Issuu on Google+


ON TH E COVER ..... A SALUTE TO 1963 Ten years ago . . ... 1963! It was a good year for 3,039 Greater Cleveland youth and adults who lined up outside the old Brownell Building in September of '63 to register for the first classes at CCc. And CCC President Charles E. Chapman was pleased when he read The Commuter's page-one story of th e largest initial enrollment in the history of the community/ junior college movement.

What were some of the other momentous and not-so· momentous happenings in 1963?

an honorary citizen of the United States . Glen Van Slyke III, of Oak Ridge, Tenn. , won the Notional Spelling Bee. The U.S. death toll in Vietnam reached 30 on Jon . 2, 1963 . A computer calculated a ne w prime number, 2,917 digits long, the largest ever proved. Bobby Fischer won the U.S. Open Chess Championship at Bay City, Mich. Oxford beat Cambridge in the annual rowing race. Jr. Lt. Valentina V. Tereshkov was sent into orbit by the Ru ssians and became the first woman space trave ler.

The succ ess of TV's liThe Fugitive", starring Da vi d

Quintuplets were born in Venezuela and in South Dakota within an eight-day p e riod . The Cleveland Public library circulated more than 7,000,000 books and California was about to pass the state of New York in population . Th e '62 -63 Great lakes region Winter was the third coldest since the turn of the century. An Indianapolis man received a patent on a non-nicotine cigarette filled with ground corncob . The U.S. submarine, Thresher, was lost at sea with 129 aboard . The l.A . Dodgers took the Yanks

Jan ssen , gave rise to a spate of imitative shows, all

four games to zero in the World Series and the

of which hod heroes looking nervously over their sho ulders . The Beatles' "I Want to Hold Your Hand" was spinning on millions of turntabl es . Tom Jones was the top flick at the cinema . The Mono lisa, on loan from th e louvre, visited America. Ex-Clevelander Andy Warhol was in the vanguard of the new "po p"

Wichita (Kan.) Dreamliners were the National Baseball Congress Non-Pro champs. Russia owed the U.S. $428,819,108 on its World War I debt and there were 4,672,000 unemployed Americans. A total of 16,456 East Germans had climbed the Berlin Wall and escaped to the West, and the

Kennedy

was

assassinated

and

Johnson

suc -

ceeded him to the presidency. Studebaker ended production and Miss Arkansas, Donna Axuro, was

named Miss America . Rolph locher was mayor of Cleveland and Ghaulardi ruled local TV. Sonny liston's fists sent Floyd Patterson on a trip to the canvas and l. Gordon Cooper, Jr., circled the earth 22 times in Faith 7. The U.S. Surgeon General's warning began appearing on cigarette packages.

art movement. Roger Staubach was the Heisman

Trophy winner. What else happened in 1963, the year that Ohio's first public community college opened? The "hot line" between Washington and Moscow was installed. Sir Winston Churchill was proclaimed

biggest demonstration

ever seen

in

Washington

was held by 200,000 civil rights marchers . Cuban MIGs fired at a U.S . merchant ship and Soviet Premier Khrushchev hinted at retirement. That's the way the wo rld was ten years and thousands of CCC students ago.


• Admission to Cuyahoga Community College is open to ALL high school graduates as well as to non-high school graduates, 19 years of age or older, who demonstrate capability of college-level performance . • Submit your application to the Office of Admissions and Records at the campus of your choice - Eastern, Metropolitan or Western. Applications will be processed in order of their receipt. • The general admissions policy of the Col lege does not insure your admittance to a particular course or program. You may be requested to enroll in special courses to erase scholastic deficiencies. • If you are transferring to CCC from another college or university, or if you are a former CCC student seeking readmission , you may be affected by the College's probation and dismissal policies. • Persons under 19 years of age who have not completed high school are not considered eligible for admission to Cuyahoga Community College. An exception to this policy is explained in this Catalogue under ACADEMIC CREDIT IN ESCROW. • Submission of American College Test (ACT) results (where specified on the following pages) is not a condition for admission, but will be of assistance to you and the College for pre-registration and postregistration counseling. • In cases where the student has taken the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAD rather than ACT, the results may be submitted to CCC instead. NOTE: Please see ADMISSIONS section of Catalogue for additional information.


If you want

to enroll

... you have never attended college . . .

-----------------_.

atCCCfor OR . . . you have attended another college or university . . .

or more quar1er credits

------------------OR . . . you are currently enrolled at another college or university ...

------------------. .'

.

."

OR . . . you already have a Baccala urea te degree . . .


~ - --------------------------------------------------------

----- -

-

ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES You should submit the following materials before you register: • A completed APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION form. A completed CCC HEALTH RECORD form. High school transcript (ask your high school to forward this transcript directly to the Office of Admissions and Records of the campus you plan to attend) • American College Test (ACT) results (this should be forwarded from the testing agency , not from your high school, directly to the appropriate campus) • If you are 19 or 20 years of age, and have not received a high school diploma, you should submit the results of the General Educational Development test (GED) • All appli cants, 19 years of age or older, who have not been awarded a high school diploma , are asked to consult with Admissions and Records before completing admissions procedures.

,------------------------------------You should submit the following materials before you register: • A completed APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION form. A completed CCC HEALTH RECORD form. High school transcript (ask your high school to forward this transcript directly to the Office of Admissions and Records of the campus you plan to attend) • ACT results (this should be forwarded from the testing agency, not from your high school , directly to the appropriate campus) • ACT scores do not have to be submitted if you have earned 15 or more quarter credits of transferable college credit. Official transcripts from all colleges or universities you have attended (ask your former college or university to forward these transcripts directly to the Office of Admissions and Records of the appropriate campus) • If you were not in good standing at the last college or university attended, please see TRANSF ER STUDENTS in this Catalogue • 1 ______ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

If you wish to be admitted to CCC as a TRANSIENT student, you should submit the following materials before you register: • A completed APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION form. A letter from the dean or other appropriate administrator of your institution, indicating permission for you to enroll in a specific course or courses at Cuyahoga Community College • NOTE : A letter of permission is necessary each time you enroll as a TRANSIENT student at CCC, and should be submitted before or at the time of registration.

------------------------------------You should submit the following: • A completed APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION form. A completed Cuyahoga Community College HEALTH RECORD form.

3


- <_ .---_... _ --

I

If you

want to enroll

atCCCfbr

n or fewer ~

quarter ~

credits

~

and •••

~...

- - - - - - - - - -- - -

... you have never attended college ...

- - - - - - - - - - - - - ______ 1

OR ... you have attended another college or university . . .

------------------_. OR ... you are currently enrolled at another college or university . . .

-------------------OR ... you already have a Baccalaureate degree ...


ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES

You may registe r for the fi rst time as soon as you complete the APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION form . Before registering for any subsequent academic period, if you attended high school, you should submit a high school transcript (ask your high school to forward this t ranscript directly to the Office of Admissions and Records of the campus you plan to attend) • If you are 19 or 20 years of age, and have not received a high school diploma, you should submit the results of the General Edu cational Development test (GED) • All applicants, 19 years of age or older, who have not been awarded a high school diploma , are asked to consult with Admissions and Records before completing admissions procedures •

._------------------------------ ------You may register for the first time as soon as you complete the APPLI CATION FOR ADMISSIONS form . Before registering for any subsequent academic period , however, you should submit the following : High school transcript (ask your high school to forward this transcript directly to the Office of Admis sions and Records of the campus you plan to attend) • Official transcripts from all other colleges and universities you have attended (ask your former college or university to forward these directly to the Office of Admissions and Records of the appropriate campus) • If you were dismissed from the last college or university attended for reasons othe r than scholarship , please see TRANSFER STUDENTS in this Catalogue •

1 __ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

-------- -

----

If you wish to be admitted to CCC as a TRANSIENT student , you should submit the following mate r ials before you register : • A completed APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION form . A letter from the dean or other appropriate administrator of your institution , indicating permission for you to enroll at Cuyahoga Community College • NOTE: A letter of permission is necessary each time you enroll as a TRANSIENT student at CCC, and should be submitted before or at the time of registration •

1 ___ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

You should submit a completed APPLICAT ION FOR ADMISSION form •

5


EASTERN CAMPUS 25444 Harvard Rd. Warrensville Township, O. Phone 464·1450

44122

Office of Admissions and Records, phone 464·3535

METROPOLITAN CAMPUS 2900 Community College Ave . 44115 Cleveland, O. Phone 241·5966 Office of Admissions and Records, phone 241·5365

WESTERN CAMPUS 7300 York Rd. Parma, O. 44130 Phone 845-4000 Office of Admissions and Records, phone 845-4000 Completion of the new Western Campus (pictured) is expected in 1975.

DISTRICT OFFICE Brownell Building 2214 E. 14 St. Cleveland, O. 44115 Phone 241·5966 Completion of the new District Office (pictured) is expected late in 1973.


CuyahOga Community COllage CATALOGUE FOR THE 1973-74 ACADEMIC YEAR Published in Spri ng of 1973


F\u~~\n~

8 \ \ ~\f\\

~

oAt

6ee~ c. \\~('J~. \\ cl,

~o (' i , ~ 'Ct\"~~()' c.o-\\ ..;').路1 \-59(, b j;.,.T 31-L\. n r C.O"", ~ --\-6 -\h;. ..; ~

L'\'''''''\ 'l:>\,\,.

,'D'''' ~.


1973 S

.. . .. . . . . I 2 3 ' 5 Ii 7 I '101112131( 15 16 111'''202122 2324 ZS 26 27 2. ~ 30 .

'I

, • ":'T~':.,

S

T

'oW

T

,.

S

JIll

T

W

T

,.

S

· .. .. . . .. .. I 2 3 ' 5 Ii 7 I

.. 1 2 3 4 5 Ii " 91011 12 11 141516111'1920 212223 U 25 26 27 2'293031 .... . .

..

.. -..... 1 23 4 5 ' 7 I 910 111213'4151511 111'2021222324 2521i27212!)O .

9101112131415

16111119202122 23241526272129 3031 .

1974 •

JIll

T

W

T

,.

.. .. I 2 3 4 5 Ii 7 I 9101112 13141516171119

20212223242526 2721293031

JIll

T

'oW

T

,.

.. 12 J 4 5 Ii 7 I 91011 1213 141515171'1920 21212324 25 2121 ""30

n . "UA I'IY •

'"

T

W

T

,.

10111213141516

17111'20212223 24 25262721 . •

III

·

T

W

T

. .. ...

,.

12

145 Ii 1 I 9 1011121314 1515

171.1920212223 24 15261.7212930 31 •

~"..../ "..,.--

.... I 2 1, 5 6 7. 9

..

T

W

T

,.

... . .. I 214 5 Ii '.91011 1213141516171. 19202122232425 2627 21 293031 . •

JIll

T

VI'

T

,.

I

....... ...... I 2 3 4 5 Ii 1 I 9101112131415 1611 1'" 20 2122 Z324 Z526 272129 30 ..

-_.--

. ~-- - ­ -----~~- - -

Day and evening students will find specific registration schedules, course offerings and other information in the Class Schedule booklet, which is published prior to each registratio n period. See following pages for instructional calendar and dates of registration.


~

-

-.--~----------------------------

cUrJbFlD!~ _~Wl FALL QUARTER 1973 Sept. 26

Classes begin.

Oct. 16

Last day for course withdrawal without official record •

Oct. 30

Last day to remove "I" (incomplete) grades from Spring quarter, 1973, or Su mmer session , 1973 •

Oct. 30

Student academic warning notificat ion.

Nov. 20

Last day for course withdrawal with automatic " W" (withdrawal) grade.

Nov. 21

Thanksgiving recess begins after last class

Nov. 26

Classes resume •

Dec. 10

Fi nal examination period begins.

Dec. 14

End of Fall quarter -

Dec. 17

Final grades due on or before noon

last day of examination period

WINTER QUARTER 1974

Jan. 7

Classes begin

Jan. 25

Last day for course withdrawal without official record

Feb. 8

Last day to remove "I" (incomplete) grades from Fall quarter, 1973 •

Feb. 13

Student academic warning notification.

Mar. 1

Last day for course withdrawal with automatic (withdrawal) grade •

Mar. 18

Final examination period begins.

Mar. 22

End of Winter quarter -

Mar. 25

Final grades due on or before noon.

"w"

last day of examination period

11


SPRING QUARTER 1974

Apr. 1

Classes begin

Apr. 19

Last day for course withdrawal without bfficial record •

May 3

Last day to remove "I" (incomplete) grades from Winter quarter, 1974 •

May 8

Student academic warning notification.

May 24

Last day for course withdrawal with automatic "W" (withdrawal) grade.

May 27

Memorial Day recess •

May 28

Classes resume.

June 10

Final exa mination period begins.

June 14

End of Spring quarter -

June 14

Commencement, Metropolitan Campus.

last day of examination period

June 15

Commencement, Western Campus.

June 16

Commencement, Eastern Campus.

June 17

Final grades due on or before noon.


Registration 1973 -1974 FALL QUARTER

1973 MAIL REGISTRATION

Metropolitan Campus-

Aug. 20 through 31

Western Campus-

Aug. 27 through Sept. 7 •

Eastern Campus-

Aug. 20 through Sept. 7 •

REGULAR REGISTRATION Metropolitan Campus-

Sept. 18 through 20 •

Western Campus-

Sept. 18 through 20 and Sept. 22 •

Eastern Campus-

Sept. 18 through 21 •

WINTER QUARTER

1974 MAIL REGISTRATION

• • 7.

Metropolitan Campus-

Nov. 26 through Dec. 7

Western Campus-

Nov. 26 through Dec. 7

Eastern Campus-

Nov . 26 through Dec.

REGULAR REGISTRATION Metropolitan Campus-

Jan. 2 through 4 •

Western Campus-

Jan. 2 through 5

Eastern Campus-

Jan. 2 through 5

• •

SPRING QUARTER

1974 MAIL REGISTRATION Metropolitan Campus-

Feb. 25 through Mar. 8 •

Western Campus-

Mar. 4 through 13 •

Eastern Campus-

Feb. 25 through Mar. 8 •

REGULAR REGISTRATION Metropolitan Campus-

Mar. 26 through 28 •

Western Campus-

Mar. 25 through 27 and Mar. 30 •

Eastern Campus-

Mar. 26 through 29 •


Mrs. Douglas D. Bond Mr. Raymond F. Dacek

14

Dr. H. Andrew Johnson III

Mr. David R. Forrest

Chairman

Vice Chairman


Mr. Richard E. Jablonski Mr. Robert L. Lewis

M ~ h UP-"'8 . -yl/&v. ~ Me-~

Mr. James E. O' Meara

Mr. Myron S. Sto ll

J5


I

:I ~ I' 1

Charles E. Chapman

President

I..


17


- --

- - - - - -- - --

-_.-

- ---


Cuyahoga Community College , Ohio 's first public community college, is a two-year institution serving Greater Cleveland and environs_ The College was chartered by the State of Ohio on Dec_ 5, 1962, following the creation of the Cuyahoga Community College District by the Cuyahoga County Board of Commissioners . On Sept _ 23, 1963, CCC opened its doors to some 3 ,000 fUll-time and part-time students . This was the largest opening-day enrollment figure in the history of the flourish ing junior college movement, which now numbers more than 1,000 two-year colleges across the nation. Nine years later, CCC's total enrollment was to swell to nearly 21 ,000 , the fifth largest in the State of Ohio. In addition , thousands of youth and adults have benefited from the College 's non-credit offerings _ The College 's instructional program got underway in the Brownell Building, a 19th century schoolhouse leased from the Cleveland Board of Education. Brownell was renovated and equipped through the generous support of individual donors , foundations , business, labor and industry_ Acceptance of the College 's evening classes for part-time students necessitated the acquisition of additional space. Arrangements were made with two suburban school districts - South Euclid -Lyndhurst and Parma - to utilize classrooms for evening instruction at Valley Forge and Brush High Schools. In September of 1964, a third evening Academic Center was added at East Junior High School in Maple Heights. Growing en rollments soon made it necessary for the College to expand its facilities . Additional space was leased in several downtown buildings. The year 1966 was one of tremendous significance for Cuyahoga Community College . That September, CCC became a truly mUlti-campus operation with the opening of the Western Campus on the site of the former Crile Veterans Administration Hospital ill Parma-Parma Heights_ Western 's initial enrollment of almost 2,800 helped push the College 's total student body in 1966 to 10,600 _ But 1966 would see still another important stride in the College's growth. That October, just one month after the opening of the Western Campus, ground was broken for a $38 .5 million permanent Metropolitan Campus in downtown Cleveland . Located on a 40-acre site in the St. Vincent area , the imposing new center of learning was designed to serve some 15,000 fUll-time and part-time students. Sept. 26, 1968, marked an important entry in the chronicle when the College took a historic step in the fulfillment of its long-range building program to serve the county. Opening on that day was the first structure of the ten-unit Metropolitan Campus. Some 3 ,000 day and evening students in the Career Program began attending classes in the Science and Technology Building. By Fall of 1969, Cleveland 's new downtown showpiece was 90% complete and virtually all of Metro's instructional offerings were trans-

21


ferred to the innovative facility . That Fall also saw a move designed to better serve the residents of the Southeast area - the transfer of the Southeastern Academic Center to Warrensville Heights High School. In the Spring of 1970, month -lon g festivities and an Open House fostered civic observance of Metro's depication. In the Fall of 1971 , the College fulfilled its commitment to open a campus which wo uld serve the populous Eastern segment of the county. Nearly 1,500 youth and adults were enrolled at the Eastern Campus when it opened on Oct. 13, 1971. Tri -C Eastern, with a broad array of both day and evening offerings , is located in Warrensville Township . On an interim site near Sunny Acres Hospital, it replaces the evening academic centers in Warrensville Heights and Lyndhurst. Today, approximately one out of every 100 students attending a junior college in the nat io n is a student at Cuyahoga Community College. Fall of '72 enrollment at Eastern was over 2,300. Nearly 11 ,000 students were at Metro. The Western student body totaled more than 7,000. In addition , hundreds of Greater Clevelanders took advantage of Tri路C's varied non-credit offerings. Cuyahoga Community College has more than fulfilled the expectations of those who envisioned it here as long ago as 1953. It is a mem ber of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secon'dary Schools . It has developed a comprehensive variety of educational offerings, and assembled an excellent faculty of highly qualified and proficient instructors . And residents of the community have been a partner in this progress through approval at the polls of operating and development moneys, and with contributions to the College scholarship funds. Responding to the sociological and economic needs of a community on the move, the College in the 1960s demonstrated a firm commitment to the broadening of educational opportunities for every resident of Cuyahoga County . What lies ahead during the remainder of the 1970s? Projections for the entire Cuyahoga Community College District indicate that CCC can expect a total enrollment of more than 30,000 within this decade. To meet the needs of this exploding student population , the College in 1965 began detailing its 1962 plans for development of a multicampus operation consisting of a centrally located Metropolitan Campus, a Western Campus and an Eastern Campus. Eastern, Metro and Western are realities today. Capital development plans for the 1970s call for replacement of the temporary buildings on the Western Campus with a permanent facility to accommodate an eventual enrollment of 11 ,000. Ground was broken for this $30 million "College in a Park " on Nov. 17,1972. The target date for use of the new campus on York Rd. is the Spring of 1975. Looking to the East, the College hopes to acquire a permanent site for facilities which will enable the Eastern Campus to better serve the vast Eastern community.

22


And , in downtown Cleveland , a $ 1. 2 million District Office build i ng is now under construction. It will house the various district functions which serve CCC's three campuses. The 25 ,OOO-square -foot building will be located on Carnegie Ave. near E. 9 St ., and is expected to be ready for occupancy in the Fall of 1973. The District Office is currently located in the old Brownell Building. Yesterday .. . . _today . . ... tomorrow . . . . . you ' re why we're he re, placing the means of education before all the youth and adults of ou r home community.


Cuyahoga Community College is dedicated to the concept that the individual talent and fib re of America 's citizenry constitute the nation's most valuable resource . The College , therefore, has committed itself to extend broad edu路 cational opportunities to the youth and adults of its community . It has established the corollary requirement of high performance f rom all those who participate in its prog rams. In pursuit of these objectives , the College offers a diverse and well 路 conceived curriculum . It maintains a staff of superior instruct ors whose prime duties revolve around their teaching assignments . It has accepted the challenge of providing an environment conducive to learning, with special emphasis on library and laboratory resou rces . The College encour路 ages independence of thought and action as essential ingredients of a functioning democracy, stressing the development of value judgment and self路discipline.

I

.

I

I

24


Cuyahoga Community College expects all students to achieve compe. tence in the fundamental processes of reading, writing, speaking, listening and computation. All students are expected to develop an appreciation of the scientific method in the solution of problems. Another prime concern of the College is that students develop an awareness of the unique values that are our national heritage, including the primacy of moral and spiritual concerns. Axiomatically, the College expects its students to manifest an increasing sensitivity to those responsibilities inherent in American citizenship. As one way of fulfilling these responsibilities, the College seeks to inspire each student to achieve and maintain a high level of occupational proficiency. Furthermore , Cuyahoga Community College expects all students to show their respect for this educational opportunity through appropriate behavior. Students are to maintain regular attendance, display exemplary conduct, and apply themselves diligently in the quest for the wisdom and knowledge upon which their contributions to society will be based . Planning and policy路making by the Trustees of the College have been consistent with the purposes and objectives of the two路year college. Specifically, the Official Plan for Cuyahoga Community College, adopted by the Board of Trustees on Nov. 28, 1962, sets forth the following student objectives: 1. To see his cultural heritage in its historical perspective. 2. To live effectively in accordance with the conditions of his physical envi ron ment. 3. To recognize and guard the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in a free society. 4. To guide his life by sound moral and spiritual values. 5. To appreciate and participate in creative activities. 6. To ach ieve satisfactory personal, socia1 and community relationships. 7. To apply critical and discriminating thought to the solution of problems. 8. To accept responsibility for his decisions. 9 . To develop the basic skills of communication. 10. To enjoy the benefits of a rewarding and productive vocation . 11. To acquire a positive attitude toward, and strengthened foundation for, lifelong learning.

25


lUghts and ResponslbWfies

oftbe College Community In December of 1968, the College's Board of Trustees adopted the Policy on Rights and Responsibilities developed and approved by a committee on student conduct comprised of representatives of the College 's student body, Board of Trustees , faculty and administration. The policy, codified in response to a directive by the l07th General Assembly of the State of Ohio, was prepared in an effort to encourage an environment conducive to the growth and development of all members of the College community . In preparation of the document , a positive attitude and a consistency with the mores of this society were maintained . The policy not only stresses the responsibilities that are necessary to freedom, but also establishes and protects the rights of all members of the College community. The College's Policy on Rights and Responsibilities may be found in the Eastern , Metropolitan or Western Campus Student Handbook.

26


Philosophy of the College Cuyahoga Community College 's statement of philosophy was developed by faculty members and administrative personnel in the Spring of 1964. The College commits itself to the following philosophy: As our culture becomes increasingly complex, we must provide educational opportunities beyond those afforded by the secondary schoolsopportunities that are easily available , geographically and financially , to any citizen who can profit from them. This premise has particular significance in a free society such as ours because we feel that the preservation and development of any culture depends upon the enlightenment and the participation of its members - upon their ability to make choices and accept responsi bi Iities. Consistent with this belief, the College is unique in that - while it is sensitive to the peculiar natural and social forces affecting members of this community, and to the differing interests and needs of these people - it is aware also of the elements of learning common to them all. The College, then , welcomes those who wish to develop abilities and prepare for responsiblities beyond their present experiences; whether such students plan to continue in senior colleges, pursue vocational or professional programs, or undertake studies to broaden their vision. In addition to furthering the students' objectives, we will undertake to excite thei r i ntellectua I cu riosity; give them a better understand i ng and appreciation of themselves and of their environment; help them evaluate objectively new ideas and concepts; and, finally, encourage them to develop their reasoning , to cultivate self-discipline, and to respect themselves and others . Inasmuch as learning extends beyond the scope of the classroom and the campus , the College strives to promote the intellectual activities of the community and to exert its every energy to enrich the culture of the area which it serves. This philosophy will be implemented by a continuing pursuit of academic and teaching excellence.


28


I Cuyahoga Community College exists throu gh the support of the county and state in which it resides . As a locally controlled and administered institution, the College is especially attuned to its own com munity - Cuyah oga County. This close identification with its home area, one of the prime advantages of the comprehensive community college , leads to a diversity of educational , occupation al and cultural offerings designed spec ifically to meet the needs of the area 's residents . Some of these offerings are traditional or conventional, but man y represent a bold and imaginative step beyond the ordinary. Recognizin g that students differ greatly in experience , needs, capac ities, aspirations and interests , the College pursues the following major purposes : 1. Academic preparation for advanced formal study. • The Arts and Sciences curriculum at Cuyahoga Community College includes those courses normally taken in the first two years of a traditional four-year Bachelor ' s degree program. The student may follow this University Parallel sequence for one or two years , and then transfer as a sophomore or junior to a four-year institution to continue working toward his Bachelor 's degree . 2. Career preparation . • A broad range of Technological, Business and other occupational offerings are available at the College. Course sequen ces prepare students for careers in fields where increasingly critic al manpower shortages exist. The Career Program at Tri-C also offers courses for those who wish to refresh or improve their present skills . 3. Community services - adult education . • As a result of its close identification with the needs of the community, the College is able to provide representative cultural , educational and occupati onal offerings as determined by public interest. Community services are offered in cooperation with other educational institutions , business , labor , government, health agencies, individuals and organizations within the community. 4. General education . • A prime concern of the College is the imparting of the knowledge , skills and attitudes needed by each individual if he is to be effective as a person , as a member of a famil y, as a wo rker and as a citizen in a free society . 5. Educational and occupational counseling. • Comprehensive counseling service is stressed to assist both full -time and parttime students in the selection and pursuit of goals compatible with their interest s, aptitudes and values .

29


Tlr~ C(dll~@) I@)~ The Cuyahoga Community COllege seal incorporates symbols which represent the concept of "lifelong learning~ ' as well as the political and economic segments which the College serves . The upper portion depicts the Cleveland skyl ine. visible from many points of Cuyahoga County. The lower portion embodies particulars from the Great Seal of the State of Ohio. The Torch of Learning. circumscribed by the symbol of nuclear energy. represents utilization of research and modern instructional techniques. The comm unications satel iite . Telstar. stresses the importance of communication as an essential of all learning activity at Cuyahoga Community College.

30


Cuyahoga Community College is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. The new Eastern Campus has correspondent status with NCA. The Nursing Programs of both the Metropolitan Campus and the Western Campus are accredited by the National League for Nursing and the Ohio State Board of Nursing. The Medical Assisting Program is accredited by the American Association of Medical Assistants and the Dental Hygiene Program is accredited by the American Council on Dental Education . The Inhalation Therapy Technology Program is accredited by the Council on Medical Edu cation of the American Medical Association in assoc iati on with the American Association for Inh alation Therapy, American Co llege of Chest Physicians and the American Society of Anesthesiology. The following organizations also are among those in which the Col lege holds institutional memberships: • Adult Edu cation Association of the United States of America • American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers • American Association of Community and Junior Colleges • American College Publi c Relations Association • Cleveland Commission on Higher Education • Council of North Central Junior Colleges • Ohio Colleges Association

31


&eeGIe PIIIORI'MIIR Cuyahoga Community College is a member of the League for Innova路 tion in the Community College. The organization consists of 16 outstand路 ing community colleges throughout the nation . In addition to Cuyahoga Community College , members are Brookdale Community College (New Jersey) , Central Piedmont Community College (North Carolina), Coast Community College District (California), Dallas County Junior College District, Delta College (Michigan), Foothill Junior College District (California), Junior College District of St. Louis and St. Louis County, Kern Junior College District (California), Los Angeles City Junior College District, Los Rios Junior College District (California) , Mari路 copa County Junior College District (Arizona). Moraine Valley Community College District (Illinois), Peralta Junior College District (California) , Santa Fe Junior College (Florida) and Tulsa Junior College. The league was conceived to encourage and evaluate innovation and experimentation in education. It focuses upon continuing improvement and development within the community college movement. Its projects have been wide in scope and the results have proved meaningful to all participating members.

32


Cuyahoga Communib COllege


Prior to the Summer of 1971, the land at the corner of Harvard Rd. and Robert Bishop Dr. was a field in the highlands of Cuyahoga County. By Oct. 13, 1971, the field had become the Eastern Campus of Cuyahoga Community College-welcoming nearly 1,500 students on opening day. The landscape remains green-the view open for miles. But nowimplanted in the center of this-is a humming educational facility. Located at 25444 Harvard Rd. , Warrensville Township, Tri-C Eastern became the third CCC campus and furthered the College's efforts to make lowcost higher education easily accessible to all members of the Greater Cleveland community. The Eastern Campus replaces both the Eastern and Southeastern Academic Centers which formerly offered evening classes at Charles F. Brush and Warrensville Heights High Schools. Unlike the academic centers, however, the Eastern Campus offers a comprehensive day and evening program similar to those of the Metropolitan and Western Campuses. Although Tri-C Eastern is an interim facility-plans call for development of a permanent facility in the future-the movable, prefabricated, modular steel facilities now in use will be utilized in the permanent Eastern Campus . The Eastern Campus contains air-conditioned classrooms and lecture rooms , several laboratories which comprise the science center, and several other rooms for specialized curriculums. Tri-C Eastern's functional and modern structure also houses the campus library, which is adjacent to the District Technical Library Service, a leisure/lunch lounge, student center, bookstore, instructional service offices , and administrative, faculty and counseling offices . Additional facilities were added to accommodate increased enroll ment - 2,319 students in the Fall quarter - during the 1972-73 academic year. The lower level of the new two-story wing is completely open for large group instruction, assembly and activities such as dramatic productions . The second floor provides different sized spaces for various elements of the instructional program . The new wing expands the Eastern Campus facility to 65,000 square feet. Eastern , the newest member of the Tri-C community, is clearly thriving and growing, demonstrating the need for a campus to serve the eastern segment of Cuyahoga County.

Tri-C Eastern: and

lrowiRg fer Yea

35


ilIr.I5llAlJON ortNS


38


-1-

39


T~m~rmw~~ CW~Ju~

.dU~lI~iN

,

.

Tomorrow became today on Sept. 29 , 1969. That day marked the grand opening of Cuyahoga Community College's first permanent facility - the innovative new Metropolitan Campus in downtown Cleveland . A metamorphosis in the St. Vincent area changed 40 acres of what once were aged commercial buildings and tenements into a resplendent ten路block-Iong center of higher learning. The $38 .5 million facility is at 2900 Community College Ave. (formerly Scovill Ave .). It extends from E. 24 to E. 33 Sts. and to Woodland Ave . The space-age Metropolitan Campus is designed to serve 15,000 day and evening, full- and part-time students. It has been conceived as a stimulating academic environment which will enrich the entire community - a center for clinics, public meetings, symposiums, lectures , orchestral and choral concerts, recitals, films, plays, operas, art shows, intercollegiate athletic contests and many other events. Ultramodern and proven electronic teaching and learning equipment is being utilized. Electronic hardware includes open and closed circuit television reception and transmission equipment, computer and computerassisted instructional systems, audio-visual equipment as well as electrical-electronic apparatus for use within specific laboratories . The Science and Technology Building, which opened its doors for instruction in the Fa II of 1968, is the la rgest structu re of the ten-un it learning complex. In addition to 13 science laboratories , it contains classroom and laboratory facilities for a wide range of career-oriented curriculums which prepare students to step directly into this fast-moving age of technological advancement. Equipment and facilities are designed to permit flexibility of instruction in the constantly changing fields of Business, Engineering, Health and Public Service Technologies. The magnificent Metro complex floats on a platform-walkway. The buildings are harmoniously arranged around student courts with study and leisure areas. Center of the architectural focus is an inner courtyard , the " Fountain Court ". Students can traverse the " all -weather " campus via heated underground corridors or open walkways through the inner courts. The central and dominant structure is the si x-story Library. The Computation Center is located on the top floor. Other highlights of the new Tri-C Metro Campus include a 376-seat theatre , bookstore (located on the southern side of the inner courtyard) , 100-station foreign language library, a 3 ,000-seat gymnasium and a 910 seat auditorium, home of the Cleveland Philharmonic Orchestra.

43


.nr Ilrvloi t-ou

A

MMro Row

Administration and Student Services Building Humanities Building Science and Technology Building Student Center Art and Music Center Theatre and Media Center Library Auditorium Maintenance and Operations Building Physical Education Building These new dimensions in public higher education were hailed in 1966 as one of the nation's outstanding examples of "excellence in the design and development of college faci I ities." The College was the sole Ohio institution honored in the first annual Design Award Program for Higher Education Facilities, co-sponsored by the United States Office of Education, the American Institute of Architects, and Education Facilities Laboratories, Inc. There were a total of 258 institutions in the competition and only 27 awards were made. Accompanying its 1969 opening were the salutes: "an architectural showpiece" . . . . "innovative , handsome and well conceived" . . . .. "functional without being frivolous".

The Greater Cleveland Growth Assoc iation also has cited the campus as an "outstanding" architectural concept. And, in 1972, the Garden Center of Cleveland and the Greater Cleveland Growth Association presented an award to Metro for its landscaping.

44


A HIT , A V~RY PA L PA 6'L~ HIT ,,,


~

.'

....£

-

I

~ .., !

SKEGNESS

IS SO BRACING

48


49


50


51


1IIIIIBWIIIIIIIIIIIIILlIIIIIDIIII I t\J(i IIIIIIFVIIIIIIR

llllrIIIIIIHIIIIIIJljIIIE~I~IIIFWllJlllllrWIJIIIIIIQ :=~ : : ~~~~_

\\v\\VIIIIIIE~llllrIIIIIIE IIIIIR t\J (Altt1IIIIIIIIIIIIPW ~ On Sept. '19, 1966, Cuyahoga Community College brought a comprehensive day and evening program 'o f public higher education to the 400 ,000 residents of Greater Cleveland's Western and Southwestern sectors . The treescaped Western Campus in Parma-Parma Heights opened its doors with nearly 2,800 full路 and part路time students . By the Fall of 1972, the Western student body totaled more than 7,000 , Offerings at Tri路C Western include the Arts and Sciences curriculum, and concentrations in a variety of career-oriented Technological and Business areas ranging from Aviation Technology and Inhalation Therapy Technology to Court and Conference Reporting and Real Estate.

-' I

52


The Western Campus also makes available, within its Community Services Program , a full range of credit and non-credit courses which reflect the community 's special needs and interests . Western is located on the site of the former Crile Veterans Administration Hospital at 7300 York Rd ., Parma. A total of 130 acres and some 60 buildings were assigned to the College by the federal government for a nominal tran sfer fee early in 1966. During the Summer of 1966, extensive renovation and equipping were completed to ready the spacious facility for College instruction . The College acquired an additional 53 acres of land from the Federal government for the Western Campus during the Summer of 1971. The 53 acre s were part of the former U.S. Army Nike Site in Parma. In addition to a large number of classrooms and instructional laboratories, facilities include the library , cafeteria , bookstore , auditorium , offices of the student newspaper, The Pulse , the Instructional Services Center, fa culty and administrative offices , Student Services, a theatre and several outdoor athletic fields. Other features include archery and karate rooms , a teletype-reading room, a student rathskeller and a recreational area known as "The Wheel". Identification with community needs is the hallmark of the comprehensive community college. The community-college coalescence has been especially pronounced at Tri-C Western. The Cleveland Institute of Music's Southwest Branch; the Northern Ohio Examination Center for the National Association of Securities Dealers , Inc.; and the Cuyahoga Astronomical Society have been quartered here. A Radio Amateur Civilian Emergency Service station , designed to serve 13 communities in time of natural or military disaster, is based at Western. As a community focal point, Western has been the site of such diverse events as Girl Scout meetings, a dance workshop for high school students, Little League baseball games , a Summer day camp for nonambulatory and severely retarded children , and a children's wrestling clinic. To better serve residents of the West-Southwest community, construction of a new $30 million Western Campus is now underway. Groundbreakingforthis "College in a Park" was on Nov. 17,1972. Six buildings , int erconnected by enclosed circulation corridors, will be erected on the 183.5-acre Western Campus site. Four of the six build路 ings will be instructional wings , each of which will house a mixture of the academic disciplines. This " interm ix" of the Arts and Sciences, Business and Technological Programs will provide an opportunity for students and faculty from the various academic pursuits to meet and become acquainted. The spirit of Western 's present Triat r ium will be maintained in the Triatrium of the new facilities . The new and larger "Tri" will contain study areas , an information center, dining facilities , student lounges , .c ounseling offices , a central library , administrative offices , admissions and records offices, and conference rooms which will be available for community use.

53


The new Western Campus will include a modern 475-seat theatre which will extend the cultural opportunities available to residents of t he West-Southwest area. The campus-to-be will have a well -equipped physical education plant as well as outdoor playing fields . The water路 retention basin being developed to solve critical drainage problems will serve as an iceskating rink during the Winter. The physical education facilities will include an indoor pool which will be made available for use by area residents . The new Western Campus, designed to accommodate an eventual enrollment of 11 ,000 students , will be " planted " in and around the numerous trees on the site. Of varied types , sizes and ages , they are an essential part of the beauty and tranquillity of Tri-C Western. Target date for the opening of the " College in a Park" is the Spring of 1975. Meanwhile , instruction continues as usual at a " compressed" Western Campus in the rem aining buildings of the old facility.

54


55


58


59


j\ r, \J tall) I~\ (\ "

"

(fft

I " r-",- r,

\, _\1" :'LJ

I:-{)I~

(21~ () '_I N[) 131~ I~ J~ I{ IN Ci

10:15 AM TO 1:00 PM 1:-1" I[) J\ "

I


LIGHTED PARKING AND PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION Eastern Campus. Lighted parking is provided at the Eastern Campus' 725-car parking lot , which is located adjacent to the facility. The Eastern Campus is served by public transportation. Its location near 1·271 is convenient to tens of thousands of residents of the East-Southeast side. Metropolitan Campus • Protected parking for 850 cars is provided under the immense platform·walkway system of the campus. Additional lighted parking is available in outdoor College lots . A lighted municipal lot is located near Metro at E. 22 St. and Community College Ave. Metro is convenient to public transportation. It is served by a number of bus lines, including the CTS loop, and by the Shaker Rapid. In addition, CTS's Campus Station Rapid stop is near Metro at E. 34 St. Located adjacent to the 1-71 , 1·77 and 1-90 freeways, Metro is only minutes away from hundreds of thousands of Greater Clevelanders. Western Campus. Student parking space is provided for more than 1,000 cars in brightly lighted areas. The location of the Parma-Parma Heights facility makes it readily accessible to residents of more than 13 municipalities in the vast WestSouthwest community.

~ ~ ...


LIBRARY The library at each campus acts as a service to the instructional area. It is maintained for the benefit of students and faculty members . Supplemental materials are part of the collection assembled through the cooperative efforts of the faculty and library staff. The campus libraries provide a computer print-out book catalogue. This universal catalogue replaces the traditional card catalogue. It makes available the collection of the entire College library system to all students. The library maintains open stacks to allow direct access to books and periodicals. Other facilities in clude play-back equipment for tapes and other recordings, microfilm readers, photographic devices for reproducing printed matter and enclosures for individual study.

63


PHYSICAL EDUCATION The College offers a program of physical education designed to develop an understanding and appreciation of bodily fitness, to improve the student's recreational skills, and to increase his poise and social competency. Facilities at the new Physical Education Center of the Metropolitan Campus include a gymnasium with Tartan flooring and roll路back seats, an Olympic路size swimming pool , Tartan track, handball courts, weightlifting room, wrestling room, dance studios , tennis courts, soccer and practice football field, lockers, whirlpool bath and showers. Western Campus athletic facilities include a gymnasium, baseball diamonds, soccer field, archery room, handball courts, weightlifting rooms, various exercise and gymnastics rooms, lockers and showers. Students use off-campus facilities for swimming classes. The physical education program at the new Eastern Campus is under development. Off-campus facilities are used for a number of classes and activities.

64


FOOD SERVICES Eastern Campus. Snack bar items are available in the leisu re/ lunch lounge. Metropolitan Campus â&#x20AC;˘ Hot meals are served in the cafeteria and snack bar items also are avai lable at the Student Center. Western Campus. Hot meals are served in the cafeteria, located off the Triatrium . Vending machines for beverages and snacks are in the cafeteria and the recreation area .

.

,".

- ""

I


66


0'

"Olralll IlIltraa,loB

Cuyahoga Community College offers three major programs of in struction. The Arts and Sciences Program provides the first two years of a traditional college curriculum. Included in these offerings are University Parallel sequences for students who wish to transfer to four-year colleges and universities. The Career Program is designed to fulfill the unique employment requirements of this community. The Community Services Program provides representative cultural, educational, occupational and avocational offerings as determined by community interest and need.

67


~~ ~@ ~©fi®Iill©®~ IT1s®~ The Arts and Sciences Program provides a wide range of course offerings in the Liberal Arts for all students at the College. Some students only take several courses in the program, but many enroll in the two-year sequences leading to the Associate in Arts degree . A large number of students in the Arts and Sciences Program plan to transfer to four -year colleges and universities as sophomores or juniors after one or two years at Tri-C. They are enrolled in what is usually referred to as the University Parallel curriculum, courses paralleling those offered in the first two years of a four-year institution . Credits earned in this curriculum may be transferred to colleges and universities as the first and second years of a Bachelor's degree program. Tri -C's University Parallel curriculum includes many courses designed to prepare students for upper division study in such specialized fields as medicine , dentistry, law, business , education , engineering and the engineering technologies .


Career Program The second major objective of Cuyahoga Community College is to develop a co-mprehensive series of Technological and Business courses to fulfill the occupational needs of the community's citizens and employers. The Career Program works toward this objective by offering specialized instruction in more than 35 occupational fields in Business , Engineering, Health and Public Service Technologies. Many students in the Career Program take only a few courses, relearning or improving skills they already possess. Other students, planning a technical or paraprofessional career, enroll in a two-year sequence leading to an Associate in Science degree or in a shorter sequence leading to a certificate . The significance of Tri-C's Career Program is derived from its immediate relevancy to the dynamic manpower situation in this community. Trained and skilled personnel are needed to meet new and increasingly exacting qualifications in many fields. Today, it is estimated that one-fourth of the entire United States labor force is working in technical , paraprofessional positions that did not even exist in 1930. The Career Program prepares the student to step directly into this fast -moving age of technological advancement. In each area of the Career Program , an Advisory Committee works with the College to make the preparation as valuable and up-to-date as possible. These civic-minded representatives of local business, labor, industry, government , health agencies and public service assist the College in the identification of needs and the development of new areas within the program.

69


a>

IJ

1ft

SIiI!'I~IiS

'I>~t1I!The Community Services Program was estab lished by the College to offer a broad spectrum of cultural, educational and occupational offerings to residents of the Greater Cleveland community. Transcending traditional limitations, the Community Services Program offers a variety of late afternoon, evening and weekend courses, credit and non·credit, for stu· dents of all ages. The time, place and subject matter of these offerings are determined by community interest and need. . The credit offerings, with few exceptions ; do not differ from those within the regular instructional program. Non·credit offerings, however, are designed to meet specific educational requirements outside the regular instructional program. Often they take such forms as one·day seminars, special programs combining facets of regular College . courses, and workshops lasting from several days to several weeks. For example, the Metropolitan and Western Campuses have offered Refresher Programs for Nurses. The Western Campus has conducted a 160·hour Firefighting Training Program in conjunction with the North· eastern Ohio Fire Chiefs Association. Other Community Service projects include Workshops in Dance at Western and a Management Tra ining Program for Minority Contractors at Metro. All three campuses offer many non·credit courses. These have in· cluded "Basic Concepts in Metalcasting" , "E.S .P. - the World of Psychic Phenomena" , "Movie History of Science Fiction", " Women and Their Autos ", "The Metric System" , "Cleveland Zoo· Logic" , "English for Foreign Born ", " Childbirth Preparat ion ", " Yoga " , "Your Personal Income Tax" , " The Art of Batik", " Data Processi ng", "Balkan Dances" , " Stock Market Investing" , "Introduction to Guitar Playing" and "Photography for Fun" . Many evening courses have been offered at off·campus locations such as the Federal Bu ilding, Hough·Norwood Family Health Care Center, the Ford Motor Company 's Brook Park plant , the Lakewood Hosp ital and N.A.S.A. The Community Services Program also conducts several continuing programs tailored to meet specific economic or social needs. These in· clude or have included Project EVE , the Paraprofessional Training Program, the Ca reer Opportunities reacher Project, Project Search and the Com· munity Educational Services Center. 70


"THERE IS A HISTORY ,0 Al.L ME.N'S LIVES""


I

Project EVE is an occupational and educational counseling and referral center for adult women planning to enter or reenter the work world. It has served more than 6,000 women since it was established in 1966. Project EVE provides information about education, volunteer work and employment opportunities in Greater Cleveland through individual coun路 seling, five-week group discussion and counseling series, tours and an annual Career Institute. The Paraprofessional Training Program, formerly known as Project New Careers, has, since 1967, prepared more than 500 inner-city residents for careers in human and social services. Project Search, located in Cleveland's Hough area, and the Community Educational Services Center, in the West Central area, provide counseling services and information about educational opportunities to area residents. The Career Opportunities Teacher Project gives teacher aides in the Cleveland Public Schools a chance to become certified teachers. En rollees range from ages 17 to 58 and are selected by three community agencies serving minority groups within the city. Another function of the Community Services Program is to encourage active involvement between the community and the College. Non-profit organizations and community residents are encouraged to use College facilities for meetings and other events . The Western Campus, for example , serves as the Northern Ohio Examination Center for the National Associa tion of Securities Dealers , Inc. The Southwest Branch of the Cleveland Institute of Music is quartered here. In addition, Western houses an amateur emergency radio station. Its athletic fields are used for Little League activities. It conducts a dance workshop for elementary and high school pupils. Girl Scouts hold their meetings at Western. The Parma-Parma Heights campus also reaches out into the community with a special service for ex-servicemen. "Veteran's Hotline" provides information on educational programs and services, and encourages veterans to return to school. The Metropolitan Campus Auditorium serves as the home of the Cleveland Philharmonic. Metro's physical education facilities are open to the community on Saturdays and Sundays under the free Weekenc;l Recreation Program. The Metro Community Services Program also conducts free Saturday classes in dance, music, drama and art for county youngsters. Individuals and organizations ,within Cuyahoga County are invited to explore with the College ways in which additional service can be provided to the community.

BLACK AFFAIRS The Department of Black Affairs at the Metropolitan Campus was established in the Fall of 1970. It was founded to help prepare people to live more equitably in a multi-racial society. The objectives of the Department of Black Affairs are to provide a more accurate view of African and African-American heritage and culture, to enhance the self路concept of African-Americans , to provide a relevant education for African-Americans , and to help prepare students vocationally for today's and tomorrow's world.


The department is located in the Met ro Campus Library, room 310. An Afr ican -American Collection affords st udents the opportunity to do research and explore t he African-American and "bl ack experience " . Muntu Drum, a newspaper, and Black Ascensions, a literary magazine , are under its aegis. Black studies courses are available in a var iety of subject areas. Credit courses are available which deal directly with the " black experience " - the culture , economics, history , language , politics , psychology and social institutions of the African-American. Credits earned in this curriculum generally are transferable toward a Bachelor's degree at four-year colleges and universities. The History sequence-courses 630-170,630-171 and 630-172-may be used to help fulfill the graduation requirements for an Associate in Arts or an Associate in Science degree at Cuyahoga Community College. The Department of Black Affairs also sponsors the Metro Community Forum as well as sem inars and workshops to bring information about minorities to a wider audience. Students interested in pursuing a program of black studies should consult their counselor and/or the Department Head of Black Affairs.

Courses Offered 1973-74 Course No.

Course Title

Cr. Hrs.

560-261

The Literature of the Black American . . .......... 3

630- 164

American Urban History .. . . . .. .. . . ... ... .... 4

630-170

History of Africa .. . . . .. . .... . ............ . . 4

630-171

The Negro in American Culture to 1908 . .. .. ... .. 4

630-172

The Negro in American Culture from 1908 .... . ... 4

800-105

The Black Voter and the Community .. .. ... . . . . . 4

800-106

Political Systems of Africa .... . .............. . 4

850-231

Contemporary American Black-Wh ite Relat ions .... 4

ETHNIC HERITAGE CENTER The Metro Campus' Ethnic Heritage Center opened in the Fall of 1971. It was founded to help bring about awareness in all ethnic groups - primarily European , Appalachian, American Indian, Spanish-speaking - of their contributions to American society. The Ethnic Heritage Center, perhaps the first of its kind in the nation , is quartered in the Metro Campus Library, room 410. Among the events sponsored by the cent er have been a recital by Japanese guita rist Norihiko Watanabe; a talk by Polish film director Krzysztos Zanussi and a showing of his movie, Behind the Wall ; a photo exhibit featuring a 775-year-old monastery in Athos , Greece; a Mountain Music Festival; and a Macedonian Folklore and Music Festival. Apr. 28, 1972 , the cente r hosted the International Youth Forum on Heritage.


The Ethnic Heritage Center is developing an ethnic studies program , documentation center and library. As part of the Metro Campus ' non -credit offerings , classes in ethnic cultures have been offered at neighborhood libraries . These have included Czech , Slovak , Ukrainian , Polish and Italian cultu res as well as a course in advanced Hungarian language . Among the non-credit courses offered at Metro have been ;' Conversational English for Non-Native Speakers ", " Ad vanced Hungarian Folk Dancing " and " An Indian Viewpoint on American Indians" _


" 1_.I

__

75


REGISTRATION Mail registrations usually are accepted several weeks before the opening of classes during each quarter. Specific registration information is published in the Class Schedule booklet prior to each quarter. To insure an advantageous class schedule and to realize the full benefits of the College's orientation and counseling services, prospective students are urged to initiate the admission process at the beginning of the quarter previous to the one they wish to enter. High school students may apply in their senior year.

CAMPUS SELECTION Cuyahoga Community College is comprised of three campuses: . . Eastern Campus, 25444 Harvard Rd ., Warrensville Township , O. 44122 .

*

Metropolitan Campus, 2900 Community College Ave. , Cleveland 44115. Western Campus, 7300 York Rd ., Parma 44130. A student selects the campus of his choice and is considered a student at that campus unless he officially transfers to the other campus. A student desiring to transfer from one campus to the other should indicate this by completing a CHANGE OF CAMPUS form in the Counseling Office at the campus where his records are located . His credent ials will then be transferred. A student should register at the campus whe re he expects to take the majority of his courses .

76


SCHEDULE OF FEES Cuyahoga Community College, supported by the taxpayers of Cuyahoga County and assisted by the state , maintains modest instructional fees.

INSTRUCTIONAL FEES PER QUARTER HOUR OF CREDIT* Out-of-State Residents

Other Ohio Residents

Cuyahoga County Residents

$20

$10

$7

* Maximum instructional fee for residents of Cuyahoga County is $100 per quarter.

GENERAL FEE PER QUARTER HOUR OF CREDITt Out-of-State Residents 70¢

Other Ohio Residents 70¢

Cuyahoga County Residents 70¢ t

Ma ximum general fee is $10 per quarter.

Credit by Examination Fee: See CREDIT BY EXAMINATION.

REFUND POLICY Refunds of instructional fees will be made when "drop" forms are properly completed, authorized and processed through the Office of Admissions and Records and the Business Office. The following schedule and conditions govern all refunds of instructional fees : Refund Period

Regular Quarter

Summer Session

First Week ... .. . .. . .. . . . _ . . . . .. 90% 90% Second Week . ... . . .... .. ... .. . . 70% 50% No Refund Third Week. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 50% Effective the fourth week of any quarter, no refund will be made . Full refunds of instructional fees are granted if the College cancels a course , or if a student is drafted and inducted into military service during the refund period . (In th is case, the refund request is to be accompanied by official written notice from the military service involved.) Partial refunds are granted under two circumstances: (1) If the student withdraws during the refund period (see the preceding schedule) . (2) If a student is drafted and inducted into military service after the refund period, in which case the refund will be prorated on the number of weeks of attendance before withdrawal.

71


No refunds are granted if a student voluntarily enlists into military service following the close of the refund period, if he is dismissed for disciplinary reasons, or if he is financially obligated to the bookstore, library or other department of the College at the time of his withdrawal.

STUDENT IDENTIFICATION CARDS All students are issued identification (I-D) cards . These cards are required for registration activities , for library checkout purposes, and for admittance to athletic , cultural and social events . Currently enrolled students are expected to carry their 1-0 cards at all times. They should be presented on request from anyone in authority in the College at any time. The 1-0 card is non -transferable and is void unless it is signed by the student and validated for the current term . Loss or theft of an 1-0 card should be reported within 24 hours to the Office of Admissions and Records . Replacement cost for a duplicate 1-0 card is $1.25 .

RESIDENCY Because Cuyahoga Community College is supported by the residents of Cuyahoga County, tuition surcharges are required of out-of-county and out-of-state students who wish to enroll at the College. A student's resi路 dency will be determined at the time of registration according to the residency policy of the State of Ohio, the Ohio Board of Regents and the Cuyahoga Community College Board of Trustees. Requests to change legal residence should be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records. A general residency statement can be found in the Class Schedule booklet.

CHANGE OF ADDRESS OR NAME All changes in address or name should be reported to the Office of Admissions and Records at the campus where your records are kept. A change to a Cuyahoga County address does not automatically entitle a student to Cuyahoga County resident instructional fees.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS As part of the admissions procedure, international students are required to demonstrate proficiency in the use of the English language. An examination may be required to determine such adequacy, and previous work at other educational institutions will also be considered. For further information, contact the Office of Admissions and Records.

78


TRANSFER STUDENTS Students transferring to Cuyahoga Community College from another college or university should comply with the established admissions procedures . Students who were placed on academic probation or dismissal by their previous college or university will be placed on first probation if admitted to Cuyahoga Community College. They will remain on first probation until they have attempted 15 or more quarter credits and have removed themselves from probation or have been placed on second probation . See ACADEMIC PROBATION. Transfer credits will not be accepted for courses in which a grade of less than "C" has been earned. Transfer credits accepted from other collegiate institutions will be entered on the College's permanent record forms, but the grades earned in these courses will not be indicated. Only course grades earned at Cuyahoga Community College will be used in computing grade-point averages. If a student has been dismissed for disciplinary reasons from the last college or university attended, he should normally be eligible to return to that institution before being considered for admission to Cuyahoga Community College. Petitions for exceptions to this policy may be submitted to the Director of Admissions and Records for consideration by the Admissions Board.

PROGRAM CHANGES A student may make changes in his course schedule during the program adjustment period. However, his choice of cou rses during this period is limited. Therefore, it is highly desirable that courses be selected with care during the registration to avoid the necessity of an adjustment. See Class Schedule booklet for dates of program adjustment.

AUDITING A COURSE An auditor is a student enrolled in a course for which he will receive neither grade nor credit. The auditor is permitted to attend the class but is not required to submit assignments or take exam inations. The fee for auditing is the same as that for enrolling for credit. Careful consideration is in order before requesting permission fo audit a course - audit status is not convertible to credit status once the form for auditing a course has been completed and filed. Students approaching this decision with any uncertainty are advised to consult with a counselor before requesting audit status. Students who are not currently attending Cuyahoga Community College may register to audit a course during the first week of classes, if space is available in the class at that time . Students who are currently enrolled for credit at Cuyahoga Com munity College and whD wish to audit one or more courses will be allowed to add these during the first week of classes , providing space is available. Registration by mail is not available to auditors .

79


~-----------

---

---

READMISSION A student applying for readmission following his first dism issal for academic reasons is subject to the following conditions: (1) If dismissed with a cumulative grade-point average of 0.75 or higher, the student may apply for immediate readmission for the next academic term . If he is readmitted , his permanent record will bear the notation, "D ismissed - poor scholarship, readmitted on second probation ." Students readmitted under these circumstances will be placed on second probation and will be allowed to enroll for a maximum of 11 quarter credits. (Exceptions to this maximum will be considered by the Admissions Appeals Board.) (2) A student dismissed with a cumulative grade-point average of less than 0.75 may qualify for readmiss ion by exe rcising one of three options. First, he may remain out of Cuyahoga Community College for at least one full quarter before applying for readmission. Secondly, he may petition the Admissions Appeals Board to be considered for immediate readmission on second probation. Finally, the student may elect to use the " Change of Degree Objective" plan to be readmitted in good standing. Readmission following the second or subsequent dismissal will be permitted only after the student has remained out of Cuyahoga Commun ity College for at least one full quarter. He should then petition the Admissions Board to be considered for readmission. If the Board 's action is affi rmative, and if the student is permitted to continue without a "Change of Degree Objective" , he will be placed on second probation . If the student reenters with a "Change of Degree Objective " , he will be admitted in good standing.

CHANGE OF DEGREE OBJECTIVE If a student is not satisfactorily progressing in an Associate degree program , or if he has been dismissed for academic reasons , he may petition the Admissions Appeals Board for permission to change his degree objective or to pursue a Certificate Program . The following procedure should be followed in making this change: (1) The student is to discuss the prospective change with his counselor who will initiate the appropriate form . (2) He is to obtain the approval of the department head of t he program which he plans to enter. Following approval by the Admissions Appeals Board, the student 's permanent reco rd will indicate his change of degree objective . Grades for all courses taken prior to this change will not be considered in computing the student 's cumulative grade-point average at Cuyahoga Commun ity College . He will , t herefore , be adm itted to the new program in good standing, and credits successfully earned prior to the change will still count toward completion of the new program. .

80


After the change of degree has been approved, a student must earn a minimum of 24 quarter credits and complete all other requirements to be eligible for graduation. NOTE: Students planning to transfer to another college or university are cClutioned that the receiving institution may use all grades earned in computing grade路point averages for admission or other purposes.

CHANGE OF STATUS If a student currently enrolled in 11 or fewer quarter credits wishes to enroll for the next academic term for 12 or more quarter credits, he is asked to file a CHANGE OF STATUS form in the Office of Admissions and Records. He will then be notified of the credentials needed to make this change . To be considered for Change of Status, the student is required to have a cumulative grade-point average of 1.00 or higher at the time the request is submitted.

COURSE LOAD The normal course load for a full-time student is 15 quarter credits. A counselor or advisor may recommend a heavier or lighter load, however, because of past performance or other factors .

A new student who ranked in the lowest one-fourth of his high school graduating class may not enroll for more than 12 quarter credits. Previously enrolled students who have attended less than a total of nine quarter credits at the College, and who ranked in the lowest one-fourth of their high school graduating class, also may not enroll for more than 12 quarter credits.

81


ADVANCED PLACEMENT OPPORTUNITIES Academic Credit in Escrow is available to county high school seniors with outstanding scholastic records and aptitudes. It enables these students to enroll in one College day course each quarter for regular Tri路C credit. The College recognizes the Advanced Placement Program. This is a nationally administered program which provides descriptions of the College-level courses to be given in high school. The College Entrance Examination Board prepares tests to grade high school students who have courses under this program. The College will grant credit for selected courses in which satisfactory scores have been attained by the high school student. Interested students should consult their high school counselor or call the Office of Admissions and Records at the Tri路C campus they wish to attend.

VETERANS' EDUCATION The Veterans Administration accepts Cuyahoga Community College as an institution qualified and equipped to provide education in the Arts and Sciences, and in the Career Program area , under the provisions of the War Orphans Assistance Act and the Veterans Readjustment Benefits Act of 1966. Please contact the Office of Admissions and Records at either the Metropolitan or Western Campus for further information. Cuyahoga Community College will grant three quarter hours of academic credit in Physical Education in recognition of basic physical educa tion training received by veterans having served 365 consecutive days on active duty in the military service of the United States of America. After notice of official acceptance to the College, a veteran is to submit a certified copy of Form DD-214 to the Office of Admissions and . Records in order to receive Physical Education credits for the equivalent military service experience.

NEAREST RE.CRUITING.sTATION

82


.

-

,

.

j )/ -.

.

",

',

4

.-

".

.'

:

. ,"

,

.

, , 路c路

"

.

,

.

. ~

-

.'

"

...

~ .:'

" ......

'

.

'

.

,'.

.-- .. ': . ~.

- .. .'.. " ". . ,,~'::' ~~: '.

\

'

"

.

.. , "..

:;


ATTENDANCE Regular class attendance and consistent study habits are essential to success in college and are required of all students at Cuyahoga Com路 munity College . A student may be dropped from a course by his instructor whenever total absences exceed three hours in any quarter - if , in the instructor's judgment , the student cannot benefit from further class instruction. If illness or emergency should necessitate brief absence from class, the student is asked to confer with the instructor on return. If a student is absent due to prolonged illness , for a week or more, he is urged to consult the Health Service on his campus. In the event of problems arising out of the absence in relation to class performance, he should confer with his counselor or instructor.

ATTENDING COLLEGE WHILE EMPLOYED Many students find it necessary to work while attending college. By careful and realistic planning, work and study can be successfully combined . Each credit hour generally requires a minimum of two hours of outside study each week. On this basis, students employed full time should attempt to carry no more than two courses per quarter. Those employed part time should carry a course load proportionate to their hours of employment.

FINAL EXAMINATIONS A f inal examination is required in each course and is given at a regularly scheduled time . Except under emergency circumstances , stu路 dents may not be excused from these examinations . If a student is unable to appear, it is his responsibility to inform his inst ructor prior to the scheduled examination. If an examination is officially postponed, the st udent will be assigned an "I" (incomplete) as his grade for that course . You must personally reo quest an incomplete grade , it is not granted automatically. Incomplete grades are to be removed by completing the examination no later than the fifth week of the following academic quarter. Failure to do so will result in an " F" (failure) grade.

84


CREDIT BY EXAMINATION A student who feels he can demonstrate ability and knowledge in a particular subject may petition the appropriate academic dean for the privilege of taking a special examination and / or performing a special assignment for credit in that subject. An examination fee of $5 is assessed for each course involved . A student is not permitted to earn more than 18 units of credit by examination. Credit by examination requires College-wide approval as well as that of the appropriate academic department. A standard symbol indicating "credit by examination " will be posted on the student's permanent record, but letter grades or quality points will not be used . Courses taken by examination cannot be used as part of the repeat policy because no grade is given.

RECORDS -

GRADES AND QUALITY POINTS

Final grades are issued at the end of each quarter. Letter grades earn a number of quality points per credit unit according to the following schedule: A - Excellent . .. ................ .. .. .... . 4 8 -Good .... . .. . .. ............. . .... .. 3 C - Average .. .. . .............. . ........ 2 D - 8elow Average .. ......... ....... ..... 1 F - Failure .... .. . ... . ............... .. . 0 *W - Withdrawal ................ . ........ 0 I -Incomplete ..... ...... .... ... ... .... . . 0 *S - Audit . .. ....... . .. . ..... .......... . 0 The student's grade路 point average is computed by the following formula: Total Quality Points Earned = Grade-Point Average * Total Units of Credit Attempted For example, if you took five courses worth three credits each, you would be attempting 15 total units of credit. If you earned four "8's" and one "A" as final grades, you would have a total of 48 quality points. Your grade-point average would be 3.20 - 48 divided by 15. * NOTE: Courses in which a student earns grades of "W" or "S" are not considered part of the total. credit units attempted.

HONORS Each quarter, the Dean's List gives public recognition to those students whose academic achievements are considered outstanding. This list includes all students who have earned a grade-point average of 3.50 or higher in attempting 12 or more credit hours during the preceding quarter.

85


- --- ------

- - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - -

ACADEMIC WARNING NOTICES To alert those students who are earning less than a "C" at midquarter, Cuyahoga Community College issues academic warnings. Students receiving such notices are invited to discuss their progress with their instructors or counselors.

REPEATING A COURSE A student may repeat a course in which he has earned a grade of "0" or "F". The most recently earned grade in that course will be used in computing his cumulative grade-point average at Cuyahoga Community College. NOTE: Students planning to transfer to another college or uni versity are cautioned that the receiving institution may use all grades earned in repeated courses to compute gradepoint averages for admission or other purposes.

WITHDRAWING FROM A CLASS A student may withdraw from a class at any time prior to the last two weeks of instruction upon completion of the necessary forms in the Office of Admissions and Records. Students enrolled for 12 or more quarter credits are to confer with the instructor and may, if they so desire, confer with a counselor and / or advisor as part of the official withdrawal procedure. Students enrolled for less than 12 quarter credits should also confer with the instructor or a counselor and/ or advisor prior to withdrawal . A student who withdraws from a course during the first three weeks of a quarter will have no notation made on his permanent record. A student who withdraws from a course after the third week will receive a grade of "W" on his permanent record. An instructor may withdraw a student from a course for excessive absences. This may be done after the third week, but prior to the last two weeks, of a quarter. A student withdrawn in this manner also will receive a grade of "W" on his permanent record.

86


ACADEMIC PROBATION A student will be placed on probation under anyone of the following ci rcumstances: (1) If, after attempting 15 or more quarter credits at Cuyahoga Community College, he has failed to compile a cumulative grade-point average to meet the following minimum requirements (based on a four-point system):

Credits 15-44 45路74 75 or

Attempted Minimum Grade-Point Average inclusive .... _ .. _... _.. __ . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 1.50 inclusive ................ . ... ... _.... _. 1.75 more _ .. . . _ .. , _... . _... _ . . . ... _ . . . . . . . 2.00

(2)

If a student wishes to enroll for 12 or more quarter credits at Cuyahoga Community College while attending or after attending another college or university which has placed him on probation, he will be admitted on first probation. He will remain on first probation until he ha$ attempted 15 or more quarter credits at Cuyahoga Community College and has been either removed from probation or placed on second probation. (3) If a student wishes to enroll for 12 or more quarter credits at Cuyahoga Community College after attending another college or university from which he has been academically dismissed, he may follow the procedures outlined under the READMISSION section of the Catalogue. (4) If a student - who has been academically dismissed from a university or who is on academic probation - wishes to enroll for 11 or fewer quarter credits at Cuyahoga Community College, he will be admitted on a probationary status. A student on first probation will be placed on second probation if he does not remove himself from probation at the end of the next period of enrollment. A student can remove himself from first or second probation by raising his cumulative grade-point avel'age at Cuyahoga Community College to meet the requirements in the preceding box.

ACADEMIC DISMISSAL A student on second probation will be dismissed at the end of that period of enrollment unless he removes himself from probation, or unless his grade-point average for the most recent period of enrollment was 2.00 or higher, in which case he will be permitted to continue on second probation. A student will also be dismissed if he has attempted 15 or more quarter credits at Cuyahoga Community College and has compiled lower than a .75 cumulative grade-point average at the end of any period of enrollment. 87


~--

-- ----

-

---- - - - --

DEFINITION OF CLASS STANDING A freshman or first-year student at Cuyahoga Community College is one who has earned 44 or fewer quarter credits. This includes any credits transferred from other colleges or universities. Students who have earned 45 or more quarter hours (30 semester hours), including any transferred from other colleges or universities, are considered sophomores or second-year students.

TRANSFERRING TO OTHER INSTITUTIONS Counselors and other members of the College staff will advise and assist any student planning to transfer to a four-year college or university. They will help the student in preparing for and completing the transfer process. It remains the responsibi lity of the student , however, to select his transfer institution and to closely follow its admissions requirements. These requirements are set forth in the catalogue of each college and university. Reference copies of these catalogues are available in the campus library and in the Offices of Admissions and Records at both campuses. Because of the highly specialized nature of curriculums in the Career Program, many of the courses are not designed for transfer to a four-year institution. Students also should note that courses with numbers lower than 100 (the last three digits) are not ordinarily transferable. See COURSE NUMBERING.

TRANSCRIPTS OF GRADES Official transcripts of grades earned at Cuyahoga Community College may be requested through the Office of Admissions and Records. Requests are to bear the student's signature. Telephone requests cannot be honored. Each student is entitled to one free transcript. Additional copies may be obtained for a fee of $1 each.

CCC TRANSIENT STATUS AT OTHER INSTITUTIONS CCC students requesting transient status at another institution should do the following: 1. Request a TRANSIENT STUDENT form from the Office of Admissions and Records or the Counseling Office. 2. Complete the form and return it to the Office of Admissions and Records. 3. The Office of Admissions and Records will confirm the student's status. One copy of the TRANSIENT STUDENT form will be mailed to the appropriate institution and the other copy will be returned to the Counseling Office to be filed in the student's folder.

88


Gmdoatik~D

.

R~CIRm~m~D~


Good standing is a requisite to candidacy for graduation from Cuyahoga Community College. An Associate in Arts degree will be granted to the student completing the following requirements: A. GENERAL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. The satisfactory completion of no fewer than 93 quarter hours. 2. The completion of no fewer than 30 of the above 93 hours while in attendance at Cuyahoga Community College. A student is to attain a"C" (2.00) average for all work at the College. B. SPECIFIC GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. Minimum competency in communication as verified by one of the following sequences: a. English 091, 092, 093 and 101. b. English 091, 101 and 102. c. English 101, 102 and 103. 2. The completion. of one of the following sequences: a. History 101,102 and 103. b. HistorY 151, 152 and 153. c. History 170, 171 and 172. d. Political Science (any three courses). e. Social Science 103, 104 and 105. 3. The completion of Health 101 or three quarter hours of physical education. 4. Minimum competency in mathematics as verified by one of the following: a. A satisfactory score on the mathematics portion of ACT or SAT. b. Any mathematics course satisfactorily completed at Cuya路 hoga Community College. c. Achievement of a satisfactory score on a standardized mathematics test administered by the College. C. ELECTIVE GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. A total of no fewer than 27 quarter hours of electives to be selected from any three of the following four areas: a. Humanities. b. Science and Mathematics. c. Social Sciences. d. Career Programs, including Technical and Business offerings. 2. No fewer than nine quarter hours may be chosen from anyone area. Courses used to satisfy the preceding B-1 or 8-2 requirement may not be used again for this elective requirement.

90


ro~~rn~~m~~ flm ~~~~rn~~ m~mliG~ Good standing is a requisite to candidacy for graduation from Cuyahoga Community College. An Associate in Science degree will be granted to the student completing the following requirements: A. GENERAL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. The satisfactory completion of no fewer than 93 quarter hours. 2. The completion of no fewer than 30 of the above 93 quarter hours while in attendance at Cuyahoga Community College. A student is to attain a "C" (2.00) average for all work at the College. B. SPECIFIC GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. Minimum competency in communication as verified by one of the following sequences: a. English 091, 092 and 093 . b. English 091, 101 and 102. c. English 101 , 102 and 103. d. English 091, 092 and Speech 101. e. English 101, 102 and Speech 101. 2. The completion of one of the following sequences: a. History 101, 102 and 103. b. History 151,152 and 153. c. History 170, 171 and 172. d. Political Science (any three courses). e. Social Science 103, 104 and 105. 3. The completion of Health 101 Qr three quarter hours of physical education. 4. Minimum competency in mathematics as verified by one of the following : a. A satisfactory score on the mathematics portion of the ACT or SAT. b. Any mathematics course satisfactorily completed at Cuyahoga Community College. c. Achievement of a satisfactory score on a standardized mathematics test administered by the College . C. ELECTIVE GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. A total of no fewer tlian 18 quarter hours of electives to be selected from any two of the following three areas: a. Humanities. b. Science and Mathematics. c. Social Sciences _ 2. No fewer than nine quarter hours may be chosen from anyone area . Courses used to satisfy the preceding 8-1 or 8-2 requirement may not be used again for this elective requirement. In addition to the preceding requirements, a student is to fulfill the curricular requirements for the particular program as listed nea r the end of this Catalogue under SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCES.


. .-

-- - - - _._ - -

CERTIFICATES OF PROFICIENCY In addition to the two路year Associate in Arts and Associate in Science degrees, Cuyahoga Community College awards Certificates of Proficiency to full路 or part路time students wishing to specialize in and select courses from a specific subject matter area . These certificate awards have been established to meet the needs of those who, for one reason or another, do not wish to pursue an Associate degree program . A Certificate of Proficiency may be awarded upon completion of a course or a pattern of courses which fulfill a special educationalobjective . Courses for which certificates are awarded mayor may not carry academic credit.

94


~

..

-.-

----------~-----


CounseU~9 Professional counselors are available at the Eastern Campus , Metropol itan Campus and Western Campus to help students achieve productive and rewarding experiences at the College. Counseling services are provided for all students - full time, part time, day and evening. Upon admission to the College , each student is encouraged to schedule a conference with a counselor to consider his previous educational background , interests, aptitudes and goals. The counselor offers assistance in choosing an appropriate program of studies from the variety of courses offered. Throughout his enrollment , each student is encouraged to seek counseling assistance in reviewing his progress and plans. Counselors assist students who wish to clarify their educational and occupational objectives. Occupational information files and college catalogues are located in the campus libraries . When appropriate, counselors may suggest a variety of tests and inventories as aids in educational and occupational planning. Students may consult with cO,unselors when they desire assistance in becoming more effective students, in developing gratifying personal and social relationships, and in making the college experience more personally rewarding.

PLACEMENT TEST Entering students planning to enroll for 12 or more quarter credits are requested to have the results of the ACT (American College Test) forwarded to Cuyahoga Community College. These results are used for counseling purposes only - to place students in appropriate programs and courses. In cases where the student has taken the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) rather than ACT , the results may be submitted to Tri-C instead. Psychological tests assessing mental ability, interests and aptitudes are administered on campus as the need arises . Students may arrange with a counselor for such testing.

HEALTH SERVICES Health Services, headed by registered nurses, are free and open to all students, full or part time . The staffs are available on a "walk-in" basis to assist students in the maintenance of their physical and emotional health, particularly as it relates to their college experiences. The major function of these services is individual counseling by the College nurses to help all students identify and work toward appropriate solutions of their health problems. The Health Services also provide first-aid care for injuries and temporary treatment for minor illnesses under the standing orders of the consulting physician. The services offered at the College are designed to complement the basic care given by private physicians, clinics and dentists in the community. As one part of the total College health program, the Health Services work with other departments and community agencies to

96


provide educational and screening programs which assist students in improving their health levels. Students with any questions or concerns in relation to disabi lities, or any special requirement necessary for the College environment, are encouraged to contact Health Services prior to the first day of classes. A comprehensive Student Health Insurance Plan is available to all students enrolled for nine or more credit hours. The plan provides health insurance protection at a reduced rate for accidents and unexpected hospitalization. The Health Services recommend enrollment in the plan for those students who do not have other health insurance coverage.

SELECTIVE SERVICE Information regarding Selective Service may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records at one of the three campuses.

'~~~_.t~!I' il)1I~ 'i1MD~Ai!G PLACEMENT SERVICES The Offices of Placement and Student Financial Aid at the Eastern, Metropolitan and Western Campuses coordinate all student employment for the College. Graduates of the College as well as currently enrolled students are invited to make use of these services. Any currently enrolled student may apply for part-time, on-campus employment and can also be assisted in obta ining full- or part-time employment outside the College. Students who wish to use the offices' career placement service are urged to apply shortly before graduation.

FINANCIAL AID Cuyahoga Community College's Financial Aid Program consists of scholarship grants, loans and part-time employment. The program is designed to complement the student's own resources. Primary considerations in selecting students to receive assistance are financial need and the potential to succeed in an academic program at the College. Financial aid awards are made before the beginning of each regular academic quarter. Students may request applications for assistance at any campus through the Office of Placement and Student Financial Aid. Application Procedures for Financial Aid â&#x20AC;˘ Students applying for assistance are asked to complete either the Parents' Confidential Statement (PCS) or the Family Financial Statement (FFS). These application forms are obtainable at the Offices of Placement and Student Financial Aid.

97


The student is urged to submit his completed application as early as possible prior to the beginning of the quarter in which he wishes to enroll. Final action will be taken after the student has submitted all required admissions credentials and has been accepted by the College . Scholarship Grants • All scholarship grants are awarded for the entire academic year and are renewable. Recipients may also be con· sidered for other types of financial assistance. The General Scholarship Fund was created and is sustained by civic·minded individuals and groups interested in fostering the College's purposes, programs and objectives. Ohio Instructional Grants Program • This program provides finan· cial aid for full·time college students who are Ohio residents. These grants are for the average as well as the superior student. They are awarded solely on the basis of financial need to cover all or part of the instructional fees. Students should apply for this assistance directly to the Ohio Board of Regents. Applications may be obtained from the high school or the Office of Placement and Student Financial Aid at a Tri·C campus. Waiver of Instructional Fees. Cuyahoga Community College's policy on waiver of instructional fees further broadens educational opportunities for the youth and adults of Cuyahoga County. This additional form of financial aid for Cuyahoga County residents is awarded to potential students requiring financial assistance who have demonstrated academic potential, or to students with special talents or abilities in such areas as music, art, dance, drama, foreign languages, journalism, public speaking and physical athletic activities. The instructional waiver policy applies only to the College instructional fees per quarter hour of credit. Educational Opportunity Grants • Students qualifying for this program will receive a stipend for each academic year at Cuyahoga Community College. The amount of this award is then matched with other scholarship, work·study or loan funds. The purpose of this program is to provide grants to students who, for lack of available funds, would be unable to enter or continue in college . National Direct Student Loans. Eligibility for this program is open to students registered for six quarter hours who are in good academic standing. The applicants should be able to verify their need for assistance by filing the appropriate application. Repayment of the loan does not commence until completion of studies. The borrower who enters one of several specified occupations within the teaching field may be entitled to a substantial reduction in the total amount of repayment. Nursing Scholarship Grants and Student Loans • Students in need of assistance, who are registered for 12 or more quarter credits and are pursuing the Associate degree in Nursing, may apply for these awards. Each applicant must file the appropriate application . These loans have cancellation provisions of 10% per year for five years of nursing for those who enter the profession. Repayment procedures are similar to those for the National Direct Student Loans.

98


College Work-Study Program • This program provides employment at the College or in off-campus agencies for students who wish to work while they are enrolled _ To be eligible for this program, the student must be enrolled for 12 or more credits during the quarter in which he wishes to be employed. The student must also verify a need for financial assistance. Employment under this program is limited to 20 hours per week whenever regular classes are in session and 40 hours per week when College is not in session. Law Enforcement Education Program • Grant and loan money is made available by the federal government to currently enrolled law enforcement officers as well as students who are pursuing the College's Associate degree in Law Enforcement. The grant program makes available payments for instructional fees to in-service law enforcement officers who may be enrolled in this degree program on either a part- or full-time basis. Loans to cover instructional fees and other related educational expenses are available to any full-time student who is pursuing the Associate degree in Law Enforcement . Short-Term Loans • Short-term loans for half of instructional fees are also available. These loans are interest-free for 60 days. After that period, there is a finance charge of $2 per month_ Failure to make repayment by the end of a specific quarter precludes further registration for classes until the loan is repaid. Short-term loans are not renewable. Special consideration is given to veterans. Where to Get Further Information • Upon request, the Office of Placement and Student Financial Aid will forward a brochure explaining in greater detail financial aid opportunities at Cuyahoga Community College. Further inquiries regarding any aspect of the Placement and Financial Aid Program may be directed to this office at any campus lcication:

~ Cuyahoga Communi~ COllege EASTERN CAMPUS Room 121 25444 Harvard Rd. Warrensville Township, O. 44122 Phone: 464-1450, ext. 246, 247 METROPOLITAN CAMPUS Administration Building - Room 107 2900 Community College Ave. Cleveland, O. 44115 Phone: 241-5966, ext 315,316

WESTERN CAMPUS Building 400 7300 York Rd . Parma , O. 44130 Phone: 845-4000 , ext. 258, 259, 260

99


Cuyahoga Community College recognizes the educational, recreational and social values of a well-integrated program of student activities. It believes that student participation in co-curricular activities contributes to the wholesome development of the individual and to the growth of leadership ability. The College features a well-balanced program developed in response to student requests and needs. A large measure of responsibility for campus affairs is in the hands of the students themselves, assisted by the Director of Student Activities and faculty members on each campus. The students essentially establish and administer most non-academic campus activities. They determine social programs and participate in the maintenance. of the discipline essential to an academic community. Activities may vary from quarter to quarter, depending upon student choice. Three newspapers-Metro's The Commuter and Muntu Drum, and Western's The Pulse-are staffed by students drawn largely from the College's journalism courses. The College's periodicals have received numerous state and national awards for excellence. Every student is welcome to participate in a great variety of activities from fencing and karate to chess and camera clubs. Further information may be obtained from the officers of each organization or from the Office of Student Activities. Among the many activities and events to be found on one or more of the Tri-C campuses each quarter are: Artist and lecture series softball, swimming, table tenBand nis, tennis, track and weightliftChoir ing) College Union Board Local fraternities and sororities Convocations Movies Dances and other social functions Political clubs Drama Professional organizations Interclub Council Religious groups Interest groups Student Government Inter-Greek Council Varsity sports Intramural sports (Including track, soccer, wres(Including archery, badminton, tling, tennis, cross-country, basbasketball, fencing , flag footketball, bowling, golf and baseball, paddleball, handball, pool, ball)

100


102


INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS The official colors of Cuyahoga Community College are: Metropolitan Campus, brown and gold; Western Campus, blue and gold. The names of the College's athletic teams are: Metropolitan Campus, "Cougars"; Western Campus, "Chargers". Both campuses are members of the National Junior College Athletic Association and engage in intercollegiate competition as a member of the Turnpike Athletic Conference. The Eastern Campus, which opened in the Fall of 1971, has not engaged in intercollegiate competition. Its participation in the near future is contingent upon a number of factors, especially the availability of offsite facilities.

103


ALUMNI ASSOCIATION The Alumni Association is a social and service organization designed to develop a stronger bond among former students, the College and the community. Those eligible for membership are all Tri-C graduates and former students who have not been graduated, but who have accumulated the equivalent of 45 quarter hours before leaving the College.

HOUSING Because Cuyahoga Community College is an urban institution primarily designed to serve its own community, no residential housing is provided for its students.

STUDENT-FACULTY CONFERENCES The faculty members in Cuyahoga Community College maintain scheduled office hours to confer with students regarding class work and related matters. Schedules of office hours will be found in the faculty office areas. Students are urged to familiarize themselves with the schedules and to contact their instructors during these hours.

COLLEGE RELATIONS The Office of College Relations disseminates information to the various publics of the College. Among its functions is the preparation of the Catalogue, Annual Report, Career Program brochures, the newsletter, Precis, and other official internal and external College publications. The Office of College Relations also serves as coordinator of the Speakers Bureau. As a community service, faculty and staff members of the College are available for appearances at meetings of religious, educational, service, political and other organizations or groups. Inquiries may be addressed to this office at Cuyahoga Community College District Office, 2214 E. 14 St., Cleveland, O. 44115. Phone 241 -5966 .

.

.


COUISI DISCRIPTIONS


~@@® lID~®cQI fillD I1~@ ~@~® @®~©Lffl~@~ To simplify the task of maintaining accurate and complete academic records of all students at the College , a six-digit code has been introduced for use in listing all courses. In this code, the first three digits indicate the subject area (see chart below). The remaining three digits are the number assigned to that particular course within the specified subject area. For example, Intermediate French bears the code 590-202. The number 590 refers to the subject area, French . The number 202 has been assigned to a specific course, Intermediate French , within that subject area. CODE

SUBJECT AREA

410 Accounting 420 Anthropology 450 Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology

430 Art 435 Aviation Technology 437 Banking and Finance 440 Biology 460 Business Administration 465 Certified Laboratory Assisting 470 Chemical Technology 480 Chemistry 481 Child Care Techno logy 482 Court and Conference Reporting 485 Dance 490 Data Processing 500 Dental Hygiene 505 Dietary Technology 730 Early Childhood Education 510 520 530 535 540 550 560 570 590 600 610 616 620 624 625 630

(formerly Nursery School Assisting) Ea rth Science Economics Education Educational Media Electrical-Electronic Engineering Technology Engineering English Fire Technology French Geography German Graphic Communications Management and Technology Health Health Technology Hebrew History

CODE SUBJECT AREA 635 Hospitality Management 648 Humanities 650 Industrial Supervision 655 Inhalation Therapy Technology 660 Journalism 670 Law Enforcement 680 Library Techno logy 685 Marketing 690 Mathematics 700 Mechanical Engineering Technology 710 Medical Assisting 715 Medical Record Technology 717 Mental Health Technology 720 Music 725 Music Th erapy Assisting Technology 740 Nursing 745 Occupational Therapy Assisting Technology 830 Office Administration 750 Philosophy 760 Physical Education 770 Physical Science 775 Physical Therapy Assisting . Technology 778 Physician's Clinical Assistant 780 Physics 790 Plant Operation Services 800 Political Science 810 Psychology 815 Real Estate 820 Russian 840 Social Science 850 Sociology 860 Spanish 870 Speech 880 Physician's Surgical Assistant 890 Theatre Arts 900 Transportation


COURSE NUMBERING Courses are listed in numerical order within each subject area . Some courses cover one quarter. Other courses extend over two, three or more quarters. Courses within the XXX '090 to XXX- 099 series generally are designed to provide students with foundations necessary for freshman studies . English 560-091 , for example, is Ess.e ntials of Written Communication. The XXX-100 to XXX-199 sequence normally represents freshman COL rses. The XXX-200 to XXX-299 series usually consists of sophomorelevel courses _ Course numbers do not indicate whether or not a course will be accepted for transfer to other institutions. Students are advised to consult with their counselors regarding transfer of courses and credits to other institutions. See TRANSFERRING TO OTHER INSTITUTIONS .

CREDIT HOURS The quarter credit for each course is indicated opposite the course title. Three credits; e.g_, is 3 Cr. The number of credits granted for a course does not always equal the number of hours that the course meets in one week . The exceptions are noted in the course descriptions.

PREREQUISITES The prerequisites listed for specific courses and curriculums should be closely observed to insure qualification for subsequent courses , and to gain maximum benefit from instruction_

SCHEDULE OF CLASSES Courses listed in this CATALOGUE are those which Cuyahoga Community College plans to offer. Inclusion of a course descript ion does not obligate the College to present the course in any particular quarter. Many of the courses on the following pages are offered at all three campuses. Students are referred to the appropriate CLASS SCHEDULE booklet each quarter for specific and current information _ The Eastern , Western and Metro Campuses each publish a CLASS SCHEDULE booklet prior to the registration period for each quarter. It contains a list of the classes to be offered, placement test schedules and general registration information .

9

107


410-106

Consumer Finance

3 Cr.

Management of personal finances and study of consumer protect ion. Personal budgeting, buying on credit, planning an insurance program and medical care. Also covers investments, home ownership, retirement planning and income ta xes. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None.

410-107

Business Mathematics

3 Cr.

Application of simple mathematical procedures to typical accounting, financial , marketing and other business problems. Includes study of essentials of business ar ithmetic , simple , periodic and compound interest, present value , payrolls , commissions , pricing and accounting mathematics . Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None .

410-110

Principles of Finance

3 Cr.

Introductory finance course. Study of private and government financial institutions , financial instruments , money and credit systems , basic principles, and current problems in consumer and business financing. Includes study of Federal Reserve System. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisites: 410-107 Business Mathematics and 460-108 Introduction to Business.

410-111

Practical Accounting

3 Cr.

Bookkeeping for students of business administration and office administ ration with no previous bookkeeping knowledge . Principles of double-entry bookkeeping applicable to service and mercantile businesses. Practice in preparation of conventional records, reports and statements. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

410-121

Principles of Accounting

4 Cr.

Analytical study of basic accounting theory and procedures for service and merchandising corporations. Conventional double-entry procedures. End -of-period summary activities , including preparation of worksheets; adjusting, closing and reversing entries; preparation of financial statements _ Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

108


ACCOUNTING 410

410-122

Principles of Accounting

4 Cr.

Continuation of 410-121 Principles of Accounting. In addition , accounting for corporations, analysis of financial statements, funds-flow analysis, accounting for manufacturing operations and proprietorships. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 410-1 07 Business Mathematics or departmental approval ; 410-121 Principles of Accounting; 460-108 Introduction to Business or departmental approval.

410-141

Investments

3 Cr.

Sources of capital, types of securities , operation of brokerage and investment banking houses . Understanding of investment principles and the acquisition of skills needed fo r success as salesman or clerical worker in securities business. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 460-108 Introduction to Business or equivalent business experience.

410-201

Management Finance and Accounting

4 Cr.

Development of managerial skills in using financial and accounting information. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 410123 Principles of Accounting or departmental approval .

410-202

Management Finance and Accounting

4 Cr.

Continuation of 410路201 Management Finance and Accounting. Lec ture 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 410 -201 Management Finance and Accounting.

410-221

Intermediate Accounting

4 Cr.

Comprehensive study of the accounting theory, procedures and analyses, reports and presentations generally accepted by major authorities. Accrual-basis accounting concepts and accounting control practices conducted at professional levels of presentation. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 410-122 Principles of Accounting.


ACCOUNTING 410

410-222

Intermediate Accounting

4 Cr.

Continuation of 410 -221 Intermediate Accounting. Accrual basis and cash-basis accounting, double- and single路entry formats, historical and replacement cost valuations , funds-flow and common -dollar analyses conducted at professional levels of presentation. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 410-221 Intermediate Accounting.

410-231

Cost Accounting

4 Cr.

Theory and practice of cost accounting as it is applied in industrial management informat ion systems for accountability, product and process cost analysis, price setting and determination of profitability. Cost theories , concepts, assumptions, systems and procedures. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 410-122 Principles of Accounting.

410-232

Cost Accounting

4 Cr.

Planning, implementing, controlling and analytical processes of management of manufacturing businesses. The budgeting process and standard cost procedures used to analyze productive processes measuring effects for the use of management in decision-making activities. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 410-231 Cost Accounti ng.

410-260

Cooperative Field Experience

9 Cr.

Limited to students in the Cooperative Field Experience Program . Full -time employment in an approved area under College supervision. Requirements for credit will be a minimum of 350 clock hours of approved work, a report from the employer, term report by student and on-the-job visits by the coordinator of the department. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 35 hours. Prerequisite : Departmenta l approval.

410-261

Cooperative Field Experience

9 Cr.

Continuation of 410路260 Cooperative Field Experience. Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 35 hours. Prerequisite: 410-260 Cooperative Field Experience.

410-265

Taxation

3 Cr.

Thorough study of federal individual income tax regulations and procedures with practice in preparation of returns . Cursory study of federal income tax reporting of corporations and unincorporated businesses . Introduction to princ ipal state taxes. Lectu re 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 410-122 Principles of Accounting.

110


ANTHRDPDLDGY42D 420-101

Cultural Anthropology

4 Cr.

Cultural patterns and dynamics . History, distribution and growth of cultural patterns . Includes social organization and material culture. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

420-102

Physical Anthropology

4 Cr.

Study of man as a physical being. Origin and antiquity of man, the relationship of man to animals, paleontological discoveries and racial phenomena. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

420-103

Prehistoric Archaeology

4 Cr.

The discovery of man's prehistoric past by the methods of modern archaeology. Presentation of archaeological findings and interpretations in selected parts of the world. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

420-201

Peoples and Cultures of the World

4 Cr.

A survey of primitive cultures, non-Western civilizations ahd peasant societies. Theories of cultural anthropology will be utilized in an attempt to understand the reasons for differences among humans. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 420-101 Cultural Anthropology.

111


ARCHITECTURAL AND CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 450 450-100

Building Construction Orientation

2 Cr.

Designed to acquaint the student with his specific curriculum as well as the various job classifications of the construction industry. Instruction is given in the use of the slide rule. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: None .

450-121

Architectural Drawing

3 Cr.

Design and construction of domestic structures. Scale , detailing, framing systems, dimens ioning, architectural lettering and modular systems. Contemporary buildin g materials are surveyed . Lectu re 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 550路 121 Engineering Drawing or equivalent.

112


Wlot Et-l we. MEAN "TO 8 IJ \L. D) WE FIRST $URVE'(' TKE. PI..OT1 TI4EN I)RAW

-r~e MoDEL. .. 路

Kin9 Herirj \"- P.artn A~t 1.

450-122

Architectural Drawing

3 Cr.

A continuation of 450-121 Architectural 路Drawing with emphasis on masonry construction. Introduction to steel construction . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 450-121 Architectural Drawing.

450-123

Architectural Drawing

3 Cr.

A continuation of 450-122 Architectural Drawing. Steel and concrete structures are emphasized . Practical drawing problems are introduced relating to commercial structures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 450-122 Architectural Drawing.

450-221

Building Equipment

3 Cr.

Introduction to mechanical systems as applicable to building construction. Water supply, sanitation and acoustical systems. Environmental factors affecting systems design . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory hours. Prerequisite: 450-122 Architectural Drawing.

o

450-222

Building Equipment

3 Cr.

Fundamentals of heating, ventilating and air conditioning. Equipment and systems will be investigated . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 450-122 Architectu ra I Drawi ng.

113


ARCHITECTURAL AND CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 450

450-223

Building Equipment

3

Cr~

Electrical theory and electrical systems as applicable to buildings. Fundamentals of commercial and industrial lighting. Systems of power distribution . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 450-122 Architectural Drawing.

450-23l

Contracts and Specifications

2 Cr.

Legal contracts, construction and interpretation of specifications as related to the construction industry. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 450-122 Architectural Drawing.

450-232

Construction Estimating

3 Cr.

A basic course for the beginning estimator, architect or contractor. Computing from plans of a construction project, including cost of labor and materials, lump sum and unit costs, preliminary and final estimates. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 450123 Architectural Drawing or equivalent.

450-241

Principles of Structural Design

3 Cr.

Introduction to the design of structural members and systems. Stress analysis by graphic method. Fasteners, welded connections, members in tension and compression, rolled beams and girders are topics considered. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours'. Prerequisite: 550-251 Strength of Materials or concurrent enrollment.

450-242

Principles of Structural Design

3 Cr.

A continuation of 450-241 Principles of Structural Design with emphasis on roof and timber construction. Introduction to reinforced concrete. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 450-241 Principles of Structural Design.

450-243

Principles of Concrete Design

3 Cr.

Capacities of reinforced concrete. Design of reinforced concrete beams, girders, floor slabs, column and wall footings. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 450-242 Principles of Structural Design.

450-251

Construction Procedures

3 Cr.

Various construction methods and procedures. Includes an orientation to contemporary construction equipment and its application to the job schedule. Site preparation, scheduling of equipment, men and materials. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 450-123 Architectural Drawing or ability to interpret construction drawings and specifications.

114


)

THERE IS A DIVINITY

TKAT SHAPe;.s ouR

ENDS ...

430-101

Art Appreciation

4 Cr.

Development of an understanding and interest in creative forms , within the visual art field, for those without an art background . General survey of art painting, sculpture and architecture explored through texts, slides and prints. Simple experimental studies in basic design. Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

430-102

Art History

3 Cr.

A survey of the chronological and stylistic development of Western art. Includes Egyptian , Mesopotamian, Greek, Roman, Early Christian, Byzantine, Gothic schools . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: None.

430-103

Art History

3 Cr.

A survey of the chronological and stylistic development of Western art . Includes Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo schools. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

115


ART 430

430-104

Art History

3 Cr.

A survey of the chronological and stylistic development of Western art. Includes the 19th century schools and some study of the 20th century. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None .

430-105

Drawing

3 Cr.

Introduction to communication with non·verbal symbols. Students use various drawing materials and employ naturalistic representation of oujects emphasizing structure, value and texture. Theory of aerial and converging perspective practiced by extensive application to various subjects. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours . Prerequisite: None.

430-106

Drawing

3 Cr.

Continuation of 430· 105 Drawing. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequ isite: 430·105 Drawing or departmental approval.

430-107

Drawing

3 Cr.

Continuation of 430·106 Drawing. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430·106 Drawing or departmental approval.

430-108

Fundamentals of Design

3 Cr.

Study of such elements of design as line , mass , space, light , shade, texture and color. Organization to achieve rhythm, balance , move· ment and unity. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None .

430-109

Fundamentals of Design

3 Cr.

Continuation of 430·108 Fundamentals of Design. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430·108 Fundamentals of Design or departmental approval.

430-110

Fundamentals of Design

3 Cr.

Continuation of 430·109 Fundamentals of Design. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430·109 Fundamentals of Design or departmental approval.

430-111

Sculpture

3 Cr.

An introduction to sculpture, through the medium of clay, with stress on the procedures of sculpture and modeling. Lecture 2 hours. Lab· oratory 4 hours . Prerequisite: None .

116


ART 43(

430-112

Sculpture

3 Cr.

A continuation of 430-111 Sculpture with an introduction to plaster casting, wood and light metals plus advanced techniques in clay. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-111 Sculpture or departmental approval.

430-113

Sculpture

3 Cr.

A continuation of 430-112 Sculpture with more complex problems in clay and glaze mixing plus advanced problems in wood and metal. Introduction to stone sculpture and plastics. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-112 Sculpture.

430-120

Survey of Non-Western Art

3 Cr.

The art of Africa, Persia and the Orient, and its relation to contemporary art. Lecture 3 hou rs. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

430-121

Calligraphy

3 Cr.

Study and execution of letter forms and their history as elements of design in such applications as layout and illustration. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None .

430-131

Commercial/Advertising Art

3 Cr.

Knowledge of basic equipment and techniques used in the advertising, d isplay and manufacturing fields. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: 430-105 Drawing or 430-121 Calligraphy and departmental approval.

430-132

Commercial/Advertising Art

3 Cr.

Personal application of t echniques in advertising design wit h emphasis on the layout and lettering methods. Knowledge of production. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hou rs. Prerequisite: 430-131 Commercial / Advertisi ng Art.

430-133

Commercial/Advertising Art

3 Cr.

Advanced methods of advertising/commercial display and their demands in the current market. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430 -132 Commercial/Advertising Art.

430-140

Film Appreciation

3 Cr.

An introduction to the aspects of the film including script , directing and t he elements of cinematography. Includes a survey of film history and crit icism. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

117


ART 430

430-151

Art for Elementary Education

3 Cr.

Planned to meet the needs of prospective elementary teachers. Creative studio work as well as an introduction to art in the elemen tary school. Fundamentals of using elementary school art materials. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

430-169

Ceramics

3 Cr.

Basic clay-working techniques including slip-casting, hand-build ing and wheel thrown ceramics. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None.

430-170

Ceramics

3 Cr.

Hand-building, throwing and mold design. Introduction to clay and glaze science. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430169 Ceramics.

430-171

Ceramics

3 Cr.

Throwing skills for functional and production pottery. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-170 Ceramics.

430-201

Life Drawing

3 Cr.

Drawing from the human figure in various media. Introduction to anatomy for artists. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-105 Drawing or concurrent enrollment.

430-202

Life Drawing

3 Cr.

Continuation of 430·20'1 Life Drawing. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430·201 Life Drawing or departmental approval.

430-203

Life Drawing

3 Cr.

Continuation of 430-202 Life Drawing. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Pre requisite: 430·202 Life Drawing or departmental approval.

430-204

Painting

3 Cr.

Introduction to oil and opaque water color. Includes landscape, still life and the human form. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-105 Drawing .

430-205

Painting

3 Cr.

Continuation of 430·204 Painting . Lectu re 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430·204 Painting or departmental approval.

118


ART 430/ AVIATION TECHNOLOGY 435

43('·206

Painting

3 Cr.

Continuation of 430·205 Painting. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430·205 Painting or departmental approval.

430-207

Water Color

3 Cr.

Fundamentals of water color techniques and qualities. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite : 430·105 Drawing.

430-221

Printmaking

3 Cr.

General introduction to various aspects of printmaking and graphic composition . Special emphasis on the woodcut. Some multi·block color work. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 430· 105 Drawing.

430-222

Printmaking

3 Cr.

Continuation of 430·221 Printmaking with emphasis on developing further the techniques of etching, engraving, drypoint and woodcut. Some multi·block color work. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 430·221 Printmaking.

Aviation Tecb~ology 436 435-101 Private Pilot Theory (Formerly Introduction to Aviation)

3 Cr.

An overview of the aviation industry, the industry's importance in our economy, career opportunities in aviation, familiarization with avi· ation terminology, introduction to training for pilots and prelimin~ry study for the private pilot. Written examination required by the Fed· eral Aviation Administration. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

435-105

Aviation Communications

3 Cr.

Radio usage, knowledge of low and medium frequencies, proper phraseology, A.T.C. procedures, convenience of radio aids in naviga· tion. Emergency procedures, radar vectors, FCC·assigned frequencies , high density traffic communication, approach and departure control, and en route procedures . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Pre· requisite: None.

119


AVIATION TECHNOLOGY 435

435-121 Commercial Pilot Theory (Formerly Private Pilot)

3 Cr.

Elementary aerodynamics, weight and balance in aircraft, instruments and instrument systems, basic meteorology, FAA. regulations, radio communications and procedures, pre-flight inspection, safety pro路 cedures, navigation, principles leading to the written examination for commercial pilots administered by the Federal Aviation Administration. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: None.

435-141

Aviation Meteorology

3 Cr.

Basic concepts of meteorological phenomena, formation of air masses, fronts , thunderstorms, icing, fog and clouds. The analysis and use of weather data for safe flight. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: None.

435-151

Primary Flight

3 Cr.

Actual flight experience in approved aircraft. Designed to train students in aircraft pilot fundamentals which lead to private pilot licensure by the Federal Aviation Administration . Flight experience: 38 hours. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 435路121 Commercial Pilot Theory or concurrent enrollment or departmental approval. Costs of actual flight instruction are paid by the student to the fixed base operator.

435-171

Commercial Pilot

3 Cr.

Advanced maneuvers including Chandelles, lazy eights and eightson路pylons, and 720-degree power turns; gliding spirals; 180-degree side approaches and 360-degree overhead approaches; accuracy landings. Advanced cross-country flying. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 435路151 Primary Flight or private pilot certificate. Costs of actual flight instruction are paid by the student to the fixed base operator.

435-172

Commercial Pilot

3 Cr.

Extensive navigation training including radio navigation utilizing VHF and LF radio navigation aids, air surveillance radar approaches, night operations including night navigation, extensive basic instrument training including radar approach procedures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours . Prerequisite: 435-171 Commercial Pilot. Costs of actual flight instruction are paid by the student to the fixed base operator.


435-201

Intermediate Flight

~

AVIATION TECHNOLOGY 435

3 Cr.

Review of all precision maneuvers and multi·engine aircraft systems, loading and performances ; pre·flight, take·offs and landings , basic maneuvers; single engine operation; emergency procedures; flight and fuel consumption planning; VMC VI and V2 speeds ; theories of multi ·engine flight . Flight experience: 38 hours. Lecture 1 hour. Lab· oratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 435·172 Commercial Pilot Costs of actual flight instruction are paid by the student to the fixed base operator.

435-202

Intermediate Flight

3 Cr.

Instrument flight planning; filing flight plan; aircraft performance range and fuel requirements ; required instrumentation and equip· ment and their proper use; emergency procedures ; IFR navigation, instrument approach procedures including VOR, ILS, DME and ADF, and radar approach procedures ; holding procedures, missed approach procedures; compliance with ATC . procedures. Lecture 1 hour. Lab· oratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 435 ·201 Intermediate Flight Costs of actual flight instruction are paid by the student to the fixed base operator.

435-221

Instrument Pilot

3 Cr.

Advanced course leading to the FAA. examination for instrument pilot rating. Covers instruments, charts, advanced meteorology, ap· proach and landing aids, radio navigation, radar, automatic flight Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 435· 101 Introduc· tion to Aviation or 435·121 Commercial Pilot Theory or departmental approval .

435-271

Flight Instructor

3 Cr.

Advanced course leading to F.A.A. written examination for instructor rating. Covers fundamentals of flight instruction, effective flight in · struction methods, instructor responsibilities, medical requirements of flying, FAA. regulations and safety. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory o hours . Prerequisite: 435·221 Instrument Pilot or concurrent enroll · ment or FAA. instrument pilot license.

435-281

Ground Instructor

3 Cr.

A comprehensive study of the fundamentals of teaching and learning as they apply to flight instruction , effective teaching methods; instruc· tional management; instructor responsibilities; aeromedical informa· tion for instructors; aerodynamics; airplane performance ; flight train· ing syllabus; federal regulations for instructors. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 435·221 Instrument Pilot or con· current enrollment

121


BANKING AN[] FINANI:E 437 437-101

Principles of Bank Operations

3 Cr.

The fundamentals of bank functions. A descriptive survey of various bank operations such as accounting, trust, demand deposits, savings and time deposits, home mortgage lending, credit administration and financing business enterprise. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

437-110

Money and Banking

3 Cr.

Money and money creation; role and limitations of central bank con路 trol; basic monetary theory and stabilization policy; government fiscal policy; gold and foreign exchange; economic disturbances and the effect on yield curves and bank portfolios. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: Appropriate work experience or departmental approval.

437-114

Bank Letters and Reports

3 Cr.

Dictation of correspondence. Public relations aspects of correspond路 ence. Basic psychological principles in bank letter writing; review of various bank le,t ters. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Appropriate work experience or departmental approval.

437-115

Bank Management

3 Cr.

Trends in philosophy and practice of bank management. Case studies of good and poor bank management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Appropriate work experience or departmental approval.

437-116

Supervision and Personnel Administration

3 Cr.

Fundamental supervisory principles designed to facilitate the transi路 tion of personnel with expertise in a particular task into a leadership role inspiring the efforts of others. Emphasis placed on securing maximum production consonant with management policies. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hou rs. Prerequisite: Appropriate work experience or departmental approval.

437- 120

Analysis of Financial Statements

3 Cr.

Characteristics of financial statements and financial statement anal路 ysis. A review of accounting basic to financial statements. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 410-121 Principles of Accounting or equivalent.

122


~

-

- - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

--------

BANKING & FINANCE 437

437·121

Financing Business Enterprise

3 Cr.

Lending and investi ng as different aspects of financing business enterprise. Financing from the viewpoint of the corporate treasurer who must safeguard the financial future of his corporation. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Appropriate work experience or departmental approval.

437·132

Trust Functions and Services

3 Cr.

Services rendered by institutions engaged in trust· business. Trust operations duties and services with a discussion of business and legal aspects of trust functions. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Appropriate work experience or departmental approval.

437·142

Credit Administration

3 Cr.

Factors influencing and determining loan policy. Methods of credit investigation and analysis, credit techniques and specific credit problems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory. 0 hours. Prerequisite: Appropriate work experience or departmental approval.

437·143

Installment Credit

3 Cr.

Techniques of installment lending. Establishing credit, obtaining and checking loan information, servicing the loan and collection procedure. Inventory financing, special loan programs, business development and advertising of installment lending. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Appropriate work experience or departmental approval.

437·145

Bank Investments

3 Cr.

Requirements for, and the nature of, primary reserves and loanable funds : their affect on the availability of funds for investment. Primary and secondary reserves: random and cyclical fluctuations and influences on investment policy and yield changes. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 .hours. Prerequisite: Appropriate work experience or departmental approval.

437·146

Home Mortgage Lending

3 Cr.

Developing a sound mortgage portfolio. Acquisition of mortgage plans, procedures, mortgage loan processing and servicing and overall portfolio management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Appropriate work experience or departmental approval.

437·170

Bank Public Relations and Marketing

3 Cr.

The essentials of bank public relations and marketing procedures. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Appropriate work experience or departmental approval. 123


BANKING & FINANCE 437!BIOLOGY 440

437-175

International Banking

3 Cr.

Basic framework and fundamentals of international banking. Transfer of money from country to country, financing trade, international agen· cies as they supplement the work of commercial banks, the exchange of money from one currency to another. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: Appropriate work experience or departmental approval.

440-101

Introductory Biology

3 Cr.

First of a three·quarter sequence designed primarily for non·science majors. Fundamental concepts of biology are stressed, with emphasis on cytology, basic biochemistry and genetics. Lecture 2 hours. Lab· oratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

440-102

Introductory Biology

3 Cr.

Continuation of 440·101 Introductory Biology. Special reference is made to evolutionary adaptations of living organisms, with emphasis on coordinating, endocrine and reproductive mechanisms. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 440·101 Introductory Biology.

440-103

Introductory Biology

3 Cr.

Continuation of 440-102 Introductory Biology. Special emphasis is placed on homeostasis as it relates to the nutritional, transport and excretory mechanisms of living organisms. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours . Prerequisite: 440-102 Introductory Biology.

440-111

General Biology

4 Cr.

First of a three-quarter sequence for students who plan to major in biology. General introduction to basic biological concepts structured around a detailed study of cell morphology and physiology with emphasis on the metabolic processes of photosynthesis, respiration, reproduction and inheritance . Biochemical principles are stressed. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

440-112

General Biology

4 Cr..

Continuation of 440-111 General Biology. Evolutionary adaptations of plants and animals. Ecological concepts. Application of the nervous, endocrine and reproductive processes in organisms . Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 440-1'11 General Biology. 124


BIOLOGY 440

440-113

General Biology

4 Cr.

Continuation of 440-112 General Biology. The metabolism and selfperpetuation of the organism. Emphasis is placed on homeostasis as it relates to the nutritional, transport and excretory mechanisms of living organisms. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours . Prerequisite : 440-112 General Biology.

440-121

Principles of Medical Science

4 Cr.

Basic inorganic, organic and bio-chemistry, with emphasis on physi ological principles and applications. Includes principles of physics and metric system. Designed principally for Health Technology programs. Study of chemistry, other related subject matter included in laboratory. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

440-126

Anatomy and Physiology fo r Health Technologies (Western Campus only) 5 Cr.

Fundamental concepts of cellular structure and physiology. A study of the architectural plan of the body, its skeletal , muscular, digestive, respiratory and circulatory systems, with emphasis on the structural and functional features of these systems. Laboratory activities include microscopic study of histological preparations, observations of gross anatomical specimens and experiments in physiology . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.


BIOLOGY 440

440-127

Anatomy and Physiology for Health Technologies (Western Campus only) 5 Cr.

Continuation of 440-126 Anatomy and Physiology for Health Technologies . Study is made of the anatomical and function features of the nervous , sensory, urinary, endocrine and reproductive systems . Fundamentals of fluid and electrolyte balance, embryology and genetics are stressed . Laboratory includes gross and microscopic anatomy study, experiments and exercises in physiology. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 440 -126 Anatomy and Physiology for Health Technologies.

440-128

Anatomy and Physiology (Metropolitan Campus only)

4 Cr.

Fundamental concepts of cellular structure and physiology. Archi tectural plan of the body, its skeletal, muscular, digestive and circulatory systems. Emphasis on morphological and physiological concepts and applications. Laboratory includes gross anatomy and experiments in physiology. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

440-129

Anatomy and Physiology (Metropolitan Campus only)

4 Cr.

Hematology, acid-base balance, and fluid and electrolyte balance. Structure and function of the respiratory, urinary and nervous systems. Laboratory includes gross anatomy and experiments in physiology. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 440路128 Anatomy and Physiology.

440-130

Anatomy and Physiology (Metropolitan Campus only)

4 Cr.

Structure and functions of the reproduct ive system. Fundamentals of embryology, genetics and endocrinology as related to the human body. Laboratory includes experiments, demonstrations and related microscopic study. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 440-129 Anatomy and Physiology.

440-200

General Botany

4 Cr.

Survey of the plant kingdom. Includes classification, physiology, structure, life cycles and interrelationships between plants and ani路 mals. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 440路101 Introductory Biology or 440-111 General Biology.

126


BIOLOGY 440/BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 460

440-201

Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates

5 Cr.

Gross anatomy of the organ systems in representative members of the vertebrates. Emphasis on evolution and functional adaptations. Laboratory dissection and direct observation of selected specimens. Emphasis placed on squalus, necturus and felis. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours . Prerequisite : 440-113 General Biology or equivalent.

440-202

Vertebrate Embryology

4 Cr.

Studies of the ontogeny of vertebrates, stressing embryological induction and cell differentiation. The lab will include the organogenesis of a frog, chick and pig. Many experiments will involve the use of live embryos. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 440-113 General Biology and 440 -201 Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates or equivalent.

440-221

Microbiology

4 Cr.

A survey of representative types of microorganisms. Emphasis is placed on cellular structure and physiology, nutritional and environ mental requirements and methods of reproduction . Introduction to the role of pathogenic organisms in carrying diseases and infections. Principles of immunity and resistance to disease. Laboratory includes methods of sterilization, culture, ' staining and identification. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite (Metro Campus): 440-130 Anatomy and Physiology or concurrent enrollment. Prerequisite (Western Campus): Departmental approval.

460-101

Introduction to Industrial Management

3 Cr.

Concepts of modern-day, first-line supervision. Emphasis on the supervisor's major functions and development of sensitivity to human factors in management, using behavioral science findings. Lecture ;3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

460-108

Introduction to Business

3 Cr.

A comprehensive survey of business principles, problems and procedures. Examination and discussion of the nature of business production and distribution of goods. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

127


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 460

460-111

Psychology of Supervision

3 Cr.

Contemporary social-psychological theory and research on the personto-person , small group and organizational problems encountered by the modern manager. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

460-112

Business Management

4 Cr.

Introduction to concepts of management and business. Detailed analysis of management functions. Includes planning objectives, policies, methods and procedures. Delineating authority, responsibilities and preparing organization charts. Controlling standards, production and costs. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460路108 Introduction to Business.

460-121

labor-Management Relations

3 Cr.

Historical, legal and structural environments which influence labor relations, and an examination of the negotiation and administration of labor contracts. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

460-130

Small-Business Management

3 Cr.

Development of managerial skills required by those who may want to go into business for themselves or to manage a small business. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460-108 Introduction to Business or departmental approval.

460-131

Small-Business Management

3 Cr.

Continuation of 460路130 Small-Business Management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460-130 Small-Business Management.

460-170

Principles of Insurance

3 Cr.

Economic, social and historical background of insurance. General considerations of insurance contracts . Types, scope and organization of insurance companies. Regulation of insurance companies. Basic forms of property and liability insurance, life insurance and annuities will be studied . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisites: 410-107 Business Mathematics or consent of instructor and 460-108 Introduction to Business.

460-201

Work Simplification

3 Cr.

Principles , practices and techniques of the design , measurement and simplification of work, with emphasis on the relationship between man and machine . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

128


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 460

460-211

Production Control

3 Cr_

Principles and techniques of coordinating the routing, scheduling and control of industrial production , including planning, charting, critical path analysis and quality control. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

460-213

Business Law

3 Cr.

A study of the development of laws that govern modern commercial transactions, such as contracts, agency and employer·employee reo lationships, negotiable instruments and an understanding of our courts. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

460-214

Business Law

3 Cr.

A continuation of the study of law governing modern business trans· actions . Emphasis on sales, bailments, partnerships , corporations and personal property as related to business transactions . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460·213 Business Law.

460-215

Business Law

3 Cr.

A continuation of the study governing business transactions, includ· ing real property, insurance, mortgages, wills, bankruptcy and secu· rity devices. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460· 214 Business Law.

460-216

Introduction to Industrial Purchasing

3 Cr.

Analysis of purchasing organization structure and procedures . De· scriptions of quality, quantity, value analysis , sources of supply and procurement controls. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prereq· uisites: 410·107 Business Mathematics and 410·121 Principles of Accounting and 460·108 Introduction to Business.

460-217

Intermediate Purchasing

3 Cr.

Application of principles relating to price policies, speculation, equip· ment procu rement, sa Ivage operations, lega I matters, records and budgets. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 460·216 Introduction to Industrial Purchasing.

460-218

Purchasing Management

3 Cr.

Procedures and policies relative to contract negotiations. Vendor· buyer relationships , make or buy decisions, inventory control , buyer training, materials handling, records and budgets. Analysis of specific case studies . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460· 217 Intermediate Purchasing.

129


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 460 / CERTIFIED LABORATORY ASSISTI NG 465

460-220

Human Relations in Business

3 Cr.

Basic motives of people in job situations. Company relationships with worker, suppliers and customers. Leadership development, communication and group processes . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Pre requisite: None.

460-221

Materials Management

3 Cr.

Principles of the purchase and use of materials in an industrial firm , with emphasis on cost reduction and the materials cycle from specifi cation to shipment. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: None.

460-241

Office Management

4 Cr.

Basic principles of office organization and management. Emphasizes the interrelationship among physical , personal and procedural factors affecting the efficient layout of an office. Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None.

460-245

New-Business Seminar

4 Cr.

On-the-job analysis of an existing small business. Creation of a simulated business. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 460-131 Small -Business Management or departmental approval.

460-246

New-Business Seminar

4 Cr.

Continuation of 460-245 New-Business Seminar. Lecture 2 hours_ Laboratory 4 hours . Prerequisite: 460-245 New-Business Seminar.

CertHted Labomtory Asslstlng 485 465-231

Laboratory Analyses and Tests

4 Cr.

Introduction to colorimetry. A survey of stomach function and gastric and fecal analyses. Preparation and use of laboratory solutions . Standard laboratory tests for cardiac and thyroid function. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 710-204 Medical Laboratory Procedures.

130


470-121

Elementary Physical Chemistry

3 Cr.

Fundamental course consisting of lectures and demonstrations. Ex路 planation of chemical phenomena on the basis of molecular behavior. Properties of solutions, ionic and phase equilibrium , colligative prop路 erties and the laws of thermodynamics are studied. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequ isite: 480 -111 Genera I Chemistry.

470-212

Chemical Engineering

3 Cr.

Beginning course for chemistry students , laboratory technicians or non路technical chemical equipment operators. Discussion of the fundamental principles of chemical engineering, and the relationships and analysis of chemical engineering process operations and equipment. Principles of unit operation, such as heat exchange, condensation and evaporation. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: High school chemistry and mathematics or industrial experience.

470-220

Introduction to Chemical Instrumentation

3 Cr.

Beginning course consisting of lectures and demonstrations of the theory, principles, designs and operation of available chemical instruments . Flow of electronic signals and the information they represent in chemical instrument operation . Valuable fundamentals for chemistry students and practicing laboratory technicians. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 480路1 n General Chemistry or 780-101 Introductory Physics or industrial chemistry laboratory experience.

480-101

Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry

5 Cr.

Emphasis on states of matter, atomic and molecular structure as a basis for understanding valence , formulas and chemical reactions . Solution chemistry including concentration calculations are covered. Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or equivalent.

131


CHEMISTRY 480

480-102

Introduction to Organic Chemistry and. Biochemistry (Western Campus only)

5 Cr.

Survey of organic chemistry and elementary biochemistry with applications to daily life. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 480-101 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry or equivalent_

480-106

Introduction to Organic Chemistry

5 Cr.

Atomic structure, chemical bonding, elementary organic chemistry with emphasis on functional groups and reactions. A practical rather than theoretical course . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or equivalent.

480-109

Introduction to Biochemistry

5 Cr.

Chemical bonding, the chemistry of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, enzymes and the metabolic process . Emphasis on the practical application to nutrition . (Not designed for pre-medical students.) Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

480-111

General Chemistry

4 Cr.

Study of the fundamental principles of chemistry. Emphasis on atomic structure, chemical bonding, equation balancing and stoichiometry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 480-101 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry or one year of high school chemistry or equivalent and one year of high school algebra or equivalent.

480-112

General Chemistry

4 Cr.

Continuation of 480-111 General Chemistry. Emphasis on states of matter, properties of solutions , chemical kinetics and chemical equ ilibrium. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 480-111 General Chemistry.

480-113

General Chemistry

5 Cr.

Continuation of 480-112 General Chemistry. Emphasis on thermodynamics, electrochemistry, equilibria in aqueous solution, semimicroqualitative analysis and descriptive inorganic chemistry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours . Prerequisite: 480-112 General Chemistry.

480-120

Chemistry for Health Technologies (Western Campus only)

3 Cr.

The application of chemistry to man ; a study of the processes of life at the molecular level. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry or 480-101 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry or departmental approval. 132


CHEMISTRY 480

480-211

Organic Chemistry

5 Cr.

Chemistry of carbon compounds . Preparation , properties and reactions of aliphatic and aromatic groups. Theoretical concepts and mechanisms used to aid understanding and explain reactions. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 480-113 General Chemistry.

480-212

Organic Chemistry

5 Cr.

Continuation of 480路211 Organic Chemistry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 480-211 Organic Chemistry.

480-213

Organic Chemistry

5 Cr.

Continuation of 480-212 Organic Chemistry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 480-212 Organic Chemistry.

480-221

Quantitative Analysis

3 Cr.

Theory and laboratory practice of volumetric and gravimetric analyses. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 480-113 General Chemistry.

480-222

Quantitative Analysis

3 Cr.

Continuation of 480-221 Quantitative Analysis . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 480-221 Quantitative Analysis.

480-230

Chemical Analytical Instrumentation

4 Cr.

Techniques and principles of operation of analytical instrumentation and their application in chemistry, absorption and spectrophotometry. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 480-106 Introduction to Organic Chemistry or 480'211 Organic Chemistry or concurrent enrollment.

480-231

Chemical Analytical Instrumentation

4 Cr.

Techniques ana principles of operation of chromatography, sorpto路 metry and nuclear magnetic resonance. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 480-106 Introduction to Organic Chemistry or 480-211 Organic Chemistry or concurrent enrollment.

480-232

Chemical Analytical Instrumentation

4 Cr.

Techniques and principles of operation of electrochemical, optical, thermal analytical and metal analytical instrumentation . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours . Prerequisite: 480-106 Introduction to Organic Chemistry or 480-211 Organic Chemistry or concurrent enrollment.

134


Chill Care 'technology 481 481-101

Introduction to Child Care

3 Cr.

History of child care in the United States and Europe with emphasis on the transition from substitute parent status to that of an emerging profession. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

481-102

Introduction to Child Care

3 Cr.

Continuation of 481·101 Introduction to Child Care with emphasis on the comparative study of child care institutions. Lecture 3 hours. Lab· oratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 481·101 Introduction to Child Care.

481-120

Child Observation

5 Cr.

Observation and evaluation of children within a child care facility. Analysis of case study examples. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 481·102 Introduction to Child Care.

481-211

Child Care Techniques

2 Cr.

Daily routines and problems of the child care worker. Recognition and intervention in child problems. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 481·120 Child Observation and concurrent enrollment in 481·221 Field Experience or departmental approval.

481-212

Child Care Techniques

2 Cr.

Continuation of 481·211 Child Care Techniques. Methods of han· dling common behavior problems and concerns in a child care facility. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 481·211 Child Care Techniques and concurrent enrollment in 481·222 Field Experience or departmental approval.

481-213

Child Care Techniques

2 Cr.

Continuation of 481·212 Child Care Techniques. Environmental in· fluences before and aft'€r placement. Sex attitudes. Child care worker behavior. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 481·212 Child Care Techniques and concurrent enrollment in 481·223 Field Experience or departmental approval.

481-221

Field Experience

7 Cr.

Practical experience as a child care worker under the direction of a child care worker supervisor. Emphasis on institutional philosophy and structure. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 15 hours. Prerequisites: 481· 120 Child Observation and concurrent enrollment in 481·211 Child Care Techniques or departmental approval.


CHILD CARE TECHNOLOGY 481

481-222

Field Experience

7 Cr.

Continuation of 481-221 Field Experience with attention to the treatment team. Staff referral and intake conferences. Case records review. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 15 hours. Prerequisites: 481-221 Field Experience and concurrent enrollment in 481-212 Child Care Tech niques or departmental approval.

481-223

Field Experience

7 Cr.

Continuation of 481-222 Field Experience with emphasis on the role of the child care worker in the treatment program. Recognition and alteration of negative behavior patterns in children. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 15 hours. Prerequisites: 481-222 Field Experience and con current enrollment in 481-213 Child Care Techniques or departmental approval.

481-231

Recreational Activities

3 Cr.

Presentation of various games, skills and crafts. Participation in the planning and execution of recreational activities. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 481-120 Child Observation or departmental approval.

481-241

Homemaker Activities

2 Cr.

Basic working knowledge of homemaker activities, personal hygiene, nutrition, first aid and medications in child care facilities. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 481-120 Child Observation or departmental approval.

481-251

Child Care Seminar

3 Cr.

Child care principles and their application to child care work. Student's awareness of himself and others along with understanding child behavior and child management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 481-120 Child Observation and 810-201 Child Growth and Development.

136


~lQ]f(1

@illc9l

~@~~m@®ill®w®~m@~®~ 482-113

Machine Reporting

3 Cr.

Introduction of stenograph machine theory and technique, with em· phasis on recording, reading and transcribing practice in preparation for more advanced courses in Machine Reporting. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: Eligibility to enroll in 560·101 College Composition and 830· 102 Typewriting or concurrent en· rollment.

482-114

Machine Reporting

3 Cr.

Continuation of 482·113 Machine Reporting. Mastery of stenograph machine theory and technique. Instruction and practice to develop recording, read ing and typewriting transcription skills in preparation for more advanced courses in the Court and Conference Reporting Program. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: 482·113 Machine Reporting and 830·102 Typewriting or equivalent.

482-115

Machine Reporting

3 Cr.

Continuation of 482·114 Machine Reporting. Additional instruction and practice to establish, develop and strengthen the link between theory, dictation, transcription and reporting skill. Emphasis placed on reliability. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: 482· 114 Machine Reporting and 830·103 Typewriting or equivalent.

482-116

Court Orientation and Transcription

3 Cr.

Lectures on court etiquette, the duties of the court reporter, the do's and don'ts of reporting, courtroom visitations and the introduction of transcription from paper tape, with the aim of transcription rate speed building. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 482·115 Machine Reporting or concurrent enrollment.

482-213

Machine Reporting

3 Cr.

Continuation of 482·115 Machine Reporting with emphasis on speed building on legal material, straight matter and regular correspond· ence. Emphasis is placed on accuracy tolerance of 3 per cent; and on the development of endurance and the introduction of typical legal forms. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 482·115 Machine Reporting.

137


~~--.

-_ . . .

--

COURT AND CONFERENCE REPORTING 482

482-214

Machine Reporting

3 Cr.

Continuation of 482·213 Machine Reporting with emphasis on im· proving the student's ability to take legal and medical dictation. Emphasis is placed on teaching the student to handle two , three and multiple·voice dictation in the form of actual legal reporting. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours . Prerequisite: 482-213 Machine Re·· porting .


COURT AND CONFERENCE REPORTING 482

482-215

Machine Reporting

3 Cr.

Continuation of 482-214 Machine Reporting. Live dictation speeds of 200 words per minute . Dictation of a legal, medical and general vocabulary includes multiple-voice presentation , with emphasis on endurance and speed. Methods of handling poorly heard material in court. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 482-214 Machine Reporting.

482-216

Testimony and Depositions

3 Cr.

Introduction to legal terminology dictation with emphasis on speed building on the following types of cases of two-voice dictation: common carrier, sa les warranty, arson, negligence, damages (death) ; highway traffic act, punitive damages, scope of employment, mental incompetency to contract. Scheduled courtroom visits. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: 482-116 Court Orientation and Transcription and 482-213 Machine Reporting or concurrent enrollment.

482-217

Testimony

3 Cr.

Continuation of 482 -216 Testimony and Depositions. Additional cases of multiple-voice dictation, including insurance, condemnation proceedings, income tax refund, exemplary damages, negligence-injury, authority of an agent, burden of proof, weighing evidence. Duties of the reporter on depositions. Scheduled courtroom visits involving experience in taking testimony with a court reporter present. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours . Prerequisites: 482-214 Machine Reporting or concurrent enrollment and 482-216 Testimony and Depositions.

482-218

Jury Charge

3 Cr.

Designed to provide the student of Court Reporting with practice on actual jury charge and opinion with selections of legal opiniOn, solid matter, medical and dental testimony, miscellaneous court material, and, very importantly, real estate and land descriptions with their quaint terminology. Scheduled courtroom visits involving experience in taking actual testimony with a court reporter present. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: 482-215 Machine Reporting or concurrent enrollment and 482-217 Testimony .

482-219

Court Orientation and Advanced Transcription

3 Cr.

Continuation of 482-116 Court Orientation and Transcription . Proper courtroom etiquette and decorum . Emphasis on transcription speed and accuracy from paper tape and live dictation. Courtroom visits involving experience in taking courtroom testimony with a court reporter in attendance. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 482-217 Testimony.

139


485-101

Introduction to the Art of Dance

3 Cr.

Elementary technique, improvisation, small compositions, lectures, films and discussions on dance history, philosophy, theory, survey of the current trends. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

485-102

Introduction to the Art of Dance

3 Cr.

Continuation of 485-101 Introduction to the Art of Dance. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 485路101 Introduction to the Art of Dance.

140


DANCE 48:

485-107

Theory and Techniques of Dance

2 Cr.

Integration of the physical , intellectual and aesthetic values of dance through the technique class. Ballet and modern dance in alternate hours. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours . Prerequisite : Concu r rent enrollment in 485·101 Introduction to the Art of Dance or departmental approval.

485-108

Theory and Techniques of Dance

2 Cr.

Continuation of 485·107 Theory and Techniques of Dance. Lecture o hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 485·107 Theory and Techniques of Dance.

485-109

Theory and Techniques of Dance

2 Cr.

Continuation of 485·108 Theory and Techniques of Dance . Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 485-108 Theory and Techniques of Dance.

485-122

Movement: Form and Style

2 Cr.

The organization of movement to express emotion and character through the exploration of the elements of space, time and energy. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enroll· ment in 890·150 Fundamentals of Acting or departmental approval.

485-123

Movement: Form and Style

2 Cr.

Continuation of 485-122 Movement: Form and Style. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 485-122 Movement: Form and Style.


490-101

Electronic Data Processing

4 Cr.

Introduction to electronic data processing . History of data processing. Features of data processing unit record equipment and number systems . Computer concepts , programming and system analysis principles. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

490路111

Data Processing Applications

3 Cr.

Functional problems of manipulations, logic, calculations and reporting. Typical data processing equipment-e.g. , keypunches , sorters and tabulators - use d directly as applicable to problem solution. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 490-101 Electronic Data Processing or concurrent enrollment with departmental approval.

4S0路201

Computer Programming

4 Cr.

Binary coded decimal and hexadecimal number code systems defined. Absolute machine language and symbolic language computer coding methods are used to introduce programming features of a specific computer system. Advantages and limitations of specific computer are compared with other computers in the f ield . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: 490 -101 Electronic Data Processing. 142


DATA PROCESSING 490

490-202

Computer Programming

3 Cr.

Continuation of 490-201 Computer Programming. Basic techniques of assembly language programming. Introduction of program modifi cation techniques . Logic tables . Problem-oriented languages and report generators. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 490-201 Computer Programming.

490-203

Computer Programming

3 Cr.

Continuation of 490-202 Computer Programming. Advanced techniques of assembly language/ report generators. Programming applied to problems involving program modification. Magnetic tape and / or disk storage file handling methods. Symbolic manipulation and file organization. Introduction to macros and large systems . Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 490-202 Computer Programming.

490-211

Applied Data Mathematics

4 Cr.

Logic, sets and Boolean expressions, interpolation, exact and approximate solutions to simultaneous linear systems . Statistical methods applications, numerical use of concepts of differential and integral calculus. Overview of management science techniques . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-141 Elementary Probability and Statistics.

490-215

Numerical Methods and Computers

4 Cr.

Introduces computer programming for mathematics, science and engineering. Numerical methods for solving problems arising in statistics, engineering, physics and chemistry are studied, and solutions are obtained via the digital computer. Major programming is with Fortran . Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 690115 College Algebra.

490-221

Programming Systems

4 Cr.

Stresses familiarity with the differences among assembly systems , macrosystems , tabular language and compiler languages. Applications, advantages and disadvantages. Operating systems, total sys tems and integration of programming effort. Major programming emphasis is with Cobol. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 490-203 Computer Programming.

490-231

Systems Analysis

4 Cr.

Systems and procedures function . Includes analysis , design , control of management information and data systems . Economics of manual, electromechanical and electronic data processing . Advantages and disadvantages of computer, communication and information retrieval systems for information evaluation. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 490-202 Computer Programming. 143


DATA PROCESSING 490

490-241

I nformation Retrieval

4 Cr.

Methods and problems involving information retrieval systems. Presentation of theories and approaches to the use of computers in disciplines such as statistics, law, medicine, library science, music , languages and the humanities . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 490-231 Systems Analysis.

490-245

Tele-Communication Processing

4 Cr.

Discussion of various forms of tele-communications and their relation or connection with computers. Non-computer devices such as telephone and telegraph are covered. Computer·oriented subjects covered are direct computer·to·computer data transmission, message switching facilities, real-time and on-line inquiry stations. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 490·231 Systems Analysis.

490-251

Data Processing Field Project

3 Cr.

Each student selects a project to complete. Upon approval , he develops an information system , documents and programs it for im· plementation . All projects to include hands-on assembly, testing, debugging and processing. A written report is required , giving a complete explanation of the programming method , the assembly and processing techniques, the diagnostic and debugging procedures used. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours . Prerequisites: 490-221 Programming Systems and 490-231 Systems Analysis.

490-260

Cooperative Field Experience

9 Cr.

Limited to students in the Cooperative Field Experience Program . FUll-time employment in an approved area under College supervision. Requirements for credit will be a minimum of 350 clock hours of approved work, a report from the employer, term report by student and on -the-job visits by the coordinator of the department. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 35 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

490-261

Cooperative Field Experience

9 Cr.

Continuation of 490 -260 Cooperative Field Experience . Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 35 hours. Prerequ isite : 490-260 Cooperative Field Experience.

490-280

Data Processing for Libraries

3 Cr.

Concepts and techniques for the application of data processing prin ciples in the acquisitions, cataloguing, circulation and serials con trol systems. Lectu re 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 490101 Electronic Data Processing.

144


IID@~ m~@fi@I]J@ lli)@速 500-101

Preclinical Dental Hygiene

2 Cr.

Techniques of removing stains and deposits from the teeth. Students practice on manikins and then apply the instruments in the mouth. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Dental Hygiene Program .

500-102

Head and Neck Anatomy and Tooth Morphology

4 Cr.

Study of anatomy of oral structures including the teeth and their environmental and supporting tissues . Lectures on nomenclature, morphology, structure, function and occlusion of the teeth . Identification , drawing, and carving of some permanent and deciduous teeth. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Dental Hygiene Program.

500-103

Oral Hygiene

2 Cr.

History of dentistry and development of dental hygiene. Introduction to medico-dental terminology. Study of the formation of calculus and stains, principles of preventive dentistry and instrument sharpening_ Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Dental Hygiene Program.

500-111

Preclinical Dental Hygiene

2 Cr.

Continuation of 500-101 Preclinical Dental Hygiene and techniques of fluoride applications. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours . Prerequisite: 500-101 Preclinical Dental Hygiene.

500-112

Head and Neck Anatomy and Tooth Morphology

4 Cr.

Continuation of 500-102 Head and Neck Anatomy and Tooth Morphology. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 500102 Head and Neck Anatomy and Tooth Morphology.

500-113

Oral Hygiene

3 Cr.

Study of the principles and methods of patient education, sterilization, fluoride, supplementary oral health techniques and clinic procedures. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 500-103 Oral Hygiene.

500-114

General and Oral Histology

2 Cr.

Origin and structure of tissues, histology and embryology of teeth , face and oral cavity. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 500103 Oral Hygiene. 14.5


DENTAL HYGIENE 500

500-130

Dental Materials

5 Cr.

Physical properties of dental materials and basic principles of their preparation. General manipulative techniques and various phases of laboratory techniques discussed and demonstrated . Lectu re 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 500-112 Head and Neck Anatomy and Tooth Morphology.

500-131

Clinical Dental Hygiene

3 Cr.

Students perform oral prophyla xis, expose radiographs, apply topical fluoride to the teeth and give patient education to adult and ch ild patients in the clinic. Laboratory hours refer to hours in clinic. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 500-111 Preclinical Dental Hygiene.

500-132

Radiology

3 Cr.

History and development of the X-ray, its nature and properties. Safety precautions and uses of the X-ray in dentistry. Theory and practice in the fundamentals of oral radiographic technique. Film placement, tube angulat ion , processing and mounting of films . A specific number of radiodontic examinations and hours in darkroom procedures are required throughout the two-year Dental Hygiene Program. Lec ture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 500 -112 Head and Neck Anatomy and Tooth Morphology.

500-134

General and Oral Pathology

2 Cr.

Introdu ction to gene ral pathology. Inflammation , necrosis, retrograde changes, pathological process in diseases caused by bacteria , viruses and other organisms. Clinical pathology of diseases affecting teeth and their supporting structures. Visual differentiation between normal and abnormal tissues. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 500-114 General and Oral Histology.

500-200

Clinical Dental Hygiene

2 Cr.

Continuation of 500-131 Clinical Dental Hygiene. Concentrated clinical experience. Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 500-131 Clinical Dental Hygiene.

500-201

Clinical Dental Hygiene

4 Cr.

Continuation of 500 -200 Clinical Dental Hygiene. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: 500 -200 Clinica l Dental Hygiene.

500-202

Periodontics

2 Cr.

Etiology and classification of periodontal disease and principles of peri odontology. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 500200 Clinical Dental Hygiene.

146


DENTAL HYGIENE 500

500-203

Pharmacology and Anesthesiology

4 Cr.

Drugs and anesthetics, with emphasis on those used in the dental office. Discussion of the origin of drugs and anesthetics, physical and chemical properties, preparation, mode of administration and effects on body systems. Preoperative and postoperative patient care. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 500-130 Dental Materials.


DENTAL HYGIENE 500

500-205

Dental Assisting

1 Cr.

Application of principles learned in 500 -130 Dental Materials by assisting the dental students at Case Western Reserve University School of Dentistry. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequ isite: 500-130 Dental Mate ri als.

500-206

Dental Health Education

2 Cr.

Analysis of concepts, techniques of presentation and goals of dental health education. Major emphasis is on preparation and use of lesson plans and instructional materials in dental health. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 500-130 Dental Materials.

500-210

Public Health

2 Cr.

Historical development of public health practices in the United States as they relate to dental hygiene. Present administrative organizations and their functions and services. Exploration of present public health concepts. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 500-206 Dental Health Education.

500-211

Clinical Dental Hygiene

5 Cr.

Continuation of 500-201 Clinical Dental Hygiene. Special assignments in dental departments of Veterans Administration, Metropolitan General and Highland View Hospitals to further acquaint students with diverse mouth conditions. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: 500-201 Clinical Dental Hygiene.

500-224

Dental Health Education

2 Cr.

Classroom instruction in dental health in the elementary and second ary schools. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 500206 Dental Health Education .

500-230

Dental Specialties

5 Cr.

Lectures by dental specialists in the fields of endodontics, operative dentistry, orthodontics, pedodontics, periodontics, prosthetics, research and surgery to enable students to gain a knowledge of all phases of dentistry. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 624 -223 First Aid.

148


DENTAL HYGIENE 500/DIETARY TECHNOLOGY 505

500-231

Clinical Dental Hygiene

5 Cr.

Continuation of 500-211 Clinical Dental Hygiene. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: 500-211 Clinical Dental Hygiene.

500-234

Dental Ethics and Jurisprudence

3 Cr.

Future of dentistry and role of the dental hygienist in her profession and association. Relationship of dental hygienist to other members of the dental health team . Principles of professional ethics; laws and regulations related to dentistry and dental hygiene. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 624-223 First Aid.

500-235

Dental Office Management

Introduction to office administration covering all office. Reception of patients, use of telephone, recording, billing, filing, banking procedures and Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite:

505-101

Dietary Technician Orientation

1 Cr. phases of a dental inventory records, care of equipment. 624-223 First Aid .

2 Cr.

Foods, nutrition and dietetics as a profession. Organization, job potentials in food service in health institutions. Dietary technician's role in management and administration of dietary functions. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

505-121

Foods and Nutrition

4 Cr.

Introduction to the basic principles of nutrition. Common nutritional factors underlying good health, weight control and the understanding of a balanced diet. Explores good composition and the nutritional aspects of careful preparation. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. 480-106 Introduction to Organic Chemistry recommended.

505-122

Nutrition and Diet Therapy

4 Cr.

Application of principles of nutrition related to specific disease conditions requiring dietary modifications. Planning and evaluation of dietary patterns and meal plans for individuals of various ages, institutional and cultural groups. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 505-121 Foods and Nutrition.

149


DIETARY TECHNOLOGY 505

505-135

Dietary Quantity Food Production

3 Cr.

Planning and preparation of entire meal to gain skills and knowledge of large quantity dietary production and management. Operation and maintenance of service and sanitation of large equipment. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: None.

505-136

Dietary Quantity Food Production

3 Cr.

Practical experience in quantity dietary food preparation. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: 505路135 Dietary Quantity Food Production.

505-141

Dietary Technician Field Experience

5 Cr.

Field experience in dietary departments of health care institutions under the direction of an American Dietetic Association dietitian . Participation in relevant supervisory work situations , progressive job experiences and activities. Lecture 1 hour . Laboratory 22 hours. Prerequisites: 505路 122 Nutrition and Diet Therapy and 650-121 Elements of Supervision.


~ -----------------------------------------------------

DIETARY TECHNOLOGY 505

505-221

Advanced Nutrition and Meal Planning

4 Cr.

Application of nutrition principles to problems of diet in disease. Meal planning policies and procedures . Modified dietary patterns. Concurrent field experience in health care institutions under supervision of an Amer ican Dietetic Association dietitian. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 505-122 Nutrition and Diet Therapy.

505-222

Geriatric Nutrition

4 Cr.

Application of nutrition principles to dietary needs of the elderly, with socioeconomic, psychological and physiological factors consid ered . Emphasis on decreased functional ability, basal metabolism, dentition and physical activity, and their relation to nutrition and diet. Concurrent field experience in nursing homes, extended care facilities and institutions for the aged . Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: 505-122 Nutrition and Diet Therapy.

505-235

Dietary Quantity Food Procedures

3 Cr.

Quantity purchasing methods employed in a dietary setting of institutional food services. Specifications, legal regulations, controls , use of production records, time and motion studies in purchasing, storage and handling. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 505-136 Dietary Quantity Food Production.

505-236

Dietary Organization and Management Procedures

3 Cr.

Organizational structure of quantity food service in health care institutions. Evaluation of administration, management tools,budget and cost analysis. Applications. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : 505-235 Dietary Quantity Food Procedures or concurrent enrollment.

505-241

Dietary Technician Seminar

3 Cr.

Review and analysis of dietary and nutrition management techniques, procedures and purposes in health care settings. Evaluation of field experiences, job trends and opportunities, community resourc~s, communication and media services. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650-121 Elements of Supervision.

505-251

Dietary Technician Seminar

3 Cr.

New and relevant trends in dietary service and the implications for food service in health care institutions. Opportunities and procedures for employment and advancement. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 505 -241 Dietary Technician Seminar.

151


â&#x20AC;˘

EAR~Y ~'~OHOOD

EDUCATiON 730 730-101

Early Childhood Education

4 Cr.

History and philosophy of early childhood education. The preschool plant and equipment, programs, development and needs of the young child. Supervised observation. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

730-102

4 Cr.

Early Childhood Education

Study of various types of preschool centers. Emphasis on curriculum and program development, administration and the role of the preschool teacher. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 730-101 Early Childhood Education.

730-120

Early Language Development

3 Cr.

Language skills and the importance of communication in the development of a preschool child. An interpretative and critical study of literature and related activities which aid in the development of language and communication. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 730-101 Early Childhood Education.

730-121

Literature for Early Childhood

3 Cr.

Evaluation of literary activities and material for young children. Practice in the art of reading and telling stories as well as in the use of other forms of literature. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequi site: 730 -120 Early Language Development.

730-122

Art for Early Childhood

3 Cr.

Students in a workshop setting are acquainted with a rich and meaningful variety of curriculum experiences in art for preschool children. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 730-102 Early Childhood Education.

152

Ap-ple.

A-corn.


EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 730

730-123

Science for Early Childhood

3 Cr.

Students in a workshop setting are acquainted with a rich and meaningful variety of curriculum experiences in science for preschool children. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 730-122 Art for Early Childhood.

730-124

Music for Early Childhood

3 Cr.

Designed to acquaint and train students to understand and develop the instinctive creativity of young children. Basic music vocabulary and concepts will be stressed . Experiences with sound, rhythms, musical games, instruments and records will be explored. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 730-101 Introduction to Early Childhood Education.

730-125

Music for Early Childhood

3 Cr.

To further explore the nature of music for young children . Study of notation and elemental theory. To develop skills in the use of various instruments. To continue the building of a repertoire and planning of musical experiences. To develop skills in evaluating music for young children. Lecture 2 hour~. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 730-124 Music for Early Childhood.

730-220 Child Behavior and Guidance (Formerly Child Management)

3 Cr.

Guidance of preschool children within an educational program based on interpretation of child growth principles in practice. To help students understand themselves in their roles as teachers of young children . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 810-201 Child Growth and Development and concurrent enrollment in 730-230 Early Childhood Practicum.

730-221

Early Childhood Relationships

2 Cr.

A course designed to enable teachers and parents to work together effectively toward creating a better way of life for the child, with emphasis on factors which promote satisfying relationships _ Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 730-230 Early Childhood Practicum and concurrent enrollment in 730-231 Early Childhood Practicum.

730-230

Early Childhood Practicum

5 Cr.

Actual participation in preschool teaching under supervision to develop practical skills. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 10 1/ 2 hours. Prerequisites: 730-121 Literature for Early Childhood, 730-123 Science for Early Childhood , 730-124 Music for Early Childhood. 154


EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 730 EARTH SCIENCE 510jECONOM ICS 520

730-231

Early Childhood Practicum

5 Cr.

Add itional experience with young children in an organized group. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 10 1/ 2 hours. Prerequisite: 730·230 Early Childhood Practicum .

Earth Science 510 510-110

Physical Geology

4 Cr.

Materials and structures of the earth , processes and agencies by which t he earth's crust has been and is being changed . Rocks and their mineral composition. The work of rivers , winds and glaciers as agents of erosion . Volcanoes and earthquakes as forces which change the surface of the earth . Regularly scheduled field trips are an in · tegral part of course. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 3 hours . Prereq· uisite: None .

510-111

Historical Geology

4 Cr.

Geologic history of the earth and its inhabitants , with special refer· ence to North America. Laboratory study deals with principal fossil life of the various geologic periods. Occasional field work is required . Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 510·110 Physical Geology or concurrent enrollment.

520-100

Basic Economics

3 Cr.

Practical course in the principles of economics designed to provide an understanding of the structure, organization and operation of our economy; its relation to our social and political welfare and to our standard of living. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Not open to students who have successfully completed 520· 161 Principles of Economics and/or 520·162 Princ iples of Economics or their equivalent.

520-151

Development of the American Economy

4 Cr.

Evolutionary development of our econom ic system from med ieval times to present. Designed for better understanding of the economic life. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : None.

155


ECONOMICS 520/EDUCATION 530/ EDUCATIONAL MEDIA 535

520-161

Principles of Economics

4 Cr.

An introduction to the scope and method of economics; scarcity and resource allocation ; basic demand-supply analysis; the mixed economy and its basic components; national income analysis and modern employment theory; money and banking; economic growth. Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

520-162

Principles of Economics

4 Cr.

A continuation of 520-161 Principles of Economics. Refinements in demand-supply theory; supply and the costs of production; price and output determination by market structure; resource pricing; general equilibrium analysis; labor economics; economics of poverty and inequality; the social imbalance controversy; international trade theory. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 520-161 Principles of Economics.

Education 530 530-101

Introduction to Education

3 Cr.

Designed to introduce the student to the broad and complex field of public education. Emphasis on personal and professional characteristics required for successful teaching. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

EDUc-ATIONAL A1EDIt.. 535 535-101

Introduction to Educational Media

3 Cr.

Educational media and their use in varied institutiona l settings. Development of basic skills in using various media. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

535-102

Educational Media

3 Cr.

Orientation to booking materials, cataloguing procedures, scheduling and inventory of Instructional Media Center materials. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 535-101 Introduction to Educational Media or' equivalent.

156


EDUCATIONAL MEDIA 535

535-121

Media Maintenance and Repair

3 Cr.

Maintenance of Smm and 16mm projectors, slide projector, sou n d equipment, photography equipment and television production equipment. Patch cords procedures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None.

157


EDUCATIONAL MEDIA 535 ELECTRICAL·ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 540

535-122

Graphics Production

3 Cr.

Production techniques and procedures-art work , copy photography, pasteups , transparencie s, display layouts and story boards. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Pre requisite: 535 ·101 Introduction to Edu· cational Media or equivalent.

535-151

Classroom Television Production

3 Cr.

Technique s and procedure s in the following: sound , light ing, video t aping procedures , dubbing and editing tapes. Lecture 1 hour. Lab· oratory 4 hours . Prerequisite: None.

535-152

Studio Television Procedures

3 Cr.

Techniques and procedures in the following : sound, lighting, video taping procedures , dubbing and editing tapes. Lecture 1 hour. Lab· oratory 4 hours. Prerequisite : None.

535-172

Movie Photography

3 Cr.

Techniques and procedures in the following: color, black·and·white cinematography, Bmm, 16mm and story board. Lecture 1 hour. Lab· oratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 616· 113 Photography or equivalent.

535-201

Sound Media

3 Cr.

Operating record equipment and public address systems. Reproduc· tion of sound materials. Operation of multi ·media equipment. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 535·101 Introduction to Ed· ucational Media or equivalent.

535-251

Internship

4 Cr.

Field experience in a media setting. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours . Prerequisite : 21 quarter hours completed in Educational Media .

EI~cjpic~I-EI~cjp()Qic

EQ~iQ~~piQ~ T~C~Q()I()~y S.(() 540-100

Electrical-Electronic Orientation

2 Cr.

Designed to acqua int the student with his career field , employment trends and typical future technical assignments. Instruction in the use of the slide rule and engineering problem solving. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite : None.

158


ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 540

540-125 Electric Circuits (Formerly 550-125) ~I

3 Cr.

Direct current circuit fundamentals with emphasis on electron theory of current flow , electrical quantities and their units of measurement, sources of EMF, Ohm's law, electrical energy and power relationships. Series , parallel and series-parallel circuits , voltage dividers. Kirch路 hoff's laws, Thevenin's and Norton's theorems . Practical laboratory experience in the construction of working circuits and the evaluation of their performance. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequi路 site: None.

540-126 Electric Circuits (Formerly 550-126)

3 Cr.

Fundamentals of alternating current circuits with emphasis on capacitance, inductance, sinusoidal voltage and current , reactance, vectors and phasors, impedance. Practical laboratory experience with A.C. instruments including oscilloscopes, capacitance testing and the evaluation of reactive circuits. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite : 550-125 Electric Circuits.

540-127 Electric Circuits (Formerly 550-127)

)

) ;\

)

3 Cr.

Continuation of 540-126 Electric Circuits. Emphasis on power, reson路 ance, coupled circuits, transformer action and harmonics. Practical laboratory experience with various combinations of series and parallel reactive circuits, resonant circuits and transformers. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 540-126 Electric Circuits and 690 -105 Trigonometry.

540-140 Direct Current Machines (Formerly Magnetics, Electromagnetic Induction and Direct Current Machines)

3 Cr.

Direct current generator-motor principles and construction. Includes single路phase A.C. motors. Efficiency, rating and application of dynamos. Voltage, current, excitation , torque , speed and speed regulation , armature reaction and power losses. Rotating amplifiers and D.C. machines for automation. Practical laboratory experience with electrical machines. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 540-125 Electric Circuits and 690-101 Algebra.

540-150

Alternating Current Machines

3 Cr.

Theory of alternating current machinery. Construction, characteristics and operation of induction , synchronous motors, synchronous generators , converters and transformers, both single and polyphase. Prac tical laboratory experience with machinery. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 540-127 Electric Circuits and 540-140 Direct Current Machines or concurrent enrollment. 159


ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 540

540-160

Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits

3 Cr.

Fundamentals of vacuum tubes and semiconductors . Circuit applica tions including rectifier and basic power supply circuits as well as filter networks . Vacuum triode characteristics . Practical laboratory experience with circuits involving semiconductors , ze ne r, tunnel and vacuum diodes . Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 540-127 Electric Circuits or concurrent enrollment.

540-211

Electrical Construction and Application

2 Cr.

Wiring systems for light , heat and power. Transmission and distribu· tion systems; switches , contactors , relays and circuit breakers . Wire , cable and conduit applications. Feeder and branch circuit protection. Safety and grounding practices . Demonstrations will be used to familiarize students with equipment. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequ isite: 540·150 Alternati ng Cu rrent Machi nes.

540-235

Communication Transmission

3 Cr.

Fundamentals of A.M. radio transmission and receiving . Emphasis on tuned and coupled circu its, R.F. amplifiers and oscillators, modu · lation and demodulation of A.M. waves . A.M. receiver circuitry. Practi· cal laboratory experience with audio components and circuits as well as the construction and alignment of a superheterodyne receiver . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: 540·261 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits or concurrent enrollment.

540-236

Communication Transmission

3 Cr.

Continuation of 540-235 Communication Transmission. Emphasis on frequency modulation, transmission lines, antennas and propa gat ion , telephone transmission , advanced radio transmission and receiving systems . Laboratory experience with radio and telephone equipment. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 540-235 Communication Transmission.

540-241

Electrical Drafting

3 Cr.

Specific applications of drafting techniques to describe electrical circuits and systems, motor control diagrams and electrical construc tion. Graphic symbols and conventions . Lecture 1 hour. Laborato ry 4 hours. Prerequisite: 550-121 Engineering Drawing.

540-250

Industrial Electronics

3 Cr.

Operating principles of industrially oriented equipment. Industrial aplication of semiconductors and tube-operated circuits. Rectifiers, thyristors , thyratrons and associated equipment. Includes sensing of time, voltage and light. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequi site: 540 -260 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits or concurrent enrollment. 160


ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 540

540-251

Industrial Electronics

3 Cr.

A continuation of 540-250 Industrial Electronics . Topics covered include magnetic amplifiers, synchro-generators and motors, servomechanisms , thyristo rs and firing controls , automatic motor control s. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 540-250 Industrial Electronics.

540-252

logic, Pulse and Switching Circuitry

r::J. ~

3 Cr.

Elements of logic, pulse and switching circuitry. Emphasis on num· ber systems and Boolean algebra, clipping and clamping circuits. The transistor as a switch . Bistable , monostable and astable multi· vibrators , pulse amplifiers and blocking oscillators . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: 540·261 Semiconductor and Elec· tronic Circuits or concurrent enrollment.

540-253

Computer Circuitry

3 Cr.

Application of logic, pulse and switching circuits to computers . Codes and introduction to machine language. Emphasis on counters and shift registers, timing and control, computer arithmetic operations and memory systems . Input-output equipment , analog to digital and digital to analog convers ion . Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: 540-252 Logic , Pulse and Switching Circuitry .

540-260

Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits

3 Cr.

Transistor characteristics and theory of operation . Transisto r biasing and thermal stabilization. Small signal and low frequency amplifier circuits . Field effect transistors. Practical laboratory experience with transistor and triode amplifier circuits. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite : 540·160 Semiconductor and Electronic Cir· cuits .

540-261

Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits

3 Cr.

A continuation of 540·260 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits with emphasis on amplifiers , feedback amplifiers , untuned sine wave and negative resistance oscillators , large signal amplifiers , integrated circuits and regulated power supplies . Laboratory experience with cascaded transistor amplifiers , power amplifiers , phase inverters , SCR's and amplifier integrated circuits . Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite : 540·260 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits.

[}

0-

0-

o

o C7 C7

9 [J

161


ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC ENGINEER ING TECHNOLOGY 540

540-262

Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation

3 Cr.

Principles of electronic measuring and test instruments . Basic meters in D.C. and A.C. measurements. Comparison and bridge type measurements . Electronic meters , oscilloscopes and component testing devices. Practical laboratory experience with instrument circuits , operation , calibration and measurement . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 540-260 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits or concurrent enrollment.

540-263

Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation

3 Cr.

Circuitry, operation and calibration of the more sophisticated electronic instruments. Included are recorders and transducers, signal generators, frequency measuring devices, digital instruments and the analog computer. Basic control systems are examined . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisites: 540-251 Industrial Electronics, 540-252 Logic, Pulse and Switching Circuitry and 540-262 Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation.

540-265

Automation and Electronic Controls

3 Cr.

Introduction to the various automatic control systems and their components. Emphasis on servomechanisms and other feedback control systems. Electrical, electronic , mechanical, hydraulic and pneumatic components as they relate to control systems. Basics of control circuitry. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 540-251 Industrial Electronics and 540-263 Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation.

540-271

Solid State Circuit Analysis

3 Cr.

Introduction to network terminology. Geometry and equilibrium equations, methodology of solution. Circuit elements and sources, circuit response to step functions and review of semiconductor theory. Switching circuit design. Functions and characteristics of transistors and mode circuits. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 540-261 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits and 690-'152 Analytic Geometry and Calculus .

540-275

Introduction to Microcircuits

3 Cr.

Developing science of microminiature electronic circuits and com ponents. Characteristics, fabrication and applications. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 540-261 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits or equivalent.

162

o

o

0

o

0

o


550-100

Slide Rule

2 Cr.

Introduction to the theory and application of the slide rule as a computational device . Guided problem solving with log-log trigonometric slide rules will be featured. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

550-101

Metallurgy

3 Cr.

Physical and mechanical behavior of pure metals and alloys. Specific metal systems are examined to illustrate various phenomena . Introduction to metallography and physical testing. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hou rs. Prerequisite: None .

550-102

Metallurgy

3 Cr.

A continuation of 550路101 Metallurgy with special emphasis on phase changes of metals . Heat treatment of steel is introduced . Lecture 2 hou rs. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite : 550-101 Metallurgy.

550-103

Metallurgy

3 Cr.

Non路ferrous metals and alloys , high and low temperature effects upon metals, wear and corrosion . Extractive and powder metallurgy. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 550-102 Metallurgy.

550-111

Principles of Air Conditioning and Refrigeration

4 Cr.

States of matter, pressures, temperature and energy conversion. Cooling aspect s of air condit ioning. Systems and control devices. Lectu re 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-101 Algebra.

550-112

Engineering Report Construction

3 Cr.

Oral , wr itten and graphic methods of communication for the engineer and technician. Provides practice in preparation of technical reports. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: None.

550-121

Engineering Drawing

3 Cr.

Principles and practice in orthographic and pictorial drawing and sketch ing. Lettering, applied geomet ry and use of instruments. Sec tional and au xiliary views . Dimensioning systems as applicable to production drawing. Graphic data representation. Lecture '1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours . Prerequisite : None.

164


ENGINEERING 550

550-122

Engineering Drawing

3 Cr.

Elements of machine drawing, electronic diagrams , piping and welding drawing, inte rsections and developments . Precision dimensioning as dictated by shop processes. Working drawings , methods of reproduction and control. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours . Prerequisite: 550-121 Engineering Drawing.

550-123

Engineering Drawing

3 Cr.

Drafting principles and applications pertinent to working drawings. Includes metric , dual and true position dimension ing; geometric tolerancing. Tool drawings, design drawing and technical illustration are introduced together with applications of special drafting aids and techniques. Graphical mathematics methods and media are included . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 550-122 Engineeri ng Drawi ng.

550-151

Applied Mechanics and Strength of Materials (Formerly Applied Mechanics)

3 Cr.

A basic study of engineering statics and an introduction to stress and strain in deformable bodies. Practical demonstrations include utilization of the universal testing machine in verifying theoretical concepts. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 690-101 Algebra and 690-105 Trigonometry.

550-211

Introduction to Surveying

3 Cr.

Applications and care of surveying instruments. Techniques and practice in taping. Use of transit and level in horizontal and vertical measurement, differential and .profile . Emphasis on accurate recording of field data in note form . Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 690-105 Trigonometry and 550-121 Engineering Drawing or equivalent.

550-212

Surveying

3 Cr.

A continuation of 550-211 Introduction to Surveying with emphasis on contour work , drainage and grading, and layout of vertical curves . Topographic stadia and plane table work will be introduced . Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: 550-211 Introduction to Surveying.

166


ENGINEERING 5S0/ENGLISH 560

550-251 Strength of Materials (Formerly Mechanics and Strength of Materials)

3 Cr.

The study of internal stresses and deformation in materials under various external loads. External loads examined include torque, forces applied to beams, forces applied through bolted, welded and riveted connections, combined forces on members and forces applied to columns. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 550路151 Applied Mechanics and Strength of Materials.

550-252 Applied Dynamics (Formerly Strength of Materials)

3 Cr.

A basic study of engineering dynamics including plane motion, curvilinear motion, kinetics, work, power, energy, impulse and momentum, and vibrations. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 550-151 Applied Mechanics and Strength of Materials.

English 560 560-091

Essentials of Written Communication

3 Cr.

Intensive practice in written composition and basic language skills. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Placement by department.

560-092

Essentials of Written Communication

3 Cr.

Intensive practice in written composition with emphasis on the organization of ideas into paragraphs and short themes . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-091 Essentials of Written Communication or placement by department.

560-093

Essentials of Written Communication

3 Cr.

Continued intensive practice in written composition with emphasis on the incorporation of sources into short themes and/or reports. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 560-092 Essentials of Written Communication or placement by department.

560-095

Reading Improvement

3 Cr.

Principles underlying efficient reading applied in daily practice with emphasis on study techniqlles . Group instruction in comprehension, vocabulary and learning skills . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

167


-,----~

----

- _. _- - --_._------

ENGLISH 560

560-096

Reading Improvement

3 Cr.

Extended practice in the areas of comprehension, vocabulary and rate of purposeful reading at the college level. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Placement by department.

560-097

Reading Improvement

3 Cr.

Emphasis on speed, comprehension and critical interpretation of college-level material. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours_ Prerequisite: Placement by department.

560-101

College Composition

3 Cr.

Study and practice in the principles of good writing. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Placement by department.

168


ENGLISH 560

560-102

College Composition

3 Cr.

Continuation of 560-101 College Composition with added emphasis on critical and interpretive writing _ Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequ isite : 560-101 College Composition.

560-103

College Composition

3 Cr.

Continuation of 560-102 College Composition with added emphasis on critical and interpretive writing. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-102 College Composition.

560-121

English as a Second Language

5 Cr.

English for non-native speakers. Intensive written practice in the basic English sentence patterns. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Placement by department.

560-122

English as a Second Language

5 Cr.

English for non-native speakers. Intensive written practice in modifying and combining the basic English sentence patterns and in constructing paragraphs from topic sentences. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Placement by department.

560-123

English as a Second Language

5 Cr.

English for non-native speakers. Intensive practice in analysis of American writing with emphasis on writing summaries of essays and short stories. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Placement by department.

560-125

Reading English as a Second Language

3 Cr.

English for non-native speakers. Practice in the use of the dictionary to aid spelling, pronunciation and vocabulary development. The study of phonics to increase reading comprehension and to expand vocabulary. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in 560-1 21 English as a Second Language or placement by department.

560-126

Reading English as a Second Language

3 Cr.

English for non -native speakers. Principles underlying efficient read ing with emphasis on surveying, comprehending, notetaking and outlining. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in 560-122 English as a Second Language or placement by deparment.

560-201

The Art of Writing

3 Cr.

Practice in imaginative writing for the student with a special interest in writing. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560103 College Composition or departmental approval. 169


ENGLISH 560

560-221

Survey of British Literature

3 Cr.

Study of major works of British literature from the beginning through the age of Milton. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 560-103 College Composition.

560-222

Survey of British Literature

3 Cr.

Study of major works of British literature from Restoration through the Romantic Period . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite : 560 -103 College Composition.

560-223

Survey of British Literature

3 Cr.

Study of major works of British literature from the Victorian Period to the present. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 560-103 College Composition.

560-231

Survey of American Literature

3 Cr.

Reading and analysis of notable American literary works from Bradford through Thoreau . Lecture 3 hou rs. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 560-103 College Composition.

560-232

Survey of American Literature

3 Cr.

Reading and analysis of notable American literary works from Hawthorne through Clemens. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Pre requisite: 560-103 College Composition .

560-233

Survey of American Literature

3 Cr.

Reading and analysis of notable American literary works from James to the present. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite : 560-103 College Composition.

560-241

Introduction to Literature: Poetry

3 Cr.

Critical analysis of the forms and art of poetry . The emphasis is on the poetic function of language. Lectu re 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequ isite : 560-103 College Composition.

560-242

Introduction to Literature: Fiction

3 Cr.

Critical analysis of selected works of fiction designed to develop appreciation and understanding of the short story and the novel as literary forms. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite : 560-103 College Composition .

560-243

Introduction to Literature: Drama

3 Cr.

Critical analysis of selected dramatic works designed to develop appreciation and understanding of the drama as a literary form. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite : 560-103 College Composition . 170


ENGLISH 560/FIRE TECHNOLOGY 570

560-261

The Literature of the Black American

3 Cr.

An introductory course in the literature of black Americans, emphasizing the significant themes and trends in their poetry and fiction . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-103 College Composition or concurrent enrollment.

560-271

Shakespeare

4 Cr.

A comprehensive reading course which includes a representative selection of Shakespeare 's plays: comedies , tragedies and histories. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite : 560-'103 College Composition.

570-100

Introduction to Fire Science

3 Cr.

Organizational procedures of the fire services. Includes the structure and function of battalion and company as components of municipal organizations. Discussion topics include personnel management and training, fire equipment and apparatus. Communications, records and reports , insurance rating systems and the law as it pertains to the fire services. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

570-110

Fire-Fighting Tactics

3 Cr ..

Techniques and procedures of fire fight ing. Emphasis on the individual fireman at the fire scene. Methods of extinguishing fires, lifesaving procedures. Salvage, prevention of rekindling. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 570-100 Introduction to Fire Science.

570-120

Fire Protection Systems

3 Cr.

Desigo and operation of fire protection systems. Includes water distribution, detection, alarm and watchman services, and protection systems for special hazards . Detailed examination of carbon dioxide, dry chemical, foam and water spray systems . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: None .

570-210

Fire-Fighting Command

3 Cr.

Group operations and command strategy. Pre-planning of fire fighting operations , size-up at the fire, employment of personnel and equipment. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 570-110 Fire-Fighting Tactics. 171


~ ---- ~ -- --- - -

- - - - ---

FIRE TECHNOLOGY 570

570-211

Fire-Fighting Command and Administration

3 Cr.

Analysis of specific tactical problems from a command point of view. Pre路planning of fire-fighting operations and the evaluation of these plans. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 570路110 Fire路Fighting Tactics.

570-220

Chemistry of Hazardous Materials

3 Cr.

Analysis of chemical reaction as the causative agent of fire. Includes redox reactions, reaction rates, toxic compounds and hazardous combinations of chemicals. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

172


FIRE TECHNOLOGY 570

570-230

Fire Prevention Practices

3 Cr.

Study of buildings and other structures. Emphasis on fire prevention procedures and practices. Fire ratings of materials . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 570路120 Fire Protection Systems .

570-231

Fire Prevention Practices

3 Cr.

Inspection practices as they pertain to fire prevention. Storage of explosive flammables, codes and fire ordinances, and examination of heating systems. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequi路 site: 570路230 Fire Prevention Practices.

173


FIRE TECHNOLOGY 570

570-235

Fire Investigation Methods

3 Cr.

Principles of fire investigation, arson laws, interrogation of witnesses and applications of photography. Preparation of reports and adjustments of losses. Lecture 3 hou rs. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: None.

570-236

Fire Investigation Methods

3 Cr.

Continuation of 570-235 Fire Investigation Methods with emphasis on preparation of reports and collection and presentation of arson evidence in court. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 570-235 Fire Investigation Methods.

570-240

Fire Hydraulics

3 Cr.

Hydraulic theory. Drafting of water, velocity and discharge; friction loss , engine and nozzle pressur.e, f ire stream, pressure losses , flow and pump testing, and applications in fire service. Lectu re 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: None.

570-250 Fire Service Public Relations (Formerly Municipal Public Relations)

3 Cr.

Aspects of public relations as pertinent to municipal fire services . Building goodwill, handling complaints and follow-up. Personal con tacts, publicity and promotional efforts . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None.

570-260

Personnel Training Methods

4 Cr.

Introduction to methods of instruction and applications of audiovisual eq.uipment. Testing and evaluation and preparation of materials. Special emphasis on planning an organizational training program. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

174


590-101

Beginning French

4 Cr.

Introduction to French with emphasis on speaking, reading and writing through multiple approach . Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in 560路 101 College Composition.

590-102

Beginning French

4 Cr.

Further practice of fundamentals through speaking, reading and writing on assigned topics of French culture. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 590路101 Begin路 ning French or one year of high school French.

175


-' ,..-- - -

-

- --

-_.

FRENCH 590

590-103

Beginning French

4 Cr.

Continuation of 590-102 Beginning French. Practice in constructing sentences and expressing thoughts in French through spontaneous discussions chosen from selected readings and cultural topics. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 590102 Beginning French or two years of high school French .

590-201

Intermediate French

4 Cr.

Introduction to more advanced vocabulary and speech patterns in order to facilitate the transition from simple to complex reading material, acquainting the student with French literature and civilization. Systematic review of grammar. Laboratory drill. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 590-103 Beginning French or two ye?rs of high school French.

590-202

Intermediate French

4 Cr.

Strengthening facility of oral and written expression in the language. Building of more advanced vocabulary and sentence structure by means of selections from French literature. Laboratory drill. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 590-201 Intermediate French or two years of high school French.

590-203

Intermediate French

4 Cr.

Oral and written expression in the foreign language are further developed . Literary selections are to be discussed to gain deeper understanding and appreciation of French thought and culture. Laboratory drill. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 590202 Intermediate French or three years of high school French.

590-251

French Conversation and Composition

4 Cr.

Discussion of topics of everyday life, colloquialisms, vocabulary distinctions and improvement of speech patterns. Practice in writing compositions. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 590203 Intermediate French or concurrent enrollment with consent of department or three years of high school French.

590-252

French Civilization and Literature

4 Cr.

Introduction to the civilization and literature of France. Emphasis on the interrelationship between history and geography of France and its culture. Lecture .3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 590-203 Intermediate French or concurrent enrollment with consent of department or three years of high school French.

590-253

176

Readings in French Literature

4 Cr.

An introduction to French literature of the 19th and 20th centuries. Highlights of representative authors and their works. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 590-203 Intermediate French or concurrent enrollment or departmental approval or three years of high school French.


Cjâ&#x201A;ŹoCjRAphy 600 600-101

Elements of Physical Geography

4 Cr.

Introductory study of geography's physical elements . Includes earth -sun relationships, maps, elements and controls of climate. Landforms, erosion and deposition, water resources, vegetation asoociations and soil types. World distributions, causal relationships and significance to men are stressed . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None.

600-102

World Regional Geography

4 Cr.

Geographical study of selected world regions. Landforms, climate, peoples, problems of cultural and political differences. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

600-103

Economic Geography

4 Cr.

The study of areal variation on the earth's surface in man's activities related to producing, exchanging and consuming wealth. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

600-151

Geography of the United States and Canada

4 Cr.

Regional survey of the United States and Canada noting significant characteristics of each region_ Includes physical characteristics, resource potentials and important political, economic and social activities. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

177


(J€RmAn 610 610-101

Beginning German

4 Cr.

Introduction to German with emphasis on speaking, reading, writing and grammar through multiple approach . Laboratory drill . Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in 560101 College Composition.

610-102

Beginning German

4 Cr.

Further practice of fundamentals through practice in speaking, reading and writing on assigned topics of G..erman culture . Continuation of intensive study of grammar and vocabulary . Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hou rs. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 610·101 Beginning German or one year of high school German .

610-103

610-201

4 Cr.

Beginning German

More advanced conversation readings and cultural topics. Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 1 German or two years of high

and compositioo based on selected Review of grammar. Laboratory drill. hour. Prerequisite: 610·102 Beginning school German.

Intermediate German

4 Cr.

A study of the major developments of German literature and culture. Selected grammar review. Emphasis on oral facility . Laboratory drill. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite : 610-103 Beginning German or two years of high school German.

610-202

Intermediate German

4 Cr.

Emphasis on oral and written expression. Building of more advanced vocabula ry and sentence structure through more difficult prose . Continued laboratory practice . Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 610-201 Intermediate German or two years of high school German .

610-203

Intermediate German

4 Cr.

Continued study in literature and civilizat ion. Inc reasing emphasis on conversation and free composition. Continued laboratory practice . Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 610-202 Intermediate German or three years of high school German.

6 10-25 1

17 8

German Conversation and Composition

4 Cr.

Discussion of topics of everyday life, colloquialisms , vocabulary , augmentat ion and improvement of speech patterns . Practice in writing compositions. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 610203 Intermediate German or concu rrent enrollment or departmental approval or three years of high schoo l Ge rman .


GERMAN 610 GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY 616

610-252

4 Cr.

German Civilization and Literature

Introduction to German civilization and literature: interrelationships among German history, geography, literature and culture. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 610- 203 Intermediate German or concurrent enrollment or departmental approval or three years of high school German.

610-253

Readings in German literature

4 Cr.

An introduction to German literature from the 18th century to the present. Highlights of representative authors and their works. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 610-203 Intermediate German or concurrent enrollment or departmental approval or three years of high school German.

~r~fJllit t~mmtJf1it~ti~f1s m~f1~~EmEf1t ~f1~ TEtllf1~I~~~ 616-101

Graphic Arts Orientation

tit 2 Cr.

An overview of the graphic arts industry. Career field, employment t rends and typical future technical assignments. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

616-105

Science of Graphic Arts

4 Cr.

Aspects of physics and chemistry which apply to the printing process. Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

616-109

Graphic Arts Materials

2 Cr.

A survey of the various classes, sizes and weights of printing paper. Related ink technology. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None .

616-113

Photography

3 Cr.

Use of photographic equipment and film processing. Types of cameras and film . Lighting, composition and basic darkroom techniques . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

616-117

Copy Preparation

3 Cr.

Planning, visualizing and preparing black-an d-white, and color copy. Techniques in preparing copy for color separation , including all steps necessary in the preparation of copy for camera . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours . Prerequisite: 430-108 Fundamentals of Design or 430-121 Calligraphy or departmental approval.

179


-

~

r---

-

-~--

. -~

~

-

-- - - -

GRAPHIC COMMUN ICATIONS MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY 616 HEALTH 620/ HEALTH TECHNOLOGY 624

616-171

Negative Stripping and Camera

4 Cr.

The fundamentals of single and multi-color layout and stripping as used in offset lithography. Includes camera operation , developing, enlarging, printing, copying, scaling, and the reproduction of line and halftone copy. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: 616113 Photography or departmental approval.

616-201

Platemaking and Presswork

4 Cr.

Methods and procedures used in preparation of plates for the press. The principles of offset presswork. Setting up and operating the presses, trouble shooting, simple maintenance and safety precautions. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisites: 616-109 Graphic Arts Materials and 616路113 Photography or departmental approval.

616-211

Finishing and Bindery

2 Cr.

The use of various equipment: paper cutter, folder, stapler-stitcher, collator and paper drill for pamphlet, book, adhesive and plastic bind ing. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None .

.616-220

Graphic Arts Production

3 Cr.

A laboratory course providing an opportunity to work on practical problems in the production of printed matter. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing in Graphic Communication Management and Technology or departmental approval.

616-225

Graphic Arts Estimating

2 Cr.

Estimating printing job costs from original layout to finished product. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 616-171 Negative Stripping and Camera , 616-201 Platemaking and Presswork, and 616211 Finishing and Bindery or departmental approval.

620-101

Health Education

4 Cr.

Introduction to the meaning and scope of health as related to the individual, family and community. Focus on an introspective view of physical , emotional and social factors . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: None.

624-100

Introduction to Health Technologies

3 Cr.

Introduction and orientation to the allied health professions , their history, responsibilities , licensure, ethics and liabilities. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.


HEALTH TECHNOLOGY

624-101

Anatomy and Physiology for X-Ray Technicians

624

5 Cr.

Understanding of body systems, structures, organs and their functions as a basis for certain X-ray examinations, including interpretation of X-ray requests, proper positioning for areas or organs to be visualized _ Lecture 5 hours_ Laboratory 0 hours _ Prerequisite: None.

624-121

Pathology for X-Ray Technicians

2 Cr.

Changes in disease and injury and their application to X-ray tech nology. Conditions to be known by the technologist in performance of the indicated X-ray examinations. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

624-131

Physics for X-Ray Technicians

4 Cr.

Fundamentals of electrical and radiation physics and the basic principles uncferlying the operation of X-ray equipment and auxiliary devices. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690 -095 Algebra or equivalent .

624-141

X-Ray Darkroom

1 Cr.

Orientation to darkroom techniques as used in X-ray work activity. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

624-151

Radiographic Techniques

3 Cr.

Function and operation of X-ray equipment, positioning of patients and related techniques. Radiographic procedures. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

624-223 First Aid (Formerly 500-223)

2 Cr.

General first aid instruction, treatment, required equipment and materials. Students participate in courses offered by the American Red Cross. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

624-251

Ethics for Health Technologies

1 Cr.

Definitions and concepts of ethics in Health Technologies. Confidentiality. Differentiation between ethics and mora ls. Negligence and breach of duty. Employment and interview procedures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisites: 624-100 Introduction to Health Technologies and sophomore standing.

181


625-101

Beginning Hebrew

4 Cr.

Introduction to Hebrew with emphasis on speaking, reading and writing through multiple approach . Laboratory drill . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Eligibil ity to enroll in 560-101 Col· lege Composition.

625-102

Beginning Hebrew

4 Cr.

Further practice of fundamentals through speaking, reading and writing on assigned topics of Hebrew culture. Laboratory drill. Lec· ture 4 hours . Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 625 -101 Beginning Hebrew or one yea r of high school Hebrew.

625-103

Beginning Hebrew

4 Cr.

Continuation of 625-102 Beginning Hebrew. Practice in construct· ing sentences and expressing thoughts in Hebrew through spon· taneous discussions chosen from selected reading and cultura l topics . Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Pre· requisite: 625-102 Beginning Hebrew or two years of high school Hebrew.

625-201

Intermediate Hebrew

4 Cr.

Introduction to more advanced vocabulary and ~peech patterns, ac· quainting the student with Hebrew literature , modern and medieval. Systematic review of grammar. Laboratory dri ll. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory '1 hour. Prerequisite: 625-103 Beginning Hebrew or two years of high school Hebrew.

625-202

Intermediate Hebrew

4 Cr.

Strengthening facility of oral and written expression in the language. Building of more advanced vocabulary and sentence structure by means of selections from Hebrew literature. Laboratory drill. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 625-201 Intermediate Hebrew or two years of high schoo l Hebrew.

625-203

Intermediate Hebrew

4 Cr.

Oral and written expression in the language are further developed. Literary selections are to be discussed to ga in deeper understanding and appreciation of Hebrew thought and culture. Labo ratory drill. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 625-202 Inter· mediate Hebrew or three years of high school Hebrew.

182


LINDBERGHARRIV.ES

Paris Overj oy ed at Flight "I DID IT" CRIES TIRED

EXCITEMENT ifGREATIR D;untl<ss 't'Qnke~ Astonishes W';-rld THA~ ON ANY OCCASION ! , . --~lL SINCE ARMISTICE DAY = ;... ,;w, .

,;:;; ,;.-~"7...u-

r_.. .. jMwt

.. _

...

""I<0001,'-""... _lo

~

~"',

~Jt••• ~ 1I. ~ ~ .. "~,.,,.,.\.l>-

~ •• O'·....

~WiOIIII&.IIII&:o.6o\WoIIiW.K.I.I._ _ _ _ _. . . .

u.-

l~ ""'.w

l _ot"-,,,.

I

.~';! •.~~Ef:.::..;;.~::!

=.

;+:':!~. ~..E~~I

~~~¥JB§:~;'

-

,... _ ........ _ ... -. ... '... N"",...,.... .· U

.......

.... . -'"

.....,::~:;.. =:::""~":"~~~-....::!~.:!'!::"!

.

~j.~~~~!1:

~~}!~~i' ~-;d;\:~J.y;?g~]

~f.}.~~e

t~ll!~~·~i:~~~~I -.' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' J Man and Civilization

630-101

3 Cr.

Major trends in the development of Western and Asiatic civilizations from ancient Eurasian times to the fall of Byzantium (1453). Basic approach - use of documents as well as textual materials . Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite : None.

630-102

Man and Civilization

3 Cr.

Major problems - cultural, political, economic and religious - in the development of Western and non -Western civilizations from the fall of Byzantium to the Congress of Vienna (1453-1815) . Basic approach - use of documents as well as textual materials. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 630-10'1 Man and Civi lization .

630-103

Man and Civilization

3 Cr.

Major problems - cultural, political, economic and religious - in the development of Western and non -Western civilizations since the Congress of Vienna (1815) to the present. Basic approach - use of documents as well as textual materials. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 630-1 02 Man and Civilization.

630-151

United States History to 1841

American ment for Jackson 's requisite:

3 Cr.

development from discovery, colonial foundations, moveindependence and early years of the Republic through administration. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. PreNone.

183


HISTORY 630

630-152

United States History from 1841 to 1896

3 Cr.

Jacksonian Democracy through the Populist Movement with emphasis on domestic economic and political developments. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 630路151 United States History to 1841.

630-153

United States History from 1896 to the Present

3 Cr.

Populist Movement to the present emphasizing the reform move-路 ments, two world wars and the rise of America as a world power. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 630-152 United States History from 1841 to 1896.

630-164

American Urban History

4 Cr.

Growth of the American city from the early period to the megalopolitan era. Emphasis on the development of the urban economy, the historical functioning of the political system and physical development. Includes the black man and the city and our ethnic heritage. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Instructor's permission.

630路170

History of Africa

4 Cr.

General survey of African history. Special emphasis on political, economic and social problems of the 19th and 20th centuries. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

630-171

The Negro in American Culture to 1908

4 Cr.

The role of the Negro in American history from origins in Africa; as slaves in the new world; in the making of America; his struggle to improve his status; and contributions to American culture . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

630-172

The Negro in American Culture from 1908

4 Cr.

Studies beginning with the birth of the NAACP and the National Urban League. The growing of racial intolerance in America, the Negro rena issance and the important social and cultural strivings of black Americans in the mid-20th century. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 630 -171 The Negro in American Cul ture to 1908.

630-201

History of Russia

4 Cr.

Growth , development and decline of the Kievan State. Evolution of the Muscovite tsardom and the expansion of the Russian Empire to 1917. Considers geopolitical, social, cultural and intellectual developments. Emphasis on the theory of tsardom, which led to the emergence of a distinct civilization in Russia. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 630-103 Man and Civilization . 184


HISTORY 630/HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT 635

630-251

Economic History of the United States

3 Cr.

Economic factors in American history and their impact on social, economic and political life. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 630-153 United States History from 1896 to the Present.

Hospitality Management GIS 635-101 Introduction to Hospitality Management (Formerly 635-130)

3 Cr.

Course of orientation in the history, growth and development of the food and lodging industry. Provides basic information in organization, personnel management, sales promotion, purchasing, production control and accounting, including the study of techniques and procedures of modern management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

635-102

Sanitation and Safety in Food and Lodging Establishments (Formerly 635-132)

3 Cr.

Sanitation practices, laws, methods and techniques in food handling and in lodging establishments. Elementary bacteriology, food protection, utensil sanitization, practical problems in public health protection, and safety and accident prevention . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None.

635-111 Food Technology (Formerly 635-136 Food Production Technology)

6 Cr.

Basic food preparation for students who intend to become assistant managers or supervisors in food service operations. Provides a background in foods necessary for all aspects of Hospitality Management. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: None.

635-112 Quantity Food Technology (Formerly 635-137 Quantity Food Production)

4 Cr.

Theory and practices of volume food service institutions, with emphasis on operational differences, varied menu construction , raw material estimates, volume preparation techniques and the use of institutional equipment. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 8 hours. Prerequisite: 635-111 Food Technology. 185


HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT 635

635-113 Advanced Food Technology (Formerly 635-231 Advanced Food Preparation)

3 Cr.

Major emphasis will be on estimates of raw materials needed , preparation of foods in volume and the use of institutional food service equipment. A study of work organization of food preparation processes. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours . Prerequisite: 635路112 Quantity Food Technology.

635-123 Foods and Nutrition (Formerly 635-122)

4 Cr.

A study of the nutritional needs of normal , healthy persons as they progress through the normal stages of life. The study of the effects of food, its composition and the deficiency' results confronting the world today. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

635-124 Hotel-Motel Sales Promotion (Formerly 635-232)

3 Cr.

Sales promoticn techniques and ideas. Special emphasis on the organization and functioning of a sales department and the need for sales planning. Sales tools and selling techniques used to secure room, food and beverage, and group business. Advertising , community relations, internal selling, personal selling and telephone selling. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

635路125 Quantity Food Purchasing (Formerly 635-233)

3 Cr.

Technical knowledge concerning governmental grades, purchasing , terms, purchasing processes and waste路yield factors in food prepara tion related to quantity food buying. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 635 -112 Quantity Food Technology.

635-126 Housekeeping Procedures (Formerly 635-125)

3 Cr.

Introduction to the fundamental procedures in institutional housekeeping providing technical knowledge and exposure to work procedures and opportunity to observe others performing in the trade. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours . Prerequisite: None.

635-127 Supervisory Housekeeping (Formerly 635-126)

3 Cr.

Fundamentals of housekeeping management stressing employee train ing, record keeping and executive responsibilities of the housekeeping department. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 635126 Housekeeping Procedures.

186


HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT 635

635-128 Fundamentals of Interior Design (Formerly 635-227)

3 Cr.

Selection, purchase, use and care of interior furnishings and materials in the hospitality industry. Covers the basic principles of design. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 635-127 Supervisory Housekeeping.

635-129

Communications in the Hospitality Industry (Formerly 635-127)

3 Cr.

The princ iples of oral and written communications in the hospitality industry. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 635-127 Supervisory Housekeeping or departmental approval.

635-130

Human Relations in the Hospitality Industry (Formerly 635-228)

3 Cr.

Basic knowledge of human behavior with specific application in the hospitality field. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

635-194

Cooperative Field Experience

1 Cr.

Part-time employment of a minimum of 180 hours in an approved business or distributive training center under College supervision. Lecture o hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Approval of coordinator.

635-195

Cooperative Field Experience

1 Cr.

Part-time employment of a minimum of 180 hours in an approved business or distributive training center under College supervision. Lecture o hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Approval of coordinator.

635-197

Cooperative Field Experience

1 Cr.

Part-time employment of a minimum of 180 hours in an approved business or distributive training center under College supervision. Lecture o hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Approval of coordinator.

635-198

Cooperative Field Experience

1 Cr.

Part-time employment of a minimum of 180 hours in an approved business or distributive training center under College supervision . Lecture o hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite : Approval of coordinator.

635-199

Cooperative Field Experience

1 Cr.

Part-time employment of a minimum of 180 hours in an approved business or distributive training center under College supervision. Lecture o hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : Approval of coordinator. 187


188


HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT 635

635-201 Summer Field Experience 4 Cr. (Formerly 635-196 Cooperative Field Experience) Full-time employment in an approved business or distributive training center under College supervision . Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 40 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

635-202

Management Operations

6 Cr.

A laboratory providing an opportunity to learn management techniques required in many key operating positions in the hospitality industry. Laboratory 5 hours/5 days per week. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 25 hours. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

635-203

Internship

3 Cr.

Students will be required to complete an internship of 200 hours of supervised work observation in the hospitality industry. The department will assist in arranging, scheduling and coord inating work experiences with local employers . Five weeks/8 hours per day. Lecture o hours. Laboratory 40 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

635-210 Supervisory Development (Formerly 635-225)

3 Cr.

Basic techniques for the development of supervision. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 635 -129 Communications in the Hospitality Industry.

635-211 Training Techniques for Supervisors (Formerly 635-226)

3 Cr.

Methods and techniques to help the student develop supervisory skills needed to train employees to develop efficient work methods. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 635 -127 Supervisory Housekeeping or 635 -112 Quantity Food Technology.

635-212 Food and Beverage Management Seminar (Formerly 635-251)

3 Cr.

Principles of volume food service and the study of food management problems, including job analysis; selection, control, supervision and training of personnel; work plans and schedules; labor and cost control; purchasing; equipment and care; menu planning; sanitation and safety. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 635-112 Quantity Food Technology or departmental approval.

635-213 Layout and Equipment (Formerly 635-236)

3 Cr.

Layout and design of food service fac ilities. The study, planning and evaluation of actual layouts. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 635 -112 Quantity Food Technology. 189


- - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - -

HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT 635

635-214 Food and Beverage Control (Formerly 635-241)

3 Cr.

The essential principles and procedures of effective food and beverage control . Adaptations to various types of operations are practiced. All steps in the control process are covered with special emphasis on calculating food costs, establishing standards and production planning. Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 6 hours . Prerequisite: 635-112 Quantity Food Technology.

635-225 Hotel-Motel Law (Formerly 635-244)

3 Cr.

A simple non-legal account of the important principles of today 's law in hospitality management. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Pre requisite: 460-213 Business Law or departmental approval.

635-226 Hotel-Motel Maintenance and Engineering (Formerly 635-272)

3 Cr.

A study of preventive maintenance procedures and the organization of the engineering department. Improvement in ability to diagnose many common mechanical problems and to take steps to correct them. Study of electrical systems, acoustics , plumbing , heating, ventilation , refrigeration and air conditioning, elevators . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

635-227 Hotel-Motel Front Office Procedure (Formerly 635-230)

3 Cr.

Techniques in the vital public relations responsibilities and necessary basics of human relations for the front office staff. Outlines coordinating ties between front office and management. Outline procedures , accounting principles , employee relations . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: Sophomore standing .

635-228 Hotel-Motel Accounting (Formerly 635-245)

3 Cr.

Special application of accounting principles to hotel and motel management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 410-122 Principles of Accounting.

635-229 Diet Therapy (Formerly 635-215)

3 Cr.

Appl icat ion of basic nutrition to the more specific needs of ind ividuals suffering from certain pathological conditions. Lecture 4 hours _ Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

190


Humanities 64S 648-101

Introduction to Humanities: Man as an Individual

3 Cr.

Introduction to works of art and philosophy which define both the limitations and enduring nobility of mankind. Lectures, films, performances, exhibits and field trips. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite : None.

648-102

Introduction to Humanities: Man and Society

3 Cr.

Introduction to works of art and philosophy which reflect the struggle of man to maintain his individuality while a member of society. Lectures, films, performances, exhibits and field trips. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

648-103

Introduction to Humanities: Man and the Cosmos

3 Cr.

Introduction to works of art and philosophy which reflect man's attempt to resolve his relationship to the cosmos. Lectures, films, performances, exhibits and field trips. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None.

650-111

Practical Psychology for Supervisors

3 Cr.

Management and employee motivation. Analysis of human needs and employee morale. Selecting supervisors. Training employees. Working conditions, worker efficiency and job performance. Industrial leadership, organizational behavior and human relations. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None .

650-121

Elements of Supervision

3 Cr.

Supervisory techniques in everyday foremanship . Effective communication. Instructing employees. Significance of leadership , production functions, competitive quality control and cost reduction on company profitability. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

191


- - - --

----

-

INDUSTRIAL SUPERVISION 650

650-122

Management, Automation and Computers

3 Cr.

The interrelation and manpower of machines and materials. Layouts, work flow and productivity. Systems, procedures and computers. Material handling and specifications . Management of work force, production and inventory. Automation, labor peace and profits . Overtime and fringe benefits. Retirement. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 650-121 Elements of Supervision or work experience.

650-125

Elements of Time Study

3 Cr.

Time study requirements, equipment and elements . Standard time data. Methods·time·measurements; application procedure and identified motions, principle of limiting motions . Wage incentive plans. Basic motion times. Work sampling. Method and uses of time standards. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650-121 Elements of Supervision or equivalent or industrial experience.

650-126

Principles of Work Simplification

3 Cr.

Approach, purpose and procedure of operation analysis. Manufacturing process and working conditions . Material handling and plant layout. Motion economy. Man and machine procE)ss charts . Job analysis and job evaluation. Flow process charts. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650-121 Elem!=lnts of Supervision or equivalent or industrial experience.

650-127

Work Simplification Practices

3 Cr.

Material handling and plant layout. Plant location . Feasibility reports. Special assignments. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prereq· uisite: 650· 121 Elements of Supervision or equivalent or industrial experience.

650-128

Measured Motions, Job Analysis and Incentives

3 Cr.

Methods, time and measurements. Application procedures and iden· tified motions. Principles of limiting motions . Wage incentive plans. Basic motion times. Work sampling. Job analysis and job evalua· tion. Development of base rates . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 650-121 Elements of Supervision or equivalent or industrial experience.

192


INDUSTRIAL SUPERVISION 650

650-131

Basic Management Techniques

3 Cr.

Practical supervisory training. Patterns of good management. Selection , placement and training of employees. Development of employees' attitude for greater efficiency and productivity. Cost reductions. Quality improvements . Increased production. Knowledge of machinery, materials and maintenance. Trends in automation. Understanding labor contracts and settling grievances. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650-121 Elements of Supervision or 650-122 Management, Automation and Computers or equivalent.

650-134

Employee and Plant Safety

3 Cr.

Safety and protection of employees and company property. First aid and disaster training. Selection and training of guards. Maintenance of fences, roads, fire equipment, emergency exits and sewage disposal. Safeguarding of mechanical and electrical equipment, water supplies, utilities and buildings. Individual protection against unsafe practices, explosions, fumes, chemicals, fires and other emergencies . Workmen's compensation. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650-122 Management, Automation and Computers or equivalent.


INDUSTRIAL SUPERVISION 650

650-140

Industrial Organization and Management

3 Cr.

Industrial organization management functions and communications . Business expansion , financing , manufacturing, market structure and sales service. Selection , recruitment, placement and training of executive personnel. Policies, personnel administration of the organiza tion, compensations , benefits and other activities . Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650-121 Elements of Supervision or 650-131 Basic Management Techniques or equivalent.

650-201

Product Sales and Development

3 Cr.

Market research , production capacity, quality control , competition , prestige and new products. Distribution methods. Sales order analysis, forecasting , promotion and services. Work force analysis and sales training. Product improvement . Competition in prices and marketing. Volume sales. New products, methods and machinery. Market analysis. Patents and copyrights. Obsolescence and creativity. Com pany ratings according to sales, net income and category of manufactured products. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650-122 Management, Automation and Computers or equivalent.

650-221

Supervisory Reporting and Decision Making

3 Cr.

Preparation of reports and memorandums for recording data and reaching decisions . Employer-employee communication. Preparation and use of graphs and tables . Effective oral communication and group thinking. How decisions are made and communicated by management. Understanding technical reports. Lecture 3 hours. Lab oratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 560-091 Essentials of Wr itten Com 路 munication or equivalent.

650-231

Labor-Management Relations

3 Cr.

Trade unions , labor force recruitment and labor laws . Essentials of contract negotiations , interpretations and arbitration. Employee rela tions applied to welfare, safety, compensations , benefits, grievances and their effect on the community. Application of job evaluation, time studies and incentives. Introduction of job improvements, changes in work loads and rates. Employee behavior and discipline. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650-131 Basic Management Techniques.

650-232

Collective Bargaining and Labor Laws

3 Cr.

Effective collective bargaining today. Management rights, NLRB funct ions. Representation and elections. Unfair labor practices. Union security and management rights. Strikes. Sen iority. Productivity and collective bargaining activities. The future of collective bargaining. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650-231 LaborManagement Relations.

194


INDUSTRIAL SUPERVISION 650

650-233

Basic Employee Relations

3 Cr.

Labor force . Recruitment. Employee relations applied to welfare, safety, compensations , benefits , grievances and their effect on the community. Application of job evaluation, time studies and incentives . Employees ' behavior and discipline . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650 -121 Elements of Supervision or equivalent.

650-241

Personnel Management

3 Cr.

Problems, practices and policies in the management of people . Leadership, motivation and direction of employees toward management-employee-oriented goals . Employment practices . Administration of management路union relationships , benefit programs and employee compensations . Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650路121 Elements of Supervision or industrial experience .

650-242

Wage and Salary Administration

3 Cr.

Compensation theory and policy. Wage and salary structures . Job evaluation . Pay rates of individuals. Incentive plans. Profit sharing. Indirect compensation . Compensation of managers and professionals. Wage and salary control. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 650-121 Elements of Supervision or industrial experience.

650-251

Industrial Corporate Finance

3 Cr.

Corporate financial behavior and patterns. Sources and uses of funds . Capital structure. Capital budgeting. Return from investment. Corporate annual reports. Balance sheet and income statement. Management of cash and cash flow. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 520-162 Principles of Econom ics or financial management experience.

650-261

Statistical Quality Control

3 Cr.

Application of statistical techniques in the analysis of data for the control of product quality and costs . Control charts, sampling sy.stems and procedures . Correction of product variability. Theory of probability fundamentals . Solution of statistical problems related to specifications, production or inspection . Statistical approach of acceptance sampling . Statistical quality control as a decision -making tool. Lecture 3 hou rs. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-102 Algebra.

195


650-271

Production, Quality and Cost Control

3 Cr.

Explanation and application of the control methods used in the various stages of the manufacturing process, such as control of raw materials, equipment design, and operation and product control. Procedures for the control of production planning, inventory, product quality, operating costs and budgetary control. Lecture 3 hours_ Laboratory 0 hours_ Prerequisite: 650-121 Elements of Supervision or 650-131 Basic Management Techniques or equivalent

650-281

Program Evaluation and Research Techniques .3 Cr.

Application of PERT and methodology for complete project planning, scheduling and control. Usable understanding of PERT. Network system design as a project planning and analysis device for progress evaluation and completion dates. Establishment and operation of the "Critical Path Method" (CPM). Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 650-131 Basic Management Techniques or management experience.

650-291

Materials Handling and Plant Layout

3 Cr.

The purpose, scope, transportation of materials, selection of equipment, objectives and cost of material handling are integrated with plant layout, materials and product flows , and the effective arrangement of manufacturing and service facilities. Emphasis is also placed on the coordination which is necessary between materials handling, plant layout, production planning and control, methods engineering, process engineering and production techniques. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Preferably industrial experience.

650-292

Materials Handling and Plant Layout

3 Cr.

Continuation of 650-291 Materials Handling and Plant Layout with emphasis on material handling equipment, materials flow, space allocation and related topics. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Industrial experience.

196


In~81ation Therapy

Technology 655 655-101

Introduction to Inhalation Therapy

1 Cr.

Designed to acquaint the students with inhalation therapy as an occupation. The scope of the inhalation therapy field as a wholethe duties, responsibilities and professional liabilities - are discussed. Hospitals are visited to observe inhalation therapy personnel at work. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

655-111

Microbiology for Inhalation Therapy

2 Cr.

Morphology of bacteria related to inhalation therapy. Metabolism and growth of bacteria. Pathogenic agents such as viruses and bacteria in respiratory diseases. Action of physical and chemical agents on microbes. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

655-117

Physics for Inhalation Therapy

3 Cr.

Basic physics and related mathematics as applied to inhalation therapy. Gas laws and gas analysis in inhalation therapy. Gas flow, temperature, particle size, sedimentation rate, specific gravity, density and viscosity. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

655-131

Pharmacology for Inhalation Therapy

3 Cr.

Discussion of pharmacologic principles and agents used in practice of inhalation therapy. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 440-126 Anatomy and Physiology for Health Technologies or departmental approval and 655-111 Microbiology for Inhalation Therapy and 655-117 Physics for Inhalation Therapy.

655-151

Pathology for Inhalation Therapy

3 Cr.

Types of inflammation. Pathology of respiration and cardiovascular system. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 440-126 Anatomy and Physiology for Health Technologies or departmental approval and 655-111 Microbiology for Inhalation Therapy.

655-181

Nursing Arts for Inhalation Therapy

3 Cr.

Includes principles of nursing skills and procedures as applied to the care of patients receiving inhalation therapy in a hospital setting. Internship experience emphasizes the acquisition of such skills. Hospital internship 2 hours per week . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 440-126 Anatomy and Physiology for Health Technologies or departmental approval and 655路117 Physics for Inhalation Therapy. 197


_._ ... _... -

-_._-_.

- -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

INHALATION THERAPY TECHNOLOGY 655

655-201

Inhalation Therapy Procedures

4 Cr.

Introduction in a clinical setting to inhalation therapy equipment and procedures : Gas analysis, airway management, administering of oxygen and other gases , humidification , aerosols , lung physical therapy and spirometry. Hospital internship 20 hours per week. (SUMMER ONLY.) Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 655-131 Pharmacology for Inhalation Therapy and 655-151 Pathology for Inhalation Therapy.

655-202

Inhalation Therapy Procedures

4 Cr.

Continuation of 655-201 Inhalation Therapy Procedures giving further attention in a clinical setting to inhalation therapy equipment and procedures: Administering gases other than oxygen, humidification, aerosols , lung physiotherapy and spirometry. Hospital internship 20 hours per week. (SUMMER ONLY.) Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 655-201 Inhalation Therapy Procedures or concurrent enrollment.

655-203

Inhalation Therapy Procedures

8 Cr.

Continuation of 655-202 Inhalation Therapy Procedures in a clinical setting with special emphasis on resuscitation, assisted ventilation, controlled venti lation and maintenance of equipment used. Hospital internship 24 hours per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 655-202 Inhalation Therapy Procedures.

198


INHALATION THERAPY TECHNOLOGY 655

655-221

Inhalation Therapy Clinical Application

7 Cr.

Theory and application of inhalation therapy procedures in pediatrics and medicine in a hospital setting. Hospital internship 16 hours per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 655-203 Inhalation Therapy Procedures or concurrent enrollment.

655-222

Inhalation Therapy Clinical Application

7 Cr.

Continuation of 655 -221 Inhalation Therapy Clinical Application with emphasis on surgery, emergency ward, obstetrics and pulmonary function laboratory. Hospital internsh ip 14 hours per week. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 655-221 Inhalation Therapy Clinic;al Application .

655-241

Inhalation Therapy Clinical Procedures

5 Cr.

Controlled clinical practice of the skills and mechanics of inhalation therapy in pediatrics and medicine in a hospital setting involving the inhalation therapy student under the guidance of a qualified inhalation therapist . Hospital internship 16 hours per week. Lecture 0 hours. Laporatory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 655-221 Inhalation Therapy Clinical Application and concurrent enrollment in 655-222 Inhalation Therapy Clinical Application .

655-242

Inhalation Therapy Clinical Procedures

5 Cr.

Controlled clinical practice of the skills and mechanics of inhalation therapy involving the inhalation therapy student under the guidance of a qualified inhalation therapist with emphasis on surgery, emergency ward , obstetrics and pulmonary function laboratory. Hospital internship 15 hours per week. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 655路241 Inhalation Therapy Clinical Procedures.

655-251

Inhalation Therapy Ethics

1 Cr.

Inhalation therapy ethics. Employment and interview procedures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 655-222 Inhala路 tion Therapy Clinical Application .

655-252

Medical Administration and Record Keeping

2 Cr.

Procedures of record keeping, budget development , personnel poli cies and recruitment , and departmental management techniques and administrative policies utilized in medical administration. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 655-222 Inhalation Therapy Clinical Application .

199


JOURNALISM 660 660-101

Introduction to Mass Communications

3 Cr.

Nature and function of mass media , such as the press, television, radio and film. Their impact and influence on man in the democratic society . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

660-120

News Writing and Reporting

3 Cr.

Nature and function of the mass media. Career opportunities. Journalistic principles. News gathering and writing articles . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 560 -101 College Composition or concurrent enrollment.

660-121

News Writing and Reporting

3 Cr.

Continuation of 660-120 News Writing and Reporting. News gathering and writing articles. Principal problems confronting journalists and their newspapers. Special attention to large , contemporary papers. Introduction to interpretative reporting. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 660-120 News Writing and Reporting.

660-122

News Writing and Reporting

3 Cr.

Continuation of 660-121 News Writing and Reporting. Further development in interpretative reporting, using the community as a laboratory. Greater emphas is on journalistic specialties and writing for the broadcast media. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 660-121 News Writing and Reporting.

660-123

Staff Practice

1 Cr.

Class laboratory experience in assembling, making-up and publishing the College newspaper. Detailed weekly analysis of the effectiveness of the news stories written and published as well as of the overall presentation of the College newspaper. Students are assigned to College newspaper staff. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in 660-120 News Writing and Reporting or consent of instructor.

660-124

Staff Practice

1 Cr.

Continuation of 660 -123 Staff Practice . Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 3 hours . Prerequisites: 660-123 Staff Practice and concurrent enrollment in 660-121 News Writing and Reporting.

660-125

Staff Practice

1 Cr.

Continuation of 660-124 Staff Practice. Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 3 hours . Prerequis ites : 660-124 Staff Practice and concurrent enrollment in 660-122 News Writing and Reporting.

200


JOURNALISM 660

660-126

Staff Practice

1 Cr.

Continuation of 660-125 Staff Practice. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 660-125 Staff Practice and concurrent enrollment in 660-201 News Editing or consent of instructor.

660-127

Staff Practice

1 Cr.

Continuation of 660-126 Staff Practice. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 660-126 Staff Practice.

660-128

Staff Practice

1 Cr.

Continuation of 660-127 Staff Practice . Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 660-127 Staff Practice or consent of instructor.

660-151

Broadcast Journalism

4 Cr.

News reading, news preparation, news reporting on audio tape, video tape, film and live camera for television and radio_ Covers Federal Communications Commission rules and regulations on news. Fundamentals of what makes a story and how to get it. The art of interviewing. Field work, study of radio and television history. Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

660-201

News Editing

4 Cr.

Copy desk methods. Copy and proof reading, headline writing, newspaper make-up and style. Introduction to newspaper law, including libel, right of privacy and press privileges. Editorial writing, problems and policy. Examination of major contemporary American newspapers. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 660-120 News Writing and Reporting.

201


670-101

Introduction to Law Enforcement

4 Cr.

A philosophical and historical background of law enforcement including the development and objectives of police services from ancient and feudal backgrounds up to the present time in the United States. Explanation of federal, state , local and private law enforcement agen cies . Role of enforcing officer in government and the processes of justice. Qualities and qualifications of the individual entering law enforcement work. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : None.

670-111

Patrol Procedures

4 Cr.

Advantages and disadvantages of methods of patrol and the objectives, activities of the patrol officer, preparation fo~ and observation on patrol , note-taking and narrative type of report . How to handle incidents of high frequency and emphasis on public and race relations in patrol operations. Lecture 4 hou rs. Laborat ory 0 hours . Prerequisite : 670 -101 Introduction to Law Enforcement or in-service personnel.

Criminal Law

3 Cr.

Substantive criminal depth with emphasis arrest procedure and ment level. Lecture 3

laws most often violated will be discussed in on Ohio statutes and decisions. Jurisdiction , the importance of cr iminal law at the enforcehours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: None .

670-121

670-122 Criminal Law

3 Cr.

Continuation of 670 -121 Criminal Law. Criminal liability, related laws of procedure, search and seizure, and admissibility of evidence so seized . Terms and definitions . Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 670 -121 Criminal Law.

670-123

Laws of Evidence

3 Cr.

Continuation of 670-122 Criminal Law with emphasis on evidence in criminal prosecutions . Hearsay rule and exceptions , admissions and confessions, ruling case law and effect on procedures will be emphasized in this course . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670-122 Criminal Law.

670-131

Industrial Security

3 Cr.

Organization and management of industrial secu ri ty units. Protection of facilities , installations . Manpower, planning for emergencies and riot control. Technical and legal problems , police power of personnel , detection and prevention of thefts . Security clearances , wartime measures, sabotage and espionage in plants. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : None. 202


LAW ENFORCEMENT 670

670-141

Police-Community Relations

3 Cr.

The reciprocal relationship between the community and the police with emphasis on techniques for developing and improving a favorable relationship . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670-101 Introduction to Law Enforcement or in·service personnel.

670-142

Police-Community Relations

2 Cr.

Relationship with the news media . In-depth discussion and examination of special considerations peculiar to the police-community relations. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670-141 Police·Community Relations.

670-201

Delinquency Prevention and Control

3 Cr.

Problem of juvenile delinquency, police programs and community resources for prevention of juvenile delinquency are presented . Juvenile court organization and procedure, detention, filing and police procedures in enforcement of juvenile code. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 670·121 Criminal Law.

670-211

Criminalistics

3 Cr.

Fundamental principles and techniques applicable in police investi gation from incident to trial. Use of communications systems, records and principles. Specific procedures in more frequent violations will be individually presented. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670·121 Criminal Law or in-service personnel.

670-212

Criminalistics

3 Cr.

Continuation of 670-211 Criminalistics. Techniques of scient ific investigation and assistance of various scientific aids to the police officer or field investigator. Special techniques employed in particular kinds of investigation. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670·211 Criminalistics.

670-221

Police Administration

3 Cr.

Principles of organization and management, the evaluation of administrative devices . Organization according to function with emphasis on application of these principles to line function . Regulation and motivation of personnel , and principles of leadership. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670-101 Introduction to Law Enforcement.

203


204


LAW ENFORCEMENT 670

670-222

Police Administration

3 Cr.

Continuation of 670-221 Police Administration with emphasis on staff functions_ Pay and other inducements, personnel recruitment, employment of administrative principles and processes of operation to the staff functions. Computer usage and other steps useful to man agement. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670221 Police Administration .

670-231

Fundamentals of Traffic Control

2 Cr.

History of traffic development and duties of agencies responsible for highway traffic administration. Causes of accidents and traffic congestion. Basic principles of traffic law enforcement, accident investigation and direction of traffic. Study of traffic code and uniform traffic code devices. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequi site: 670-101 Introduction to Law Enforcement.

670-232

Accident Investigation

3 Cr.

Purposes of accident investigation, procedures to be used, including interviewing of persons involved and witnesses . Determination of speed from skid marks. Preparation and use of statistics obtained from the investigation of accidents. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670-231 Fundamentals of Traffic Control.

670-233

Traffic Law Enforcement

3 Cr.

An explanation of purposes of traffic law enforcement and techniques to be used, including selective enforcement and enforcement at accident scenes. Legal authority of police, preparation and presentation of traffic cases. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670-231 Fundamentals of Traffic Control.

670-251

Crime Laboratory Techniques

2 Cr.

Frequently used police laboratory procedures explained and practiced. Latent fingerprint work and tool mark comparison. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Limited to Law Enforcement majors and in-service police officers.

670-252

Crime Laboratory Techniques

2 Cr.

Continuation of 670-251 Crime Laboratory Techniques with emphasis on firearms, identification, laboratory techniques applicable to trace evidence search. Trip to crime laboratory. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 670-251 Crime Laboratory Techniques.

205


Library Technology 680 680-101

Introduction to Library Organization

2 Cr.

General course in the purposes ana uses of the library. Introduction to reference, cataloguing, circulation, acquisitions and all other activities of the library. Library terminology. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

680-102

Introduction to Library Organization

2 Cr.

Continuation of 680-101 Introduction to Library Organization with further discussion of library functions. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 680-101 Introduction to Library Organization.

680-121

Library Acquisition Procedures

3 Cr.

Various methods of ordering and processing books. Processing of periodicals, pamphlets, records , picture collections and their inventory. Introduction to making order lists for purchas~s, checking shipments and invoices. Keeping bindery records. Computation of costs with a survey of elementary bookkeeping techniques. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: 680路102 Introduction to Library Organization.

680-122

Library Acquisition Procedures

2 Cr.

Continuation of 680路121 Library Acquisition Procedures with emphasis on making order lists, checking shipments and invoices. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 680-121 Library Acquisition Procedures.

680-151

Basic Cataloguing and Classification

3 Cr.

Cataloguing and classification systems for books and other materials. Preparation of catalogue cards. Dewey Decimal and LC classification systems. Procedures and uses of several filing systems. Card copying. Bibliographic searching procedures. Practice in filing in the various library catalogues - dictionary catalogue, authority files and shelf list. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 680-122 Library Acquisition Procedures.

680-152

Basic Cataloguing and Classification

2 Cr.

Continuation of 680-151 Basic Cataloguing and Classification with emphasis on practice in filing and using various types of files. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 680-151 Basic Cataloguing and Classification.

206


680-252

Information Sources

3 Cr.

Use of encyclopedias, yearbooks, dictionaries, directories and other general reference works. The Readers' Guide to Periodical Literature and other indexes. Practice in the preparation of simple book lists and bibliographies. Practice in information searches on simple reference questions. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 680-102 Introduction to Library Organization.

680-253

Information Sources

2 Cr.

Concentration on ~nformation searches and the formal preparation of book lists and bibliographies. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 680-252 Information Sources.

680-260

Introduction to Children's Books

3 Cr.

A survey of literature for school-age children with emphasis on classic and modern materials. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

680-270

Circulation

2 Cr.

Study of various charging systems now in use in school, college and public libraries. Routines involved in charging, discharging, methods of handling overdues, reserves, renewals and all other aspects of circulation control. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 680-102 Introduction to Library Organization.

207


Marketing 685 685-180

Cooperative Field Experience

1 Cr.

Part-time employment of a minimum of 160 hours in an approved business or distributive training center under College supervision_ Students may earn no more than 10 credits for the program or more than 3 credits per quarter. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 15 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

685-201

Principles of Marketing

4 Cr.

Functional approach is emphasized in the study of institutions involved in moving industrial, consumer, farm goods and services from producer to consumer. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 460-108 Introduction to Business and 520-100 Basic Economics or 520-161 Principles of Economics.

685-202

Salesmanship

3 Cr.

Fundamentals of retail , wholesale, outside and service selling. Customer impact, merchandise and sales presentation. Closing and postsale service. Principles of self-management, pJactice on sales preparation and demonstration. Principles of sales promotion and merchandising. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460-108 Introduction to Business recommended.

685-203

Principles of Retailing

3 Cr.

An introduction to the retail industry with a management perspective. Concentration will be given to location and layout, organization and sales promotion . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 410-107 Business Mathematics and 460-108 Introduction to Business. 685-201 Principles of Marketing recommended but not required.

685-204

Principles of Retailing

3 Cr.

Continuation of 685-203 Principles of Retailing with concentration on merchandising management (buying, control 路 and merchandising), and cost and stock control. Review of selected management cases. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hou rs. Prerequisite: 685-203 Principles of Retailing.

208


MARKETING 685

685-205

Principles of Wholesaling

4 Cr.

Survey of the wholesaling structure, past and present. Analysis of planning, operation and management of the various types of wholesaling institutions in our economy. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 685-201 Principles of Marketing.

685-208

Principles of Sales Management

3 Cr.

Principles and concepts underlying the organization , operation and control of a sales force . Topics such as selection of personnel, recruiting, compensation plans , supervision, evaluation and stimulation of sales programs are covered. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 685路202 Salesmanship or departmental approval.

685-210

Credits and Collections

3 Cr.

Review of the methods and instruments available to business firms for the offering of credit to their customers. Techniques for collecting and managing the credit function. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 685 -201 Principles of Marketing or departmental approval.

685-225

Principles of Advertising

4 Cr.

Introduction to the field of advertising, employing the economical, behavioral and practical aspects of campaign strategy, appeal and media selection. Consideration also given to layout, typography and production methods. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 685-201 Principles of Marketing.

685-254

Wholesaling Management

3 Cr.

Study and analysis of contemporary 'situations in the field of wholesaling. Emphasis on current conditions in an attempt to view the industry in a problem-solving atmosphere. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 685 -205 Principles of Wholesaling.

685-256

R'etailing Management

3 Cr.

Techniques of computation and control essential for profitable merchandising. Includes mark-up, pricing, stock turnover, retail method of inventory, analysis of current merchandising policies. Application of buying procedures . Course will be approached from a case study . and analysis emphasis. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 685-204 Principles of Retailing.

210


]

690-091

College Arithmetic

3 Cr.

Basic properties of sets. Fundamental properties of the natural num· bers, integers, rationals and real numbers. Applications of the rationals including decimal and per cent notation. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

690-095

Algebra

3 Cr.

Sets, real numbers, algebraic symbolism, factoring, basic algebraic operations and linear equations. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690·091 College Arithmetic or equivalent.

690-100

Allied Health Sciences Mathematics

4 Cr.

Fundamental operations of whole numbers, fractions and decimals. Linear equations. Per cents . Ratio and proportion. Exponents and scientific notation. The slide rule. Metric system. Apothecaries sys· tem. Quality control. Solutions. Applications. Lecture 4 hours . Lab· oratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

690-101

Algebra

3 Cr.

Functions and graphs. Systems of linear equations. Application and techniques of problem solving. Exponents and radicals. Introduction to complex numbers, quadratic equations. Lecture 3 hours. Labora· tory.O hours. Prerequisite: 690·095 Algebra or departmental approval.

690-102

Algebra

3 Cr.

Algebraic operations, conic sections, systems of equations. Inequal· ities. Applications and techniques of problem solving. Logarithms. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690·101 Algebra or departmental approval.

690-103

Geometry

3 Cr.

A study of geometry as a logical system. Deductive and inductive reasoning, locus, algebraic and geometric inequalities, congruen· cies. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690·101 Algebra or departmental approval.

690-104

Geometry

3 Cr.

Similarity, polygonal and circular regions, constructions, further anatomy of proof, non· Euclidean geometry. Lecture 3 hours. Lab· oratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690·103 Geometry.

212


MATHEMATICS 690

690-105

Trigonometry

4 Cr.

Properties of the trigonometric, logarithmic and exponential functions. Trigonometric identities and equations. Applicatio'2:'. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 690-102 Algebra and 690104 Geometry recommended or departmental approval.

690-111

Fundamentals of Mathematics

3 Cr.

Algebra of sets. Structure of arithmetic and algebra. Basic concepts of Euclidean geometry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Two years of high school mathematics including algebra and geometry.

690-112

Fundamentals of Mathematics

3 Cr.

Applications of algebra. Analytic geometry. Polynomial calculus and applications. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690III Fundamentals of Mathematics.

690-113

Fundamentals of Mathematics

3 Cr.

Trigonometric functions and applications . Statistics in the social and biological sciences. Probability. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-112 Fundamentals of Mathematics.

690-115

College Algebra

4 Cr.

Theory of equations and inequalities . Matrices and determinants. Binomial theorem . Sequences and series. Mathematical induction. Probability. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690102 Algebra or departmental approval.

690-121

Elementary Mathematical Analysis

4 Cr.

Sets, ordered fields, functions, theory of equations, inequalities, sequences, series, mathematical induction, determinants and matrices. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 690-102 Algebra and 690-104 Geometry or equivalent or departmental approval.

690-122

Elementary Mathematical Analysis

4 Cr.

Properties of the trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions. Algebra of vectors. Limits and continuity. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-121 Elementary Mathematical Analysis.

213


690-141

Elementary Probability and Statistics

4 Cr.

Organization and analysis of data, elementary probability, permuta· tions and combinations. Normal distribution, binomial distribution, random sampling, test of hypotheses, estimation, and chi·square distribution, regression and correlation . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory o hours . Prerequisite: 690·102 Algebra or equivalent

690-151

Analytic Geometry and Calculus

5 Cr.

Cartesian coordinates. Functions and graphs. Limits and continuity. Differentiation of algebraic functions. Applications. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690·122 Elementary Mathematical Analysis or equivalent or departmental approval.

690-152

Analytic Geometry and Calculus

5 Cr.

Antiderivatives . Definite integral. Applications of the definite integral. Conics. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690·151 Analytic Geometry and Calculus.

690-153

Analytic Geometry and Calculus

5 Cr.

Transcendental functions. Techniques of integration . Polar coordi· nates. Parametric equations. Improper integrals . Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690·152 AnalYtic Geometry and Calculus.

690-154

Analytic Geometry and Calculus

5 Cr.

Analytic geometry of three·dimensional space . Vectors. Partial dif· ferentiation. Multiple integra ls. Infinite series . Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690·153 Analytic Geometry and Calculus.

690-252

Differential Equations

5 Cr.

Differential equations of first, second and higher order. Simulta· neous, linear and homogeneous equations. Solution by power series. Laplace transform. Applications. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690·154 Analytic Geometry and Calculus. 214


~~~~~~~~ ~~[gf~~~~~~~[gf 8~~lSurnE~~cmJ ~gg 700-100

Mechanical Technology Orientation

2 Cr.

Designed to acquaint the student with his career field, employment trends and typical future technical assignments. Instruction on the use of the slide rule and engineering problem solving. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : None.

700-150

Machine Tools

3 Cr.

Fundamentals of metal cutting theory and factors affecting machinability. Cutting tools , speeds and feeds , cutting fluids, metal cutting and grinding machines, measurement and gaging. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

700-151

Metal Fabrication Methods

3 Cr.

Various metal fabrication methods are discussed and experienced. Oxyacetylene, electro arc and tungsten inert gas welding. Brazing, soldering - low temperature and resistance welding. Fasteners, ad hesives, and sheet metal joining and forming are covered. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

700-152

Manufacturing Processes

3 Cr.

Theory and application of manufacturing methods and processes as related to modern industry. Introduction to process and physical metallurgy. Hot and Gold forming of metals and plastics, heat treat路ing and finishing methods are highlighted. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

700-201

Industrial Hydraulics

4 Cr.

Oil hydraulics systems with applications to modern industrial uses such as transfer of power and automatic control of machines. Pumps, filters, valves, cylinders and accumulators as components of working circuits. Laboratory experience includes construction and testing of practical hydraulic circuits. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 690-095 Algebra and 780-101 Introductory Physics or equivalent.

700-211 Mechanisms (Formerly Mechanical Design)

4 Cr.

Kinematics of machine elements, gears, gear trains, linkages, cams, belts , chains, power screws, friction drives and ratchet mechanisms are explored. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 550122 Engineering Drawing and 550-252 Applied Dynamics. 215


MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 700

700-212

Machine Design

3 Cr_

Elements of design and stress analysis as applied to basic machine elements including shafts , bearings, gears, chains, belts, springs, clutches and brakes. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 550-251 Strength of Materials and 550-252 Applied Dynamics.

700-221

Applied Instrumentation - Measurement and Control 3 Cr. (Formerly Applied Instrumentation - Measurement)

Theory and practice applied to industrial measuring and controlling instrumentation. Types of equipment used to measure weight, pressure, flow, temperature and humidity are examined_ Automatic control of the measured quantities is investigated. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 780-101 Introductory Physics or equivalent.

700-231

Tool Design - Cutting Tools

3 Cr.

Metal cutting tools, their applications and principles of design . Detailed exploration of tool geometry and forces acting on cutting tools. Examines practical design problems, including a variety of singlepoint and multiple-edge cutting tools. Lecture 2 hours_ Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 690-105 Trigonometry and 550-121 Engineering Drawing.

700-232

Tool Design - Gages

3 Cr.

Shop, inspection and reference gages; their definition, applications and factors affecting their design . Examines practical gage design problems. Emphasis on special fixed -sized gage design. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 700-231 Tool DesignCutting Tools.

700-233

Tool Design - Jigs

3 Cr.

Practical design of jigs is approached through a study of standardized jig details and their application to the various types of jigs from the simple to the more complex. Practical design problems are worked to solution on the drawing board. Lecture 2 hours _ Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 700-232 Tool Design - Gages.

700-234

Tool Design -

Fixtures

3 Cr.

Study and design of various types of cast, fabricated and welded fixtures applicable to milling, boring, honing, broaching, tapping, grinding and welding operations. Fixture components and design applications are covered in detail. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 700-233 Tool Design - Jigs_

216


MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 700

700-237

Tool Engineering

3 Cr.

Covers production planning, estimating and economic tooling as applicable to the manufacturing process. Selection of process operations for manufacturing is reviewed. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 690-105 Trigonometry and 700-232 Tool Design - Gages or equivalent.

217


Medical Asslstlng 710

710-101

Medical Assisting Orientation

1 Cr.

Designed to acquaint the student with medical assisting as an occupation_ The scope of the medical field as a whole . Duties, responsibilities and professional liabilities are discussed . Community health facilities are visited to observe medical assistants at work. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite : None .

710-102

Medical Terminology

3 Cr.

Vocabulary and terms used by medical personnel. Usage and spelling of medical terms _ Lectu re 3 hours _ Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

710-103

Medical Terminology

3 Cr.

Continuation of 710-102 Medical Terminology with emphasis on specialized medical terms and systems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 710-102 Medical Terminology or equivalent.

710-201

Medical Assisting Office Procedures

2 Cr.

Medical histories, records, insurance forms, medical terms and vocabulary. Responsibilities of assisting in the examining room. Observatioh of medical assistant work activity in doctors' offices and community health facilities . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: 710-103 Medical Terminology.

710-202

Medical Assisting Office Procedures

3 Cr.

Continuation of 710-201 Medical Assisting Office Procedures with emphasis on work activity in the doctor's office. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite : 710-201 Medical Assisting Office Procedures.

710-203

Medical Laboratory Procedures

4 Cr.

Lecture and practical laboratory experience in routine medical laboratory procedures. Basic medical laboratory techniques with emphasis on purpose and procedure for the routine urinalysis_ Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours . Prerequisite: 710-103 Medical Terminology or equivalent.

219


MEDICAL ASSISTING 710/MEDICAL RECORD TECHNOLOGY 715

710-204

Medical laboratory Procedures

4 Cr.

Continuation of 710-203 Medical Laboratory Procedures with emphasis on hematology and immunohematology studies. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 710-203 Medical Laboratory Procedures.

710-250

Medical Assisting Externship

6 Cr.

Practical medical assisting experience in the physician's office, hospital or other suitable medical facility, to include front and back office assisting techniques. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisites: 710-101 Medical Assisting Orientation, 710-103 Medical Terminology, 710-202 Medical Assisting Office Procedures or 830-250 Office Methods and Procedures, 710-203 Medical Laboratory Procedures, 830-106 Filing and Records Control and departmental approval.

710-251

Medical Assisting Ethics

1 Cr.

Medical assisting ethics, negligence and breach of duty. Employment and interview procedures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 710-101 Medical Assisting Orientation, 710-102 Medical Terminology, 710-201 Medical Assisting Office Procedures and 710203 Medical Laboratory Procedures.

)iIJ@cQJfi@@l ill@@速IT@ 1f@~@ll@~ ~n速 715-101

Introduction to Medical Record Science

3 Cr.

The history of medicine as related to medical records; uses of the record by the entire medical team; duties of record personnel; filing, numbering, and retention of records and practice of such in the laboratory. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

715-102 Analysis of the Medical Record (Formerly Medical Records Usage)

3 Cr.

Analysis of record contents including forms used in acute and longterm care facilities. Medica l record functions in quantitatively analyzing the record and medical staff requirements in completing and qualitatively analyzing the record. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 715-101 Introduction to Medical Record Science or departmental approval.

220


MEDICAL RECORD TECHNOLOGY 715

715-103 Introduction to Health Statistics (Formerly Medical Record Procedures)

3 Cr.

The study of vital and public health statistics; in-depth study of hospital statistics; sources, colleGtion, reporting, presentation and anal ysis of data; sources and uses of health data in the United States. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 715-102 Analysis of the Medical Record or departmental approval.

715-201 Classifications, Indices and Registers (Formerly Medical Records Data)

3 Cr.

Purposes of classifying diseases and operations. Systems of nomenclatures and classifications and their differences. The values of indices and registers are emphasized . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 440-128 Anatomy and Physiology, 710-103 Medical Terminology, 715路103 Introduction to Health Statistics, 830 -102 Typewriting or departmental approval.

715-202 Legal Aspects of Medical Records (Formerly Medical Records Reports)

3 Cr.

The medical record as a legal document. The effect of confidential communications laws on the release of information from the medical record. Legal procedures involved in court disclosure of medical records. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 715-201 Classifications, Indices and Registers or departmental approval.

715-203 Medical Record Seminar 2 Cr. (Formerly Medical Records and Its Legal Aspects) Methods of identifying and arriving at satisfactory solutions to specific types of problems encountered in the administration of medical record services. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 715 -202 Legal Aspects of Medical Records or departmental approval.

715-204

Medical Machine Transcription

2 Cr.

Skill in the use of transcription equipment and expansion of medical terminology. Practice in transcribing medical reports and correspondence in an institutional setting. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 710-103 Medical Terminology and 830-103 Typewriting.

715-205

Medical Machine Transcription

2 Cr.

Continuation of 715-204 Medical Machine Transcription with extended practical use of transcription equipmenta'nd expansion of medical terminology and dictation. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 715-204 Medical Machine Transcription.

221


MEDICAL RECORD TECHNOLOGY 715

715-211

Directed Practice

4 Cr.

Supervised learning experience in a medical record department under the supervision of an experienced medical record administrator. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisites: 440-128 Anatomy and Physiology, 710 -103 M_edical Terminology, 715 -103 Introduction to Health Statistics , 830-102 Typewriting or departmental app roval.

715-212

Directed Practice

5 Cr.

Supervised learning experience in a medical record department under the supervision of an experienced medical record administrator. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 15 hours. Prerequisites : 715 -201 Classifications, Indices and Registers , 715 -211 Directed Practice , 830-103 Typewriting or departmental approval.

715-213

Directed Practice

5 Cr.

Supervised learning experience in a medical record department under the supervision of an experienced medical record administrator. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 15 hours . Prerequisites: 715-202 Legal Aspects of Medical Records, 715-212 Directed Practice or departmental approval.


Iffi®ml~ Nl®~~ J1®©lliml@ll@~

unu

717-121

Introduction to Mental Health

4 Cr.

A survey of the varieties of human behavior with emphasis on normal and deviant modes of responding. The introduction to classification and treatment behavior. The role of the mental health technician in the therapeutic setting. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Pre· requisite : Departmental approval.

717-122

Records Development

2 Cr.

Procedures for collecting personal and family data . Forms for record keeping. Analyzing data for their need and purpose. Summarizing and gathering data for surveys and research reports. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

717-123

Introduction to Case Work Procedures

3 Cr.

An introduction to the basic principles of social case work with em· phasis on the mental health technician's unique role in the case work process. Students will work in a setting where case work is a primary operation . Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 717-121 Introduction to Mental Health or departmental approval.

717-124

Supportive Techniques

3 Cr.

Development of the basic skills of relating at the patient's level of communication. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the mental health technician as a participant observer in the care of patients. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 717-121 Intro· duction to Mental Health.

717-125

Community Resources

3 Cr..

Community agencies involved in mental health treatment and their relative roles. Procedures for utilizing the various agencies both as a source of information and as a referral unit. Student will work with a community agency in the Metropolitan Cleveland area. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 717-123 Introduction to Case Work Procedures .

717-201

Mental Health Procedures

3 Cr.

An intensive study of the various schools of thought in the treatment and care of the mentally ill. A critical evaluation of the forms of therapy including psychological, drug, shock and other forms of therapy. Use of the case study to emphasize differential treatment needs of patients. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisites: 717-121 Introduction to Mental Health and departmental approval. 223


MENTAL HEALTH TECHNOLOGY 717

717-202

Mental Health Practices

5 Cr.

Practical experience in a mental health setting. The implementation and application of supportive techniques and therapy procedures. Students will rotate in a variety of treatment settings and with dif· ferent members of the psychiatric team. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 717·201 Mental Health Procedures or concur· rent enrollment.

717-203

Mental Health Practices

5 Cr.

Continuation of 717·202 Mental Health Practices in a mental health setting. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours . Prerequisite: 717·202 Menta I Hea Ith Practices.

717-204

Mental Health Practices

5 Cr.

Continuation of 717·203 Mental Health Practices in a mental health setting. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 717·203 Mental Health Practices.

717-221

Activities Therapy

2 Cr.

Development of the various skills in the various activity programs of mental health settings. Emphasis will be on basic motor skill activo ities. Students will work in field placement as assistants to the activities therapist. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequi· sites: 717·121 Introduction to Mental Health and departmental approval.

717-222

Activities Therapy

3 Cr.

Continuation of 717·221 Activities Therapy with emphasis on teach· ing skills to patients. Development of skills in art, music, and basic recreational activities such as checkers, cards, volleyball. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 717·221 Activities Therapy.

717-223

Activities Therapy

3 Cr.

Continuation of 717·222 Activities Therapy with emphasis on more complex recreational activities such as dramatics, hobbies and group reading. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 717· 222 Activities Therapy.

717-251

Seminar in Mental Health

3 Cr.

Review of the various procedures and practices employed in a mental health setting. Discussion of the various techniques for treating patients. Discussions centering around the technician's own attitude toward the field of mental health. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 717·203 Mental Health Practices.

224


MJI~it7211 720-100

Fundamentals of Music

3 Cr.

Preparatory course in the rudiments of music. Includes notation, rhythm, scales, key signatures, intervals, treble and bass clefs . Elementary sight singing and ear training. Introductory keyboard harmony. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

720-101

Fundamentals of Music

3 Cr.

Continuation of 720-100 Fundamentals of Music . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 720-100 Fundamentals of Music or concurrent enrollment.

720-102

Fundamentals of Music

3 Cr.

Continuation of 720路101 Fundamentals of Music. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 720-101 Fundamentals of Music or departmental approval.

r

\

\",

225


------- -

- - -- - - - - - -- - - - - -- - - -

MUSIC 720

720-103

Music Appreciation

4 Cr.

No previous technical knowledge of music required . Study of basic music materials, form and style. Lectures , illustrations, live musical performances and listening to records. Historical survey of music via compositions from the 17th century to the present. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Frerequisite: None.

720-107

Harmony

5 Cr.

Theory and musicianship for music majors . Sight singing, ear train ing, basic harmonic progressions , triads, primary and secondary chords. Root positions, inversions and non-chord tones . Keyboard harmony, rhythmic , melodic and harmonic dictation . Course divided into four general areas. Harmony occupies two sessions; ear training and sight singing, two; keyboard harmony, one. Practice sessions are on the student's own time. Lecture 5 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 720-100 Fundamentals of Music or departmental approval.

720-108

Harmony

5 Cr.

Continuation of 720-107 Harmony. Miscellaneous triad usages. Further study of non-harmonic tones , seventh chords and modulations . Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 720-107 Harmony.

720-109

Harmony

5 Cr.

Continuation of 720-108 Harmony. Diminished seventh chords, altered chords, advanced modulation and harmonic analysis. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 720-108 Harmony.

720-115

Choral Ensemble

1 Cr.

Includes music particularly suitable for a small chorus: madrigals , motets , cantatas, opera. Renaissance through contemporary works. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: By audition only.

720-119

Choir

1 Cr.

Concentration on vocal problems and techniques. Development of standard repertoire for mixed vo ices. Sacred and secular, accom panied and a cappella. School and public performances are required. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be appl ied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

226


MUSIC 720

720-123

Elementary Class Voice

2 Cr.

Basic techniques of voice production: breathing, diction, projection, tone-color and interpretation. Progressive vocal exercises and studies. Application of principles to simpler songs in English. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 720-103 Music Appreciation and 720-169 Elementary Class Piano or departmental approval.

720-151

Music for Elementary Education

3 Cr.

Designed to orient elementary teachers to the role of music in the child's growth and development. Emphasis on creating a musical environment in the elementary school classroom. The study of the child's voice. Basic theory, including piano keyboard, musical symbols and terms. Use of the autoharp, recorder and rhythm instruments. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequ isite: None.

720-155

Stage Band

1 Cr.

A course providing opportunity for the performance of music for the modern big band as well as experience playing in small "combo" groups. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

720-159

Concert Band

1 Cr.

Open to all students by audition. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements . Lecture . 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

720-163

Instrumental Ensemble

1 Cr.

Designed to develop the individual's ability to perform in instrumental ensemble groups. Music selected and determined by needs and capabilities of the class. Public performance is part of the course. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

720-169

Elementary Class Piano

2 Cr.

Basic piano techniques for students who do not intend to major in music. Exercises to develop technical facility. Improvisation of simple accompaniments to given melodies. Sight reading, memorization, repertoire and basic theory. Student should have access to piano for practice. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

228


MUSIC 720

720-177

Orchestra

1 Cr.

Open to all students by audition. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements . Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Audition only.

720-183

Applied Music

1 Cr.

Individual instruction in the following: piano, voice, violin, viola, violoncello, string bass, flute, clarinet, oboe, bassoon, French horn, trumpet-cornet, trombone, baritone-euphonium, tuba, percussion and organ. May be repeated for credit. However, no,more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture V2 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. Costs of private lessons are paid by the student.

720-191

Music History and Literature

3 Cr.

Designed for students who plan to major in music and others with some musical background. Chronological analysis of major works in the literature from early times through the 16th century. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

720-192

Music History and Literature

3 Cr.

Study of history and literature from the 17th through the 18th century. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 720-191 Music History and Literature or departmental approval.

720-193

Music History and Literature

3 Cr.

Study of history and literature from the 19th through the 20th century. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 720路192 Music History and Literature or departmental approval.

720-269

Intermediate Class Piano

2 Cr.

Building a repertoire consisting of compositions by composers from the Baroque period to the 20th century. Emphasis on building of technique. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

720-273

Applied Music

2 Cr.

Individual instruction in the following: piano, voice, violin, viola, violoncello, string bass, flute, clarinet, oboe, bassoon, French horn, trumpet-cornet, trombone, baritone-euphonium, tuba, percussion and organ. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 12 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: Permission by departmental audition. Costs of private lessons are paid by the student.

229


musIc THERAPY ASSISTING TECHNOLOGY 725 725-101

Functional - Music

1 Cr.

Survey of music fundamentals and practice on basic instrum ents such as piano, recorder, autoharp, guitar and accordion . The develo ping of skills sufficie nt to play simple folk songs and popula r music. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 720-10 0 Fundam entals of Music or concurrent enrollm ent or departmental approval.

740-101

Nursing (Metropolitan Campus only)

6 Cr.

Basic nursing problems presented by patients regardless of the specific health problems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Pre· requisite: None.

740-102

Nursing (Metropolitan Campus only)

6 Cr.

Major nu rsing problems related to normal and abnormal physio logical processes. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisites : 740· 101 Nursing and 440·12 1 Principles of Medical Science.

740-103

Nursing (Metropolitan Campus only)

6 Cr.

Continuation of 740·10 2 Nursing. Lecture 3 hours. Labora tory 9 hours. Prerequisites: 740·10 2 Nursin g and 440· 128 Anatom y and Physiology.

740-104

Nursing Fundamentals (Western Campus only)

6 Cr.

Interventions and technics essential to solution of basic nursing problems common to all patients regardless of diagnosis. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Nursing Program .

230


NURSING 740

740-105

Nursing Fundamentals (Western Campus only)

6 Cr.

Continuation of 740-104 Nursing Fundamentals. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisites: 740-104 Nursing Fundamentals, 440-221 Microbiology and 480-120 Chemistry for Health Technologies. College graduation requirements in mathematics.

740-106

Nursing Fundamentals (Western Campus only)

6 Cr.

Interventions and technics essential to solution of selected overt nursing problems of patients of all ages. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisites: 740-105 Nursing Fundamentals and 440-126 Anatomy and Physiology for Health Technologies.

740-203

Nursing (Metropolitan Campus only)

11 Cr.

Car~

of patients of all ages with nursing problems arising from fluid and electrolyte and hormonal imbalance. Present trends in nursing, major nursing organizations and career opportunities. Lecture 7 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisites: 740-103 Nursing, 440129 Anatomy and Physiology and 810-201 Child Growth and Development.

740-204

Nursing (Metropolitan Campus only)

11 Cr.

Nursing care of patients with problems of circulation, ventilation and limited motion. Present trends in nursing and ethical, legal and occupational responsibilities of nurses. Lecture 7 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisites: 740-103 Nursing, 440-129 Anatomy and Physiology and 810-201 Child Growth and Development.

740-205

Nursing (Metropolitan Campus only)

5 Cr:

Nursing intervention in the care of patients manifesting patterns of anxiety, withdrawal, projection, aggression and socially unacceptable behavior. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisites: 740103 Nursing, 440-129 Anatomy and Physiology and 810-201 Child Growth and Development.

740-206

Nursing (Metropolitan Campus only)

6 Cr.

Nursing care of women before, during and after delivery. Care of newborn infants. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisites: 740-103 Nursing, 440-129 Anatomy and Physiology and 810-201 Child Growth and Development. 231


NURSING 740

740-207

Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing (Western Campus only)

5 Cr.

Nursing care of patients with pathological and psychosocial responses to stress. This includes the deviant responses in emotional and mental illness . These responses are considered for all age groups. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequ isites: 740-106 Nursing Fundamentals, 440-127 Anatomy and -Physiology for Health Technologies and 810-201 Child Growth and Developl"(1ent.

740-208

Maternal and Newborn Nursing (Western Campus only)

6 Cr.

Basic principles of fam ily living, normal and abnormal aspects of pregnancy, labor and delivery, the puerperium and the newborn with selected experience in prenatal and postpartum clinics, with mothers through labor, delivery , postpartum with newborn in the nursery. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisites: 740-106 Nursing Fundamentals, 440-127 Anatomy and Physiology for Health Technologies and 810-201 Child Growth and Development.

740-209

Nursing of Adults and Children (Western Campus only)

10 Cr.

Nursing care of patients with problems of nutritional, fluid , electrolyte and hormonal imbalance. These problems are considered for all age groups . Lecture 6 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisites: 740-106 Nursing Fundamentals, 440-127 Anatomy and Physiology for Health Technologies and 810 -201 Child Growth and Development. Concurrent enrollment in 740-211 Legal Aspects of Nursing.

740-210

Nursing of Adults and Children (Western Campus only)

10 Cr.

Nursing care of patients with problems of circulation, ventilation and limited motion. These problems are considered for all age groups. Lecture 6 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisites: 740-106 Nursing Fundamentals, 440-127 Anatomy and Physiology for Health Technologies and 810-201 Child Growth and Development. Concurrent enrollment in 740-212 Nursing Trends.

232


NURSING 740/ 0CCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTING TECHNOLOGY 745

740-211

Legal Aspects of Nursing (Western Campus only)

1 Cr.

The ethical, legal and occupational responsibilities in nursing. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in 740-209 Nursing of Adults and Children.

740-212

Nursing Trends (Western Campus only)

1 Cr.

Trends in nursing including the role of major nursing organizations and career opportunities. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in 740-210 Nursing of Adults and Children.

©©©lillJr)~~©illl®ll D

®mJ2)3J

1ffi,~~fi~1ID~ 1r~~lllilll@~@U ~4!5) 745-101

Introduction to Occupational Therapy

3 Cr.

History, philosophy and definition of occupational therapy. Roles and functions of the registered occupational therapist and the occupational therapy assistant. Legal and ethical responsibilities. Safety, use and care of tools and equipment. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

745-102

Sewing and Needlework

3 Cr.

Instruction in skills, theory and application of sewing and needlework as therapeutic media . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours . Prereq uisite: None.

745-103

Weaving

2 Cr.

Instruction in skills, theory and application of weaving as therapeutic medium. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

745-121

Clinical Conditions in Physical Dysfunction

2 Cr.

Knowledge and management of clinical conditions in physical dysfunction. Includes medical and surgical problems in orthopedics, neurology. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 745· 101 Introduction to Occupational Therapy.

233


OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTING TECHNOLOGY 745

745-122

Clinical Conditions in Physical Dysfunction 2 Cr.

Continuation of 745·121 Clinical Conditions in Physical Dysfunction. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 745·121 Clinical Conditions in Physical Dysfunction .

745-201

Leather arid Metalwork

3 Cr.

Introduction in skills, theory and application of leather and metalwork and related minor crafts as therapeutic media. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 745·102 Sewing and Needlework.

745-202

Woodworking

2 Cr.

Instruction in skills, theory and application of woodworking and related minor crafts as therapeutic media . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 745·102 Sewing and Needlework.

745-221

Clinical Conditions in Psycho-Social Dysfunction

2 Cr.

Knowledge and understanding of clinical conditions in psycho·social dysfunction . Includes psychoses, neuroses, character and personality disorders, development defects. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 745·121 Clinical Conditions in Physical Dysfunction.

745-222

Independent Living Techniques

2 Cr.

Skills and techniques to promote independent living for the handi· capped. Includes self·care, communications, positioning, transfer, homemaking, avocational pursuits and other pertinent activities. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 745·121 Clinical Conditions in Psycho·Social Dysfunction.

745-251

Occupational Therapy Internship

6 Cr.

Procedures and techniques in an institutional setting under the supervision of a registered occupational therapist. Includes practical experience with patients having physical and psycho·social dysfunction. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: 745·122 Clinical Conditions in Physical Dysfunction.

745-252

Occupational Therapy Internship

6 Cr.

Continuation of 745·251 Occupational Therapy Internship. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: 745·251 Occupational Therapy Internship.

745-253

Occupational Therapy Internship

6 Cr.

Continuation of 745·252 Occupational Therapy Internship. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: 745 ·252 Occupational Therapy Internship.

234


O:tnce Administration 830 830-101

Typewriting

2 Cr.

Fundamentals of keyboard techniques and operation of the typewriter. Not open to students having more than one semester of high school typing or the equivalent within the last two years. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

830-102

Typewriting

2 Cr.

Continuation of 830-101 Typewriting with an introduction to business letters and problem typing. Not open to students having more than two semesters of high school typing or the equivalent within the last two years. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 830-101 Typewriting or equivalent.

830-103

Typewriting

2 Cr . .

Continuation of 830-102 Typewriting with emphasis on technical papers, business reports and job application procedures . Not open to students having more than two semesters of high school typing or the equivalent within the last two years. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 830-102 Typewriting or equivalent.

235


OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 830

830-105

Office Machines

4 Cr.

Instruction and practice in the essential operations of the ten-key and full -key adding-listing machines, rotary and printing calculators _ Applications in solving busi ness-related problems_ Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: 410-107 Business Mathematics or concurrent enrollment.

830-106

Filing and Records Control

3 Cr.

Instruction and practice in the preparation of office records for temporary and permanent storage . Includes alphabetic, geographic, numeric and subject filing systems . Detailed study of both mechanical and manual filing methods . Emphasis on classification systems and the retrieval of filed information_ Retention and dispos ition of all kinds of office records. 830-101 Typewriting recommended . Lecture 2 hou rs. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequis ite: None.

830-110

Shorthand

3 Cr.

Mastery of the Diamond Jubilee Edition of GREGG SHORTHAND FOR COLLEGES. Reading, writing and transcription practice in preparation for speed dictation and transcription in more advanced courses in shorthand. Not open to students having more than one semester of high school shorthand or the equivalent within the last two years. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 830-101 Typewriting recommended or concurrent enrollment.

830-111

Shorthand

3 Cr.

Continuation of 830-110 Shorthand . A brief and intensive review of shorthand theory. Instruction in the taking of dictation and the preparation of typed transcripts from shorthand notes. The development of speed and accuracy. Emphasis on the production of mailable letters. Not open to students having more than two semesters of high schoo l shorthand or the equivalent within the last two years. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisites: 830-110 Shorthand or equivalent and 830-101 Typewriting or equivalent.

830-112

Shorthand

3 Cr.

Continuation of 830-111 Shorthand . Additional instruction and practice in the taking of dictation and the t ranscription of shorthand notes . Continued emphasis on the development of speed and accuracy and the production of mailable letters. Not open to students having more than one year of high school shorthand or the equivalent within the last two years . Lectu re 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequis ites: 830-111 Shorthand or equivalent and 830-102 Typewriting or equivalent.

236


OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 830

830-150

Business Communications

3 Cr.

Extensive and detailed examination of oral and written communica· tive techniques used in business. Letters, memorandums and reports. Analysis of conference and meeting techniques, business addresses and talks . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Eligi· bility to enroll in 560·101 College Composition .

830-200

Advanced Typewriting

2 Cr.

Intensive training in speed and accuracy applied to general office typing, including tabulations, rough drafts , manuscripts and business letters. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours . Prerequisite : 830·103 Typewriting or equivalent.

830-201

Advanced Typewriting

2 Cr.

Continuation of 830·200 Advanced Typewriting with emphasis on speed and accuracy, and the preparation of masters for duplication . Instruction in the operation of duplicating machines. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 830 ·200 Advanced Typewriting or equivalent.

830-202

Advanced Typewriting

2 Cr.

Superior production standards practiced in the planning, editing and preparing of complex business and technical reports. Instruction in the use of voice·writing machines. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 830·201 Advanced Typewriting or equivalent.

830-203

Advanced Shorthand

3 Cr.

A course designed to provide shorthand training for students who have had previous training and / or experience . May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 9 credits may be applied to degree requirements . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

830-204

Advanced Shorthand

3 Cr.

Continuation of 830·203 Advanced Shorthand. Emphasis on the preparation of mailable letters for job competency. Not open to stu · dents having more than two years of high school shorthand or the equivalent within the last two years . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequ isites : 830·200 Advanced Typewriting or equivalent and 830·203 Advanced Shorthand or equivalent.

237


OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 830

830-205

Executive Shorthand

3 Cr.

Superior production standards as practiced in rapid, accurate notetaking and preparation of mailable letters. Office-style dictation with emphasis on technical material. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 830-201 Advanced Typewriting and 830-204 Advanced Shorthand.

830-206

Legal Shorthand

3 Cr.

Practice in note路taking and transcription for advanced shorthand students. Preparation of legal correspondence, pleadings, testimonies and depositions. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 830-201 Advanced Typewriting and 830-204 Advanced Shorthand. 460-215 Business Law or concu rrent enrollment.

830-207

Medical Shorthand

3 Cr.

Designed to give advanced shorthand students practice in note-taking and transcription of medical records, diagnoses, case histories and correspondence. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 830-201 Advanced Typewriting and 830-204 Advanced Shorthand . 710-103 Medical Terminology or concurrent enrollment.

830-250

Office Methods and Procedures

4 Cr.

A finishing course for Office Administration majors. The course is designed to integrate and extend previously learned knowledges and skills, and to develop to the production level techniques and responsibilities common to most office work through performance of typical tasks . To develop an understanding of office procedures, the flow of work in offices, the interrelationship of offices and the teamwork necessary in the production of office work so that the transition from college to office will be easier to make. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 830路200 Advanced Typewriting.

830-260

Cooperative Field Experience

1 Cr.

Part-time employment of a minimum of 150 hours in an approved business or office training center under College supervision . Students may earn no more than 10 credits for the program nor more than 3 credits per quarter. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 15 hours. Prerequi site: Departmental approval.

238


PlWosopby 750 750-101

Introduction to Philosophy

4 Cr.

Study and analysis of basic problems dealing with man's understand ing of himself, society and the universe as viewed by selected philosophers . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

750-102

Introduction to Logic

4 Cr.

Basic rules and systems of formal logic. Examines syllogisms and the elements of modern symbolic logic concepts of mathematics. Explores scientific reasoning and language usage. Lecture 4 hours . . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 750-101 Introduction to Ph ilosophy.

750-201

Comparative World Religion

4 Cr.

A study of the origin, nature and meaning of major world religions: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism , Hinduism and Confucianism. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

750-202

Eth ics

4 Cr.

A study of systems and problems of human conduct and their applica路 tion to man's moral problems and decisions. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

750-203

Introduction to Scientific Method

4 Cr.

The study of formation of scientific concepts and examination of the structure of scientific investigation and its methods . Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 750-101 Introduction to Philosophy or 750-102 Introduction to Logic .

PblYJ 路YI~ica 11 = Ql,"",~~ =

Education 780 760-103

Archery (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Stresses ski \I development, safety practices, competitive experience and its value as a lifetime activity. Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

239


- - - - - - -- - - -- -- - - - - - -

-

-

--

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 760

760-104

Badminton and Volleyball (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Stresses ski II development, safety practices, competitive experience and its value as a lifetime activity. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-105

Basketball (Men)

1 Cr.

Stresses ski II development, safety practices, competitive experience and its value as a lifetime activity. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-106

Basketball (Women)

1 Cr.

Stresses ski II development, safety practices, competitive experience and its value as a lifetime activity. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-107

Golf (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Instruction and development of golf skills. Fundamentals of the swing and phases of the game. Includes history, rules and etiquette, with stress on value as a lifetime activity. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-108

Golf (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Advanced class in golf emphasizing a high level of proficiency in skill performance. Instruction will be on an individual basis directed toward improvement of the golf swing. Includes instruction and practice in the various shots. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-107 Golf (Coeducational) or departmental approval.

760-109

Recreational Activities (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Designed for students desiring participation in physical education activities requiring modified performance levels, including those with physical limitations. Includes a number of low organizational games such as table tennis, shuffleboard, darts, horseshoes. Participation with a focus on lifetime value in future leisure time. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

760-110

Tennis (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Instruction, practice and skill development in tennis. Rules, strategy and etiquette. Singles and doubles play. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-111

240

Tennis (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Advanced class in tennis stressing a high level of skill performance. Further development of the serve, defensive strokes and strategy involved in singles and doubles matches. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-110 Tennis (Coeducational) or departmental approval.


PHYSICAL EDUCATION 760

760-115

Adapted Physical Education (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Designed for students unable to participate in regular physical education because of temporary or permanent limitations. Programs of individual exercises and recreational activities as determined by student limitations and specific remedial condit ions . Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-117

Body Conditioning (Men)

2 Cr.

Knowledge, understanding and appreciation of the intrinsic values of physical fitness and body strength . Participation in calisthenics, gymnastics, weight training and various exercise programs geared to individual needs. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-118

Body Conditioning (Men)

1 Cr.

Emphasis on refinement and establishment of a lifetime exercise routine. Lectures on diet, grooming and personal health routines. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: 760· 117 Body Conditioning (Men) or departmental approval.

760-119

Body Dynamics (Women)

2 Cr.

Knowledge , understanding, appreciation and body skills for efficient movement. Participation in calisthenics, gymnastics and various exer· cise programs . Analysis of individual posture and anatomical prob· lems , with discussions of grooming and styling. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-120

Body Dynamics (Women)

1 Cr.

Emphasis on refinement of exercise program and grooming habits as lifetime routines. Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite : 760·119 Body Dynamics (Women) or departmental approval.

760-121

Social Dancing (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Instruction and practice in the fundamental steps of a variety of popular dances. Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: None.

760-123

Square and Folk Dancing (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Development of proficiency in folk and square dancing. Includes history and etiquette. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prereq· uisite : None.

241


PHYSICAL EDUCATION 760

760-124

Cheerleading (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Techniques of cheerleading, creating original routines, understanding and control of spectator enthusiasm. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-125

Creative Rhythms (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Development of proficiency in fundamentals of locomotor skills and rhythm activities. Includes modern dance and jazz, with emphasis on creating new forms from familiar media. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-131

Aquatics - Beginning Swimming (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Fundamental swimming skills for non-swimmers. Emphasis on elementary forms of propulsion and introduction to deep water. Lecture o hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-132

Aquatics - Advanced Beginner Swimming (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Development of deep water swimming skills for advanced beginners. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-131 Aquatics-Beginning Swimming (Coeducational) or departmental approval.

760-133

Aquatics - Intermediate Swimming (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Development of form and endurance in the popular swimming strokes. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-132 Aquatics-Advanced Beginner Swimming (Coeducational) or departmental approval.

760-134

Aquatics -

Lifesaving (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Instruction and practice in six basic styles of swimming and in elementary lifesaving skills and poolside first aid. Basic to the American Red Cross Senior Lifesaving course . Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-133 Aquatics-Intermediate Swimming (Coeducational) or departmental approval.

760-135

Aquatics -

Lifesaving (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Techniques of swimming rescue including approaches, carries, reo leases and lifts . Successful completion includes certification as American Red Cross Senior Lifesaver. Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: 760-134 Aquatics-Lifesaving (Coeducational).

242


PHYSICAL EDUCATION 760

760-136

Aquatics - Synchronized Swimming (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Fundamental skills of synchronized swimming and practice in combining these skills into routines for recreational and competitive purposes . Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-133 Aquatics-Intermediate Swimming (Coeducational) or departmental approval.

760-137

Aquatics - Advanced Competitive Activities (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Develops proficiency in advanced aquatic activities including competitive swimming, springboard diving and water polo. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-134 Aquatics-Lifesaving (Coeducational) or departmental approval.

760-138

Aquatics - Skin and Scuba Diving (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Presents the basic skills necessary for safe participation in underwater diving. Lectu re 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: American Red Cross Intermediate Card or departmental approval.

760-139

Aquatics - Water Safety Instruction (Coeducational)

. 1 Cr.

Introduction to teaching methods for all levels of swimming skills stressing analysis of individual aquatic techniques. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Possession of a current li fesaving certificate, either American Red Cross or YMCA.

760-140

Aquatics - Water Safety Instruction (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Emphasis on teaching methods for lifesaving and survival skills. Completion of all requirements for certification as American Red Cross water safety instructor. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-139 Aquatics-Wat er Safety Instruction (Coeducational).

760-141

Wrestling (Men)

1 Cr.

Instruction and participation in wrestling as an individual sport. Emphasis on development of skills, physical condition and knowl edge needed in competitive wrestling. Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

243


PHYSICAL EDUCATION 760

760-143

Fencing (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Instruction and part icipation in the elements of foil fencing. Emphasis on development of skills, rules and safety for the beginner. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-144

Fencing (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Emphasizes skill development, rules, strategy and safety practices in sabre and epee . Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760路143 Fencing (Coeducational) or consent of instructor.

760-145

Fencing (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Skill development in epee and sabre . Stresses rules , strategy and etiquette in competitive fencing. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisites: 760路143 Fencing (Coeducational) and 760-144 Fencing (Coeducational) or consent of instructor.

760-147

Soccer (Men)

1 Cr.

Stresses individual skills, team play, rules and strategy. Lecture Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: None .

o hours. 760-148

Track and Field (Men)

1 Cr.

Introduction to techniques of track events. Opportunity for specialization. Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-149

Skiing (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Stresses skill development, safety practices, competitive experience and its value as a lifetime activity. Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None .

760-150

Handball (Men)

1 Cr.

Stresses skill development, safety practices, competitive experience and its value as a lifetime activity. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite : None .

760-151

Field Hockey (Women)

1 Cr.

Rules, history, strategy and development of individual skills in field hockey. Team participation and competition . Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: None .

760-153

Family Camping (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Develops basic knowledge and skills pertinent to safe family camping. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: None .

244


760-154

Self-Defense (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Basic karate, judo and other self-defense skills. History and philosophy of currently popular schools. Appreciation of fitness and selfdiscipline. Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-155

Self-Defense (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Refinement of basic skills, movements and practices in defense. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-154 SelfDefense (Coeducational).

760-156

Tumbling and Gymnastics (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Basic tumbling activities. Exercises on parallel bars, horse and buck, development of individual skills. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-157

Tumbling (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Instruction and practice in floor exercises and tumbling. Refinement of basic techniques and development of tumbling routines . Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-156 Tumbling and Gymnastics (Coeducational) or departmental approval.

245


PHYSICAL EDUCATION 760

760-158

Gymnastic Apparatus (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Instruction and practice in the use of gymnastic apparatus. Refinement of skills performed on the still rings, even and uneven parallel bars, side horse, buck, highbar and vaulting box. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-156 Tumbling and Gymnastics (Coeducational) or departmental approval.

760-159

Trampoline (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Instruction and practice in the use of the trampoline. Refinement of skills performed on the trampoline and development of basic routines. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-156 Tumbling and Gymnastics (Coeducational) or departmental approval.

760-160

Bowling (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Instruction and participation in bowling. Includes history, rules and etiquette. Practice in scorekeeping and tournament competition. Stress on value as a lifetime sport. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-161 Bowling (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Advanced class in bowling emphasizing a high level of proficiency in skill performance. Instruction primarily on an individual basis. Includes general phases of bowling: delivery, release, spare conversion and bowling lane variables affecting the performance. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760 -160 Bowling (Coeducat ional) or departmental approval.

760-164

Fall Sports (Men)

1 Cr.

Instruction and participation in sports and games of the season. May include activities such as touch football, speed ball, angle ball. Lec ture 0 hours . Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

760-165

Spring Sports (Men)

1 Cr.

Instruction and participation in sports and games of the season. May include activities such as softball , track and field, paddleball . Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

246


1I~IIHI~SIII(fAIiL 770-101

S(IIIIIEN(IIE 71710

Introduction to Physical Science

3 Cr.

A unified, elementary survey of the physical universe. Emphasis on scientific method , science history and modern developments. Introduces basic concepts of matter and energy , the structure of the universe through lecture-demo nstration and text assignments. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

770-102

Introduction to Physical Science

3 Cr.

Continuation of 770-101 Introduction to Physical Science. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 770-101 Introduction to Physical Science or departmental approval.

770-103

Introduction to Physical Science

3 Cr.

Continuation of 770-102 Introduction to Physical Science. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 770-102 Introduction to Physical Science or departmental approval.

770-107

Physical Science Laboratory

1 Cr.

Elementary laboratory exercises in physical science that correlate with lectures. Emphasis on the basic scientific principles and concepts and their practicpl applicati ons to society . Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 770 -101 Introduction to Physical Science or concurrent enrollment .

770-108

Physical Science Laboratory

1 Cr.

Continuation of 770-107 Physical Science Laboratory. Lecture 0 hours . Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 770-102 Introduction to Physical Science or concurrent enrollment.

770-109

Physical Science Laboratory

1 Cr.

Continuation of 770-108 Physical Science Laboratory . Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours . Prerequisite: 770-103 Introduction to Physical Science or concurrent enrollment.

247


~-------------------------

- ---- ---

-- - - -

PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTI NG TECH NOLOGY 775 775-100

Health Care Orientation

2 Cr.

Discussion of health service resources -- their interrelationships, functions, activities. Personal and medical team relationships. Legal and ethical responsibilities relating to health care services. Maintenance of environment conducive to patient welfare . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: None.

775-101

Fundamentals of Physical Therapy

3 Cr.

History and principles of physical therapy. The physical therapy assistant role in relation to the licensed physical therapist. The functions and duties of the physical therapy assistant in health agencies. Survey of physical therapy treatment procedures. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None .

775-121

Functional Anatomy

3 Cr.

Human anatomy with emphasis on function related to the neuromusculo-skeletal system . Study of motion of human body as basic to application to exercise. Lecture 2 hours . Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 440路128 Anatomy and Physiology, 775路101 Fundamentals of Physical Therapy and 780路 101 Introductory Physics or concurrent enrollment.

775-122

Neuro-Musculo-Skeletal Dysfunction

3 Cr.

Disease and injury and its effect on the human body as it relates to the neuro-musculo-skeletal system . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 775-121 Functional Anatomy.

775-151

Physical Therapy Procedures

4 Cr.

Theory and techniques of treatment procedures . Maintenance of equipment and supplies . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: 440 -1 28 Anatomy and Physiology, 775 -101 Fundamentals of Physical Therapy and 780-101 Introductory Physics or concurrent enrollment.

775-153

Clinical Observation

1 Cr.

Selected experiences in local physical therapy departments for the observation of application of physical therapy skills. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

248


PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTING TECHNOLOGY 775

775-201

Physical Therapy Procedures

3 Cr_

Lecture, demonstration and practice in the use of physical agents in physical therapy. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites : 775 ·151 Physical Therapy Procedures. Concurrent enrollment in 775· 121 Functional Anatomy and 775·153 Clinical Observation.

775-202

Physical Therapy Procedures

2 Cr.

Continuation of 775·201 Physical Therapy Procedures with greater emphasis on correlating use of equipment with treatment procedures and correlating application with dysfunction. Survey of test pro· cedures for evaluation for strength and range of motion. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 775·122 Neuro·Musculo· Skeletal Dysfunction and 775·201 Physical Therapy Procedures.

775-203

Physical Therapy Procedures

2 Cr.

Continuation of 775·202 Physical Therapy Procedures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 775·202 Physical Therapy Procedu res.

775-204

Physical Rehabilitation Procedures

3 Cr.

Principles and techniques of therapeutic exercise and rehabilitation in physical therapy. Practice and application of these techniques in se· lected disabilities. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 775·203 Physical Therapy Procedures.

775-251

Application of Physical Therapy

6 Cr.

Discussion and practice of physical therapy procedures and tech· niques in an institutional setting under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequi· site: 775·151 Physical Therapy Procedures.

775-252 Application of Physical Therapy

6 Cr.

Continuation of 775·251 Application of Physical Therapy. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: 775·251 Application of Physical Therapy.

775-253 Application of Physical Therapy

6 Cr.

Continuation of 775·252 Application of Physical Therapy. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: 775·252 Application of Physical Therapy.

775-261

Stress in Illness

2 Cr.

Discussion of stress, its symptoms and overt behavior in physical therapy. Review of techniques for building patient rapport in stress situations. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisites: 775· 251 Application of Physical Therapy and 810·101 General Psy· chology. 249


-~-- - ----

- - - -- -

PHYSICiANS CLINICAL ASSISTANT 778 778-101

Special Medical Techniques

2 Cr.

Introduction to the techniques and equipment used in inhalation therapy. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

778-102

Special Medical Techniques

2 Cr.

Introduction to the techniques of pulmonary physiotherapy and breathing exercises with particular emphasis on postural drainage techniques. A basic knowledge of electrocardiography is also provided. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

778-103

Special Medical Techniques

2 Cr.

Introduction to the fundamentals of radiology and to familiarize the student with the various types of unusual equipment and medical instruments used in the acute general hospital. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

778-110

Practical Clinical Laboratory

9 Cr.

Practical clinical and patient care experience in correlation with various lecture courses presented, including respiratory therapy, electrocardiograms, radiography and the administration of drugs, with emphasis on respiratory therapy. Hospital internship 45 hours per week. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

778-111

Practical Clinical Laboratory

9 Cr.

Continuation of 778-110 Practical Clinical Laboratory with emphasis on electrocardiograms. Hospital internship 45 hours per week. Lecture o hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 778-110 Practical Clinical Laboratory.

778-120

Pharmacy and Therapeutics

2 Cr.

An introduction to the nature and effects of drugs with emphasis on responsibility in medication, administration , intelligent observation, accurate recording and the reporting of drug effects. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

250


PHYSICIAN'S CLINICAL ASSISTANT 778

778-121

Pharmacy and Therapeutics

2 Cr.

Continuation of 778 -120 Pharmacy and Therapeutics. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 778-120 Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

778-201

Clinical Specialty Training

9 Cr.

Exposure to one of the following clinical departments: hypertension and nephrology, general surgery, orthopedic surgery, urology, hematology and oncology, gastroenterology. Hospital internship 45 hours per week. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

778-202

Clinical Specialty Training

9 Cr.

Continuation of 778-201 Clinical Specialty Training with emphasis on chosen clinical specialty. Hospital internship 45 hours per week. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 778-201 Clinical Specialty Traini ng.

778-210

Introduction to Medicine

2 Cr.

Introduction to the more common diseases of various organ systems, the common symptoms and principles of medical management of them. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

778-211

Introduction to Surgery

2 Cr.

Familiarization with the more common diseases of various systems, the common symptoms of these diseases and the principles of surgical management of them. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 778-210 Introduction to Medicine.


PHYSICIANS SURGICAL ASSISTANT 880 (FORMERLY SURGICAL ASSISTING) 880-101

Introduction to Surgical Assisting

2 Cr.

History of surgery and the operating room , operating room equipment, basic instruments and sterile techniques. The student's posi tion on the operating room team with progressive responsibilities and liabilities entailed in his duties_ Practice mock surgery. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Admission to the program .

252


PHYSICIAN'S SURGICAL ASSISTANT 880

880-105

Surgical Instruments

2 Cr.

Acquaint students with the name, uses, care, sterilization and disinfection of surgical instruments. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 880路101 Introduction to Surgical Assisting.

880-161

Surgical Assisting Techniques

3 Cr.

Specific procedures , instrument techniques and providing proper exposure for operative procedures, suture material, tying knots, cutting sutures. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 710-102 Medical Terminology and 880-101 Introduction to Surgical Assisting.

880-162

Surgical Assisting Techniques

3 Cr.

Continuation of 880-161 Surgical Assisting Techniques. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 880路161 Surgical Assisting Techniques.

880-241

Surgical Assisting Procedures

5 Cr.

Introduction in a clinical setting for the surgical assistant to practice procedures in the operating room and the use of instruments . Basic set-up and techniques of preparation for surgery. Hospital intern路 ship 19 hours per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 440-127 Anatomy and Physiology for Health Technologies and 880-162 Surgical Assisting Techniques.

880-242

Surgical Assisting Procedures

5 Cr.

Advanced experience in surgery, with emphasis on major surgery and special instruments . Hospital internship 19 hours per week . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 880路241 Surgical Assisting Procedures.

880-243

Advanced Surgical Assisting Techniques

5 Cr.

Continue in a clinical setting for the more advanced practical experience in major surgery. Hospital internship 19 hours per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 880-242 Surgical Assisting Procedures.

880-260

Surgical Assisting. Clinical Application

4 Cr.

Controlled clinical practice of the skills in surgery. Hospital internship 19 hours per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 880 -241 Surgical Assisting Procedures.

880-261

Surgical Assisting Clinical Application

4 Cr.

Continue controlled clinical practice of the skills in surgery. Hospital internship 19 hours per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequsite: 880-260 Surgical Assist ing Clinical Application.

253


- ---- ._.. _ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - =

780-101

Introductory Physics

4 Cr.

Introduction to elementary classical mechanics with emphasis on behavior of bodies under the influence of equilibrium and nonequilibrium forces . Study of rotational and translational motion . Se lected topics from theory of fluids . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours . Prerequisite : 690 -101 Algebra or equivalent or departmental approval.

780-102

Introductory Physics

4 Cr.

Development of oscillatory phenomena with topics from simple harmonic motion , waves on a string and elect romagnet ic waves . Applications to such areas as direct current and alternating current circuits and optics. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours . Pre requis ite: 690-101 Algebra or equivalent or departmental approval.

254


PHYSICS 780

780-103

Introd uctory Physics

4 Cr.

The laws of thermodynamics and such central concepts as specific heat. Topics from modern physics such as special relativity, atomic spectra , photoelectric and laser phenomena, atomic and nuclear physics, with emphasis on their influence on modern technology. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 690· 101 Algebra or equivalent or departmental approval.

780-111

Physics for Health Technologies

4 Cr.

Basic physics as applied to Health Technologies; encompassing mea· surement techniques, force and motion of solids and fluids, pressure, mechanical advantages, energy and work, electricity , wave phenomena and heat. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 690·091 College Arithmetic or equivalent.

780-121

Engineering Physics

4 Cr.

First quarter of a four·quarter sequence. Study of basic physical quantities, operations with vectors and scalars . Introduction to me· chanics. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 690·151 Analytic Geometry and Calculus or concurrent enrollment . High school physics recommended.

780-122

Engineering Physics

4 Cr.

Continuation of 780·121 Engineering Physics. Primarily concerned with mechanics. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 780·121 Engineering Physics and 690·152 Analytic Geometry and Calculus or concurrent enrollment.

780-221

Engineering Physics

5 Cr.

Continuation of 780·122 Engineering Physics. Heat, thermody· namics, kinetic theory of gases, electricity and magnetism. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 780·122 Engineering Physics and 690·153 Analytic Geometry and Calculus or concur· rent enrollment.

780-222

Engineering Physics

5 Cr.

Continuation of 780·221 Engineering Physics. Optics, atom ic and nuclear physics. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 780·221 Engineering Physics and 690·154 Analytic Geometry and Calculus or concurrent enrollment.

255


790-101

Boiler, Turbine and Compressor Operations

3 Cr.

Generation of steam and electric power. Theory and practice of powerhouse operations. Design, layout function, operation and main· tenance of boilers, compressors, turbines, heating and ventilating equipment. Lectu re 3 hours. Laboratory a hours. Prerequisite: None.

790-111

Softeners, Cooling Towers and Filters

3 Cr.

Water usage and purification. Industrial filtration. Design, layout, function, operation and maintenance of water softeners, cooling towers and filters . Theory and practice of filtration systems in in· dustry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory a hours . Prerequisite: None.

800-101

American National Government

4 Cr.

Nature, purpose and forms of the American government. Relation· ship between function and structure . Dynamics of political change. Outstanding governmental problems of modern society. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory hours. Prerequisite: None.

a

800-102

State and Local Government

4 Cr.

American governmental structures and functions below the national level. Emphasis on functions and interrelati onsh ips with special at· tention to Ohio state and local government. Lecture 4 hours. Lab· oratory a hours. Prerequisite : 800·101 American National Govern · ment .

800-103

Liberal-Democratic Governments

3 Cr.

A study of Liberal ·Democratic political systems: Great Britain, France and Germany. Governing political concepts, institutions, processes, problems and prospects. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory hours. Pre· requisite: 800·101 American National Government.

a

800-104

Communist Governments

3 Cr.

A study of communist political systems: Soviet Union, China and Eastern Europe . Governing political concepts, institutions, processes, problems and prospects. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory hours. Pre· requisite: 800·1 01 American National Government.

a

256


POLITICAL SCIENCE 800

800-105

The Black Voter and the Community

4 Cr.

Exploration of the development of political power by a black minority through an analysis of the exercise of political pressure by black Americans and the formation of coalitions with a va ri ety of interest groups throughout the 19th and 20th centuries . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 800·101 American National Govern· ment.

800-106

4 Cr.

Political Systems of Africa

Comparative discussion of selected topics on national and interna· tional pol itics in black Africa with particular focus on the interrelation· ship between internal and external affairs. Examination of colonial policies, party systems, interest groups and modes of development. Lecture 4 hours. Labo ratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 630·170 History of Africa.

800-201

Contemporary World Affairs

4 Cr.

Problem study of modern international relations and of the forces which confront policymakers . Special emphasis on current areas of crisis . Designed primarily for students who seek an understand· ing of the United States in a tense and highly competitive political world. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 800· 101 American National Government or departmental approval.

U'ltJIlI,ti .. '''' Rn Bllre .. IH deet"dPre.idt~ .. t, {,'OIUN'H,,"t n-tli .. ot r(,et,h 'e n"y 01' til(' 1'1'11'l,hlS Jle ...~ ....c-He is opl....ed to the distributio .. "1Il01ll!; the peol,le-lll' Ions snit! so I {' .. nneetiellt " 'illiostl her shure of

.0,00••,000 ! ,,"·etfrly $4 to e,'ery .,,"011, fJ'"oJllan alld {!hlliliu lI,e State. \ ' OTEJo'OU

H .ARRISON, AND DlnDE THE SURPLUS. F};g" &fJ

to fHuIlJltfJ-NOW

OI'

NEYEU!

HUZZ."H I<'OR

l'VIn. H. Dal-rison! 257


810-101

General Psychology

3 Cr.

Introduction to fundamental psychological concepts and principles derived from a scientific approach to the study of human and animal behavior . Emphasis on methodology, biological bases of be· havior and learning. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prereq· uisite: None.

810-102

General Psychology

3 Cr.

Continuation of 810· 101 General Psychology . Emphasis on moti· vation, emotion and dynamics of personality. Lecture 3 hours. Lab· oratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 810·101 General Psychology .

810-107

Psychology of Human Behavior

4 Cr.

Introduction to psychological concepts and terminology for non· majors. Emphasis on social living, problem solving, adjustment and the healthy personality. Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

810-201

Child Growth and Development

4 Cr.

Growth, development and guidance of the child from conception through puberty. Interpretation and significance of creativeness, ad· justment abilities and chiid ·adult relationships . Emphasis on both physiological and psychological growth stages of the child . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : 810·102 General Psycho· logy.

810-203

Educational Psychology

4 Cr.

Introduction to major psychological factors in the school learning· teaching situation . Concepts in human development related to problems in the school situation. Teacher's role in motivation, con · ceptual learning and problem solving. Development of emotional behavior, attitudes and values. Learning of skills, retention and transfer. Measurement of student abilities and achievement. 530· 101 Introduction to Education recommended . Lecture 4 hours. Lab· oratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : 810· 102 General Psychology.

810-205

Dynamics of Human Behavior

4 Cr.

The interpretation of human behavior with special emphasis on motivation, emotion and the adjustment process. The implications of theory and methodology in the study of personality. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisites: 810·102 General Psycho· logy and sophomore standing or special permission of the depart· ment.

258


PSYCHOLOGY 8lD/REAL ESTATE 815

810-207

4 Cr.

Behavior Modification

Basic conditioning and learning principles emphasizing conditioned reinforcers, social reinforcement and token economies. Applications to normal and abnormal behaviors in home, school, hospital and correctional settings. Students will conduct individual experiments. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 810·102 General Psychology or 810·107 Psychology of Human Behavior and permission of instructor.

Real Estate 815 815-101

3 Cr.

Real Estate Principles

A general introduction to real estate as a business and as a pro· fession, designed to acquaint the student with the wide range of subjects necessary to the practice of real estate. Topics include license law, ethics, purchase agreements, escrow and title work, advertising, appraisals, sales, market trends, the role and influence of real estate in the economy, taxes and assessments . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite : None.

815-111

Valuation of Residential Properties

3 Cr.

Study of those elements which affect values of residential prop· erties. Emphasis placed on the methods of evaluating property. Lecture 3 hours. ~aboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 815·101 Real Estate Principles or departmental approval.

815-121

Real Estate Law

3 Cr.

The legal phase of realty transactions, from the listing of the prop· erty to the closing of the escrow. A review for owners, brokers, salesmen, mortgage and escrow officers . Lecture 3 hours. Labora· tory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 815·101 Real Estate Principles or de· partmental aproval.

815-151

Real Estate Management

3 Cr.

Basic coverage of real estate management embracing the areas of leasing, maintenance, budgeting, creative market analysis, public relations , collections, office procedures, zoning and development. Relationship of management to other specialized real estate areas. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 815·101 Real Estate Principles or departmental approval.

THE S ELFSAME. SUN , HA"T SHINES U PON HIS c:ou RT HIDE S NOT HI'S " 'SA~~ FROM

OUR COHACiE " .. Winhc's l iIol e ,Ad N

259


REAL ESTATE 815

815-171

Real Estate Financing

3 Cr.

A study of the procedures and techniques requisite to the analysis of risks involved in financing real estate property. The sources of funds , lending institutions , their limits and requirements , types of mortgages including conventional, Federal Housing Administra 路 tion, Veterans Administration and construction loans . Application forms , credit evaluations, interest rates , loan costs, loan closings and competition in the money market. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 815路101 Real Estate Principles or departmental approval.

815-211

Real Estate Sales .

3 Cr.

Deals with the current sales techniques. An approach to everyday problems in selling and sales management with particular emphasis on consumer motivation and reactions . Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 815 -101 Real Estate Principles or departmental approval.

815-221

Real Estate Brokerage

3 Cr.

Study of the factors necessary for the establishment and efficient operation of a sales and brokerage office. Salesman-broker relations , terminology, listings , purchase agreements, loans , land contracts, office location, records and procedures. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 815-101 Real Estate Pr inciples or departmental approval.

815-251

Valuation of Income Properties

3 Cr.

Factors which influence the value of commercial properties. Dem onstrations of the methods which apply to the preparation of the appraisal cost. Analysis of comparative and capitalization approaches . Problems taken from actual appraisals. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory hours. Prerequisite: 815-111 Valuation of Residential Properties or consent of instructor.

o

815-271

Commercial and Industrial Real Estate

3 Cr.

All aspects relative to the ownership and operation of shopping centers, industrial complexes , large apartments and related properties: leasing, broker functions, management, taxes, financing and construction methods. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Pre requisite: 815-101 Real Estate Principles or departmental approval.

260


~USSlllN 820-101

820

Beginning Russian

4 Cr.

Introduction to modern Russian with emphasis on speaking, read· ing and writing through multiple approach. Basic study of grammar and pronunciation. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in 560-101 College Com· position.

820-102

Beginning Russian

4 Cr.

Study of grammar. Oral and written exercises. Reading of elementary texts. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prereq· uisite: 820-101 Beginning Russian or one year of high school Russian.

820-103

Beginning Russian

4 Cr.

Strengthening facility of oral expression through discussions and study of speech patterns. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Labora· tory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 820-102 Beginning Russian or two years of high school Russian.

820-201

Intermediate Russian

4 Cr.

Introduction to more advanced vocabulary and speech patterns and plays. Reading of stories by outstanding 19th and 20th century writers and a systematic review of grammar. Laboratory practice. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 820-103 Beginning Russian or two years of high school Russian .

820-202

Intermediate Russian

4 Cr.

Strengthening of oral and written facility of expression. Building of more advanced vocabulary and sentence structure. Review of gram· mar. Laboratory practice. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Pre· requisite: 820·201 Intermediate Russian or two years of high school Russian .

820-203

Intermediate Russian

4 Cr.

Further readings and discussions on literary masterpieces in Russian for understanding and appreciation of Russian thought and culture. Oral reports on works by outstanding Russian writers. Review of grammar. Laboratory practice. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 820-202 Intermediate Russian or three years of high school Russian.


--

840-103

-

----

-------- -- -- - - - - - - - - - - -

I ntroduction to Social Science

3 Cr.

An interdisciplinary approach to the social sciences outlining the roles of the separate disciplines as they pertain to anthropologicalsociological and psychological behavior of man. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None or departmental approval for students who have earned credit in 850·101 Introductory Sociology.

840-104

Introduction to Social Science

3 Cr.

An interdisciplinary approach to the social sciences outlining the roles of the separate disciplines as they pertain to the economic and political behavior of man. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 840·103 Introduction to Social Science or 850·101 Introductory Sociology.

840-105

Introduction to Social Science

3 Cr.

An interdisciplinary approach to the social sciences through selected topics and readings on the behavior of man . Lecture 3 hours. Labora · tory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 840·104 Introduction to Social Science.

860 850-101

Introductory Sociology

4 Cr.

Survey of the principles, theory, concepts and research methods used in sociology. Intensive study of such concepts as culture, social organization, norms, status and social stratification. Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

850-102

Social Institutions

4 Cr.

Examination of the concepts developed in the introductory course as they relate to the family, religion , education, urban community and other such institutions. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 850·101 Introductory Sociology.

850-121

Marriage and Family Life

3 Cr.

An examination of contemporary marriage and family relations from a soc ial· psychological perspective. Special emphasis on the man·wom· an relationship in transition . Alternative models examined. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 810·102 General Psychology or 850·101 Introductory Sociology.

262


SOCIOLOGY 8S0/ SPANISH 860

850-201

Social Problems

4 Cr.

Pathology of modern American society, including topics such as juvenile delinquency, adult crime, alcoholism, mental health, ruralurban conflict or other problems of current concern . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 850-101 Introductory Sociology.

850-205

Introduction to Social Services

4 Cr.

History of social services with emphasis on the United States from colonial times to the present. The emergence of social work as a profession. The helping services in perspective. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 850-101 Introductory Sociology and sophomore standing.

850-231

Contemporary American Black-White Relations

4 Cr.

A sociological and psychological analysis of contemporary American black-white relations . A study of minority-majority behavior patterns as they are related to social-historical structure, stratification and power. Consideration of programs, movements and realistic alterna tives to present conditions. ' Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 850-201 Social Problems or 850-101 Introductory Sociology with departmental approval.

SPAn~SH 860-101

860

Beginning Spanish

4 Cr.

A functional course with emphasis on spoken language. Introduction to grammar through cultural approach and written exercises. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in 560-101 College Composition .

860-102

Beginning Spanish

4 Cr.

Further study of grammar with oral and written exercises. Development of conversational proficiency. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 860-101 Beginning Spanish.

860-103

Beginning Spanish

4 Cr.

Further study of grammar. Vocabulary building with stress on Spanish idioms. Continued emphasis on development of oral and written skills . Laboratory c;frill . Lecture 4 hours . Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 860-102 Beginning Spanish or two years of high school Spanish.


SPANISH 860

860-201

Intermediate Spanish

4 Cr.

Study of major developments in Spanish literature and civilization from the historic period to the Moorish conquest. Intensive exercises in written and oral expression. Grammar review . Laboratory practice. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite : 860-'103 Beginning Spanish or two years of high school Spanish.

860-202

Intermediate Spanish

4 Cr.

Spanish literature and civilization from the ninth century to the end of the 15th century, with stress on EL CID and the ROMANCERO. Intensive exercise in written and oral expression . Grammar review. Continued laboratory practice. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 860路201 Intermediate Spanish or two years of high school Spanish .

860-203

Intermediate Spanish

4 Cr.

Study of the works of Spanish authors, from Cervantes to modern times, whose primary interest was critical examination of themselves and their society. Intensive exercise in written and oral expression. Continued laboratory practice. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 860-202 Intermediate Spanish or three years of high school Spanish.

860-251

Spanish Conversation and Composition

4 Cr.

Discussion of topics of everyday life, colloquialisms, vocabulary distinctions and improvement of speech patterns. Practice in writing compositions. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 860203 Intermediate Spanish or concurrent enrollment or departmental approval or three years of high school Spanish.

860-252

Spanish Civilization and Literature

4 Cr.

Introduction to the civilization and literature of Spain. Interrelationships among Spanish history, geography , literature and cultun~ ._ Lec路 ture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 860 -203 Intermediate Spanish or concurrent enrollment or departmental approval or three years of high school Spanish .

860-253

Readings in Spanish Literature

4 Cr.

An introduction to Spanish literature from the golden age to the present . Highlights of representative authors and their wo rks . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 860-203 Intermediate Span ish or concu rrent enrollment or depa rt mental approval or three years of high school Spanish. .

264


870-091

Basic Speech Training

4 Cr.

Group drill and individual instruction designed to help students achieve adequate proficiency in use of voice and production of speech sounds in English. Helpful to international students as well as those with individual problems in speaking or understanding speech. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Placement by department.

870-101

Fundamentals of Speech Communication

4 Cr.

Effective speech communication. Application of principles to a variety of practical speaking situations. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

870-105

Voice and Articulation

4 Cr.

A practical course in the application of both theory and technique to conscious vocal control, and the development of articulation and pronunciation standards. Individual and group practice. Performance through exercises and readings. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

870-121

Group Discussion

4 Cr.

Designed to develop more effective participation in small groups through an understanding and practical application of the knowledge, attitudes and methods of group discussion. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: None.

870-205

Oral Interpretation

4 Cr.

Development of the student's oral ability to communicate various types of written material with understanding and appreciation. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 870-105 Voice and Articulation or consent of instructor.

870-211

Argumentation and Debate

4 Cr.

Discovering , selecting and evaluating evidence. Its arrangement into orderly, persuasive, oral and written argument. Special emphasis on causes and effects of prejudice, remedies and the influence of language on human behavior. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 870-101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication or con sent of instructor.

265


-- ---

- - - -- - - -- - - - - -- - -- - -

SPEECH 870/THEATRE ARTS 890

870-212

Forensic Activity

1 Cr.

Participation in a variety of forensic activities by assignment including intercollegiate debate, choral reading , readers theater and individual events. This course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 870-211 Argumen tation and Debate and/or 870路205 Oral Interpretation or consent of instructor.

870-215

Introduction to Speech Pathology

4 Cr.

A survey of the profession of speech pathology and an introduction to the various organic and functional speech disorders including deviant articulation , delayed speech development and stuttering. Techniques for diagnosis and treatment are explored. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and 870-105 Voice and Articulation or consent of instructor.

:::... .::::::...

.:::::::

890-101

Theatre Appreciation

4 Cr.

An examination of the theatre as an art form . How playwrights, directors, actors, scenic designers, costumers, make-up artists and technicians approach their crafts. Students are not required to perform. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

890-121

History of the Theatre

3 Cr.

Survey of dramatic presentations, conventions and techniques from classical Greece through the Commedia dell'arte. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

890-122

History of the Theatre

3 Cr.

Survey of dramatic presentations, conventions and techniques from the Renaissance through the 18th century. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 'hours. Prerequisite: None.

890-123

History of the Theatre

3 Cr.

Survey of dramatic presentations, conventions and techniques from the 19th century to the present. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

890-130

Fundamentals of Theatrical Make-up

3 Cr.

Practical application of theory and techniques of make-up for performers. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: None.

266


THEATRE ARTS 890

890-140

Introduction to Scenic Design

3 Cr.

Theory and practice of set design. Orientation to elements of scenery. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: None .

890-141

Introduction to Scenic Design

3 Cr.

Preparation of floor plans, lighting plots, elevations and color renderings. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 890 -140 Introduction to Scenic Design.

890-142

Introduction to Scenic Design

3 Cr.

Examination of contemporary scenic designs and execution of model settings. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 890-141 Introduction to Scenic Design .

890-150 through 152

Fundamentals of Acting

3 Cr. Ea.

Theory and practice of the basic techniques of acting: body movement, voice production and diction. Introduction to scene study. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

890-153

Stagecrafts

1 Cr.

Workshop in technical theatre. Scenery, lighting, costumes, properties and sound by assignment in campus theatrical productions. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite : None.

890-154

Rehearsal and Performance

2 Cr.

Practical experience for students accepted as members of a CCC theatre company - as an actor, stage manager or in a position created by the needs of the specific production other than technical. May be repeated for no more than 8 credit hours. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: By audition.

890-171

Radio and Television Production

2 Cr.

Survey of the broadcasting industry, its history and place in our society. Examination of technical areas, advertising, writing, programming and analysis. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

I 路1

890-250 through 252

Advanced Acting

3 Cr. Ea.

Scene study, methods of characte rization. Consideration of styles of acting. Refinement of acting techniques of the individual student. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 890-152 Funda mentals of Acting.

267


900-121

Transportation Principles

3 Cr.

Survey of the American transportation systems, tariffs and classification. Traffic regulations and industrial traffic management . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 520-100 Basic Economics.

900-122

Transportation Principles

3 Cr.

Conti nuation of 900·121 Transportation Princi pies. Emphasis on modes of transportation and their interrelation . Transport via motor, rail, water and air. How they combine to make the total transportation picture. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 900-121 Transportation Principles or consent of instructor.

900-221

Tariffs and Classifications

3 Cr.

Through routes and rates-in-transit privileges. Technical tariffs and various rate interpolations . Over·charges and under-charges, loss and damage, import and export. Emphasis on theoretical considerations. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 900·122 Transportation Principles.

900-222

Tariffs and Classifications

3 Cr.

A continuation of 900-221 Tariffs and Classifications. Uniform freight classifications , classification committee procedure and their phases of tariff and classification. Emphasis on practical applications. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: 900·221 Tariffs and Classifications.

900-231

Transportation Regulations

3 Cr.

Local, state and federal legislative acts regulating the transportation systems . Includes the Public Utilities Commission Act, Interstate Commerce Act and Civil Aeronautics Board Act. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 900·122 Transportation Principles.

900-241

Industrial Traffic Management

4 Cr.

Basic principles of the transportation function operating within a commercial company. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 900-122 Transportation Principles.

269


~~~-

~---- - ~

- --

-- --

~~~~ ~\Wm_m~ rrmiMJnn~ ~m~~fl~mnmrrn~ Transfer or University Parallel curriculums in Liberal Arts and pro- fessional fields such as Business Administration, Education, Engineering and the Engineering Technologies are planned in consultation with the student's counselor. The courses parallel the curriculums of the four-year college or university to which the student plans to transfer. It is the responsibility of the student to acquaint himself with, and to follow the requirements of, the institution to which he intends to transfer. In general , transfer students specialize at the senior institution during the junior and senior year. Typical course work during the freshman and sophomore years involves the following subject areas: College Composition British or American Literature American or World History Science Mathematics Social Sciences Humanities Students intending to major in Liberal Arts usually complete two years of a foreign language, or the equivalent, at the college level. Students planning to pursue a Baccalaureate degree in Business Administration need at least a year of college-level mathematics (including algebra) as preparation for later courses involving statistics and other quantitative methods. Engineering students take a concentration of courses in theoretical mathematics. The College offers preparatory or refresher courses in English composition, reading comprehension , speech and mathematics for students who are deficient in basic skills areas. Such courses are not designed for transfer but are intended to provide students with an opportunity to improve their skills.


Listed in alphabetical order on the following pages are suggested quarter sequences for each of the 39 two-year Associate degree curriculums in the Career Program. These sequences are intended to be a guide in the scheduling of the student's course work. Each student should confer with a counselor on course selection prior to, or at the time of, registration. The Career Program Offices' staff and faculty will be happy to discuss any aspect of these programs. The Career Program encompasses four general categories: Business, Engineering, Health and Public Service Technologies. With the approval of the appropriate dean, students may make substitutions for courses not required for graduation and courses outside the area of concentration. The College offers "go-ahead " two-year career curriculums in : PAGE Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology Aviation Technology (Business) Accounting (Business) Banking and Finance (Business) Business Management (Business) Business Management with Emphasis on Small-Business Management (Business) Court and Conference Reporting (Business) O.ata Processing (Business) Hospitality Management with Emphasis on Hotel·Motel Management (Business) Hospitality Management with Emphasis on Housekeeping Management (Business) Hospitality Management with Emphasis on I nstitutional Food Management (Business) Hospitality Management with Emphasis on Restaurant Management (Business) Industrial Management (Business) Marketing (Business) Office Administration (Business) Purchasing Management (Business) Real Estate (Business) Transportation Certified Laboratory Assisting (One·year Certificate Program) Child Care Technology Dental Hygiene Dietary Tech nology Early Childhood Education flectrical·Electronic Engineering Technology Fire Technology Graphic Communications Management and Technology Industrial Supervision Inhalation Therapy Technology Law Enforcement Library Technology Mechanical Engineering Technology Medical Assistjng Medical Record Technology Mental Hea lth Technology Nursing Occupational Therapy Assisting Technology Physical Therapist Assisting Technology Physician's Clinical Assistant Physician's Surgical Assistant

272-3 274-5 276-7 278-9 280-1 282-3 284-5 286-7 288-9 290-1 292-3 294-5 296-7 298-9 300-1 302·3 304-5 306-7 350 308-9 310-11 3i2-13 314-15 316-17 318-19 320-21 322-23 324-25 326-27 328-29 330-31 332-33 ·334-35 336-37 338-41 342-43 344-45 346-47 348-49

271


. ___ J

'" '""

1'1"1»

2:::0

CH,,)

-::c 2_

Associate in Science Degree in Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology Property development personnel make up one of the largest groups in the nation's labor force. This program is designed to prepare students for paraprofessional employment in the construction industry. Possible career positions include architectural draftsman, field engineer, materials and job estimator, construction supervisor, specifications writer, building materials salesman, contractor or building inspector. The building construction technician often serves as a liaison between the architect or engineer and the building contractor.

I'I"I-t 1'1"11'1"1

:::0(")

--t

Zc:

":::0 -t>

1'I"Ir-

(")> :::t:2

2C

~(") "2 -<en 00

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FIRST QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduatian Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Architectural and Construction Engineering Techn ology 450·100 Building Construction Orientation 450·121 Architectural Drawing Mathematics 690·102 Algebra*

-t

FOURTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

3

Cr. Hrs. Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Engineering

3

2 3

550-211 Introduction to Surveying 550-251 Strength af Materials Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology 450·221 Building Equipment 450·241 Principles of Structural Design Psychology 810·101 Genera I Psychology

3 3 3 3 3

3 16 15

:::0

c: ~

o 2


SECOND QUARTER

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hr._

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology 450-122 Architectu ral Drawing Physics 780-101 Introductory Physics Mathematics 690-105 Trigonometry

3

3 3

" "

Cr. Hr •. Psychology 810-102 General Psychology Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology 450-222 Building Equipment 450-231 Contracts and Specifications 450-242 Principles of Structural Design Engineering 550-212 Surveying 550-252 Applied Dynamics

3 3 2 3 3

3 17

17

» ::c 3 3 3 3

"

16

::J: Cr. Hr._

Cr. Hr•. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology 450-123 Architectural Drawing E"ngineering 550-151 Applied Mechanics and Strength of Materials Physics 780-102 Introductory Physics

("")

SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER

Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Economics 520-100 Ba.ic Economics Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology 450-223 Building Equipment 450-232 Construction Estimati ng 450-243 Principles of Concrete Design 450-251 Construction Procedures

m-4 3

3 3

3 3 16

* Students

may begin the Mathematics sequence at a depending upon prior accomplishments in this area.

-4

m

("")

higher level

zC:

C')::c

-» Zrm m» ::cZ

zO

C')("")

-4

0

Z m ("")(J) ::J:-4

z::C oC: ("")

'"'-I

w

g~

-<Z


....,

~ :;

'..J ~

Associate in Science Degree in Aviation Technology Provides education and training for a career in aviation with Federal Aviation Administration licenses for private pilot, commercial pilot, instrumentation rating and instructor's rating. Also provides training for general aviation industry careers.

o""'"

z

""'" n

ITI

::I: Z

o o

r-

"-< SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FIRST QUARTER

FOURTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

Aviation Technology 435-101 Private Pilot Theory 435-151 Primary Flight路 English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Elective Graduation Requirements)" Health or Physical Education (See Speci/lc Graduation Requirements)

3 3

3 3 4

Cr. Hrs.

Aviation Technology 435-141 Aviation Meteorology 435-201 Intermediate Flight路 Business Administration 460-108 Introduction to Business Social Science (See Elective Graduation Requirements)"** Social Science (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Mathematics and Science Elective*** **

3 3

3 3 3 3 18

17


FIFTH QUARTER

SECOND QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. Aviation Technology 435-121 Commercial Pilot Theory 435-171 Commercial Pilot* Engineering 550-100 Slide Rule Office Administration 830-101 Typewriting Eriglish (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3 3 2 2

Aviation Technology 435-105 Aviation Communications 435-202 Intermediate Flight* 435-271 Flight Instructor Industrial Supervision 650-221 Supervisory Reporting and Decision Making Transportation 900-121 Transportation Principles

3

3 3 3 3 3 15

3

17

THIRD QUARTER

SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

Aviation Technology 435- 172 Commercia I Pilot* 435-221 Instrument Pilot Theory English ' (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Mathematics and Science Elective***

3 3

3 3 1

Cr. Hrs. Aviation Technology 435-281 Ground Instructor Busine.. Administration 460-112 Business Management Transportation 900-122 Transportation Principles 900-231 Transportation Regulations Mathematics and Science Elective (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3

4 3 3

3

3 16

......

u.

~

o Z

-4

ITI ("')

16

....,

~ ~

*Flight experience: 38 hours. **Geography recommended. ***690-105 Trigonometry recommended. ****Economics recommended. *****780-101 Introductory Physics recommended. SPRING AND SUMMER: MAKE UP FLIGHT HOURS AS REQUIRED .

:J: Z

o (; C) -<


-

- - - ----

to

C

CJ)

Associate in Science Degree in Business with Concentration in Accounting There is today an increasing demand for the services of accountants in business, industry and government. Highly qualified accountants are well prepared for promotion to management positions of responsibility. Career opportunities are available in the financial area of accounting as well as in the administration of other business activities such as sales, procurement, credit and collections, business research, data compilation and reporting. This curriculum prepares individuals for immediate employment, working under supervision in the preceding areas. It also provides a sound basis for advancement as experience and further education are acquired.

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FIRST QUARTER

FOURTH QUARTER

3 3

3 3 4 17

IT!

CJ) CJ)

l>

(")

8c Z -I Z

C)

Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) * Social Science (See Speciflc Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Speciflc Graduation Requirements) Business Administration 460- 108 Introduction to Business Accounting 410- 107 Business Mathematics 410- 121 Principles of Accounting

Z

Cr. Hrs. Humanities, Social Science or Science and Mothematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Science or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Gra duation Requirements) Economics 520- 100 Basic Economics or 520-151 Development of the American Economy Business Administration 460-213 Business law Accounting 410-222 Intermediate Accounting

3 3 3 or 4 3

4 16 or 17


SECOND QUARTER

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)' Social Science (See Specific Gra duation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Reauirementsl Data Processing 490-101 Electronic Data Processing Accounting 410-122 Principles of Accounting

3

Cr. Hrs. Humanities, Social Sciences or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3

Humanities, Social Sciences or Science and Mathematics

3

4

(See Elective Graduation Requirements) Office Administration 830-150 Business Communications Accounting 410-110 Principles of Finance 410-231 Cost Accounting

3

3 3

4

4 16 15

THIRD QUARTER

SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. English or Speech (See Specific Graduation Requirements) ' Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Office Administration 830-105 Office Machines Accounting 410-221 Intermediate Accounting

3

3

Humanities, Social Sciences or Science and Mathemotks

3

3

4 14

' English 560-101, 560-102 and Speech 870-101 recammended.

Humanities, Social Sciences or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Elective 460Accounting 410-232 Cost Accounting

3

4 4 14

OJ C

(J)

Z

IT!

-Âť (J) (J)

C") C")

0

C Z

-f

""

r.:r.l

'-I '-I

Z

G')


-

r.J

to en

'-I

c:

CD

Associate in Science Degree in Business with Concentration in Banking and Finance

z

This Associate degree program is designed specifically for persons employed in the field and for those consider. ing such a career. Includes theory and application of banking services, and functions such as installment credit, home mortgage, financial statements, investments financing and supervisory techniques.

",

en en to Z

l>

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FIRST QUARTER

="

Cr. Hrs.

English (See Speciflc Graduation Requirements)

3 3 3 4

Banking and Finance 437· 101 Principles of Bank Operations

Cr. Hrs. (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3

Health or Physical Education

Accounting 410· 107 Business Mathematics 410·121 Principles of Accounting

G)

English

Social Science (See Speciflc Graduation Requirements)

Z

FOURTH QUARTER

3

(See Specific Graduation Requirements) Economics 520·162 Principles of Economics

z

4 4 3

16 15

I-.r.J

c

::!!

Speech 870·101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication Banking and Finance 437· Elective

l> Z

l>

Z

C') ",


SECOND QUARTER

FIFTH QUARTER Cr . Hrs.

English

Cr. Hrs . •

Health or Physical Education

(See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3

Social Science'

(See Specific Graduation Requirements)

Business Administration

(See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3

Accounting 410-122 Principles of Accounting

4

Psychology

460- 213 Business Law Office Administration 830-150 Business Communications

3 3

Bonking and Finance

810- 107 Psychology of Human Behavior

4

Banking and Finance 437 -115 Bank Management

3

437 -110 Money and Bonking 437-116 Supervision and Personne l Administration 437-143 Installment Credit

17

16

THIRD QUARTER

SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

Humanities (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Social Scien.ce (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3

Data Processing

3

490-101 Electronic Data Processing

4

Banking and finance

3

4

Banking and Finance 437-170 Bank Public Relations and Marketing

(See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3 17

437-120 Analysis of Financial Statements 437 -1 21 Financing Business Enterprise 437Elective

IX!

Cr. Hr •.

Humanities

3

Business Administration 460Elective Economics 520-161 Principles of Economics

3 3 3

3 3 3 16

c: VJ

Z

1"1'1 VJ VJ

IX!

» Z

"Z

C)

z» c

::!! "->

'" -0

z z» C") 1"1'1


~ ~ (Xl

Dl

o

c: en

Associate in Science Degree in Business with Concentration in Business Management

2

More than 4,500,000 salaried workers today are engaged in managing the business activities of our nation's enterprises. Many others are self-employed managers who carryon all or part of the activities necessary for the management of their own businesses. This two-year curriculum offers a working knowledge of varied business procedures as preparation for a middle-level management career with a small or large company.

",

en en

s::

l> Z l>

C')

",

s::

",

2 -i

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FIRST QUARTER

FOURTH QUARTER Cr. Hr>.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410-107 Business Mathematics Data Processing 490-101 Electronic Data Processing

3

Humanities, Social Sciences, or

3

3

4

Business Administration

460-108 Introduction to Business

Cr. Hrs. Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3

Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirementslf Business Administration 460Elective Business Administration 460-213 Business Lqw Marketing 685-201 Principles af Marketing

3 3

3 04

16

104


FIFTH QUARTER

SECOND QUARTER

Cr. HI'S.

Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduatian Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirementslt

Economics 520-100 Basic Economics** Accounting 410-121 Principles of Accounting Business Administration 460-216 Introduction to Industrial Purchasing

4

3 3

3 Office Administration 830-150 Business Communications Business Administration 460-214 Business law 460Electivet

3

3 3

"

16

3 17

SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410-122 Principles of Accounting

3

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3

3

4

Business Administration 460·241 Office Management Elective

Business Administration

460-112 Business Management

3 3

""

17

"

t Psychology 810·101 and 810·102 recommended.

15

* English 560-101, 560-102 and Speech 870-101 recommended.

** Economics 520-161 and 520-162 may be substituted.

t Student

may elect a course of his choice from among oflerings in the Business Administration area - a course not required in this program.

OJ C

CJ),

Z

ITI

CJ) CJ)

s::

» z » C')

ITI

s:: ITI

'"

(X)

Z

-I


""

m

en

""

c: en

Associate in Science Degree in Business with Concentration in Business Management and Emphasis on Small-Business Management

z

",

This two-year Career Program is designed for students who wish to go into business for themselves or would like to manage a small business. It also affords opportunities to strengthen your managerial skills if you are presently managing a small business.

en en

3:

» z »

"3: ",

",

Z

-t

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FIRST QUARTER

en

Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduatian Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduotion Requirements) Accounting 410-107 Business Mathematics 410-121 Principles of Accounting Business Administration 460-108 Introduction to Business

3:

FOURTH QUARTER Cr_ Hrs.

» r-

3

m c:

Humanities, Social Sciences, or

3 3 3 4 3 16

Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410-201 Management Finance and Accounting Business Administration 460-213 Business law Elective· Elective·

.. 3 3

3 17

r-

en z", en en

-


SECOND QUARTER

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410·122 Principles of Accounting Psychology 810-101 General Psychology Business Administration 460-130 Small-Business Management

3

3

4

Cr. Hrs. Accounting 410-202 Management finance and Accounting Business Administration 460-214 Business law 460-245 New-Business Seminar 460Elective or Industrial Supervision 650Elective

3

4 3

4

3 14

rnen en

3

z

17

THIRD QUARTER

s: » z

SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Speech 870-101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication Psychology 810-102 General Psychology Business Administration 460-131 Small-Business Management

Cr. Hrs. Humanities, Social Sciences, or

3

Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3

3 3

Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration 460-246 New-Business Seminar Elective* Elective *

'"

Q)

w

Z

-

3 3

r-

* Business Administration and/or Industrial Supervision electives are to be chosen.

s: ITI ~

3

16

14

~ ITI

4

Humanities, Social Sciences, or

4

OJ

c::

en

s:

» r-

OJ

c::

-

en Z ITI

en en


_

.h-=J

'" (» .j>..

OJ

Associate in Science Degree in Business with Concentration in Court and Conference Reporting This program provides a practical and theoretical preparation for career reporters in the court room and business community in general, where there is a serious shortage of qualified personnel. The student is prepared to work as a court reporter, or as a free-lance reporter in civil, criminal, municipal or supreme court.

c

en

2

-8 J'T1

en en

c :::c -f

» 2

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FIRST QUARTER

C FOURTH QUARTER

Cr. Hr•. English 560-101 Colle ge Composition Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation ' Requirements) Accounting 410·111 Practical Accounting Court and Conference Re porting 482·113 Machine Reporting Office Administration 830-102 Typewriting "

Cr. Hr••

.." J'T1

Humanitie s, Social Science s, or

3

Science and Mathematics (See Elective G raduation Requirements)

3

3

3

Court and Conference Reporting 482·213 Machine Reporting 482-216 Testimony and Depositions Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Law Enforcement 670·122 Criminal Law

3 3 3 3

:::c

J'T1

2

("')

J'T1

:::c J'T1

3

~ :::c

16

2

2 15

82

::::!

C)


SECOND QUARTER

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English 560-102 College Comp05ition Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3 3

Humanities, Social Sciences, or

Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Court and Conference Reporting 482-114 Machine Reporting Office Administration 830-103 Typewriting Medical Assisting 710-102 Medical Terminology

Cr. Hrs. Humanities, Social Sciences, or

3 3

2

3

Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Court and Conference Reporting* 482-214 Machine Reporting 482-217 Testimony Office Administration 830:201 Advanced Typewriting

3 3 3 2

Business Adminisfration

460-213 Business Law Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Law Enforcement 670-123 Laws of Evidence

3

3

English or Speech (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requir~ments) Court and Conference Reporting 482-115 Machine Reporting 482-116 Court OrientQtion and Transcription Office Administration 830-200 Advanced Typewriting Law Enforcement 670-121 Criminal Law

3 3 3 2

Highly recommended courses: Business Administration 460-2 J 4, 460-220 and 460-24 J; Law Enforcement 670-20 J; and Office Administration 830-250. N (XI

Cr. Hrs.

l> Z

3

3 3 3

3

::0 -I

c

8z -n

ITt

::0

ITt

Z

(")

2

ITt

17

::0

3 17

lJI

Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Cour' and Conference Reporting* 482-215 Machine Reporting 482-218 Jury Charge 482-219 Court Orientation and Advanced Transcription Office Administration 830-202 Advanced Typewriting

-8 c

Humanities, Social Sciences, or

3

ITt

18

SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

c::J

c en z

en en

17

THIRD QUARTER

-

*Each Court and Conference Reporting course requires a minimum of one weekly court visit. "Students are expected to begin the typing sequence at this advanced level. Beginners will need to take preparatory courses.

ITt

~

::0 -I

Z

Ci')


-..

'"

QI)

m c:

0.

en

Associate in Science Degree in Business with Concentration in Data Processing Through continuing research, the number and diversity of electronic data processing applications are growing rapidly _ More and more firms today are turning to electronic computers to expedite and accurately process the complex facts and figures of their business operations _ This curriculum focuses attention on the programming aspects of machine use, and offers instruction in hardware organization and systems methodology. Graduates are eligible for career opportunities as programmers, junior analysts and operations personnel.

2

ITI

en

!!J

~ ~ "'tI :::0

o("')

ITI

en en

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FIRST QUARTER

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Mathematics 690-101 Algebra* Business Administration 460-108 Introcluction to Business Data Processing 490-101 Electronic Data Processing

2

FOURTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs.

3

Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Mathematics 690-141 Elementary Probability and Statistics

4

3

Accounting 410-122 Principles of Accounti ng

4

3

3

4

Elective Data Processing 490-203 Computer Programming

4

3 16

16

C')


SECOND QUARTER

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hr••

English (See Specific Graduatian Requirement.)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirement.) Mathematics 690·102 Algebra** Data Processing 490·111 Data Processi ng Applications 490·201 Computer Programming

3 3

3 3

4

Cr. Hrs. Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Economics 520·100 Basic Economics or 520·161 Principles of Economics Data Processing 490·221 Programming Systems 490·231 Systems Analysis

3

3 or 4

4 4

16 15 or 16

SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirement.)*

3

(See Specific Grad uation Requirements) Humanities or Social Sciences (See Eledive Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410·121 Principles of Accounting Data Processing 490·202 Computer Programming

c: Cf)

Humanities or Social Sciences

Social Science

3

3 4

(See Elective Grqduation Requirements) Business Administration 460·112 Business Management Data Processing 490·251 Data Processing Field Project 490. Elective

4 4

3 4 16

* English 560·101 , 560·1.02 and 560·103. Speech 870· 101 may be substituted for English 560.103.

* * Students

Z

rr'I

3 16

txJ

Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduatian Requirements)

may begin the Mathematics sequence at a higher level depending upon prior accomplishments in this area.

Cf) Cf)

~

."

::c n

o

rr'I

Cf) Cf)

'""I <Xl

Z

C)


_Me11 ~

co co

Associate in Science Degree in Business with Concentration in Hospitality Management and Emphasis on Hotel-Motel Management A mid-management program designed to prepare the student for a career in the hotel-motel management field. The series of courses offered in the present curriculum prepares students for a variety of positions including assistant food and beverage manager, night manager, catering manager and hotel-motel auditor. Theory is combined with practical experience during the student's preparation for an Associate in Science degree .

ITIs:to ""Cc:: ::I:~

»Z

enlTl -en en en

--

0::I:

Zo

::I:

en

0::2 -t-t

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FIRST QUARTER

ITI»

" ~:::::j

FOURTH QUARTER

0-<

Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Hospitality Management 635-101 Introduction to Hospitality Management 635-102 Sanitation and Safety in Food and lodging Establishments 635-111 Food Technology

3

3 3 6

Cr. Hrs.

Health or Physical Education (See Specific G raduation Requirements) Psychology 810-101 General Psychology Social Science 840-104 Introduction to Social Science Hospitality Management 635-202 Management Operations 635-211 Training Techniques for Supervisors 635-214 Food and Beverage Control

~s:

s:Z

3

»~

ZITI

3 6 3 3

16 19

»s:

"ITI ITI Z S:-t

ITI

Z

-t


SECOND QUARTER

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

Cr . Hrs.

English (See Speciflc Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Speciflc Graduation Requirements) Social Science 840-103 Introduction to Socia I Science Accounting 410- 107 Business Mathematics Hospitality Monagement 635-112 Quantity Food Technology 635- 124 Hotel-Motel Sales Promotion

3

3 3

Psychology 810-102 General Psychology Business Administration 460-213 Business law Hospitality Management 635 - 203 Internship 635-210 Supervisory Development 635-225 Hotel-Motel law 635-226 Hotel-Motel Maintenance and Engineering

3 3 3 3 3 3

4 18

3

1"1

s::

"tI_

17

::J:tIJ

»C (J)(J)

THIRD QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English or Speech (See Speciflc Gra duation Requirements) Accounting 410- 121 Principles of Accounting Hospitality Management 635-126 Housekeeping Procedures 635-127 Supervisory Housekeeping 635-129 Communications in the Hospitality Industry 635-130 Human Relations in the Haspitality Industry

cnz

SIXTH QUARTER

3

4 3 3 3 3

Cr. Hrs. Chemistry 480-106 Introduction to Organic Chemistry Social Science 840- 105 Introduction to Socia I Science Economics 520-100 Basic Economics or 520-161 Principles of Economics Hospitality Management 635-227 Hotel-Motel Front Office Procedure 635-228 Hotel-Mote l Accounting

5 3 3 or 4 3 3

19 17 or 18 SUMMER SESSION

""

00

-0

z~

::J::J:

00 ~(J)

~"tI

3:=i 0» ~!:: 1T1~

r-<

S::S::

»» »» c)c) 1"11"1

zz

Cr. Hrs.

Hospitality Management 635-201 Summer Field Experience

-

01"1

4 4

S::S::

1"1 1"1

ZZ ~~


'"

ITIs::Dl iJC

-0

o

::J:~

Associate in Science Degree in Business with Concentration in Hospitality Management and Emphasis on Housekeeping Management

»Z enlTl

A two-year Associate in Science degree program for career preparation in the field of executive housekeeping. Supervisory positions are available at hotels , motels, hospitals , clubs, college dormitories and a variety of welfare institutions.

O::J:

-en en en

-

Zo

::J:en O~

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE

C-f

en»

FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Speciflc Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Speciflc Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410- 107 Business Mathematics Psychology 810-101 Genera I Psychology Hospitolity Management 635-101 Introduction to Hospitality Management 635-102 Sanitation and Safety in Food and lodging Establishments

1TIr-

FOURTH QUARTER

3

3

3

Cr. Hrs.

Biology 440-128 Anatomy and Physiology Social Science 840- 104 Introduction to Socia I Science Business Administration 460-216 Introduction to Industrial Purchasing Hospitality Management 635-202 Management Operations 635 - 211 Training Techniques for Supervisors

4 3 3 6 3

3 19

3 16

~­ ITI-f ITI-< ~s::

C)z » S::C) »ITI ZS:: »ITI C)z ITI-f S::I ITI Z

-f


FIFTH QUARTER

SECOND QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology 810-102 General Psychology Social Science 840-103 Introduction to Social Science Hospitality Management 635-124 Hotel-Motel Soles Promotion 635-128 Fundamentols of In·l erior Design

3

3 3

Biology 440-129 Anatomy and Physiology Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Hospitality Management 635-203 Internship 635-210 Supervisory Development 635-225 Hotel-Motel law 635-226 Hotel-Motel Maintenance and Engineering

4

3 3 3 3

IT'I

3 3

17

3:

"'tJ_

:J:DJ

16

»C

~(/)

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. English or Speech (See Specific Groduotion Requirements) Accounting 410- 121 Principles of Accounting Hospitality Management 635-126 Housekeeping Procedures 635-127 Supervisory Housekeeping 635-129 Communications in the Hospitality Industry 635 -1 30 Human Relations in the Hospitality Industry

(/)2

SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER

3 4 3 3 3 3

Economics 520-100 Basic Economics Social Science 840-105 Introducti on to Social Science Biology 440-221 Microbiology Hospitality Management 635-227 Hotel-Motel Front Office Procedures

3

SUMMER SESSION Cr. Hrs.

Hospitality Management 635-201 Summer Field Experience

4 4

'"

-0

2~

:J::J:

3

00

4

(/)"'tJ IT'I_

3 13

19

-

01T'l

c(/)

,,---4 IT'I» 1T'Ir"'tJ_---4 z-< C')3: 3:» »2 z» »C') C')IT'I 1T'13: 3:1T'1 1T'12 2---4 ---41


_I

'" '"

1"1'1-

'<)

Associate in Science Degree in Business with Concentration in Hospitality Management and Emphasis on Institutional Food Management This two-year sequence provides a combination of theoretical and practical preparation leading to supervisory positions in the institutional food management industry. Career opportunities are available in the areas of college food services, school lunch programs and at health care facilities, hospitals and other institutions. Positions available to the graduate might include production supervisor, food service supervisor, catering supervisor and assistant manager.

3

3 3

Psychology 81 0- 1 01 Genera I Psychology Social Science 840- 104 Introduction to Socia I Science Hospitality Management 635-202 Management Operations 635-211 Training Techniques for Supervisors 635 - 214 Food and Beverage Control

Z:::t: _0

Zen

en~ -4-4 -4rc:-4-4 Z~

»»

r-Z 3

~~

3

81"1'1

6 3 3

3: Z

18

20

0-

o

Cr. Hrs.

6 4

»Z

en 1"1'1 -en en en

--<

FOURTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Hospitality Management 635-101 Introduction to Hospitality Management 635-102 Sanitation ond Safety in Food and lodging Esta blishments 635 - 111 Food Technology Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

:::t:~

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FIRST QUARTER

~CJ "'tIC:

o~

1"1'1

»-4

zi

»

"

1"1'1 ~ 1"1'1

Z -4


FIFTH QUARTER

SECOND QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410· 107 Business Mathematics Social Science 840·103 Introduction to Social Science Hospitality Management 635· 11 2 Q uantity Food Technology 635·123 Foods and Nutrition

Economics

3 3 3

4 4

3

520·100 Basic Economics Business Administration 460·213 Business Law

3

Hospitality Management 635·203 Internship 635·210 Supervisory Development 635·212 Food and Beverage Management Seminar 635 · 213 Layout and Equipment

3 3 3 3 18

17

",

3: "'tI

::J:

»

en en

-

OIXl SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs.

Health or Physicol Education (Se e Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410· 121 Principles of Accounting Hospitality Management 635·113 Advanced Food Technology 635·125 Quantity Food Purchasing 635·129 Communications in the Hospitality Industry 635·130 Human Relations in the Hospitality Industry

4 3 3 3 3 17

Cr. Hrs.

~

-0

W

Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) English or Speech (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3

Social Science 840·105 Introduction to Social Science

3

Psychology 810·102 General Psychology Chemistry 480·106 Introduction to Organic Chemistry

-z

2",

en en

:::!en

3 5 15

-4C::J:

:::!O oen 2"'t1 »-

r-~

."r-

8~

03: 3:»

»2 2»

SUMMER SESSION

Hospitality Management 635·201 Summer Field Experience

2 C en

4 4

»G")

C)",

",3: 3:'" ",2

~~


maJ

3:

"tiC

Associate in Science Degree in Business with Concentration in Hospitality Management and Emphasis on Restaurant Management A two·year Career Program designed to prepare the student for a position in restaurant management. Emphasis is on the elements of commercial production, promotion and merchandising techniques in the restaurant opera. tion . Pnsitions available to the graduate might include food service supervisor, assistant manager, night man. ager, assistant food and beverage manager, catering manager.

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FIRST QUARTER

3 3 6 4 20

Z:J:

::cO

men en:::E ~~

C!:: ::c-l

FOURTH QUARTER

3

enm -en

en en 0-

-1-1

Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Hospitality Management 635·101 Introduction to Hosp itality Management 635·102 Sanitation and Safety in Food and lodging Establishments 635·111 Food Technology Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

:J:~

~Z

~-<

Cr. Hrs.

Psychology 810·101 General Psychology Social Science 840·104 Introduction to Social Science Hospitality Management 635 · 202 Management Operations 635·211 Training Techniques for Supervisors 635·214 Food and Beverage Centrol

3 3 6 3 3 18

~3:

3:~

~~

zC) ~m C)3: mm 3: Z m-l

zi

-I


FIFTH QUARTER

SECOND QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs.

English

Economics

(See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 4 1 0- 1 07 Business Mathematics Social Science 840-103 Introduction to Social Science

Hospitality Management 635-112 Quantity Food Technology 635-124 Hotel-Motel Sales Promotion

3

3

520- 100 Basic Economics Business Administration

3

3

4 3

460-213 Business Law Hospitality Management 635-203 Internship 635-210 Supervisory Development 635-212 Food and Beverage Management Seminar 635-213 Layout and Equipment

3 3 3 3 3 18

16

ITI

~-

"OJ ZC THIRD QUARTER

»~

SIXTH QUARTER Cr . Hrs .

Health or Physical Education

Cr. Hrs .

Health or Physical Education

(See Specific Graduation Requ irements) Accounting 410-121 Principles of Accounting Hospitality Management 635-1 13 Advanced Food Technology 635-125 Quantity Food Purchasing 635-1 2 9 Communications in the Hospitality Industry 635-130 Human Relations in the Hospitality Industry

O~

(See Specific Graduation Requirements)

English or Speech 4 3 3 3 3

(See Specific Graduation Requirements)

Social Science 840-105 Introduction to Social Science Psychology 810-102 Genera I Psychology Chemistry 480- 106 Introduction to Organic Chemistry

V)Z -ITI V) V)

3 3 3 5

17

15

Zz

:::cO ITIV) V) " -t»~

C,...

:::c»-t Z-< -t~ ~»

SUMMER SESSION Cr. Hrs .

Hospitality Management 635-201 Summer Field Experience •

""

-0 VI

4

4

»Z Z» »" "ITI ITI~ ~ITI

ITIZ Z-t -tl


--c

"-J '<)

OJ

0-

en

Associate in Science Degree in Business with Concentration in Industrial Management This Career Program is tailored for individuals who are or will be working in industrial management positions where a high degree of technical engineering skills is not required . Emphasis is placed on the behavorial aspects of management rather than machines and techniques of management.

zI'T'I

en en

z

c c

en

-f ::0

» r-

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FIRST QUARTER

FOURTH QUARTER

Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410-1 11 Practical Accounting Business Administration 460· 1 0 1 Introduction to Industrial Management

3 3

4 3 10

17 3

3

Economic s

520- 100 Basic Economics

Cr. Hrs. Sociology 850- 1 0 1 Introductory Sociology Business Administration 460-121 Labor-Management Relations 460Electives *

3 16

s: » z ~ I'T'I s: I'T'I

:z -f


FIFTH QUARTER

SECOND QUARTER

Cr. Hr!. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Data Processing 490·101 Electronic Data Processing Psychology 810·101 General Psychology Humanities or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3 3

4

Cr. Hrs. Business Administrafion 460-201 Work Simplification 460-211 Production Control 460-220 Human Relations in Business 460Elective* Humanities or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3 3 3

4

3 16

3

-

3 17

tx:J

c::

en

THIRD QUARTER Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements' Psychology 810· 102 General Psychology Business Administration 460·111 Psychology of Supervision 460Elective *

3 3

3 3 3 16

: I\J

-0 '.J

z

SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs. Business Administration 460-112 Business Management 460-221 Materials Management 460Elective* Humanities or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

4 3 3

rrt

en en

z c

c::

3

"

17

*The elective(s) in Business Administration should be interpreted in relation to the career objectives of the student.

en --f

::c

:; r-

s: » z ~ rrt s: rrt Z

-I


-

tV

-0

CO

00

c: en

Associate in Science Degree in Business with Concentration in Marketing

2

This two-year curri culum is concerned with the activities performed in supplying products and services to the consuming sectors of the economy_ These activities include sales, warehousing, promotion , credit maintenance and market research. It is the responsibility of the marketing department of any company to see that the appropriate product , at the right price , is made available to the buyers in the proper quantities when demanded . Cuyahoga Community College offers specialized areas of concentration in Advertising , Retailing, Salesmanship and Wholesaling.

IT!

en en

s:: Âť :::c ~

IT!

-I

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FIRST QUARTER

2

Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3

(See Specific Graduation Requirements)

Accounting

Marketing

3

685Elective *** Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

Social Science 840-103 Introduction to Social Science

3 3 3

3 16

3 16

~

4

3

Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

410-121 Principles of Accounting Business Administ ration 460-213 Busin ess law 460-220 Human Relotions in Business

3

Business Administration 460- 108 Introduction to Business

Cr. Hrs.

Accounting

Health or Physical Education

410- 107 Business Mathematics

C')

FOURTH QUARTER


I~I

FIFTH QUARTER

SECOND QUARTER Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduatian Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Business Administration 460-112 Business Management Social Science 840-104 Introduction ta Social Science Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements)'

Cr. Hrs. Accounting

3

410-122 Principles of Accounting

4

Business Administration

4 3 3 or 4

460-214 Business Law Office Administration 830- 150 Business Communications Marketing 685Elective'" Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

14 or 15

3 3 3

4 17

THIRD QUARTER

SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs . Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Marketing 685-201 Principles of Marketing Social Science 840-105 Introduction 10 Social Science Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements)"

3

'"

685-225 Principle, of Advertising 685Electives'" Business Elective**** Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

4 6 or 7 3 3

4 16 or 17

3 4 15

-0 -0

Marketing

, Economics 520-100 or 520-161 recommended. " Speech 870·101 recommended. , •• Course selection in Marketing will depend on maior concentration. (Does not include 685·180 Cooperative Field Experience). •••• Course may be selected from (410) Accounting, (460) Business Administration, (490) Data Processing or (520) Economics.

to

C

en :z f'I"I en en

~

» :::C o

"-t f'I"I

:z C')


.~I

w

o

to

o

Associate in Science Degree in Business with Concentration in Office Administration This curriculum provides preparation for career secretaries in business, industry and government. Graduates are qualified for positions with educational institutions, law firms, medical and insurance offices, hospitals, industrial plants and business firms. Other employment opportunities exist with county, city, state and federal government agencies.

c: en :z IT! en en

o

~ ~

(")

IT!

»c

3:

:z

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE Cr. Hr>. English (See Specific Graduatian Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduatian Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410-107 Business Mathematics Office Administration 830·101 Typewriting** 830·110 Shorthand**

en

FOURTH QUARTER

FIRST QUARTER

3 3

-I

Cr. Hrs. Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410-111 Practical Accounting

3

3 3

Office Administration

3

2 3 15

830·150 Business Communications 830·200 Advanced Typewriting 830·203 Advanced Shorthand

~

-I

3 2

3 17

o

:z


FIFTH QUARTER

SECOND QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Office Administration 830·102 Typewriting** 830·105 Office Mochines 830·111 Shorthand**

Humanities, Social Sciences, or

3

Science ond Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3

2 4

Business Administration 460·220 Human Relations in Business Office Administration 830·201 Advanced Typewriting 830·204 Advanced Shorthand

3 3

3 2

3

3

14 16

Cr. H...

Cr. Hrs.

English or Speech (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Office Administration 830·103 Typewriting** 830·106 Filing and Records Control 830·112 Shorthand**

Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3

2 3

Elective Office Administration 830·202 Advanced Typewriting 830·205 Executive Shorthandt 830·250 Office Methods and Procedures

-o

2 3

." ("")

.(

I'T1

16

* English 560·101, 560·102 **

and 560·103. Speech 870·101 may be

substituted for English 560· I 03. Substitute electives if completed elsewhere.

t Arrangements

en

3 3 1

3 15

c:

zfT1

Humanities, Social Sciences, or

3

OJ

SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER

can be made for students who are specializing in legal training to take 830·206 Legal Shorthand, and for students special. izing in medical training to take 830·207 Medical Shorthand.

en en

."

:t:O

s:: Z

en -t

~(5

t.l

o ~

Z


OJ C

Associate in Science Degree in Business with Concentration in Purchasing Management

CfJ

Purchases of materials, supplies and equipment represent a large part of a business or industrial firm's total cost of operation. Purchasing, because of its importance, is often designated as a separate responsibility to be handled by one or more individuals . Purchasing agents and their assistants are responsible for obtaining raw materials, goods and services at the lowest cost consistent with required quality. The majority of the nation's purchasing personnel are employed in manufacturing firms . Many also work in government agencies, public utilities , schools and hospitals.

:z rrt CfJ CfJ

" tI

C :::0 (")

::I:

»

CfJ

:z

"s::

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FIRST QUARTER

Cr. Hr•. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) '

3

Social Science

(See Specific Graduation Requirements)

(See Elective Graduation Requirements)

Accounting

410· 107 Business Mathematics

3

Business Administration

460·108 Intraduction to Business Data Processing 490·101 Electronic Data Processing

"s::

3 3

:z

Marketing 685·201 Pri nciples of Ma rketing

4

Business Administration

3

4 16

r.r.l

Cr. Hrs. Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics

3

460·216 Introduction to Industrial Purchasing Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

» »

:z

FOURTH QUARTER

3

14

rrt rrt

-t


~I

SECOND QUARTER

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduatian Requirements)· Economics 520· 100 Basic Ecanamics** Sacial Science (See Specific Graduatian Requirements) Office Administratian 830·150 Business Cammunications Accounting 410· 121 Principles of Accounting Health ar Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3

Cr. Hrs. Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)t

3

3 3

Business Administration 460-217 Intermediate Purchasing 460-213 Busi ness Law 460· Electivet

4

3 3 3 3 3 15

to

17

c: en 2

THIRD QUARTER Cr. Hr<.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) ' Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Business Administration 460· 112 Business Management 460· Elective Accounting 410· 122 Principles of Accounting Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3 3 4 3

w o w

Business Administration 460-218 Purchasing Management 460-214 Busi ness Law 460·220 Human Relations in Business

3 3 3 15

f Psycho/ogy 810-101 and 810-102 recommended. t Student may elect a course from among offerings in the 8usiness Administration area - a course not required in this program.

en en -a

3 3

4

18

• English 560· I 0 I, 560· I 02 and Speech 870· 101 recommended. " Economics 520· 161 and 520·162 may be substituted.

Cr. Hrs. Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation RequirementsJt

fTI

SIXTH QUARTER

c:

::0

C')

:::t:

»en 2

"» ~

2

»

" fTI

~

fTI

2

-f


.r.r.ll

-

w

o

to

~

C

(J)

Associate in Science Degree in Business with Concentration in Real Estate This curriculum is designed to fulfill academic requirements leading to real estate licensure in the State of Ohio and to prepare you for a professional career in the real estate industry. Graduates of the program are qualified for positions as brokers, sales agents, real estate managers, appraisers, counselors and real estate financiers.

2

f'I"1

(J) (J)

:::c

f'I"1

l>

.IT!

(J)

E

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FIRST QUARTER

IT!

FOURTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)<'

3

Social Science

(See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3

Business Admin;stration

460·108 Introd uction to Business Real Estate 815· 101 Real Estate Principles' Elective (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3

3

3 3 6

3 15

3

16

f!!!1

Cr. Hrs. Office Administration 830·150 Business Communications Real Estate 815· 151 Real Estate Management' 815·171 Real Estate Financing' Elective (See Elective Graduation Requirements)


SECOND QUARTER

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

Eng/ish (See Specifoc Graduation Requirements)· Social Science (See Spe ~ifoc Graduation Requirements) Economicl

**

520-100 Basic Economics Real Estate 815-111 Valuation of Residential Properties' Elective (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specifoc Graduation Requirements)

3 3 3

3

Cr. Hr•. Marketing 685-201 Principles of Marketing Real Estate 815·211 Real Estate Sales' Busi"es$ Administration 460·241 Office Management Elective (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

.. 3

.. 3 14

3

16

SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER

Cr . Hrs.

Cr . Hrs. English or Speech (See Specifoc Graduation Requirements)* Socia' Science (See Specifoc Graduation Requirements) Bus;ness Administration 460·112 Business Management Real Estate 815-121 Real Estate law' Health or Physical Education (See Specifoc Graduation Requirements)

3

3 4

Real Estate 815·221 Real Estate Brokerage ' or 815·251 Valuation of Income Properties' Elective (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3

3 12

Electives+

3

°

18

* English 560· 1 I, 560-102 and Speech 870·101 recommended.

* * Economics 520· 161 may be substituted. Students wishing to earn a certificate in Real Estate, rather than a degree, are required to take the courses indicated. t Marketing 685·225, Data Processing 490·101, Real Estate 815·271 t

14

and a

basic courSe in Architectural and Construction

Technology are recommended.

Engineering

aJ

c: en :z IT1

en en

::c IT1

» r-

IT1

en

w

o

VI

E ITI


w

o

-OJ

0-

C

CJ)

Associate in Science Degree in Business with Concentration in Transportation People who help move goods and people through the air and water and over land account for a sizable seg. ment of the nation's work force . This two·year curriculum is designed to prepare students for clerical, super. visory and administrative positions with a carrier or an industrial traffic department. Career possibilities include rate analyst, traffic claims agent, terminal office manager, reservations, salesman, traffic expediter and scheduler. Employment opportunities are available with truck, bus, water, rail and air carriers.

:z I'TI

CJ) CJ)

-4

:::c l> :z CJ)

o"

:::c

~ -4 o

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FIRST QUARTER

FOURTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) ' Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410· 107 Business Mathematics Business AcJministration 460· 108 Introduction to Business Office Admin istration 830·101 Typewriting

3

3

3 3 2 15

Cr. Hrs.

Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requ irements) Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requ irements) " Office Admin istration 830· 150 Busine .. Cammunications Business Administration 460·213 Busi ne.. law 460·220 Human Relations in Business Tran sportation 900·221 Tariffs and Cla .. ifications

3 3 3 3

3 16

2


FIFTH QUARTER

SECOND QUARTER

Cr. Hrs_

Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Economics ~ 520-151 Development of th~ American Economy Transportation 900-121 Transportation Principles Business Administrati~n 460Elective

3

Humanities, Sociol Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requ irements) t

3

3 3

Business Administration

4

3

460-214 Business Law Accounting 410-111 Practical Accounting Transportation 900-222 Tariffs and Classifications

3

3 3 15

3 17

SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) * Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Marketing 685-201 Principles of Marketing Transportation 900-122 Transportation Principles

3

Business Administration 460Elective

3 4

3

3

3

3

Transportation

900-231 Transportation Regulations 900-241 Industrial Traffic Management

3 4 16

3 16

* English 560-101,560-102 and Speech 870-101 recommended.

Science and Mpthematics (See Elective Graduation Requirementslt

* * Geography 60()' 103 recommended. t Psychology 810-101 and 810-102 recommended.

DJ

c::

Humanities, Sociol Sciences, or

~

2

ITI

en en

---I

::c

Âť

2

en "'tI 0

::c

Âť--I --I 0

2


w

(')

o

:::J:

CO

r-

Associate in Science Degree in Child Care Technology

C

This curriculum is designed to prepare a student for a career as a child care worker in a child care institu tion. This worker would work directly with a group of children as a substitute parent in matters of discipline, homemaking activity and recreational activity. Knowledge of child needs and behavior as well as the development of skills in working with children are basic to the program.

:::c (')

:::I:

2:

FOURTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) * Psychology 810-101 General Psychology Health 620-101 Health Education Child Care Technology 481 -1 01 Introduction to Child Care

Humanities

3 3 3

4 3 16

rrI

-I

rrI

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FIRST QUARTER

~

(See Elective Graduation Requirements) Sociology 850-121 Marriage and Family life Child Care Technology 481-211 Child Care Techniques 481-221 Field Experience 481-231 Recreational Activities

3 3 2 7 3 18

oroC')

-<


SECOND QUARTER

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hr •.

English

Cr. Hrs.

Humanities

(See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3

Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) *

Psychology 810 - 102 General Psychology Sociology 850-101 Introductory Sociology Child Care Technology 481-102 Introduction to Child Care

3 3

(See Elective Graduation Requirements)

Child Care Technology 481-212 Child Care Techniques 481 -222 Field Ex perience 481 -241 Homemaker Activities

3 2

7 2

14

4 3 16

THIRD QUARTER

SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3

Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements)*

Psychology 810 -2 01 Child Growth and Development Child Care Technology 481-120 Child Observation

Cr. Hrs.

Humanities

3 4

(See Elective Graduation Requirements)

Child Care Technology 481-213 Child Care Techniques 481-223 Field Ex perience 481-251 Child Care Seminar

5 15 ,. Social Science 840-103, 840-104 and 840-105.

3

("')

:I: 2 7 3 15

r-

C

("')

» ::c

",

-I

ITI ("')

:I:

w

o

-0

Z 0 r0

C)

-<


w

C

o

IT1

2:

Associate in Science Degree in Dental Hygiene Dental hygienists work in private practice, in school systems ' dental health programs, for health agencies, on government research programs and as teachers. Working under the supervision of a dentist, dental hygien ists scale and polish teeth, chart abnormalities , take radiographs , apply fluoride , impart dental health information and perform other chairside and office duties. Upon successful completion of this curriculum, the student is eligible to take a licensing examination prescribed by the board of dental examiners of the state in which she chooses to practice.

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE SUMMER SESSION Health or Physical Education (See Sp"ciAc Groduatian Requirements) Speech 870-101 Fundamentals of Speech Cammunication Sociolagy 850-101 lntroductary Sociology Psychology 810-101 General Psychology Dental Hyg iene 500-200 Clinical Dental Hygiene

Requirements for Acceptance: 1. Matriculatian in Cuyahaga Community College.

2. High school graduate with at least a "C" average . 3. Dental Hygiene Aptitude Test (Navember and February). 4 . Completian af Dental Hygiene. applicatian . 5 . Campletian af entrance requirements by May 15.

Cr. Hrs.

4 4

3

2 14

FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs. Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requ irements) Biology 440-121 Principles of Medicol Science 440-128 Anatomy and Physiology Dental Hygiene 500-101 Preclin ical Dental Hygiene 500-102 Heod and Neck Anatomy and Tooth Morphology 500-103 Oral Hygiene

4 4 2 4 2

FOURTH QUARTER Social Science (See Spedf1c Graduatian Requirements) ** Dietary Technology 505 -1 21 Faods and Nutritian Dental Hygiene 500-201 Clinical Dental Hygiene 500 -202 Periodontics 500-203 Pharmacology and Anesthesiology 500-205 Dental Assisting 500-206 Dental Health Education

Cr. Hrs.

3 4 4 2 4 2

17 20

~ r

:I:

-<

G')

IT1

2:

IT1


.NI

FIFTH QUARTER

SECOND QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. English 560·101 College Composition Health or Physical Education (See Specific Groduation Requirements) Biology 440·129 Anatomy and Physiology* Dental Hygiene 500· 111 Preclinical Dental Hygiene 500·112 Head and Neck Anatomy ond Tooth Morphology 500· 113 Oral Hygiene 500· 114 General and Oral Histology

3

4 2

4 3

Socicll Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) ** Biology 440·221 Microbiology Dental Hygiene 500·210 Public Health 500·211 Clinical Dental Hygiene 500·224 Dental Health Education Health Technology 624·223 First Aid

3 4

2

5 2 2

2

18 19

SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER

Cr. Hrs .

Cr. Hr>. English 560·102 College Composition Biology 440·130 Anatomy and Physiology * Dental Hygiene 500·130 Dental Materials 500·13'1 Clinical Dental Hygiene 500· 13 2 Radiology 500·134 General and Oral Pathology

3

4 5 3

3 2

20

* Should be taken on the Metropolitan Campus. ** Social Science 840·103, 840·104 and 840·105.

Social Science (See Speciijc Graduation Requirements) ** Dental Hygiene 500·230 Dental Specialties 500·231 Clinical Dental Hygiene 500·234 Dental Ethics and Jurisprudence 500·235 Dental Office Management Psychology 810· 102 General Psychology

3

5 5 3 1

3 20

C

1"1

Z

~

r-

:x: -<

-Z

C')

1"1 w

1"1


_nell w

C

~

ITI

Associate in Science Degree in Dietary Technology The dietary technician is employed by hospitals, nursing homes, extended care facilities, clinics and other related health care agencies that provide institutional food services . The dietary technician supervises dietary food production - including nutrition, diet therapy and food services administration - under the direction of an American Dietetic Dietitian .

~ -<

::c

-f

ITI

n

J:

2

oro

Q ~

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE

FIRST QUARTER

FOURTH QUARTER

Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology 440-128 Anatomy and Physiology Dietary Technology 505-101 Dietary Technician Orientation 505-121 Foods and Nutrition 505-135 Dietary Quantity Food Production

3 4 2

4 3 16

Cr. Hrs. Psychology 810-1 1 Genera I Psychology Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health 620-101 Health Education Dietary Technology 505-221 Advanced Nutrition and Meal Planning

3 3 4

4 14


FIFTH QUARTER

SECOND QUARTER

Cr_ Hr•.

Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Hospitality Management 635·132 Sanitation and Safety in Food and Lodging Establishments Chemistry 480-109 Introduction to Biochemistry Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Dietary Technology 505-136 Dietary Quantity Food Production

3

3

5 3

Psychology (See Social Science Elective Graduation Requirements) Economics 520-100 Basic Economics Speech 870-101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication Dietary Technology 505-222 Geriatric Nutrition 505-241 Dietary Technician Seminar

3

3 3 4

4 3 17

17

SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER

Cr. Hr•.

Cr. Hr•. Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Mathematics 690-100 Allied Heolth Sciences Mathematics Industrial Supervision 650-121 Elements of Supervision Dietary Technology 505-122 Nutrition and Diet Therapy

3 4

3

Hospitality Management 635-213 Layout and Equipment Dietary Technology 505-235 Dietary Quantity Food Procedures 505-236 Dietary Organization and Management Procedure. 505-251 Dietary Technician Seminar

3 3 3 3

4

12 14

-C

IT!

-I

» ::c -<

-I

IT! ("')

SUMMER SESSION Cr. Hrs. Dietary Technology 505-141 Dietary Technician Field Experience

w w

5 5

::I: Z

0 r0

~


w

/TI

Âť

~

::0

r-

Associate in Science Degree in Early Childhood Education

-<

The Early Childhood Education Program is designed for those who wish to teach preschool children in preschool centers of all kinds. The curriculum is conceived to give students a basic understanding of principles of nursery education and child development as well as specific skills in planning and conducting nursery school activities. Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared to take charge of preschool groups, working under the supervision of preschool education directors. This program is not intended to train students for state teacher certification as elementary school teachers.

C")

:::I:

r-

C :::I:

o o C

/TI

C C

C")

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FIRST QUARTER

~

Cr. Hr.. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology 810-101 General Psychology Sociology 850-101 Introductory Sociology Early Childhood Education 730-101 Early Childhood Education

o 2

FOURTH QUARTER

3 3

4

4 14

Cr. Hr,. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)*** Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Socicl Science 840-104 Introduction to Social Science Psychology 810-207 Behavior Modif1cation Early Childhood Education 730-121 Literoture for Eorly Childhood 730-123 Science for Eorly Childhood

3

3

4 3 3 17


SECOND QUARTER

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

Science

(See Specific Gradu~tion Requirements)" Psychology 810-102 General Psychology Early Childhood Education 730-102 Early Childhood Education 730-120 Early Language Development 730-124 Music for Early Childhood

3 or 4 3 .4 3 3

Cr. Hrs. Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science 840-105 Introduction to Social Science Early Childhood Education 730-220 Child Management 730-230 Early Childhood Practicum

3 or 4 3 3

5

16 or 17 15 or 16

SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. English (See SpeciAc Graduation Requirements) Science or Mathematics (See Specific Graduation Requirements)** Psychology 810-201 Child Growth and Development Early Childhood Education 730-122 Art for Early Childhood 730-125 Music for Early Childhood

3

3 or 4

4 3 3

Health or Phy'sical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Sociology 850-121 Marriage and Family Life or 850- 102 Social Institutions Dietory Technology 505-121 Foods and Nutrition Early Childhood Education 730-221 Early Childhood Relationships 730-231 Early Childhood Practicum

r-

oo(

3 or 4

lJI

C")

::J: 4

r-

C ::J:

2 5

o o

15 or 16

ITI

C

C C

• A Laboratory Science is preferable for those who plan to transfer to a four-year college_

W

»

::0

16 or 17

" One year of Science and minimum competency in Mathematics are required for graduation . If necessary, one quarter of Mathematics may be substituted for one quarter of Science.

ITI

" 'Speech 870-101 is strongly recommended a s the last quarter in the English sequence, unless the student plans to transfer to a four-year college.

C")

»-I

o 2


W

IT1

r-

0..

IT1 (")

Associate in Science Degree in Electrical-Electronic Engineering Technology

-f

The needs of an expanding and increasingly complex technological age have greatly intensified the demand for technicians to assist engineers and scientists. Career opportunities exist in a broad range of electricalelectronic fields. They are to be found in aerospace research, in communications, with manufacturers of electrical equipment, and with electric light and power companies. Potential positions include electrical or electronic engineering aide, motor test technician, instrument technician, technical writer and commun ications specialist.

::c (")

» rI

IT1

r-

IT1 (")

-f

::c o 2

o IT1

:z c;, :z

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FOURTH QUARTER

FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Electrica/·Electronic Engineering Technology 540-100 Electrical-Electronic Orientation 550-125 Electric Circuits Engineering 550-121 Engineering Drawing Mathematics 690-102 Algebra ' Physics 780-101 Introductory Physics

3

2 3 3

3

Cr. Hr •. Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Economics 520-100 Basic Economics Electrical-Electronic Engineering Technology 540-250 Industrial Electronics 540-260 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits 540-262 Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation

3 3 3 3 3

4 16 18

IT1 IT1

::c :z c;, -f

IT1 (")

:J:

:z

o

5

c;,

-<


fiFTH QUARTER

SECOND QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Mathematics 690-105 Trigonometry Engineering 550-112 Engineering Report Construction

3

Electricol-Electronic Engineering Technology 540-126 Electric Circuits 540-140 Direct Current Machines

3 3

3

-4

Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology 810-101 General Psychology Electrical-Electronic Engineering Technology 540-235 Communication Transmission 540-251 Industrial Electronics 540-252 logic, Pulse and Switching Circuitry 540-261 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits

3 3 3 3 3 3

",

r-

",

(")

-f ::0

c=5 ~

18

r:-

",

r-

",

(")

17

-f ::0

o Z

(") SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Mathematics 690-115 College Algebro

3 -4

Electrical-Electronic Engineering Technology

540-127 Electric Circuits 540-150 Alternating Current Machines 540-160 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits

3 3 3 16

w 'I

* Students

may begin the Mathematics sequence at a depending upon prior accomplishments in this area.

higher level

",

Cr. Hrs_

Cr . Hrs . Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology 810-102 General Psychology Healfh or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Eleclrical-Electronic Engineering Technology 540-211 Electrical Construction and Application 540-236 Communication Transmission 540-253 Computer Circuitry 540-263 Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation

3 3

Z

C')

Z ", ",

::0 Z

C') 2

3 3 3 18

-f

", (")

:J:

Z or-

oC')

-<


w "'T1

00

:::Q

Associate in Science Degree in Fire Technology This curriculum offers a balanced and broad education to students who plan to enter fire service as a career. It also helps active firemen upgrade themselves for advancement within the service. Included are such specialized areas of instruction as fire prevention, inspection, fire protection systems and municipal public relations .

"" n"" ::r: -I

2

or-

o C') -<

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FIRST QUARTER

FOURTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requ irements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Mathematics 690.101 Algebra ' fire Technology 570· 1 00 Introduction to Fire Science

3 3

3

Cr. Hrs. Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) fire Technology 570·211 Fire·Fighting Command and Administration 570·230 Fire Prevention Practices Industrial Supervision 650·111 Practical Psychology for Supervisors Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3 3 3 3

3

3 15 13


SECOND QUARTER

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. H...

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Physics 780·10 1 Introd uctory Physics Fire Technology 570-110 Fire-Fighting Tactics Elective

3 3

Cr. Hrs. Humanities or Social Science's (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Fire Technology 570 -220 Chemistry of Hazardous Materials 570-;23 I Fire Prevention Practices 570-235 Fire Investigation Methods Elective

"

3 3 3 3 3 15

3 3 17

SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER Cr. Hrs. Speech (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Fire Technology 570-120 Fi re Protection Systems 570-210 Fire-Fighting Command 570-2 4 0 Fire Hydraulics

.. 3

3 3 3 17

• Students may begin the Mathematics sequence at a higher level depending upon prior accomplishments in this area . W

-0

Cr. Hrs. Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Fire Technology 570-236 Fire Investigation Methods 570-250 Municipal Public Relations 570-260 Personnel Training Methods Elective

3 3 3 4 3 16

"TI

;Q ", ~

", (")

:J:

Z

0 r0

G'>

-<


_I~. I I

>c;, Z::c C>

W "-l