Design.

890-150 through 152

Fundamentals of Acting

3 Cr. Ea.

Theory and practice of the basic techniques of acting: body move路 ment, voice production and diction. Introduction to scene study. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

890-153

Stagecrafts

1 Cr.

Workshop in technical theatre. Scenery, lighting, costumes, prop路 erties and sound by assignment in campus theatrical productions. May be repeated for credit; however, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

890-154

Rehearsal and Performance

2 Cr.

Practical experience for students accepted as members of a CCC theatre company - as actors, stage managers or in positions created by the needs of the specific production other than technical. May be repeated for no more than 8 credit hours. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: By audition.

890-171

Radio and Television Production

2 Cr.

Survey of the broadcasting industry, its history and place in our society. Examination of technical areas, advertising, writing, programming and analysis. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

210


The Board of Trustees of the Cuyahoga Community College District reserves the right to change, at any time, without notice, graduation requirements, costs, curriculum course structure and content, and such other matters as may be within its control, notwithstanding any information set forth in this catalogue.


Just The Facts • Admission to Cuyahoga Community College is open to ALL high school graduates as well as to non-high school graduates, 19 years of age or older, who demonstrate capability of college-level performance. • Submit your application to the Office of Admissions and Records at the campus of your choice - Eastern, Metropolitan or Western. \. Applications will be processed in order of their receipt . • The general admissions policy of the College does not insure your admittance to a particular course or program. In some instances, you may be requested to enroll in special courses to erase scholastic deficJencies . • If you are transferring to CCC from another college or university, or if you are a former CCC student seeking readmission, you may be affected by the College's probation and dismissal policies . • Persons under 19 years of age who have not completed high school are not considered eligible for admission to Cuyahoga Community College. An exception to this policy is explained in this Catalogue under ACADEMIC CREDIT IN ESCROW. • Submission of American College Test (ACT) results (where specified on the following pages) is not a condition for admission, but will be of assistance to you and the College for pre-registration and postregistration counseling. • In cases where the student has taken the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) rather than ACT, the results may be submitted to CCC instead . •

NOTE: Please see ADMISSIONS section of Catalogue for additional information.


If You Want to enroll atCCC for 12 or more quarter credits and •••

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· . . you have never attended college . . . You should submit the following materials before you register: • A completed APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION form. High school transcript (ask your high school to forward this transcript ·directly to the Office of Admissions and Records of the campus you plan to attend) • American College Test (ACT) results (this should be forwarded from the testing agency, not from your high school, directly to the appropriate campus) • If you are 19 or 20 years of age, and have not received a high school diploma, you should submit the results of the General Educational Development test (GED) • All applicants, 19 years of age or older who have not been awarded a high school diploma, are asked to consult with Admissions and Records before completing admissions procedures •

or . . . you are currently enrolled at another college or university You should submit the following materials before you regis~ ter: • A completed APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION form. A letter from the dean, or other appropriate administrator of yOl,Jr institution, indicating permission for you to enroll at Cuyahoga Community College • NOTE: A letter of permission, whic:h should be submitted before or at the time_ of registration, is necessary each time you enroll as a TRANSIENT student at CCC •

or . . . you have attended another college or university . . .

You should submit the following materials before you register: • A completed APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION form. High school transcript (ask your high school to forward this transcript directly to the Office of Admissions and Records of the campus you plan to attend) • ACT results (this should be forwarded from the testing agency, not from your high school , • directly to the appropriate campus) • ACT scores do not have to be submitted if you have earned 15 or more quarter credits of transferable college credit • Official transcripts from all colleges or universities you have attended (ask your former college or university to forward these transcripts directly to the Office of Admissions and Records of the appropriate campus) • If you were not in good standing at the last college or university attended, please see TRANSFER STUDENTS in this Catalogue.

or . you already have_ a Baccalaureate degree . . .

You should submit a completed APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION form. 3


If You Want to enroll atCCC for 11 or fewer quarter credits and •••

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. . . you have never attended college . . . You may register for the first time as soon as you complete the APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION form. Before registering for any subsequent academic period, if you attended high school , you should submit a high school transcript (ask your high school to forward this transcript directly to the Office of Admissions and Records of the campus you plan to attend) • If you are 19 or 20 years of age, and have not received a high school diploma, you should submit the results of the General Educational Development test (GED) • All applicants , 19 years of age or older who have not been awarded a bigh school diploma, are asked to consult with Admissions and Records before completing admissions procedures.

or . . . you are currently enrolled at another college or university . You should submit the following materials before you register: • A completed APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION form • A letter from the dean , or other appropriate administrator of your institution, indicating permission for you to enroll at Cuyahoga Community College. NOTE: A letter of permis sion, which should be submitted before or at the time of registration , is necessary each time you enroll as a TRANS.IENT student at CCC •

or . you have attended another college or university . . .

You may register for the first time as soon as you complete the APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION form • Before registering for any subsequent academic period, however, you should submit the following: • High school transcript (ask your high school to forward this transcript directly to the Office of Admissions and Records of the campus you plan to attend) • Official transcripts from all other colleges and universities you have attended (ask your former college or university to forward these directly to the Office of Admissions and Records of the appropriate campus) • If you were dismissed from the last college or university attended for reasons other than scholarship , please see TRANSFER STUDENTS in this Catalogue.

or . you already have a Baccalaureate degree . . .

You should submit a completed APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION form.

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/

METROPOLITAN CAMPUS / 1 / 12,236 students

EASTERN CAMPUS 25444 Harvard Rd. Warrensville Township, O. 44122 Phone 464·1450 Office of Admissions and Records, phone 464·3535

METROPOLITAN CAMPUS 2900 Community College Ave. Cleveland, O. 44115 Phone 241·5966 Office of Admissions and Records, phone 241·5365

WESTERN CAMPUS 11000 W. Pleasant Valley Rd. Parma, O. 44130 Phone 845-4000

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DISTRICT ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 700 Carnegie Ave . Cleveland, O. 44115 Phone 241·5966


Cuyahoga Community College CATALOGUE FOR THE 1976-77 ACADEMIC YEAR Published in Spring of 1976

Calendar of Instruction and Registration Dates 1976-77 FALL QUARTER Eastern Campus Sept. 21·26

Registration, Fall Quarter •

Metropolitan Campus Sept. 21, 22, 23

Registration , Fall Quarter •

Western Campus Sept. 21, 22 and 23 (evening only)

Registration , Fall Quarter •

Sept. 29

Oct. 19

Fall Quarter classes begin • Last day for course withdrawal without official record •

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Nov. 2 Nov. 23

Nov. 24 Nov. 29 Dec. 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 Dec. 18

Dec. 20

Last day to remove "Incomplete" grades from Spring Quarter, 1976, or Summer Session, 1976 • Last day to withdraw from course with automatic "W" (withdrawal) grade, for student and/or faculty • Thanksgiving recess begins after last class • Classes resume • Final examination period, including Saturday, to accommodate Weekend course offerings • End of Fall Quarter, includes Saturday as the last day of examination period to accommodate the "Weekend" College • Fall Quarter grades due on or before 12:00 Noon •

WINTER QUARTER Eastern Campus Jan. 4, 5, 6,

8, 9

Registration, Winter Quarter •

Metropolitan Campus Jan. 4, 5, 6

Registration, Winter Quarter •

Western Campus Jan. 4 and 5

Registration, Winter Quarter •

Jan. Jan . Jan. Jan.

10 17 18 31

Feb. 14 Mar. 7

Mar. 22, 23, 24, 25, 26 Mar. 26

Mar. 28

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Winter Quarter classes begin • Martin Luther King Day recess • Classes resume • Last day for course withdrawal without official record • Last day to remove "I ncomplete" grades for Fall Quarter, 1976 • Last day to withdraw from course with automatic "W" (withdrawal) grade, for students and/or faculty • Final examination period including Saturday to accommodate Weekend course offerings • End of Winter Quarter, includes Saturday as the last day to accommodate the "Weekend College" and to provide day for make-up examinations necessitated by examination conflict • Winter Quarter grades due on or before 12:00 Noon.


SPRING QUARTER Eastern Campus Mar. 29, 30, 31, Apr. 2, 3

Registration, Spring Quarter •

Metropolitan Campus Mar. 29, 30, 31

Registration, Spring Quarter •

Western Campus Mar. 29 and 30

Registration, Spring Quarter •

Apr. 4 Apr. 22 May 6 May 27 May 30 May 31 June 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 June 18

June June June June

17 18 19 20

Spring Quarter classes begin • Last day course withdrawal without official record • Last day to remove "I" (Incomplete) grades for Winter Quarter, 1977 • Last day to withdraw from course with automatic"W" (withdrawal) grade, for students and/or faculty • Memorial Day recess • Classes resume • Final examination period including Saturday to ac· commodate Weekend course offerings • End of Spring Quarter, includes Saturday as the last day of examination period to accommodate the "Weekend" College • Commencement Exercises, Eastern Campus • Commencement Exercises, Metropolitan Campus • Commencement Exercises, Western Campus • Final grades due on or before 12:00 Noon •

REGISTRATION Regular in·person registration is held at each of CCC's three campuses as well as various off-campus sites about one week prior to the start of classes each quarter, while mail registrations usually are accepted several weeks before the opening of classes. Specific registration information such as who may register by mail, exact registration days and times and registration locations, is contained in Class Schedule booklets. Each campus publishes its own quarterly Class Schedule booklet through the Office of Admissions and Records. Students should consult the Class Schedule booklet for specific registration information. The booklets are generally available six weeks prior to each quarter.

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Board of Trustees

Mr. Robert L. Lewis Chairman

Mr. Davi.d R. Forrest (Retired Jan., 1976)

Mr. Myron S. Stoll 10

Mrs. Rubie J. McCullough

Mrs. Douglas D. Bond

Vice Chairperson

Dr. H. Andrew Johnson III

Mr. James E. O'Meara

Mr. Charles S. Tricarichi

Mr. Bert L. Wolstein


President's Message

Welcome to Cuyahoga Community College - an institution truly committed to serving your educational and career needs! We believe you will find CCC an exciting and stimulating environment, whether you are studying toward a four-year degree, preparing for a career in any of 50 different fields offered, or returning to College to update your skills or broaden personal horizons. Two hundred years ago our American forebearers set out on a journey of struggle to freedom. It has been an exciting journey challenged internally and externally by many forces . Yet, in the year 1976, all of us can also reflect with pride on the many accomplishments of our country and on the potential for both national and individual growth and development that face Americans in the years ahead . Cuyahoga Community College like the community college movement nationally reflects this spirit of freedom, creativity and opportunity that has characterized and distinguished both American'society and public education in our great country. For CCC is at the cutting edge of the \\new" community college movement - a distinct and unique effort that has blossomed in less than 15 years to become America's answer to providing access to a college education for all members of our society who have the will, desire and aspiration to learn. Cuyahoga County citizens will find that CCC, like its more than 1,200 sister institutions across the land, offers citizens quality education, at low cost, near their homes. CCC is open to all people, regardless of age, sex, ethnic origin or past academic experiences. The College exists to serve you and to help you move forward in achieving a challenging and rewarding life. That has and will continue to be our commitment to you, during the past 13 years, in 1976 and the decades ahead. ~

\'1\. f~

Nolen M. Ellison President

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Alfred M. Livingston Executive Vice President

Dwight A. Burrill President of the Western Campus

Dante N. Biello Vice President Financial Affairs and Administrative Services

Robert E. Shepack President of the Eastern Campus

Robert E. Parilla Vice President for Educational Planning and Dev.e/opment

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David Stevenson President of the Metropolitan Campus


Cuyahoga Community College: Where We've Been Where We're Going Cuyahoga Community College, Ohio's first public community college, is a two-year institution of higher education whose aim is to provide comprehensive educational opportunities to the citizens of the community it serves_ Now , as when it was chartered in December of 1962, CCC's instructional programs serve the educational , career, and technical-occupational needs of Cuyahoga County residents and are complemented by a wide range of community and stude'lit services. CCC is one College with three major campuses - Eastern in Warrensville Township, Metropolitan in downtown Cleveland and Western in Parma - and a District Administrative Services Building. It has grown from an initial first day enrollment of nearly 3 ,000 students on September 23, 1963 - the largest opening day enrollment in the history of the community-junior college movement - to 27,497 students in the fall of 1975. CCC's current enrollment makes it the third largest higher education institution in the State of Ohio. In addition, 10,000 persons benefit each year from the College's numerous non-credit classes, workshops and seminars. CCC's first classes in 1963 were held in the Brownell Building, a 19th Century schoolhouse leased from the Cleveland Board of Educationand located on East 14th St. in downtown Cleveland. Brownell was renovated and equipped through the generous support of individual donors, foundations, business, labor and industry. Growing enrol lments soon made it necessary for the College to acqu ire additional space. Through arrangements made with suburban school districts, CCC began offering evening classes for its students at three locations on the east, southeast and west sides of the county and leased more space in several downtown buildings.

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In the fall of 1966, CCC became a truly multi-campus operation. That September, the Western Campus was opened on the site housing the former Crile Veterans Hospital in Parma-Parma Heights with an enrollment of almost 2,800 full- and part-time students. Just one month later, ground was broken for a permanent Metropolitan Campus on a 40-acre site in downtown Cleveland near St. Vincent Hospital. Opening of a third campus - Eastern in Warrensville Townshipin the fall of 1971 enabled the College to further its commitment of providing educational opportunities to persons throughout the County. In the three years that followed , construction of a new $30 million Western Campus facility neared completion , CCC took occupancy of its newly-completed and centrally-located District Administrative Services Building, and a study began on a search for a possible site for a per.manent Eastern Campus. The most important part of Cuyahoga Community College's past , however, is the 175,000 students who have entered its doors since 1963. They contribute significantly to the College's present and future goal of making the entire County its Campus.

Educational Objectives Cuyahoga Community College is dedicated to the concept that the individual talent and fibre of America's citizenry constitute the nation's most valuable resource . The College, therefore, has committed itself to extend broad educational opportunities to the youth and adults of its community. It has established the corollary requirement of high performance from all those who participate in its programs. In pursuit of these objectives, the College offers a diverse and wellconceived curriculum. It mair:ltains a staff of superior instructors whose prime duties revolve around their teaching assignments. It has accepted the challenge of providing an environment conducive to learning, with special emphasis on library and laboratory resources. The College encourages independence of thought and action as essential ingred ients of a functioning democracy, stressing the development of value judgment and self-discipline. Cuyahoga Community College expects all students to achieve competence in the fundamental processes of readin g, writing, speaking, listening and computation . All students are expected to develop an appreciation of the scientific method in the solution of problems.

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Another prime concern of the College is that stu de nts develop an awareness of the unique values that are our national heritage, including the primacy of moral and spiritual concerns. Axiomatically, the College expects its students to manifest an increasing sensitivity to those respon sibilities inherent in American citizenship. As one way of fulfilling these responsibilities, the College seeks to inspire each student to achieve and maintain a high level of occupational proficiency. Furthermore , Cuyahoga Community College expects all students to show their respect for this educational opportunity through appropriate behavior. Students are to maintain regular attendance , display exemplary conduct, and apply themselves diligently in the quest for the wisdorn and knowledge upon which their contributions to society will be based. Planning and policy-making by the Trustees of the College have been consistent with the purposes and objectives of the two-year college . Specifically, the Official Plan for Cuyahoga Community College, adopted by the Board of Trustees on Nov. 28, 1962, sets forth the following student objectives: 1. To see one's cultural heritage in its historical perspective . 2. To live effectively in accordance with the conditions of one ' s physical environment. 3. To recognize and guard the rights and responsibinties of citizenship in a free society. 4 . To guide one 's life by sound moral and spiritual values . 5. To appreciate and participate in creative activities. 6. To achieve satisfactory personal, social and community relationships. 7. To apply critical and discri minating thought to the solution of problems. 8. To accept responsibility for one's decisions . 9. To develop the basic skills of communication. 10. To enjoy the benefits of a rewarding and productive vocation. 11. To acquire a positive attitude toward, and strengthened foundation for, lifelong learning.

Rights and Responsibilities of the College Community In December of 1968, the College 's Board of Trustees adopted the Policy on Rights and Responsibilities developed and approved by a committee on student conduct comprised of representatives of the College's student body, Board of Trustees, faculty and administration.

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The policy, codified in response to a directive by the 107th General Assembly of the State of Ohio, was prepared in an effort to encourage an environment conducive to the growth and development of all members of the College community. In preparation of the document, a positive attitude and a consistency with the mores of this society were maintained. The policy not only stresses the responsibilities that are necessary to freedom , but also establishes and protects the rights of all members of the College community. The College 's Policy on Rights and Responsibilities may be found in the Eastern , Metropolitan or Western Campus Student Handbook.

Philosophy of the College Cuyahoga Community 8'ollege has recently examined and revitalized its philosophy and mission statement in' order to better serve student needs and our rapidly changing society. In May of 1975, CCC faculty , staff, students, Trustees and community representatives devoted two days to an intensive working session. The result was the following Mission Statement which focuses on CCC's role in the community: Cuyahoga Comunity College is a public , open·door two·year community·based college accessible within a minimum of bar· riers to all. Its mission is to provide low·cost, quality, lifelong educational opportunities and to assume leadership in a metropolitan , multi-racial setting for meeting the changing needs and improving the quality of life for the individual and the community. The Mission Statement, which still is subject to modification, charts out Cuyahoga Community College's belief in and commitment to providing educational opportunities to any citizen who can profit from them. The College welcomes those who wish to develop abilities beyond their present skills; whether students plan to continue stud ies at a four-year college, pursue vocational or professional programs, or undertake studies that will broaden their cultural or social lives. CCC believes it must give students a better understanding and appreciation of themselves and their environment and help them evaluate objectively new ideas and concepts. Since learning extends beyond the classroom and the campus, CCC strives to promote the intellectual activities of the community and to help enrich the culture of the area which it serves. Such a philosophy requires that Cuyahoga Community College maintain and heighten academic teaching excellence.

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Purposes of the College Cuyahoga Community College exists through the support of the county and state in which it resides . As a locally controlled and administered institution, the College is especially attuned to its own community - Cuyahoga County. This close identification with its home area, one of the prime advantages of the comprehensive community college, leads to a diversity of educational, occupational and cultural offerings designed specifically to meet the needs of the area's residents. Some of these offerings aretraditional or conventional, but many represent a bold and imaginative step beyond the ordinary. Recognizing that students differ greatly in experience, needs, capacities, aspirations and interests, the College pursues the following major purposes: 1. Academic preparation for advanced formal study. • The Arts and Sciences curriculum at Cuyahoga Community College includes courses normally taken the first two years at a four-year institution awarding the Bachelor's degree. The student may follow this University Parallel sequence for one or two years and then transfer to a four-year institutionto continue working toward a Bachelor's degree. 2. Career preparation . • A broad range of Technological, Business and other occupational offerings are available at the College. Course sequences prepare students for careers in fields where increasingly critical manpower shortages exist. The Career Program at Tri-C also offers courses for those who wish to refresh or improve their present skills. 3. Community services - adult education . • As a result of its close identification with the needs of the community, the College is able to provide representative cultural, educational and occupational offerings as determined by public interest. Community services are offered in cooperation with other educational insti· tutions, business, labor, government, health agencies, individuals and organizations within the community. 4. General education . • A prime concern of the College is the imparting of the knowledge, skills and attitudes needed by each individual to become effective as a person, as a member of a fam_ily, as a worker and as a citizen in a free society. 5. Educational and occupational counseling~ • Comprehensive counseling service is stressed to assist both full-time and parttime students in the selection and pursuit of goals compatible with their interests, aptitudes and values.

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The Col"lege Seal The Cuyahoga Community College seal incorporates symbols which represent the concept of "lifelong learning" as well as the political and economic segments which the College serves. The upper portion depicts the Cleveland skyline, visible from many points of Cuyahoga County. The lower portion embodies particulars from the Great Seal of the State of Ohio. The Torch of Learning, circumscribed by the symbol of nuclear energy, represents utilization of research and modern instructional techniques. The communications satellite, Telstar, stresses the importance of communication as an essential of all learning activity at Cuyahoga Community College.

Accreditation and Memberships Cuyahoga Community College is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. The Eastern Campus, Tri-C's newest, has candidate status with NCA. The Nursing Programs of both the Metropolitan Campus and the Western Campus are accredited by the National League for Nursing and the Ohio State Board of Nursing. The Medical Assisting Program is accredited by the American Association of Medical Assistants and the Dental Hygiene Program is a~red足 ited by the American Council on Dental Education.

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The Respiratory Therapy Technology Program is accredited by the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical Association in association with the American Association for Inhalation Therapy, American College of Chest Physicians and the American Society of Anesthesiology. The following organizations also are among those in which the College holds institutional memberships: • Adult Education Association of the United States of America • American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers • American Association of Community and Junior Colleges • Council for Advancement and Support of Education • Cleveland Commission on Higher Education • Council of North Central Junior Colleges • Ohio Colleges A~ sociation

League for Innovation Cuyahoga Community College , by invitation , is a member of the League for Innovation in the Community College. The organization consists of 16 outstanding community colleges throughout the nation. In addition to Cuyahoga Community College, members are Brookdale Community College (New Jersey), Central Piedmont Community College (North Carolina) , Coast Community College District (California) , Dallas County Community College District (Texas) , Delta College (Michigan) , Foothill Community College District (California) , Junior College District of st. Louis (Missouri) , Kern Community College District (California) , Lane Community College (Oregon), Los Angeles Community College District (California) , Los Rios Community College District (California) , Maricopa County Community College District (Arizona) , Moraine Valley Community College (Illinois) , Peralta Community College (California) , Santa Fe Community College (Florida) . The league was conceived to encourage and evaluate innovation and experimentation in education. It focuses upon continuing improvement and development within the community college movement. Its projects have been wide in scope and the results have proved meaningful to all participating members.

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CCC Eastern: Planning for Growth The Eastern Campus of Cuyahoga Community College has a utilitarian , sand -colored exterior. Inside, in brightly-decorated surroundings, more than 4500 people are enrolled . Established to serve the Eastern portion of the county, the Campus is located at 25444 Harvard Rd., between Green and Richmond Rds., in Warrensville Township. It is easily accessible from the Chagrin Blvd. exit of 1-27l. Since October, 1971 , when the first Eastern Campus students were registering in a trailer parked on a grassy field, the Campus has grown steadily. By Fall of 1972, a two-story addition was under construction. During the 1975-6 academic year, a second two-story addition was built_ Presently, College officials are planning a permanent Eastern Campus to serve as home base for community education in the area.

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A lively fine arts program at Eastern attracts hundreds of students, from retirees to high school seniors earning advanced credits. Special programs headquartered at this campus include Dental Laboratory Tech. nology, Micro路Precision Technology, Commercial Art, and Technical Illus. tration. The Campus offers a wide range of business programs, highlighted by secretarial refresher courses, and management training for super. market personnel. Nearly 3000 people each year enroll in non路credit classes sponsored by the Eastern Campus, and offered both there and at off路campus loca. tions such as schools, churches, and residences for the elderly. Topics of non路credit classes range from "Photography for Fun" to "Italian for the Traveler" and include sailing, golf, leaded glass, and indoor gardening. Eastern's popular annual Writers' Workshop features noted authors. It is open to the public, as are other community service programs for senior citizens, for women in management, and other special groups. Saturday classes for children include ballet, puppetry, karate, and French. Parents often find this ....permits the entire family to "go to college" as a shared experience.

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Metro: CCC's Downtown Campus In downtown Cleveland, the Metropol itan Campus of Cuyahoga Community College serves more than 12,000 students. The modern 10unit complex, built at a cost of $38.5 million, opened in fall of 1969. The Metro Campus was CCC's first permanent facility. Its buildings extend from E. 22nd St. to past E. 30th St. and Woodland Ave. Metro is easily accessible by bus and rapid transit. The Campus has both paved outdoor lots and well-lit , supervised underground garages. For handicapped persons, there are ramps and elevators. Metro's award-winning landscaping includes multi-level courtyards, greenery, shrubs, and a dramatic fountain. The largest Campus building is Science and Technology. It contains 13 laboratories with the most modern equipmen! geared to tomorrow's jobs in industry and in health careers. The Campus Learning Resources Center h'as 64,646 books and also houses the College's Computer Center, Campus newspapers, and community services such as Project EVE, a counseling and referral service for

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women interested in further education, volunteering, or employment. Two-year career programs based at the Metropolitan Campus include Dental Hygiene, Hospitality Management, Library/Media Technology, Child Care Technology, Mental Health Technology, and Electrical-Electronic Engineering Technology. Counseling, financial aid, and placement services are in the Administrative Building. The Campus also offers an outstanding physical education and recreation program, with a swimming pool and tennis courts available for use both by students and by community groups. The 3,000seat gymnasium is the home of CCC's high-scoring Cougar basketball. team. The Cleveland Philharmonic Orchestra's concerts are given in Metro's 910-seat auditorium. A variety of plays are presented in the Campus' two theatres. The Fairmount Dance Theatre Company gives several outstanding dance performances each year, as part of a cooperative agreement with the College. The Department of Black Affairs, the Ethnic Heritage Center, and the Early Childhood Learning Center all exist to respond to specific student needs. The Metropolitan Campus offers a comprehensive range of innovative learning opportunities to the thousands of people who live or work in the heart of Cleveland.

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Western: The Campus in the Park The Western Campus of Cuyahoga Community College, often described as the "Campus in the Park," is a dramatic new six-building complex located at 11000 W_ Pleasant Valley Rd_, in Parma_ It was dedicated on October 13, 1975_ More than 10,800 people are enrolled at Western, taking arts, sciences, business, and technology offerings in every subject area from law enforcement to sculpture_ Designed to blend with and preserve the natural beauty of the 183.5 wooded acres on which it was built, the $30 million facility consists of handsome red brick buildings interconnected by enclosed corridors_ The new Western Campus buildings replace the old Crile Veterans Hospital quarters wh ich CCC used from 1966-1975. At the heart of the Western Campus is the Galleria_ This three-story central activities area contains counseling, financial aid, and placement services, as well as library, cafeteria, snack bar, and study areas. The Fieldhouse, which has bleacher seating for 1,050 spectators, provides space for indoor tennis, badminton, volleyball, and varsity basketball. The Campus also has an olympic-size swimming pool, handball courts. Outdoor sports facilities include an archery range, an all-weather track, tennis courts, and baseball and soccer fields.

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Western sponsors satellite learning centers at Lakewood Hospital, N. Olmsted High School, and NASA's Lewis Research Center. Career program offerings available at the Western Campus include Aviation Technology, Court and Conference Reporting, Graphic Communications Management and Technology, Physicians Assisting, Physician's Surgical Assistant and Respiratory Therapy Technology. Therapy Technology. The community often attends Campus events, which have recently included a live circus, appearances by Israeli Gen. Moshe Dayan and TV personality Alan Funt, and an exhibit of drawings by Leonardo da Vinci. Western's splendidly-equipped 467-seat theatre offers plays and concerts. Continuing education includes evening and weekend non-credit classes on topics from "Pre-Retirement Planning" to "Stamp Collecting." Among Western's diverse community service offerings are a popular summer baseball clinic for youngsters, and "New Directions for Women," a program designed to meet the special needs of women who head households.

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LIGHTED PARKING AND PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

CamEastern Camp us. Lighted parking is provided at the Eastern The . facility the to nt adjace located is which lot, pus! 656-ca r parking 1-271 near n locatio Its . rtation transpo public by served is s Eastern Campu st side. is convenient to tens of thousands of residents of the East-Southea d provide is cars 850 for Metropolitan Campus • Protected parking nal Additio s. campu the of system ay under the immense platform-walkw municipal lighted parking is available in outdoo r College lots. A lighted Ave. College unity Comm and St. 22 E. at Metro near lot is located by a Metro is convenient to public transpo rtation . It is served Rapid. Shaker the by and loop, RTA numbe r of bus lines, includi ng the at E. 34 St. In additio n, RTA's Campus Station Rapid stop is near Metro is only Metro s, freeway 1-90 and 1-77 1-71, the to nt adjace Located nders. Clevela r minute s away from hundreds of thousands of Greate s facility Western Camp us. The location of the Parma-Parma Height in palities munici 13 than more of ts makes it readily accessible to residen nity. commu st the vast West-Southwe cars in Student parking space is provided for more than 2,500 brightl y lighted areas. d at all PARKING FEE. A 25¢ pay· upon-exit parking fee is charge ees. employ College all and ts three campuses for studen

LIBRARY

area. The library at each campus acts as a service to the instruc tional Supple rs. membe faculty and ts studen of It is maintained for the benefit acooper the h throug led assemb on collecti the of part are ls mental materia tive efforts of the faculty and library staff. ue. The campus librarie s provide a compu ter print-o ut book catalog makes It ue. catalog car:d nal traditio This universal catalogue replaces the all stu dents. available the collection of the entire College library system to to books access direct allow to stacks open The library mainta ins and periodicals. other Other facilitie s include play-back equipm ent for tapes and ucing reprod for devices recordings, microfi lm readers , photog raphic printed matter and enclosures for individ ual study. Learning On the Metrop olitan Campus the library is known as the with library the of s service the es combin it e Resources Center becaus involve s service latter These . Center s Service ional nstruct I the those of for utilizat ion the design, acquisition, and distribu tion of non-pr int media itself. Center ces Resour g in the classroom as well as in the Learnin

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION The College offers a program of physical education designed to develop an understanding and appreciation of bodily fitness, to improve the student's recreational skills , and to increase poise and social competency_ \ Facilities at the new Physical Education Center of the Metropolitan Campus include a gymnasium with Tartan flooring and roll-back seats, an olympic-size swimming pool, Tartan track, handball courts , weightlifting room, wrestling room , dance studios , tennis courts, soccer and practice football field , lockers, whirlpool bath and showers_ New Western Campus athletic facilit ies include a gymnasium, baseball diamonds , soccer field, archery range, handball courts, weightlifting rooms , tennis courts, running t rack , swimming pool, various exercise and gymnastics rooms , lockers and showers_ The physical education program at the new Eastern Campus is under development Off-campus facilities are used for a number of classes and activities _

FOOD SERVICES Eastern Campus • Snack bar items are- available in the leisure/ lunch lounge_ Metropolitan Campus . Hot meals are served in the cafeteria _ Western Campus . the snack bar.

Hot meals are served in the dining room and in

BOOK CENTERS Book Centers are located at the three campuses to serve students, faculty and staff by providing required textbooks and supplies_ In addition , they carry a selection of non-required books and incidental items_

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Programs of Instruction Cuyahoga Community College offers three major programs of instruction. The Arts and Sciences Program provides the first two years of a traditional college curriculum. Included in these offerings are University Parallel sequences for students who wish to transfer to four-year colleges and universities. The Career Program is designed to fulfill the unique employment requirements of this community. The Community Services Program provides representative cultural, educational, occupational and avocational offerings as determined by community interest and need.

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Arts and Sciences Program The Arts and Sciences Program provides a wide range of course offerings in liberal arts for all students at the College. Some students only take several courses in the program, but many enroll in the two-year sequences leading to the Associate of Arts degree. A large number of students in the Arts and Sciences Program plan to transfer to four-year colleges and universities after one or two years at CCC. They are enrolled in what is usually referred to as the University Parallel curriculum, courses paralleling those offered in the first two years of a four-year institution. Credits earned in this curriculum may be transferred to colleges and universities as the first and second years of a Bachelor's degree program. CCC's University Parallel curriculum includes many courses designed to prepare students for upper division study in such specialized field s as medi ci ne , dentistry, law, bu siness, education, engineering and the en gineering technologies.

Career Program Another major objective of Cuyahoga Community College is to develop a comprehensive series of Technolog ical and Business courses to fulfill the occupational needs of the community's citizens and employers. The Career Program works toward this objective by offering specialized instruction in some 45 occupational fields in Business, Engineering , Health and Public Service Technologi es. Many students in the Career Program take only a few courses, re learning or improving skills they already possess. Other students, planning a technical or paraprofessional ca ree r, enroll in a two-year sequence leading to an Associate of Applied Busine ss or Associate of Applied Sci · ence degree. Still others take a shorter sequence leading to a certificate. The significance of CCC's Career Program is derived from its immediate relevancy to the dynamic manpower situation in this com- · munity. Trained and skilled personnel are needed to meet new and increasingly exacting qualifications in many fields . Today, it is estimated that one·fourth of the entire United States labor force is working in technical, paraprofessiona l positions that did not even exist in 1930. The Career Program prepares the student to step directly into this fast-moving age of technological advancement. In each area of the Career Progra m, an Advisory Committee works with the Colle ge to make the preparation as valuable and up-to·date as possible. These civic·minded representatives of local business, labor, industry , government , health agencies and pub lic service assist the College in the identification of needs 'and the development of new areas within the program.

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Co m m un ity Se rv ic es Pr og ra m range of The College's Community Services Program offers a broad of the ts residen to cultura l, educational and occupational offerin gs unity"comm are s Service Greater Cleveland community. Comm unity ms progra such making to tted commi is based" in the sense that CCC ns. locatio s campu at as well as nity commu the available throug hout credit A variety of late afternoon, evening and weekend courses, both place time, The ages. all 'and non-credit, are available to students of internity commu by ined determ are gs and subject matter of these offerin from differ not do ions, except few with s, offering est and need. The credit m. progra tional instruc regular the those within educaNon-credit offering s, however, are designed to meet specific often They m. progra tional tional requirements outside the regular instruc College regular of facets ing combin ms include one-day seminars, progra ees for courses, and workshops. Others have focused on retrain ing employ ColThe . nurses area business and industr y, and refreshe r programs for indusand s busines for rs lege also provides an extensive range of semina Safety Standtryon such topics as the Federal Occupational Health and ards. s each All three CCC campuses feature many non-credit course crafts, l orienta eping, bookke as topics such d include have quarte r. These g, plannin t iremen slimnastics, photography, wines of America, pre-ret day some and evening Many tennis, yoga, karate and many more subjects. ent centers, courses are offered at off-campus locations, includi ng retirem s ProService unity Comm The ls. hospita area at high school facilitie s and tailored ms progra ion educat ing continu of variety a ts conduc gram also to meet specific economic or social needs. These include: Lonal Project EVE, offered throug h The Center for Comm unity Educat and nal vocatio a is and 1966 in opened Services at the Metro Campus, over served has EVE . women for service ferral ling/re educational counse programs 8,000 women with individual and group counseling and with nge long-ra and iate designed to assist in the process of developing immed , service nity commu ion, educat ing goals in life plannin g related to continu behind mover y primar a also was EVE . growth employment and personal Cleveland's 1975 Interna tional Women's Year Congress. program Project Search is a comprehensive educational counseling s operate Search 1967. which has served more than 5,000 persons since is s veteran for ling counse l Specia an east side and near west side center. Cleveland. also offered at these centers plus a veterans center in East m.) Progra s Veteran (Project Search

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Eastern's Program for the Elderly has enrolled more than 300 senior citizens each academic quarter at four retirement centers . A full range of both credit and non 路credit courses are offered at area high schools during evening hours in Eastern Cuyahoga County. Cuyahoga Community College 's Community Services Program also fosters active involvement between the community and the College . Nonprofit organizations and community residents are encouraged to use College facilities for meetings and other events. For example, the Metropolitan Campus Auditorium serves as home of the Cleveland Philharmonic Orchestra and the Fairmount Dance Theatre. Individuals and organizations within Cuyahoga County are invited to contact the Community Services Office at any of the three CCC campuses to explore ways in which additional service can be provided to the community.

BLACK AFFAIRS The Department of Black Affairs at the Metropolitan Campus was established in the Fall of 1970. It was founded to help prepare people to live more equitably in a multi-cultural society. The objectives of the Department of Black Affairs are to provide a more accurate view of African and African-American heritage and culture , to enhance the self-concept of African-Americans, to provide a relevant education for Afri ca n-American s, and to help prepare students for ca-reers in today' s and tomorrow's world. The department is located in the Metro Campus Library, room 310. An African-American Collection affords students the opportunity to do research and explore the African-American and " black experience". Muntu Drum, a newspaper, and Black Ascensions, a literary magazine , are under its aegis. The Department of Black Affairs also sponsors the Metro Community Forum , as well as seminars and workshops , to bring illformation about minorities to a wider audience. Black studies courses are available to all students in a variety of subject areas . Credit courses are available which deal directly with the . "black experience " - the culture, economics , history, language , politics , psychology and social institution s of the African-American. Credits earned in this curriculum generally are transferable toward a Bachelor's degree at four-year colleges and universities . The History sequence - courses 630-170, 630-171 and 630 -172 - may be used to help fulfill the graduation requirements for an Associate of Arts or an Associate of Applied Business or Applied Science degree at Cuyahoga Community College. Students interested in pursuing a program of black studies should consult their counselor and / or the Director of Black Affairs.

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Course No . 560-251

560-252 560-253 630-164 630-170 630-171 630-172 660-161 800-105 800-106 840-105 850-231

COURSES AVAILABLE 1976路1977 Course Title Black American Literature (Study of Major Works of Black Americans from the post-Reconstruction Era through the Harlem Renaissance) Black American Literature (from 1930-1950) Black American Literature (Survey of Major Works from the Fifties to the Present) Urban History History of Africa The Negro in American Culture to 1908 The Negro in American Culture from 1908 Survey of the Black Press The Black Voter and the Community Political Systems of Africa The Black Community Contemporary American Black-White Relations

EARLY CHILDHOOD LEARNING CENTER The Early Childhood Learning Center was established on the Metropolitan Campus in August, 1972. The Center provides a full child development program for a limited number of children, ages 3 to 5 years. Parents are asked to make early application for enrollment. All parents of enrolled children participate actively in Center activities. The Center relates to other campus departments by providing opportunities for students to volunteer, engage in practicum or internship experiences. The Early Childhood Learning Center is located on South Concourse, room 88. Visitors are welcome. The phone number is 241-5966, extension 441.

ETHNIC HERITAGE CENTER The Metro Campus' Ethnic Heritage Center opened in the fall of 1971. It was founded to help bring about awareness in ethnic groupsprimarily European, Asian, Appalachian, American Indian, Spanish-speaking - of their contributions to American society. The Ethnic Heritage Center, perhaps the first of its kind in the nation, is quartered in the Metro Campus Library, room 312_ Among the events sponsored by the Center have been recitals, concerts, dance festivals, Bicentennial events and conferences such as Conference on World Food Crisis, Conference on World Population Prob-

32


lems and Youth Conference on Ethnicity which was the first and only conference of its type in the nation. As part of the Metro Campus ' non-credit offerings, classes in ethnic cultures have been offered at neighborhood libraries and Metro Campus. These have included Asian and East and South European cultures as well as beginning language classes geared primarily to social workers. Among the non-credit courses offered at Metro have been "Slovak Language and Literature", "Slavic Studies", "The Asian Character" and "Chinese (Mandarin) Language".

Admissions, Records and Academic Policy WHERE SHOULD I APPLY? Cuyahoga Community College has three campuses: Eastern Campus, 25444 Harvard Road, Warrensville Township, Ohio 44122. Metropolitan Campus, 2900 Community College Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44115. Western Campus, 11000 West Pleasant Valley Road, Parma, Ohio 44130. You should register at the campus where you expect to take the majority of your courses. After you have selected a campus, you are considered to be a student there until an official transfer is submitted to another campus. If you wish to transfer from one campus to another you should indicate this by completing a CHANGE OF CAMPUS form in the Counseling Office at the campus where your records are located_ Your credentials and your permanent academic record can then be transferred.

HOW DO I REGISTER? Mail registrations are accepted several weeks before the opening of each quarter's classes. You will find specific registration information in the Class Schedule booklet published before each quarter begins. To insure an advantageous class schedule and to realize the full benefits of the College's orientation and counseling services, you are urged to begin the admission process at the beginning of the quarter preceding the one you wish to enter. High school students may apply in their senior year.

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ANTICIPATED 1976 - 1977 SCHEDULE OF FEES Cuyahoga Community College, supported by the taxpayers of Cuyahoga County and assisted by the state, maintains modest instructional and general fees, both of which are subject to review during the academic year 1976-1977 by the Board of Trustees of Cuyahoga Community College and may be changed at their discretion with the approval of the Ohio Board of Regents.

INSTRUCTIONAL FEES PER QUARTER HOUR OF CREDIT;." Subject to revision by the Board of Trustees, the Fall 1976 Instructional Fee per quarter hour of credit will be: Out-of-State Cuyahoga County Other Ohio Residents Residents Residents $20 $10 $7 "Maximum instructional fee for residents of Cuyahoga County is $100 per quarter.

GENERAL FEE PER QUARTER HOUR OF CREDIT

t

Subject to revision by the Board of Trustees, the Fall 1976 General Fee per quarter hour of credit will be: Out -of -State Cuyahoga County Other Ohio Residents Residents Residents $.70 $.70 $.70 t Maximum general fee is $10 per quarter. Credit by Examinaiton Fee: See CREDIT BY EXAMINATION.

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CAN I GET MY MONEY BACK IF I DROP A COURSE? In many cases, the answer is "yes". If you qualify for a refund, the following schedule must be observed: Refund Regular Summer Period Quarter Session First Week . . .. . . .. . . . . .. . ..... . 90% 90% Second Week .. . ... . .. ... . . . . .. . 70 % 50 % Third Week. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50% No Refund Effective the fourth week of any quarter, no refund will be made. FULL REFUNDS of instructional fees are granted if the College can路 cels a course. PARTIAL REFUNDS are granted if the student withdraws during the refund period (see the preceding schedule) . NO REFUNDS are granted if the student voluntarily enlists into military service following the close of the refund period , is dismissed for disciplinary reasons , or is financially obligated to the bookstore , the library or any other department of the College at the time of withdrawal.

DO I NEED AN ID CARD? As a CCC student, you are required to have a data collection (DC) identification (10) card. It is required for registration activities, for library checkout purposes, and for admittance to athletic , cultural and social events. Currently enrolled students should carry their DCIID cards at all times: it must be presented on request of College authorities at any time. You will acquire your DCIID card as part of the registration procedure. If you register by mail, your card will be mailed to you . If you register in person, you will get your card during the registration process. The DCIID card is non -transferable and is void unless it is signed by the student and validated for the current term . Loss or theft of your DCllD card should be reported within 24 hours to the Office of Admissions and Records. Replacement cost for a duplicate DCIID card is $1.25 .

MUST I LIVE IN CUYAHOGA COUNTY? Cuyahoga Community College is supported by the taxpayers of Cuyahoga County. If you are not a county resident, you will have to pay a tuition surcharge. Your official residency will be determined during registration according to the residency policy of the State of Ohio, the Ohio Board of Regents and the Cuyahoga Community College Board of Trustees. A change to a Cuyahoga County address does not automatically entitle a student to Cuyahoga County resident instructional fees. Requests to change legal residence should be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records. More information on residency requirements can be found in the Class Schedule booklet.

35


WHAT IF I CHANGE MY NAME OR ADDRESS? You should report the change to the Office of Admissions and Records at the campus where your records are kept_

DO I NEED TO SPEAK ENGLISH? Yes_ As part of the admissions procedure, international students are required to show proficiency in English. A special English examination may be required, however, previous work at other educational institutions will also be taken into considerat ion . For more information , contact the Office of Admissions and Records. The CCC English Department regularly offers classes in "English as a Second Language. " This course is designed to teach the bare rudiments of English to persons whose native language is not Engl ish . It is not meant to prepare you for admission to CCC . For more information , please call the English Department.

CAN I TRANSFER TO CCC FROM ANOTHER COLLEGE? Yes. You must, however, comply with the established admissions procedures. If you were placed on academic probation or dismissed by your previous college, you will be placed on first probation when you are admitted to Cuyahoga Community College. You will then remain on first probation until you have successfully completed 15 or more quarter credits or until you have been placed on second probation. See WHAT IS ACADEMIC PROBATION , P 43. CCC will not accept transfer credit for courses in which you got less than a "C" . Transfer credits from other institutions will be entered on the College's permanent record forms, but no grades will be recorded. Only grades earned at CCC will be used in computing grade-point averages. If you were dismissed for disciplinary reasons from your last college, you will have to be eligible to return to that institution before you can be considered for admission to Cuyahoga Community College. You may, however, petition the Director of Admissions and Records to exempt you from this policy. Your petition will be considered by the Admissions Board.

CAN I CHANGE MY SCH EDU LE AFTER CLASSES BEGIN? Yes , you are allowed to make changes in your course schedule during the program adjustment period . You should, however, keep in mind that your choices during this period are limited. You should select your courses very carefully during the registration period so that you won't need to change your schedule. See Class Schedule booklet for dates of program adjustment.

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WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO AUDIT A COURSE? Auditing a course means that you attend classes but are not required to submit assignments or take examinations. An auditor, therefore, reo ceives neither a grade nor course credit. The auditing fee, however, is the same as when you are regularly enrolled for credit. Currently enrolled CCC students are permitted to audit one or more courses. The audited courses may be added during the first week of classes, providing space is available. Careful consideration is advisable before you request permission to audit a course: audit status is not convertible to credit status. If you are uncertain about whether to audit a course, you should discuss it with your counselor before you request audit status. Persons not currently attending CCC may register to audit a course during the first week of classes. Acceptance depends on class space being avai lable. Registration by mail is not available to aud itors.

CAN I EVER BE RE-ADMITTED IF I'VE BEEN DISMISSED FOR lOW ACADEMIC STANDING? If you apply for readmission following first dismissal for academic reasons, you are subject to the following condit ions: (1) If dismissed with a cumulative grade路point average of 0.75 or higher, you may apply for immediate readm ission for the next academ ic term. Students readmitted under these circumstances will be placed on second probation and will be allowed to enroll for a maximum of 11 quarter credits. (Exceptions to this maxi 路 mum will be considered by the Admissions Appeals Board .) (2) If you were dismissed with a cumulative grade路point average of less than 0 .75 you may qualify for readmission by using one of these three methods: i: Remain out of Cuyahoga Community College for at least one full quarter before applying for readmission . ii: Petition the Admissions Appeals Board to be considered for immediate readmission on second probation . iii: Elect to use the "Change of Degree Objective" plan (described below) to be readmitted in good standing. Readmission following the second dismissal will be permitted only after you have remained out of CCC for at least one full quarter. You should then petition the Admissions Board for readmission . If the Board's action is affirmative and if you are permitted to continue without a "Change of Degree Objective", you will be placed on second probation. If you reenter with a "Change of Degree Objective", you will be admitted in good standing.

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WHAT IS A CHANGE OF DEGREE OBJECTIVE? If you are not making satisfactory progress in an Associate degree program or if you have been dismissed for academic reasons, you may petition the Admissions Appeals Board for permission to change the degree you're working toward or to pursue a Certificate Program. The following procedure should be followed in making such a change: (1) Discuss your plans with a counselor who will help you initiate the appropriate form. (2) Obtain the approval of the department head of the program you wish to enter. Following Admissions Appeals Board approval, your permanent record will indicate the change of degree objective. Failing grades for all courses taken prior to this change will not be considered in computing your CCC grade·point average. You will, therefore, be admitted to the new program in good standing. Credits successfully earned prior to the change will , of cou rse, be applied toward the new program. After the change of degree has been approved, you must earn a min· imum of 24 quarter credits and complete all other requirements to be eligible for graduation. NOTE: Students planning to transfer to another college or university are cautioned that the receiving institution may use all grades earned in computing grade·point averages for admission or other pur· poses.

HOW MANY COURSES MUST I TAKE TO BE CONSIDERED A FULL-TIME STUDENT? You must take at least 12 quarter credits to be considered a fulltime student. Although the normal course load for full-time students is 15 quarter credits, a counselor or advisor may recommend a heavier or lighter load depending on ability and/or past performance. If you ranked in the lowest one·fourth of your high school graduating class , you may not enroll for more than 12 quarter credits during your first quarter at CCC. Once you have successfully completed 12 quarter credits, you will be allowed to take the normal full·time schedule of 15 or more quarter credits. If you are currently enrolled in 11 or fewer quarter credits (part·time) and wish to enroll for the next academic quarter for 12 or more quarter credits (full·time), you must file a CHANGE OF STATUS form in the Office of Admissions and Records. You will be notified of the credentials needed to make this change. To be considered for Change of Status, you must have a cumulative grade·point average of 1.00 or higher at the time the request is submitted.

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WHAT IS THE CREDIT IN ESCROW PROGRAM? Academic Credit in Escrow is a program for Cuyahoga County high school seniors. It enables them to enroll in one College day course each quarter for regular CCC credit. The College also recognizes the Advanced Placement Program. This is a nationally administered program in which college-level courses are available in high school to selected students. The College Entrance Examination Board prepares tests to grade the high school students taking courses in the program . The College will grant credit for selected courses in which you have attained satisfactory test scores. You should consult your high school counselor or the CCC Office of Admissions and Records if you want more information.

WHAT IF I'M A VETERAN? You may be eligible for educational benefits from the Veterans Ad ministration while attend ing Cuyahoga Community College. The VA accepts Cuyahoga Community College as an institution qualified and equipped to provide education in the arts and sciences and in the career program area, under the provisions of the War Orphans Assistance Act and the Veterans Readjustment Benefits Act of 1966. CCC will grant three quarter hours of academic credit in Physical Education in recognition of basic physcial education training received by veterans who have served 365 consecutive days on active duty in the mili tary service of the United States. After you have been officially admitted to the College, you should submit a certified copy of Form DD-214 to the Office of Admissions and Records in order to receive Physical Education credits for your basic physical training during military service.

WHAT IF I MISS A CLASS? Regular class attendance is required. You may be dropped from a course by the instructor whenever total absences exceed three hours in any quarter after the third through the eighth week if, in the instructor's judgment, you cannot benefit from further class instruction. If illness or emergency should necessitate a brief absence from class; you should confer with your instructor when you return. If you are absent for a week or more due to prolonged illness, you should consult the campus Health Services. If you are having problems with your classwork due to a prolonged absence , you should confer with your instructor or a counselor.

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WHAT IF I HAVE A JOB? By careful and realistic planning, you can successfully manage both your job and your academic studies . Each credit hour of your schedule usually requires a minimum of two hours of outside study each week. If you are employed full time, you should probably not attempt to carry more than two courses per quarter. If you have a part-time job, you should carry a course load in proportion to your hours of employment.

WILL I HAVE FINAL EXAMS IN ALL MY CLASSES? Yes, a final examination is required in each course and is given at a regularly scheduled time. Under emergency circumstances, students may be able to postpone an examination. If unable to appear, it is your responsibility to inform the instructor prior to the scheduled examination. If you receive official permission to postpone an examination, you will be assigned an "I" (incomplete) as the grade for that course. You must personally request an incomplete grade from your instructor. It is not granted automatically. Incomplete grades can be removed by completing the examination no later than the fifth week of the following academic quarter. Failure to do so will result in an "F" (failure) grade.

40


COURSE CREDIT SOLELY BY EXAMINATION? Yes. If you feel competent in a particular subject, you may petition the appropriate academic dean for the privilege of taking a special examination and/or performing a special assignment for credit in that subject. An examination fee of $5 is assessed for each course involved. You are not permitted to earn more than 18 units of credit by examination. Credit by examination requires the approval of the appropriate academic department. A standard symbol indicating "credit by examination" will be posted on your permanent record , but letter grades and quality points will not be used .

WHAT ABOUT GRADES? Final grades are issued at the end of each quarter. Letter grades earn quality points per credit unit. according to the following schedule : A - Excellent . . .............. . ..... .. ... 4 8 - Good ....... . ..... . .......... . ... . . 3 C - Average . . .... . ...... .. ..... .. ... . . . 2 D - 8elow Average .. . . . .. ... ...... .... .. . 1 F - Failure .. . .... .. . . .......... . .. .. . . . 0 ;'W - Withdrawal .. ....... . . .. ... . .. .. . . .. 0 I - Incomplete . . ... . .. . .... . ........ .. . . 0 * S - Audit ......... . ....... . .... . .. . .. . . 0 Your grade-point average is computed by the following formula: Total Quality Points Earned = Grade-Point Average ~' Total

Units of Credit Attempted For example, if you took路 five courses worth three credits each, you would be attempting 15 total units of credit. If you earned four "8's" and one "A" as final grades, you would have a total of 48 auality points. Your grade-point average would be 3.20 - 48 divided by 15. * NOTE: Courses in which you earn grades of "W" or "S" are not considered part of the total credit units attempted.

HONORS? Yes. Each quarter, the Dean's List gives public recognition to those students who achieve outstanding academic success. You will be included in t he Dean's List if you have earned a grade-point average of 3.50 or higher in attempting 12 or more credit hours during the preceding quarter.

HOW WILL I KNOW IF I'M PASSING MY COURSES? If you are earning less than a "C" at mid -quarter, you will p.wbably get an academic warning from your instructor. If you receive such a notice, you should seek help from your instructor or counselor. It is , however, your responsibility to monitor your academic standing and progress, and seek help if you need it.

41


CAN I REPEAT A COURSE? Yes , you may repeat a course in which a grade of "0" or "F" has been earned. The most recently earned grade in that course will be used in computing your grade-point average. NOTE: Students planning to transfer to another college or university are cautioned that the receiving institution may use all grades earned in repeated courses to compute grade-point averages for admission or other purposes.

HOW DO I WITHDRAW FROM A CLASS? You may withdraw from a class at any time prior to the last two weeks of instruction or end of the eighth week of the quarter by completing the necessary forms in the Office of Admissions and Records. Both full-time and part路time students should confer with the course instructor and, if necessary, a counselor as part of the withdrawal procedure . If you withdraw from a course during the first three weeks of a quarter, your permanent record will carry no notation. If you withdraw from a course after the third week but before the ninth week of a quarter, your permanent record will carry a "W". An instructor may withdraw you from a course fbr excessive absences. This may be done after the third week through the end of the eighth week, but before the last two weeks of a quarter. If you are with路 drawn in this manner, your permanent record will carry a "W".

WHO HAS ACCESS TO MY STUDENT RECORDS? Cuyahoga Community College, in the execution of its responsibilities to students, must maintain accurate and confidential student records. The College recognizes the rights of students to have access to their educa tional records and to limit such access by others in accordance with existing College guidelines and The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. passed by the U.S. Congress in 1974. Student records, with certain exceptions, will not be released without prior consent of the student. Students have the right to revi.ew and question the content of their ed\.Jcational records within a reasonable time after making a request for such a review. If there are any questions as to the accuracy or appropriateness of the records that cannot be resolved informally, an opportunity for a hearing on the matter is provided. Students wishing to review their educa路 tional records may apply to the Office of Admissions and Records on their respective campuses for details regarding College policy and procedure designed to expedite their request.

42


WHAT IS ACADEMIC PROBATION? You will be placed on probation under anyone of the following circumstances: (1) If, after attempting 15 or more quarter credits at Cuyahoga Community College, you have failed to compile a cumulative grade-point average to meet the following minimum requirements (based on a four-point system): Credits Attempted minimum Grade-Point Average 15-44 inclusive ..... . .... . ... .. ................ 1.50 45-74 inclusive . ... .... . ... .. ........ . .... . .... 1.75 75 or more .. . .. . . . ..... .. ............... . . ... 2.00 (2) If you wish to enroll for 12 or more quarter credits at CCC while attending or after attending another college or university which has placed you on probation, you will be adm itted on first pr.obation. You will remain 'on first probation until you have at路 tempted 15 or more quarter credits at CCC and have been either removed from probation or placed on second probation. (3) If you wish to enroll for 12 or more quarter credits at CCC after attending another college or university from which you have been academically dismissed , you should follow the procedures outlined under CAN I BE READMITTED IF I'VE BEEN DISMISSED FOR LOW ACADEMIC STANDING? on page 37. (4) If you have been academically dismissed from a university or if you are on academic probation and wish to enroll for 11 or fewer quarter credits at CCC, you will be admitted on a probationary status. You will be placed on second probation if you have not removed yourself from first probation by the end of the next period of enrollment. You can remove yourself from first or second probation by raising your cumulative grade-point average to meet the requirements listed above.

WHAT DOES ACADEMIC DISMISSAL MEAN? If you are on second probation , you will be dismissed at the end of that period of enrollment unless you remove yourself from probation, or unless your grade-point average for the most recent period of enrollment is 2.00 or higher, in which case you will be permitted to continue on second probation. You will also be dismissed if you have attempted 15 or more quarter credits at Cuya hoga Community College and have compiled lower than a .75 cumulative grade-point average at the end of any period of enrollment.

HOW WILL I KNOW MY CLASS STANDING? A freshman or first-year student at CCC is one who has earned 44 or fewer quarter credits. This includes any credits transferred from other colleges or universities. Students who have earned 45 or more quarter hours, including those transferred from other colleges or universities, are considered sopho路 mores or second-year students. 43


WHAT IF I WANT TO TRANSFER TO ANOTHER INSTITUTION? Counselors and other members of the College staff will advise and assist any student planning to transfer to a four-year institution. They will help you in preparing for and completing the transfer process. It remains your responsibility, however, to select the transfer institution and to closely follow its admissions requirements . These requirements are set forth in the institution 's catalogue. Reference copies of these catalogues are available in the campus library and in the Offices of Admissions and Records. Because of the highly specialized nature of curriculums in the Career Program, many of the courses are not designed for transfer to a four-year institution. Students also should note that courses with numbers lower than 100 (the last three digits) are not ordinarily transferable. See COURSE NUMBERING, p. 55.

HOW DO I GET TRANSCRIPTS OF MY GRADES? You may request official transcripts of grades earned at CCC through the Office of Admissions and Records. Requests must bear the student's signature. You 路are entitled to one free transcript. Additional copies may be obtained for a fee of $1 each.

WHAT ABOUT TRANSIENT STATUS AT OTHER INSTITUTIONS? If you wish to take a course for credit at another institution while you are attending CCC , you can avoid having to go through the admissions procedure at the other institution by requesting transient status. You should perform these three steps: 1. Request a TRANSIENT STUDENT FORM from the Office of Admissions and Records or the Counseling office. 2. Complete the form and return it to the Office of Admissions and Records. 3. The Office of Admissions and Records will confirm your st atus so that the credit earned at the other institution can be properly credited to your CCC permanent record. This information will also be sent to the institution where you are seeki ng transient status.

44


Graduation Requirements Associate of Arts Degree Good standing is a reauisite to candidacy for graduation from Cuyahoga Community College. An Associate of Arts degree will be granted to the student completing the following requirements: A. GENERAL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. The satisfactory completion of no fewer than 93 quarter hours. 2. The completion of no fewer than 30 of the above 93 hours while in attendance at Cuyahoga Community College. A student is to attain a " C" (2.00) average for all work at the College . B. SPECIFIC GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. Minimum competency in communication as verified by one of the following sequences: a. English 091, 092, 093 and 101. b. English 091, 101 and 102. c. English 101, 102 and 103. 2. The completion of one of the following sequences: a. History 101 , 102 and 103. b. History 151 , 152 and 153. c. History 170, 171 and 172. d. Political Science (any three courses) . e. Social Sc ience 103 or Sociology 101 , Social Science 104 and 105. 3 . The completion of Health 101 or three quarter hours of physical education. 4. Minimum competency in mathematics as verified by one of the following: a. A satisfactory score on the mathematics portion of ACT or SAT. b. Any mathematics course satisfactorily completed at Cuyahoga Community College. c. Achievement of a satisfactory score on a standardized mathematics test administered by the College.

45


C.

ELECTIVE GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS ~. A total of no fewer than 27 quarter hours of electives to be selected from any three of the following four areas: a. Humanities. b. Science and Mathematics. c. Social Sciences. d. Career Programs, including Technical and Business offerings. 2. No fewer than nine quarter hours may be chosen from anyone area. Courses used to satisfy the preceding B路1 or B路2 requirement may not be used again for this elective requirement.

Associate of Applied Business Degree Good standing is a requisite to candidacy for graduation from Cuyahoga Community College . An Associate of Applied Business degree will be granted to the student completing the following requirements:

46

A.

GENERAL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. The satisfactory completion of no fewer than 93 quarter hours. 2. The completion of no fewer than 30 of the above 93 quarter hours while in attendance at Cuyahoga Community College. A student is to attain a "C" (2.00) average for all work at the College.

B.

SPECIFIC GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. Minimum competency in communication as verified by one of the following sequences: a. English 091, 092 and 093. b. English 091, ~01 and '102. c. English 101, 102 and 103. d. English 091, 092 and Speech Communciation 100 or 101. e. English 101, 102 and Speech Communication 100 or 101. 2. The completion of one of the following sequences: a. History 101, 102 and 103. b. History 151, 152 and 153. c. History 170, 171 and 172. d. Political Science (any three courses). e. Social Science 103 or Sociology 101, Social Science 104 and 105. f. Geography 103, History 161 , Economics 151 or History 251.


3.

The completion of Health 101 or three quarter hours of physical education.

4.

C.

Minimum competency in mathematics as verified by one of the following: a. A satisfactory score on the mathematics portion of the ACT or SAT. b. An.y mathematics course satisfactorily completed at Cuya hoga Community College. c. Achievement of a satisfactory score on a standardized mathematics test administered by the College. ELECTIVE GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. A total of no fewer ttian 18 quarter hours of electives to be selected from any two of the following three areas: a. Humanities. b. Science and Mathematics. c. Social Sciences. 2. No fewer than nine quarter hours may be chosen from anyone area. Courses used to satisfy the preceding 8-1 or 8-2 requirement may not be used again for this elective requirement.

Associate of Applied Science Degree Good standing is a requisite to candidacy for graduation from Cuyahoga Community College. An Associate of Applied Science degree will be granted to the student completing the following requirements:

A.

B.

GENERAL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. The satisfactory completion of no fewer than 93 quarter hours. 2. The completion of no fewer than 30 of the above 93 quarter hours while in attendance at Cuyahoga Community College. A student is to attain a "C" (2 .00) average for all work at the College. SPECIFIC GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. Minimum competency in communication as verified by one of the following sequences: a. English 091, 092 and 093. b. English 091, 101 and '102. c. English 101, 102 and 103. d. English 091, 092 and Speech Communication 100 or 10l. e. English 101 , 102 and Speech Communication 100 or 10l.

47


2. The a. b. c. d. e. 3.

4.

C.

completion of one of the following sequences: History 101, 102 and 103. History 151 , 152 and 153. History 170, 171 and 172. Political Science (any three courses). Social Science 103 or Sociology 101, Social Science 104 and 105. The completion of Health 101 or three quarter hours of physical education . Minimum competency in mathematics as verified by one of the following: a. A satisfactory score on the mathematics portion of the ACT or SAT. b. Any mathematics course satisfactorily completed at Cuyahoga Community College. c. Achievement of a satisfactory score on a standardized mathematics test administered by the College .

ELECTIVE GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. A total of no fewer tlian 18 quarter hours of electives to be selected from any two of the following three areas: a. Humanities. b. Science and Mathematics. c. Social Sciences. 2. No fewer than nine quarter hours may be chosen from anyone area . Courses used to satisfy the preceding B-1 or B-2 requirement may not be used again for this elective requirement.

In addition to the preceding requirements, a student is to fulfill the curricula requirements for the particular program as listed near the end of this Catalogue under QUARTER SEQUENCES.

CERTIFICATES OF PROFICIENCY In addition to the two-year Associate of Arts, Associate of Ap路plied Business and Associate of Applied Science degrees, Cuyahoga Community College awards a Certificate of Proficiency to full- or part-time students wishing to specialize in and select courses from a specific subject matter area. The Certificate of Profici.ency has been established to meet the needs of those who do not wish to pursue at this time an Associate degree program, but wish to obtain a Certificate of Proficiency indicating completion of a series of courses which provide competency in a specific area. A list of such series may be found on the page preceding the quarter sequences. In addition to this list, certificates may be given for non-credit offerings fulfilling special educational objectives.

48


Serving the Student: Counseling Professional counselors are available at the Eastern Campus, Metropolitan Campus and Western Campus to help students achieve productive and rewarding experiences at the College. Counseling services are provided for all students - full -time, part-time, day and evening. Upon admission to the College , each student is encouraged to schedule a conference with a counselor to consider previous educational background, interests, aptitudes and goals. The counselor offers assistance in ciloosing an appropriate program of studies from the variety of courses offered. Thereafter, each student is encouraged to seek counseling assistance in reviewing progress and plans. Counselors assist students who wish to clarify their educational and occupational objectives. Occupational information files and college catalogues are located in the campus libraries. When appropriate, counselors may suggest a variety of tests and inventories as aids in educational and occupational planning. Students may consult with counselors when they desire assistance in becoming more effective students, in developing gratifying personal and social relationships, and in making the college experience more personally rewarding.

PLACEMENT TEST Entering students planning to enroll for 12 or more quarter credits are requested to have the results of the ACT (American College Test) forwarded to Cuyahoga Community College. These results are used for counseling purposes only - to place students in appropriate programs and courses. In cases where the student has taken the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) rather than ACT, the results may be submitted to CCC instead. Psychological tests assessing mental ability, interests and aptitudes are administered on campus as the need arises. Students may arrange with a counselor for such testing.

HEALTH SERVICES Health Services, which is staffed by nurse-counselors, is open to all full- and part-time students on a walk-in basis at the Metropolitan and Western Campuses. First aid services only are available 24 hours a day on the Eastern Campus. In line with its philosophy of fostering independence on the part of students, the Service's emphasis is on health counseling. Througt) counseling, students are assisted in the assessment of health problems and !n. the utilization of existing health care facilities such as clinics, private phYSICians and dentists . First aid care for injuries and treatment for minor illnesses is

49


provided by the Health Services under standing orders of the consulting physician. During the academic year, the Health Services in cooperation with other College departments and community agencies provides educational and screening programs. Students with special concerns or questions relating to disabilities or other special requirements should contact Health Services. A student health insurance plan is available to all students who are enrolled for six (6) or more credit hours. Information regarding the plan may be obtained in the Health Services Office.

SELECTIVE SERVICE Information regarding Selective Service may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records at one of the three campuses.

Placement and Financial Aid Program PLACEMENT SERVICES The Offices of Placement and Student Financial Aid at the Eastern, Metropolitan and Western Campuses coordinate all student employment for the College. Th is student service has been designed to assist interested students in their quest for full· or part·time employment. A Career Placement Service is also available to all prospective gradu· ates and alumni of the College. Prospective graduates interested in utiliz· ing the Placement Service should register for placement at least one quar· ter prior to graduation to establish their credential file.

FINANCIAL AID Cuyahoga Community College's Financial Aid Program consists of scholarship grants, loans and part·time employment. The program is designed to complement the student's own resources. Primary considerations in selecting students to receive assistance are financial need and the potential to succeed in an academic program at the College. Financial aid awards are made before the beginning of each regular academic quarter. Students may request applications for assistance at any campus through the Office of Placement and Student Financial Aid. Application Procedures for Financial Aid • Students applying for assistance are asked to complete either the Parents' Confidential State· ment (PCS) or the Family Financial Statement (FFS). These application forms are obtainable at the Offices of Placement and Student Financial Aid.

50


The student is urged to submit a completed application as early as possible prior to the beginning of the quarter in which he or she wishes to enroll. Final action will be taken after required admissions credentials have been submitted and the student has been accepted by the College. Scholarship Grants • All scholarship grants are awarded for the entire academic year and are renewable. Recipients may also be considered for other types of financial assistance. The General Scholarship Fund was created and is sustained by civic -minded individuals and groups interested in fostering the College's purposes, programs and objectives . Ohio Instructional Grants Program • This program provides financial aid for full-time college students who are Ohio residents. These grants are for the average as well as the superior student. They are awarded solely on the basis of financial need to cover all or part of the in structi onal fees. Students should apply for this assistance directly to the Ohio Board of Regents. Applications may be obtained from the high school or the Office of Placement and Student Financial Aid at a CCC campus. Waiver of Instructional Fees. Cuyahoga Community College's policy on waiver of instructional fees further broad~ns educational opportunities for the youth and adults of Cuyahoga County. This add itional form of financial aid for Cuyahoga County residents is awarded to potential students requiring financial assistance who have demonstrated academic potential, or to students with special talents or abilities in such areas as music, art, dance, drama, foreign languages, journalism , public speaking and athletic activities. The instructional waiver policy applies only to the College instructional fees per quarter hour of credit. Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Program (B.E.O.G.) • Makes funds availab le for tuition and / or other college -related expenses to undergraduate students beginning post -secondary educat ion for the first time after Apr. 1, 1973 , provided they are enrolling on a full-time basis and are citizens of the United States. Grants vary from $50 to $1,050 depending on financial need. Applications are available in the Financial Aid Offices. Completed applications must be mailed directly to Washington, D.C. , fo r' determination· of grant eligibility. Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants. Students qualifying for this program will receive a stipend for each academic year at Cuyahoga Community College. The amount of this award is then matched with other scholarship, work-study or loan funds. The purpose of this program is to provide grants to students who, for lack of available funds , would be unable to enter or continue in college. National Direct Student Loans. Eligibility for this program is open to students registered for six quarter hours who are in good academic standing. The applicants should be able to verify their need for assistance by filing the appropriate application. Repayment of the loan does not commence until comp letion of studies. The borrower who enters one of

51


several specified occupations within the teaching field may be entitled to a substantial reduction in the total amount of repayment'. Nursing Scholarship Grants and Student Loans • Students in need of assistance, who are registered for six or more quarter credits and are pursuing the Associate degree in Nursing, may apply for these awards. Each applicant must file the appropriate application These loans have cancellation provisions of 10% per year for five years of nursing for those who enter the profession. Repayment procedures are similar to those for the National Direct Student Loans. College Work-Study Program • This program provides employment at the College or in off·campus agencies for students who wish to work while they are enrolled. To be eligible for this program, the student must be enrolled for 12 or more credits during the quarter in which he wishes to be employed. The student must also verify a need for financial assistance. Employment under this program is .Iimited to 20 hours per week whenever regular classes are in session and 40 hours per week when College is not in session. Law Enforcement Education Program • Grant and loan money is made available by the federal government to currently enrolled law en forcement officers as well as students who are pursuing the College's Associate degree in Law Enforcement. The grant program makes available payments for instructional fees to in-service law enforcem.!'lnt officers who may be enrolled in this degree program on either a part- or full-time basis. Loans to cover instructional fees and other related educational expenses are available to full -time students who are pursuing the Associate degree in Law Enforcement. Short-Term Loans • Short-term loans for half of instructional fees are also available. These loans are interest-free for 60 days. After that period, there is a finance charge of $2 per month. Failure to make repayment by the end of a specific quarter precludes further registration for classes until the loan is repaid . Short·term loans are not renewable. Special consideration is given to veterans. Where to Get Further Information • Upon request, the Office of Placement and Student Financial Aid will forward a brochure explaining in greater detail financial aid opportunities at Cuyahoga Community College. Further inquiries regarding any aspect of the Placement and Financial Aid Program may be directed to this office at any campus location: METROPOLITAN CAMPUS Administration Building - Room 107 2900 Community College Ave. Cleveland, O. 44115 Phone: 241-5966, ext 315,316 WESTERN CAMPUS 11000 West Pleasant Valley Rd. Parma, O. 44130 Phone: 845-4000, ext. 258, 259 , 260

52

EASTERN CAMPUS Room 121 25444 Harvard Rd. Warrensville Township, O. 44122 Phone: 464-1450, ext. 246 , 247


Student Activities Cuyahoga Community College recognizes the educational, recrea. tional and social values of a well-integrated program of student activities. It believes that student participation in co-curricular activities contributes to the wholesome development of the individual and to the growth of leadership ability. The College features a well-balanced program developed in response to studetlt requests and needs. A large measure of responsibi lity for campus affairs is in the hands of the students themselves, assisted by the Director of Student Activities and faculty members on each campus. The students essentially establish and administer most non-academic campus activities. They determine social programs and participate in the maintenance of the discipline essential to an academic community. Activities may vary from quarter to quarter, depending upon student choice. Four newspapers - Metro's The Commuter and Muntu Drum, Western's Pulse and Eastern's High Point - are staffed by students drawn largely from the College's journalism courses. The College's periodicals have received numerous state and national awards for excellence. Every student is welcome to participate in a great variety of activities from fencing and karate to chess and camera clubs. Further information may be obtained from the officers of each organization or from the Office of Student Activities. Among the many activities and events to be found on one or more of the CCC campuses each quarter are: Artist and lecture series Band Choir College Union Board Convocations Dances and other social functions Drama Interclub Council Interest groups Inter-Greek Council Intramural-Extramural sports (Including archery, badminton , basketball, bowling, fencing, flag football, golf, paddleball,

handball, pool, softball, swim ming, table tennis, tennis, track, volleyball and weightl ifting) Local fraternities and sororities Movies Political clubs Professiona I orga n izations Religious groups Student Government Associations Varsity sports-Men and Women (Including baseball, basketball, bowl i ng, cross-country , golf, gymnastics, soccer, swimming, tennis, track, volleyball and wrestling)

53


INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS The official colors of Cuyahoga Community College are: Eastern Campus, navy blue and silver; Metropolitan Campus , brown and gold; Western Campus, blue and gold . The names of the College's athletic teams are: Metropolitan Campus, "Cougars"; Western Campus, "Chargers". Both campuses are members of the National Junior College Athletic Association and engage in intercollegiate competition in conference and independent contests. The Eastern Campus, which opened in the Fall of 1971, has not engaged in intercollegiate competition. Its participation in the near future is contingent upon a number of factors, especially the availability of offsite facilities.

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION The Alumni Association is a social and service organization designed to develop a stronger bond among former students, the College and the community. Those eligible for membership are all CCC graduates and former students who have not been graduated, but who have accumulated the equivalent of 45 quarter hours before leaving the College .

HOUSING Because Cuyahoga Community College is an urban institution primarily designed to serve its own community, no residential housing is provided for its students.

STUDENT-FACULTY CONFERENCES The faculty members in Cuyahoga Community College maintain scheduled office hours to confer with students regarding class work and related matters. Schedules of office hours will be found in the faculty office areas. Students are urged to familiarize themselves with the sched ules and to contact their instructors during these hours.

COLLEGE RELATIONS The Office of College Relations disseminates information to the various publics of the College. Among its functions is the preparation of the Catalogue, Annual Report, Career Program brochures and other official internal and external College publications. The Office of College Relations also serves as coordinator of the Speakers Bureau. As a community service, faculty and staff members of the College are available for appearances at meetings of religious, educational, service, political and other organizations or groups. Inquiries may be addressed to this office at Cuyahoga Community College District Admin istrative Services , 700 Carnegie Ave ., Cleveland, O. 44115 . Phone 241-5966.

54


C.ode Used in Listing Course Descriptions To simplify the task of maintaining accurate and complete academic records of all students at the College, a six-digit code has been introduced for use in listing all courses. In this code, the first three digits indicate the subject area (see chart p-56). The remaining three digits are the number assigned to that particular course within the specified subject area. For example, Intermediate French bears the code 590-202. The number 590 refers to the subject area, French. The number 202 has been assigned to a specific course, Intermediate French, within that subject area.

COURSE NUMBERING Courses are listed in numerical order within each subject area . Courses within the XXX-090 to XXX-099 series generally are designed to provide students with foundations necessary for freshman studies. English 560-091, for example, is Essentials of Written Communication. The XXX-IOO to XXX-199 sequence normally represents freshman courses. The XXX-200 to XXX-299 series usually consists of sophomorelevel cou rses. Course numbers do not indicate whether or not a course will be accepted for transfer to other institutions. Students are advised to consult with their counselors regarding transfer of courses and credits to other institutions . See TRANSFERRING TO OTHER INSTITUTIONS .

CREDIT HOURS The quarter credit for each course is indicated opposite the course title. Three credits; e.g., is 3 Cr. The number of credits granted for a course does not necessarily equal the number of hours that the course . meets in one week.

PREREQUISITES The prerequisites listed for specific courses and curriculums should be closely observed to insure qualification for subsequent courses and to gain maximum benefit from instruction.

SCHEDULE OF CLASSES Courses listed in this Catalogue are those which Cuyahoga Community College plans to offer. Inclusion of a course description does not obligate the College to present the course in any particular quarter. Many of the courses on the follOWing pages are offered at all three

55


campuses. Students are referred to the appropriate Class Schedule booklet each quarter for specific and current information . The Eastern , Western and Metro Campuses publish a Class Schedule booklet prior to the registration period for each quarter. It contains a list of the classes to be offered, placement test schedules and general registration infcrmation. CODE

SUBJECT AREA

410 Accounting 420 Anthropology 450 Architectural and Construction 430 435 437 440 460 470 480 481 438 482 485 490 500 502 505 508 730 510

520 530 535 538 540 550 560 570 590 595 600 610

616 620 624 625 630

56

Engineering Technology Art Aviation Technology Banking and Finance Biology Business Administration Chemical Technology Chemistry Child Care Technology Commercial Art Court and Conference Reporting Dance Data Processing Dental Hygiene Dental Laboratory Technology Dietetic Technology Drafting and Design Early Childhood Education Earth Science Economics Education Educational Media Educational Assisting Technology Electrical路Electronic Engineering Technology Engineering English Fire Technology French General Studies Geography German Graphic Communications Management and Technology Health Health Technology Hebrew History

SUBJECT AREA CODE Hospitality Management Humanities Industrial Technology Journalism Law Enforcement Library/Media Technology Marketing Mathematics Mechanical Engineering Technology 710 Medical Assisting 712 Medical Laboratory Technology 715 Medical Record Technology 717 Mental Health Technology 718 Micro-Precision 720 Music 740 Nursing 745 Occupational Therapy Assisting Technology 830 Office Administration 750 Philosophy 760 Physical Education 770 Physical Science 775 Physical Therapist Assisting Technology 778 Physicians Assisting 880 Physician 's Surgical Assistant 780 Physics 790 Plant Operation Services 800 Political Science 810 Psychology 815 Reai Estate 655 Respiratory Therapy Technology 820 Russian 840 Socia I Science 850 Sociology 860 Spanish 870 Speech 875 Supermarket Management 890 Theatre Arts 900 Transportation

635 648 650 660 670 680 685 690 700


Accounting 410 410-106

Consumer Finance

3 Cr.

Management of personal finances and study of consumer protection: personal budgeting, buying on credit , planning an insurance program and medical care. Also covers investments, home ownership, retirement planning and income taxes. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None.

410-107

Business Mathematics

3 Cr.

Application of simple mathematical procedures to typical accounting, financial, marketing and other business problems. Includes study of essentials of business arithmetic , simple, periodic and compound interest, present value, payrolls, commissions , pricing and accounting mathematics . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

410-110

Principles of Finance

3 Cr.

Introductory finance course. Study of private and government financial institutions, financial instruments, money and credit systems, basic principles, and current problems in consumer and business financing. Includes study of Federal Reserve System . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 410-107 Business Mathematics and 460-108 Introduction to Business.

410-111

Practical Accounting

3 Cr.

Bookkeeping for students of business administration and office admin istration with no previous bookkeeping knowledge. Principles of double-entry bookkeeping applicable to service and mercantile businesses. Practice in preparation of conventional records, reports and statements. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

410-121

Principles of Accounting

4 Cr.

Analytical study of basic accounting theory and procedures for service and merchandising corporations. Conventional double-entryprocedures. End-of-period summary activities, including preparation of worksheets; adjusting, closing and reversing entries; preparation of financial statements. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

57


ACCOUNTING 410

410-122

Principles of Accounting

4 Cr.

Continuation of 410-121 Principles of Accounting. In addition, accounting for corporations, analysis of financial statements, funds-flow analysis, accounting for manufacturing operations and proprietorships. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 410-107 Business Mathematics or departmental approval; 410-121 Principles of Accounting; 460-108 Introduction to Business or departmental approval.

410-141

Investments

3 Cr.

Sources of capital, types of securities, operation of brokerage and investment banking houses. Understanding of investment principles and the acquisition of skills needed for success as salesman or clerical worker in securities bu siness. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory o hours . Prerequisite: 460-108 Introduction to Business or equivalent business experience.

410-201

Management Finance and Accounting

4 Cr.

Development of managerial skills in using financial and accounting information . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 410121 Principles of Accounting or departmental approval.

410-202

Management Finance and Accounting

4 Cr.

Continuation of 410-201 Management Finance and Accounting. Lec路 ture 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 410-201 Management Finance and Accounting.

410-221

Intermediate Accounting

4 Cr.

Comprehensive study of the accounting theory, procedures and analyses , reports and presentations generally accepted by major authorities . Accrual-basig accounting concepts and accounting control practices conducted at professional levels of presentation. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 410 -122 Principles of Accounting.

410-222

Intermediate Accounting

4 Cr.

Continuation of 410-221 Intermediate Accounting. Accrual-basis and cash-basis accounting, double and single-entry formats, historical and replacement cost valuations, funds-flow and common-dollar analyses conducted at professional levels of presentation. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 410-221 Intermediate Accounting.

58


ACCOUNTING 410/ANTHROPOLOGY 420

410-231

Cost Accounting

4 Cr.

Theory and practice of cost accounting as it is applied in industrial management information systems for accountability, product and process cost analysis , price setting and determination of profitability. Cost theories, concepts, assumptions, systems and procedures. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 410 -122 Principles of Accounting.

410-232

Cost Accounting

4 Cr.

Planning, implementing, controlling and analytical processes of management of manufacturing businesses. The budgeting process and standard cost procedures used to analyze productive processes measuring effects for the use of management in decision-making activities. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 410-231 Cost Accou nti ng.

410-260

Cooperative Field Experience

1 Cr.

Limited to students in the Cooperative Field Experience Program. Full-time or part-time employment :n an approved area under College supervision including an in-college seminar. The requirement for one credit is 120 clock hours of approved work. Students may earn three credits in one quarter. The course may be repeated to a cumulative maximum of nine credits. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

410-265

Taxation

4 Cr.

Thorough study of federal individual income tax regulations and procedures with ~xposure to the preparation of returns. Cursory study of Federal Income tax reporting of corporations and unincorporated businesses. Introduction to principal Ohio and city income taxes with exposure to said returns. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite; 410-122 Principles of Accounting or departmental approval.

Anthropology 420 . 420-101

Cultural Anthropology

4 Cr.

Cultural patterns and dynamics. History, distribution and growth of cultural patterns. Includes social organization and material culture. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: None.

59


ANTHROPOLOGY 420 ARCHITECTURAL AND CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 450

420-102

Physical Anthropology

4 Cr.

Study of man as a physical being. Origin and antiquity of man, the relationship of man to animals, paleontological discoveries and racial phenomena . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

420-103

Prehistoric Archaeology

4 Cr.

The discovery of man's prehistoric past by the methods of modern archaeology. Presentation of archaeological findings and interpreta路 tions in selected parts of the world. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

420-201

Peoples and Cultures of the World

4 Cr.

A survey of primitive cultures , non-Western civilizations and peasant societies. Theories of cultural anthropology will be utilized in an attempt to understand the reasons for differences among humans. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 420-101 Cultural Anthropology or 850-101 Introductory Sociology.

Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology 450 450-121

Architectural Drawing

3 Cr.

Design and construction of domestic structures. Scale, detailing, framing systems, dimensioning, architectural lettering and modular systems. Contemporary building materials are surveyed . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 550-121 Engineering Drawing or consent of instructor.

450-122

Architectural Drawing

3 Cr.

A continuation of 450-121 Architectural Drawing with emphasis on masonry construction. Introduction to steel construction. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 450路121 Architectural Drawing.

60


ANTHROPOLOGY 420 ARCHITECTURAL AND CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 450

420-102

Physical Anthropology

4 Cr.

Study of man as a physical being. Origin and antiquity of man, the relationship of man to animals, paleontological discoveries and racial phenomena. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

420-103

Prehistoric Archaeology

4 Cr.

The discovery of man's prehistoric past by the methods of modern archaeology. Presentation of archaeological f indings and interpretations in selected parts of the world. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

420-201

Peoples and Cultures of the World

4 Cr.

A survey of primitive cultures , non-Western civilizations and peasant societies. Theories of cultural anthropology will be utilized in an attempt to understand the reasons for differences among humans . Lecture 4 hou rs. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 420-101 Cultural Anthropology or 850-101 Introductory Sociology.

Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology 450 450-121

Architectural Drawing

3 Cr.

Design and construction of domestic structures. Scale, detailing, framing systems, dimensioning, architectural lettering and modular systems. Contemporary building materials are surveyed. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours . Prerequisite: 550-121 Engineering Drawing or consent of instructor.

450-122

Architectural Drawing

3 Cr.

A continuation of 450-121 Architectural Drawing with emphasis on masonry construction. Introduction to steel construction. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 450-121 Architectural Drawing.

60


ARCHITECTURAL AND CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 450

450-123

Architectural Drawing

3 Cr.

A continuation of 450-122 Architectural Drawing. Steel and concrete structures are emphasized. Practical drawing problems are introduced relating to commercial structures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 450-122 Architectural Drawing.

450-221

Building Equipment

3 Cr.

Introduction to mechanical systems as applicable to building construction. Water supply, sanitation and acoustical systems. Environmental factors affecting systems design . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 450-122 Architectural Drawing.

450-222

Building Equipment

3 Cr.

Fundamentals of heating, ventilating and air conditioning. Equipment and systems will be investigated . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 450-122 Architectural Drawing.

450-223

Building Equipment

3 Cr.

Electrical theory and electrical systems as applicable to buildings. Fundamentals of commercial and industrial lighting. Systems of power distribution. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 450-122 Architectural Drawing.

450-231

Contracts and Specifications

2 Cr.

Legal contracts, construction and interpretation of specifications as related to the construction industry. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 450-122 Architectural Drawing.

450-232

Construction Estimating

3 Cr.

A basic course for the beginning estimator, architect or contractor. Computing from plans of a construction project , including cost of labor and materials, lump sum and unit costs, preliminary and final estimates. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 450123 Architectural Drawing or equivalent.

450-241

Principles of Structural Design

3 Cr.

Introduction to the design of structural members and systems. Stress analysis by graphic method . Fasteners, welded connections, members in tension and compression, rolled beams and girders are topics considered . Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 550-251 Strength of Materials or concurrent enrollment.

61


OLOGY 450 ARCHITECTURAL AND CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING TECHN ART 430

450-242

Principles of Structural Design

3 Cr.

450-243

Principles of Concrete Design

3 Cr.

450-251

Construction Procedures

3 Cr.

with emA continu ation of 450-24 1 Princip les of Structu ral Design ed reinforc to ction phasis on wood and timber constru ction. Introdu 1 450-24 uisite: Prereq hours. 2 concrete. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory . Design Princip les of Structu ral concrete Capacities of reinforced concrete. Design of reinforced 2 Lecture s. footing wall and column , slabs floor beams, girders , Strucof les hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 450 -242 Princip tural Design. orientaVarious constru ction methods and procedures. Includes an tion to applica its and tion to contem porary constru ction equipm ent men ent, equipm of ling schedu the job schedule . Site prepar ation , uisite: Prereq hours. 0 tory Labora . hours and materials. Lecture 3 ction 450-12 3 Archite ctural Drawing or ability to interpr et constru drawin gs and specifications.

450-2 61

Contract Drawing Preparation

3 Cr.

s to Applica tion of previously learned princip les and draftin g method indusand rcial comme a of gs drawin g workin final the prepar ation of Pretrial constru ction project. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. les Princip 1 450-24 and g requisites : 450-12 3 Archite ctural Drawin of Structu ral Design .

Ar t 43 0 430-1 01

Art Appreciation

4 Cr.

withDevelopment of an unders tanding and interes t in creative forms, l Genera ound. backgr art an t withou those for field, art in the visual d explore cture painting, sculptu re and archite survey of art in basic throug h texts, slides and prints. Simple experimental studies None. uisite: Prereq hours. 0 tory design. Lecture 4 hours. Labora

430-102

Art History

3 Cr.

430-103

Art History

3 Cr.

Western A survey of the chronological and stylistic development of n, Christia art. Includes Egyptian , Mesopotamian , Greek , Roman , Early . hours 0 tory Labora Byzantine , Gothic schools. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite: None. Western A survey of the chrono logical and stylisti c development of 3 Lecture . schools Rococo and e art. Includes Renaissance, Baroqu None. isite: Pr~requ hours. Laboratory 0 hours.

62


ART 430

430-104

Art History

3 Cr.

A survey of the chronological and stylistic development of Western art. Includes the 19th century schools and some study of the 20th century. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None .

430-105

Drawing

3 Cr.

Introduction to communication with non ·verbal symbols. Students use various drawing materials and employ naturalistic representation of objects emphasizing structure, value and texture. Theory of aerial and converging perspective practiced by extensive application to various subjects. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours . Prerequisite: None.

430-106

Drawing

3 Cr.

Continuation of 430-105 Drawing. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430·105 Drawing or departmental approval.

430-107

Drawing

3 Cr.

Continuation of 430-106 Drawing. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430·106 Drawing or departmental approval.

430-108

Fundamentals of Design

3 Cr.

Study of such elements of design as line, mass , space , light, shade, texture and color. Organization to achieve rhythm, balance, move· ment and unity. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None.

430-109

Fundamentals of Design

3 Cr.

Continuation of 430·108 Fundamentals of Design. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-108 Fundamentals of Design or departmental approval.

430-110

Fundamentals of Design

3 Cr. .

Continuation of 430·109 Fundamentals of Design . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-109 Fundamentals of Design or departmental approval.

430-111

Sculpture

3 Cr.

An introduction to sculpture, through the media of clay, with stress on the procedures of sculpture and modeling. Lecture 2 hours. Lab· oratory 4 hOl:Jrs. Prerequisite: None.

63


ART 430

430-112

Sculpture

3 Cr.

430-111

Sculpture

3 Cr.

430-120

Survey of Non-Western Art

3 Cr.

430-121

Calligraphy

3 Cr.

plaster A continu ation of 430-11 1 Sculpture with an introdu ction to in clay. ues techniq ed advanc plus metals light and wood , casting re Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-11 1 Sculptu or depart mental approval. s in A continu ation of 430-11 2 Sculpture with more complex problem metal. and wood in s problem clay and glaze mixing plus advanced LabIntrodu ction to stone sculptu re and plastics. Lectu re 2 hours. re. Sculptu 2 430-11 uisite: Prereq oratory 4 hours. contem The art of Africa , Persia and the Orient, and its relation to None. isite: u Prereq hours. 0 tory Labora hours. 3 porary art . Lecture ts of Study and execut ion of letter forms and their history as elemen hours. 2 Lecture . tion illustra and layout as design in such applica tions Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None.

430-131

Commercial/Advertising Art

3 Cr.

430-132

Commercial! Advertising Art

3 Cr.

430-133

Commercial/Advertising Art

3 Cr.

430-140

Film Appreciation

3 Cr.

advertisKnowledge of basic equipm ent and techniques used in the tory 4 Labora hours. 2 Lecture fields. cturing ing, display and manufa phy and Calligra 1 430-12 or g Drawin 5 430-10 uisites: Prereq hours. depart mental approval. h emPersonal application of techniq ues in adverti sing design wit tion. produc of dge phasis on the layout and letterin g methods. Knowle Com 1 430-13 uisite: Prereq Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. mercia l/ Advertisi ng Art. their deAdvanced methods of advert ising/c ommer cial display and 4 hours. tory Labora hours. 2 Lecture . mands in the curren t market Art. ing dvertis ercial/A Comm 2 430-13 Prerequisite: g An introdu ction to the aspects of the film includi ng script, directin history film of survey a s Include y. tograph cinema of ts and the elemen None. and crit icism. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite:

64


ART 430

430-151

Art for Elementary Education

3 Cr.

Planned to meet the needs of prospective elementary teachers. Creative studio work as well as an introduction to art in the elemen· tary school. Fundamentals of using elementary school art materials. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

430·169

Ceramics

3 Cr.

Basic clay-working techniques including slip-casting, hand-building and wheel thrown ceramics. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequi site: None.

430-170

Ceramics

3 Cr.

Hand-bu ilding, throwing and mold design . Introduction to clay and glaze sc ience. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430169 Ceramics.

430-171

Ceramics

3 Cr.

Throwing skills for functional and production pottery. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-170 Ceramics.

430·181

Appreciation of Interior Design and Decoration

3 Cr.

Basic knowledge of the aesthetic beauty of architecture, interior design, decoration and furniture. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 430-101 Art Appreciation recommended.

430·182

Appreciation of Interior Design and Decoration

3 Cr.

A knowledge of the principles of contemporary exterior and interior architectural designs. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 430-101 Art Appreciation recommended .

430·183

Appreciation of Interior Design and Decoration

3 Cr.

StUdy of the elements of pure design, expression of structure, suitability of material to its use, contrast and variety, avoidance of monotony, pleasure of surprise, the establishment of unity and evi· dence of taste as the foundation stones of good design regardless of style or period. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 430-101 Art Appreciation recommended.

65


ART 430

430-201

Life Drawing

3 Cr.

Drawing from the human figure in various media. Introduction to anatomy for artists. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-105 Drawing or concurrent enrollment.

430-202

Life Drawing

3 Cr.

Continuation of 430路201 Life Drawing. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-201 Life Drawing or departmental approval.

430-203

Life Drawing

3 Cr.

Continuation of 430-202 Life Drawing. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-202 Life Drawing or departmental approval.

430-204

Painting

3 Cr.

Introduction to oil and opaque water color. Includes landscape, still life and the human form. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-105 Drawing.

430-205

Painting

3 Cr.

Continuation of 430-204 Painting. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-204 Painting or departmental approval.

430-206

Painting

3 Cr.

Continuation of 430路205 Painting. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. F.?rerequisite: 430-205 Painting or departmental approval.

430-207

Water Color

3 Cr.

Fundamentals of water color techniques and qualities. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-105 Drawing.

430-221

Printmaking

3 Cr.

General introduction to various aspects of printmaking and graphic composition. Special emphasis on the woodcut. Some multi-block color work. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 430105 Drawing.

430-222

Printmaking

3 Cr.

Continuation of 430-221 Printmaking with emphasis on developing further the techniques of etching, engraving, drypoint and woodcut. Some multi路block color work. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 430-221 Printmaking.

66


Aviation Technology 435 435-101

Private Pilot Theory

3 Cr.

An overview of the aviation industry, the industry's importance in our economy, career opportunities ih aviation, familiarization with aviation terminol0gy, introduction to training for pilots and preliminary study for the private pilot written examination required by the Federal Aviation Administration. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : None.

435-105

Aviation Communications

3 Cr.

Radio usage, knowledge of low and medium frequencies, proper phraseologies , A.T.C . procedures, convenience of radio aids in navigation . Emergency procedures, radar vectors, FCC assigned frequencies , high density traffic communication, approach and departure control, and en route procedures. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

435-121

Commercial Pilot Theory

3 Cr.

Elementary aerodynamics, weight and balance in aircraft, instruments and instrument systems, basic meteorology, F.A.A. regulations, radio communications and procedures, pre-flight inspection, safety procedures, navigation, principles leading to the written exarDination for commercial pilots administered by the Federal Aviation Administration. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

435-141

Aviation Meteorology

3 Cr.

Basic concepts of meteorological phenomena , formation of air masses , fronts, thunderstorms, icing, fog and clouds , and the analysis and use of weather data for safe flight. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: None.

435-151

Primary Flight

3 Cr.

Actual flight experience in approved aircraft. Designed to train students in aircraft pi iot fundamentals which lead to private pilot licen sure by the Federal Aviation Administration . Flight experience: 38 hours. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None. Costs of actual flight instruction are paid by the student to the fixed base operator.

67


AVIATION TECHNOLOGY 435

435-171

Commercial Pilot

3 Cr.

Advanced maneuvers including Chandelles, lazy eights and eightson-pylons, and 720 degree power turns ; gliding spirals; 180 degree side approaches and 360-degree overhead approaches; accuracy la.ndings. Advanced cross-country flying. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 435-151 Primary Flight or private pilot certificate. Costs of actual flight instruction are paid by the student to the fixed base operator.

435-172

Commercial Pilot

3 Cr.

Extensive navigation training including radio navigation utilizing VHF and LF radio navigation aids; air surveillance radar approaches; night operations including night navigation; extensive basic instrument training including radar approach procedures. Lecture 1 hour_ Laboratory 3 hours . Prerequisite: 435-171 Commercial Pilot Costs of actual flight instruction are paid by the student to the fixed base operator_

435-201

Intermediate Flight

3 Cr.

Review of all precision maneuvers and multi-engine aircraft systems, loading and performances ; pre-flight, take -ofts and landings, basic maneuvers; single engine operation; emergency procedures; flight and fuel consumption planning; VMC VI and V2 speeds ; theories of multi-engine flight . Flight experience: 38 hours. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 435-172 Commercial Pilot Costs of actual flight instruction are paid by the student to the fixed base operator.

435-202

Intermediate Flight

3 Cr.

Instrument flight planning; filing flight plan ; aircraft performance range and fuel requirements; required instrumentation and equipment and their proper use ; emergency procedures; I FR navigation , instrument approach procedures including VOR , ILS , DME and ADF, and radar approach procedures ; holding procedures, missed approach procedures; compliance with ATC. procedures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 435-201 Intermediate Flight Costs of actual flight instruction are paid by the student to the fixed base operator. -

435-221

Instrument Pilot

3 Cr;

Advanced course leading to the FAA. examination for instrument pilot rating . Covers instruments, charts , advanced meteorology, approach and landin g aids , radio navigation , radar, automatic flight , etc. Le ctu re 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hou rs . Prereq uisite: 435-101 Private Pilot Theory or" 435-121 Commercial Pilot Theory or departmental approvaL

68


AVIATION TECHNOLOGY 435 / BANKING & FINANCE 437

435-271

Flight Instructor

3 Cr.

Advanced course leading to F.A.A. written examination for instructor rating. Covers fundamentals of flight instruction, effective flight in. struction methods, instructor responsibilities, medical requirements of flying, F.A.A. regulations and safety. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory a hours. Prerequisite: 435 -221 Instrument Pilot or concurrent enrollment or F.A.A. instrument pilot license.

435-281

Ground Instructor

3 Cr.

A comprehensive study of the fundamentals of teaching and learning as they apply to flight instruction, effective teaching methods; instructional management; instructor responsibilities; aeromedical information for instructors; aerodynamics; airplane performance; flight training syllabus; federal regulations for instructors. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory a路hours. Prerequisite: 435-221 Instrument Pilot or concurrent enrollment.

Banking and Finance 437 437-101

Principles of Bank Operations

3 Cr.

The fundamentals of bank functions. A descriptive survey of various bank operations such as accounting, trust, demand deposits, savings and time deposits, home mortgage lending, credit administration and financing business enterprise. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory a hours. Prerequisite: None.

437路110

Money and Banking

3 Cr.

Money and money creation; role and limitations of central bank control; basic monetary theory and stabilization policy; government fiscal policy; gold and foreign exchange; economic disturbances and the effect on yield curves and bank portfolios. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory a hours. Prerequisite: Appropriate work experience or departmental approval.

437-114

Bank letters and Reports

3 Cr.

Dictation of correspondence. Public relations aspects of correspondence. Basic psychological principles in bank letter writing; review of various bank letters. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory a hours. Prerequi路 site: Appropriate work experience or departmental approval.

69


BANKIN G & FINANCE 437

437-1 15

Bank Management

3 Cr.

studies Trends in philosophy and practice of bank management. Case tory 0 Labora hours. 3 Lecture ement. of good and poor bank manag mental depart or nce experie work riate Approp hours. Prerequisite: approval.

437-1 16

Supervision and Personnel Administration

3 Cr.

437-1 20

Analysis of Financial Statements

3 Cr.

437-1 21

Financing Business Enterprise

3 Cr.

437-1 32

Trust Functions and Services

3 Cr.

437-1 42

Credit Administration

3 Cr.

437-1 43

Installment Credit

3 Cr.

transiFundamental supervisory princip les designed to facilita te the hip leaders a into task lar tion of personnel with expertise in a particu g securin on placed sis Empha role inspirin g the efforts of others. 3 Lecture . policies ement manag with ant conson maxim um produc tion nce hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Approp riate work experie or depart mental approval. ent analCharac teristic s of financial statements and financial statem 3 Lecture ents. statem al ysis. A review of accoun ting basic to financi Acof les Princip 1 410-12 uisite: Prereq hours. Laboratory 0 hours. countin g or equivalent. s enterLending and investi ng as differe nt aspects of financi ng busines er who treasur te corpora the of int viewpo the prise. Financing from 3 Lecture tion. corpora his of future al financi the ard safegu must nce experie work riate hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Approp or depart mental approval.

Trust Services rendered by institut ions engaged intrus t busi ness. legal and s busines of ion discuss a with s service and operati ons duties Prehours. 0 tory aspects of trust functio ns. Lecture 3 hours. Labora al. approv ental departm or requisi te : Approp riate w~rk experience

of credit Factors influen cing and determ ining loan policy. Methods probcredit c specifi and ues techniq credit s, analysi and investigation riate Approp uisite: lems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prereq al. work experience or departm ental approv

ng and Techniques of installm ent lending. Establi shing credit, obtaini ure. proced on collecti and loan the g servicin tion, checking loan informa and pment develo s busines s, program loan special ng, financi ry Invento 0 tory Labora hours. 3 adverti sing of installm ent lending. Lecture ental departm or nce experie work hours. Prerequisite: Approp riate approval.

7()


BANKING & FINANCE 437/BIOLOGY 440

437-145

Bank Investments

3 Cr.

Requirements for, and the nature of, primary reserves and loanable funds : their effect on the availability of funds for investment. Rrimary and secondary reserves: random and cyclical fluctuations and influences on investment policy and yield changes. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Appropriate work experience or departmental approval.

437-146

Home Mortgage Lending

3 Cr.

Developing a sound mortgage portfolio. Acquisition of mortgage plans, procedures, mortgage loan processing and servicing and overall portfolio management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Appropriate work experience or departmental approval.

437-170

Bank Public Relations and Marketing

3 Cr.

The essentials of bank public relations and marketing procedures. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Appropriate work experience or departmental approval.

437-175

International Banking

3 Cr.

Basic framework and fundamentals of international banking. Transfer of money from country to country, financing trade, international agencies as they 'supplement the work of commercial banks, the exchange of money from one currency to another. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: Appropriate work experience or departmental approval.

Biology 440 440-101

Introductory Biology

3 Cr.

Designed primarily for non-science majors. Fundamental concepts of reproduction, development, and factors regulating development at cellular and organismal levels with special emphasis on the significance of these concepts to the individual living in today's world. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours of which one hour will be recitation/discussion. Prerequisite: None.

440-102

Introductory Biology

3 Cr.

Designed primarily for non-science majors. Fundamental concepts in genetics, population biology, evolution, and ecology with special emphasis on the significance of these concepts to the individual living in today's world . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours of which one hour will be recitation/discussion. Prerequisite: None.

71


BIOLOGY 440

440-103

Introductory Biology

3 Cr.

Designed primarily for non-science majors. Fundamental concepts of behavioral coordination, nutrition, transport, gas-exchange, and excretory processes with special emphasis on the significance of these concepts to the individual living in today 's world. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 3 of which one hour will be recitation/discussion. Prerequisite : None.

440-111

General Biology

4 Cr.

First of a three quarter sequence for students who plan to major in biology or other science related areas. General introduction to basic biological principles structured around a detailed study of cell morphology and physiology with emphasis on the metabolic processes of photosynthesis, respiration, reproduction, and development. Biochemical principles are stressed. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

440-112

General Biology

4 Cr.

Continuation of 440 -111 General Biology. The metabolism and self perpetuation of the organism . Emphasis is placed on homeostasis as it relates to the nutritional , transport, excretory, reproductive , nervous and endocnne processes in organisms. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite : 440-111 General Biology or departmental approval.

440-113

General Biology

4 Cr.

Continuation of 440-112 General Biology. Introduction to genetics, evoluti.onary adaptations of plants and animals, ecological concepts. Field trips are scheduled. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite : 440-112 General Biology or departmental approval.

440-121

Principles of Medical Science

4 Cr.

Basic inorganic, organic and bio-chemistry, with emphasis on physiological principles and applications. Includes principles of physics and metric system. Designed principally for Health Technology programs. Study of chemistry, other related subject matter included in laboratory. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

440-126

Anatomy and Physiology (Western Campus only)

5 Cr.

Fundamental concepts of cellular structure and physiology. A study of the architectural plan of the body, its skeletal , muscular, digestive, respiratory and circulatory systems, with emphasis on the structural and functional features of these systems. Laboratory activities include microscopic study of histoiogical preparations, observations of gross anatomical specimens, and experiments in physiology. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

72


BIOLOGY 440

440-127

Anatomy and Physiology (Western Campus only)

5 Cr.

Continuation of 440-126 Anatomy and Physiology. Study is made of the anatomical and function features of the nervous, sensory, urinary, endocrine and reproductive systems. Fundamentals of fluid and electrolyte balance, embryology and genetics are stressed . Laboratory includes gross and microscopic anatomy study, experiments and exercises in physiology. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 440-126 Anatomy and Physiology.

440-128

Anatomy and Physiology (Metropolitan Campus only)

4 Cr.

Fundamental concepts of cellular structure and physiology. Architectural plan of the body, its skeletal, muscular, digestive and circulatory systems. Emphasis is placed on morphological and physiological concepts and applications. Laboratory includes gross anatomy and experiments in physiology. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

440-129

Anatomy and Physiology (Metropolitan Campus only)

4 Cr.

Hematology, acid路base balance and fluid and electrolyte balance. Structure anc;l function of the respiratory, urinary and nervous sys路 tems. Laboratory includes gross anatomy and experiments in physi路 ology. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 440-128 Anatomy and Physiology.

440-130

Anatomy and Physiology (Metropolitan Campus only)

4 Cr.

The structure and functions of the reproductive system. Fundamentals of embryology, genetics and endocrinology as related to the human body. Laboratory includes experiments, demonstrations and related microscopic study. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 440-129 Anatomy and Physiology.

440-200

Field Botany (Formerly General Botany)

4 Cr.

Study of the plant kingdom w.ith emphasis on local vegetation. Field trips included. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 440-101 Introductory Biology and 440-111 General Biology.

73


BIOLOGY 440 / BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 460

440-201

Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates

5 Cr.

Gross anatomy of the organ systems in representative members of the vertebrates . Emphasis on evolution and functional adaptations. Laboratory dissection and direct observation of selected specimens. Emphasis placed on Squalus, Necturus and Felis. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 440-113 General Biology or equivalent.

440-202

Vertebrate Embryology

4 Cr.

Studies of the ontogeny of vertebrates, stressing embryological induction and cell differentiation. The lab will include the organogenesis of a frog , chick and pig. Many experiments will involve the use of live embryos. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 440-113 General Biology and 440-201 Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates or equivalent.

440-221

Microbiology

4 Cr.

A survey of representative types of microorganisms. Emphasis is placed on cellular structure and physiology, nutritional and environmental requirements and methods of reproduction. Introduction to the role of pathogenic organisms in carrying diseases and infections. Principles of immunity and resistance to disease. Laboratory includes methods of sterilization, culture, staining and identification . Lecture 3 hours. Laborato~y 3 hours. Prerequisite (Metro Campus): 440-130 Anatomy and Physiology or concu rrent enrollment. Prerequisite (Western Campus) : Departmental approval.

Business Administration 460 460-101

Introduction to Industrial Management

3 Cr.

Concepts of modern-day, first-line supervision. Emphasis on the supervisor's major functions and development of sensitivity to human factors in management, using behavioral science findings. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

460-108

Introduction to Business

3 Cr.

A comprehensive survey of business principles, problems and procedures. Examination and discussion of the nature of business production and distribution of goods. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

74


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 460

460-111

Psychology of Supervision

3 Cr.

Contemporary social-psychological theory and research on the personto-person, small group and organizational problems encountered by the-modern manager. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

460-112

Business Management

4 Cr.

Introduction to concepts of management and business . Detailed analysis of management functions . Includes planning objectives, policies, methods and procedures. Delineating authority, responsibilities and preparing organization charts. Controlling standards, production and costs. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460-108 Introduction to Business.

460-121

Labor-Management Relations

3 Cr.

Historical, legal and structural environments which influence labor relations, and an examination of the negotiation and administration of labor contracts. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

460-130

Small-Business Management

3 Cr.

Development of managerial skills required by those who may want to go into business for themselves or to manage a small business. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460 -108 Introduction to Business or departmental approval.

460-131

Small-Business Management

3 Cr.

Continuation of 460路130 Small-Business Management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460-130 Small-Business Management.

460-170

Principles of Insurance

3 Cr.

Economic , social and historical background of insurance. General considerations of insurance contracts. Types , scope and organization of insurance companies. Regulation of insurance companies. Basic forms of property and liability insurance, life insurance and annuities will be studied. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisites: 410-107 Business Mathematics or consent of instructor and 460路108 Introduction to Business.

460-201

Work Simplification

3 Cr.

Principles , practices and techniques of the design, measurement and simplification of work, with emphasis on the relationship between man and machine. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

75


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 460

460-211

Production Control

3 Cr.

Principles and techniques of coordinating the routing, scheduling and control of industrial production , including planning, charting, critical path analysis and quality cont rol. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

460-213

Business law

4 Cr.

A study of the development of laws that govern modern commercial transactions , such as contracts, agency, and employer-employee relationships , commercial papers , and an understanding of our legal system . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

460-214

Business law

4 Cr.

A continuation of the study of law governing modern business transactions. Emphasis on sales , personal property, bailments, partnerships , corporations, insurance, security devices, and bankruptcy as related to business transactions. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460-213 Business Law.

460-216

Introduction to Industrial Purchasing

3 Cr.

Analysis of purchasing organization structure and procedures . Descriptions of quality , quantity, value analysis , sources of supply and procurement controls. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prereq uisites: 410-107 Business Mathematics , 410路121 Principles of Accounting and 460路108 Introduction to Business.

460-217

Intermediate Purchasing

3 Cr.

Application of principles relating to price policies, speculation, equipment procurement, salvage operations, legal matters , records and budgets. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460-216 Introduction to Industrial Purchasing.

460-218

Purchasing Management

3 Cr.

Procedures and policies relative to contract negotiations. Vendorbuyer relationships, make or buy decisions , inventory cont rol , buyer training, materials handling, records and budgets . Analysis of specific case studies. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460217 Intermediate Purchasing.

76


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 460

460-220

Human Relations in Business

3 Cr.

Basic motives of people in job situations. Company relationships with worker, suppliers and customers . Leadership development, communication and group processes. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

460-221

Materials Management

3 Cr.

Principles of the purchase and use of materials in an industrial firm, with emphasis on cost reduction and the materials cycle from specification to shipment. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: None.

460-232

Collective Bargaining & Labor Laws

3 Cr.

Effective collective bargaining today. Management rights, NLRB functions. Representation and elections. Unfair labor practices. Union security and management rights. Strikes. Seniority. Productivity and collective bargaining activities. The future of collective bargaining. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460-121 Labor Management Relations.

460-233

Personnel Management

3 Cr.

Problems , practices and policies in the management of people. Leadership, motivation and direction of employees toward managementemployee-oriented goals. Employment practices. Administration of management-union relationships, benefit programs and employee compensation. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460101 Introduction to Industrial Management or departmental approval.

460-241

Office Management

4 Cr.

Basic principles of office organization and management. Emphasizes the interrelationship among physical, personal and procedural factors affecting the efficient layout of an office. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None.

460-245

New-Business Seminar

4 Cr.

On-the-jqb analysis of an existing small business; creation of a simulated business. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 460-131 Small-Business Management or departmental approval.

460-246

New-Business Seminar

4 Cr.

Continuation of 460-245 New-Business Seminar. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 460-245 New-Business Seminar.

77


Chemical Technology 470 470-121

Elementary Physical Chemistry

3 Cr.

Fundamental course consisting of lectures and demonstrations. Explanation of chemical phenomena on the basis of molecular behavior. Properties of solutions, ionic and phase equilibrium, colligative properties and the laws of thermodynamics are studied. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 480-111 General Chemistry.

470-212

Chemical Engineering

3 Cr.

Beginning course for chemistry students, laboratory technicians or non-technical chemical equipment operators. Discussion of the fundamental principles of chemical engineering and the relationships and analysis of chemical engineering process operations and equipment. Principles of unit operation, such as heat exchange, condensation and evaporation. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisites: High school chemistry and mathematics or industrial experience.

470-220

Introduction to Chemical Instrumentation

3 Cr.

Beginning course consisting of lectures and demonstrations of the theory, principles, des.ign and operation of available chemical instruments. Flow of electronic signals and the information they represent in chemical instrument operation. Valuable fundamentals for chemistry students and practicing laboratory technicians . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 480-111 General Chemistry ' or 780-101 Introductory Physics or industrial chemistry laboratory experience.

Chemistry 480 480-101

Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry

5 Cr.

Emphasis on states of matter, atomic and molecular structure as a basis for understanding valence , formulas and chemical reactions. Solution chemistry including concentration calculations are covered. Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 3 hours . Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or equivalent.

480-102

Introduction to Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry (Western Campus only)

5 Cr.

Survey of organic chemistry and elementary biochemistry with applications to daily life. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 480-101 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry or equivalent.

78


CHEMISTRY 480

480-106

Introduction to Organic Chemistry

5 Cr.

Atomic structure , chemical bonding, elementary organic chemistry with emphasis on functional groups and reactions. A practical rather than theoretical course. Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 3 hours . Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or equivalent.

480-109

Introduction to Biochemistry

5 Cr.

Chemical bonding, the chemistry of carbohydrates , fats, proteihs, enzymes and the metabolic process . Emphasis on the practical application to nutrition. (Not designed for pre-medical students.) Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: None.

480-111

General Chemistry

4 Cr.

Study of the fundamental principles of chemistry. Emphasis on atomic structure, chemical bonding, equation balancing and stoichiometry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours . Prerequisites: 480-101 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry or one year of high school chemistry or equivalent and one year of high school algebra or equivalent.

480-112

General Chemistry

4 Cr.

Continuation of 480-111 General Chemistry. Emphasis on states of matter, properties of solutions , chemical kinetics and chemical equilibrium . Lecture 3 hours. 'Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite : 480-111 General Chemistry.

480-113

General Chemistry

5 Cr.

Continuation of 480-112 General Chemistry. Emphasis on thermodynamics, electrochemistry, equilibria in aqueous solution, semimicroqualitative analysis and descriptive inorganic chemistry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 480-112 General Chemistry.

480-120

Chemistry for Health Technologies (Western Campus only)

3 Cr.

The application of chemistry to man; a study of the processes of life at the molecular level. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry or 480-101 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry or departmental approval.

79


CHEMISTRY 480

480-211

Organic Chemistry

5 Cr.

Chemistry of carbon compounds. Preparation, properties and reactions of aliphatic and aromatic groups. Theoretical concepts and mechanisms used to aid understanding and explain reactions. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 480-113 General Chemistry.

480-212

Organic Chemistry

5 Cr.

Continuation of 480-2"11 Organic Chemistry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 480-211 Organic Chemistry.

480-213

Organic Chemistry

5 Cr.

Continuation of 480-212 Organic Chemistry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 480-212 Organic Chemistry.

480-220

Quantitative Analysis

6 Cr.

Study of chemical stoichiometry, homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibrium and the theory and techniques of gravimetric and volumetric methods of quantitative analytical chemistry. Instrumental analysis is an integral part of this course. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 480-113 General Chemistry.

480-230

Chemical Analytical Instrumentation

4 Cr.

Techniques and principles of operation of analytical instrumentation and their application in chemistry, absorption and spectrophotometry. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 480-106 Introduction to Organic Chemistry or 480-211 Organic Chemistry or concurrent enrollment.

480-231

Chemical Analytical Instrumentation

4 Cr.

Techniques and principles of operation of chromatography, sorptometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 480-106 Introduction to Organic Chemistry or 480-211 Organic Chemistry or concurrent enrollment.

480-232

Chemical Analytical Instrumentation

4 Cr.

Techniques and principles of operation of electrochemical, optical, thermal analytical and metal analytical instrumentation. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 480-106 Introduction to Organic Chemistry or 480-211 Organic Chemistry or concurrent enrollment.

80


Child Care Technology 481 481-101

Introduction to Child Care

3 Cr.

History of child care in the United States and Europe with emphasis on the transition from substitute parent status to that of an emerging profession. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

481-102

Introduction to Child Care

3 Cr.

Continuation of 481·101 Introduction to Child Care with emphasis on the comparative study of child care institutions. Lecture 3 hours. Lab· oratory 0 hours. Prerequi site: 481·101 Introduction to Child Care .

481-120

Child Observation

5 Cr.

Observation and eva lu ation of children within a child care facility. Analysis of case study examp les. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 481·102 Introduction to Child Care.

481-211

Child Care Techniques

2 Cr.

Daily routines and problems of the child care worker. Recognition and intervention in child problems. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 481·120 Child Observation and concurrent enrollment in 481·221 Field Experience or departmental approval.

481-212

Child Care Techniques

2 Cr.

Continuat ion of 481·211 Child Care Techniques . Methods of han· dling common behavior problems and concerns in a child care fac ility. Lect ure 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites : 481·211 Child Care Techniques and concurrent enrollment in 481·222 Field Experience or departmental approval.

481-213

Child Care Techniques

2 Cr.

Continuation of 481·212 Child Care Techniques. Environmental in· fluences befo~e and after placement. Sex attitudes. Child care worker behavior. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 481·212 Child Care Techniques and concurrent enrollment in 481·223 Field Experience or departmental approval.

481-221

Field Experience

7 Cr.

Practical experience as a child care worker under the direction of a child care worker supervisor. Emphasis on institutiona l philosophy and structure. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 15 hours. Prerequisites: 481 120 Chi ld Observation and concurrent enrollment in 481-211 Child Care Techniques or departmental approval.

81


CHILD CARE TECHNOLOGY 481/COMMERCIAL ART 438

481-222

Field Experience

7 Cr.

Continuation of 481-221 Field Experience with attention to the treatment team. Staff referral and intake conferences. Case records review. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 15 hours. Prerequisites: 481-221 Field Experience and concurrent enrollment in 481-212 Child Care Techniques or departmental approval.

481-223

Field Experience

7 Cr.

Continuation of 481-222 Field Experience with emphasis on the role of the child care worker in the treatment program. Recognition and alteration of negative behavior patterns in children. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 15 hours. Prerequisites: 481-222 Field Experience and con current enrollment in 481-213 Child Care Techniques or departmental approval.

481-231

Recreational Activities

3 Cr.

Presentation of various games , skills and crafts. Participation in the planning and execution of recreational activities. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : 481-120 Child Observation or departmental approval.

481-241

Homemaker Activities

2 Cr.

Basic working knowledge of homemaker activities, personal hygiene, nutrition, first aid and medications in child care facilities. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 481-120 Child Observation or departmental approval.

481-251

Child Care Seminar

3 Cr.

Child care principles and their application to child care work. Student's awareness of himself and others along with understanding child behavior and child management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 481-120 Child Observation and 810-201 Child Growth and Development.

Commercial Art 438 438-101

Commercial Art and Advertising Orientation

2 Cr.

An introduction and overview of Commercial Art and Advertising as a field will be explored through direct observation and by guest lecturers. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None .

82


COMMERCIAL ART 438

438·111

Typography and Layout

2 Cr.

An introductory course in advertising layout , design and lettering to prepare the commercial art student/freshman for the more specialized second year of the program. Emphasis on basic layout design plus type recognition, roughing in of headline , lettering, copy designating, total design approach and terminology understanding. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

438·112

Typography and Layout

2 Cr.

A continuation of 438-111 Typography and Layout in preparing the student for hand lettering. The speed ball pen, ruling pen, crowquill pen and brush will be utilized. Roman , Gothic and Blackletter styles will be studied as well as formal and informal scripts, poster and outline lettering. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 438III Typography and Layout.

438·113

Typography and Layout

2 Cr.

A continuation of 438-112 Typography and Layout in teach ing the student the use and application of pressure sensitive type sheets today. The use of type or hand lettering in the design of monograms, trademarks and logotypes and the situations where hand lettering is a must. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 438-112 Typography and Layout.

438·201

Graphic Drawing

2 Cr.

This course is designed to help students transfer basic skills to areas of practical usage through assignments in graphic production and illustration similar to those encountered in the field of Commercial Art. The projects will include drawing the clothed human figure and the parts of the figure most frequently used commercially and constructing drawings of manufacturer's products. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 430-107 Drawing, 430-109 Fundamentals of Design and 430-202 Life Drawing.

438·202

Graphic Drawing

2 Cr.

Continuation of 438-201 Graphic Drawing. In addition, the student will concentrate on drawing product packages and containers, fashions, and animals. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 438-201 Graphic Drawing.

438·211

Illustration

3 Cr.

Course introducing basic professional rendering technique in black and white and color generally used in simple illustrations for advertising design and newspaper advertising. Primary emphasis, however, on black and white renderings. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: 438-113 Typography and Layout , 430-107 Drawing, 430-109 Fundamentals of Design and 430-202 Life Drawing.

83


COMMERCIAL ART 438

438-212

Illustration

3 Cr.

A continuation of 438-211 Illustration , emphasizing the airbrush and its role in advertising art. The ma intenance, care and use of the airbrush , friskets and acetate masks. Various textures, obtainable with the airbrush , will be pursued. Complete airbrush renderings will be em phasized . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 438-211 Illustration.

438-221

Graphic Production

2 Cr.

A comprehensive course in preparation of art for reproduction (cameraready art) . Editorial preparation and layout for publication. Study of style; point system ; type faces; word and character count ; texture substances and uses of paper; printing process; photo engraving; platemaking; offset lithography to acquaint student with practical and economical advantages of different media used in pro<;luction of publications. Study of professional standards and cost of production in the publishing industry. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 430-107 Drawing, 430-109 Fundamentals of Design and 430-202 Life Drawing.

438-222

Graphic Production

2 Cr.

A continuation of Graphic Production in the preparation of artwork for reproduction; including the use of crop marks, register marks, bleed, cropping , sizing of artwork and photographs. Also a complete understanding of keyline procedure and paste-up necessary for getting art work ready for the camera. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 438-221 Graphic Production.

438-261

Commercial Art Specialization

5 Cr.

This course is designed to help the Commercial Art student who is in his final quarter, prepare a portfolio of professionai quality. The portfolio will be critiqued on a professional basis. In addition, the student will be expected to spend one day per week in an agency on a cooperative basis. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Third quarter standing in the Commercial Art Program.

84


Court and Conference Reporting 482 482-113

Machine Reporting

3 Cr.

Introduction of stenograph machine theory and technique, with em phasis on recording, reading and transcribing practice in preparation for more advanced courses in Machine Reporting. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: Eligibility to enroll in 560路101 College Composition and 830-102 Typewriting or concurrent enrollment.

482-114

Machine Reporting

3 Cr.

Continuation of 482-113 Machine Reporting. Mastery of stenograph machine theory and technique. Instruction and practice to develop recording, reading and typewritten transcription skills in preparation for more advanced courses in the Court and Conference Reporting Program~ Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours . Prerequisites: 482路1l3 Machine Reporting and 830-102 Typewriting or equivalent.

482-115

Machine Reporting

3 Cr.

Continuation of 482-114 Machine Reporting. Addit ional instruction and practice to establish, develop and strengthen the link between theory, dictation, transcription and reporting skill. Emphasis placed on ma ilability. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: 482114 Machine Reporting and 830-103 Typewriting or equivalent.

482-116

Court Orientation and Transcription

3 Cr.

Lectures on court etiquette, the duties of the court reporter, the do's and don'ts of reporting, courtroom visitations and the introduction of transcription from paper tape, with the aim of transcription rate speed building. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 482-115 Machine Reporting or concurrent enrollment.

482-213

Machine Reporting

3 Cr.

Continuation of 482路115 Machine Reporting with emphasis on speed building on legal material, straight matter and regular correspondence. Emphasis is placed on accuracy tolerance of 3 per cent; and on the development of endurance and the introduction of typical legal forms. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours . Prerequisite: 482-115 Machine Reporting.

85


COURT AND CONFERENCE REPORTING 482

482-214

Machine Reporting

3 Cr.

Continuation of 482-213 Machine Reporting with emphasis on improving the students' ability to take legal and medical dictation . Emphasis is placed on teaching the student to handle two, three and multiple-voice dictation in the form of actual legal reporting. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 482-213 Machine Reporting.

482-215

Machine Reporting

3 Cr.

Continuation of 482-214 Machine Reporting. Live dictation speeds of 200 words per minute. Dictation of a legal, medical and general vocabulary includes multiple-voice presentation, with emphasis on endurance and speed. Methods of handling poorly heard material in court. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 482-214 Machine Reporting.

482-216

Testimony and Depositions

3 Cr.

Introduction to legal terminology dictation with emphasis on speed building on the following types of cases of two-voice dictation: common carrier, sales warranty, arson, negligence, damages (death); highway traffic act, punitive damages, scope of employment, mental incompetency to contract. Scheduled courtroom visits. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: 482-116 Court Orientation and Transcription and 482-213 Machine Reporting or concurrent enrollment.

482-217

Testimony

3 Cr.

Continuation of 482-216 Testimony and Depositions. Additional cases of multiple-voice dictation, including insurance, condemnation proceedings, income tax refund, exemplary damages, negligence-injury, authority of an agent, burden of proof, weighing evidence. Duties of the reporter on depositions. Scheduled courtroom visits involving experience in taking testimony with a court reporter present. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: 482-214 Machine Reporting or concurrent enrollment and 482-216 Testimony and Depositions_

482-218

Jury Charge

3 Cr.

Designed to provide the student of Court Reporting with practice on actual jury charge and opinion with selections of legal OpiniOn, soltd matter, medical and dental testimony, miscellaneous court material, and, very importantly, real estate and land descriptions with their quaint terminology. Scheduled courtroom visits involving experience in taking actual testimony with a court reporter present. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: 482-215 Machine Reporting or concurrent enrollment and 482-217 Testimony. 86


COURT AND CONFERENCE REPORTING 482/DANCE 485

482-219

Court Orientation and Advanced Transcription

3 Cr.

Continuation of 482-116 Court Orientation and Transcription . Proper courtroom etiquette and decorum. Emphasis on transcription speed and accuracy from paper tape and live dictation . Courtroom visits involving experience in taking courtroom testimony with a court reporter in attendance. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 482-217 Testimony.

Dance 485 485-101

Introduction to the Art of Dance

3 Cr.

Elementary technique, improvisation, small compositions, lectures, .films and discussions on dance history, philosophy, theory, survey of the current trends. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

485-102

Introduction to the Art of Dance

3 Cr.

Continuation of 485-101 Introduction to the Art of Dance. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 485-101 Introduction to the Art of Dance.

485-103

Introduction to the Art of Dance

3 Cr.

Continuation of 485-102 Introduction to the Art of Dance. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 485-102 Introduction to the Art of Dance.

485-107

Theory and Techniques of Dance

2 Cr.

Integration of the physical, intellectual and aesthetic values of dance through the technique class. Ballet and modern dance in alternate hours. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in 485-101 Introduction to the Art of Dance or departmental approval.

485-108

Theory and Techniques of Dance

2 Cr.

Continuation of 485-107 Theory and Techniques of Dance. Lecture o hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 485-107 Theory and Techniques of Dance.

485-109

Theory and Techniques of Dance

2 Cr.

Continuation of 485-108 Theory and Techniques of Dance. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 485路108 Theory and Techniques of Dance.

87


DANCE 485/ DATA PROCESSING 490

485-122

Movement: Form and Style

2 Cr.

The organization of movement to express emotion and character through the exploration of the elements of space, time and energy. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in 890-150 Fundamentals of Acting or departmental approval.

485-123

Movement: Form and Style

2 Cr.

Continuation of 485 -122 Movement: Form and Style. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 485-122 Movement: Form and Style.

Data Processing 490 490-101

Electron ic Data Processing

4 Cr.

Introduction to electronic data processing. History of data processing. Features of data processing unit record equipment and number systems. Computer concepts, programming and system analysis principles. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

490-111

Data Processing Applications

3 Cr.

Functional problems of manipulations, logic, calculation , and reporting. Typical data processing equipment-e.g., keypunches, sorters and tabufators - use d dire<;:tly as applicable to problem solution. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 490-101 Electronic Data Processing or concurrent enrollment with departmental approval.

490-201

Computer Programming

4 Cr.

Binary coded decimal and hexadecimal number code systems defined. Absolute machine language and symbolic language computer coding methods are used to introduce programming features of a spe::ific computer system. Advantages and limitations of specific computer are compared with other computers in the field . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 490-101 . Electronic Data Processing.

490-202

Computer Programming

3 Cr.

Continuation of 490-201 Computer Programming. Basic techniques of assembly language programming. Introduction of program modification techniques. Logic tables. Problem-oriented languages and report generators. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 490-201 Computer Programming.

88


DATA PROCESSING 490

490-203

Computer Programming

3 Cr.

Continuation of 490·202 Computer Programming. Advanced tech· niques of assembly language/ report generators. Programming applied to problems involving program modification . Magnetic tape and / or disk storage file handling methods. Symbol manipulation and file organization. Introduction to macros and large systems. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 490·202 Computer Pro· gramming.

490-211

Applied Data Mathematics

4 Cr.

Logic, sets and Boolean expressions, interpolation , exact and ap· proximate solutions to simultaneous linear systems. Statistical methods applications, numerical use of concepts of differential and integral calculus. Overview of management science techniques. Lec· ture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690·141 Elementary Probability and Statistics.

490-215

Numerical Methods and Computers

4 Cr.

Introduces computer programming for mathematics, science and engineering. Numerical methods for solving problems arising in statisti"Cs, engineering, physics and chemistry are studied and solu · tions are obtained via the digital computer. ' Major programming is with Fortran. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 690· 115 College Algebra.

490-221

Programming Systems

4 Cr.

Stresses familiarity with the differences among assembly systems, macrosystems, tabular language and compiler languages. Applica· tions, advantages and disadvantages . Operating systems, total sys· tems, and integration of programming effort. Major programming em · phasis is with Cobol. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequi· site: 490·203 Computer Programming.

490-231

Systems Analysis

4 Cr.

Systems and procedures function. Includes analysis, design, control of management information and data systems. Economics of manual, electromechanical and electronic data processing. Advantages and disadvantages of computer, communication and information retrieval systems for information evaluation. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 490·202 Computer Programming.

89


DATA PROCESSING 490

490-241

I nformation Retrieval

4 Cr.

Methods and problems involving information retrieval systems. Presentation of theories and approaches to the use of computers in disciplines such as statistics, law, medicine, library science, music, languages and the humanities. Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 490路231 Systems Analysis.

490-245

Tele-Communication Processing

4 Cr.

Discussion of various forms of tele-communications and their relation or connection with computers. Non-computer devices such as telephone and telegraph are covered. Computer路oriented subjects covered 'are direct computer to computer data transmissi.on, message switching facilities, real-time and on-line inquiry stations. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 490-231 Systems Analysis.

490-251

Data Processing Field Project

3 Cr.

Each student selects a project to complete. Upon approval, he develops an information system, documents and programs it for implementation. All projects to include hands-on assembly, testing, debugging and processing. A written report is required, giving a complete explanation of the programming method, the assembly and processing techniques, the diagnostic and debugging procedures used. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisites: 490-221 Programming Systems and 490-231 Systems Analysis.

490-260

Cooperative Field Experience

1 Cr.

Full or part-time employment in an approved area with a maximum of

40 hours per quarter under College supervision. Students may earn no more than 9 credits for the program. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

490-261

Cooperative Field Experience

9 Cr.

Continuation of 490-260 Cooperative Field Experience. Lecture. 0 hours. Laboratory 35 hours. Prerequisite: 490-260 Cooperative Field Experience.

490-280

Data Processing for Libraries

3 Cr.

Concepts and techniques for the application of data processing principles in the acquisitions, cataloguing, circulation and serials control systems. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 490101 Electronic Data Processing.

90


Dental Hygiene 500

500-101

Preventive Oral Health Service I (Formerly Preclinical Dental Hygiene)

5 Cr.

Principles of social science related to dental hygiene practice and the professionalization of dental hygiene. Knowledge and understanding of an oral inspection and history prior to the initiation of treatment. Philosophy of preventive oral health and its relevance to dental hy路 giene. Etiology, pathogenesis, treatment and prevention of all oral accretions. Principles of technique for the oral prophylaxis. Students practice on manikins and then apply the instruments in the mouth. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Dental Hygiene Program.

500-102

Head and Neck Anatomy and Tooth Morphology

4 Cr.

Study of nomenclature, development, calcification and eruption of permanent and deciduous teeth. Lectures on physiology of the den路 tition, physiologic tooth form, the periodontium, arrangement of teeth and occlusion. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Dental Hygiene Program.

500-105

General and Oral Histology (Formerly 500-114)

2 Cr.

Origin and structure of tissues, histology and embryology of teeth, face and oral cavity. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequi路 site: Formal acceptance into the Dental Hygiene Program.

500-112

Head and Neck Anatomy (Formerly Head and Neck Anatomy and Tooth Morphology)

4 Cr.

Study of the function of the masticatory apparatus as a unit. Lectures on dento-osseous structures and the tempero-mandibular joint, muscles of facial expression and mastication, suprahyoid muscles and tongue, neurology of the head and neck, vascular system of the head, viscera of the head and neck. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 500-102 Head and Neck Anatomy and Tooth Morphology.

91


DENTAL HYGIENE 500

500-113

Preventive Oral Health Service II (Formerly Oral Hygiene)

5 Cr.

Methods and materials utilized to implement preventive oral health. Study of diagnostic aids for the use of the dentist in treatment plan路 ning. Identification of diagnostic criteria for caries susceptibility used in oral diagnosis. Apply knowledge of plaque control in patient oral physio路therapy instruction. Apply topical anti路carogenic agents and understand the mode of action. Study of the clinic manual to apply knowledge to all facets of treatment of patients in the dental hygiene clinic. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 500-101 Preventive Oral Health Service I.

500-123

Radiology (Formerly 500-132)

3 Cr.

History and development of the X-ray, its nature and properties. Safety precautions and uses of the X-ray in dentistry. Theory and practice in the fundamentals of oral radiographic technique. Film placement, tube angulation, processing and mounting of films. A specific number of radiodontic examinations and hours in darkroom procedures are required throughout the two-year Dental Hygiene Program. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 500-102 Head and Neck Anatomy and Tooth Morphology.

500-125

General and Oral Pathology (Formerly 500-134)

2 Cr.

Introduction to general pathology. Inflammation, necrosis, retrograde changes, pathological process in diseases caused by bacteria, viruses and other organisms. Clinical pathology of diseases affecting teeth and their supporting structures. Visual differentiation between normal and abnormal tissues. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequi site: 500-101 Preventive Oral Health Service I.

500-130

Clinical Restorative Dentistry (Formerly Dental Materials)

5 Cr.

Physical properties of dental materials and basic principles of their preparation. Principles of the skills of four handed dentistry. Application of the principles of dental materials by fabricating dental restorations in manikins and assisting dental students at the dental school and dental hygiene students in the clinic. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 500-101 Preventive Oral Health Service I.

92


DENTAL HYGIENE 500

500-131

Preventive Oral Health Service III (Formerly Clinical Dental Hygiene).

3 Cr.

Students perform oral prophylaxis, expose radiographs, apply topical fluoride to the teeth and give patient education to adult and child patients in the clinic. Laboratory hours refer to hours in clinic. Lec· ture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 500·113 Preventive Oral Health Service II.

500-200

Preventive Oral Health Service IV (Formerly Clinical Dental Hygiene)

3 Cr.

Concentrated clinical experience for three weeks performing oral prophylaxis, exposing radiographs, applying topical fluoride, polish· ing restorations, and giving patient education to adult and child patients in the clinic. During the 3rd week the students work on typodonts in the clinic placing rubber dam, applying matrices, insert· ing base and restorative material in anterior and posterior prepared teeth. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: 500·131 Preventive Oral Health Service III.

500-201

Preventive Oral Health Service V (Formerly Clinical Dental Hygiene)

6 Cr.

Etiology and classification of periodontal disease and principles of periodontology. Principles of Nutrition applied to dental hygiene through the study of nutritional counseling for dental patients. Study and clinical application of the principles of ultrasonic scaling, nutri· tional counseling, root planning, subgingival curettage and restora· tive dentistry on patients in the dental hygiene clinic. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: 500·200 Preventive Oral Health Service IV.

500-203

Pharmacology and Therapeutics 3 Cr. (Formerly Pharmacology and Anesthesiology)

Drugs and anesthetics, with emphasis on those used in the dental office. Discussion of the origin of drugs and anesthetics , physical and chemical properties, preparation, mode of administration and effects on body systems. Preoperative and postoperative patient care. Lecture 3 (4) hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 500·200 Pre· ventive Oral Health Service IV.

93


DENTAL HYGIENE 500

500-206

Community Oral Health I (Formerly Dental Health Education)

2 Cr.

Historical development of community health practices in the United States; present administrative organizations and their functions and services. Study of preliminary research, project planning, operation and project evaluation of community health activities. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 500·200 Preventive Oral Health Service IV.

500-221

Preventive Oral Health Service VI 5 Cr. (Formerly 500-211 Clinical Dental Hygiene)

Continuation of 500·201 Preventive Oral Health Service V. Special assignments in dental departments of county hospitals and city clinics to further acquaint students with diverse mouth conditions. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: 500·201 Preven· tive Oral Health Service V.

500-222

Community Oral Health II (Formerly 500-210 Public Health)

3 Cr.

Continuation of Community Oral Health I. Study of the application of psychological .concepts to oral health instruction; educational con· cepts applied to oral health instruction; role of instructional materials in oral health instruction. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Pre· requisite: 500·206 Community Oral Health I.

500-225

Dental Hygiene Extended Functions (Formerly 500-230 Dental Specialties)

3 Cr.

Study of the practice of general dentistry and specialty practices. Application of the principles of extended functions for dental auxili · aries through assignments to specialty practices and/or the school of dentistry. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 500·201 Preventive Oral Health Service V.

500-231

Preventive Oral Health Service VII (Formerly Clinical Dental Hygiene)

5 Cr.

Continuation of 500·221 Preventive Oral Health Service VI. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: 500·221 Preventive Oral Health Service VI.

94


DENTAL HYGIENE 500 DENTAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY 502

500-232

Community Oral Health III 1 Cr. (Formerly 500-224 Dental Health Education)

Application of the principles in Community Oral Healt h I and II 'through field experiences in the community participating in community health care planning and related activities. Lecture 0 hours_ Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 500-222 Community Oral Health II.

500-234

Dental Hygiene Practice 3 Cr. (Formerly Dental Ethics and Jurisprudence)

Future of dentistry and role of the dental hygienist as related to the profession and association; relationsh ip of dental hygienist to the members of the health team; principles of professional ethics; laws, rules, and regulations regulating the practice of dental hygiene and dentistry. Introduction to administration and management of a dental health team. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 500-221 Preventive Oral Health Service VI.

Dental Laboratory Technology 502 502-101

Dental Laboratory Materials

2 Cr.

Composition , properties and uses of nonmetallic dental materials. Exercises designed to illustrate the properties and uses ofthe materials studied and the results of proper and improper manipulation. Lecture o hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

502-111

Dental Metallurgy

3 Cr.

Study of precious metals, alloys and chrome alloys: their application to dental procedures including the physical and mechanical properties, crystalline structure investments, methods of casting, soldering, heat treatment and polishing. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 502-101 Dental Laboratory Materials.

95


DENTAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY 502

502-115

Anatomy and Physiology for Dental Technologies

6 Cr_

Introduction to the anatomy of the head and neck; physiology of occlusion with special emphasis on anatomy of the individual teeth and surrounding tissues. Laboratory includes drawings of each tooth from the central incisor through the second molar on one side of the upper and lower arches. Fourteen teeth are carved in wax. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Dental Laboratory Program or prior approval.

502-121

Complete Denture Techniques

2 Cr.

StlJdy of fabrication of complete dentures. Boxil,~ and pouring models, construction of trays, construction of shellac base plates and o.cclusion rims , mounting casts, arrangement of teeth for complete maxillary and mandibular dentures on an articulator, and simple denture repair. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: Formal acceptance in the Dental Laboratory Program or departmental approval.

502-122

Complete Denture Techniques

4 Cr.

Continuing study of the fabrication of complete dentures. Construction of complete maxillary and mandibular dentures using various posterior tooth forms on an adjustable articulator and procedures for relining and rebasing complete dentures . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: 502-121 Complete Denture Techniques.

502-126

Crown and Bridge Techniques

5 Cr.

Study of techniques for fabricating cast restorations and introduction to terminology and techniques specific to inlays , crowns and bridges. Preparation of casts and dies from impressions: waxing, carving, investing, casting and polishing of simple and complex inlays, full crowns, and three-quarter crowns. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisites: 502-101 Dental Laboratory Materials, 502-115 Anatomy and Physiology for Dental Technologies , 502-121 Complete Denture Techniques.

502-127

Crown and Bridge Techniques

4 Cr.

Construction of fixed bridges with a review of dental anatomy and terminology as related to crown and bridge techniques. Construction of bridges of various designs utilizing metal with veneer facings in all phases from the fabrication of the cast through the polishing of the completed bridge. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: 502 -126 Crown and Bridge Techniques.

96


DENTAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY 502

502-128

Crown and Bridge Techniques

4 Cr.

Study of the physical properties and manipulation of veneering materials; techniques for construction of bridges in the anterior and posterior region. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: 502127 Crown and Bridge Techniques.

502-130

Partial Denture Techniques

5 Cr.

Study of basic techniques used in fabrication of cast removable dentures. Fundamentals of survey and design, constructing refractory casts and casting removable partial denture frameworks utilizing chrome-nickel alloy. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisites: 502-111 Dental Metallurgy, 502-122 Complete Denture Techniques, 502-126 Crown and Bridge Techniques.

502-131

Partial Denture Techniques

4 Cr.

Fabrication of various types of temporary removable appliances including wrought-metal. Bending and assembling wrought clasps, and the fabrication of combination wrought and cast metal frameworks. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: 502路130 Partial Denture Techniques.

502-214

Advanced Dentures

5 Cr.

Fabrication of complete denture construction. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisites: 502路122 Complete Denture Techniques, 502-131 Partial Denture Techniques.

502-215

Ceramic Techniques

5 Cr.

Study of the physical properties and manipulation of porcelain including staining and personalizing crowns. Fabrication of porcelain units includes the preparation of dies, adaptation of platinum matrix, firing, and glazing. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prereq.uisites: 502233 Advanced Crown and Bridge Techniques.

502-216

Advanced Ceramic Techniques

4 Cr.

Advanced study of various techniques for bonding porcelain to metal and methods of personalizing porcelain used in bridge construction. Fabrication of crown and bridge units. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 502-215 Ceramic Techniques.

97


DENTAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY 502

502-228

Advanced Partial Denture Techniques

3 Cr.

Advanced techniques in removable partial denture design . Construc路 tion of all-metal removable partial dentures using tube teeth and flatback facings , and repair and reconstruction of removable partial dentures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 502-131 Partial Denture Techniques.

502-229

Advanced Partial Denture Techniques

4 Cr.

Advanced techniques in removable partial denture design . Use of in路 ternal attachments, precision attachments and advanced clasping techniques. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: 502228 Advanced Partial Denture Techniques.

502-233

Advanced Crown and Bridge Techniques

3 Cr.

Construction of bridges combining resin material and gold- framework utilizing plastic build-up techniques. Lecture 1 hou r. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 502-128 Crown and Bridge Techniques.

502-241

Dental laboratory Practice

2 Cr.

Fabrication of appliances from casts and prescriptions supplied by the School of Dentistry , Case Western Reserve University. Dentist-laboratory relations are followed and the technician路student witnesses insertion 路of the appliances fabricated in the College laboratory. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 4 hours . Prerequisites: 502-214 Advanced Dentures, 502-229 Advanced Partial Denture Techniques and 502 -233 Advanced Crown and Bridge Techniques.

502-242

Advanced Dental laboratory Practice

2 Cr.

Fabrication of advanced appliances from casts and prescriptions supplied by the School of Dentistry , Case Western Reserve University; continued emphasis on dentist-laboratory relations. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 502-241 Dental Laboratory Practice.

502-251

Jurisprudence and Ethics Seminar

3 Cr.

Study of the legal and ethical aspects of dental laboratory practice, dentist-laboratory relationsh ip, and business aspects of operation and managing a dental laboratory. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None .

98


99


Dietetic Technology 505 505·101

Dietetic Orientation and Management Techniques

3 Cr.

Overview of objectives, goals, organizational structures, personnel management, and personnel policies and practices io nutrition and dietetic departments. Development of work schedules, job descriptions, job specifications and roles . Human relations and interpersonal relationships in health care facilities studied. Lecture 3 hours. Labora tory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

505·120

Nutrition Care I

3 Cr.

Introductory cou rse. Overview, study and appl ication of nutrition principles and knowledge of energy-yielding nutrients, digestion, absorption and utilization. Interview and evaluation techniques, cultu ral food patterns and preventive nutrition emphasized. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in 480-109 Introduction to Biochemistry.

505·121

Nutrition Care II

3 Cr.

Continuation of 505 -120 Nutrition Care I. Deals with the non-energyyielding nutrients, vitamins and minerals and water, and introduces the importance of nutrition care and education throughout the life cycle . It will also deal with interviewing, counseling and evaluation , as well as basic menu planning. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 505-120 Nutrition Care I.

505·122

Nutrition and Diet Therapy

4 Cr.

Application of principles of nutrition related to specific disease conditions requiring dietary modifications. Planning and evaluation of dietary pattern s and meal plans for individuals of various ages , in stitutional and cultural groups . Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : 505 -121 Nutrition Care II.

505·135

Dietetic Quantity Food Production

3 Cr.

Planning and preparation of entire meal to gain skills and knowledge of large quantity dietary production and management. Operation and maintenance of servi ce and san itation of large equipment. Lectu re 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite : None.

100


DIETETIC TECHNOLOGY 505

505-136

Dietetic Quantity Food Production

3 Cr.

Practical experience in quantity dietary food preparation. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite : 505-135 Dietetic Quantity Food Production.

505-137

Dietetic Meal Planning and Food Systems

3 Cr.

Study and application of meal planning and management principles based on nutritional adequacy throughout life cycle. Techniques and methods will be put into practice using diverse food delivery systems. Budgeting and cost control in basic and therapeutic diet meal planning. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 505 -136 Dietetic Quantity Foods.

505-140

Supervised Nutrition Care Field Experience

1 Cr.

To provide concurrent clinical field experience in nutrition care settings. Activities correlated with theory in Nutrition Care II. Structured and unstructured nutrition projects geared to needs and interests of students. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in 505-122 Nutrition and Diet Therapy .

505-141

Dietetic Technician Field Experience

8 Cr.

Field experience in dietary departments of health care institutions under the direction of an American Dietetic Association dietitian. Participation in relevant supervisory work situations, progressive job experiences and activities. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 40 hours. Prerequisites: 505-122 Nutrition and Diet Therapy and 505-137 Dietetic Meal Planning and Food Systems .

505-142

Dietetic Technician Seminar

2 Cr.

Review and analysis of dietary and nutrition management techniques, procedures and purposes in health care settings. Evaluation of field experiences, job trends and opportunities, community resources , communication and media services. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 505-137 Dietetic Meal Planning and Food Sys tems.

505-221

Supervised Nutrition Care Field Experience

1 Cr.

Under supervision of registered dietitian, field experience in community, social service, public and governmental health agencies. Special nutrition problems encountered, including food stamp usage, commodity foods, family budgeting, consumer and nutrition education , nutrition counseling, home health care. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 505-122 Nutrition and Diet Therapy.

101


DIETETIC TECHNOLOGY 505

505-222

Geriatric Nutrition

4 Cr.

Application of nutrition principles to dietary needs of the elderly, with socioeconomic, psychological and physiological factors considered. Emphasis on decreased functional ability, basal metabolism, dentition and physical activity, and their relation to nutrition and diet. Concurrent field experience in nursing homes, extended care facilities and institutions for the aged. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequ isite: 505-122 Nutrition and Diet Therapy.

505-235

Dietetic Quantity Food Procedures

3 Cr.

Course designed to acquaint students with principles and techniques of quantity purchasing methods employed in institutional food services. Specifications , legal regulations, controls, use of production records, work, time and motion studies in purchasing, storage and handling. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequ isite: 505-137 Dietetic Meal Planning and Food Systems.

505-236

Dietetic Organization and Management Procedures

3 Cr.

Organ izational structure of quantity food service in health care institutions. Evaluation of administration , management tools, budget and cost analysis. Applications. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 505-235 Dietetic Quantity Food Procedures.

505-251

Dietetic Technician Seminar

2 Cr.

New and relevant trends in dietary service and the implications for food service in health care institutions. Opportunities and procedures for employment and advancement. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 505-236 Dietetic Organization and Management Procedures and 505-142 Dietetic Technician Seminar.

505-252

Nutrition and Health Care Delivery Systems

3 Cr.

Study and summary of concepts of nutrition care and management in correlation with diversified activities in clinical field settings in area of students' interests and needs. Detailed specialized experiences under supervision of registered dietitian . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 505-236 Dietetic Organization and Management Procedures and 505-251 Dietetic Technician Seminar or concurrent enrollment.

102


Drafting and Design 508 508·111

Technical Illustration

3 Cr.

An introduction to various methods of presenting technical data to achieve economical and effective communication. Several types of pictorial representation are analyzed with emphasis on trimetric draw· ing, ranging from projection methods through the development and use of trimetric scales. Principles involved in the selection of drawing angles, drawing scale, along with time·saving techniques and the cor· rect methods of inking are studied. The use of practical industrial parts in problem assignments provide a wide range of geometric construction and experience in the use of base·line .and center·line plotting tech· niques. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 550·121 Engineering Drawing and 550·122 Engineering Drawing.

508·112

Technical Illustration

3 Cr.

Advanced drawing techniques are studied and applied in creating illustrations of greater complexity with appropriate emphasis on design layout and reproduction requirements. Methods of drawing assemblies, exploded parts, and cutaway views are included, as well as the repre· sentation of data in a variety of forms for schematics, charts, graphs, tables, flow diagrams, etc. Plotting and ellipse selection and/or con· struction for off·axis scale for measurement. Techniques for improving the clarity and appearance of illustrations through the use of line shad· ing, pressure sensitive shade patterns and depth perception are studied. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 508·111 Technical Illustration.

508·113

Technical Illustration

3 Cr.

Various specialized illustrative techniques and practices are studied including methods of preparing pre·separated line·art for multicolor reproduction , the preparation of line illustrations from black and white glossy photographs for use in technical manuals. Lecture 2 hours. Lab· oratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 508·112 Technical Illustration.

508·114

Technical Illustration

3 Cr.

Numerous requirements relating to the design and production of visual aids are studied. Methods of simplifying and limiting the amount of data per visual aid are stressed, along with the need for utilizing typog· raphy of proper style and size to insure maximum legibility and compre· hension. Time is allotted in the course to re·work art done in previous technical illustration, drafting and art courses to be made ready for the student portfolio which is an aid in job placement in local industry as a beginning technical illustrator. This course is taken along with Photo· graphic Procedures so that photo equipment and supplies are available as an aid in the construction of the student portfolio. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. I?rerequisite: 508·113 Technical Illustration.

103


DRAFTING AND DESIGN 508

508-115

Principles of Technical Writing

3 Cr.

A survey of how efforts of a technical writer and technical illustrator fit into the scheme of producing a technical publication. Student will study the steps involved in the production of a technical publication from concept stage to delivery of printed copies. At each stage the importance of coordination between writer and illustrator is shown byexamples consisting of workshop-like exercises . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None.

508-116

Airbrush

3 Cr.

A survey lab course how to use the basic two路control airbrush as an aid in rendering technical or commercial art for technical publications. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 550-122 Engineering Drawing.

508-117

Airbrush

3 Cr.

A continuation of 508-116 Airbrush with special emphasis on photo retouching. Lecture 2 hours. Laborato;-y 4 hours. Prerequisite: 508-116 Airbrush.

508-118

Descriptive Geometry

3 Cr.

The structure of this course emphasizes the fundamental theories of space relationships of points, lines, planes , intersections of surfaces, and developed surfaces with applications to practical problems from industry. Reinforcement of skills and principles introduced in Engineering Drawing is an important object of the course. Problems include clearances and angular relationships between structures , machine parts from industry. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequi路 sites: 550-122 Engineering Drawing.

104


Early Childhood Education 730 730-101

Early Childhood Education

4 Cr.

History and philosophy of early childhood education. The preschool plant and equipment, programs, development and needs of the young child. Supervised observation. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

730-102

Early Childhood Education

4 Cr.

Study of various types of preschool centers. Emphasis on curriculum and program development, administration and the role of the preschOol teacher. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 730-101 Early Childhood Education.

730-120

Early Language Development

3 Cr.

Language skills and the importance of communication in the development of a preschool child. An interpretative and critical study of literature and related activities which aid in the developmerit of language and communication . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 730-101 Early Childhood Education.

730-121

Literature for Early Childhood

3 Cr.

Evaluation of literary activities and material for young children. Prac路 tice in the art of reading and telling stories as well as in the use of other forms of literature. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 730-120 Early Language Development.

730-122

Art for Early Childhood

3 Cr.

Students in a workshop setting are acquainted with a rich and meaningful variety of curriculum experiences in art for preschool children. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 730-102 Early Childhood Education.

730-123

Science for Early Childhood

3 Cr.

Students in a workshop setting are acquainted with a rich and meaningful variety of curriculum experiences in science for preschool children. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 730-122 Art for Early Childhood.

105


EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 730

730-124

Music for Early Childhood

3 Cr.

Designed to acquaint and train students to understand and develop the instinctive creativity of young children . Basic music vocabulary and concepts will be stressed . Experiences with sound, rhythms, musical games, instruments and records will be explored . Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 730-101 Early Childhood Education.

730-125

Music for Early Childhood

3 Cr.

To further explore the nature of music for young children . Study of notation and elemental theory. To develop skills in the use of various instruments. To continue the building of a repertoire and planning of musical experiences. To develop skills in evaluating music for young children. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 730-124 Music for Early Childhood.

730-220

Child Behavior and Guidance

3 Cr.

Guidance of preschool children within an educational program based on interpretation of child growth principles in practice. To help students understand themselves in their roles as teachers of young children. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 810-201 Child Growth and Development and concurrent enrollment in 730-.230 Early Childhood Practicum.

730-221

Early Childhood Relationships

2 Cr.

A course designed to enable teachers and parents to work together effectively toward creating a better way of life for the child, with emphasis on factors which promote satisfying relationships. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 730-230 Early Childhood Practicum and concurrent enrollment in 730-231 Early Childhood Practicum.

730-230

Early Childhood Practicum

5 Cr.

Actual participation in preschool teaching under supervision to develop practical skills. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 10 1/ 2 hours. Prerequisites: 730 -121 Literature for Early Childhood, 730-123 Science for Early Childhood and 730-124 Music for Early Childhood.

730-231

Early Childhood Practicum

5 Cr.

Additional experience with young children in an organized group. lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 10% hours. Prerequisite: 730-230 Early Childhood Practicum.

106


EARTH SCIENCE 510 j ECONOMICS 520

Earth Science 510 510-110

Physical Geology

4 Cr.

Materials and structures of the earth , processes and agencies by which the earth 's crust has been and is being changed . Rocks and their mineral composition. The work of rivers , winds and glaciers as agents of erosion. Volcanoes and earthquakes as forces which change the surface of the earth. Regularly scheduled field tr ips are an integral part of course. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 3 hours . Prerequisite: None.

510-111

Historical Geology

4 Cr.

Geologic history of the earth and its inhabitants , with special reference to North America. Laboratory study deals with principal fossil life of the various geologic periods. Occasional field work is required . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 510-110 Physical Geology or concurrent enrollment.

Economics 520 520-100

Basic Economics

3 Cr.

Practical course in the principles of economics designed to provide an understanding of the structure, organization and operation of our economy; and its relation to our social and political welfare and to our standard of living. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Not open to students who have successfully completed 520-161 Principles of Economics and/or 520 -162 Principles of Economics or their equivalent.

520-151

Development of the American Economy

4 Cr..

Evolutionary development of our economic system from medieval times to present. Designed for better understanding of the economic . life. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

520-161

Principles of Economics

4 Cr.

An introduction to the scope and method of economics; scarcity and resource allocation ; basic demand-supply analysis; the mixed economy and its basic components; national income analysis and modern employm~nt theory; money and banking; economic growth . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

107


ECONOMICS 520/EDUCATION 530 EDUCATIONAL ASSISTING TECHNOLOGY 538

520-162

Principles of Economics

4 Cr.

A continuation of 520-161 Principles of Economics. Refinements in demand-supply theory; supply and the costs of production; price and output determination by market structure; resource pricing; general equilibrium analysis; labor economics ; economics of poverty and inequality; the social imbalance controversy; international trade theory. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 520-161 Principles of Economics.

Education 530 530-101

Introduction to Education

3 Cr.

Designed to introduce the student to the broad and complex field of public educat ion. Emphasis on personal and professional characteristics required for successful teach ing. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : None _

Educational Assisting Technology 538 538-100

General Orientation for Teacher Aides

2 Cr.

Designed to orient and acquaint the prospective Teacher Assistant or Technologist to the job and role of assisting professionals in education. The seminar will orient the student to professional requirements and possibilities. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

538-101

Seminar on Reading and the language Arts

2 Cr.

Application of corrective teaching techniques on a one-to-one or small group basis in the language arts with a special emphasis on reading. Includes an examination of the language process and difficulties associated with its development. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: None.

538-102

Seminar in Tutoring Mathematics and Social Studies

2 Cr.

An introduction to tutoring techniques in the areas of mathematics and social studies with special emphasis on communication and activities involving small groups or in one-to-one tutoring relationships. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: None.

108


EDUCATIONAL ASSISTING TECHNOLOGY 538

538-103

Seminar in Student Management Problems

2 Cr.

Discussion of problems encountered in school environment, especially related to the inner-city. Emphasis on real problems of lunchroom management , field trips and recess supervision , and proctoring tests. Some approaches to beh avioral management will be considered. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: None.

538-104

Seminar in Educational Media

2 Cr.

Practical experience in the production of multi-sensory instructional materials and in the operation of supportive equipment. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite : None.

538-121

Seminar in Educational Clerical Procedures

2 Cr.

Development of fundamental concepts as they pertain to practices in the classroom and central office in a public school setting. Emphasis will be placed on developing proficiency in filing , record keeping, checking attendance, keeping registers , and maintaining student and teacher records. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: None.

538-201

Seminar in Home-School Relations

2 Cr.

Development of fundamental concepts and procedures and techniques related to parent contacts, teacher reports to parents , parent 's resource file , and room mothers. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequi site: None.

538-205

Educational Assisting Technology Internship

4 Cr.

The Educational Assisting Technologist intern will be provided opportunity for practical application of activities in the educational setting for which the individual is being prepared through selection of the eighteen hours of elective credits. The internship will emphasize cleri-. cal and housekeeping activities. Internship 13% hours per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 530-101 Introduction to Education , 538-100 General Orientation for Teacher Aides and 538-121 Seminar in Educational Clerical Procedures.

109


EDUCATIONAL ASSISTING TECHNOLOGY 538 EDUCATIONAL MEDIA 535

538·206

Educational Assisting Technology Internship

4 Cr.

Continuation of Educational Assisting Technology Internship 538·205. The Educational Assisting Technologist intern will be provided the opportunity to apply clerical and managerial skills in the educational setting for which the individual is being prepared through selection of the eighteen elective credits. The internship will emphasize managerial skills . Internship 13 1/ 2 hours per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 538·205 Educational Assisting Technology Intern· ship , 538·201 Seminar in Home School Relations and 538·103 Seminar in Student Management Problems.

538·207

Educational Assisting Technology Internship

4 Cr.

Continuation of Educational Assisting Technology Internship 538·206. The Educational Assisting Technologist intern will be provided the opportunity to apply instructional support skills in the educational setting appropriate to the individual's area of specialization determined by the eighteen elective credit hours selected by the individual. Intern· ship 13112 hours per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Pre· requisites: 538·206 Educational Assisting Technology Internship, 538· 101 Seminar in Reading and Language Arts , 538·102 Seminar in Tutoring Mathematics and Social Studies and 538·104 Seminar in Educational Media.

Educational Media 535 535·101

Introduction to Educational Media

3 Cr.

Educational media and their use in varied institutional settings. Devel· opment of basic skills in using various media. Lecture 2 hours. Labora· tory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

535·102

Educational Media

3 Cr.

Orientation to booking materials, cataloguing procedures, scheduling and inventory of Instructional Media Center materials. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 535·101 Introduction to Educational Media or equivalent.

110


EDUCATIONAL MEDIA 535

535-121

Media Maintenance and Repair

3 Cr.

Maintenance of Bmm and 16mm projectors, slide projector, sou n d equipment, photography equipment and television production equipment. Patch cords procedures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None .

535-122

Graphics Production

3 Cr.

Production techniques and procedures in art work - copy photography, pasteups, transparencies, display layouts and story boards. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 535-101 Introduction to Educational Media or equivalent.

535-125

Color Slide Production

3 Cr.

The production of color slide transparencies , 35mm slide and half frame filmstrips. Emphasis on media presentation sequencing, copy stand photography, color processing, copy art preparation and technical considerations. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 616-113 Photography or departmental approval.

535-130

Advanced Black-and-White Photography

3 Cr.

Advanced basic photography skills, black and white. Advanced lighting, composition and darkroom techniques. Emphasis on technical skills. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 616-113 Photography or departmental approval.

535-131

Color Photography

3 Cr.

A basic course in color photography. Color slide processing, lighting, color filters, exposure, control, darkroom processing and color printing. Emphasis on quality product through technical knowledge of photography. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 616-113 Photography or departmental approval.

535-151

Classroom Television Production

3 Cr.

Techniques and procedures in the following: sound, lighting, videa taping procedures, dubbing and editing tapes. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None.

535-152

Studio Television Procedures

3 Cr.

Techniques and procedures in the following: sound , lighting, video taping procedures , dubbing and editing tapes. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None.

535-172

Movie Photography

3 Cr.

Techniques and procedures in the following: color, black and white cinematography, Bmm, 16mm and story board . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 616-113 Photography or equivalent.

111


EDU CATIONAL MEDIA 535 ELECTRICAL -ELECTRONIC Er---jGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 540

535-201

Sound Media

3 Cr.

Operating record equipment and public address systems. Reproduc· tion of sound materials. Operation of multi·media equipment. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 535·101 Introduction to Ed · ucational Media or equivalent.

535-251

Internship

4 Cr.

Field experience in a media setting. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 21 quarter hours completed in Educational Media.

Electrical-Electronic Engineering Technology 540 540-125

Electric Circuits

3 Cr.

Direct current circuit fundamentals with emphasis on electron theory of current flow , electrical quantities and their units of measurement, sources of EMF, Ohm 's law, electrical energy and power relationships. Series, parallel and series·parallel circuits, voltage dividers. Kirch· hoff's laws, Thevenin's and Norton's theorems. Practical laboratory experience in the construction of working circuit s and the evaluation of their performance. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequi· site: None.

540-126

Electric Circuits

3 Cr.

Fundamentals of alternating current circuits with emphasis on capa· citance, inductance , sinusoidal voltage and current , reactance , vectors and phasors , impedance. Practical laboratory experience with A.C. instruments including oscilloscopes, capacitance testing and the eval · uation of reactive circuits. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Pre· requisite: 540· 125 Electric Circuits.

540-127

Electric Circuits

3 Cr.

Continuation of 540·126 Electric Circuits. Emphasis on power, reson· ance, coupled circuits, transformer action and harmonics. Practical laboratory experience with various combinatiuns of series and parallel reactive circuits , resonant circuits and transformers . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 540·126 Electric Circuits and 690·105 Trigonometry.

112


ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 540

540-140

Direct Current Machines

3 Cr.

Direct current generator-motor principles and construction. Includes single phase A.C. motors. Efficiency, rating and application of dynamos. Voltage, current, excitation, torque, speed and speed regul"ation, armature reaction and power losses. Rotating amplifiers and D.C. machines for automation. Practical laboratory experience with electrical machines. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 540路125 Electric Circuits and 690-101 Algebra.

540-150

Alternating Current Machines

3 Cr.

Theory of alternating current machinery. Construction, characteristics and operation of induction, synchronous motors, synchronous generators, converters and transformers, both single and polyphase. Practical laboratory experience with machinery. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 540-127 Electric Circuits and 540-140 Direct Current Machines or concurrent enrollment.

540-160

Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits

3 Cr.

Fundamentals of vacuum tubes and semiconductors. Circuit applications incll!ding rectifier and basic power supply circuits as well as filter networks. Vacuum triode characteristics. Practical laboratory experience with circuits involving semiconductors, zener, tunnel and vacuum diodes. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 540-127 Electric Circuits or concurrent enrollment.

540-211

Electrical Construction and Application

2 Cr.

Wiring systems for light, heat and power. Transmission and distribution systems; switches, contactors, relays and circuit breakers . Wire, cable and conduit applications. Feeder and branch circuit protection. Safety and grounding practices. Demonstrations will be used to familiarize students with equipment. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 540-150 Alternating Current Machines.

540-235

Communication Transmission

3 Cr.

Fundamentals of A.M. radio transmission and receiving. Emphasis on tuned and coupled circuits, R.F. amplifiers and oscillators, modu 路 lation and demodulation of A.M. waves. A.M. receiver circu itry. Practical laboratory experience with audio components and circuits as well as the construction and alignment of a superheterodyne receiver. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: 540-261 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits or concurrent enrollment.

113


ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC Ef':JGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 540

540-236

Communication Transmission

3 Cr.

Continuation of 540-235 Communication Transmission. Emphasis on frequency modulation, transmission lines, antennas and propagation, telephone transmission, advanced radio transmission and receiving systems. Laboratory experience with radio and telephone equipment. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 540-235 Communication Transmission.

540-241

Electrical Drafting

3 Cr.

Specific applications of drafting techniques to describe electrical circuits and systems, motor control diagrams and electrical construction. Graphic symbols and conventions. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 550-121 Engineering Drawing.

540-250

Industrial Electronics

3 Cr.

Operating principles of industrially oriented equipment. Industrial aplication of semiconductors and tube operated circuits . Rectifiers , thyristors, thyratrons and associated equipment. Includes sensing of time, voltage and light. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 540-260 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits or concurrent enrollment.

540-251

Industrial Electronics

3 Cr.

A continuation of 540-250 Industrial Electronics. Topics covered in clude: magnetic amplifiers , synchro generators and motors, servomechanisms, thyristors and firing controls, automatic motor controls. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 540-250 Industrial Electron ics.

540-252

Logic, Pulse and Switching Circuitry

3 Cr.

Elements of logic, pulse and switching circuitry. Emphasis on number systems and Boolean algebra, clipping and clamping circuits. The transistor as a switch . Bistable, monostable and astable multivibrators, pulse amplifiers and blocking oscillators. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 540 -261 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits or concurrent enrollment.

540-253

Computer Circuitry

3 Cr.

Application of logic, pulse and switching circuits to computers. Codes and introduction to machine language . Emphasis on counters and shift registers , timing and control , computer arithmetic operations and memory systems. Input-output equipment, analog to digital and digital to analog conversion . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 540-252 Logic, Pulse and Switching Circuitry.

114


ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 540

540-260

Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits

3 Cr.

Transistor characteristics and theory of operation . Transistor biasing and the rmal stabilization . Small signal and low frequency amplifier circuits. Field effect transistors . Practical laboratory experience with transistor and triode amplifier circuits. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: 540-160 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits.

540-261

Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits

3 Cr.

A cont inuation of 540-260 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits with emphasis on amplifiers , feedback amplifiers, untuned sine wave and negative resistance oscillators, large signal amplifiers, integrated circuits and regulated powe r supplies . Laboratory experience with cascaded transistor amplifiers , power amplifiers, phase inverters , SCR's and amplifier integrated circuits . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: 540-260 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits .

540-262

Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation

3 Cr.

Principles of electronic measuring and test instruments. Basic meters in D.C. and A.C. measurements. Compa r ison and bridge type mea surements. Electronic meters, oscilloscopes and component testing devices. Practical laboratory experience with instrument circuits, operation, calibration and measurement . Lecture 2 hours. Labora tory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 540-260 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits or concurrent enrollment.

540-263

Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation

3 Cr.

Circuitry, operation and calibration of the more sophisticated electronic instruments . Included are recorders and transducers, signal generators, frequency measuring devices , digital instruments and the analog computer. Basic control systems are examined. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 540-251 Industrial Elec tronics, 540-252 Logic, Pulse and Switching Circuitry and 540-262 Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation .

540-265

Automation and Electronic Controls

3 Cr.

Introduction to the various automatic control systems and their components. Emphasis on servomechanisms and other feedback control systems. Electrical , electronic, mechanical , hydraulic and pneumatic components as they relate to control systems . Basics of control circuitry. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisites: 540-251 Industrial Electronics and 540-263 Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation .

115


ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 540

540-271

Solid State Circuit Analysis

3 Cr.

Introduction to network terminology. Geometry and equilibrium equa路 tions, methodology of solution. Circuit elements and sources, circuit response to step functions and review of semiconductor theory. Switching circuit design. Functions and characteristics of transistors and mode circuits . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisites: 540-261 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits and 690路152 Analytic Geometry and Calculus .

540-275

Introduction to Microcircuits

3 Cr.

Developing science of microminiature electronic circuits and components. Characteristics, fabrication and app lications . Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prere-quisite: 540-261 Semiconductor and Electronic Cir'cuits or equivalent.

116


Engineering 550 550-101

Metallurgy

3 Cr.

Physical and mechanical behavior of pure metals and alloys . Specific metal systems are examined to illustrate various phenomena . Introduction to metallography and physical testing . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: None .

550-102

Metallurgy

3 Cr.

A continuation of 550-101 Metallurgy with special emphasis on phase changes of metals . Heat treatment of steel is introduced. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequ isite: 550-101 Metallurgy.

550-103

Metallurgy

3 Cr.

Non-ferrous metals and alloys , high and low temperature effects upon metals , wear and corrosion. Ext ractive and powder metallurgy. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 550 -101 Metallu rgy.

550-110

Engineering Technology Orientation

2 Cr.

An introduction and orientation to the Engineering Technology programs. Designed to acquaint the student with program requirements and post graduation opportunities for employment and/or continuation of education . Course includes instruction on some basic skills and techniques required for su.ccess in these programs and on the various aspects of related career areas. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None.

550-111

Principles of Air Conditioning and Refrigeration

4 Cr.

States of matter, pressures , temperature and energy conversion. Cooling aspects of air conditioning. Systems and control devices . Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-101 Algebra.

550-112

Engineering Report Construction

3 Cr.

Oral , written and graphic methods of communication for the engineer and technician. Provides practice in preparation of technical reports . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : None.

117


ENGINEERING .550

550-120

Engineering Calculating Devices

2 Cr.

An introduction to calculating devices used in engineering including slide rule and full function electronic calculator. Emphasis upon appli· cation to problems, method of problem solution and development of speed in the manipulation of these instruments. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 690· 105 Trigonometry or equiva· lent high school Algebra and Trigonometry.

550-121

Engineering Drawing

3 Cr.

Principles and practice in orthographic and pictorial drawing and sketching. Lettering, applied geometry and use of instruments . Sec· tional and au xiliary views . Dimensioning systems as applicable to production drawing. Graphic data representation . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None.

550-122

Engineering Drawing

3 Cr.

Elements of machine drawing, electronic diagrams , piping and weld· ing drawing, intersections and developments. Precision dimensioning as dictated by shop processes . Working drawings, methods of reo production and control. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours . Pre· requisite : 550·121 Engineering Drawing .

550-123

Engineering Drawing

3 Cr.

Drafting principles and applications pertinent to working drawings. Includes metric, dual and true position dimensioning; geometric tol· erancing. Tool drawings, design drawing and technical illustration are introduced together with applications of special drafting aids and techniques. Graphical mathematics methods and media are included . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 550·122 Engineer· ing Drawing.

118


ENGINEERING 550

550-151

Applied Mechanics and Strength of Materials

3 Cr.

A basic study of engineering stati cs and an introduction to stress and strain in deformable bodies. Practical demonstrations include utiliza· tion of the universal testing machine in verifying theoret ical concepts. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 690·101 Algebra and 690-105 Trigonometry.

550-211

Introduction to Surveying

3 Cr.

Applications and care of surveying instruments . Techniques and practice in taping. Use of transit and level in horizontal and vertical measurement, differential and profile. Emphasis on accurate record· ing of field data in note form . Lecture 2 hou rs. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 690-105 Trigonometry and 550-121 Engineering Draw· ing or equivalent.

550-212

Surveying

3 Cr.

A continuation of 550·211 Introduction to Surveying with emphasis on contour work, drainage and grading, and layout of vertical curves. Topographic stadia and plane table work will be introduced. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: 550-211 Introduction to Surveying.

550-251

Strength of Materiars

3 Cr.

The study of internal stresses and deformation in materials under various external loads. External loads examined include torque, forces applied to beams, forces applied through bolted, welded and riveted connections, combined forces on members and forces applied to columns. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 550-151 Applied Mechanics and Strength of Materials.

550-252

Applied Dynamics

3 Cr.

A basic study of engineering dynamics including plane motion, curvi linear motion, kinetics , work , power, energy, impulse and momentum, and vibrations. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 550-151 Applied Mechanics and Strength of Materials.

119


English 560 560-091

Essentials of Written Communication

3 Cr.

Intensive practice in written composition and basic language skills. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Placement by department.

560-092

Essentials of Written Communication

3 Cr.

Intensive practice in written composition with emphasis on the organization of ideas into paragraphs and short themes. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560路091 Essentials of Written Communication or placement by department.

560-093

Essentials of Written Communication

3 Cr.

Continued intensive practice in written composition with emphasis on the incorporation of sources into short themes and / or reports. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560路092 Essentials of Written Communication or placement by department.

560-095

Reading Improvement

3 Cr.

Principles underlying efficient reading applied in daily practice with emphasis on study techniques . Group instruction in comprehension, vocabulary and learning skills. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

560-096

Reading Improvement

3 Cr.

Extended practice in the areas of comprehension, vocabulary and rate of purposeful reading at the college level. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Placement by department.

560-101

College Composition

3 Cr.

Study and practice in the principles of good writing. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Placement by department.

560-102

College Composition

3 Cr.

Continuation of 560路101 College Composition, with added emphasis on critical and interpretative writing. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560路101 College Composition.

120


ENGLISH 560

560-103

College Composition

3 Cr.

Continuation of 560-102 College Composition , with added emphasis on critical and interpretative writing_ Lecture 3 hours_ Laboratory 0 hours_ Prerequisite: 560-102 College Composition.

560-107

Advanced Reading Improvement

3 Cr.

Empha~is

on reading comprehension and critical interpretation of college level material. Some applications to professional and business level reading when adaptable . Some effective speed reading tchniques. Group instruction and individualized attention in the art and skills of efficient reading. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Eligibility for 100 level English courses or placement by department.

560-121

English as a Second language

5 Cr.

English for non -native speakers. Intensive written practice in the basic English sentence patterns. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Placement by department.

560-122

English as a Second language

5 Cr.

English for non-native speakers. Intensive written practice in modifying and combining the basic English sentence patterns and in constructing paragraphs from topic sentences. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Placement by department.

560-123

English as a Second language

5 Cr.

English for non-native speakers. Intensive practice in analysis of American writing with emphasis on writing summaries of essays and short stories. Lecture 5 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Placement by department.

560-125

Reading English as a Second language

3 Cr.

English for non-native speakers. Practice in the use of the dictionary to aid spelling, pronunciation and vocabulary development ; the study of phonics to increase reading comprehension and to expand vocabu lary. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in 560-121 English as a Second Language or placement by department.

560-126

Reading English as a Second language

3 Cr.

English for non-native speakers. Principles underlying efficient reading with emphasis on surveying, comprehending, notetaking and outlining. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in 560-122 English as a Second Language or placement by department.

121


ENGLISH 560

560-201

Creative Writing (Formerly The Art of Writing)

3 Cr.

Practice in imaginative writing for the student with a special interest in writing. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560103 College Composition or departmental approval.

560-221

Survey of British Literature

3 Cr.

Study of major works of British literature from the beginning through the age of Milton . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : 560-103 College Composition .

560-222

Survey of British Literature

3 Cr.

Study of major works of British literature from Restoration through the Romantic Period. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-103 College Composition.

560-223

Survey of British Literature

3 Cr.

Study of major works of British literature from the Victorian Period to the present. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-103 College Composition.

560-231

Survey of American Literature

3 Cr.

Reading and analysis of notable American literary works from Bradford through Thoreau. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-103 College Composition.

560-232

Survey of American Literature

3 Cr.

Reading and analysis of notable American literary works from Hawthorne through Clemens. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-103 College Composition.

560-233

Survey of American Literature

3 Cr.

Reading and analysis of notable American literary works from Jar:1es to the present. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-103 College Composition.

560-241

Introduction to Literature: Poetry

3 Cr.

Critical analysis of the forms and art of poetry. The emphasis is on the poetic function of language. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-103 College Composition .

122


ENGLISH 560

560-242

Introduction to Literature: Fiction

3 Cr.

Critical analysis of selected works of fiction designed to develop appreciation and understanding of the short story and the novel as literary forms. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-103 College Composition.

560-243

Introduction to Literature: Drama

3 Cr.

Critical analysis of selected dramatic works designed to develop appreciation and understanding of the drama as a literary form. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-103 College Composition.

560-251

Black American Literature

3 Cr.

Study of major works of Black Americans from the Post-Reconstruction Era through the Harlem Renaissance. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours: Prerequisite: Completion of 560-103 College Composition or concurrent enrollment.

560-252

Black American Literature

3 Cr.

Study of major works of Black Americans from 1930 to 1950. Lecture 3 hours. L'aboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Completion of 560-103 College Composition or concurrent enrollment.

560-253

Black American Literature

3 Cr.

Study of major works of Black Americans from the fifties to the present. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Completion of 560路103 College Composition or concurrent enrollment.

560-271

Shakespeare

4 Cr.

A comprehensive reading course which includes a representative selection of Shakespeare's plays: comedies, tragedies and histories. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-103 College Composition.

123


FIRE TECHNOLOGY 570

Fire Technology 570 570-100

Introduction to Fire Science

3 Cr.

Organizational procedures of the fire services. Includes the structure and function of battalion and company as components of municipal organizations . Discussion topics include personnel management and training, fire equipment and apparatus. Communications, records and reports , insurance rating systems and the law as it pertains to the fire services . Lecture 3 hou rs. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

570-110

Fire-Fighting Tactics

3 Cr.

Techniques and procedures of fire fighting. Emphasis upon the individual fireman at the fire scene. Methods of extinguishing fires, lifesaving procedures, salvage, prevention of rekindling. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 570-100 Introduction to Fire Science .

570-120

Fire Protection Systems

3 Cr.

Design and operation of fire protection systems . Includes water distribution, detection , alarm and watchman services, and protection systems for special hazards. Detailed examination of carbon dioxide, dry chemical, foam and water spray systems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: None.

570-210

Fire-Fighting Command

3 Cr.

Group operations and command strategy. Pre-planning of firefighting operations, size-up at the fire, employment of personnel and equipment. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 570-110 Fire-Fighting Tactics.

570-211

Fire-Fighting Command and Administration

3 Cr.

Analysis of specific tactical problems from a command point of view. Pre-planning of fire-fighting operations and the evaluation of these plans. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 570-110 Fire-Fighting Tactics.

570-220

Chemistry of Hazardous Materials

3 Cr.

Analysis of chemical reaction as the causative agent of fire. Includes redox reactions, reaction rates, toxic compounds and hazardous combinations of chemicals. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

124


FIRE TECHNOLOGY 570

570-230

Fire Prevention Practices

3 Cr.

Study of buildings and other structures. Emphasis on fire prevention procedures and practices. Fire ratings of materials. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 570-120 Fire Protection Systems.

570-231

Fire Prevention Practices

3 Cr.

Inspection practices as they pertain to fire prevention. Storage of explosive flammables, codes and fire ordinances, and examination of heating systems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 570-230 Fire Prevention Practices.

570-235

Fire Investigation Methods

3 Cr.

Principles of fire investigation, arson laws, interrogation of witnesses and applications of photography. Preparation of reports and adjustments of losses. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

570-236

Fire Investigation Methods

3 Cr.

Continuation of 570-235 Fire Investigation Methods with emphasis on preparation of reports and collection and presentation of arson evidence in court. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 570-235 Fire Investigation Methods.

570路240

Fire Hydraulics

3 Cr.

Hydraulic theory. Drafting of water, velocity and discharge, friction loss , engine and nozzle pressure, fire streams , pressure losses, flow and pump testing, and applications in fire service. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

570路250

Fire Service Public Relations

3 Cr.

Aspects of public relations as pertinent to municipal fire services. Building goodwill, handling complaints and follow-up. Personal contacts, publicity and promotional efforts . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None.

570-260

Personnel Training Methods

3 Cr.

Introduction to methods of instruction and applications of audio路visual equipment. Testing and evaluation and preparation of materials. Spe路 cial emphasis on planning and organizational training program. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

125


FRENCH 590

French 590 590-101

Beginning French

4 Cr.

Introduction to French with emphasis on speaking, reading and writing through multiple approach . Laboratory drill . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in 560101 College Composition.

590-102

Beginning French

4 Cr.

Further practice of fundamentals through speaking, reading and writing on assigned topics of French culture. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 590·101 Beginning French or one year of high school French .

590-103

Beginning French

4 Cr.

Continuation of 590-102 Beginning French . Practice in constructing sentences arid expressing thoughts in French through spontaneous discussions chosen from selected readings and cultural topics. Laboratory drill . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 590102 Beginning French or two years of high school French.

590-201

Intermediate French

4 Cr.

Introduction to more advanced vocabulary and speech patterns in order to facilitate the transition from simple to complex reading material, acquainting the student with French literature and civilization . Systematic review of grammar. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 590·103 Beginning French or two years of high school French.

590-202

Intermediate French

4 Cr.

Strengthening facility of oral and written expression in the language. Building of more advanced vocabulary and sentence structure by means of selections from French literature. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 590-201 Intermediate French or two years of high school French .

590-203

Intermediate French

4 Cr.

Oral and written expression in the foreign language are further de· veloped. Literary selections are to be discussed to gain deeper under· standing and appreciation of French thought and culture. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : 590·202 Intermediate French or three years of high school French .

126


FRENCH 590 / GENERAL STUDIES 595/GEOGRAPHY 600

590-251

French Conversation and Composition

4 Cr.

Discussion of topics of everyday life, colloquialisms, vocabulary distinctions and improvement of speech patterns. Practice in writing compositions. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 590203 Intermediate French or concurrent enrollment with consent of department or three years of high school French.

590-252

French Civilization and Literature

4 Cr.

Introduction to the civilization and literature of France. Emphasis on the interrelationship between history and geography of France and its culture. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 590-203 Intermediate French or concurrent enrollment with consent of department or three years of high school French .

590-253

Readings in French Literature

4 Cr.

An introduction to French literature of the 19th and 20th centuries . Highlights of representative authors and their works. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 590-203 Intermediate French or concurrent enrollment or departmental approval or three years of high school French.

General Studies 595 595路101

Personal Development as an Approach to Careers (Formerly Career Development as a Life Process)

3 Cr.

An experience based approach to help students examine their personal resources, values and goals as they relate to personal and career development. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

Geography 600 600-101

Elements of Physical Geography

4 Cr.

Introductory study of geography's physical elements. Includes earth-sun relationships, maps, elements and controls of climate. Landforms, erosion and deposition, water resources, vegetation associations and soil types , world distributions , causal relationships and significance to men are stressed . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None.

127


GEOGRAPHY 600jGERMAN 610

600-102

World Regional Geography

4 Cr.

Geographical study of selected world regions. Landforms, clim;;tte, peoples, problems of cultural and political differences. Lecture '+ hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

600-103

Economic Geography

4 Cr.

The study of areal variation on the earth's surface in man's activities related to producing, exchanging and consuming wealth. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

Geography of the United States and C~nada 4 Cr. Regional survey of the United States and Canada noting significant characteristics of each region. Includes physical characteristics, resource potentials and important political, economic and social activities. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

600-151

German 610 610-101

Beginning German

4 Cr.

Introduction to German with emphasis on speaking, reading, writing and grammar through multiple approach. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in 560101 College Composition.

610-102

Beginning German

4 Cr.

Further practice of fundamentals through practice in speaking, reading and writing on assigned topics of German culture. Continuation of intensive study of grammar and vocabulary. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 610-101 Beginning German or one year of high school German.

610-103

Beginning German

More advanced conversation readings and cultural topics. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 German or two years of high

610路201

4 Cr. and composition based on selected Review of grammar. Laboratory drill. hour. Prerequisite: 610-102 Beginning school German.

Intermediate German

4 Cr.

A study of the major developments of German literature and culture. Selected grammar review. Emphasis on oral facility. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 610-103 Beginning German or two years of high school German .

128


GERMAN 610 GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY 616

610-202

Intermediate German

4 Cr.

Emphasis on oral and written expression . Building of more advanced vocabulary and sentence struct ure through more difficult prose . Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 610 -201 Intermediate German or two years of hi gh school German .

610-203

Intermediate German

4 Cr.

Continued study in literature and civilization . Increasing emph asis on conversation and free composition. Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : 610-202 Intermediate German or three years of high school German.

610-251

German Conversation and Composition

4 Cr.

Discussion of topics of everyday life, colloquialisms, vocabulary, augmentation and improvement of speech patterns. Practice in writing compositions. Lecture 3 hours. Laooratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 610203 Intermediate German or concurrent enrollment or departmental approval or three years of high school German.

610-252

German Civilization and literature

4 Cr.

Introduction to German civilization and literature: interrelationships among German history, geography , literature and culture. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 610-203 Intermediate German or concurrent enrollment or departmental approval or three years of high school German.

610-253

Readings in German literature

4 Cr.

An introduction to German literature from the 18th century to the present. Highlights of representative authors and their works. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 610-203 Intermediate Ger路 man or concurrent enrollment or departmental approval or three years of high school German.

Graphic Communications Management and Technology 616 616-101

Graphic Arts Orientation

2 Cr.

An overview of the graphic arts industry : career field, employment trends and typical future technical assignments. Lecture 2 hours. Lab路 oratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

129


GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY 616

616-105

Science of Graphic Arts

4 Cr.

Aspects of physics and chemistry which apply to the printing process. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

616-109

Graphic Arts Materials

2 Cr.

A survey of the various classes, sizes and weights of printing paper and related ink technology. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Pre路 requisite: None.

616-113

Photography

3 Cr.

Use of photographic equipment and film processing: types of cameras and film, lighting, composition and basic darkroom techniques. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

616-114

Photography

3 Cr.

A continuation of 616-113 Photography. This course will expand both the student's photographic darkroom experience and technical knowledge of black-and-white photography. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 616-113 Photography or departmental approval by submission of portfolio of photographs.

616-115

Color Photography

3 Cr.

A continuation of 616-114 Photography. Use of photographic equipment, film processing and printing for color work. Concentrating on lighting, composition and darkroom procedures. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 616-114 Photography or depart路 mental approval by submission of portfolio of photographs.

616-117

Copy Preparation

3 Cr.

Planning, visualizing and preparing black and white, and color copy. Techniques in preparing copy for color separation, including all steps necessary in the preparation of copy for camera. Lecture 1 hour. !..aboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 430-108 Fundamentals of Design or 430-121 Calligraphy or departmental approval.

616-171

Negative Stripping and Camera

4 Cr.

The fundamentals of single and multi-color layout and stripping as used in offset lithography, including camera operation, developing, enlarging, printing, copying, scaling, and the reproduction of line and halftone copy. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: 616113 Photography or departmental approval.

130


GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY 616 HEALTH 620/HEALTH TECHNOLOGIES 624

616-201

Platemaking and Presswork

4 Cr.

Methods and procedures used in preparation of plates for the press. The principles of offset presswork; setting up and operating the presses; trouble shooting; simple maintenance and safety precautions . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 9 hours . Prerequisites: 616路109 Graphic Arts Materials and 616路113 Photography or departmental approval.

616-211

Finishing and Bindery

2 Cr.

The use of various equipment: paper cutter, folder, stapler-stitcher, collator and paper drill for pamphlet. book, adhesive and plastic binding. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

616-220

Graphic Arts Production

3 Cr.

A laboratory course providing an opportunity to work on .practical problems in the production of printed matter. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing in Graphic Communications Management and Technology or departmental approval.

616-225

Graphic Arts Estimating

2 Cr.

Estimating printing job costs from original layout to finished product. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 616-171 Negative Stripping and Camera , 616-201 Platemaking and Presswork, and 616211 Finishing and Bindery or departmental approval.

Health 620 620-101

Health Education

4 Cr.

Introduction to the meaning and scope of health as related to the individual, family and community. Focus on an introspective view of physical, emotional and social factors. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

Health Technologies 624 624-100

Introduction to Health Technologies

3 Cr.

Introduction and orientation to the allied health professions, their history, responsibilities, licensure, ethics and liabilities . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

131


HEALTH TECHNOLOGY 624

624-101

Anatomy and Physiology for Radiologic Technologists

4 Cr.

A basic understanding of body systems, structures, organs and their funct ion as a basis for x-ray examination . Includes topographic anatomy. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

624-113

Emergency Medical TechnicianAmbulance I

4 Cr.

Lecture and practice sessions in emergency victim care required by the Ohio State Department of Education for ambulance and rescue personnel. Personnel will be trained in the treatment and transportation of the sick and injured State EMT-A certification equivalency exam provided upon completion of the course. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Standard and Advanced First Aid recommended.

624-114

Emergency Medical TechnicianAmbulance II

2 Cr.

In -hospital based practical session for ambul ance and rescue person nel. Trainees will rotate through community hospitals and be supervised by phy sicians and nurses in the treatment skills necessary to provide emergency medical treatment and the normal procedures in the function of a hospital emergency room. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite : Emergency Medical Technician-Ambulance I.

624-131

Physics for X-Ray Technicians

4 Cr.

Fundamentals of electrical and radiation physics and the basic principles underlying the operation of X-ray equipment and auxiliary devices. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-095 Algebra or equivalent.

624-141

X-Ray Darkroom

1 Cr.

Orientation to darkroom techniques as used in X-ray work activity. Lecture 1 bour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

624-151

Radiographic Techniques

3 Cr.

Function and operation of X-ray equipment, positioning of patients and related techniques . Radiographic procedures. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

132


HEALTH TECHNOLOGY 624

624·201

Anatomy and Physiology for Radiologic Technologists

3 Cr.

Understanding of body systems, organs and their functions in relation to specialized procedures in radiography. Includes the media contrast used in these procedures. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 624-101 Anatomy and Physiology for Radiologic Technologists.

624·211

Medical Use of Radioisotopes

1 Cr.

Fundamentals of radioisotope technique and the role of the technologist in their use. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

624·212

Radiation Protection

1 Cr.

Protection to patients and personnel. Includes the terminology employed and thei r sign ificance, interaction of radiation and matter, examinations requiring special protective measures and the reasons for protective measures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

624·213

Radiation Therapy

1 Cr.

The effects of radiation on body tissue, radioactive materials, therapy planning and record keeping for students from diagnostic radiologic technology who may work in radiation therapy. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

624·221

Pathology for Radiologic Technologists

2 Cr.

Pathological diseases of the human body. Includes changes that occur in disease and injury, and their application to radiologic technology. This is not intended as a detailed course in pathology. Various pathological conditions which should be known by the technologist in performing x-ray examinations. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 710-102 Medical Terminology.

624·223

First Aid

2 Cr.

General first-aid instruction , treatment, required equipment and materials. Students participate in courses offered by the American Red Cross. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

624·231

Physics for Radiologic Technologists

3 Cr.

Advanced concepts in physics for x-ray ~o understand the operation of certain radiographic equipment and x-ray film reproduction . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 624-131 Physics for Radiologic Technologists or departmental approval.

133


HEALTH TECHNOLOGY 624 / HEBREW 625

624-2 41

Radiographic Exposure for Radiologic Technologists

3 Cr.

various Applica ble knowledge of manipu lating exposure factors for ct constru to needed les radiological exams. Includes basic princip Lecture ranges. age kilovolt all and ns techniq ue charts for all situatio raphic 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 624·15 1 Radiog al. approv mental depart or ques Techni

624-2 51

Ethics for Allied Health Technologies

1 Cr.

Confiden· Definit ion s and concepts of ethics in health techno logies. nce and Neglige s. moral and ethics n betwee tiality . Differe ntiation 1 Lecture breach of duty. Employ ment and interview procedures. to ction Introdu 0 624·10 : hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequi sites Hea lth Technologies and Sophomore sta nding.

He br ew 62 5 students Cuyahoga Comm unity College will accept credit earned by H 11· Hebrew tary Elemen for at the Cleveland College of Jewish Studies ing Beginn our to lent equiva as 13-14 H 12 and Interme diate Hebrew , 202 1 625-20 Hebrew diate Interme and 103 and 102 , 1 Hebrew 625·10 and 203.

625-101

Beginning Hebrew

4 Cr.

625-102

Beginning Hebrew

4 Cr.

625-103

Beginning Hebrew

4 Cr.

and Introdu ction to Hebrew with emphasis on speaking, reading hours. 4 Lecture drill. tory Labora writing throug h multipl e approach. 1 ColLaboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Eligibil ity to enroll in 560·10 sition. lege Compo and Furthe r practic e of fundam entals throug h speaking, reading Lecdrill. tory Labora . culture Hebrew of topics d writing on assigne ing ture 4 hours . Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite : 625-10 1 Beginn . Hebrew or one year of high school Hebrew ctContin uation of 625 -102 Beginn ing Hebrew . Practice in constru sponh throug Hebrew in ing sentences and expressing though ts cultura l taneous discussions chosen from selected reading and Pre· hour. 1 tory Labora . hours 4 Lecture drill. topics. Laboratory school high of years two or Hebrew ing Beginn 2 625·10 : requisi te Hebrew.

134


HEBREW 625/HISTORY 630

625-201

Intermediate Hebrew

4 Cr.

Introduction to more advanced vocabulary and speech patterns , acquainting the student with Hebrew literature, modern and medieval. Systematic review of grammar. Laboratory drill. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 625-103 Beginning Hebrew or two years of high school Hebrew.

625-202

Intermediate Hebrew

4 Cr.

Strengthening facility of oral and written expression in the language . Building of more advanced vocabulary and sentence structure by means of selections from Hebrew literature . Laboratory drill. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 625-201 Intermediate Hebrew or two years of high school Hebrew.

625-203

Intermediate Hebrew

4 Cr.

Oral and written expression in the language are further developed . Literary selections are to be discussed to gain deeper understanding and appreciation of Hebrew thought and culture. Laboratory drill . Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 1 hou r. Prerequisite: 625-202 Intermediate Hebrew or three years of high school Hebrew.

History 630 630-101

Man and Civilization

3 Cr.

Major trends in the development of Western and Asiatic civilizations from ancient Eurasian times to the fall of Byzantium (1453). Basic approach - use of documents as well as textual materials. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None .

630-102

Man and Civilization

3 Cr.

Major problems - cultural, political , economic and religious - in the development of Western and non-Western civilizations from the fall of Byzantium to the Congress of Vienna (1453-1815) . Basic approach - use of documents as well as textual materials. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: .630-101 Man and Civilization .

630-103

Man and Civilization

â&#x20AC;˘

3 Cr.

Major problems - cultural, political , economic and religious - in the development of Western and non-Western civilizations since the Congress of Vienna (1815) to the present. Basic approach - use of documents as well as textual mate r ials . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 630-102 Man and Civilization.

135


HISTORY 630

630-151

United States History to 1841

American ment for Jackson's requisite:

630-152

3 Cr.

development from discovery, colonial foundations, moveindependence and early years of the Republic through administration. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. PreNo路ne .

United States History from 1841 to 1896

3 Cr.

Jacksonian Democ ra cy through the Populist Movement with emphasis on domestic , economic and political developments . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 630-151 United States History to 1841.

630-153

United States History from 1896 to the Present

3 Cr.

Populist Movement to the present emphasizing the reform movements, two world wars and the rise of America as a world power. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 630-152 United States History from 184'1 to 1896.

630-161

American Studies

3 Cr.

Introduction to American studies. Discussion of approaches to subject matter, utilizing multidisciplinary techniques in which perceptions associated with minorities and minority viewpoints will be explored . A student journal and genealogical record will be maintained. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

630-162

American Studies

3 Cr.

A colloquium on selected contemporary issues and institutions em ploying a multidisciplinary approach. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

630-164

American Urban History

4 Cr.

Growth of the American city from the early period to the megalopolitan era. Emphasis on the development of the urban economy, the historical functioning of the po li tica l system and physical development. Includes the black man and the city and our ethnic heritage , Lect ure 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites : 600路103 Economic Geography or instructor's permission.

630-170

History of Africa

4 Cr.

General survey of African history. Special emphasis on political , economic and social problems of the 19th and 20th centuries. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

136


HISTORY 630 / HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT 635

630-171

The Negro in American Culture to 1908

4 Cr.

The role of the Negro in American history from origins in Africa; as slaves in the new world , in the making of America, his struggle to improve his status, and contributions to American culture. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: None.

630-172

The Negro in American Culture from 1908

4 Cr.

Studies beginning with the birth of the NAACP and the National Urban League. The growing of rac ial intolerance in America, the Negro renaissance and the important social and cultural strivings of black Americans in the mid-20th century. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 630-171 The Negro in American Cultureto 1908.

630-201

History of Russia

4 Cr.

Growth, development and_ decline of the Kievan State . Evolution of the Muscovite tsardom and the expansion of the Russian Empire to 1917. Considers geopolitical, social, cultural and intellectual developments . Emphasis on the theory of tsardom , which led to the emergence of a distinct civilization in Russia. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 630-103 Man and Civilization.

630-251

Economic History of the United States

3 Cr.

Economic factors in American history and the ir impact on social , economic and political life. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites : 600-103 Economic Geography or instructor's permission.

Hospitality Management 635 635-101

Introduction to Hospitality Management

3 Cr.

Course of orientation in the history, growth and development of the food and lodging industry. Provides basic information in organization, personnel management, sales promotion, purchasing, production control and accounting, including the study of techniques and procedures of modern management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : None.

635-102

Sanitation and Safety in Food and lodging Establishments

3 Cr.

Sanitation practices, laws, methods and techniques in food handling and in lodging estaqlishments. Elementary bacteriology, food protection , utensil sanitization, practical problems in public health protection, and safety and accident prevention. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None. 137


HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT' 635

635-111

Food Technology

6 Cr.

Basic food preparation for students who intend to become assistant managers or supervisors in food service operations. Provides a background in foods necessary for all aspects of Hospitality Management. Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 12 hours . Prerequisite: None.

635-112

Quantity Food Technology

4 Cr.

Theory and practices of volume food service institutions, with emphasis on operational differences, varied menu construction , raw material estimates, volume preparation techniques and the use of institutional equipment. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 8 hours. Prerequisite : 635-111 Food Technology.

635-113

Advanced Food Technology

3 Cr.

Major emphasis will be on estimates of raw materials needed, preparation of foods in volume and the use of institutional food service equipment. A study of work organization of food preparation processes. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours . Prerequisite: 635-112 Quantity Food Technology.

635-114

Pantry Procedures

3 Cr.

A study of salads, canapes, appetizers, sandwiches and other cold items. Section is characterized by the production of many small units requiring considerable hand labor emphasizing artistry of preparation . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 8 hours. Prerequisite: None.

635-115

Culinary Theory and Production

6 Cr.

More advanced techniques and procedures for professional food preparation explained, demonstrated and produced. Students are assigned to all working stations to gain the widest possible exposure to the professional kitchen . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: 635-111 Food Technology.

635-116

Baking Principles and Production

6 Cr.

Acquainting students with fundamentals, principles and applications of baking. Skills are developed for quality hand-crafted bakery products. Elementary cake-decorating techniques are performed. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: 634-111 Food Technology_

635-117

Convenience Foods

3 Cr.

The use of convenience foods exemplifying their potential for better eating, greater efficiency while promoting creativity in planning, preparation and service. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 8 hours. Prerequisites: 635-112 Quantity Food Technology or 635 -115 Culinary Theory and Production .

138


HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT 635

635-118

Advanced Culinary

3 Cr.

A more intensified and sophisticated study of elaborate American and Continental dishes . Each student functions as a sous-chef, saucier, rotisseur, tournat, etc. , while studying advanced Culinary Management . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 8 hours. Prerequisites: 635-114 Pantry Procedures, 635-115 Culinary Theory and Production, and 635-116 Baking Principles and Production.

635-123

Foods and Nutrition

4 Cr.

A study of the nutritional needs of normal, healthy persons as they progress through the normal stages of life. The study of the effects of food, its composition and the deficiency results confronting the world today. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

635-124

Hotel-Motel Sales Promotion

3 Cr.

Sales promotion techniques and ideas. Special emphasis on the organization and functioning of a sales department and the need for sales planning. Sales tools and selling techniques used to secure room, food and beverage, and group business. Advertising, community relations, internal selling, personal selling and telephone selling. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

635-125

Quantity Food Purchasing

3 Cr.

Technical knowledge concerning governmental grades, purchasing, terms, purchasing processes and waste-yield factors in food preparation related to quantity food buying. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 635-112 Quantity Food Technology.

635-126

Housekeeping Procedures

3 Cr.

Introduction to the fundamental procedures in institutional housekeep: ing providing technical knowledge and exposure to work procedures and opportunity to observe others performing in the trade. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None.

635-127

Supervisory Housekeeping

3 Cr.

Fundamentals of housekeeping management stressing employee training, record keeping and executive responsibilities of the housekeeping department. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 635126 Housekeeping Procedures.

635-128

Fundamentals of Interior Design

3 Cr.

Selection, purchase, use and care of interior furnishings and materials in the hospitality industry. Covers the basic principles of design. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 635-127 Supervisory Housekeeping.

139


HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT 635

635-131

Communication in the Hospitality Industry

3 Cr.

The principles of oral and written communications in the hospitality industry. Basic knowledge of human behavior with specific application in the hospitality industry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

635-201

Summer Field Experience

4 Cr.

FUll-time employment in an approved business or distributive training center under College supervision. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 40 hours: Prerequisite: Departmental approvaL

635-202

Management Operations

6 Cr.

A laboratory providing an opportunity to learn management techniques required in many key operating positions in the hospitality industry. Laboratory 5 hours/5 days per week. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 25 hours. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

635-203

Internship

3 Cr.

Students will be required to complete an internship of 200 hours of supervised work observation in the hospitality industry. The department will assist in arranging, scheduling and coordinating work experiences with local employers. Five weeks/8 hours per day. Lecture o hours. Laboratory 40 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

635-204

Catering and Table Service

3 Cr.

All aspects of table service and catering including, type of service, plannmg, purchasing, preparation and storing. Provides guidelines of practical ideas for successful operation of all types of catering activities and services. L.:ecture 1 hour. Laboratory 8 hours. Prerequisite: 635-118 Advanced Culinary.

635-205

Buffet Catering and Decorating

3 .Cr.

Preparation of more advanced products for the haute cuisine restaurant using decorative centerp ieces and culinary show pieces. Developments of French, Russian and American tableside, banquet service and dining room supervision. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 8 hours. Prerequisite: 635-204 Catering and Table Service.

635-207

International Cuisine

3 Cr.

Includes the most popular American and the best-known national dishes from Great Britain, Netherlands, Belgium , Austria , Germany, Scandanavia, Switzerland, Italy, the Middle East, Spain, South America, the Orient, plus some well-loved Jewish recipes. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 8 hours. Prerequisite: 635-204 Catering and Table Service. 140


HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT 635

635-208

Classical Cuisine

3 Cr.

Introduces the student to the traditional style of food preparation, its history and techniques. A study of dishes originated by great masters such as Escoffier and Careme, and enjoyed with great popularity by gourmets through many decades . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 8 hours. Prerequisite: 635·204 Catering and Table Service.

635-212

Food and Beverage Management Seminar

3 Cr.

Principles of volume food service and the study of food management problems, including job analysis; selection, control, supervision and training of personnel; work plans and schedules; labor and cost con· trol; purchasing; equipment and care; menu planning; sanitation and safety. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 635·112 Quantity Food Technology or departmental approval.

635-213

Layout and Equipment

3 Cr.

Layout and design of food service facilities. The study, planning and evaluation of actual layouts. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Pre· requisite: 635·112 Quantity Food Technology.

635-214

Food and Beverage Control

3 Cr.

The essential principles and procedures of effective food and beverage control. Adaptations to various types of operations are practiced. All steps in the control process are covered with special emphasis on calculating food costs , establishing standards and production planning. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 635·112 Quantity Food Technology.

635-215

Supervisory Techniques

3 Cr.

This course offers methods and techniques to help the student de· velop supervisory skills while in the management area. Techniques are offered to help develop supervision of employees and to develop efficient work methods. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prere· quisite: 635·131 Communication in the Hospitality Industry.

635-225

Hotel-Motel law

3 Cr.

A simple non·legal account of the important principles of today's law in hospitality management. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Pre· requisite: 460·213 Business Law or departmental approval.

635-226

Hotel-Motel Maintenance and Engineering

3 Cr.

A study of preventive maintenance procedures and the organization of the engineering department. Improvement in ability to diagnose many common mechanical problems and to take steps to correct them. Study of electrical systems , acoustics, plumbing, heating, ventilation, refrigeration and air conditioning, elevators. Lecture 2 hours. Labora· tory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

141


HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT .6 35/HUMANITIES 648

635-227

Hotel-Motel Front Office Procedure

3 Cr.

Techniques in the vital public relations responsibilities and necessary basics of human relations for the front office staff. Outlines coordi· nating ties between front office and management. Outline procedures, accounting principles , employee relations . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

635-228

Hotel-Motel Accounting

3 Cr.

Special application of accounting principles to hotel and motel man· agement. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequ isite: 410· 122 Principles of Accounting.

635-229

Diet Therapy

4 Cr.

Appli cation of ba sic nutrition to the more specific needs of individuals suffering from certain pathological condition s. Lecture 4 hours. Lab· oratory 0 hours . Prerequ isite: Departmental approval.

Humanities 648 648-101

Introduction to Humanities: Man as an Individual

3 Cr.

Introduction to works of art and philosophy which define both the . limitations and enduring nobility of mankind . Lectures , films, per· formances , exhibits and field trips . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: None .

648-102

Introduction to Humanities: Man and Society

3 Cr.

Introduction to works of art and philosophy which reflect the struggle of man to maintain his indiv iduality while a member of society. · Lec· tures, films, performances, exhibits and field trips. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: None .

648-103

Introduction to Humanities: Man and the Cosmos

3 Cr.

Introduction to works of art and philosophy which reflect man's attempt to resolve his relationship to the cosmos. Lectures, films, performances, exhibits and field trips . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None .

142


INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 650

Industrial Technology 650 650-122

Management, Automation and Computers

3 Cr.

The interrelation and manpower of machines and materials. Layouts, work flow and productivity. Systems, procedures and computers. Mate· rial handling and specifications . Management of work force, production and inventory. Automation , labor peace and profits. Overtime and fringe benefits. Retirement. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Pre· requisite : None.

850-125

Elements of Time Study

3 Cr.

Time study requirements, equipment and elements. Standard time data . Methods·time·measurements; application procedure and identi· fied motions, principle of limiting mot ion s. Wage incentive plans. Basic motion times. Work sampling . Method and uses of time standards. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None .

650-126

Principles of Work Simplification in Industry

3 Cr.

Approach , purpose and procedure of operation analysis. Manufacturing process and working conditions . Material handling and plant layout. Motion economy. Man and machine process charts. Job analysis and job evaluation . Flow process charts. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite : None.

650-128

Motion and Job Analysis

3 Cr.

Methods, time and measurements. Application procedures and identi· fied motions. Principles of limiting motions. Wage incentive plans. Basic motion times. Work sampling. Job analysis and job evaluation. Development of base rates. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Pre· requisite: 650-125 Elements of Time Study .

650-134

Employee and Plant Safety

3 Cr. ·

Safety and protection of employees and company property. Security personnel and thei r trai ni ng. Mai ntenance of property for safety, fi re equipment and its use. Employee protection against unsafe practices. Discussion of Workmen 's Compensation and Occupational Safety and Health Act. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

650-164

Inventory Management

3 Cr.

Comprehensive coverage of principles and techniques utilized in man· aging inventory including: inventory classification , methods of replenishment,safety stock determination, order quantities, lot sizing , stockroom organization , and physical counting. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory o hours . Prerequisite: None.

143


INDUST RIAL TECHNOLOGY 650

Production and Inventory Forecasting

3 Cr.

650-1 66

Materials Requirements Planning

3 Cr.

650-1 67

Shop Floor Control

3 Cr.

650-1 68

Shop Capacity Planning

3 Cr.

650-2 22

Manufacturing Management

3 Cr.

650-2 61

Introduction to Statistical Quality Control

3 Cr.

650-1 65

. Various Importa nce of forecas ting in successful business operation ed . discuss are y industr in used ting descrip tive techniq ues of forecas operatother to t forecas the relating and ting Respon sibility for forecas uisite: ing departm ents . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prereq None.

sh a Forecasting materia ls require ments with bills of materia l to路 establi prodled assemb for t shmen time phased program of invento ry repleni compu ter ucts. Roles of a forecast , bills of materia l , lead time accuracy, tory 0 Labora . hours 3 Lecture g. plannin y capacit shop software , and hours. Prereq uisite: None .

to plan, Princip les , approaches and techniq ues used by managers tion produc shop of schedule, control , and evaluate the effectiveness hdispatc ling schedu , process in operati ons includi ng control of work . system ork paperw shop and , es prioriti ining ing, expedi ting , determ None. uisite: Prereq hours. 0 tory Labora hours. 3 Lecture

a master Conver ting the sales forecas t into a produc tion plan and capacity. le availab of ling schedu over control utput Input-o le. schedu g lead reducin y, capacit ing Coverage of various techniq ues for increas tory 0 Labora . hours 3 Lecture s. analysi y time , and load versus capacit . None hours . Prereq uisite:

pl anning , Produc tion systems and their develo pment with emphasis on systems. tion produc various of control schedu ling management and None. uisite: Prereq hours. 0 tory Labora Lecture 3 hours.

for the Applica tion of statist ical techniq ues in the analysis of data s system ng sampli , control of produc t quality and costs. Control charts ity il probab of Theory . lity variabi t and procedures. Correc t ion of produc cations, fundam entals. Solution of statist ical problem s related t o specifi ng . sampli nce accepta of ch approa cal Statisti ion. inspect or produc tion hours. 3 Lecture Statisti cal quality control as a decisio n-maki ng tool. lent. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-09 5 Algebra or equiva

144


INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 650 / JOURNALISM 660

650-291

Materials Handling and Plant Layout

3 Cr.

The purpose, scope , transportation of materials, selection of equipment, objectives and cost of material handling are integrated with plant layout, materials and product flows , and the effective arrangement of manufacturing and service facilities . Emphasis is also placed on the coordination which is necessary between materials handling, plant layout, production planning and control , methods engineering, process enginee ring and production techniques. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite : Preferably industrial experience.

650-292

Materials Handling and Plant Layout

3 Cr.

Continuation of 650-291 Materials Handling and Plant Layout with emphasis on material handling equipment, materials flow, space allocation and related top ics . Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Industrial experience.

Journalism 660 660-101

Introduction to Mass Communications

3 Cr.

Nature and function of mass media, such as the press, television, radio and film. Their impact and influence on man in the democratic society. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None .

660-131

News Writing and Reporting

3 Cr.

Nature and function of the mass media. Career opportunities. Journalistic principles. News gathering and writing articles. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 560-101 College Composition or concurrent enrollment.

660-132

News Writing and Reporting

3 Cr.

Continuation of 660-131 News Writing and Reporting. News gathering and writing articles. Principal problems confronting journalists and their newspapers. Special attention to large, contemporary papers. Introduction to interpretative reporting. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 660-131 News Writing and Reporting.

660-133

News Writing and Reporting

3 Cr.

Continuation of 660-132 News Writing and Reporting. Further development in interpretative reporting, using the community as a laboratory. Greater emphasis on journalistic specialties and writing for the broadcast media. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 660-132 News Writing and Reporting.

145


JOURNALISM 660

660-141

Staff Practice

1 Cr.

Class laboratory experience in assembling, making-up and publ ishing the College newspaper. Detailed weekly analysis of the effectiveness of the news stories written and published as well as of the overall presentation of the College newspaper. Students are assigned to the staff of the Coll ege newspaper. May be repeated for cred it. However, not more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

660-151

Broadcast Journalism

4 Cr.

News reading , news preparation , news reporting on audio tape , video tape , film and live camera for television and radio . Covers Federal Communications Commission rules and regulations on news. Fundamentals of what makes a story and how to get it. The art of interviewing. Fie ld work, study of radio and television history. Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequ isite: None.

660-161

Survey of the Black Press

3 Cr.

The nature and function of the Black Pres s includin g broadca st with emphasis on the history and function of the Black Press and the impact of the Black Press on minorities in general. Career opportuni 路 ties for minorities and the problems of t he black journalist on the general press are given special attention . Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory o hours . Prerequisite: None.

660-201

News Editing

4 Cr.

Copy desk methods . Copy and proof reading, headline writing, newspaper make-up and style. Introduction to newspaper law, including libel , rig ht of privacy an d press privileges . Editorial writing , prob路 lems and policy. Examination of major contemporary American newspapers . Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : 660-120 News Writing and Reporting.

660-202

News Editing

4 Cr.

Cont inuation of 660-201 News Editing. Copy desk methods . Copy and proofreading, head line writing, newspaper makeup and style. Introduction to newspaper law, including libel , right of privacy and press privileges. Editorial writing, problems and policy. Examination of major contemporary American newspapers. Lecture 4 hours. Labora tory 0 hours. Prerequisite : 660-201 News Edit ing.

146


Law Enforcement 670 670-101

Introduction to Law Enforcement

4 Cr.

A philosophical and historical background of law enforcement includ· ing the development and objectives of police services from ancient and feudal backgrounds up to the present time in the United States. Explanation of federal, state , local and private law enforcement agen · cies. Role of the enforcing officer in government and the processes of justice. Qualities and qualifications of the individual entering law enforcement work. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prere quisite: None.

670-111

Patrol Procedures

4 Cr.

Advantages and disadvantages of methods of patrol and the objec· tives, activities of the patrol officer, preparation for and observation on patrol, note·taking and na r rative type of report How to handle incidents of high frequency and emphasis on public and race rela · tions in patrol operations . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Pre· requisite : 670·101 Introduction to Law Enforcement or in·service personnel.

Criminal Law

3 Cr.

Substantive criminal depth with emphasis arrest procedure and ment level. Lecture 3

laws most often violated will be discussed in on Ohio statutes and decisions . Jurisdiction, the importance of criminal law at the enforce· hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

670-121

670-122 Criminal Law

3 Cr.

Continuation of 670·121 Criminal Law . Criminal liability, related laws of procedure, search and seizure , and admissibility of evidence so seized. Terms and definitions . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670·121 Criminal Law.

670-123

Laws of Evidence

3 Cr.

Continuation of 670·122 Criminal Law with emphasis on evidence in criminal prosecutions . Hearsay rule and exceptions, admissions and confessions, ruling case law and effect on procedures will be emphasized in this course. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Pre· requisite: 670·122 Criminal Law.

670-131

Industrial Security

3 Cr.

Organization and management of industrial security units. Protection of facilities atld installations . Manpower, planning for emergencies and riot control. Technical and legal problems , police power of person· nel, detection and prevention of thefts. Security clearances, wartime measures , sabotage and espionage in plants . Lecture 3 hours. Lab· oratory 0 hours . Prerequisite : None.

147


LAW ENFORCEMENT 670

670-141

Police-Community Relations

3 Cr.

The reciprocal relationship between the commun ity and the police with emphasis on techniques for developing and improving a favorable relationship. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670-101 Introduction to Law Enforcement or in -service personnel.

670-142

POlice-Community Relations

2 Cr.

Relationship with the news media . In -depth discussion and examination of special considerations peculiar to the police-community rela tions . Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670-141 Police-Community Relations.

670-201

Delinquency Prevention and Control

3 Cr.

Problem of juvenile delinquency, police programs and community resources for prevention of juvenile delinquency are presented . Juvenile court organization and procedure, detention , filing and police procedures in enforcement of juvenile code. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : 670-121 Criminal Law.

670-211

Criminalistics

3 Cr.

Fundamental principles and techniques applicable in police investigation from incident to trial. Use of communicat ions systems, records and pr inciples . Specific procedures in more frequent violations will be individually presented . Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670-121 Criminal Law or in-service personnel.

670-212

Criminalistics

3 Cr.

Continuation of 670-211 Criminalistics. Techniques of scientific investigation and assistance of various scientific aids to the police officer or field investigator. Special techniques employed in particular kinds of investigation. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670-211 Criminalistics.

670-221

Police Administration

3 Cr.

Principles of organization and management , the evaluation of administrative devices: Organization according to function with emp hasis on application of these principles to line function. Regulation and motivation of personnel , and principles of leadership . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 670-101 Introduction to Law Enforcement.

670-222

Police Administration

3 Cr.

Continuation of 670-221 Police Administration with emphasis on staff functions. Pay and other inducements, personnel recruitment, employment of administrative principles and processes of operation to the staff functions . Computer usage and other steps useful to man agement. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 670221 Police Administration .

148


LAW ENFORCEMENT 670 / LiBRARY /MEDIA TECHNOLOGY 680

670-231

Fundamentals of Traffic Control

2 Cr.

History of traffic development and duties of agencies responsible for highway traffic administration . Causes of accidents and traffic congestion. Basic principles of traffic law enforcement, accident investigation and direction of traffic. Study of traffic code and uniform traffic code devices . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670-101 Introduction to Law Enforcement.

670-232 Accident Investigation

3 Cr.

Purposes of accident investigation , procedures to be used including interviewing of persons involved and witnesses. Determination of speed from skid marks. Preparation and use of statistics obtained from the investigation of accidents . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequ isite: 670-231 Fundamentals of Traffic Control.

670-233 Traffic Law Enforcement

3 Cr.

An explanation of purposes of traffic law enforcement and techniques to be used including selective enforcement and enforcement at accident scenes. Legal authority of police, preparation and presentation of traffic cases. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670-231 Fundamentals of Traffic Control.

670-251

Crime Laboratory Techniques

2 Cr.

Frequently used police laboratory procedures explained and practiced . Latent fingerprint work -and tool mark comparison. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Limited to Law Enforcement majors and in-service police officers.

670-252

Crime Laboratory Techniques

2 Cr.

Continuation of 670-251 Crime Laboratory Techniques with emphasis on firearms, identification, laboratory techniques applicable to trace evidence search . Trip to crime laboratory. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 670-251 Crime Laboratory Techniques.

LibraryIMedia Technology 680 680-101

Introduction to Library/Media Resources and Services 3 Cr. (Formerly Introduction to Library Organization)

A general course in the organization , purposes , and uses of information centers of all kinds , school library/media centers , technical, academic, and public libraries. Emphasis upon the media explosion and its effect upon information centers in our society. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

149


LIBRARY/MEDIA TECHNOLOGY 680

680-121

Technical Processes I (Formerly library Acquisition Procedures)

3 Cr.

Various methods of ordering books and other media needed in library/media and information centers. Bibliographic searching, the preparation and receiving of orders, inventory methods, and the keeping of bindery records. A survey of the publishing field and the role of wholesale bookdealers. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 680-101 Introduction to Library/Media Resources and Services.

680-151

Technical Processes II 3 Cr. (Formerly Basic Cataloging and Classification)

Systems for organizing books and other media for use in library/ media and other information centers, with emphasis upon DC and LC classifications. Preparation of the unit card and practice in filing, according to rules of the American Library Association. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequsite: 680-121 Technical Processes I.

680-252

Readers' Services (Formerly Information Sources)

4 Cr.

Basic procedures for working with and assisting in directional and referral services, the use of the public catalog, general reference materials , microfilm , and the operation of equipment for its use. Practice in the preparation of bibliographies. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 680-101 Introduction to Library/Media Resources and Services.

680-260

Introduction to Children's Books

3 Cr.

A survey of literature for school-age children with emphasis on classic and modern materials. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

680-270

Circulation Control Systems (Formerly Circulation)

3 Cr.

Various changing systems in use in library/media and information centers. Routines involved in charging, discharging, both manual and mechanical as well as computerized systems. Methods of handling overdues, reserves, renewals, and other aspects of circulation controls are discussed. Special attention is given in this course to bookcraft and materials conservation. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 680-101 Introduction to Library/Media Resources and Services.

150


LIBRARY / MEDIA TECHNOLOGY 680/MARKETING 685

680·280

Internship for Library/Media Technical Assistants (Formerly Supervised Work Experience)

4 Cr.

The primary objective of this course is to provide the student with carefully planned and closely supervised field work in an information center of the student's interest. By working under actual conditions for a minimum of 13 1/ 2 hours per week for 10 weeks, students are given the opportunity to participate in a variety of learning situations structured to combine theory with practice. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 680·151 Technical Processes II and/or departmental approval.

Marketing 685 685-180

Cooperative Field Experience

1 Cr.

Part-time employment of a minimum of 160 hours in an approved business or distributive training center under College supervision . Students may earn no more than 10 credits for the program or more than 3 credits per quarter. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 15 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

685·201

Principles of Marketing

4 Cr.

Functions, institutions and oasic problems in the marketing of goods and services from the viewpoint of the manager of a business firm operating within the social , economic and legal environments of today 's business world. Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 460·108 Introduction to Business .

685·202

Principles of Salesmanship

4 Cr.

Fundamentals of retail, wholesale , outside and service selling . Cus· tomer impact, merchandise and sales presentation. Closing and post· sale service. Principles of self· management , practice on sales preparation and demonstration. The relationship of the sales process to promotion and advertising. Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 460-108 Introduction to Business recommended.

685·203

Principles of Retailing

4 Cr.

An introduction to the retail industry with a management perspective. Study of the structure and opportunities in retailing , franchising, location and layout, organization, sales promotion , and customer services. Review of selected management cases. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 460-108 Introduction to Business , 685-201 Principles of Marketing recommended but not required.

151


MARKETING 685 j MATHEMATICS 690

685-204

Retailing Management

4 Cr.

Continuation of Retailing 203 with concentration on merchandise management and retail control . Includes application of buying procedures , markup, pricing, stock turnover, and analysis of current merchandising policies. Review of selected management cases. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 685 -203 Pr:inciples of Retailing.

685-209

Marketing Management

4 Cr.

The viewpoint of the marketing manager is utilized. Case approach to marketing policies and strategies , buyer behavior, product management , marketing channels, promotion and pricing. Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 685-201 Principles of Marketing.

685-225

Principles of Advertising

4 Cr.

Introduction to the field of advertising, employing the economical, behavioral and practical aspects of campaign strategy, appeal and media selection. Consideration also given to layout, typography and production methods. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 685-201 Principles of Marketing.

685-250

Industrial Marketing

4 Cr.

Principles and problems involved in marketing materials, equipment and supplies to manufacturers , other business firms and institutions which use the goods in further production. Analysis of the characteristics of the industrial market , channels of distribution, industrial seIling, promotional practices and marketing policies. Lecture 4 路hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 685-201 Principles of Marketing.

Mathematics 690 690-091

College Arithmetic

3 Cr.

Basic properties of sets. Fundamental properties of the natural numbers, integers, rationals and real numbers. Applications of t lJe rationals including decimal and per cent notation. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

690-095

Algebra

3 Cr.

Sets, real numbers, algebraic symbolism, factoring, basic algebraic operations and linear equations. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 690-091 College Arithmetic or equivalent.

690-100

Allied Health Sciences Mathematics

4

Cr.

Fundamental operations of whole numbers, fractions and decimals. Linear equations. Per cents. Ratio and proportion . Exponents and scientific notation. The sl ide ru Ie. Metric system. Apothecaries system. Quality control. Solutions . Applications. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hOllrs. Prerequisite: None. 152


MATHEMATICS 690

690-101

Algebra

3 Cr.

Funct ions and graphs. Systems of linear equations. Application and techniques of problem solving. Exponents and radicals. Introduction to complex numbers, quadratic equations. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-095 Algebra or departmental approval.

690-102

Algebra

3 Cr.

Algebraic operations , conic sections, systems of equations. Inequal ities. Applications and techniques of problem solving. Logarithms. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-101 Algebra or departmental approval.

690-103

Geometry

3 Cr.

A study of geometry as a logical system , deductive and inductive reasoning, locus , algebraic and geometric inequalities, congruencies. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-101 Algebra or departmental approval.

690-104

Geometry

3 Cr.

Similarity, polygonal and circular regions, constructions, further anatomy of proof, non-Euclidean geometry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 690-103 Geometry.

690-105

Trigonometry

4 Cr.

Properties of the trigonometric, logarithmic and exponential functions. Trigonometric identities and equations. Applications. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 690-102 Algebra and 690路 104 Geometry recommended or departmental approval.

690-111

Fundamentals of Mathematics

3 Cr.

Algebra of sets. Structure of arithmetic and algebra. Basic concepts of Euc lidean geometry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : Two years of high school mathematics including algebra and geometry.

690-112

Fundamentals of Mathematics

3 Cr.

Applications of algebra . Analytic geomet ry. Polynomial calculus and applications. Lecture 3 hours'. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690III Fundamentals of Mathematics.

690-113

Fundamentals of Mathematics

3 Cr.

Trigonometric functions and applications. Statistics in the social and biological sciences . Probability. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-112 Fundamentals of Mathematics.

153


MATHEMATICS 690

690-115

College Algebra

4 Cr.

Theory of equations and inequalities. Matrices and determinants. Binomial theorem. Sequences and series. Mathematical induction . Probability. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690· 102 Algebra or departmental approval.

690·117

Mathematical Concepts

4 Cr.

Algebra of linear equations, set notation, linear systems and matrices, solution of equations with logarithms and applications to business. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690· 102 Algebra or departmental approval.

690·118

Mathematical Concepts

4 Cr.

Fundamentals of differential calculus. Linear programming techniques as applied to business problems and the simplex method . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : 690·117 Mathematical Con· cepts or departmental approval.

690·119

Mathematical Concepts

4 Cr.

Principles of integral calculus applied to management and economics such as revenue, surplus , profit, and expected value. Compound interest and the theory of probability as applied to business. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-118 Mathematical Concepts.

690-121

Elementary Mathematical Analysis

4 Cr.

Sets, ordered fields, functions, theory of equations, inequalities, sequences, series, mathematical induction, determinants and matrices. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 690-102 Alge. bra and 690-104 Geometry or equivalent or departmental approval.

690-122

Elementary Mathematical Analysis

4 Cr.

Properties of the trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions. Algebra of vectors. Limits and continuity. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-121 Elementary Mathematical Analysis.

690-141

Elementary Probability and Statistics

4 Cr.

Organization and analysis of data, elementary probability, permutations and combinations. Normal distribution, binomial distribution. random sampling, test of hypotheses, estimation and chi-square distribution, regression and correlation. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 690-102 Algebra or equivalent.

154


MATHEMATICS 690/MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 700

690-151

Analytic Geometry and Calculus

5 Cr.

Cartesian coordinates. Functions and graphs. Limits and continuity. Differentiation of algebraic functions. Applications. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-122 Elementary Mathematical Analysis or equivalent or departmental approval.

690-152

Analytic Geometry and Calculus

5 Cr.

Antiderivatives. Definite integral. Applications of the definite integral. Conics . Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 690-151 Analytic Geometry and Calculus.

)90-153

Analytic Geometry and Calculus

5 Cr.

Transcendental functions . Techniques of integration . Polar coordinates. Parametric equations. Improper integrals. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-152 Analytic Geometry and Calculus.

690-154

Analytic Geometry and Calculus

5 Cr.

Analytic geometry of three-dimensional space. Vectors . Partial differentiation. Multiple integrals. Infinite series. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite : 690-153 Analytic Geometry and Calculus.

690-201

Introduction to Linear Algebra

5 Cr.

Vector spaces. Linear transformations and matrices. Determinants. Invariant subspaces. Characteristic values and vectors. Applications. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-154 Analytic Geometry and Calculus or departmental approval.

690-252

Differential Equations

5 Cr.

Differential equations of first , second and higher order. Simultaneous, linear and homogeneous equations. Solution by power series. Laplace transform. Applications. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-154 Analytic Geometry and Calculus.

Mechanical Engineering Technology 700 700-150

Machine Tools

3 Cr.

Fundamentals of metal cutting theory and factors affecting machinability. Cutting tools, speeds and feeds, cutting fluids , metal cutting and grinding machines, measurement and gaging. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: None.

155


MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 700

700-151

Metal Fabrication Methods

3 Cr.

Various metal fabrication methods are discussed and experienced. Oxyacetylene, electro arc and tungsten inert gas welding. Brazing, soldering - low temperature and resistance welding. Fasteners, ad路 hesives and sheet metal joining and forming are covered . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

700-152

Man ufacturing Processes

3 Cr.

Theory and application of manufacturing methods and processes as related to modern industry . Introduction to process and physical metallurgy. Hot and cold forming of metals and plastics, heat treating and finishing methods are highlighted. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

700-201

Industrial Hydraulics

4 Cr.

Oil hydraulics systems with applications to modern industrial uses such as transfer of power and automatic control of machines. Pumps, filters, valves , cylinders and accumulators as components of working circuits. Laboratory experience includes construction and testing of practical hydraulic circuits. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 690-095 Algebra and 780-101 Introductory Physics or equivalent.

700-211

Mechanisms

4 Cr.

Kinematics of machine elements, gears, gear trains , linkages, cams, belts , chains , power screws, friction drives and ratchet mechanisms are explored. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 550122 Engineering Drawing and 550-252 Applied Dynamics.

700-212

Machine Design

3 Cr.

Elements of design and 'stress analysis as applied to basic machine elements including shafts , bearings, gears , chains, belts, springs, clutches and brakes. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 550-251 Strength of Materials and 550-252 Applied Dynamics.

700-221

Applied Instrumentation - Measurement and Control

3 Cr.

Theory and practice applied to industrial measuring and controlling instrumentation. Types of equipment used to measure weight, pressure, flow, temperature and humidity are examined . Automatic control of the measured quantities is investigated. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 780-101 Introductory Physics or equivalent.

156


MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 700 MEDICAL ASSISTING 710

700-231

Tool Design - Cutting Tools

3 Cr.

Metal cutting tools, their applications and principles of design. Detai led exploration of tool geometry and forces acting on cutting tools. Examines practical design problems , including -a variety of singlepoint and multiple-edge cutting tools. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 690-105 Trigonometry and 550-121 Engineering Drawing.

700-232

Tool Design - Gages

3 Cr.

Shop, inspection and reference gages ; their definition , applications and factors affecting their design . Examines practical gage design problems. Emphasis on special fixed-sized gage design. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 700-231 Tool Des ignCutting Tools.

700-233

Tool Design - Jigs

3 Cr.

Practical design of jigs is approached through a study of standardized jig details and their application to the various types of jigs from the simple to the more complex. Practical design problems are worked to solution on the drawing board . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: 700-232 Tool Design - Gages.

700-234

Tool Design - Fixtures

3 Cr.

Study and design of various types of cast, fabricated and welded fixtures applicable to milling, boring, honing, broaching, tapp ing, grinding and welding operations . Fixture components and design applica tions are covered in detail. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite : 700-233 Tool Design - Jigs.

700-237

Tool Engineering

3 Cr.

Covers production planning, estimating and economic tooling as applicable to the manufacturing process. Selection of process operations for manufacturing is reviewed . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 690-105 Trigonometry and 700-232 Tool Design - Gages or equivalent.

Medical Assisting 710 710-101

Medical Assisting Orientation

1 Cr.

Designed to acquaint the student with medical assisting as an occupation . The scope of the medical field as a whole. Duties, responsibilities and professional liabilities are discussed . Community health facilities are visited to observe medical assistants at work . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequis ite: None.

157


MEDICAL ASSrSTING 710

710-102

Medical Terminology

3 Cr.

Vocabulary and terms used by medical personnel. Usage and spelling of medical terms. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

710-103

Medical Terminology

3 Cr.

Continuation of 710-102 Medical Terminology with emphasis on specialized medical terms and systems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 710-102 Medical Terminology or equivalent.

710-248

Administrative Medical Assisting

5 Cr.

Specific application of administrative duties and responsibilities to the medical office . Mailing, telephone services , appointments, written and oral communications, accounting , fee collection , record maintenance , insurance forms , machine transcription , typing, preparation of physicians' speeches and manuscripts. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: 710-101 Medical Assisting Orientation , 710103 Medical Terminology, 712·204 Medical Laboratory Procedures and official acceptance into the Medical Assisting Program and de· partmental approval.

710-249

Clinical Medical Assisting

5 Cr.

Examination room, minor surgical and other special assisting tech· niques; physical examination; medical emergencies; sterilization and asepsis; medications, nutrition and diet; supplies and inventory; the electrocardiogram ; appl ication of physical therapy and x-ray to medical assisting. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: 710·248 Administrative Medical Assisting , concurrent enrollment and departmental approval.

710-250

Applied Medical Assisting (Formerly Medical Assisting Externship)

2 Cr.

Principles, procedures and practical application of administrative , clinical and special medical assisting procedures. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 710·101 Medical Assisting Orien· tation , 710·103 Medical Terminology, 710-249 Cl inical Medical As· sisting, 712-204 Medical Laboratory Procedures and departmental approval. Concurrent enrollment in 710·252 Medical Assisting Ex· ternship.

710-251

Medical Assisting Ethics

2 Cr.

Principles of Medical Ethics; legal relationship between physician and patient; creation and termination of contracts, informed consent, professional liabil ity and torts especially negligence; medico legal aspect of Medical Assisting; types of medical practice. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 710·101 Medical Assisting Orientation , 710-103 Medical Terminology, 710-249 Clinical Medical As· sisting, 712-204 Medical Laboratory Procedures, 710-250 Medical Assisting Externsh ip or concurrent enrollment. 158


MEDICAL ASSISTING 710 MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY 712

710-252

Medical Assisting Externship

4 Cr.

A one-quarter period of supervised clinical experience_ Students perform duties of a medical assistant while rotating through administrative and clinical areas of a physician's private office, clinic or hospital. A total of 350 hours are spent under supervision during the externship experience which includes Saturdays. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 710-101 Medical Assisting Orientation, 710-103 Medical Terminology, 710-249 Clinical Medical Assisting, 712-204 Medical Laboratory Procedures and departmental approval. Concurrent enrollment in 710-250 Applied Medical Assisting is required.

710-256

Allied Health Seminar

3 Cr.

The Allied Health Professional, evolving concepts, issues and problems. Interpersonal relations, communication, professional decorum, responsibilities and organizations. Professional development, continuing education, resources, the outline, annotated bibliography and equivalency and proficiency examinations. Certification examination requirements . .Employment opportunities, the resume and personal interview. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Eligibility for Graduation and departmental approval.

Medical Laboratory Technology 712 712-100

Introduction to Medical Laboratory Technology

3 Cr.

Introduction to laboratory medicine. Educational requirements , duties and responsibilities of the Medical Laboratory Technician MLT (ASCP). Professional organizations and certification. Names and purposes of " diagnostic tests. Visits to hospitals and other health facilities. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into Medical Laboratory Technician Program.

712-102

Medical Laboratory Ethics

1 Cr.

Principles of medical ethics. Applies concepts to field of medical laboratory science. Emphasizes professional honesty and conduct, and consequences of negligence and invasion of the patients' privacy. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 712-100 Introduction to Medical Laboratory Technology and Departmental approval.

159


MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY 712

712-203

Medical laboratory Procedures

4 Cr.

Introduction to Hematology and Immunohematology. Red and white cell counts. Normal leukocyte differential. Sedimentation rate, Microhematrocrit, Hemoglobin and selected coagulation studies. ABO and Rh typing. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours . Prerequisites: 440-128 Anatomy and Physiology and 710-103 Medical Terminology or departmental approval.

712-204

Medical laboratory Procedures

4 Cr.

Introduction to basic medical laboratory techniques , pH, indicators, buffers and stains. Laboratory safety. Handling and identification of glassware and equipment . Review of urinary system. Routine urinalysis and other selected renal function tests. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 712-203 Medical Laboratory Procedures .

712-205

Medical laboratory Procedures

4 Cr.

Introduction to colorimetry and instrumentation. Application of fundamental chemistry to the medical laboratory. Selected manual tests. Preparation and use of medical laboratory solutions. Tests for thyroid function and routine analyses. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: Formal admission to CLA or MLT Program or departmental approval, 712-204 Medical Laboratory Procedures.

712-209

Certified laboratory Assisting Procedures

3 Cr.

Principles, procedures and applications of selected routine diagnostic tests performed by the CLA Category of medical laboratory workers. Principles of Hematology, Clinical Chemistry, blood bank, routine analyses, automation and instrumentation and special tests. Presentation by clinical laboratory instructors in a clinical setting. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: All required courses and/or departmental approval. Concurrent enrollment in 712-210 Certified Laboratory Assisting Internship required.

712-210

Certified laboratory Assisting Internship

4 Cr.

Supervised clinical experience. Students rotate through selected departments of clinical laboratories 40 hours per week performing general laboratory duties associated with the CLA Category of the medical laboratory. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: All required courses and/or departmental approval. Concurrent enrollment in 712-209 Certified Laboratory Assisting Procedures is required.

160


MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY 712 MEDICAL RECORD TECHNOLOGY 715

712·214

Medical Technology Procedures

5 Cr.

Principles, procedures and applications of complex, advanced diagnostic tests performed by medical laboratory personnel at the MlT level. Principles of advanced Hematology, diagnostic microbiology, chemistry, urinalysis and renal function, serology, immunohematology and advanced laboratory techniques. Presentation by clinical laboratory instructors in a clinical setting. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: All required courses and/or departmental approval. Concurrent enrollment in 712-215 Medical Laboratory Technology Internship is required.

712·215

Medical laboratory Technology Internship

4 Cr.

Supervised clinical experience. Students rotate through Hematology, urinalysis , chemistry, microbiology, serology and immunohematology laboratories 40 hours per week meeting performance obj.ectives of medical laboratory personnel at the MlT level. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: All required courses and/or departmental approval. Concurrent enrollment in 712-214 Medical Technology Procedures is required.

Medical Record Technology 715 715·101

Introduction to Medical Record Science

3 Cr.

The history of medicine as related to medical records; uses of the record by the entire medical team ; duties of record personnel; filing, numbering, and retention of records and practice of such in the laboratory. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

715·102

Analysis of the Medical Record

3 Cr.

Analysis of record contents including forms used in acute and longterm care facilities. Med ical record functions in quantitatively analyzing the record and medical staff requirements in completing and qualitatively analyzing the record. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 715-101 Introduction to Medical Record Science or departmental approval.

715·103

Introduction to Health Statistics

3 Cr.

The study of Vital and Public Health Statistics; in-depth study of hospital statistics; sources , collection, reporting , presentation and analysis of data; sources and uses of health data in the United States. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 715-102 Analysis of the Medical Record or departmental approval. College Math requirements must be fulfilled prior to taking this course (see graduation requirements). 161


MEDICAL RECORD TECHNOLOGY 715

715-104

Auxiliary Health Facilities

3 Cr.

An introduction to other types of health related faci'lities available other than hospitals with emphasis on their record keeping systems. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 715·102 Analysis of the Medical Record or departmental approval.

715-201

Classifications, Indices and Registers

3 Cr.

Purposes of classifying diseases and operations. Systems of nomen· clatures and classifications and their differences. The values of indices and registers are emphasized. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 440·128 Anatomy and Physiology, 710·103 Med· ical Terminology, 715·103 Introduction to Health Statistics, 830·102 Typewriting or departmental approval.

715-202

legal Aspects of Medical Records

3 Cr.

The medical record as a legal document . The effect of confidential communications laws on the release of information from the medical record. Legal procedures involved in court disclosure of medical rec· ords . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 715·201 Classifications, Indices and Registers or departmental approval.

715-203

Medical Record Seminar

2 Cr.

Methods of identifying and arriving at satisfactory solutions to specific types of problems encountered in the administration of medical record services. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 715·202 Legal Aspects of Medical Records or departmental approval.

715-204

Medical Machine Transcription

2 Cr.

Skill in the use of transcription equipment and expansion of medical terminology. Practice in transcribing medical reports and correspondence in an institutional setting. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 710·103 Medical Terminology and 830·103 Typewriting.

715-205

Medical Machine Transcription

2 Cr.

Continuation of 715·204 Medical Machine Transcription with extended practical use of transcription equipment and expansion of medical terminology and dictation. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 715·204 Medical Machine Transcription.

715-211

Directed Practice

4 Cr.

Supervised learning experience in a medical record department under the supervision of an experienced medical record administrator. Lec· ture 0 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisites: 440·128 Anatomy and Physiology, 710·103 Medical Terminology, 715·103 Introduction to Health Statistics , 830·102 Typewriting or departmental approval.

162


MEDICAL RECORD TECHNOLOGY 715 MENTAL HEALTH TECHNOLOGY 717

715-212

Directed Practice

5 Cr.

Supervised learning experience in a medical record department under the. supervision of an experienced medical record administrator. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 15 hours. Prerequisites: 715-201 Classifications, Indices and Registers, 715-211 Directed Practice, 830-103 Typewriting or departmental approval.

715-213

Directed Practice

5 Cr.

Supervised learning experience in a medical record department under the supervision of an experienced medical record administrator. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 15 hours. Prerequisites: 715-202 Legal Aspects of Medical Records, 715-212 Directed Practice or departmental approval.

Mental Health Technology 717 717-121

Introduction to Mental Health

4 Cr.

A survey of the varieties of human behavior with emphasis on normal and deviant modes of responding. The intr.oduction to classification and treatment behavior. The role of the mental health technician in the therapeutic setting. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

717-122

Records Development

2 Cr.

Procedures for collecting personal and family data. Forms for record keeping. Analyzing data for their need and purpose. Summarizing and gathering data for surveys and research reports. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

717-123

Introduction to Case Work Procedures

3 Cr.

An introduction to the basic principles of social case work with emphasis on the mental health technician's unique role in the case work process. Students will work in a setting where case work is a primary operation. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 717-121 Introduction to Mental Health or departmental approval.

717-124

Supportive Techniques

3 Cr.

Development of the basic skills of relating at the patient's level of communication. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the mental health technician as a participant observer in the care of patients. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 717-121 Introduction to Mental Health.

163


MENTAL HEALTH TECHNOLOGY 717

717-125

Community Resources

3 Cr.

Community agencies involved in mental health treatment and their relative roles. Procedures for utilizing the various agencies both as a source of information and as a referral unit. Student will work with a community agency in the Metropolitan Cleveland area. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 717-123 Introduction to Case Work Procedures .

717-201

Mental Health Procedures

3 Cr.

An intensive study of the various schools of thought in the treatment and care of the mentally ill. A critical evaluation of the forms of therapy including psychological, drug, shock and other forms of therapy. Use of the case study to emphasize differential treatment needs of patients. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 717路121 Introduction to Mental Health and departmental approval.

717-202

Mental Health Practices

5 Cr.

Practical experience in a mental health setting. The implementation and application of supportive techniques and therapy procedures. Students will rotate in a variety of treatment settings and with different members of the psychiatric team. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 717-201 Mental Health Procedures or concurrent enrollment.

717-203

Mental Health Practices

5 Cr.

Continuation of 717-202 Mental Health Practices in a mental health setting. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 717-202 Mental Health Practices.

717-204

Mental Health Practices

5 Cr.

Continuation of 717-203 Mental Health Practices in a mental health setting. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 717-203 Mental Health Practices.

717-221

Activities Therapy

2 Cr.

Development of the various skills in the various activity programs of mental health settings. Emphasis will be on basic motor skill activities. Students will work in field placement as assistants to the activities therapist. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 717-121 Introduction to Mental Health and departmental approval.

717-222

Activities Therapy

3 Cr.

Continuation of 717路221 Activities Therapy with emphasis on teaching skills to patients. Development of skills in art, music, and basic recreational activities such as checkers, cards, volleyball. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 717-221 Activities Therapy.

164


MENTAL HEALTH TECHNOLOGY 717 MICRO·PRECISION TECHNOLOGY 718

717-223

Activities Therapy

3 Cr.

Continuation of 717 ·222 Activities Therapy with emphasis on more complex recreational activities such as dramatics, hobbies and group reading . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours . Prerequisite: 717· 222 Activities Therapy.

717-251

Seminar in Mental Health

3 Cr.

Review of the various procedures and practices employed in a mental health setting. Discussion of the various techniques f~r treating patients. Discussions centering around the technician's own attitude toward the field of mental health. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 717·203 Mental Health Practices.

Micro-Precision Technology 718 718-111

Introduction to Micro-Precision

4 Cr.

Introduction to fundamental concepts of miniaturized timekeeping ele· ments and the repair and adjusting of these elements. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: None .

718-112

Micro-Precision II

4 Cr.

Introduction and familiarization with laboratory instruments and meas· urements techniques. Basic escapement work. Lecture 2 hours . Lab· oratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 718·111 I ntroduction to Micro·Precision and 718·112 Micro·Precision II are concurrent courses.

718-113

Micro-Precision III

4 Cr.

A study of meter instruments and a further development of repair techniques for t imekeeping instruments. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours . Prerequisite: 718·112 Micro·Precision II.

718-114

Micro-Precision and Instrumentation

4 Cr.

A study of escapements with further emphasis on micro·precision mao chining techniques. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: None.

718-115

Micro-Precision and Instrumentation II

4 Cr.

Introduction to photo·milling procedures and speed methods of over· hauling watches . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 718·114 Micro·Precision and Instrumentation I.

165


MICRO-PRECISION TECHNOLOGY 718

718-118

Advanced Watch Repair I

4 Cr.

Theory of miniature gearing used in timekeeping instruments and a further study of watch regulation. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 718-115 Micro-Precision Instrumentation II and 718-118 Advanced Watch Repair I are concurrent courses.

718-119

Advanced Watch Repair II

4 Cr.

Advanced watch repair techniques and production methods. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 718-118 Advanced Watch Repair I.

718-120

Advanced Watch Repair III

4 Cr.

A study of properly designed workshops and efficiency in shop practices. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 718-119 Advanced Watch Repair II and 718-120 Advanced Watch Repair III and . concurrent courses.

718-211

Advanced Micro-Precision Technology I

4 Cr.

A study of Micro-Precision gearing theory and miniatu re milling technigues. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 718-115 Micro-Precision I nstrumentation II.

718-212

Advanced Micro-Precision Technology II

4 Cr.

The design and construction of micro-precision mechanical instruments. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours . Prerequisite: 718-211 Advanced Micro-Precision Technology I.

718-213

Advanced Micro-Precision Technology III

4 Cr.

A study of basic electro-mechanical, micro-precision instruments. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 718-212 Advanced Micro-Precision Technology II.

718-214

Micro-Precision Design and Construction - Mechanisms

4 Cr.

A study of the theory of racks, snails, retarding and trip-type mechan isms. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 hours . Prerequisite: 718-213 Advanced Micro-Precision Technology III.

718-215

Micro-Precision Design and Construction - Instruments

4 Cr.

Design, construction , and service of mechanical electronic microprecision instruments. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequi site: 718-214 Micro-Precision Design and Construction-Mechanisms.

718-216

Micro-Precision Design and Construction - Subminiature Products

4 Cr.

Problems related to the manufacture of subminiature products. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 718-215 Micro-Preci sion Design and Construction-Instruments.

166


Music 720 720-100

Fundamentals of Music

3 Cr.

Preparatory course in the rudiments of music. Includes notation, rhythm, scales, key signatures, intervals, treble and bass clefs. Elementary sight singing and ear training. Introductory keyboard harmony. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

720-101

Fundamentals of Music

3 Cr.

Continuation of 720路100 Fundamentals of Music. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 720-100 Fundamentals of Music or departmental approval.

720-102

Fundamentals of Music

3 Cr.

Continuation of 720路101 Fundamentals of Music. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 720-101 Fundamentals of Music or departmental approval.

720-103

Music Appreciation

4 Cr.

No previous technical knowledge of music required. Study of basic music materials, form and style . Lectures, illustrations , live musical performances and listening to records. Historical survey of music via compositions from the 17th century to the present. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None .

720-107

Harmony

5 Cr. .

Theory and musicianship for music majors. Sight singing, ear training, basic harmonic progressions, triads, primary and secondary chords . Root positions, inversions and non-chord tones. Keyboard harmony, rhythmic , melodic and harmonic dictation . Course divided into four general areas . Harmony occupies two sessions; ear training a.nd sight singing, two; keyboard harmony , one. Practice sessions are on the student's own time. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequ isite : 720-100 Fundamentals of Music or departmental approval.

720-108

Harmony

5 Cr.

Continuation of 720-107 Harmony . Miscellaneous triad usages . Further study of non-harmonic tones, seventh chords and modulations. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 720-107 Harmony.

720-109

Harmony

5 Cr.

Continuation of 720-108 Harmony . Diminished seventh chords, altered chords, advanced modulation and harmonic analysis . Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 720-108 Harmony.

167


MUSIC 720

720-115

Choral Ensemble

1 Cr.

Includes music particularly suitable for a sm all chorus: mad r igals , motets, cantatas , opera . Renaissance through contemporary works. May be repeated for credit; however, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: By audition only.

720-119

Choir

1 Cr.

Concentration on vocal problems and techniques . Development of standard repertoire for mixed voices . Sacred and secular, accompanied and a cappella. School and public performances are required. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 3 hours . Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

720-123

Elementary Class Voice

2 Cr.

Basic techniques of voice production: breathing, diction, projection, tone路color and interpretation. Progressive vocal exercises and studies. Application of principles to simpler songs in English. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 720-103 Music Appreciation and 720-169 Elementary Class Piano or departmental approval.

720-151

Music for Elementary Education

3 Cr.

Designed to orient elementary teachers to the role of music in the child's growth and development Emphasis on creat ing a musical environment in the elementary school classroom. The study of the child 's voice. Basic theory, including piano keyboard, musical symbols and terms. Use of the autoharp, recorder and rhythm instruments. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

720-155

Stage Band

1 Cr.

A course providing opportunity Tor the performance of music for the modern big band as well as experience playing in small "combo" groups. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

720-159

Concert Band

1 Cr.

Open to all students by audition. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approva l. .

168


MUSIC 720

720-163

Instrumental Ensemble

1 Cr.

Designed to develop the individual 's ability to perform in instrumental ensemble groups . Music selected and determined by needs and capa bilities of the class . Public performance is part of the course. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements . Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

720-169

Elementary Class Piano

2 Cr.

Basic piano techniques for students who do not intend to major in music . Exercises to develop technical facility. Improvisation of simple accompaniments to given melodies . Sight reading, memorization, repertoi re and basic theory. Student should have access to piano for practice . May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

720-177

Orchestra

1 Cr.

Open to all students by audition. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements . Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Audition only.

720-180

Elementary Band and Orchestral Instruments

1 Cr.

Basic techniques in band and orchestral instruments for students who do not intend to major in music. Exercises to develop technical facility. Sight reading, memorization , repertoire and basic theory. Student should have access to an orchestra] or band instrument. This includes one of the following: violin , viola , cello , string bass , flute , clarinet, oboe, bas ~ oon , French horn , trumpet-cornet, trombone, baritone, tuba, percussion , saxaphone . May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: None.

720-183

Applied Music

1 Cr.

Individual instruction in the following: piano, voice, violin , viola, violoncello, string bass, flute , clarinet, oboe . ba'ssoon, French horn, trumpet路cornet, trombone, baritone-euphonium, tuba, percussion and organ . May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 1f2 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Depart mental approval. Costs of private lessons are paid by the student.

169


MUSIC 720

720-191

Music History and Literature

3 Cr.

Designed for students who plan to major in music and others with some musical background. Chronological analysis of major works in the literature from early times through the 16th century. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

720-192

Music History and Literature

3 Cr.

Study of history and literature from the 17th through the 18th century. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 720-191 Music History and Literature or departmental approval.

720-193

Music History and Literature

3 Cr.

Study of history and literature from the 19th through the 20th century. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 720-192 Music History and Literature or departmental approval.

720-269

Intermediate Class Piano

2 Cr.

Building a repertoire consisting of compositions by composers from the Baroque period to the 20th century. Emphasis on building of technique. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

720-273

Applied Music

2 Cr.

Individual instruction in the following: piano, voice, violin, viola, violoncello, string bass, flute, clarinet, oboe, bassoon, French horn, trumpet-cornet, trombone, baritone-euphonium, tuba, percussion and organ. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 12 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: Permission by departmental audition. Costs of private lessons are paid by the student.

720路280

Intermediate Band and Orchestral Instruments

1 Cr.

Continuation of 720-180 Elementary Band and Orchestral Instruments. Basic techniques in band and orchestral instruments for those who have had some instruction but do not qualify for 720-183 Applied Music or 720-273 Applied Music. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 720-180 Elementary Band and Orchestral Instruments.

170


Nursing 740 740-104

Nursing Fundamentals (Western Campus only)

6 Cr.

Interventions and technics essential to solution of basic nursing problems common to all patients regardless of diagnosis. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Nursing Program.

740-105

Nursing Fundamentals (Western Campus only)

6 Cr.

Continuation of 740·104 Nursing Fundamentals. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisites: 740·104 Nursing Fundamentals, 440·221 Microbiology and 480-120 Chemistry for Health Tech nologies or 480-102 Introduction to Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry.

740-106

Nursing Fundamentals (Western Campus only)

6 Cr.

Interventions and technics essential to solution of selected overt nursing problems of patients of all ages. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisites: 740-105 Nursing Fundamentals and 440·126 Anatomy and Physiology.

740-121

Nursing I (Metropolitan Campus Only)

6 Credits

Introduction to the role of the nurse in meeting the needs common to patients of all ages. Basic " fundamentals" plus prenatal care and be· ginning communications. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisites : See Admission Requirements: English 560-101 proficiency. Mathematics 690·100 or Nursing Mathematics proficiency.

740-122

Nursing II (Metropolitan Campus Only)

7 Credits

Continuation of 740·121 Nursing I. Growth and development and developmental tasks for all ages. Beginning study of major areas of illness in the United States with emphasis on physical problems and care and crisis intervention . Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisites: 740-121 Nursing I, 810-101 General Psychology, 440121 Principles of Medical Science, and 440-128 Anatomy and Physi ology.

171


NURSING 740

740-123

Nursing III (Metropolitan Campus Only)

8 Credits

Continuation of 740-122 Nursing II. Discussion of physical and emotional problems in all ages including labor, delivery and postpartum with emphasis on practice in problem solving. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisites: 740路122 Nursing II, 810-102 General Psychology, 440-129 Anatomy and Physiology, and 440路221 Microbiology.

740-207

Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing (Western Campus only)

5 Cr.

Nursing care of patients with pathological and psychosocial reo sponses to stress. This includes the deviant responses in emotional and mental illness. These responses are considered for all age groups. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisites: 740-106 Nursing Fundamentals, 440-127 Anatomy and Physiology and 810-201 Child Growth and Development.

740-208

Maternal and Newborn Nursing (Western Campus only)

6 Cr.

Basic principles of family living, normal and abnormal aspects of pregnancy, labor and delivery, the puerperium and the newborn with selected experience in prenatal and postpartum clinics, with mothers through labor, delivery, postpartum with newborn in the nursery. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisites: 740-106 Nursing Fundamentals, 440-127 Anatomy and Physiology and 810-201 Child Growth and Development.

740-209

Nursing of Adults and Children (Western Campus only)

10 Cr.

Nursing care of patients with problems of nutritional, fluid, electrolyte and hormonal imbalance. These problems are considered for all age groups. Lecture 6 hours. Laboratory 12 hours . Prerequ isites: 740-106 Nursing Fundamentals, 440-127 Anatomy and Physiology and 810-201 Child Growth and Development.

740-210

Nursing of Adults and Children (Western Campus only)

10 Cr.

Nursing care of patients with problems of circulation, ventilation and limited motion. These problems are considered for all age groups. Lecture 6 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisites: 740-106 Nursing Fundamentals, 440-127 Anatomy and Physiology and 810-201 Child Growth and Development. Concurrent enrollment in 740-212 Nursing Trends.

172


NURSING 740

740-212

Nursing Trends (Western Campus only)

1 Cr.

Trends in nursing including the role of major nursing organizations and career opportunities. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in 740-210 Nursing of Adults and Children.

740-213

Leadership in Nursing Care (Western Campus Only)

3 Cr.

A theoretical and practical framework of adm inistration principles for use by the nurse leader in planning patient care. Students who have not completed a nursing program will be afforded an opportunity to observe the role of the nurse leader in a clinical setting. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 740-210 Nursing of Adults and Children or concurrent enrollment.

740-221

Nursing IV (Metropolitan Campus Only)

11 Credits

Continuation of 740-123 Nursing III. Consideration is given to the scope, prevention, diagnosis, treatment , and psycho-social aspects of illness with emphasis on decision making. Attention is also given to psychological processes ranging from normal to extreme deviation in mental health. Lecture 7 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisites: 740-123 Nursing III , 810-201 Child Growth and Development, and 440-130 Anatomy and Physiology.

740-222

Nursing V (Metropolitan Campus Only)

13 Credits

Continuation of 740-221 Nursing IV. Continued study of major areas of illness in the United States with consideration given to complica tions of pregnancy, leadership skills, specialty areas, rehabilitative aspects of nursing, community agencies, trends and legal aspects. Lecture 8 hours. Laboratory 15 hours. Prerequisite: 740-221 Nursing IV.

740-223

Nursing VI (Metropolitan Campus Only)

7 Credits

Continuation of 740-222 Nursing V. Continued study of major areas of illness in the United States with consideration given to rehabilita tive aspects of nursing care, community agencies, and prevention of physical and emotional problems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 12 hou rs. Prerequisite: 740-222 Nursing V.

173


Occupational Therapy Assisting Technology 745 745-101

Introduction to Occupational Therapy

3 Cr.

History, philosophy and definition of occupational therapy. Roles and functions of the registered occupational therapist and the occupational therapy assistant. Legal and ethical responsibilities. Safety, use and care of tools and equipment. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

745-102

Sewing and Needlework

3 Cr.

Instruction in skills, theory and application of sewing and needlework as therapeutic media. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

745-103

Weaving

2 Cr.

Instruction in skills, theory and application of weaving as therapeutic medium. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

745-121

Clinical Conditions in Physical Dysfunction

Knowledge and management of clinical conditions in 'function. Includes medical and surgical problems in neurology, etc. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. 745-101 Introduction to Occupational Therapy.

745-122

2 Cr.

physical dysorthopedics, Prerequisite: .

Clinical Conditions in Physical Dysfunction 2 Cr.

Continuation of 745-121 Clinical Conditions in Physical Dysfunction. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 745 -121 CliJlical _ Conditions in Physical Dysfunction.

745-201

leather and Metalwork

3 Cr.

Introduction in skills, theory and application of leather and metalwork and related minor crafts as therapeutic media. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 745-102 Sewing and Needlework.

745-202

Woodworking

2 Cr.

Instruction in skills, theory and application of woodworking and related minor crafts as therapeutic media. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 745-102 Sewing and Needlework.

174


OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTING TECHNOLOGY 745 OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 830

745-221

Clinical Conditions in Psycho-Social Dysfunction

2 Cr.

Knowledge and understanding of clinical conditions in psycho-social dysfunction. Includes psychoses, neuroses, character and personality disorders, development defects. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 745-121 Clinical Conditions in Physical Dysfunction.

745-222

Independent Living Techniques

2 Cr.

Skills and techniques to promote independent living for the handicapped. Includes self-care, communications, positioning, transfer, homemaking, avocational pursuits and other pertinent activities. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 745-221 Clinical Conditions in Psycho-Social Dysfunction.

745-251

Occupational Therapy Internship

6 Cr.

Procedures and techniques in an institutional setting under the supervision of a registered occupational therapist. Includes practical experience with patients having physical and psycho-social dysfunction. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: 745-122 Clinical Conditions in Physical Dysfunction.

745-252

Occupational Therapy Internship

6 Cr.

Continuation of 745 -251 Occupational Therapy Internship. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: 745-251 Occupational Therapy Internship.

745-253

Occupational Therapy Internship

6 Cr.

Continuation of 745-252 Occupational Therapy Internship. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: 745路252 Occupational Therapy Internship.

Office Administration 830 830-101

Typewriting

2 Cr.

Fundamentals of keyboard techniques and operation of the typewriter. Not open to students having more than one semester of high school typing or the equivalent within the last two years. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

830-102

Typewriting

2 Cr.

Continuation of 830-101 Typewriting with an introduction to business letters and problem typing. Not open to students having more than two semesters of high school typing or the equivalent within the last two years. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 830-101 Typewriting or equivalent. 175


OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 830

830-103

Typewriting

2 Cr.

Continuation of 830-102 Typewriting with emphasis on technical papers, business reports and job application procedures. Not open to students having more than two semesters of high school typing or the equivalent within the last two years. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 830-102 Typewriting or equjvalent.

830-105

Office Machines

4 Cr.

Instruction and practice in the essential operations of the ten-key and full-key adding-listing machines , rotary and printing calculators. Applications in solving business路related problems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: 410-107 Business Mathematics or concurrent enrollment.

830-106

Filing and Records Control

3 Cr.

Instruction and practice in the preparation of office records for temporary and permanent storage. Includes alphabetic, geographic, numeric and subject filing systems. Detailed study of both mechanical and manual filing methods. Emphasis on classification systems and the retrieval of filed information . Retention and disposition of all kinds of office records. 830-101 Typewriting recom mended. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

830-110

Shorthand

3 Cr.

Mastery of the Diamond Jubilee Edition of GREGG SHo'RTHAND FOR COLLEGES. Reading, writing and transcription practice in preparation for speed dictation and transcription in more advanced courses in shorthand. Not open to students having more than one semester of high school shorthand or the equivalent within the last two years. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 830-101 Typewriting recommended or concurrent enrollment.

830-111

Shorthand

3 Cr.

Continuation of 830路110 Shorthand. A brief and intensive review of shorthand theory. Instruction in the taking of dictation and the preparation of typed transcripts from shorthand notes. The development of speed and accuracy. Emphasis on the production of mailable letters. Not open to students having more than two semesters of high school shorthand or the equivalent within the last two years. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 830-110 Shorthand or equivalent and 830-101 Typewriting or equivalent.

830-112

Shorthand

3 Cr.

Continuation of 830-111 Shorthand. Additional instruction and practice in the taking of dictation and the transcription of shorthand notes. Continued emphasis on the development of speed and accuracy and the production of mailable letters . Not open to students having more than one year of high school shorthand or the equivalent within the last two years. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 830-111 Shorthand or equivalent and 830-102 Typewriting or equivalent. 176


OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 830

830-150

Business Communications

3 Cr.

Extensive and detailed examination of oral and written communica· tive techniques used in business. Letters, memorandums and reports. Analysis of conference and meeting techniques, business addresses and talks. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: Eligi· bility to enroll in 560·101 College Composition .

830-200

Advanced Typewriting

2 Cr.

Intensive training in speed and accuracy applied to general office typing, including tabulations, rough drafts, manuscriRts and business letters. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours . Prerequisite: 830·103 Typewriting or equivalent.

830-201

Advanced Typewriting

2 Cr.

Continuation of 830·200 Advanced Typewriting with emphasis on speed and accuracy, and the preparation of masters for duplication . Instruction in the operation of duplicating machines. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 830·200 Advanced Typewriting or equivalent.

830-202

Advanced Typewriting

2 Cr.

Superior production standards practiced in the planning, editing and preparing of complex business and technical reports . Instruction in the use of voice·writing machines . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 830·201 Advanced Typewriting or equivalent.

830-203

Advanced Shorthand

3 Cr.

A course designed to provide shorthand training for students who have had previous training and / or experience. May be repeated for credit; however, no more than 9 credits may be applied to degree requirements . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

830-204 Advanced Shorthand

3 Cr.

Continuation of 830·203 Advanced Shorthand. Emphasis on the preparation of mailable letters for job competency. Not open to stu· dents having more than two years of high school shorthand or the equivalent within the last two years. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites : 830·200 Advanced Typewriting or equivalent and 830·203 Advanced Shorthand or equivalent.

830-205

Executive Shorthand

3 Cr.

Superior production standards as practiced in rapid, accurate note· taking and preparation of mailable letters. Office·style dictation with emphasis on technical material. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 830·201 Advanced Typewriting and 830·204 Advanced Shorthand. 177


OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 830jPHILOSOPHY 750

830-206

Legal Shorthand

3 Cr.

Practice in note-taking and transcription for advanced shorthand students. Preparation of legal correspondence, pleadings, testimonies and depositions. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 830-201 Advanced Typewriting and 830-204 Advanced Shorthand, or concurrent enrollment.

830-207

Medical Shorthand

3 Cr.

Designed to give advanced shorthand students practice in note-taking and transcription of medical reports, diagnoses, case histories and correspondence. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 830-201 Advanced Typewriting and 830-204 Advanced Shorthand. 710-103 Medical Terminology or concurrent enrollment.

830-250

Office Methods and Procedures

4 Cr.

A finishing course for Office Administration majors. The course is designed to integrate and extend previously learned knowledges and skills, and to develop to the production level techniques and responsibilities common to most office work through performance of typical tasks. To develop an understanding of office procedures, the flow of work in offices, the interrelationship of offices and the teamwork necessary in the production of office work so that the transition from college to office will be easier to make. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 830-200 Advanced Typewriting.

830-260

Cooperative Field Experience

1 Cr.

Part-time employment of a minimum of 150 hours in an approved business or office training center under College supervision. Students may earn no more than 10 credits for the program nor more than 3 credits per quarter. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 15 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

Philosophy 750 750-101

Introduction to Philosophy

4 Cr.

Study and analysis of basic problems dealing with man's understanding of himself, society and the universe as viewed by selected philosophers. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

750-102

Introduction to Logic

4 Cr.

Study of fundamental principles of formal logic, with emphasis on modern logic and its applications to reasoning in philosophy and . ordinary life. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

17S


PHILOSOPHY 750/PHYSICAL EDUCATION 760

750-201

Comparative World Religion

4 Cr.

A study of the origin , nature and meaning of major world religions: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism , Hinduism and Confucian ism . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: None.

750-202

Ethics

4 Cr.

A study of systems and problems of human conduct and their application to man's moral problems and decisions. Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Any previous philosophy course or departmental approval.

750-203

Introduction to Scientific Method

4 Cr.

The study of formation of scientific concepts and examination of the structure of scientific investigation and its methods. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 750-101 Introduction to Philosophy or 750-102 Introduction to Logic .

Physical Education 760 760-103

Archery (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Stresses skill development, safety practices, competitive experience and its value as a lifetime activity. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-104

Badminton and Volleyball (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Stresses skill development, safety practices, , competitive experience and its value as a lifetime activity. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-105

Basketball (Men)

1 Cr.

Stresses skill development, safety practices, competitive experience and its value as a lifetime activity. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-106

Basketball (Women)

1 Cr.

Stresses skill development, safety practices, competitive experience and its value as a lifetime activity. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-107

Golf (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Instruction and development of golf skills. Fundamentals of the swing and phases of the game. Includes history, rules and etiquette, with stress on value as a lifetime activity. Lecture 0 hours. L'aboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

179


PHYSICAL EDUCATION 760

760-108

Golf (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Advanced class in golf emphasizing a high level of proficiency in skill performance. Instruction will be on an individual basis directed toward improvement of the golf swing. Includes instruction and practice in the various shots. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-107 Golf (Coeducational) or departmental approval.

760-109

Recreational Activities (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Designed for students desiring participation in physical education activities requiring modified performance levels, including those with physical limitations. Includes a number of low organizational games such as table tennis, shuffleboard, darts, horseshoes. Participation with a focus on lifetime value in future leisure time. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

760-110

Tennis (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Instruction, practice and skill development in tennis. Rules, strategy and etiquette. Singles and doubles play. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-111

Tennis (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Advanced class in tennis stressing a high level of skill performance. Further development of the serve, defensive strokes, and strategy involved in singles and doubles matches. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-110 Tennis (Coeducational) or departmental approval. '

760-115

Adapted Physical Education (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Designed for students unable to participate in regular physical education because of temporary or permanent limitations. Programs of individual exercises and recreational activities as determined by student limitations and specific remedial conditions. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-117

Body Conditioning (Men)

2 Cr.

Knowledge, understanding and appreciation of the intrinsic values of physical fitness and body strength. Participation in calisthenics, gymnastics, weight training and various exercise programs geared to individual needs. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-118

Body Conditioning (Men)

1 Cr.

Emphasis on refinement and establishment of a lifetime exercise routine. Lectures on diet, grooming and personal health routines . Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-117 Body Conditioning (Men) or departmenta l approval.

180


PHYSICAL EDUCATION 760

760-119

Body Dynamics (Women)

2 Cr.

Knowledge, understanding, appreciation and body skills for efficient movement. Participation in calisthenics, gymnastics and various exercise programs. Analysis of individual posture and anatomical problems, with discussions of grooming and styling. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-120

Body Dynamics (Women)

1 Cr.

Emphasis on refinement of exercise program and grooming habits as lifetime routines. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-119 Body Dynamics (Women) or departmental approval.

760-121

Social Dancing (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Instruction and practice in the fundamental steps of a variety of popular dances. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-123

Square and Folk Dancing (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Development of proficiency in folk and square dancing. Includes history and etiquette. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-124

Cheerleading (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Techniques of cheerleading, creating original routines, understanding and control of spectator enthusiasm. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-125

Creative Rhythms (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Development of proficiency in fundamentals of locomotor skills and rhythm activities. Includes modern dance and jazz, with emphasis on creating new forms from familiar media. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-131

Aquatics - Beginning Swimming (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Fundamental swimming skills for non-swimmers. Emphasis on elementary forms of propulsion and introduction to deep water. Lecture o hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-132

Aquatics - Advanced Beginner Swimming (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Development of deep water swimming skills for advanced beginners. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-131 Aquatics-Beginning Swimming (Coeducational) or departmental approval.

181


PHYSICAL EDUCATION 760

760-133

Aquatics - Intermediate Swimming (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Development of form and endurance in the popular swimming strokes. Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-132 Aquatics - Advanced Beginner Swimming (Coeducational) or departmental approval.

760-134

Aquatics -

Lifesaving (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Instruction and practice in six basic styles of swimming and in elementary lifesaving skills and pool-side first aid . A course basic to the American Red Cross Senior Lifesaving course. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-133 Aquatics-Intermediate Swimming (Coeducational) or departmental approval.

760-135

Aquatics -

Lifesaving (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Techniques of swimming rescue including approaches, carries, releases and lifts. Successful completion includes certification as American Red Cross Senior Lifesaver. Lecture 0 hours. Labora tory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-134 Aquatics-Lifesaving (Coedu路 cational) or consent of instructor.

760-136

Aquatics - Synchronized Swimming (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Fundamental skills of synchronized swimming and practice in combining these skills into routines for recreational and competitive purposes. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-133 Aquatics -Intermediate Swimming (Coeducational) or departmental approval.

760-137

Aquatics - Advanced Competitive Activities (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Develops proficiency in advanced aquatic activities including competitive swimming, springboard diving a'1d water polo. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-134 Aquatics - Lifesaving (Coeducational) or departmental approval.

760-138

Aquatics - Skin and Scuba Diving (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Presents the basic skills necessary for safe participation in underwater diving. Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: American Red Cross Intermediate Card or departmental approval.

760-139

Aq uatics - Water Safety Instruction (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Introduction to teaching methods for all levels of swimming skills stressing analysis of individual aquatic techniques. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite : Possession of a current Red Cross Advanced lifesaving certificate .

182


PHYSICAL EDUCATION 760

760-140

Aq uatics - Water Safety Instruction (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Emphasis on teaching methods for lifesaving and survival skills. Completion of all requirements for certification as American Red Cross water safety instructor. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760 -139 Aquatics - Water Safety Instruction (Coedu cational).

760-141

Wrestling (Men)

1 Cr.

Instruction and participation in wrestling as an individual sport. Emphasis on development of skills, physical condition and know路 ledge needed in competitive wrestling. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-143

Fencing (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Instruction and participation in the elements of foil fencing. Emphasis placed upon development of skills, rules and safety for the beginner. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None .

760-144

Fencing (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Emphasizes skill development, rules, strategy and safety practices in sabre and epee. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-143 Fencing (Coeducational) or consent of instructor.

760-145

Fencing (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Skill development in epee and sabre. Stresses rules, strategy and etiquette in competitive fencing. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 760路143 Fencing (Coeducational) and 760-144 Fencing (Coeducational) or consent of instructor.

760-147

Soccer (Men)

1 Cr.

Stresses individual skills, team play, rules and strategy. Lecture o hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-148

Track and Field (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Introduction to techniques of track events. Opportunity for specialization. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-149

Skiing (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Stresses skill development , safety practices, competitive experience and its value as a lifetime activity. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

183


PHYSICAL EDUCATION 760

760-150

Handball (Men)

1 Cr.

Stresses skill development, safety practices, competitive experience and its value as a lifetime activity. Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-151

Field Hockey (Women)

1 Cr.

Rules , history, strategy and development of individual skills in field hockey . Team participation and competition. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None .

760-153

Family Camping (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Develops basic knowledge and skills pertinent to safe family camping. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite : None .

760-154

Self-Defense (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Basic karate , judo and other self-defense skills . History and philosophy of currently popular schools. Appreciation of fitness and selfdiscipline . Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None .

760-155

Self-Defense (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Refinement of basic ski lis, movements and practices in defense . Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-154 SelfDefense (Coeducational) .

760-156

Tumbling and Gymnastics (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Basic tumbling activities. Exercises on parallel bars, horse and buck; development of individual skills . Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None .

760-157

Tumbling (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Instruction and practice in floor exercises and tumbling. Refinement of basic techniques and development of tumbling routines . Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-156 Tumbling and Gymnastics (Coeducational) or departmental approval.

760-158

Gymnastic Apparatus (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Instruction and practice in the use of gymnastic apparatus . Refinement of skills performed on the still rings, even and uneven parallel bars, side horse, buck, highbar and vaulting box . Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-156 Tumbling and Gymnastics (Coeducational) or departmental approval.

184


PHYSICAL EDUCATION 760

760-159

Trampoline (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Instruction and practice in the use of the trampoline. Refinement of skills performed on the trampoline and development of basic routines. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-156 Tumbling and Gymnastics (Coeducational) or departmental approval.

760-160

Bowling (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Instruction and participation in bowling. InCludes history, rules and etiquette. Practice in scorekeeping and tournament competition . Stress on value as a lifetime sport. Lectu re 0 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-161 Bowling (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Advanced class in bowling emphasizing a high level of proficiency in skill performance. Instruction primarily on an individual basis . Includes general phases of bowling: delivery, release, spare conversion and bowling lane variables affecting the performance. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: 760-160 Bowling (Coeducational) or departmental approval.

760-164

Fall Sports (Men)

1 Cr.

Instruction and participation in sports and games of the season which may include activities such as touch football , speed ball and angle ball. Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-165

Spring Sports

1 Cr.

Instruction and participation in sports and games of the season which may include activities such as softball, track and field , paddleball. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite : None.

760-167

JUDO (Coed)

1 Cr.

Instruction and practice module in the physical education method and sport of Judo, with introduction to skills of throwing, holding, and immobilization techniques. Includes cognitive, affective, and locomotor development of the Olympic sport. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-168

Self-Protection (Women)

1 Cr.

Instruction and practice in the pre-arranged Self Defense based upon Hapkido (joint twisting, locking, and countering) and Karate (for personal Self Defense) techniques . Emphasis on techniques not requiring strength and weight , but balance, leverage and speed. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite : None.

185


Physical Science

770 770-101

Introduction to Physical Science

3 Cr.

A unified , elementary survey of the physical universe. Emphasis on scientific method, science history and modern developments . Introduces basic concepts of matter and energy, the structure of the universe through lecture-demonstration and text assignments. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

770-102

Introduction to Physical Science

3 Cr.

Continuation of 770-101 Introduction to Physical Science. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 770-101 Introduction to Physical Science or departmental approval'.

770-103

Introduction to Physical Science

3 Cr.

Continuation of 770-102 Introduction to Physical Science. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 770-102 Introduction to Physical Science or departmental approval.

770-107

Physical Science Laboratory

1 Cr.

Elementary laboratory exercises in physical science that correlate with lectures. Emphasis on the basic scientific principles and concepts and their practical applications to society. Lecture 0 hours.. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 770-101 Introduction to Physical Science or concurrent enrollment .

770-108

Physical Science Laboratory

1 Cr.

Continuation of 770路107 Physical Science Laboratory. Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite : 770-102 Introduction to Physical Science or concurrent enrollment.

770-109

Physical Science Laboratory

1 Cr.

Continuation of 770路108 Physical Science Laboratory. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 770-103 Introduction to Physical Science or concurrent enrollment.

186


Physical Therapist Assisting Technology 775 775-100

Health Care Orientation

2 Cr.

Discussion of health service resources - their interrelationships, functions, activities. Personal and medical team relationships. Legal and ethical responsibilities relating to health care services. Maintenance of environment conducive to patient welfare. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

775-101

Fundamentals of Physical Therapy

3 Cr.

History and principles of physical therapy. The physical therapy assistant role in relation to the licensed physical therapist. The functions and duties of the physical therapy assistant in health agencies. Survey of physical therapy treatment procedures. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequ~site: None.

775-120

Introduction to Clinical Conditions

2 Cr.

Injury and the process of inflammation and repair of tissue. Introduction to medical conditions commonly encountered in the practice of physical therapy which affect the integumentary, cardiovascular, respiratory and endocrine systems. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 775-101 Fundamentals of Physical Therapy and concurrent enrollment in 775-151 Physical Therapy Procedures.

775-121

Functional Anatomy

3 Cr.

Human anatomy with emphasis on function related to the neuro路 musculo-skeletal system . Study of motion of human body as basic to application to exercise. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 440-128 Anatomy and Physiology, 775-101 Fundamentals of Physical Therapy and 780路101 Introductory Physics or concurrent enrollment.

775-122

Neuro-Musculo-Skeletal Dysfunction

3 Cr.

Disease and injury and its effect on the human body as it relates to the neuro-musculo-skeletal system . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 775-121 Functional Anatomy.

775-151

Physical Therapy Procedures

3 Cr.

Theory and techniques of treatment procedures. Maintenance of equipment and supplies. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Pre- 路 requisites: 440-128 Anatomy and Physiology, 775-101 Fundamentals of Physical Therapy and 780-101 Introductory Physics or concurrent enrollment.

187


PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTING TECHNOLOGY 775

775-153

Clinical Observation

2 Cr.

Selected experiences in local physical therapy departments for the observation of application of physical therapy skills. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

775-201

Physical Therapy Procedures

3 Cr.

Lecture, demonstration and practice in the use of physical agents in physical therapy. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: 775 ·151 Physical Therapy Procedures. Concurrent enrollment in 775· 121 Functional Anatomy and 775·153 Clinical Observation.

775-202

Physical Therapy Procedures

2 Cr.

Continuation of 775·201 Physical Therapy Procedures with greater emphasis on correlating use of equipment with treatment procedures and correlating application with dysfunction. Survey of test pro· cedures for evaluation for strength and range of motion. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 775·122 Neuro·Musculo· Skeletal Dysfunction and 775·201 Physical Therapy Procedures.

775-203

Physical Therapy Procedures

2 Cr.

Continuation of 775·202 Physical Therapy Procedures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 775·202 Physical Therapy Procedures.

775-204

Physical Rehabilitation Procedures

3 Cr.

Principles and techniques of therapeutic exercise and rehabilitation in physical therapy. Practice and application of these techniques in se· lected disabilities. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 775·203 Physical Therapy Procedures.

775-251

Application of Physical Therapy

6 Cr.

Discussion and practice of physical therapy procedures and tech· niques in an institutional setting under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequi· site: 775-151 Physical Therapy Procedures.

775-252 Application of Physical Therapy

6 Cr.

Continuation of 775·251 Application of Physical Therapy. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: 775·251 Application of Physical Therapy.

775-253 Application of Physical Therapy

6 Cr.

Continuation of 775·252 Application of Physical Therapy. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: 775-252 Application of Physical Therapy.

188


PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTING TECHNOLOGY 775 PHYSICIANS ASSISTING 778

755-254

Application of Physical Therapy

4 Cr.

Clinical education in selected physical therapy departments for four weeks on a full-time basis. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 40 hours. Prerequisite: 775-253 Application of Physical Therapy.

775-261

2 Cr.

Stress in Illness

Discussion of stress, its symptoms and overt behavior in physical therapy. Review of techniques for building patient rapport in stress situations . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 775251 Application of Physical Therapy and 810-101 General Psychology.

Physician's Assisting 778 778-101

Special Medical Techniques

2 Cr.

Introduction to the techniques and equipment used in respiratory therapy including methods of administering oxygen therapy. Introduction to the fundamentals of radiology. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Admission to the program and departmental approval.

778-102

Special Medical Techniques

2 Cr.

Introduction to the techniques of pulmonary physiotherapy and breathing exercises with particular emphasis on postural drainage techniques. A basic knowledge of electrocardiography is also provided. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Admission to the . program and departmental approval.

778-110

Practical Clinical laboratory

5 Cr.

To provide orientation and clinical experience in a variety of technical procedures used in patient evaluation and management and exposure to the Constant Care Environment. This will include radiology, LV. therapy, electrocardiography, physical medicine, laboratory technology, and respiratory evaluation and management. Clinical experience 25 hours per week. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the program and departmental approval.

189


PHYSIC IANS ASSISTING 778

778-1 11

Practical Clinical Laboratory

778-1 20

Pharmacy and Therapeutics I

8 Cr.

throug h During the followi ng three quarte rs the studen t will rotate that nce experie g receivin areas nt inpatie various outpati ent clinics and the to d assigne be will t studen The . nature in l genera in total will be areas ation followin g areas : (1) General History and Physical Examin ics Pediatr (3) ; weeks 4 logy 12 weeks; (2) Obstet rics and Gyneco Medicine - 4 weeks ; (4) General Surgery - 4 weeks ; (5) Emergency y- 2 ngolog Otolary (7) ; weeks 3 tology Derma (6) - 4 weeks ; re Exposu ling Counse weeks; (8) Geriatr ic Medicine and Social Service 40 m minimu nce experie l Clinica - 2 weeks; (9) Elective - 4 weeks. uisites: hours per week. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prereq al. approv ental departm and tory Labora l Clinica al 778-11 0 Practic

2 Cr.

sis on An introdu ction to the nature and effects of drugs with empha ation, observ ent intellig , stration admini , respon sibility in medication hours. 2 Lecture . effects drug of ng reporti the and , ing accurate record m and Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites : Admission to the progra depart menta l approval.

778-121

Pharmacy and Therapeutics II

2 Cr.

2 Contin uation of 778 -120 Pharmacy and Therapeutics I. Lecture Therand cy Pharma 0 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 778-12 apeutics I and departm ental approval.

778-2 01

Clinical Specialty Training

8 Cr.

778-2 02

Clinical Specialty Training

8 Cr.

l experiContin uation of Practical Clinical Laboratory 778 -111. Clinica tory 0 Labora hours. ence minimu m 40 hours per week . .Lecture 0 ental departm and m progra the hours. Prerequisite: Admission to approval. l experi Contin uation of Clinical Specialty Trainin g 778-20 1. Clinica tory 0 Labora hours. 0 Lecture week. per ence minimu m 40 hours depart and g Trainin lty Specia l Clinica 1 778-20 uisite: hours. Prereq mental approval.

778-2 10

Introduction to Medicine

3 Cr.

ures The studen ts receive an introdu ction to the concepts and proced l physica precise a ing perform and history te accura an of obtaini ng uisites: Prereq hours. examination. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 Admission to the program and depart mental approval.

190


PHYSICIANS ASSISTING 778

778-220

Differential Diagnosis I

3 Cr.

Major and common diseases are presented and discussed, giving the signs and symptoms, physical findings, differential diagnosis from related or similar diseases , laboratory data interpretation, course of the disease, and the treatment most commonly agreed upon by the major specialties. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Admission to the program and departmental approval.

778-230

Differential Diagnosis "

2 Cr.

Major and common diseases are presented and discussed, giving the signs and symptoms, physical findings, differential diagnosis from related or similar diseases, laboratory data interpretation, course of disease, and the treatment most commonly agreed upon by the major specialties. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Successful completion of 778-220 Differential Diagnosis I and .departmental approval.

778-240

Emergency Medicine

3 Cr.

Presentation is made of the principles of surgical evaluation and management. Presentation is made of the principles of evaluation and management of the emergency patient. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Admission to the program and departmental approval.

778-250

Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Pediatrics

3 Cr.

Representatively, the student receives material describing the patient and her condition from diagnosis of pregnancy through the 6 week postpartum checkup. Instruction is presented on the GYN examination, diagnosis and management of common problems, and assisting with family planning. The pediatric history and physical examination, common diseases and conditions, and preventive medicine are presented and discussed with emphasis being placed on treatment and management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours~ Prerequisites: Successful completion of 778-220 Differential Diagnosis I and departmental approval.

778-260

Psychological-Social Counseling

2 Cr.

To introduce the student to various community agencies and their function in the community and apply an approach from a counseling point of view. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Admission to the program and departmental approval.

191


Physician's Surgical Assistant 880 880-101

Introduction to Surgical Assisting

2 Cr.

History of surgery and the operating room; operating room equipment; basic instruments and sterile techniques_ The student's position on the operating room team with progressive responsibilities and liabilities entailed in his duties_ Practice mock surgery_ Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

880-105

Surgical Instruments

2 Cr.

Acquaint students with the name, uses, care, sterilization and disinfection of surgical instruments. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 880-101 Introduction to Surgical Assisting.

880-161

Surgical Assisting Techniques

3 Cr.

Specific procedures, instrument techniques and providing proper exposure for operative procedures, suture material, tying knots, cutting sutures. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 710-102 Medical Terminology and 880-101 Introduction to Surgical Assisting.

880-162

Surgical Assisting Techniques

3 Cr.

Continuation of 880-161 Surgical Assisting Techniques_ Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 880-161 Surgical Assrsting Techniques.

880-241

Surgical Assisting Procedures

5 Cr.

Introduction in a clinical setting for the surgical assistant to practice procedures in the operating room and the use of instruments. Basic set up and techniques of preparation for surgery_ Hospital internship 19 hours per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 440-127 Anatomy and Physiology and 880 -162 Surgical Assisting Techniques.

880-242

Surgical Assisting Procedures

5 Cr.

Advanced experience in surgery, with emphasis on major surgery and special instruments. Iolospital internship 19 hours per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 880-241 Surgical Assisting Procedures.

880-243

Advanced Surgical Assisting Procedures

5 Cr.

Continue in a clinical setting for the more advanced practical experience in major surgery. Hospital internship 19 hours per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 880-242 Surgical Assisting Procedures. 192


PHYSI CIAN 'S SURGICAL ASSISTANT 880/ PHYSICS 780

880-260

Surgical Assisting Clinical Application

4 Cr.

Controlled clinical practice of the skills in surgery. Hospital internship 19 hours per week. Lecture '1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 880-241 Surgical Assisting Procedures.

880-261

Surgical Assisting Clinical Application

4 Cr.

Continue controlled clinical practice of the skills in surgery. Hospital internship 19 hours per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 880 -260 Surgical Assisting Clinical Application .

Physics 780 780-101

Introductory Physics

4 Cr.

Introduction to elementary classical mechanics with emphasis on behavior of bodies under the influence of equilibrium and nonequilibrium forces. Study of rotational and translational motion. Selected topics from theory of fluids. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 690-101 Algebra or equivalent or departmental approval.

780-102

Introductory Physics

4 Cr.

Development of oscillatory phenomena with topics from simple harmonic motion, waves on a string and electromagnetic waves. Applications to such areas as direct current and alternating current circuits and optics. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 690-101 Algebra or equivalent or departmental approval.

780-103

Introductory Physics

4 Cr.

The laws of thermodynamics and such central concepts as specific heat. Topics from modern physics such as special relativity , atomic spectra, photoelectric and laser phenomena , 'atomic and nuclear physics, with emphasis on their influence on modern technology. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 690~ 101 Algebra or equivalent or departmental approval.

780-111

Physics for Health Technologies

4 Cr.

Basic physics as applied to Health Technologies; encompassing measurement techniques , force and motion of solids and fluids, pressure, mechanical advantages', energy and work, electricity, wave phenomena and heat. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 690-091 College Arithmetic or equivalent.

193


PHYSICS 7BO/PLANT OPERATION SERVICES 790

780-121

Engineering Physics

4 Cr.

First quarter of a four-quarter sequence. Study of basic physical quantities, operations with vectors and scalars . Introduction to mechanics. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 690-151 Analytic Geometry and Calculus or concurrent enrollment. High school physics recommended.

780-122

Engineering Physics

4 Cr.

C?ntinuation of 780-121 Engineering Physics. Primarily concerned with mechanics. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 780-121 Engineering Physics and 690-152 Analytic Geometry and Calculus or concurrent enrollment.

780-221

Engineering Physics

5 Cr.

Continuation of 780-122 Engineering Physics. Heat, thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases, electricity and magnetism. Lecture 4 -hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 780-122 Engineering Physics and 690-153 Analytic Geometry and Calculus or concurrent enrollment.

780-222

Engineering Physics

5 Cr.

Continuation of 780-221 Engineering Physics. Optics, atomic and nuclear physics. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 780-221 Engineering Physics and 690-154 Analytic Geometry and Calculus or concurrent enrollment.

Plant Operation Services 790 790-101

Boiler, Turbine and Com pressor 0 perations

3 Cr.

Generation of steam and electric power. Theory and practice of powerhouse operations. Design, layout function, operation and maintenance of boilers, compressors, turbines, heating and ventilating equipment. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

790-111

Softeners, Cooling Towers and Filters

3 Cr.

Water usage and purification. Industrial filtration. Design, layout, function, operation and maintenance of water softeners, cooling towers and filters. Theory and practice of filtration systems in iridustry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

194


POLITICAL SCIENCE 800

Political Science 800 800-101

American National Government

4 Cr.

Nature, purpose and forms of the American government. Relation· ship between function and structure. Dynamics of political change. Outstanding governmental problems of modern society. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

800-102

State and Local Government

4 Cr.

American governmental structures and functions below the national level. Emphasis on functions and interrelationships with special at· tention to Ohio state and local government. Lecture 4 hours. Lab· oratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 800·101 American National Govern· ment.

800-103

Liberal-Democratic Governments

3 Cr.

A study of Liberal·Democratic political systems: Great Britain, France and Germany. Governing political concepts, institutions, processes, problems and prospects. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Pre· requisite: 800·101 American National Government.

800-104

Communist Governments

3 Cr.

A study of communist political systems: Soviet Union, China and Eastern Europe. Governing political concepts, institutions, processes, problems and prospects. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Pre· requisite: 800·101 American National Government.

800-105

The Black Voter and the Community

4 Cr.

Exploration of the development of political power by a black minority through an analysis of the exercise of political pressure by black Americans and the formation of coalitions with a variety of interest groups throughout the 19th and 20th centuries. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 800·101 American National Govern· ment.

800-106

Political Systems of Africa

4 Cr.

Comparative discussion of selected topics on national and interna· tional politics in black Africa with particular focus on the interrelation· ship between internal and external affairs. Examination of colonial policies, party systems, interest groups and modes of development. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 800·101 American National Government.

195


POLITICAL SCIENCE 800/PSYCHOLOGY 810

800-201

Contemporary World Affairs

4 Cr.

Problem study of modern international relations and of the forces which confront policymakers. Special emphasis on current areas of crisis. Designed primarily for students who seek an understanding of the United States in a tense and highly competitive political world. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 800-101 American National Government or departmental approval.

Psychology 810 810-101

General Psychology

3 Cr.

Introduction to fundamental psychological concepts and principles derived from a scientific approach to the study of human and animal behavior. Emphasis on methodology, biological bases of behavior and learning. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

810-102

General Psychology

3 Cr.

Continuation of 810-101 General Psychology. Emphasis on motivation , emotion and dynamics of personality. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 810-101 General Psychology.

810-107

Psychology of Human Behavior

4 Cr.

Introduction to psychological concepts and terminology for nonmajors. Emphasis on social living, problem solving, adjustment and the healthy personality. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

810-201

Child Growth and Development

4 Cr.

Growth, development and guidance of the child from conception through puberty. Interpretation and significance of creativeness, ad : justment abilities and child -adult relationships. Emphasis on both physiological and psychological growth stages of the child . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 810-102 General Psychology.

810-203

Educational Psychology

4 Cr.

Introduction to major psychological factors in the school learningteaching situation. Concepts in human development related to problems in the school situation. Teacher' s role in motivation , conceptual learning and problem solving. Development of emotional behavior, attitudes and values . Learning of skills, retention and transfer. Measurement of student abilities and achievement. 530101 Introduction to Education recommended. Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 810-102 General Psychology. 196


PSYCHOLOGY 810/REAL ESTATE 815

810-205

Dynamics of Human Behavior

4 Cr.

The interpretation of human behavior with special emphasis on motivation , emotion and the adjustment process. The implications of theory and methodology in the study of personality. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 810-102 General Psychology and sophomore standing or special permission of the department.

810-207

Behavior Modification

4 Cr.

Basic conditioning and learning principles emphasizing conditioned reinforcers, social reinforcement and token economies. Applications to normal and abnormal behaviors in home, school, hospital and correctional settings. Students will conduct individual experiments. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 810路102 General Psychology or 810-107 Psychology of Human Behavior and permission of instructor.

Real Estate 815 815-101

Real Estate Principles and Practices I

3 Cr.

A general introduction to real estate as a business and as a profession , designed to acquaint the student with the wide range of subjects necessary to the practice of real estate. Topics include license law , ethics, purchase agreements , escrow and title work , advertising , appraisals, sales, market trends , the role and influence of real estate in the economy , taxes and assessments. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

815-102

Real Estate Principles and Practices II

3 Cr.

Study of the factors necessary for the establishment and efficient operation of a sales and brokerage office . Salesman路 broker relations, terminology , listings, purchase agreements , loans, land contracts , office locations, records and procedures. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 815-101 Real Estate Principles and Practices I or departmental approval.

815-111

Valuation of Residential Properties

3 Cr.

Study of those elements which affect values of residential properties. Emphasis placed on the methods of evaluating property. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 815路101 Real Estate Principles and Practices I or departmental approval.

197


REAL ESTATE 815

815-121

Real Estate Law

3 Cr.

The legal phase of realty transactions, from the listing of the property to the closing of the escrow. A review for owners, brokers, salesmen, mortgage and escrow officers. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 815-101 Real Estate Principles and Practices I or departmental approval.

815-151

Real Estate Management

3 Cr.

Basic coverage of real estate management embracing the areas of leasing, maintenance, budgeting, creative market analysis, public relations, collections, office procedures, zoning and development. Relationship of management to other specialized real estate areas. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 815-101 Real Estate Principles and Practices I or departmental approval.

815-171

Real Estate Financing

3 Cr.

A study of the procedures and techniques requisite to the analysis of risks involved in financing real estate property. The sources of funds, lending institutions, their limits and requirements, types of mortgages including conventional, Federal Housing Administration, Veterans Administration and construction loans. Application forms, credit evaluations, interest rates, loan costs, loan closings and competition in the money market. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 815路101 Real Estate Principles and Practices I or departmental approval.

815-211

Real Estate Sales

3 Cr.

Deals with the current sales techniques. An approach to everyday problems in selling and sales management with particular emphasis on consumer motivation and reactions. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 815-101 Real Estate Principles and Practices I or departmental approval.

815-251

Valuation of Income Properties

3 Cr.

Factors which influence the value of commercial properties. Demonstrations of the methods which apply to the preparation of the appraisal cost. Analysis of comparative and capitalization approaches. Problems taken from actual appraisals. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 815-111 Valuation of Residential Properties or consent of instructor.

815-271

Commercial and Industrial Real Estate

3 Cr.

All aspects relative to the ownership and operation of shopping centers, industrial complexes, large apartments and related properties: leasing, broker functions, management, taxes, financing and construction methods. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 815-101 Real Estate Principles and Practices I or departmental approval. 198


RESPIRATORY THERAPY TECHNOLOGY 655

Respiratory Therapy Technology 655 655-101

Introduction to Respiratory Therapy

1 Cr.

Designed to acquaint the students with respiratory therapy as an occupation. The scope of the respiratory therapy field as a whole the duties, responsibilities and professional liabilities - are discussed. Hospitals are visited to observe respiratory therapy personnel at work. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

655-117

Physics for Respiratory Therapy

3 Cr.

Basic physics and related mathematics as applied to respiratory therapy. Gas laws and gas analysis in respiratory therapy. Gas flow, temperature, particle size, sedimentation rate, specific gravity, density and viscosity. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

655-131

Pharmacology for Respiratory Therapy

3 Cr.

Discussion of pharmacologic principles and agents used in practice of respiratory therapy. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 440-126 Anatomy and Physiology or departmental approval, and 440-221 Microbiology and 655-117 Physics for Respiratory Therapy.

655-140

Clinical Phase I (For Certification)

4 Cr.

Introduction in a clinical setting for the Respiratory Therapy Technician . Instruction and application in procedures and equipment, oxygen administration and other gases , aerosols and humidification, airway management and intermittent positive pressure breathing. Clinical experience 20 hours per week (11 weeks) . Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Completion of First Quarter Sequence.

655-151

Pathology for Respiratory Therapy

3 Cr.

Types of inflammation. Pathology of respiration and cardiovascular system. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 440-126 Anatomy and Physiology - or departmental approval and 440-221 Microbiology .

655-160

Clinical Phase " (For Certification)

4 Cr.

Continuation of 655-140 Clinical Phase I for the Respiratory Therapy Technician giving further attention in a clinical setting to respiratory therapy training. Instruction and application in equipment and procedures: administering pulmonary drainage, continuous ventilation, aerosol medication, cardiorespiratory drugs, and infection control. Clinical experience 20 hours per week (11 weeks). Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 655 -140 Clinical Phase I. 199


RESPIRATORY THERAPY TECHNOLOGY 655

655-181

Nursing Arts for Respiratory Therapy

3 Cr.

Includes principles of nursing skills and procedures as applied to the care of patients receiving respiratory therapy in a hospital setting. Internship experience emphasizes the acquisition of such skills. Hos· pital internship 2 hours per week. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 440·126 Anatomy and Physiology or depart· mental approval and 655·117 Physics for Respiratory Therapy.

655-190

Clinical Phase III (For Certification)

4 Cr.

Theory, review and application of respiratory therapy procedures in a hospital setting for certification of a Respiratory Therapy Technician. Clinical experience 40 hours per week (5 weeks) , (3 conferences). Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 655·160 Clinical Phase II.

655-200

Clinical Phase IV (For Certification)

4 Cr.

Continuation of 655·190 Clinical Phase III with emphasis on the clinical application of all procedures and treatment for certification of a Respiratory Therapy Technician . Clinical experience 40 hours per week (5 weeks) , (1 conference). Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in 655 ·190 Clinical Phase III.

655-201

Respiratory Therapy Procedures '

4 Cr.

Introduction in a clinical setting to resp iratory therapy equipment and procedures: Gas analysis, airway management, administering of oxy· gen and other gases, humidification, aerosols, lung physical therapy and spirometry. Hospital internsh ip 20 hours per week. (SUMMER ONLY.) Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 655·131 Pharmacology for Respiratory Therapy and 655·151 Pathology for Respiratory Therapy.

655-202

R'espiratory Therapy Procedures

4 Cr.

Continuation of 655·201 Respiratory Therapy Procedures giving fur· ther attention in a clinical setting to respiratory therapy equipment and procedures: administering gases other than oxygen, humidifica· tion, aerosols, lung physiotherapy and spirometry. Hospital internship 20 hours per week. (SUMMER ONLY.) Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 655·201 Respiratory Therapy Procedures or con· current enrollment.

200


RESPIRATORY THERAPY TECHNOLOGY 655

655-203

Respiratory Therapy Procedures

8 Cr.

Continuation of 655 -202 Respiratory Therapy Procedures in a clinical setting with special emphasis on resuscitation, assisted ventilation , controlled ventilat~ on and maintenance of equipment used. Hospital internship 24 hours per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours_ Prerequisite: 655-202 Respiratory Therapy Procedures.

655-221

Respiratory Therapy Clinical Application

7 Cr.

Theory and application of respiratory therapy procedures in pediatrics and medicine in a hospital setting. Hospital internship 16 hours per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 655-203 Respiratory Therapy Procedures or concurrent enrollment.

655-222

Respiratory Therapy Clinical Application

7 Cr.

Cont inuation of 655-221 Respiratory Therapy Clinical Application with emphasis on surgery, emergency ward , obstetrics and pulmonary function laboratory. Hospital internship 14 hours per week. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 655-221 Respiratory Therapy Clinical Application.

655-241

Respiratory Therapy Clinical Procedures

5 Cr.

Controlled clinical practice of the skills and mechanics of respiratory therapy in pediatrics and medicine in a hospital setting involving the respiratory therapy student under the guidance of a qualified respiratory the rapist. Hospital internship 16 hours per week. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 655 -221 Respiratory Therapy Clinical Application and concurrent enrollment in 655-222 Respiratory Therapy Clinical Application.

655-242

Respiratory Therapy Clinical Procedures

5 Cr. _

Controlled clinical practice of the skills and mechanics of respiratory therapy involving the respiratory therapy student under the guidance of a qualified respiratory therapist with emphasis on surgery, emergency ward, obstetrics and pulmonary function laboratory. Hospital internship 15 hours per week. Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 655-241 Respiratory Therapy Clinical Procedures.

655-251

Respiratory Therapy Ethics

1 Cr.

Respiratory therapy ethics. Employment and interview procedures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

201


RESPIRATORY THERAPY TECHNOLOGY 655/RUSSIAN 820

655-252

Medical Administration and Record Keeping

2 Cr.

Procedures of record keeping, budget development, personnel policies and recruitment, and departmental management techniques and administrative policies utilized in medical administration. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 655-222 Respiratory Therapy Clinical Application.

Russian 820 820-101

Beginning Russian

4 Cr.

Introduction to modern Russian with emphasis on speaking, reading and writing through multiple approach. Basic study of grammar and pronunciation . Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in 560-101 College Composition.

820-102

Beginning Russian

4 Cr.

Study of grammar. Oral and written exercises. Reading of elementary texts. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 820-101 Beginning Russian or one year of high school Russian.

820-103

Beginning Russian

4 Cr.

Strengthening facility of oral expression through discussions and study of speech patterns. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 820-102 Beginning Russian or two years of high school Russian.

820-201

Intermediate Russian

4 Cr.

Introduction to more advanced vocabulary and speech patterns and plays. Reading of stories by outstanding 19th and 20th century writers and a systematic review of grammar. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 820-103 Beginning Russian or two years of high school Russian.

820-202

Intermediate Russian

4 Cr.

Strengthening of oral and written facility of expression. Building of more advanced vocabulary and sentence structure. Review of grammar. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 820-201 Intermediate Russian or two years of high school Russian.

202


RUSSIAN 820 SOCIAL SCIENCE 840jSOCIOLOGY 850

820-203

Intermediate Russian

4 Cr.

Further readings and discussions on literary masterpieces in Russian for understanding and appreciation of Russian thought and culture. Oral reports on works by outstanding Russian writers. Review of grammar. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 820-202 Intermediate Russian or three years of high school Russian.

Social Science 840 840-103

Introduction to Social Science

3 Cr.

An interdisciplinary approach to the social sciences outlining the roles of the separate disciplines as they pertain to anthropologicalsociological and psychological behavior of man. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None or departmental approval for students who have earned credit in 850-101 Introductory Sociology.

840-104

Introduction to Social Science

3 Cr.

An interdisciplinary approach to the social sciences outlining the roles of the separate disciplines as they pertain to the economic and political behavior of man. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 840-103 Introduction to Social Science or 850-101 Introductory Sociology.

840-105

Introduction to Social Science

3 Cr.

An interdisciplinary approach to the soc ial sciences through selected topics and readings on the behavior of man. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 840-104 Introduction to Social Science.

Sociology 850, 850-101

Introductory Sociology

4 Cr.

Survey of the principles, theory, concepts and research methods used in sociology. Intensive study of such concepts as culture, social organization, norms, status and social stratification. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

850-102

Social Institutions

4 Cr.

Examination of the concepts developed in the introductory course as they relate to the family, religion, education, urban community and other such institutions. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 850-101 Introductory Sociology.

203


SOCIOLOGY 8S0/SPANISH 860

850-121

Marriage and Family Life

3 Cr.

An examination of contemporary marriage and family relations from a social-psychological perspective; special emphasis on the man-wom an relationship in transition; alternative models examined . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 810-102 General Psychology or 850-101 Introductory Sociology.

850-201

Social Problems

4 Cr.

Pathology of modern American society, including topics such as juvenile delinquency, adult crime, alcoholism, mental health, ruralurban conflict or other problems of current concern. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 850-101 Introductory Sociology.

850-205

Introduction to Social Services

4 Cr.

History of social services with emphasis on the United States from colonial times to the present; the emergence of social work as a profession; the helping services in perspective. Lecture 4 hours. Labora路 tory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 850-101 Introductory Sociology and sophomore standing.

850-231

Contemporary American Black-White Relations

4 Cr.

A sociological and psychological analysis of contemporary American black-white relations . A study of minority-majority behavior patterns as they are related to social-historical structure, stratification and power. Consideration of programs, movements and realistic alternatives to present conditions. Lec~ure 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 850-201 Social Problems or 850-101 Introductory Sociology with departmental approval.

850-251

Urban Sociology

4 Cr.

The nature and scope of the American urban environment; the urban condition as it relates to ' politics, technology, bureaucracy, ecoiogy, work and leisure; inequality, racism, sexism; alternatives to the urban crisis considered. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 850-102 Social Institutions or 850-201 Social Problems.

Spanish 860 860-101

Beginning Spanish

4 Cr.

A functional course with emphasis on spoken language. Introduction to grammar through cultural approach and written exercises. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in 560-101 College Composition.

204


SPANISH 860

860-102

Beginning Spanish

4 Cr.

Further study of grammar with oral and written exercises. Develop· ment of conversational proficiency. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 860·101 Beginning Spanish.

860-103

Beginning Spanish

4 Cr.

Further study of grammar. Vocabulary building with stress on Spanish idioms. Continued emphasis on development of oral and written skills. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prereq· uisite: 860·102 Beginning Spanish or two years of high school Spanish.

860-201

Intermediate Spanish

4 Cr.

Study of major developments in Spanish literature and civilization from the historic period to the Moorish conquest. Intensive exercises in written and oral expression. Grammar review. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 860·103 Beginning Spanish or two years of high school Spanish.

860-202

Intermediate Spanish

4 Cr.

Spanish literature and civilization from the ninth century to the end of the 15th century, with stress on EL CID and the ROMANCERO. Intensive exercise in written and oral expression . Grammar review. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 860-201 Intermediate Spanish or two years of high school Spanish .

860-203

Intermediate Spanish

4 Cr.

Study of the works of Spanish authors, from Cervantes to modern times, whose primary interest was critical examination of themselves and their. society. Intensive exercise in written and oral expression. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 860-202 Intermediate Spanish or three years of high school Spanish.

860-251

Spanish Conversation and Composition

4 Cr.

Discussion of topics of everyday life, colloquialisms, vocabulary distinctions and improvement of speech patterns. Practice in writing compositions. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: .860203 Intermediate Spanish or concurrent enrollment or departmental approval or three years of high school Spanish.

860-252

Spanish Civilization and literature

4 Cr.

Introduction to the civilization and literature of Spain: interrelation· ships among Spanish history , geography, literature and culture . Lec· ture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 860·203 Intermediate Spanish or concurrent enrollment or departmental approval or three years of high school Spanish. 205


SPANISH 860/ SPEECH COMMUNICATION 870

860-253

Readings in Spanish literature

4 Cr.

An introduction to Spanish literature from the golden age to the pres· ent. Highlights of representative authors and their works. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 860·203 Intermediate Spanish or concurrent enrollment or departmental approval or three years of high school Spanish.

860-262

Civilizacion y literatura de Puerto Rico

4 Cr.

Civilization and literature of Puerto Rico from the Pre·Columbian period to the present. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequi· sites: 860·203 Intermediate Spanish or concurrent enrollment, or departmental approval or three years of high school Spanish.

Speech Communication 870 870-091

Basic Speech Training

4 Cr.

Group drill and individual instruction designed to help students achieve adequate proficiency in use of voice and production of speech sounds in English. Helpful to international students as well as those with in· dividual problems in speaking or understanding speech. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Placement by department.

870-100

Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication

4 Cr.

Effective interpersonal communications. Application of principles to a variety of interpersonal situations. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

870-101

Fundamentals of Speech Communication

4 Cr.

Effective speech communication. Application of principles to a variety of practical speaking situations. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

870-105

Voice and Articulation

4 Cr.

A practical course in the application of both theory and technique to conscious vocal control and the development of articulation and pronunciation standards. Individual and group practice. Performance through exercises and readings. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

870-118

Basic Speech Training

4 Cr.

Group drill and individual instruction designed to help students achieve adequate proficiency in use of voice and production of speech sounds in English. Designed for international students as well as those with individual problems in speaking or understanding speech. Lec.~ure 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. 206


SPEECH COMMUNICATION 870

870-119

Basic Speech Training

4 Cr.

Continuation of 870·118 Basic Speech Training with emphasis upon achieving carryover of newly corrected speech sounds into connected speech. Designed for international students as well as those with individual problems in speaking or understanding speech. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 870·118 Basic Speech Train· ing or placement by department.

870-121

Group Discussion

4 Cr.

Designed to develop more effective participation in small groups through an understanding and practical application of the knowledge, attitudes and methods of group discussion . Lecture 4 hours. Lab· oratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: None.

870-201

Advanced Public Speaking

4 Cr.

Organizing and presenting informative speeches, persuasive speeches, and speeches for special occasions. Emphasis on using evidence and reasoning to support ideas, adapting to the audience , developing ef· fective oral style and improving physical and vocal attributes of delivery. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 870·101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication or departmental approval.

870-205

Oral Interpretation

4 Cr.

Development of the student's oral ability to communicate various types of written material with understanding and appreciation. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 870·105 Voice and Articu lation or consent of instructor.

870-211

Argumentation and Debate

4 Cr.

Discovering, selecting and evaluating evidence. Its arrangement into orderly, persuasive, oral and written argument Special emphasis on causes and effects of prejudice, remedies and the influence of Ian· guage on human behavior. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Pre· requisite: 870·101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication or con· sent of instructor.

870-212

Forensic Activity

1 Cr.

Participation in a variety of forensic activities by assignment including intercollegiate debate, choral reading, readers theater and individual events. This course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 870·211 Argumen· tation and Debate and/or 870·205 Oral Interpretation or consent of instructor.

207


SPEECH COMMUNICATION 870 SUPERMARKET MANAGEMENT 875

870-215

Introduction to Speech Pathology

4 Cr.

A survey of the profession of speech pathology and an introduction to the various organic and functional speech disorders including: deviant articulation, delayed speech development and stuttering; techniques for diagnosis and treatment are explored. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and 870 -105 Voice and Articulat ion or consent of instructor.

Supermarket Management 875 875-105

Introduction to Supermarket Management

3 Cr.

An introductory course for' those entering the field of Supermarket Management. A study of the supermarket, its history, evolution, and structure with emphasis on the growing importance of the store unit will be analyzed. Topics included are : history and development of the food industry , role of trade groups, systems of distribution , current food industry issues . Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequi site: None.

875-215

Supermarket Merchandising

4 Cr.

A study of the principles used in the various merchandising techniques peculiar to the supermarket. Emphasis is placed upon buying habits of the consumer , display, promotion , turnover, space management , demograph ic stud ies , customer spotti ng. Specific project studies include consum'er traffic pattern studies , customer area spotting, and various consumer categories as related to income, shopping trends , social and educational status , product information, and con sumer dynamics. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 875-105 Introduction to Supermarket Management .

875-225

Supermarket Operations

4 Cr.

A study of the principles and methods in the operations of a supermarket with regard to organization, planning, scheduling, layout , equipment , tools and materials, and work methods. The overall objective will be to develop an attitude in the students to strive for more efficient store operation to control costs , award utmost in customer services, and encourage personnel and corporate growth in supermarketing. Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 875 215 Supermarket Merchandising,

208


SUPERMARKET MANAGEMENT 875 THEATRE ARTS 890

875-230

Cooperative Field Experience

1 Cr.

Limited to students in the Cooperative Field Experience Program. Full-time or part-time employment in an approved area under College supervision, including an in-college seminar. The requirement for one credit is 120 clock hours of approved work. Students may earn three credits in one quarter. The course may be repeated to a cumulative maximum of nine credits. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

Theatre Arts 890 890-101

Theatre Appreciation

4 Cr.

An examination of the theatre as an art form; how playwrights, directors, actors, scenic designers, costumers, make-up artists and technicians approach their crafts. Students are not required to perform. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

890-121

History of the Theatre

3 Cr.

Survey of dramatic presentations, conventions and techniques from classical Greece through the Commedia dell'arte. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

890-122

History of the Theatre

3 Cr.

Survey of dramatic presentations, conventions and techniques from the Renaissance through the 18th century. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

890-123

History of the Theatre

3 Cr.

Survey of dramatic presentations, conventions and techniques from the 19th century to the present. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

890-130

Fundamentals of Theatrical Make-up

3 Cr.

Practical application of theory and techniques of make-up for performers. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

890-140

Introduction to Scenic Design

3 Cr.

Theory and practice of set design. Orientation to elements of scenery. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

890-141

Introduction to Scenic Design

3 Cr.

Preparation of floor plans, lighting plots, elevations and color renderings. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 890-140 Introduction to Scenic Design. 209


THEATRE ARTS 890 /TRANSPORTATION 900

890-250 through 252

Advanced Acting

3 Cr. Ea.

Scene study, methods of characterization . Consideration of styles of acting. Refinement of act ing techniques of the individual student. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : 890-152 Funda mentals of Acting or consent of instructor.

Transportation 900 900-121

Transportation Principles

3 Cr.

Survey of the American transportation systems , tariffs and classifica tion. Traffic regulations and industrial traffic management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours: Prerequisite: 520-100 Basic Economics.

900-210

Freight loss and Damage Claims

3 Cr.

This course is related to claims for the loss or damage of cargo transported by common carriers and a guide for the voluntary settlement of such claims. This course can serve as guide for those in industry handling claims . Emphasis is placed on the common carrier' s liability with specific phases of carrier liability, measure of damage, freight fo rwarder claims , ojl d carrier claim regulations. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 900 -121 Transportation Principles or departmental approval.

900-221

Tariffs and Classifications

3 Cr.

Through routes and rates-in-transit privileges. Technical tariffs and various rate interpolations. Over-charges and under-charges, loss and damage, import and export. Emphasis on theoretical considerations. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : 900-121 Transportation Principles.

900-222

Tariffs and Classifications

3 Cr.

A continuation of 900-221 Tariffs and Classifications. Uniform freight classifications, classification committee procedure and their phases of tariff and classification . Emphasis on practical applications. Lec-' ture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 900-221 Tariffs and Classifications.

900-231

Transportation Regulations

3 Cr.

Local, state and federal legislative acts regulating the transportation systems. Includes the Public Utilities Commission Act , Interstate Commerce Act and Civil Aeronautics Board Act. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 900-121 Transportation Principles.

900-241

Industrial Traffic Management

4 Cr.

Basic principles of the transportation funct ion operating within a commercial company. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hou rs. Prerequisite: 900-121 Transportation Principles. 211


Transfer or University Parallel Curriculums Transfer or University Parallel curriculums in Liberal Arts and professional fields such as Business Administration, Education, Engineering and the Engineering Technologies are planned in consultation with the student's counselor. The courses par<!lIel the curriculums of the four-year college or university. It is the responsibility of the student to be acquainted with and . to follow the requirements of the institution to which the student intends to transfer. In general, transfer students specialize at the senior institution during the junior and senior year. Typical course work during the freshman and sophomore years involves the following subject areas: College Composition British or American Literature American or World History Science Mathematics Social Sciences Humanities Students intending to major in Liberal Arts usually complete two years of a foreign language, or the equivalent, at the college level. Students planning to pursue a Baccalaureate degree in Business Ad ministration need at least a year of college-level mathematics (including algebra) as preparation for later courses involving statistics and other quantitative methods. Engineering students take a concentration of courses in theoretical mathematics. The College offers preparatory or refresher courses in English composition, reading comprehension, speech and mathematics for students who are deficient in basic skills areas. Such courses are not designed for transfer but are intended - to provide students with an opportunity to improve their skills.

212


Career Programs Listed in alphabetical order on the following pages are quarter sequences for each of the two-year Associate degree curriculums in the Career Programs. These sequences encompass four general categories: Business, Engineering, Health and Public Service technologies. Each student should confer with a counselor about course selection prior to or at the time of registration. Only with the approval of the appropriate dean may students substitute courses for those not specifically required for graduation and courses outside the area of specialization. A Certificate of Proficiency may be obtained in the programs having an asterisk ( " ) in the following list of two-year career curriculums offered: PAGE 214-215 Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology 216-217 Aviation Technology 218-219 (Business) Accounting" 220-221 (Business) Banking and Finance 222-223 (Business) Business Management 224-225 (Business) Business Management with Emphasis on Small-Business Management 226-227 (Business) Commercial Art 228-229 (Business) Court and Conference Reporting 230-231 (Business) Data Processing" (Business) Hospitality Management with Emphasis on Culinary Art 232-233 (Business) Hospitality Management with Emphasis on Hotel-Motel Management 234-235 (Business) Hospitality Management with Emphasis on Housekeeping Management 236-237 (Business) Hospitality Management with Emphasis on Institutional Food Management 238-239 (Business) Hospitality Management with Emphasis on Restaurant Management 240-241 (Business) I ndustrial Management 242-243 (Business) Marketing 244-245 (Business) Office Administration " 246-247 (Business) Supermarket Management 248-249 (Business) Real Estate" 250-251 (Business) Supermarket Management" 252:253 (Business) Transportation" 254-255 Certified Laboratory .Assisting (One-year Certificate Program) 308 256-257 Child Care Technology 258-259 Dental Hygiene 260-261 Dental Laboratory Technology 262-263 Dietetic Technology 264-265 Drafting and Design 266-267 Early Childhood Education Educational Assisting Technology 268-269 Electrical-Electronic Engineering Technology 270-271 Fire Technology 2n273 Graphic Communications Management and Technology 274-275 Industrial Technology" 276-277 Law Enforcement 278-279 Library/Media Technology 280-281 Mechanical Engineering Technology 282-283 Medical Assisting 284-285 Medical Laboratory Technology 286-287 Medical Record Technology 288-289 Mental Health Technology 290-291 Micro-Precision Technology 292-293 Nursing 294-297 Occupational Therapy Assisting Technology 298-299 Physical Therapist Assisting Technology 300-301 Physician's Assisting 302-303 Physician's Surgical Assi.stant 304-305 Respiratory Therapy Technology 306-307 Respiratory Therapy (One-Year Certificate Program) 309 213 Watch Repair (One-Year Certificate Program) 310


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Associate of Applied Science Degree in Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology Property development personnel make up one of the largest groups in the nation's labor force. This program is designed to prepare students for paraprofessional employment in the construction industry. Possible career positions include architectural draftsman, field engineer, materials and job estimator, construction supervisor, specifications writer, building materials salesman, contractor or building inspector. The building construction technician often serves as a liaison between the architect or engineer and the building contractor.

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FIRST QUARTER

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Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

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Engineering

3

3 2

3 15

550·211 Introduction to Surveying 550·251 Strength of Materials Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology 450·221 Building Equipment 450·241 Principles of Structural Design Psychology 810·101 General Psychology

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SECOND QUARTER

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Cr. Hrs_ English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology 450-122 Architectural Drawing Physics 780-101 Introductory Physics Mathematics 690-105 Trigonometry

3 3

3

4

Psychology 810-102 General Psychology Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology 450.-222 Building Equipment 450-231 Contracts and Specifications 450-242 Principles of Structural Design 450-251 Construction Procedures

Hrs_

3 3 2 3 3

Engineering

3

550-212 Surveying

4

17

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SIXTH QUARTER

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Cr. Hr•. Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Economics 520- 100 Basic Economics Architectural a~d Construction Engineering Technology 450-223 Building Equipment 450-232 Construction Estimating 450-243 Pri nciples of Concrete Design 450-261 Contract Drawing Preparation

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**Engineering 550-120 may be substituted by evening students.

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Associate of Applied Science Degree in Aviation Technology Provides education and training for a career in aviation with Federal Aviation Administration licenses for private pilot, commercial pilot, instrumentation rating and instructor's rating. Also provides training for general aviation industry careers.

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FIRST QUARTER

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Cr. Hrs. Aviation Technology 435-101 Private Pilot Theory 435-151 Primary Flight* English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Elective Graduation Requirements)** Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3 3

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Aviation Technology 435-141 Aviation Meteorology 435-201 Intermediate Flight* Business Administration 460-108 Introduction to Business Social Science (See Elective Graduation Requirements)*** Social Science (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

Mathematics 690-105 Trigonometry or equivalent high school Algebra & Trigonometry

3 3 3 3 3

3 18


FIFTH QUARTER

SECOND QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. Aviation Technology 435-121 Commercial Pilot Theory 435-171 Commercial Pilot* Engineering 550-120 Engineering Calculating Device. Office Administration 830-101 Typewriting English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3 3 2

2

Aviation Technology 435-105 Aviation Communications 435-202 Intermediate Flight* 435-271 Flight Instructor

3 3 3

Transportation 900- 1 21 Transportation Principles

3

Mathematics and Science Elective ** ••

3

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15

3

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THIRD QUARTER

SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

Aviation Technology 435-172 Commercial Pilot* 435-221 Instrument Pilot Theory English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3 3 3 3

Cr. Hr •. Aviation Technology 435-281 Ground Instruclar Business Administration 460-112 Business Management Transportation 900-231 Transportation Regulations Mathematics and Science Elective (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

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There is today an increasing demand for the services of accountants in business, industry and government. Highly qualified accountants are well prepared for promotion to management positions of responsibility. Career opportunities are available in the financial area of accounting as well as in the administration of other business activities such as sales, procurement, credit and collections, business research, data compilation and reporting. This curriculum prepares individuals for immediate employment, working under supervision in the preceding areas. It also provides a sound basis for advancement as experience and further education are acquired.

QUARTER SEQUENCE Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduatian Requirements) * Social Science I I (See Specific Graduatian Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Business Administration 460- 108 Introductian ta Business Accounting 410- 107 Business Mathematics 410-121 Principles of Accounting

3 3

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Humanities, Social Science or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Science or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

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SECOND QUARTER

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. -"; English /0:;>-' (See Specifoc Graduation Requirements) * Social Science , I '5 T I ~ (See Specifoc Graduation Requirements) ...... Health or Physical Education (See Specifoc Graduation Reauirements) Data Processing 490-101 Electronic Data Processing Accounting 410- 122 Principles of Accounting

3 3

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Humanities, Social Sciences or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Office Administration 830-150 Business Communications Accounting 410-110 Principles of Finance 410-231 Cost Accounting

3 3 3

3 4

4 16 15

SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER

Cr. Hrs .

Cr. Hrs . ~ English or Speech

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3 3

4

Humanities, Sociol Sciences or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Sodal Sciences or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Elective 460Accounting 410-232 Cost Accounting

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Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Banking and Finance

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FIRST QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 4 10- I 07 Business Mathematics 410-121 Principles of Accounting Banking and Finance 437 -10 I Principles of Bank Operations

3

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

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Economics 520-162 Principles of Economics

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SECOND QUARTER

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English (See Specific Graduatian Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduatian Requirements) Accaunting 410-122 Principles of Accounting Psychology 810- 107 Psychology of Human Behavior Banking and finance 437-115 Bank Management

3 3

4 4 3

Health ar Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Business Administration 460-213 Business Law Office Administration 830-150 Business Cammunications Banking and finance 437- 110 Money and Banking 437-116 Supervision and Personnel Administration 437-143 Installment Credit

3 3 3

3 17

17

SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER

3 3

3

Humanities (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Data Processing 490-101 Electronic Data Processing Banking and finance 437-120 Analysis af Financial Statements 437 - 1 21 Financing Business Enterprise 437Elective

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Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Business Management More than 4 ,500,000 salaried workers today are engaged in managing the business activities of our nation's enterprises . Many others are self路employed managers who carryon all or part of the activities necessary for the management of their own businesses. This two路year curriculum offers a working knowledge of varied business procedures as preparation for a middle-level management career with a small or large company.

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Cr. Hr> . English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410-107 Business Mathematics Data Processing 490-101 Electronic Data Processing Business Administration 460-108 Introduction to Business

3 3 3

Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities , Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requ irementslt Business Administration 460Elective

4

Business Administration

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460-213 Business Law Marketing 685-201 Principles of Marketing

3 3

4 4

16 15


SECOND QUARTER

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

Economics 520·100 Basic Economics " Accounting 410-121 Principles of Accounting Business Administration : 460-216 Introduction to Industrial Purchasing

3

Cr. Hrs.

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)t

3

3

3

3 Office Administration 830-150 Business Communications Business Administration 460-214 Busi ness law 460Elective*

3 4

4

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17

3

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SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)' Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410-122 Principles of Accounting Business Administration 460-112 Business Ma/Ttlgement

3

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Business Administration 460-24 1 Office Management Elective

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Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Business Management and Emphasis on Small-Business Management

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QUARTER SEQUENCE FIRST QUARTER

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Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410-107 Business Mathematics

Business Administration 460-108 Introduction to Business Psychology 810-101 General Psycholagy

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3 3 3 3

3

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410-201 Management Finance and Accounting Business Administration 460-213 Business Law Marketing 685 -201 Principles of Marketing

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FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduotion Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

Accounting 410-121 Principles of Accounting Psychology 810-102 General Psychalogy Business Administration 460-130 Small-Business Management

3 3

Cr. Hrs. Accounting 410-202 Management Finance and Accounting Business Administration 460-214 Business law 460-245 New-Business Seminar

460-

4 4 4 3

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SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Speech Communication 870-101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication

4

Business Administration 460-131 Small-Business Management

3

Economics 520-151 Development of the American Economy

3

4

Cr. Hrs. Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration 460-246 New-Business Seminar 460Elective* Industrial Technology 650 Elective*

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Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Commercial Art This two-year degree program is based on the professional standards followed by advertising agencies, art studios, and free-lance artists . Students in this program prepare for a variety of employment opportunities in commercial art including agencies, studios, letter press , lithography and silk screen process companies, department stores and newspapers.

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Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Art 430-105 Drawing 430-108 Fundamentals of Desig n

Commercial Art 438-101 Commercial Art and Advertising Orientation 438-111 Typography and layout Graphic Communications and Management Technology 616-113 Photography

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3

3 3 2 2

3 16

Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) (Se e Elective Graduate Requirement) Health or Physical Education (Se e Specific Graduation Requirements) Art 430-102 Art History 430 - 131 Commercial / Adv€'I"tising Art Commercial Art 438-201 Graphic Drawing 438-221 Graphic Production

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FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Art 430-106 Drawing 430-109 Fundamentals of Design 430-201 Life Drawing Commercial Art 438-112 Typography and layout

3

3 3 3 3 2

Cr. Hrs . (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Art 430- 103 Art History 430-132 Commercial / Advertising Art Commercial Art 438-202 Graphic Drawing 438-211 Illustration 438-222 Graphic Production

17

THIRD QUARTER

Art 430- 107 Drawing 430-202 Life Drawing Graphic Communications and Management Technology 616- 171 Negative Stripping and Camero Commercial Art 438-113 Typography and layout

3 3 2 3

2 17

SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3

3 3 3 3

4 2

18

(See Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Art 430-104 Art History 430-133 Commercial / Advertising Art Commercial Art 438-212 Illustration 438-261 Commercial Art Specialization

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Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Court and Conference Reporting This program provides a practical and theoretical preparation for career reporters in the court room and business community in general, where there is a serious shortage of qualified personnel. The student is prepared to work as a court reporter, or as a free-lance reporter in civil, criminal, municipal or supreme court.

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English 560-101 College Composition Social Science (See Specific Graduatian Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410-111 Practical Accounting Co url and Conference Reporting 482-113 Machine Reporting Office Administration 830-102 Typewriting"

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FOURTH QUARTER Cr. Hr •• 3

Cr. Hrs. Humanities, Sociol Sciences, or Science and Mathemalics (See Elective Graduation Requi rements)

3

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Courl and Conference Reporting 482-213 Machine Reporting 482-216 Testimony and Depositions Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Law Enforcement 670-122 Criminal Law

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SECOND QUARTER

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Cr. Hrs. English 560-102 College Composition Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

Humanities, Social Sciences, or

3 3

Humanities , Social Sciences, or

Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Court and Conference Reporting 482-114 Machine Reporting Office Administration 830-103 Typewriting Medical Assisting 710-102 Medical Terminology

3 3 2

3

Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Court and Conference Reporting* 482-214 Machine Reporting 482-217 Testimony Office Administration 830-201 Advanced Typewriting

3 3 3

2

Business Administration

460-213 Business Law Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Law Enforcement 670-123 Laws of Evidence

4

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SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English or Speech Communication (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Court and Conference Reporting 482-115 Machine Reporting 482-116 Court Orientation and Transcription Office Administration 830-200 Advanced Typewriting Law Enforcement 670-121 Criminal Law

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Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Court and Conference Reporting* 482-215 Machine Reporting 482-218 Jury Charge 482-219 Court Orientation and Advanced Transcription Office Administration 830-202 Advanced Typewriting

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' Each Court and Conference Reporting course requires a minimum of one weekly court visit. " Students are expected to begin the typing sequence at this advanced level. Beginners will need to take preparatory courses.

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Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Data Processing Through continuing research, the number and diversity of electronic data processing applications are growing rapidly. More and more firms today are turning to electronic computers to expedite and accurately process the complex facts and figures of their business operations. This curriculum focuses attention on the programming aspects of machine use, and offers instruction in hardware organization and systems methodol· ogy. Graduates are eligible for career opportunities as programmers, junior analysts and operations personnel.

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3 3 3 3

C) Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduatian Requirements) Mathematics 690·141 Elementary Probability and Statistics Accounting 410-122 Principles of Accounting Elective Data Processing 490·203 Camputer Programming

4

4

4 3

4 16 16


FIFTH QUARTER

SECOND QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)'

3

Social Science

(See Specific Graduation Requirements) Mathematics 690·102 Algebra" Data Processing 490·111 Data Processing Applications 490·201 Computer Programming

3 3 3

4

Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Economics 520- 100 Basic Economics or 520· 161 Principles of Economics Data Processing 490·221 Programming Systems 490·231 Systems Analysis

3 3 or 4

4 4

16 15 or 16

SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)' Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410·121 Principles of Accounting Data Processing 490·202 Computer Programming

3 3 3

3

" English 560.101, 560·102 and 560·103 . Speech Communication 870·700 or 870·101 may be substituted for English 560·103 .

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Data Processing

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Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration 460·112 Business Management

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Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Hospitality Management and Emphasis on Culinary Art A program designed to prepare the student for a mid-management career in culinary art. Major emphasis on developing practical culinary skills and developing expertise in the field of food handling, preparation and service for on-premise consumption.

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FIRST QUARTER

Cr. Hr..

Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Hospitality Management 635-101 Introduction to Hospitality Management 635- 1 02 Sonitation and Safety in Food and ladging Esta blishments 635-111 Food Technology 635-114 Pantry Procedures

3

3 3 6

3

Accounting 410-107 Business Mathematics Business Administration 460-213 Business law Psychology 810-101 General Psychology Social Science (See Specific Gradu~tion Requirements) Hospitality Management 635-204 Catering and Table Service 635-214 Food and Beverage Control

3 4

3 3

3 3

19 19

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FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See SpeciAc Graduation Requirements)

3

Health or Physical Education (See SpeciAc Graduation Requirements)

Social Science (See SpeciAc Graduation Requirements)

3

Hospitality Management 635-115 Culinary Theory and Production 635-116 Baking Principles and Production

6

Cr. Hrs.

Accouriting 410-121 Principles of Accounting Hospitality Manageme.,t 635-202 Management Operations 635-205 Buffet Catering and Decorating 635-213 Layout and Equipment 635-215 SlIpervisory Techniques

4 6 3 3 3

6 19

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19

Cr. Hr•.

Cr. Hr•.

English or Speech Communication (See SpeciAc Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See SpeciAc Graduation Requirements) Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

Hospitality Management 635- 117 Convenience Foods 635-118 Advanced Culinary 635- 125 Quantity Food Purchasing 635-131 Communication in the Hospitality Industry

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SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER

3

3 or 4

Chemistry 480-106 Introduction to Organic Chemistry Economics 520- 100 Basic Economics or 520-161 Principles of Economic·s Social Science (See SpeciAc Graduation Requirements)

3 3 3 3

5 3 or 4

3

Psychology 810-102 General Psychology

3

Hospitality Man.a gement 635-207 International Cuisine 635-208 Classical Cuisine

3 3

19 or 20 20 or 21 SUMMER SESSION Cr. Hrs.

Hospitality Management 635-201 Summer Field Experience tv W W

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QUARTER SEQUENCE

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Hospitality Management 635-101 Introduction to Hospitality Management 635-102 Sanitation and Safety in Food and lodging Establishments 635-111 Food Technology

Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3

3 3 6

4 20

Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requir> e ments) Psychology 810-101 General Psychology Social Science 840-104 Introduction to Social Science Hospitality Man> a gement 635-202 Management Operations 635-214>Food and Beverage Control

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FIRST QUARTER

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SECOND QUARTER

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Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science 840- 103 Introduction to Socia I Science Accounting 410- 107 Business Mathematics Hospitality Management 635-112 Quantity Food Technology 635-124 Hotel-Motel Sales Promotion

3

3 3

Psychology 810 - 102 General Psychology Business Administration 460-213 Business Law Hospitality Management 635 - 203 Intern.hip 635-215 Supervisory Techniques 635-2'25 Hotel-Motel Law 635-226 Hotel-Motel Maintenance Engineering

4 3

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SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs.

English or Speech Communication (See Specific Gra duation Requirements) Accounting 410-121 Principles of Accounting Hospitality Management 635 - 126 Housekeeping Procedures 635- 127 Supervisory Housekeeping 635-131 Communication in the Hospitality Industry

3 4 3 3 3 16

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Chemistry 480- 106 Introduction to Organic Chemistry Social Science 840- 105 Introduction to Socia I Science Economics 520-100 Basic Economics or 520-161 Principles of Economics Hospitality Management 635 - 227 Hotel-Motel Front Office Procedure 635 - 228 Hotel-Motel Accounting

5 3 3 or 4 3 3 17 or 18

SUMMER SESSION Cr. Hrs.

Hospitality Management 635-201 Summer Field Experience

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Cr. Hrs. English (See SpeciAc Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See SpeciAc Graduation Requirements) Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3

3

Psychology

810·101 General Psychology" Hospitality Management 635·101 Introduction to Hospitality Management 635·102 Sanitation and Safety in Food and lodging Establishments

3

3

3 16

Biolog y 440·128 Anatomy and Physiolog y Bu siness AdministratiolJ 460 · 216 Introdu ction to Industrial Purchasing Industrial Te chnology 650 · 125 Elements of Time Study Social Science 840·104 Introduction to Social Scien ce Hospitality Man ag e me nt 635·202 Manag e ment Operation s

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SECOND QUARTER

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I ndustrial Technolog y

English

3

(See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting

3

410-107 Business Mathematics So cial Science

840-103 Introduction to Social Science or 850-101 Introductory Sociology

3 or 4

Hospitality Management

650-126 Principles of Work Simp lifica tion in Industry 650-134 Employee and Plant Safety Hosp itality Management

635-203 635-215 635-225 635-226

Internship Supervisory Techniqu es Hotel-Motel Law Maintenance and Engin eeri ng

3 3

635-124 Sales Promotion 635-128 Fundamentals of Interior Design

3 3

3 3 3 3 18

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THIRD QUARTER

870- 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication

4

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810-102 General Psychology 3 3 3 17 or 18

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635-227 Hotel- Motel Front Office Procedures

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840-105 Introdw:tion to Social Science

Hospitality Management

635-201 Summer Field Experience

3

(See Specific Graduation Requirements )

Ph ysical Education

635-126 Housekee ping Procedure 635- 127 Supervisory Housekee ping 635-131 Communications in Hospitality Management

Economics 520-100 Basic Economics Health or Physical Education

Accounting

410-121 Principles of Accounting or 410-111 Practical Accounting

0 2 Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs.

870- 100 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communi ca tion or

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2S:: Cr . Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. English (See Specifk Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Hospitality Management 635 - 101 Introduction to Hospitality Management 635-102 Sanitation and Safety in Food and lodging Esta b lish ments 635-111 Food Technology Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

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FOURTH QUARTER

Psychology

3

3 3 6

4 20

810 - 101 General Psychology Social Science 840-104 Introduction to Social Science Hospitality Management 635-202 Management Operations 635-214 Food- and Beverage Control

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FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 4 10 - 107 Business Mathematics Social Science 840-103 Intraduction to Social Science Hospitality Management 635- 11 2 Quantity Food Technology 635-123 Foods and Nutrition

Cr. Hrs.

Economics

3

520-100 Basic Ecanomics

3

Business Administra tio n

3 3

4

4

460-2 13 Business La w Hospitality Management 635-203 Internship 635-215 Supervisory Techniques 635-2 12 Food and Beverage Management Seminar 635-213 Layout and Equipment

17

THIRD QUARTER

3 3 3 3 19

SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs.

Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 4 10-121 Principles of Accounting Hospitality Management 635-113 Advanced Food Technology 635-125 Quantity Food Purchasing 635-13 1 Communication in the Hospitality Industry

4

4 3 3 3 14

Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) English or Speech Communication (See Specific Graduation Requirem ents) Socia l Science 840-105 Introduction to Social Science Psycholog y 810- 102 General Psychology Chemistry 480- 106 Introd uction to Organic Chemistry

3 3 3 5 15

SUMMER SESSION

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English (See Specifk Graduatian Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Hospitality Management 1535-101 Introduction to Hospitality Management 635-102 Sanitation and Safery in Food and Lodging Esta blishments 635 - 111 Food Technology Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

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FOURTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

Psychology 81 0- 101 Genera I Psychology Social Science 840-104 Introduction to Social Science Hospitality Management 635-202 Manag e ment Operations 635-214 Food and Beverage Centrol

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SECOND QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410 - 1 07 Business Mathematics Social Science 840-103 Introduction to Social Science Hospitality Management 635-112 Quantity Food Technology 635 - 124 Hotel-Motel Sa les Promotion

Economics

3 3 3

4 3

3

520-100 Basic Economics Business Administration 460-213 Business Law

4

Hospitality Management 635-203 Internship 635-215 Supervisory Techniques 635-212 Food and Beverage Management Seminar 635-213 Layout and Equipment

3 3 3 3

16

THIRD QUARTER

19

Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410- 121 Principles of Accounting Hospitality Management 635-113 Advanced Food Technology 635-125 Quantity Food Purchasing 635-131 Communication in the Hospitality Industry

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4 3 3

3 14

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Cr. Hrs.

Hearth or Physical Education (See Specific Graduotion Requirements) English or Speech Communication (See Specific Graduation Require'ments) Social Science 840 - 105 Introduction to Social Science Psychology 810-102 General Psychology Chemistry 480-106 Introduction to Organic Chemistry

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QUARTER SEQUENCE FIRST QUART~R English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410-111 PractictJl Accounting Business Administration 460-101 Introduction to Industrial Management Economics 520-100 Basic Economics

3:

FOURTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

3 3

Cr. Hr•• Sociology 850-101 Introductory Sociology Business Administration 460-121 labor·Management Relations 460Electives ·

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FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Data Processing 490-101 Electronic Data Processing Psychology 810-101 General Psychology Humanities or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3 3

4

Cr. Hrs. Business Administration 460-201 Work Simplification 460-211 Production Control 460·220 Human Relations in Business 460· Elective *

3 3 3 4

Humanities or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3 16

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SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific:. Graduation Requirements) Psychology 810-102 General Psychology Business Administration 460- 111 Psychology of Supervision 460· Elective*

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Business Administration 460 - 112 Business Management 460-221 Materials Management 460· Elective * Humanities or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

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Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Marketing This two-year curriculum is concerned with the activities performed in supplying products and services to the consuming sectors of the economy. These activities include sales, warehousing, promQtion, credit maintenance and market research. It is the responsibility of the marketing depa rtment of any company to see that the appropriate product, at the right price, is made available to the buyers in the proper quantities when demanded.

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(See Elective Graduation Requirements)*

3

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Cr. Hr>. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410-107 Business Mathematics Business Administration 460-108 Introduction to Business Social Science ' 840- 103 Introduction to Social Science Humanities or Social Sciences

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Accounting 410-121 Principles of Accounting Business Administration 460-213 Business Low 460-220 Human Relotions in Business Marketing 685Elective *** Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

4 4 3

4 3

3 18

3 16


SECOND QUARTER

FIFTH QUARTER

Cr. Hrs .

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Marketing 685-201 Principles of Marketing Social Science 840-104 Introduction to Social Science Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3

4 3 3

Cr. Hrs. AccounHng 410-122 Principles of Accounting Business Administration .460-214 Business law Office Administration 830-150 Business Communications Marketing 685Elective ·** Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

14

4 4 3 3 4 18

THIRD QUARTER

SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs . Cr. Hrs .

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) '* Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Marketing 685-225 Principles of Advertising Social Science 840-105 Introduction to Social Science Humanities or Social Sciences ·(See Elective Graduation Requirements) *·

3

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4 3

(See Elective Graduation Requirements)

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Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Office Administration This curriculum provides preparation for career secretaries in business, industry and government. Graduates are qualified for positions with educational institutions, law firms, medical and insurance offices, hospitals, industrial plants and business firms. Other employment opportunities exist with county, city, state and federal government agencies.

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FOURTH QUARTER

FIRST QUARTER

Cr. Hrs. Humanities, Social Science s, or

3 3

3 2 3 15

Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410-111 Practical Accounting Office Administration 830-150 Business Communications 830-200 Advanced Typewriting 830-203 Advanced Shorthand

3

3 3 3 2 3 17

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SECOND QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific . Graduation Requirements)· Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Office Administration 830-102 Typewriting · · 830-105 Office Machines 830-111 Shortha nd **

3

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3 3

3 Business Administration

2 4 3

460-220 Human Relations in Business Office Administration 830-201 Advanced Typewriting 830-204 Advanced Shorthand

3 2 3

14 16

THIRD QUARTER Cr. Hrs. English or Speech Communication (See Specific Graduotion Requirements)· Social Science (See Specific Groduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduotion Requirements) Office Administration 830-103 Typewriting·· 830-106 Filing and Records Control 830-112 Shorthand **

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Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

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Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Purchasing Management PUl chases of materials, supplies and equipment represent a large part of a business or industrial firm's total cost of operation. Purchasing, because of its importance, is often designated as a separate responsibility to be handled by one or more individuals. Purchasing agents and their assistants are responsible for obtaining raw materials, goods and services at the lowest cost consistent with required quality. The majority of the nation's purchasing personnel are employed in manufacturing firms. Many also work in government agencies, public utilities, schools and hospitals.

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FOURTH QUARTER

Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduatian Requirements)' Sacial Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410·107 Business Mathematics

3

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3 3

Business Administration

460·108 Introduction to Business Data Processing 490·101 Electronic Data Processing

Cr. Hrs.

3

4 16

Marketing 685·201 Principles of Ma rketing Business Administration 460·216 Introduction to Industrial Purchasing Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3 3

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SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)'

Economics 520-100 Basic Economics" Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Office Administration 830-150 Business Communications Accounting 410-121 Principles of Accounting Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3

Humaniti es, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation RequirementsJt

3 3 3

Hrs.

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Business Administration 460-217 Intermediate Purchasing 460-213 Business Law 460Elective:j:

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Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)' Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Business Administration 460-112 Business Management 460Elective Accounting 410-122 Principles of Accounting Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3

(See Elective Graduation Requirements)t

4 3

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Business Administration 460-218 Purchasing Management 460-214 Busi ness Law 460-220 Human Relations in Business

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3 3 3 4 3

4 16

'English 560-701, 560-702 and Speech Communication 870-100 or 870-107 recommended. " Economics 520-161 (4 cr.) and 520-162 (4 cr.) may be substituted.

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Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Real Estate This curriculum is designed to fulfill academic requirements leading to real estate licensure in the State of Ohio and to prepare you for a professional career in the real estate industry. Graduates of the program are qualified for positions as brokers, sales agents, real estate managers, appraisers, counselors and real estate financiers.

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FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hr>. English (See Specific Graduatian Requirements禄 1 Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Business Administration 460-108 I ntrod uction to Busine .. Real Estate 815- 101 Real Estate Principles and Practices I Elective (See Elective Graduatian Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3 3

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Cr. Hr> . Office Administration 830路150 Business Communications Real Estate 815-121 Real Estate law 815路151 Real Estate Management Elective (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3

3 3 6

3 15

3

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SECOND QUARTER

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)' Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Economics 520-100 Basic Economics Real Estate 815-102 Real Estate Principles and Practices II Elective (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

**

3 3

Marketing 685-201 Principles of Marketing Real Estate 815-171 Real Estate Financing

4

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Business Administration

3

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460路241 Office Management Elective (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3

4 3 14

16

THIRD QUARTER

SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. English or Speech Communication (See Specific Graduation Requirements)' Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3 3

Business Administration

460路112 Business Management Real Estate 815-111 Valuation of Residential Properties Heolth or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

4

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Real Estate 815 -211 Real Estate Sales or 815-251 Valuation of Income Properties Elective (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Electivest

3 3 12 18

*English 560-101, 560-102 and Speech Communication 870-100 or 870-101 recommended . * * Economics 520-161 may be substituted. I Students wishing to earn a certificate in Real Estate, rather than a degree, are required to take the courses indicated. fMarketing 685路225, Data Processing 490路101 , Real Estate 815-271 and a basic course in Architedural and Construction Engineering Technology are recommended.

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ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED BUSINESS IN SUPERMARKET MANAGEMENT This is a two-year career program directed toward preparing individuals as supermarket departmental man agers_ The departmental managers are responsible for ordering, receiving, price marking, merchandising, promoting, planning and supervision of their departments_

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QUARTER SEQUENCE FIRST QUARTER

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Cr_ Hrs_ English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Science or Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration 460-108 Introduction to Business Data Processing 490-101 Electronic Data Processing Social Science 840-103 Introduction to Social Science

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Humanities (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Science or Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration 460-220 Human Relations in Business Marketing 685-225 Principles of Advertising Supermarket Management 875-215 Supermarket Merchandising

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SECOND QUARTER

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Science or Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410-121 Principles of Accounting Social Science 840 - 104 Introduction to Social Science Supermarket Management 875-105 Introduction to Supermarket Management

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Cr. Hrs. Humanities (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

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Business Administration

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460-112 Business Management Marketing 685-202 Principles of Salesmanship 685-203 Principles of Retailing Supermarket Management 875-230 Cooperative Field Experience

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SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hr•.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410 - 122 Principles of Accounting Marketing 685 -201 Principles of Marketing Social Science 840-105 Introduction to Social Science Supermarket Management 875 - 230 Cooperative Field Experience

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Cr. Hrs . Humanities (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

Business Administration 460-111 Psychology of Supervision 460-213 Business Law Supermarket Management 87 5-225 Supermarket Operations 875-230 Cooperative Field Ex perience

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Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Transportation People who help move goods and people through the air and water and over land account for a sizable segment of the nation's work force_ This two-year curriculum is designed to prepare students for clerical , supervisory and administrative positions with a carrier or an industrial traffic department. Career possibilities include rate analyst, traffic claims agent, terminal office manager, reservations, salesman, traffic expediter and scheduler. Employment opportunities are available with truck, bus, water, rail and air carriers.

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QUARTER SEQUENCE Cr. Hrs.

Engli.h (See Specific Graduation Requirements)Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Phy.ical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410-107 Business Mathematics Business Administration 460-108 Introduction to Business Office Admini.tration 830-101 Typewriting

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Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) - Office Admini.tration 830-150 Business Communications Business Administration 460-213 Business Law 460-220 Human Relations in Business Transportation 900-221 Tariffs and Classifications

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FOURTH QUARTER

FIRST QUARTER

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