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(Admissions and Records, phone 241-5365) Huron Building 626 Huron Rd.

Brownell Building 2214 E. 14 St. Science and Technology Building 2900 Community College Ave. Cleveland, O. 44115

(Evening Only) Charles F. Brush High School Mayfield and Evanston Rds. Lyndhurst, O. 44124

CAMPUS (Admissions and Records, phone 845-5400) 7300 York Rd. Parma, O. 44130

SOUTHEASTERN ACADEMIC CENTER (Evening Only) East Junior High School Broadway and Lee Rd. Maple Heights, O. 44137

2123 9 St. Cleveland, O. 44115

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OHIO'S FIRST PUBLIC COMMUNITY COLLEGE


Calendar of Instruction 19 -1969 The 1968-69 academic year marks the inauguration of the quarter calendar of instruction at Cuyahoga Community College. The College previously followed a semester calendar. The conversion to the quarter system has been carried out in such a way that returning students will receive full credit for those semester credits which they have already earned. Under the quarter calendar, the regular academic year is divided into three terms - to be called the Fall quarter, the Winter quarter and the Spring quarter - plus a Summer session. The new quarter calendar will make no significant difference in the total length of the regular academic year (September to June), but many changes have been made in such matters as refund deadlines and withdrawal dates. This calendar is designed primarily for day students. Evening students should consult the Evening Bulletin - published several weeks in advance of each quarter - for course offerings, registration schedules and other information.

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QUARTER 1968 Aug. I-Sept. 6 Aug. 19-30 Sept. 18-20, 23 Sept. 18, 19, 21, 23 Sept. 26 Oct. 16 Oct. 30 Oct. 31 Nov. 27

Nov. Dec. Dec. Dec.

27 2 9 13

Dec. 16

Mail registrations accepted Early registration Day student registration Evening student registration Classes begin Last day for course withdrawal without official record Last day to remove "I" (incomplete) grades from Spring semester, 1968, and Summer session, 1968 Mid -quarter academic warning notice to be mailed Last day for course withdrawal with automatic "W" (withdrawal) grade - students may not withdraw from courses after this date Thanksgiving recess begins after last class Classes resume Final examination period begins End of Fall quarter -last day of final examination period Final grades due in the Office of Admissions and Records by noon

WINTER QUARTER 1968-69 Nov. 18-Dec. 13 Nov. 18-Dec. 6 Dec. 19, 20-J an. 2 Dec. 18, 19, 21-Jan. 2

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Mail registrations accepted Early registration Day student registration Evening student registration


Jan. 7 Jan. 24 Feb. 7 Feb. 7 Feb. 7 Mar. 4

Mar. 14 Mar. 20 Mar. 21

Classes begin Last day for course withdrawal without official record Last day to remove "I" (incomplete) grades from Fall quarter, 1968 Mid -quarter academic warning notice to be mailed Last day to file intent for graduation in June, 1969 Last day for course withdrawal with automatic "W" (withdrawal) grade - students may not withdraw from courses after this date Final examination period begins End of Winter quarter -last day of final examination period Final grades due in the Office of Admissions and Records by noon

SPRING 1969 Feb. 19-Mar. 18 Feb. 19-Mar. 11 Mar. 27-29 Apr. 1 Apr. 22 May 6 May 7 May 29

May 30,31 June 9 June 13 June 13 June 16

Mail registrations accepted Early registration Registration for day and/or evening students Classes begin Last day for course withdrawal without official record Last day to remove "I" (incomplete) grades from Winter quarter, 1968-69 Mid -quarter academic warning notice to be mailed Last day for course withdrawal with automatic "W" (withdrawal) grade - students may not withdraw from courses after this date Memorial Day vacation Final examination period begins End of Spring quarter - last day of final examination period Commencement Final grades due in the Office of Admissions and Records by noon~

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Board of Trustees (Left to right, top to bottom) Mr. Frank L. Kelker, Chairman Mrs. Thomas H. Ham, Vice Chairman

Mr. David R. Forrest Mr. Robert L. Lewis Mr. Thomas O. Matia Mr. Arthur B. McBride, Jr. Mr. James E. O'Meara Dr. Webster G. Simon Mr. Robert E. Wendling

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Charles E. Chapman President

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Dan te N. Biello Vice President of Finance and Business Affairs

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Alfred M. Livingston Executive Vice President

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Charles N. Pappas Vice President and Director of the Metropolitan Campus

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Dell Reed Vice President and Director of the Western Campus

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Cleveland: NOW! Cleveland: NOW! means action. The entire Greater Cleveland community is moving on all fronts to meet the social and economic problems which beset America's urban centers: • Education • Employment opportunities ., Youth resources • Neighborhood rehabilitation • Health and welfare • Economic revitalization It

Downtown development

• Planning for the future Cleveland: NOW! is working in a concerted effort to cure its pressing big city ills. It is in the throes of a multi-million-dollar Renaissance-fanning out in all directions from the Public Square and the dominant Terminal Tower thrusting forward to secure its dominant place in the forefront of America's great metropolises. The face of Greater Cleveland is undergoing a remarkable transformation from the inner city to suburban outreaches on the east and west shores of Lake Erie. Outcroppings of steel, masonry and glass are adding new dimensions to the profile. Upon viewing the downtown building boom, French banker Baron Guy Rothschild exclaimed, "Cleveland seems to be the center of everything - the Erieview rebuilding is fantastic." Billboards exhort area residents to "brag a little about Cleveland." And the cosmopolitan admixture of 2.1 million people has plenty of talking points. Consider that: More than 52 per cent of the American and Canadian people live within 500 miles of Cleveland and environs. Within this arc are 59 per cent of America's manufacturing industries. The annual value of Cleveland's manufactured products exceeds $ 7 billion. Cleveland, world port, is first in tonnage on the St. Lawrence Seaway as a handler of general cargo. It's a thriving hub of Midwestern rail, bus and truck traffic. Its Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, minutes from downtown Cleveland via rapid transit or freeway, is a bustling link with the world. Its Burke Lakefront Airport is one of the nation's few downtown commuter airfields.

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Cleveland, a city of many "firsts", has long been a pioneer in social work, medicine, health and city planning. It gave birth to the community chest concept. It is the home of the nation's first supplementary education center and first health museum. The "open shelves" system was born here at the nation's second largest library. The Mall plan and Shaker Heights have been models for the country. The "Emerald Necklace" of woodland parks is the envy of other urban centers. Cleveland's University Circle has the largest concentration of cultural and educational facilities in the world. Within this "Modern Athens" are Severance Hall, home of the renowned Cleveland Orchestra, the Cleveland Museum of Art, Case Western Reserve University, the Museum of Natural History, the Garden Center, Western Reserve Historical Society, Thompson Auto Museum and scores of other institutions.

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Leisuretime activities abound with a full calendar of offerings by the Cleveland Browns, Cleveland Indians and Cleveland Stokers at the 80,000seat Municipal Stadium. Tennis to tobogganing, boating to bocce - Cleveland has it. The Play House, Karamu Theatre and Great Lakes Shakespeare Festival offer excellent repertory theatre and Cleveland boasts a lively straw hat circuit. The Metropolitan Opera visits Cleveland annually and the Hanna Theatre offers the best of Broadway. Greater Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, U.S.A., long has been a bustling Midwestern domain of manufacturing, business, agriculture (the "Greenhouse Center of the World"), graphic arts, advertising, transportation, finance, distribution, wholesaling and warehousing. Amassed here is America's fourth largest concentration of industrial, scientific and medical research. Cleveland: NOW! has come a long way since General Moses Cleaveland selected it as an ideal site for a fur-trading center in 1796. Cleveland built the world's first central power station and was the first to electrically light its streets. The nation's first electric streetcars ran in Cleveland. The National Air Races and the Great Lakes Exposition thrilled millions here. Many of the nation's first automobiles were manufactured in Cleveland and this area is now number one in the manufacture of auto parts. A new Convention Center, the nation's largest, attracts millions of visitors annually. Greater Cleveland, aware that education is the watchword for a brighter tomorrow, is on the move. It was into this climate of "now" that Cuyahoga Community College was born in 1963 - a community-oriented institution concerned with and responsive to the social and economic problems of one of America's major metropolitan areas. Greater Cleveland's commitment to education for tomorrow will soon be nearer realization when Tri-C's innovative Metropolitan Campus in downtown Cleveland is completed. Cleveland State University, also young and on the grow, is progressing through the first phase of its huge development and building program. Cleveland: TOMORROW! is as bright with promise as its heritage is proud. Its location, its people have helped make Greater Cleveland a great place for learning.

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ctives

Cuyahoga Community College is dedicated to the concept that the individual talent and fibre of America's citizenry constitute the nation's most valuable resource. The College, therefore, has committed itself to extend broad educational opportunities to the youth and adults of its community. It has established the corollary requirement of high performance from all those who participate in its programs. In pursuit of these objectives, the College offers a diverse and wellconceived curriculum. It maintains a staff of superior instructors whose prime duties revolve around their teaching assignments. It has accepted the challenge of providing an environment conducive to learning, with special emphasis on library and laboratory resources. The College encourages independence of thought and action as essential ingredients of a functioning democracy, stressing the development of value judgment and self-discipline. Cuyahoga Community College expects all students to achieve competence in the fundamental processes of reading, writing, speakin~, listening and computation. All students are expected to develop an appreciation of the scientific method in the solution of problems. Another prime concern of the College is that students develop an awareness of the unique values that are our national heritage, including the primacy of moral and spiritual concerns. Axiomatically, the College expects its students to manifest an increasing sensitivity to those responsibilities inherent in American citizenship. As one way of fulfilling these responsibilities, the College seeks to inspire each student to achieve and maintain a high level of occupational proficiency. Furthermore, Cuyahoga Community College expects all students to

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show their respect for this educational opportunity through appropriate behavior. Students are to maintain regular attendance, display exemplary conduct, and apply themselves diligently in the quest for the wisdom and knowledge upon which their contributions to society will be based. Planning and policy-making by the Trustees of the College have been consistent with the purposes and objectives of the two-year college. Specifically, the Official Plan for Cuyahoga Community College, adopted by the Board of Trustees on Nov. 28, 1962, sets forth the following student objectives: 1. To see his cultural heritage in its historical perspective. 2. To live effectively in accordance with the conditions of his physical environment.

3. To recognize and guard the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in a free society. 4. To guide his life by sound moral and spiritual values. 5. To appreciate and participate in creative activities.

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6. To achieve satisfactory personal, social and community relationships. 7. To apply critical and discriminating thought to the solution of problems. 8. To accept responsibility for his decisions. 9. To develop the basic skills of communication. 10. To enjoy the benefits of a rewarding and productive vocation. 11. To acquire a positive attitude toward, and strengthened foundation for, lifelong learning.


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Philosophy of the College Cuyahoga Community College's statement of philosophy was developed by faculty members and administrative personnel in the Spring of 1964. The College commits itself to the following philosophy: As our culture becomes increasingly complex, we must provide educational opportunities beyond those afforded by the secondary schoolsopportunities that are easily available, geographically and financially, to any citizen who can profit from them. This premise has particular significance in a free society such as ours because we feel that the preservation and development of any culture depends upon the enlightenment and the participation of its members - upon their ability to make choices and accept responsibilities. Consistent with this belief, the College is unique in that - while it is sensitive to the peculiar natural and social forces affecting members of this community, and to the differing interests and needs of these people it is aware also of the elements of learning common to them all. The College, then, welcomes those who wish to develop abilities and prepare for responsibilities beyond their present experiences; whether such students plan to continue in senior colleges, pursue vocational or professional programs, or undertake studies to broaden their vision. In addition to furthering the students' objectives, we will undertake to excite their intellectual curiosity; give them a better understanding and appreciation of themselves and of their environment; help them evaluate objectively new ideas and concepts; and, finally, encourage them to develop their reasoning, to cultivate self-discipline, and to respect them.: selves and others. Inasmuch as learning extends beyond the scope of the classroom and the campus, the College strives to promote the intellectual activities of the community and to exert its every energy to enrich the culture of the area which it serves. This philosophy will be implemented by a continuing pursuit of academic and teaching excellence.

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Purposes of the College Cuyahoga Community College exists through the support of the county and state in which it resides. As a locally controlled and administered institution, the College is especially attuned to its own communityCuyahoga County.

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This close identification with its home area, one of the prime advantages of the comprehensive community college, leads to a diversity of educational, occupational and cultural offerings designed specifically to meet the needs of the area's residents. Some of these offerings are traditional or conventional, but many represent a bold and imaginative step beyond the ordinary. Recognizing that students differ greatly in experience, needs, capacities, aspirations and interests, the College pursues the following major purposes: 1. Academic preparation for advanced formal study.

The Arts and Sciences curriculum at Cuyahoga Community College includes those courses normally taken in the first two years of a traditional fouryear Bachelor's degree program. The student may follow this University Parallel sequence for one or two years, and then transfer as a sophomore or junior to a four-year institution to continue working toward his Bachelor's degree.

2. Career preparation. A broad range of technological, business and other occupational offerings are available at the College. Course sequences prepare students for careers in fields where increasingly critical manpower shortages exist. The Career Program at Tri-C also offers courses for those who wish to refresh or improve their present skills. 3. Community services-adult education. As a result of its close identification with the needs of the community, the College is able to provide representative cultural, educational and occupational offerings as determiried by public interest. Community services are offered in cooperation with other educational institutions, business, labor, government, health agencies, individuals and organi~ zations within the community. 4. General education. A prime concern of the College is the imparting of the knowledge, skills and attitudes needed by each individual if he is to be effective as a person, as a member of a family, as a worker and as a citizen in a free society. 5. Educational and occupational counseling. Comprehensive counseling service is stressed to assist both full-time and part-time students in the selection and pursuit of goals compatible with their interests, aptitudes and values.

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History of Cuyahoga Community College Cuyahoga Community College, Ohio's first public community college, is a two-year institution serving Greater Cleveland and environs. The College was chartered by the State of Ohio on Dec. 5, 1962, following the creation of the Cuyahoga Community College District by the Cuyahoga County Board of Commissioners. On Sept. 23, 1963, Tri-C opened its doors to some 3,000 full-time and part-time students. This was the largest opening-day enrollment figure in the history of the flourishing junior college movement, which now numbers more than 800 two-year colleges across the nation. The College's instructional program got underway in the Brownell Building, leased from the Cleveland Board of Education. The building had seen lengthy service as an elementary school and later as a junior high school. Brownell was renovated and equipped through the generous support of individual donors, foundations, business, labor and industry. Acceptance of the College's evening classes for part-time students necessitated the acquisition of additional space. Arrangements were made with two suburban school districts South Euclid-Lyndhurst and Parma to utilize classrooms for evening instruction at Valley Forge and Brush High Schools. In September of 1964, a third evening Academic Center was added at East Junior High School in Maple Heights. Growing enrollments soon made it necessary for the College to expand its facilities in downtown Cleveland. Additional space was leased in the Huron Building as well as in the Gallo Building, Huron Building Annex and other buildings. The year 1966 was one of tremendous significance for Cuyahoga Community College. That September, Tri-C became a truly multi-campus operation with the opening of the Western Campus on the site of the former Crile Veterans Administration Hospital in Parma-Parma Heights. Western's initial enrollment of almost 2,800 helped push the College's total student body to 10,600.

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But 1966 would see still another important stride in the College's growth. That October, just one month after the opening of the Western Campus, ground was broken for a $32 million permanent Metropolitan Campus learning facility in downtown Cleveland. Located on a 40-acre site in the St. Vincent area, the new megastructure will accommodate some 15,000 full-time and part-time students by the early 1970's. In February of 1967, the College took a decisive step forward in its relationship to Greater Cleveland's educational community with the joint publication of Agenda for Action by Tri-C and Cleveland State University. The document outlined specific areas of cooperation between the two institutions, with the goal of diversification in public higher education. The College also has continued to strengthen its interinstitutional bonds with other colleges and universities throughout the state. Cuyahoga Community College has more than fulfilled the expectations of those who envisioned it here as long ago as 1953. It has achieved membership in the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. A faculty of highly qualified and proficient instructors continues to enlarge, and enrollment projections forecast even greater demands on the College. The community has continued to assist in its development with approval at the polls of operating and development funds, and with contributions to the College scholarship funds. Responding to the sociological and economic needs of a community on the move, the College in the 1960's demonstrated a firm commitment to the broadening of educational opportunities for every resident of Cuyahoga County. During the decade of tomorrow, Cuyahoga Community College will further intensify its efforts to place the means of education before all of its home area's youth and adults.

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_ _- - - - - - - - - -

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The College Seal The Cuyahoga Community College seal incorporates symbols which represent the concept of "lifelong learning" as well as the political and economic segments which the College serves. The upper portion depicts the Cleveland skyline, visible from many points of Cuyahoga County. The lower portion embodies particulars from the Great Seal of the State of Ohio. The Torch of Learning, circumscribed by the symbol of nuclear energy, represents utilization of research and modern instructional techniques. The communications satellite, Telstar, stresses the importance of communication as an essential of all learning activity at Cuyahoga Community College.

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Accreditation Cuyahoga Community College is an accredited member of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. The College also holds membership in the following organizations: American Association of Junior Colleges Council of North Central Junior Colleges Council of Ohio Community-Junior Colleges American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers Cleveland Commission on Higher Education Ohio Colleges Association (Associate Member)

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College Facilities

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Metropolitan Campus During the 1968-69 academic year, the Metropolitan Campus takes the first step in occupying its new $32 million facility at 2900 Community College Ave., in the St. Vincent area of downtown Cleveland. An estimated 3,000 students in the Career Program, with accompanying faculty and staff members, are expected to attend day and evening classes during the Fall quarter in the Science and Technology Building. The operation will be a self-sustaining unit, including library and food services and all instructional facilities needed for selected areas of the" Career Program. The Maintenance and Operations Building, which will serve the entire campus, also is scheduled to open in September of 1968. The Administration Building should be ready for occupancy in January of 1969. The Metropolitan Campus will rely on leased space to meet the remainder of its classroom and office needs during the 1968-69 academic year. The Brownell Building, where the College first began operation in 1963, is located at 2214 E. 14 St., between Sumner Ave. and Bronson Ct. Brownell contains classrooms, faculty offices, laboratories and a little theatre.

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Facilities at the Huron Building, 626 Huron Rd., include classrooms and student lounges, cafeteria, bookstore, library, faculty and administrative offices, the Computation Center and the Educational Media Center. Student Services and the Office of Admissions and Records are quartered on the fifth floor. A number of administrative offices, plus Student Services and the Office of Admissions and Records, are expected to be relocated in the new Administration Building during the latter portion of the 196869 academic year.

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Western Campus On Sept. 19,1966, Cuyahoga Community College brought a comprehensive day and evening program of public higher education to the 400,000 residents of Greater Cleveland's western and southwestern sectors. The spacious Western Campus in Parma-Parma Heights opened its doors with nearly 2,800 full- and part-time students. By the Spring of 1968, enrollment was close to the 4,000 mark. Offerings at Tri-C Western include the Arts and Sciences curriculum, and concentrations in a variety of career-oriented technological and business areas. The Western Campus also makes available, within its Community Services Program, a full range of credit and non-credit courses which reflect the community's special needs and interests. Western is located on the site of the former Crile Veterans Administration Hospital at 7300 York Rd., Parma. A total of 130 acres and some 60 buildings comprise the campus, which was assigned to the College by the federal government for a nominal transfer fee early in 1966. During

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the Summer of 1966, extensive renovation and equipping were completed to ready the facility for College instruction. With the exception of the gymnasium building, the entire Western facility is interconnected by covered, lighted hallways. The focal point of the Western Campus is the Triatrium, the area where the three major traffic corridors converge. Located near the Triatrium are the campus library, cafeteria, bookstore, auditorium and the Instructional Services Center. In addition to a large number of classrooms and instructionallaboratories, facilities include the various administrative offices, Student Services, a theatre building and several outdoor athletic fields. Faculty offices, staf~ conference rooms and student lounges are located throughout the campus. Other features include a non-denominational chapel, an art gallery, archery and karate rooms, a coffee house and a recreational area known as The Wheel.

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PARKING AND PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION Metropolitan Campus Student parking is not currently available on the Metropolitan Campus premises. Metered on-street parking is permitted nearby at times designated by the City of Cleveland. Space is also available at the municipal Lakefront and St. Vincent lots for a nominal daily fee. Additional downtown parking is available at several private garages and lots near the campus. All buildings of the Metropolitan Campus are convenient to public transportation as well as to the freeway system. Beginning in the Fall of 1968, a special "loop" bus will make regularly scheduled runs between the Terminal Tower and the new Metropolitan Campus site. Western Campus Student parking for some 900 automobiles is provided on the Western Campus grounds. The Cleveland Transit System buses operate to the Western Campus.


LIBRARY The library at each campus acts as a service to the instructional area. I t is maintained for the benefit of students and faculty members. Supplemental materials are part of the collection assembled through the cooperative efforts of the faculty and library staff. Both campus libraries provide a computer print-out book catalogue. This universal catalogue replaces the traditional card catalogue. It makes available the collection of the entire College library system to all students. The library maintains open stacks to allow direct access to books and periodicals. Other facilities include play-back equipment for tapes and other recordings, microfilm readers, photographic devices for reproducing printed matter and enclosures for individual study. Recognizing that accessibility is one of the prime requisites of a library, the Metropolitan Campus has arranged to provide special library service to those students occupying the Science and Technology Building at the new campus site. Individual subject matter sections will include all required materials, although students are encouraged to make use of the main Metro library in the Huron Building as well.

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION The College offers a program of physical education designed to develop an understanding and appreciation of bodily fitness, to improve the student's recreational skills, and to increase his poise and social competency. Leased facilities utilized by the Metropolitan Campus include gymnasiums, an Olympic-size swimming pool, lockers and showers. Western Campus athletic facilities include a gymnasium and various exercise and gymnastics rooms. Students use off-campus facilities for swimming classes.


FOOD SERVICES Metropolitan Campus The Huron Building cafeteria serves hot meals and snack bar items daily. In addition, vending machines dispense beverages, sandwiches and snacks at the Brownell Building. Students occupying the new Science and Technology Building during the 1968-69 academic year are scheduled to be served by a temporary cafeteria located on the first floor of the Maintenance and Operations Building. Western Campus Hot meals are served in the cafeteria, located off the Triatrium. Vending machines for beverages and snacks are in the cafeteria and the recreation area.

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Cuyaho Community College: TOMORR W Projections for the entire Cuyahoga Community College District indicate that Tri-C can expect a total enrollment of approximately 20,000 by 1970. To meet the needs of this exploding student population, the College in 1965 began detailing its 1962 plans for development of a multi-campus operation consisting of a centrally located Metropolitan Campus, a Western Campus and an Eastern Campus. In 1966, the College implemented these plans with the opening of a second facility serving day and evening, full- and part-time students the Western Campus. Preliminary planning is now underway to replace the temporary structures on this Parma-Parma Heights campus with new buildings to serve an eventual Tri-C Western enrollment expected to exceed 10,000. Looking to the east, the College is moving to identify a site for a campus which will serve the populous eastern segment of the county. Forty acres of prime land in downtown Cleveland, where aging commercial buildings and tenements once stood, now are being transformed into a resplendent ten-block-long center of higher learning - the College's first permanent facility, the Metropolitan Campus.

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Groundbreaking for Tri-C Metro took place in the Fall of 1966. The Science and Technology Building - the largest structure in gross area is scheduled to open in September of 1968. The entire campus is expected to be ready for occupancy by 1970. The $32 million complex will extend from E. 24 to E. 33 Sts. and from Woodland to Community College Aves. (formerly Scovill), near the St. Vincent area municipal parking lot. It is accessible via freeway from the east, west and south. This space-age megastructure has been designed to accommodate 15,000 students and is conceived as a stimulating academic environment which will enrich the entire community. It will be a center for clinics, public meetings, symposiums, lectures, orchestral and choral concerts, recitals, films, plays, operas, art shows, intercollegiate athletic contests and many other events. Ultramodern and proven electronic teaching and learning equipment will be utilized, including closed circuit television and a motion picture studio. Buildings will float on a platform with parking space underneath. The units will be harmoniously arranged around student courts with study and leisure areas. The center of the architectural focus will be an inner court with fountain and pool for warm-weather cooling and Winter ice skating. The central and dominant structure will be the six-story Library and Computation Center. Students will traverse the "all-weather" campus via heated underground corridors or heated open walkways through the spacious inner courts.


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Tri-C Metro Campus units include: College Administration and Student Services Building Humanities Building Science and Technology Building Music and Art Center Health and Physical Education Center Drama and Educational Media Center Student Center and Cafeteria Maintenance and Operations Building Library and Computation Center Bookstore These new dimensions in public higher education were hailed in 1966 as one of the nation's outstanding examples of "excellence in the design and development of college facilities." The College was the sole Ohio institution honored in the first annual Design Award Program for Higher Education Facilities, co-sponsored by the United States Office of Education, the American Institute of Architects, and Education Facilities Laboratories, Inc. There were a total of 258 institutions in the competition and only 27 awards were made.

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Programs of Instruction Cuyahoga Community College offers three major programs of instruction. The Arts and Sciences Program provides the first two years of a traditional college curriculum. Included in these offerings are University Parallel sequences which allow transfer to four-year colleges and universities. The Career Program is designed to fulfill the unique employment requirements of this community. The Community Services Program provides representative cultural, educational, occupational and avocational offerings as determined by community interest and need.

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Arts and Sciences Program The Arts and Sciences Program provides a wide range of course offerings in the Liberal Arts for all students at the College. Some students only take several courses in the program, but many enroll in the two-year sequences leading to the Associate in Arts degree. A large number of students in the Arts and Sciences Program plan to transfer to four-year colleges and universities as sophomores or juniors after one or two years at Tri-C. They are enrolled in what is usually referred to as the University Parallel curriculum, courses paralleling those offered in the first two years of a four-year institution. Credits earned in this curriculum may be transferred to colleges and universities as the first and second years of a Bachelor's degree program. Tri-C's University Parallel curriculum includes many courses designed to prepare students for upper division study in such specialized fields as medicine, dentistry, law, business, education and engineering.

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Career Program The second major objective of Cuyahoga Community College is to develop a comprehensive series of technological and business courses to fulfill the occupational needs of the community's citizens and employers. The Career Program works toward this objective by offering specialized instruction in more than 20 occupational fields in business, engineering, health and public service technologies. Many students in the Career Program take only a few courses, relearning or improving skills they already possess. Other students, planning to enter a technical or paraprofessional career, enroll in a two-year sequence leading to an Associate in Science degree or in a shorter sequence leading to a certificate. The significance of Tri-C's Career Program is derived from its immediate relevancy to the dynamic manpower situation in this community. Trained and skilled personnel are needed to meet new and increasingly exacting qualifications in many fields. It is estimated that, by 1970, onefourth of the entire United States labor force will be working in technical, paraprofessional positions that did not even exist in 1930. The Career Program prepares the student to step directly into this fast-moving age of technological advancement. In each area of the Career Program, an Advisory Committee works with the College to make the preparation as valuable and up-to-date as possible. These civic-minded representatives of local business, labor, industry, government, health agencies and public service assist the College in the identification of needs and the development of new areas within the program.

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Community Services Program The function of the Community Services Program is to enlarge educational opportunity beyond the traditional limitations of time, place and subject matter normally associated with institutions of higher learning. Because of employment, family or financial responsibilities, thousands of Cuyahoga County residents find these limitations prohibitive. In order to meet the needs of these individuals, the Community Services Program offers evening courses; in-service, on- or off-site business and industrial courses; programs and courses designed to assist individuals with specific economic or social needs. In short, the program implements cultural, educational and occupational offerings at a time and place and of a nature determined by community need and interest. The Community Services Program offers a broad spectrum of late afternoon and evening courses, credit and non-credit, for students of all ages. Some courses are offered to students without fee. The credit courses, with very few exceptions, differ in no essential degree from those offered during the daytime. Non-credit courses are designed to meet specific needs outside the scope of regular degree programs. They often take such unor~hodox forms as one-day seminars, special evening programs combining portions of many regular College courses, or workshops lasting from several days to several weeks. An example of the latter is the Secretarial Skills Workshop offered every Summer since 1964 in cooperation with the Urban League. These offerings are established as a result of a request from a specific group within the community, or upon the recommendation of other departments within the College. Individuals and enterprises within Cuyahoga County are invited to explore ways in which the College can provide additional community services. An example of continuing non-credit service is Project EVE, a free counseling and referral center for mature women planning to enter or reenter the work world. It helps individual women solve their problems by providing information regarding education, volunteer work and employment opportunities throughout Greater Cleveland. Other community services offered by the College are Project "New Careers", which in 1967-68 trained some 120 welfare aides for positions with the County Welfare Department, and Project SEARCH, an educa-

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tional counseling service in Cleveland's Hough area. The College's recently developed "Project in Dance" is the first such undertaking in northern Ohio to provide collegiate instruction for students seeking careers as performers, choreographers or teachers of the dance. The diverse array of specialized non-credit courses offered at the College during the past year has included "How to Study for Adults", "Leadership Seminar for Registered Nurses", "Creative Writing", "Introduction to Data Processing for Middle Management Personnel" and "Surface Coating Technology". Most of these courses were held at the College'S two campuses and two academic centers. Other credit and non-credit courses were scheduled at such off-campus locations as the new Federal Office Building in downtown Cleveland, the Cleveland Electric Illuminating Co., the Ford Motor Co. and the Chase Brass and Copper Co.

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dmissions

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Admissions

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ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES

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ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES

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Admissions

REGISTRATION Mail registrations usually are accepted some eight weeks before the opening of classes during each quarter. Registration at the College generally gets underway approximately five weeks before the beginning of classes. To insure an advantageous class schedule, and to realize the full benefits of the College's orientation and counseling services, prospective students are urged to initiate the admission process as early as possible.

CAMPUS SELECTION Administratively, Cuyahoga Community College is comprised of two campuses, identified as follows: •

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Metropolitan Campus, 626 Huron Rd., Cleveland, and the Eastern Academic Center at Brush High School, Lyndhurst. Western Campus, 7300 York Rd., Parma, and the Southeastern Academic Center at East Junior High School, Maple Heights.

A student selects the campus of his choice and is considered a student at that campus unless he officially transfers to the other campus. A student desiring to transfer from one campus to the other should indicate this in writing to the Office of Admissions and Records at the campus where his records are located. His credentials will then be transferred. A student should register at the campus where he expects to take the majority of his courses.

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SCHEDULE OF FEES Cuyahoga Community College, supported by the taxpayers of Cuyahoga County and assisted by the state, maintains modest instructional fees.

INSTRUCTIONAL FEES PER QUARTER HOUR OF CREDIT* Cuyahoga County Residents

Other Ohio Residents

Out-ot-State Residents

$7

$10

$20

* Maximum instructional fee for residents of Cuyahoga County is $100 per quarter.

STUDENT SERVICES FEE PER QtJARTER HOUR OF CREDITt Cuyahoga County Residents

Other Ohio Residents

Out-ot-State Residents

70¢

70¢

70¢

fMaximum student services fee is $10 per quarter.

Laboratory Deposit: A $5 breakage deposit is required for certain courses in which a laboratory is required. A deposit card should be purchased at the bookstore. A complete refund is made at the end of the quarter if no breakage has occurred.

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REFUND POLICY Refunds of instructional fees will be made when "drop" forms are properly completed, authorized and processed through the Office of Admissions and Records and the Business Office. Late registration fees are not refundable. The following schedule and conditions govern all refunds of instructional fees:

Refund Period

Regular Quarter

First Week ....................... 90% Second Week ...................... 70% Third Week ....................... 50%

Summer Session 90% 50% No Refund

Effective the fourth week of any academic period, no refund will be made. Full refunds of instructional fees are granted if the College cancels a course, or if a student is drafted and inducted into military service during the refund period. (In this case, the refund request is to be accompanied by official written notice from the military service involved.) Partial refunds are granted under three circumstances: (1) If the student withdraws during the refund period (see the preceding schedule). (2) If a student is drafted and inducted into military service after the refund period, in which case the refund will be prorated on the number of weeks of attendance before withdrawal. (3) If a veteran enrolled at Cuyahoga Community College under one of the federally assisted programs withdraws from a course, his refund shall be a fraction of the fees previously paid by him. The numerator of this fraction shall be the number of weeks remaining in the current quarter, and its denominator shall be the total number of weeks in that same quarter. No refunds are granted if a student voluntarily enlists into military service following the close of the refund period, if he is dismissed for disciplinary reasons, or if he is financially obligated to the bookstore, library or other department of the College at the time of his withdrawal.

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RESIDENCY Because Cuyahoga Community College is supported by the residents of Cuyahoga County, tuition surcharges are required of out-of-county and out-of-state students who wish to enroll at the College. A student's residency will be determined at the time of registration according to the residency policy of the State of Ohio, the Ohio Board of Regents and the Cuyahoga Community College Board of Trustees. A general residency statement can be found in the Class Schedule. All changes in address should be reported to the Office of Admissions and Records at the Campus where your records are kept.

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INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS As part of the admissions procedure, international students are required to demonstrate proficiency in the use of the English language. An examination may be required to determine such adequacy, and previous work at other educational institutions will also be considered. For further information, contact the Office of Admissions and Records.

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TRANSFER STUDENTS Students transferring to Cuyahoga Community College from another college or university should comply with the established admissions procedures. If their college work prior to enrolling at CCC does not meet the following minimum requirements (based on a four-point system), they will be admitted on probation: Quarter Credits Attempted At Other Institutions

Minimum Cumulative Grade-Point Average

15-44 inclusive .......................... 1.50 45-74 inclusive .......................... 1.75 75 or more ............................. 2.00 Transfer credits will not be accepted for courses in which a grade of less than "c" has been earned. Transfer credits accepted from other collegiate institutions will be entered on the College's permanent record forms, but the grades earned in these courses will not be indicated. Only course grades earned at Cuyahoga Community College will be used in computing grade-point averages. If a student has been dismissed for academic reasons from another college or university, he should petition the Director of Admissions and Records at either campus for admission. Students whose petitions are approved will be admitted on probation. They are to maintain a gradepoint average of "c" (2.00) or higher each quarter while on probation. Failure to meet these requirements will result in dismissal. If a student has been dismissed for disciplinary reasons from the last college or university attended, he should normally be eligible to return to that institution before being considered for admission to Cuyahoga Community College. Petitions for exceptions to this policy may be submitted to the Director of Admissions and Records.

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PROGRAM CHANGES A student may make changes in his course schedule during the program adjustment period. However, his choice of courses during this period is limited and all changes are to be approved by a counselor. It is highly

desirable, therefore, to select courses with care during the registration to avoid the necessity of an adjustment. See Class Schedule for dates of program adjustment.

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AUDITING A COURSE An auditor is a student enrolled in a course for which he will receive neither grade nor credit. The auditor is permitted to attend the class but is not required to submit assignments or take examinations. The fee for auditing is the same as that for enrolling for credit. Careful consideration is in order before requesting permission to audit a course audit status is not convertible to credit status once the form for auditing a course has been completed and filed. Students approaching this decision with any uncertainty are advised to consult with a counselor before requesting audit status. Students who are not currently attending Cuyahoga Community College may register to audit a course during the first week of classes, if space is available in the class at that time. Students who are currently enrolled in credit classes at Cuyahoga Community College and who wish to audit one or more courses will be allowed to add these during the first week of classes, providing space is available. Registration by mail is not available to auditors.

READMISSION A student applying for readmission following his first dismissal for academic reasons is subject to the following conditions: (1) If dismissed with a cumulative grade-point average of 0.75 or higher, the student may apply for immediate readmission for the next academic term. If he is readmitted, his permanent record will bear the notation, "Dismissed - poor scholarship, readmitted on second probation." Students readmitted under these circumstances will be placed on second probation and will be allowed to enroll for a maximum of nine quarter credits. (Exceptions to this maximum will be considered by the Admissions Board.) (2) A student dismissed with a cumulative grade-point average of less than 0.75 may qualify for readmission by exercising one of three options. First, he may remain out of Cuyahoga Community College for at least one full quarter before applying for readmission. Secondly, he may petition the Admissions Board to be considered for immediate readmission on second probation. Finally, the student may elect to use the "Change of Degree Objective" plan to be readmi tted in good standing.

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Readmission following the second or subsequent dismissal will be permitted only after the student has remained out of Cuyahoga Community College for at least one full quarter. He should then petition the Admissions Board to be considered for readmission. If the Board's action is affirmative, and if the student is permitted to continue without a "Change of Degree Objective", he will be placed on second probation. If the student reenters with a "Change of Degree Objective", he will be admi tted in good standing.

CHANGE OF DEGREE OBJECTIVE .If a student路 is not satisfactorily progressing in an Associate degree program, or if he has been dismissed for academic reasons, he may petition the Admissions Board for permission to change his degree objective or to pursue a Certificate Program. The following procedure should be followed in making this change: (1) The student is to discuss the prospective change with his counselor.

(2) He is to obtain the approval of the department head of the program which he plans to enter. (3) Following approval by the Admissions Board, the student's permanent record will indicate his change of degree objective. Grades for all courses taken prior to this change will not be considered in computing the student's cumulative grade-point average at Cuyahoga Community College. He will, therefore, be admitted to the new program in good standing, and credits successfully earned prior to the change will still count toward completion of the new program. NOTE: Students planning to transfer to another college or university are cautioned that the receiving institution may use all grades earned in computing grade-point averages for admission or other purposes.

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CHANGE OF STATUS If a student currently enrolled on a part-time basis wishes to enroll for the next academic term as a full-time student, he is asked to file a Change of Status form in the Office of Admissions and Records. He will then be notified of the credentials needed to make this change. To be considered for Change of Status, the student is required to have a cumulative grade-point average of 1.00 or higher at the time the request is submitted. A student who has earned grades of "C" or better in at least 15 quarter credits of work at Cuyahoga Community College will not be asked to submit American College Test (ACT) results in order to gain full-time status.

COURSE LOAD The normal course load for a full-time student is 15 quarter hours. A counselor may recommend a heavier or lighter load, however, because of past performance or other factors. A new student who ranked in the lowest one-fourth of his high school graduating class may not enroll for more than 12 quarter hours. Previously enrolled students who have attempted less than a total of nine credit hours at the College, and who ranked in the lowest one-fourth of their high school graduating class, also may not enroll for more than 12 quarter hours. For more information concerning course load restrictions, see ACADEMIC PROBATION.

ACADEMIC CREDIT IN ESCROW Academic Credit in Escrow is available to county high school seniors with outstanding scholastic records and aptitudes. It enables these students to enroll in one College day course each quarter for regular Tri-C credit. Interested students should consult their high school counselor or call the Office of Admissions and Records at the Tri-C campus they wish to attend.

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VETERANS' EDUCATION The Veterans Administration accepts Cuyahoga Community College as an institution qualified and equipped to provide education in the Arts and Sciences, and in the Career Program area, under the provisions of the War Orphans Assistance Act and the Veterans Readjustment Benefits Act of 1966. Please contact the Office of Admissions and Records at either the Metropolitan or Western Campus for further information.

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The Academic Side


ATTENDANCE Regular class attendance and consistent study habits are essential to success in college and are required of all students at Cuyahoga Community College. A student may be dropped from a course by his instructor whenever total absences exceed three hours in any quarter-if, in the instructor's judgment, the student cannot benefit from further class instruction. When illness forces a student to be absent from class for three or more consecutive days, he should report this fact to the Health Service at his campus. If an absence is of less than three days duration, or is caused by an emergency not related to illness, the student is asked to confer with his instructor upon returning to class.

ATTENDING COLLEGE WHILE EMPLOYED Many students find it necessary to work while attending college. By careful and realistic planning, work and study can be successfully combined. Each credit hour generally requires a minimum of two hours of outside study each week. On this basis, students employed full time should attempt to carry no more than two courses per quarter. Those employed part time should carry a course load proportionate to their hours of employment.

FINAL EXAMINATIONS A final examination is required in each course and is given at a regularly scheduled time. Except under ,emergency circumstances, students may not be excused from these examinations. If a student is unable to appear, it is his responsibility to inform his instructor prior to the scheduled examination. If an examination is officially postponed, the student will be assigned an "I" (incomplete) as his grade for that course. Incomplete grades are to be removed by completing the examination no later than the fifth week of the following academic quarter. Failure to do so will result in an "F" (failure) grade.

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CREDIT BY EXAMINATION A student who feels he can demonstrate ability and knowledge in a particular subject may petition the appropriate academic dean for the privilege of taking a special examination and/or performing a special assignment for credit in that subject. An examination fee of $5 is assessed for each course involved. A student is not permitted to earn more than 18 units of credit by examination. Credit by examination requires College-wide approval as well as that of the appropriate academic department. A standard symbol indicating "credit by examination" will be posted on the student's permanent record, but letter grades or quality points will not be used.

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RECORDS - GRADES AND QUALITY POINTS Final grades are issued at the end of each quarter. Letter grades earn a number of quality points per credit unit according to the following schedule: A Excellent ............................ 4 B - Good ............................... 3 C - Average ............................ 2 D - Below Average. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 F - Failure ............................. 0 *W - Withdrawal. ......................... 0 I Incomplete .......................... 0 *8 - Audit .............................. 0 The student's grade-point average is computed by the following formula: Total Quality Points Earned Grade-Point Average *Total Units of Credit Attempted For example, if you took five courses worth three credits each, you would be attempting 15 total units of credit. If you earned four "B's" and one" A" as final grades, you would have a total of 48 quality points. Your grade-point average would be 3.20 - 48 divided by 15. *NOTE: Courses in which a student earns grades of "W" or "8" are not considered part of the total credit units attempted.

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HONORS Each quarter, the Dean's List gives public recognition to those students whose academic achievements are considered outstanding. This list includes all students who have earned a grade-point average of 3.50 or higher in attempting ten or more credit hours during the preceding quarter.

ACADEMIC WARNING NOTICES To alert those students who are earning less than a "C" at mid-quarter, Cuyahoga Community College issues academic warnings. Students receiving such notices are invited to discuss their progress with their instructors or counselors.

REPEATING A COURSE A student may repeat a course in which he has earned a grade of "D" or "F". The most recently earned grade in that course will be used in computing his cumulative grade-point average at Cuyahoga Community College. NOTE: Students planning to transfer to another college or university are cautioned that the receiving institution may use all grades earned in repeated courses to compute grade-point averages for admission or other purposes.

WITHDRAWING FROM A CLASS A student may withdraw from a class at any time prior to the last two weeks of instruction upon completion of the necessary forms in the Office of Admissions and Records. Full-time students are to confer with the instructor and their counselor as part of the official withdrawal procedure. Part-time students also are encouraged to confer with the instructor or a counselor prior to withdrawal. A student who withdraws from a course during the first three weeks of a quarter will have no notation made on his permanent record. A student who withdraws from a course after the third week will receive a grade of "W" on his permanent record. An instructor may withdraw a student from a course for excessive absences. This may be done after the third week, but prior to the last two weeks, of a quarter. A student withdrawn in this manner also will receive a grade of "W" on his permanent record.

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ACADEMIC PROBATION A student will be placed on probation under anyone of the following circumstances: (1) If, after attempting 15 or more quarter credits at Cuyahoga Community College, he has failed to compile a cumulative grade-point average to meet the following minimum requirements (based on a four-point system):

Credits Attempted

Minimum Grade-Point Average

15-44 inclusive ................................ 1.50 45-74 inclusive ................................ 1.75 75 or more .................................... 2.00

(2) If a student wishes to enroll for ton or more quarter credits at Cuyahoga Community College while attending or after attending another college or university which has placed him on probation, he will be admitted on first probation. He will remain on first probation until he has attempted 15 or more quarter credits at Cuyahoga Community College and has been either removed from probation or placed on second probation. (3) If a student wishes to enroll for ten or more quarter credits at Cuyahoga Community College after attending another college or university from which he has been academically dismissed, he may follow the procedures outlined under the READMISSION section of the Catalogue. (4) If a student - who has been academically dismissed from a universityor who is on academic probation - wishes to enroll for nine or fewer quarter credits at Cuyahoga Community College, he will be admitted on a probationary status.

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A student on first probation will be placed on second probation if he does not remove himself from probation at the end of the next period of enrollment. A student can remove himself from first or second probation by raising his cumulative grade-point average at Cuyahoga Community College to meet the requirements in the preceding box.

ACADEMIC DISMISSAL A student on second probation will be dismissed at the end of that period of enrollment unless he removes himself from probation, or unless his ,grade-point average for the most recent period of enrollment was 2.00 or higher, in which case he will be permitted to continue on second probation. A student will also be dismissed if he has attempted 15 or more quarter credits at Cuyahoga Community College and has compiled lower than a .75 cumulative grade-point average at the end of any period of enrollment.

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DEFINITION OF CLASS STANDING A freshman or first-year student at Cuyahoga Community College is one who has earned 44 or fewer quarter credits. This includes any credits transferred from other colleges or universities. Students who have earned 45 or more quarter hours (30 semester hours), including any transferred from other colleges or universities, are considered sophomores or second-year students.

TRANSFERRING TO OTHER INSTITUTIONS Counselors and other members of the College staff will advise and assist any student planning to transfer to a four-year college or university. They will help the student in preparing for and completing the transfer process. I t remains the responsibility of the student, however, to select his transfer institution and to closely follow its admissions requirements. These requirements are set forth in the catalogue of each college and university. Reference copies of these catalogues are available in the College library and in the Offices of Admissions and Records at both campuses. Because of the highly specialized nature of curriculums in the Career Program, many of the courses are not designed for transfer to a four-year institution. Students also should note that courses with numbers lower than 100 (the last three digits) are not ordinarily transferable. Official transcripts of grades earned at Cuyahoga Community College may be requested through the Office of Admissions and Records. Each student is entitled to one free transcript. Additional copies may be obtained for a fee of $1 each.

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Associate in Arts Degree Good standing is a requisite to candidacy for graduation from Cuyahoga Community College. An Associate in Arts degree will be granted to the student completing the following requirements:

A. GENERAL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. The satisfactory completion of no fewer than 93 quarter hours. 2. The completion of no fewer than 30 of the above 93 hours while in attendance at Cuyahoga Community College. A student is to attain a "C" (2.00) average for all work at the College.

B. SPECIFIC GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. Minimum competency in communication as verified by one of the following sequences: a. English 091, 092, 093 and 10l. b. English 091, 101 and 102. c. English 101, 102 and 103. 2. The completion of one of the following sequences: a. History 101, 102 and 103. b. History 151, 152 and 153. c. Political Science (any three courses). d. Social Science 103, 104 and 105. 3. The completion of Health 101 or three quarter hours of physical education. 4. Minimum competency in mathematics as verified by one of the following: a. A satisfactory score on the mathematics portion of ACT or SAT. b. Any mathematics course satisfactorily completed at Cuyahoga Community College. c. Achievement of a satisfactory score on a standardized mathematics test administered by the College.

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C. ELECTIVE GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. A total of no fewer than 27 quarter hours of electives to be selected

from any three of the following four areas: a. Humanities. b. Science and Mathematics. c. Social Sciences. d. Career Programs, including Technical and Business offerings. 2. No fewer than nine quarter hours may be chosen from anyone area. Courses used to satisfy the preceding B-1 or B-2 requirement may not be used again for this elective requirement.

Associate in Science Degree Good standing is a requisite to candidacy for graduation from Cuyahoga Community College. An Associate in Science degree will be granted to the student completing the following requirements:

A. GENERAL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. The satisfactory completion of no fewer than 93 quarter hours. 2. The completion of no fewer than 30 of the above 93 quarter hours while in attendance at Cuyahoga Community College. A student is to attain a "C" (2.00) average for all work at the College.

B. SPECIFIC GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. Minimum competency in communication as verified by one of the

following sequences: a. English 091, 092 and b. English 091, 101 and c. English 101, 102 and d. English 091, 092 and e. English 101, 102 and

093. 102. 103. Speech 101. Speech 101.

2. The completion of one of the following sequences: a. History 101, 102 and 103. b. History 151, 152 and 153. c. Political Science (any three courses). d. Social Science 103, 104 and 105.

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3. The completion of Health 101 or three quarter hours of physical education. 4. Minimum competency in mathematics as verified by one of the following: a. A satisfactory score on the mathematics portion of the ACT or SAT. b. Any mathematics course satisfactorily completed at Cuyahoga Community College. c. Achievement of a satisfactory score on a st~ndardized mathematics test administered by the College. C. ELECTIVE GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. A total of no fewer than 18 quarter hours of electives to be selected from any two of the following three areas: a. Humanities. b. Science and Mathematics. c. Social Sciences. 2. No fewer than nine quarter hours may be chosen from anyone area. Courses used to satisfy the preceding B-1 or B-2 requirement may not be used again for this elective requirement. In addition to the preceding requirements, a student is to fulfill the curricular requirements for the particular program as listed near the end of this Catalogue under SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCES.

CERTIFICATES OF PROFICIENCY In addition to the two-year Associate in Arts and Associate in Science degrees, Cuyahoga Community College awards Certificates of Proficiency to fun~ or part-time students wishing to specialize in and select courses from a specific subject matter area. These certificate awards have been established to meet the needs of those who, for one reason or another, do not wish to pursue an Associate degree program. A Certificate of Proficiency may be awarded upon completion of a course or a pattern of courses which fulfill a special educational objective. Courses for which certificates are awarded mayor may not carry academic credit.

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Serving the Student


Counseling Professional counselors are available at the Metropolitan Campus, Western Campus and Academic Centers to help students achieve productive and rewarding experiences at the College. Counseling services are provided for all students - full time, part time, day and evening. Upon admission to the College, each student has an opportunity for a conference with a counselor to consider his previous educational background, interests, aptitudes and goals. He is assisted in choosing an appropriate program of studies from the variety of courses offered. Throughout his enrollment, each student is encouraged to seek counseling assistance in reviewing his progress and plans. Counselors assist students who wish to clarify their educational and occupational objectives. Occupational information files and college catalogues are located in the campus libraries. When appropriate, counselors may suggest a variety of tests and inventories as aids in educational and occupational planning. Students may consult with counselors when they desire assistance in becoming more effective students, in developing gratifying personal and social relationships, and in making the college experience more personally rewarding.

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PLACEMENT TEST Entering students planning to enroll for ten or more quarter credits are requested to have the results of the ACT (American College Test) forwarded to Cuyahoga Community College. These results are used for counseling purposes only - to place students in appropriate programs and courses. Psychological tests assessing mental ability, interests and aptitudes are administered on campus as the need arises. Students may arrange with a counselor for such testing.

HEALTH SERVICES Health Services are provided to students at both campuses to aid them in maintaining physical and emotional health as it relates to their college experiences. These services are staffed by registered nurses. The College also retains a consulting physician who serves in an advisory capacity. A primary function of the Health Services is health counseling, provided by the College nurses, to assist students in identifying and solving their health problems. Students with questions regarding physical disabilities or the advisability of participating in College programs should contact the Health Services. Temporary treatment of minor illnesses is administered under the standing orders of the consulting physician, and first-aid care for injuries is also provided. As a part of the total health program of the College, the Health Services work with other College departments and with community agencies to offer educational and screening services throughout the year. The Health Services operation is designed to supplement the basic care the student receives from physicians and dentists in the community. A comprehensive Student Health Insurance Plan is available through the Health Services to students enrolled for ten or more credit hours. This plan provides health insurance protection, at moderate cost, for accidents and unexpected hospitalization.

ASSISTANCE TO THE PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED The Office of Student Services renders a variety of services to the physically handicapped. For further information, contact this office at either campus.

SELECTIVE SERVICE Information regarding Selective Service may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records at either campus.

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Financial Aid Program Cuyahoga Community College's Financial Aid Program consists of scholarships, grants, loans and part-time employment. The program is designed to complement the student's own resources. Primary considerations in selecting students to receive assistance are financial need, past academic achievement and potential for the future. Financial aid awards are made before the beginning of each regular academic quarter. Any student may request an application for assistance at either campus through the Office of Admissions and Records or the Office of Placement and Student Financial Aid. The student is urged to submit his complete application as early as possible prior to the beginning of the quarter in which he intends to enroll. Final action is taken on this application after the student has submitted all required admissions credentials. Scholarships-The College provides scholarships to full- and part-time, new and returning students who have satisfactorily demonstrated their academic ability and who will benefit from such assistance. These scholarships are renewable providing the student maintains a cumulative gradepoint average of 2.50 or higher. All scholarships are awarded for the entire academic year, and their recipients may also be considered for other types of financial assistance. The General Scholarship Fund was created and is sustained by civicminded individuals and groups interested in fostering the College's purposes, programs and objectives. Grants-in-Aid-A grant-in-aid is a type of financial assistance similar to a scholarship. It, too, can be awarded to part-time as well as full-time students and may also be renewed. Federal Educational Opportunity Grants-Students qualifying for this program will receive a stipend for each academic year of full-time attendance at Cuyahoga Community College. The amount of this stipend is then matched by other scholarship, grant or loan funds. Interested students are invited to contact the Office of Placement and Student Financial Aid on either campus. National Defense Student Loans - Eligibility for this program is open to full-time students with grade-point averages of 2.00 or higher. The applicant should be able to verify his need for financial assistance and is

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required to maintain a good academic standing. Repayment of the loan is scheduled over a period of ten years. The borrower who enters one of several specified occupations may be entitled to a substantial reduction in the total he is required to repay. Nursing Student Loans-Full-time students pursuing an Associate degree in Nursing and maintaining a grade-point average of 2.00 or higher are eligible to apply for this loan. The procedure for repayment is similar to that for National Defense Student Loans. Other Loans - Currently enrolled students may borrow up to 50 per cent of their assessed fees at no interest. These loans are to be repaid within 60 days according to a schedule established at the time the loan is granted. Federal Work-Study Program - This program provides employment at the College for students who wish to work while they are enrolled. Funds for the project are made available to the College by a grant under the Economic Opportunities Act of 1964. To be eligible for this program, the student should be classified as a full-time student during the quarter in which he wishes to be employed. The student also is to verify a need for financial assistance. Employment under this program is limited to an average of 15 hours per week whenever regular classes are in session. Student Employment and Placement-The Offices of Placement and Student Financial Aid at the Metropolitan and Western Campuses coordinate student employment for the College. All graduates and currently enrolled students are invited to make use of these services. Any currently enrolled student may apply for part-time, on-campus employment. Students also are assisted in obtaining full-time or part-' time employment outside the College. Any student who wishes to use the office's career placement service is urged to apply several months before graduation. Need More Information? Upon request, the Office of Placement and Student Financial Aid will forward a booklet explaining in greater detail the scope and diversity of financial aid opportunities at Cuyahoga Community College. Further inquiries regarding any aspect of the Financial Aid Program may be directed to this office at either campus.

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Student Activities Cuyahoga Community College recognizes the educational, recreational and social values of a well-integrated program of student activities. It believes that student participation in co-curricular activities contributes to the wholesome development of the individual and to the growth of leadership ability. The College features a well-balanced program developed in response to student requests and needs. A large measure of responsibility for campus affairs is in the hands of the students themselves, assisted by the Director of Student Activities and faculty members on each campus. The students essentially establish and administer most non-academic campus activities. They determine social programs and participate in the maintenance of the discipline essential to an academic community. Activities may vary from quarter to quarter, depending upon student choice. Two newspapers, Metro's The Commuter and Western's The West Word, are staffed by students drawn largely from the College's journalism courses. Both periodicals received statewide recognition for excellence during 1968 and The Commuter was named the nation's number one junior college newspaper. Every student is welcome to participate in a variety of activities from karate to skiing and may obtain further information from officers of each organization or from the Office of Student Activities at either campus. Among the many activities and events to be found on one or both campuses each quarter are:


Student Cabinet Band* Interclub Council Drama* Interest groups Political clubs Intramural sports College Union Board Choir*

Inter-Greek Council Professional organizations Religious groups Dances and other social functions Convocations Local fraternities and sororities Varsity sports (Track and field, soccer, basketball, golf and baseball)

'" Formal class instruction is available in these areas.

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INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION The official colors of Cuyahoga Community College are: Metropolitan Campus, brown and gold ; Western Campus, blue and gold. The names of the College's athletic teams are: Metropolitan Campus, "Cougars"; Western Campus, "Chargers". Both campuses are members of the National Junior College Athletic Association and engage in intercollegiate competition with teams from Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia.

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COLLEGE RELATIONS The Office of College Relations disseminates information to the various publics of the College. Among its functions is the preparation of the Catalogue, Annual Report, Progress Report and other official College publications. The Office of College Relations also serves as coordinator of the Speakers Bureau. As a community service, faculty and staff members of the College are available for appearances at meetings of religious, educational, service, political and other organizations or groups. Inquiries may be addressed to this office at Cuyahoga Community College District Office, 2123 E. 9 St., Cleveland, O. 44115. Phone 241-1556.

HOUSING Because Cuyahoga Community College is an urban institution primarily designed to serve its own community, no residential housing is provided for its students.

STUDENT-FACULTY CONFERENCES The faculty members of Cuyahoga Community College maintain scheduled office hours to confer with students regarding class work and related matters. Schedules of office hours will be found in the faculty office areas. Students are urged to familiarize themselves with the schedules and to contact their instructors during these hours.

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Course Descriptions

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Code Used in Listing Course Descriptions To simplify the task of maintaining accurate and complete academic records of all students at the College, a six-digit code has been introduced for use in listing all courses. In this code, the first three digits indicate the subject area (see chart below). The remaining three digits are the number assigned to that particular course within the specified subject area. For example, Intermediate French bears the code 590-202. The number 590 refers to the subject area, French. The number 202 has been assigned to a specific course, Intermediate French, within that subject area.

CODE

SUBJECT AREA

410 Accounting 420 Anthropology 430 Art 440 Biology 450 Building Construction Technology 460 Business (General) 470 Chemical Technology 480 Chemistry 490 Data Processing 500 Dental Hygiene 520 Economics 530 Education 540 Electrical-Electronic Technology 550 Engineering 560 English 570 Fire Technology 590 French 600 Geography 610 German 620 Health 630 History 640 Home Economics 580 Hotel-Restaurant Management (formerly Food Service Management)

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CODE

650 660 670 680 690 700 710 720 730 740 750 760 770 780 790 800 810 820 830 840 850 860 870 890 900

SUBJECT AREA

Industrial Supervision Journalism Law Enforcement Library Technology Mathematics Mechanical Technology Medical Assisting Music Nursery School Assisting Nursing Philosophy Physical Education Physical Science Physics Plant Operation Services Political Science Psychology Russian Secretarial Science Social Science Sociology Spanish Speech Theatre Arts Transportation


COURSE NUMBERING Courses are listed in numerical order within each subject area. Some courses cover one quarter. Other courses extend over two, three or more quarters. Courses within the XXX-090 to XXX-099 series generally are designed to provide students with foundations necessary for freshman studies. English 560-091, for example, is Essentials of Written Communication. The XXX -100 to XXX -199 sequence normally represents freshman courses. The XXX-200 to XXX-299 series usually consists of sophomore-level courses. Course numbers do not indicate whether or not a course will be accepted for transfer to other institutions. Students are advised to consult with their counselors regarding transfer of courses and credits to other institutions. See TRANSFERRING TO OTHER INSTITUTIONS.

CREDIT HOURS The quarter credit for each course is indicated opposite the course title. Three credits; e.g., is 3 Cr. The number of credits granted for a course does not always equal the number of hours that the course meets in one week. The exceptions are noted in the course descriptions.

PREREQUISITES The prerequisites listed for specific courses and curriculums should be closely observed to insure qualification for subsequent courses, and to gain maximum benefit from instruction.

SCHEDULE OF CLASSES Courses listed in this Catalogue are those which Cuyahoga Community College plans to offer. Inclusion of a course description does not obligate the College to present the course in any particular quarter. Many of the courses on the following pages are offered at both the Metropolitan and Western Campuses. Students are referred to the appropriate Class Schedule each quarter for specific and current information. The Western and Metro Campuses publish a Class Schedule prior to the registration period for each quarter. It contains a list of the classes to be offered, placement test schedules and general registration information.

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Accounting 410 3 Cr. 410-107 Business Mathematics Application of simple mathematical procedures to typical accounting, financial, marketing and other business problems. Includes study of essentials of business arithmetic, simple, periodic and compound interest, present value, payrolls, commissions, pricing and accounting mathematics. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 107 Busimss Mathematics. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

410-110 Principles of Finance 3 Cr. Introductory finance course. Study of private and government financial institutions, financial instruments, money and credit systems, basic principles, and current problems in consumer and business financing. Includes study of Federal Reserve System. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 410-107 Business Mathematics and 460-108 Introduction to Business. (Formerly 110 Principles of Finance. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Business 107 and 108.)

136


ACCOUNTING 410

410-111 Practical Accounting 3 Cr. Bookkeeping for students of business administration and secretarial science with no previous bookkeeping knowledge. Principles of double entry bookkeeping applicable to service and mercantile businesses. Practice in preparation of conventional records, reports and statements. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 111 Practical Accounting. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Labot'atory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

410-121 Principles of Accounting 3 Cr. Analytical study of basic accounting theory and practices. Conventional double entry procedures. Form and content of statements, records, analyses and reports. Elemental procedures applied to proprietorship and partnership forms, and to mercantile activities. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 121 Principles of Accounting. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

410-122 Principles of Accounting 3 Cr. Continuation of 410-121 Principles of Accounting. In addition, accounting procedures applied to the corporate form. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 410-121 Principles of Accounting. (Formerly 122 Principles of Accounting. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Accounting 121.)

410-123 Principles of Accounting 3 Cr. Continuation of 410-122 Principles of Accounting. In addition, accounting procedures applied to manufacturing activities. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 410-107 Business Mathematics, 410-122 Principles of Accounting and 460-108 Introduction to Business. (Formerly 122 Principles of Accounting. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Accounting 121.)

3 Cr. 410-141 Investments Sources of capital, types of securities, operation of brokerage and investment banking houses. Understanding of investment principles and the acquisition of skills needed for success as salesman or clerical worker in securities business. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460-108 Introduction to Business or equivalent business expenence. (Formerly 141 Investments. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

137


ACCOUNTING 410

410-221 Intermediate Accounting 3 Cr. Comprehensive ~tudy at a professional level of accounting theory, procedures, analyses, reports and presentations as accepted by major authorities. Conventional double entry acceptances and practices. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 410-123 Principles of Accounting. (Formerly 221 Intermediate Accounting. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Accolmting 122.)

3 Cr. 410-222 Intermediate Accounting Continuation of the comprehensive study begun in 410-221 Intermediate Accounting in the context of the conventional double entry accounting. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 410-221 Intermediate Accounting. (Formerly 222 Intermediate Accounting. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hout路s. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Accounting 221.)

410-223 Intermediate Accounting 3 Cr. Continuation of 410-222 Intermediate Accounting. In addition, specialized studies in single entry, funds flow and common-dollar accounting. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 410-222 Intermediate Accounting. (Formerly 222 Intermediate Accounting. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Accounting 221.)

410-231 Cost Accounting 3 Cr. Theory and practice of cost accounting procedures as applied in industry for purposes of managerial control. Job order and process cost systems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 410-123 Principles of Accounting. (Formerly 231 Cost Accounting. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Accounting 122.)

410-232 Cost Accounting 3 Cr. Continuation of 410-231 Cost Accounting. In addition, further study of process cost systems, study of budgeting, standard, estimated cost procedures and determination of variances. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 410-231 Cost Accounting. (Formerly 231 Cost Accounting. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Accounting 122.)

138


ACCOUNTING 410 / ANTHROPOLOGY 420

410-260 Cooperative Field Experience 9 Cr. Limited to students in the Cooperative Field Experience Program. Full-time employment in an approved area under College supervision. Requirements for credit will be a minimum of 350 clock hours of approved work, a report from the employer, term report by student and on-the-job visits by the coordinator of the department. Lecture o hours. Laboratory 35 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. (New Course.)

410-261 Cooperative Field Experience 9 Cr. Continuation of 410-260 Cooperative Field Experience. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 35 hours. Prerequisite: 410-260 Cooperative Field Experience. (New Course.)

410-265 Taxation 3 Cr. Thorough study of federal individual income tax regulations and procedures with practice in preparation of returns. Cursory study of federal income tax reporting of corporations and unincorporated businesses. Introduction to principal state taxes. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 410-123 Principles of Accounting. (Formerly 265 Taxation. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hout'S. Prerequisite: Accounting 122.)

Anthropology 420 420-101 Cultural Anthropology 4 Cr. Cultural patterns and dynamics. History, distribution and growth of cultural patterns. Includes social organization and material culture. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 101 Cultural Anthropology. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

420-102 Physical Anthropology 4 Cr. Study of man as a physical being. Origin and antiquity of man, the relationship of man to animals, paleontological discoveries and racial phenomena. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 102 Physical Anthropology. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Lab01-atory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

139


ART 430

of objects emphasizing structure, value and texture. Theory of aerial and converging perspective practiced by extensive application to various subjects. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 104 Beginning Drawing. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

430-106 Drawing 3 Cr. Continuation of 430-105 Drawing. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-105 Drawing or departmental approval. (Formerly 105 Beginning Drawing. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Labomtory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Art 104.)

430-107 Drawing 3 Cr. Continuation of 430-106 Drawing. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-106 Drawing or departmental approval. (Formerly 105 Beginning Drawing. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Art 104.)

430-108 Fundamentals of Design 3 Cr. Study of such elements of design as line, mass, space, light, shade, texture and color. Organization to achieve rhythm, balance, movement and unity. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 106 Fundamentals of Design. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None.)


Art 430 430-101 Art Appreciation 3 Cr. Development of an understanding and interest in creative forms, within the visual art field, for those without an art background. General survey of art - painting, sculpture and architecture - explored through texts, slides and prints. Simple experimental studies in basic design. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed 430-102,430-103 or 430-104 Art History. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formedy 101 Art Appreciation. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: JHay not be taken /01' credit by students who have completed A 1'/ 102 or 103.)

430-102 Art History 3 Cr. A survey of the chronological and stylistic development of Western Art. Includes Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Greek, Roman, Early Christian, Byzantine, Gothic schools. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 102 Art History. 3 Semester Ct'. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

430-103 Art History 3 Cr. A survey of the chronological and stylistic development of Western Art. Includes Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo schools. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 103 Art History. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 h01l1's. Prerequisite: Art 102.)

430-104 Art History 3 Cr. A survey of the chronological and stylistic development of Western Art. Includes the 19th century schools and some study of the 20th century. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 103 Art History. 3 Semester Ct'. Lecture 3 hOllrs. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Art 102.)

430-105 Drawing 3 Cr. Introduction to communication with non-verbal symbols. Students use various drawing materials and employ naturalistic representation

140


ART 430

of objects emphasizing structure, value and texture. Theory of aerial and converging perspective practiced by extensive application to various sUbjects. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 104 Beginning D1路awing. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Pre1'equisite: None.)

430-106 Drawing 3 Cr. Continuation of 430-105 Drawing. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-105 Drawing or departmental approval. (Formerly 105 Beginning Drawing. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Art 104.)

430-107 Drawing 3 Cr. Continuation of 430-106 Drawing. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-106 Drawing or departmental approval. (Formerly 105 Beginning Drawing. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Art 104.)

430-108 Fundamentals of Design 3 Cr. Study of such elements of design as line, mass, space, light, shade, texture and color. Organization to achieve rhythm, balance, movement and unity. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 106 Fundamentals of Design. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hout'S. Prerequisite: None.)


ART 430

430-109 Fundamentals of Design 3 Cr. Continuation of 430-108 Fundamentals of Design. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-108 Fundamentals of Design or departmental approval. (Formerly 107 Fundamentals of Design. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laborat01Y 4 hours. Prerequisite: At,t 106.)

430-110 Fundamentals of Design 3 Cr. Continuation of 430-109 Fundamentals of Design. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-109 Fundamentals of Design or departmental approval. (Formerly 107 Fundamentals of Design. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Art 106.)

430-121 Calligraphy 3 Cr. Study and execution of letter forms and their history as elements of design in such applications as layout and illustration. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 121 Calligraphy. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: Art 105 and 107.)

430-151 Art for Elementary Education 3 Cr. Planned to meet the needs of prospective elementary teachers. Creative studio work as well as an introduction to art in the elementary school. Fundamentals of using elementary school art materials. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : None. (Formerly 151 Art for Elementary Education. 3 Semester Cr. Lectm'e 3 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

430-201 Life Drawing 3 Cr. Drawing from the human figure in various media. Introduction to anatomy for artists. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-105 Drawing or concurrent enrollment. (Formerly 201 Life Drawing. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture I hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Art 104 or concurrent enrollment.)

430-202 Life Drawing 3 Cr. Continuation of 430-201 Life Drawing. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-201 Life Drawing or departmental approval. (Formerly 202 Life Drawing. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Art 201.)

142


ART 430

430-203 Life Drawing 3 Cr. Continuation of 430-202 Life Drawing. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-202 Life Drawing or departmental approval. (Fonnerly 202 Life Drawing. 3 Semestet路 Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Art 201.)

430-204 Painting 3 Cr. Introduction to oil and opaque water color. Includes landscape, still life and the human form. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-105 Drawing. (Fonnerly 203 Painting. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Art 105.)

430-205 Painting 3 Cr. Continuation of 430-204 Painting. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-204 Painting or departmental approval. (Formerly 204 Pablting. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Art 203.)

430-206 Painting 3 Cr. Continuation of 430-205 Painting. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-205 Painting or departmental approval. (Formrwly 204 Painting. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Art 203.)

3 Cr. 430-207 Water Color Fundamentals of water color techniques and qualities. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 430-105 Drawing. (Fonnerly 205 Water Color. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: Art 104 and 105.)

430-221 Printmaking 5 Cr. General introduction to various aspects of printmaking and graphic composition. Special emphasis on the woodcut. Some multi-block color work. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 7 hours. Prerequisite: 430-105 Drawing. (Fonnerly 221 Printmaking. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Art 104.)

143


Biology 440 440-101 Introductory Biology 3 Cr. First of a three-quarter sequence .designed primarily for non-science majors. Fundamental concepts of biology are stressed, with emphasis on cytology, basic biochemistry and genetics. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 101 IntroductOtJl Biology. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

440-102 Introductory Biology 3 Cr. Continuation of 440-101 Introductory Biology. Special reference is made to evolutionary adaptations of living organisms, with emphasis on coordinating, endocrine and reproductive mechanisms. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 440-101 Introductory Biology. (Formerly 102 Introductory Biology. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 10 1.)

440-103 Introductory Biology 3 Cr. Continuation of 440-102 Introductory Biology. Special emphasis is placed on homeostasis as it relates to the nutritional, transport and excretory mechanisms of living organisms. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 440-102 Introductory Biology. (Formerly 102 Introductory Biology. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 101.)

440-111 General Biology 4 Cr. First of a three-quarter sequence for students who plan to major in biology. General introduction to basic biological concepts structured around a detailed study of cell morphology and physiology with emphasis on the metabolic processes of photosynthesis, respiration, reproduction and inheritance. Biochemical principles are stressed. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 111 General Biology. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Knowledge of basic chemistry is essential.)

144


BIOLOGY 440

440-112 General Biology 4 Cr. Continuation of 440-111 General Biology. Evolutionary adaptations of plants and animals. Ecological concepts. Application of the nervous, endocrine and reproductive processes in organisms. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 440-111 General Biology. (Formerly 112 General Biology. 4 Semester' Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 111.)

440-113 General Biology 4 Cr. Continuation of 440-112 General Biology. The metabolism and selfperpetuation of the organism. Emphasis is placed on homeostasis as it relates to the nutritional, transport and excretory mechanisms of living organisms. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 440-112 General Biology. (Formerly 112 General Biology. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 111.)

145


BIOLOGY 440

3 Cr. 440-121 Principles of Medical Science Basic inorganic, organic and bio-chemistry, with emphasis on physiological principles and applications. Includes principles of physics and metric system. Designed principally for Health Technology programs. Study of chemistry, other related subject matter included in laboratory. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 121 Principles of Medical Science. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Labomtory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

440-122 Principles of Medical Science 3 Cr. Fundamental concepts of cellular structure and physiology. A study of the architectural plan of the body, its skeletal, muscular and digestive systems. Emphasis is placed on morphological and physiological concepts and applications. Laboratory includes gross anatomy and experiments in physiology. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 121 Principles of Medical Science. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

440-123 Principles of Medical Science 3 Cr. Continuation of 440-122 Principles of Medical Science. Principles of electrolytes and fluid balance. Structure and function of the circulatory and respiratory systems. Laboratory includes gross anatomy and experiments in physiology. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 440-122 Principles of Medical Science. (Formerly 122 Principles of Medical Science. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 121.)

440-124 Principles of Medical Science 3 Cr. Continuation of 440-123 Principles of Medical Science. Structure and functions of the nervous, urinary and reproductive systems. Laboratory includes gross anatomy and experiments in physiology. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 440-123 Principles of Medical Science. (Formerly 122 Principles of Medical Science. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 121.)

440-125 Principles of Medical Science 3 Cr. Fundamentals of endocrinology, with emphasis on homeostatic endocrine control. Fundamentals of embryology and genetics as related to the human body. Laboratory includes experiments, demonstrations and related microscopic study. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours.

146


BIOLOGY 440

Prerequisite: 440-124 Principles of Medical Science. (Formerly 122 Principles of Medical Science. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 121.)

440-200 General Botany 4 Cr. Survey of the plant kingdom. Includes classification, physiology, structure, life cycles and interrelationships between plants and animals. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 440-103 Introductory Biology or 440-113 General Biology. (Formerly 202 General Botany. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 112.)

440-201 Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates 5 Cr. Gross anatomy of the organ systems in representative members of the vertebrates. Emphasis on evolution and functional adaptations. Laboratory dissection and direct observation of selected specimens. Emphasis placed on squalus, necturus and felis. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 440-113 General Biology or equivalent. (Formerly 201 Comparatit'll Anatomy of the Vertebrates. 5 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours, Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 112 or equivalent.)

440-202 Vertebrate Embryology 4 Cr. Studies of the ontogeny of vertebrates, stressing embryological induction and cell differentiation. The lab will include the organogenesis of the frog, chick and pig. Many experiments will involve the use of live embryos. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 440-113 General Biology and 440-201 Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates. (New Course.)

440-221 Microbiology 4 Cr. A survey of representative types of microorganisms. Emphasis is placed on cellular structure and physiology, nutritional and environmental requirements and methods of reproduction. Introduction to the role of pathogenic organisms in carrying diseases and infections. Principles of immunity and resistance to disease. Laboratory includes methods of sterilization, culture, staining and identification. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 440-124 Principles of Medical Science or concurrent enrollment. (Formerly 221 Microbiology. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hout'S. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 122.)

147


uilding Construction Technology 450 450-100 Building Construction Orientation 2 Cr. Designed to acquaint the student with his specific curriculum as well as the various job classifications of the construction industry. Instruction is given in the use of the slide rule. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 100 Building Construction Orientation. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

450-121 Architectural Drawing 3 Cr. Design and construction of domestic structures. Scale, detailing, framing systems, dimensioning, architectural lettering and modular systems. Contemporary building materials are surveyed. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 550-121 Engineering Drawing or equivalent. (Formerly 121 Architectural Drawing. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 121 or equivalent.)

450-122 Architectural Drawing 3 Cr. A continuation of 450-121 Architectural Drawing with emphasis on masonry construction. Introduction to steel construction. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 450-121 Architectural Drawing. (Forme1'/y 122 Architectural Drawing. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Building Construction Technology 121.)

148


BUILDING CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY 450

450-123 Architectural Drawing 3 Cr. A continuation of 450-122 Architectural Drawing. Steel and concrete structures are emphasized. Practical drawing problems are introduced relating to commercial structures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 450-122 Architectural Drawing. (Fonnerly 122 Architectural Drawing. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Building C011struction Technology 121.)

450-221 Building Equipment 3 Cr. Introduction to mechanical systems as applicable to building construction. Water supply, sanitation and acoustical systems. Environmental factors affecting systems design. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 450-122 Architectural Drawing. (Formerly 221 Building Equipmmt. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Building Comtruction Technology 122.)

450-222 Building Equipment 3 Cr. Fundamentals of heating, ventilating and air conditioning. Equipment and systems will be investigated. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 450-122 Architectural Drawing. (Fonnerly 222 Building Equipment. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Building Construction Technology 122.)

450-223 Building Equipment 3 Cr. Electrical theory and electrical systems as applicable to buildings. Fundamentals of commercial and industrial lighting. Systems of power distribution. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 450-122 Architectural Drawing. (Formerly 222 Building Equipment. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Building Construction Technology 122.)

450-231 Contracts and Specifications 2 Cr. Legal contracts, construction and interpretation of specifications as related to the construction industry. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 450-122 Architectural Drawing. (Fonnerly 231 Contracts, Specifications and Estimating. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite Building Construction Technology 122.)

149


BUILDING CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY 450

450-232 Construction Estimating 3 Cr. A basic course for the beginning estimator, architect or contractor. Computing from plans of a construction project, including cost of labor and materials, lump sum and unit costs, preliminary and final estimates. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 450-123 Architectural Drawing or equivalent. (Formerly 231 Contracts, Specifications and Estimating. 3 Semester Cr. Lectm'e 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Builditlg Comtruction Technology 122.)

450-241 Principles of Structural Design 3 Cr. Introduction to the design of structural members and systems. Stress analysis by graphic method. Fasteners, welded connections, members in tension and compression, rolled beams and girders are topics considered. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 550-252 Strength of Materials or concurrent enrollment. (Formerly 241 Principles o/Structural Design. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Bulding Construction Technology 122 and Engineering 201 may be taken concurrently.)

450-242 Principles of Structural Design 3 Cr. A continuation of 450-241 Principles of Structural Design with emphasis on roof and timber construction. Introduction to reinforced concrete. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 450-241 Principles of Structural Design. (Formerly 241 Principles o/Structural Design. 3 Semester Ct~ Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Building Construction Technology 122 and Engineering 201 may be taken concurrently.)

450-243 Principles of Concrete Design 3 Cr. Capacities of reinforced concrete. Design of reinforced concrete beams, girders, floor slabs, column and wall footings. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 450-242 Principles of Structural Design. (Formerly 201 Introduction to Concrete Design. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Builditlg Comtruction Tech11Oiogy 241.)

3 Cr. 450-251 Construction Procedures Various construction methods and procedures. Includes an orientation to contemporary construction equipment and its application to the job schedule. Site preparation, scheduling of equipment, men and materials. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 450-123 Architectural Drawing or ability to interpret construction drawings and specifications. (Formerly 251 Construction Procedures and Building Codes. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Building Construction Technology 221 recommended.)

150


Business (General) 460 460-108 Introduction to Business 3 Cr. A comprehensive survey of business principles, problems and procedures. Examination and discussion of the nature of business production and distribution of goods. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 108 Introduction to Business. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

460-112 Business Management 5 Cr. Introduction to concepts of management and business. Detailed analysis of management functions. Includes planning objectives, policies, methods and procedures. Delineating authority, responsibilities and preparing organization charts. Controlling standards, production and costs. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460-108 Introduction to Business. (Formerly 112 Business Management. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Business 108.)

460-152 Salesmanship 3 Cr. Fundamentals of retail, wholesale, outside and service selling. Customer impact, merchandise and sales presentation. Closing and post-sale service. Principles of self-management, practice on sales preparation and demonstration. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460-108 Introduction to Business recommended. (Formerly 116 Salesmanship. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Business 108 recommended.)

3 Cr. 460-154 Sales Promotion Fundamentals of sales promotion. Coordination of sales promotion campaigns. Sales literature, manuals and visual aids. Displays, trad~ shows and other dealer aids. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460-152 Salesmanship. (Formerly 116 Salesmanship. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Business 108 recommended.)

460-155 Principles of Retailing 3 Cr. An exploration of retailing organization and management in historical perspective. Includes store location and layout, buying and pricing. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 410-107 Business Mathematics and 460-108 Introduction to Business. (Formerly 155 Principles of Retailing. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Busimss 107 and 108.)

151


BUSINESS (GENERAL) 460

460-157 Principles of Retailing 3 Cr. Continuation of 460-155 Principles of Retailing with emphasis on sales promotion, selection of market areas, inventory control and store management. Review of selected cases. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460-155 Principles of Retailing. (Formerly 155 Principles of Retailing. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Pret'equisites: Bushless 107 and 108.)

460-201 Principles of Marketing 5 Cr. Functional approach is emphasized in the study of institutions involved in moving industrial, consumer, farm goods and services from producer to consumer. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 460-108 Introduction to Business, and 520-100 Economics for Business and Industry or 520-201 Principles of Economics. (Formerly 201 Principles of Marketing. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hom"!!. Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201.)

460-213 Business Law 3 Cr. A study of the development of laws that govern modern commercial transactions, such as contracts, agency, and employer-employee relationships, negotiable instruments and an understanding of our courts. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. (Formerly 213 Business Law. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Sophomot'e standing.)

152


BUSINESS (GENERAL) 460

3 Cr. 460-214 Business Law A continuation of the study of law governing modern business transactions. Emphasis on sales, bailments, partnerships, corporations and personal property as related to business transactions. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460-213 Business Law. (Formerly 214 Business Law. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hout'S. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Business 213.)

3 Cr. 460-215 Business Law A continuation of the study governing business transactions, including real property, insurance, mortgages, wills, bankruptcy and security devices. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460-214 Business Law. (Fonnerly 214 Business Law. 3 Semestet' Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Business 213.)

460-216 Introduction to Industrial Purchasing 3 Cr. Analysis of purchasing organization structure and procedures. Descriptions of quality, quantity, value analysis, sources of supply and procurement controls. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 410-107 Business Mathematics and 460-108 Introduction to business. (Formerly 111 Industrial Purchasing. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hout's. Prerequisite: None.)

460-217 Intermediate Purchasing 3 Cr. Application of principles relating to price policies, speculation, equipment procurement, salvage operations, legal matters, records and budgets. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460-216 Introduction to Industrial Purchasing. (Fomzerly 1 II Industrial Purchasing. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

460-218 Purchasing Management 3 Cr. Procedures and policies relative to contract negotiations. Vendorbuyer relationships, make or buy decisions, inventory control, buyer training, materials handling, records and budgets. Analysis of specific case studies. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460-217 Intermediate Purchasing. (New course.)

153


BUSINESS (GENERAL) 460

3 Cr. 460-220 Human Relations in Business Basic motives of people in job situations. Company relationships with worker, suppliers and customers. Leadership development, communication and group processes. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 220 Human Relations in Business. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

460-225 Principles of Advertising 4 Cr. Introduction to the field of advertising, employing the economical, behavioral and practical aspects of campaign strategy, appeal and media selection. Consideration also given to layout, typography and production methods. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460-201 Principles of Marketing. (Formerly 225 Advertising. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Business 201')

460-241 Office Management 4 Cr. Basic principles of office organization and management. Emphasizes the interrelationship between physical, personal and procedural factors affecting the efficient layout of an office. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 241 Office Management. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

460-252 Sales Management 3 Cr. Principles and concepts underlying the organization, operation and control of a sales force. Topics such as selection of personnel, recruiting, compensation plans, sup~rvision, evaluation and stimulation of sales programs are covered. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460-154 Sales Promotion or consent of instructor. (Formerly 252 Sales Management. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Business 108 and 116.)

460-253 Wholesaling 4 Cr. Survey of the wholesaling structure, past and present. Analysis of planning, operation and management of the various types of wholesaling institutions in our economy. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460-201 Principles of Marketing. (Formerly 253 Wholesaling. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Pt'erequisite: Business 201.)

154


BUSINESS (GENERAL) 460/ CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY 470

460-256 Retail Buying and Merchandising 3 Cr. Techniques of computation and control essential for profitable merchandising. Includes mark-up, pricing, stock turnover, retail method of inventory, analysis of operating statements, unit and dollar control, open-to-buy computation. Review and analysis of current merchandising policies. Application of buying procedures. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 460-157 Principles of Retailing. (Formerly 256 Retail Buying and Merchandising. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Business 107 and 155.)

460-260 Cooperative Field Experience 9 Cr. Limited to students in the Cooperative Field Experience Program. Full-time employment in an approved area under College supervision. Requirements for credit will be a minimum of 350 clock hours of approved work, a report from the employer, term report by student and on-the-job visits by the coordinator of the department. Note: Open to students taking courses in the concentrations of Purchasing, Retailing, Salesmanship and Wholesaling. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 35 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. (New Course.)

460-261 Cooperative Field Experience 9 Cr. Continuation of 460-260 Cooperative Field Experience. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 35 hours. Prerequisite: 460-260 Cooperative Field Experience. (New Course.)

Chemical Technology 470 470-121 Elementary Physical Chemistry 3 Cr. Fundamental course consisting of lectures and demonstrations. Explanation of chemical phenomena on the basis of molecular behavior. Properties of solutions, ionic and phase equilibrium, colligative properties and the laws of thermodynamics are studied. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 480-111 General Chemistry. (Formerly 121 Elementa1J1 Physical Chemistry. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry III or taken concurrently; or industrial analytical experience.)

155


CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY 470/ CHEMISTRY 480

470-212 Chemical Engineering 3 Cr. Beginning course for chemistry students, laboratory technicians or non-technical chemical equipment operators. Discussion of the fundamental principles of chemical engineering, and the relationships and analysis of chemical engineering process operations and equipment. Principles of unit operation, such as heat exchange, condensation and evaporation. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: High school chemistry and mathematics, or industrial experience. (Formerly 212 Chemical Engineering. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: High school chemistry and mathematics, or bldustrial experience.)

3 Cr. 470-220 Introduction to Chemical Instrumentation Beginning course consisting of lectures and demonstrations of the theory, principles, design and operation of available chemical instruments. Flow of electronic signals and the information they represent in chemical instrument operation. Valuable fundamentals for chemistry students and practicing laboratory technicians. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 480-111 General Chemistry or 780-101 Introductory Physics, or industrial chemistry laboratory experience. (Fonnerly 220 Introduction to Chemical Instrumentation. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 111 or Physics 10 1, or industrial chemical laboratory experience.)

Chemistry 480 480-101 Introductory Chemistry 5 Cr. Emphasis on atomic and molecular structure as a basis for understanding valence, formulas and chemical reactions. States of matter, solutions, compounds, ionization and nuclear chemistry as well as their application in daily life. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: One year of high school ~lgebra or equivalent. (Formerly 101 Introductory Chemistry. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 houn Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or equivalent.)

480-102 Introductory Chemistry 5 Cr. Elementary organic chemistry and biochemistry with emphasis on the chemical nature of foods, body processes in nutrition and chemical basis of deficiency diseases. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or equivalent. (Formerly 102 Introductory Chemistry. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101.)

156


CHEMISTRY 480

480-111 General Chemistry 4 Cr. Study of the fundamental principles of chemistry. Emphasis on atomic structure, chemical bonding, equation balancing and stoichiometry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 480-101 Introductory Chemistry or one year of high school chemistry, or equivalent, and one year of high school algebra or equivalent. (Formerly 111 General Chemistry. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: Chemistry 101; or one year of high school chemistry or equivalent; atld one year of high school algebra or equivalent.)

480-112 General Chemistry 4 Cr. Continuation of 480-111 General Chemistry. Emphasis on states of matter, properties of solutions, chemical kinetics and chemical equilibrium. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 480-111 General Chemistry. (Formerly 112 General Chemistry. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 111.)

480-113 General Chemistry 5 Cr. Continuation of 480-112 General Chemistry. Emphasis on thermodynamics, electrochemistry, equilibria in aqueous solution, semimicro qualitative analysis and descriptive inorganic chemistry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 480-112 General Chemistry. (Formerly 112 General Chemistry. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 111.)

480-211 Organic Chemistry 5 Cr. Chemistry of carbon compounds. Preparation, properties and reactions of aliphatic and aromatic groups. Theoretical concepts and mechanisms used to aid understanding and explain reactions. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 480-113 General Chemistry. (Formerly 211 Organic Chemistry. 5 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Chemish'JI 112.)

480-212 Organic Chemistry 5 Cr. Continuation of 480-211 Organic Chemistry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 480-211 Organic Chemistry. (Formerly 212 Organic Chemistry. 5 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 211.)

158


CHEMISTRY 480/ DATA PROCESSING 490

480-213 Organic Chemistry 5 Cr. Continuation of 480-212 Organic Chemistry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 480-212 Organic Chemistry. (Formerly 212 Organic Chemistry. 5 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 211.)

480-221 Quantitative Analysis 3 Cr. Theory and laboratory practice of volumetric and gravimetric analyses. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 480-113 General Chemistry. (Formerly 221 Quantitative Analysis. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 8 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 112.)

480-222 Quantitative Analysis 3 Cr. Continuation of 480-221 Quantitative Analysis. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 480-221 Quantitative Analysis. (Formerly 221 Quantitative Analysis. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 8 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 112.)

Data Processing 490 490-101 Electronic Data Processing 4 Cr. Introduction to electronic data processing. History of data processing. Features of data processing unit record equipment and number systems. Computer concepts, programming and system analysis principles. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 101 Electronic Data Processing. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. P1'erequisite: None.)

490-111 Data Processing Applications 3 Cr. Functional problems of manipulations, logic, calculation and reporting. Typical data processing equipment - e.g., keypunches, sorters and tabulators - used directly as applicable to problem solution. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 490-101 Electronic Data Processing. (Formerly 111 Data Processing Applications Laboratory. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Data Processing 101.)

159


DATA PROCESSING 490

490-201 Computer Programming 4 Cr. Binary coded decimal and hexadecimal number code systems defined. Absolute machine language and symbolic language computer coding methods are used to introduce programming features of a specific computer system. Advantages and limitations of specific computer are compared with other computers in the field. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 490-101 Electronic Data Processing. (Formerly 201 Computel' Programming. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Data Processing 101.)

490-202 Computer Programming 3 Cr. Continuation of 490-201 Computer Programming. Basic techniques of assembly language programming. Introduction of program modification techniques. Logic tables. Problem-oriented languages and report generators. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 490-201 Computer Programming. (Formerly 202 Computer Programming. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Data Processing 201')

490-203 Computer Programming 3 Cr. Continuation of 490-202 Computer Programming. Advanced techniques of assembly language/report generators. Programming applied to problems involving program modification. Magnetic tape and/or disk storage file handling methods. Symbol manipulation and file organization. Introduction to macros and large systems. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 490-202 Computer Programming. (Formerly 202 Computer Programming. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Data Processing 201.)


DATA PROCESSING 490

490-211 Applied Data Mathematics 4 Cr. Logic, sets and Boolean expressions, interpolation, exact and approximate solutions to simultaneous linear systems. Statistical methods applications, numerical use of concepts of differential and integral calculus. Overview of management science techniques. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-141 Elementary Probability and Statistics. (Formerly 211 Applied Data Mathematics. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 121.)

490-215 Numerical Methods and Computers 4 Cr. Introduces computer programming for mathematics, science and engineering. N limerical methods for solving problems arising in statistics, engineering, physics and chemistry are studied, and solutions are obtained via the digital computer. Major programming emphasis is with Fortran. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 690-115 College Algebra. (New course.)

490-221 Programming Systems 4 Cr. Stresses familiarity with the differences among assembly systems, macrosystems, tabular language and compiler languages. Applications, advantages and disadvantages. Operating systems, total systems and integration of programming effort. Major programming emphasis is with Cobol. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 490-203 Computer Programming. (Fo17nerly 221 Programming Systems. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Data Processitlg 202')

490-231 Systems Analysis 4 Cr. Systems and procedures function. Includes analysis, design, control of management information and data systems. Economics of manual, electromechanical and electronic data processing. Advantages and disadvantages of computer, communication and information retrieval systems for information evaluation. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 490-203 Computer Programming. (Formerly 231 Systems Analysis. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Pret'equisite: Data Processing 201.)

161


DATA PROCESSING 490

490-241 Information Retrieval 4 Cr. Methods and problems involving information retrieval systems. Presentation of theories and approaches to the use of computers in disciplines such as statistics, law, medicine, library science, music, language and the humanities. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 490-231 Systems Analysis. (New Course.)

490-245 Tele-Communication Processing 4 Cr. Discussion of various forms of tele-communications and their relation or connection with computers. Non-computer devices such as telephone and telegraph are covered. Computer-oriented subjects covered are direct computer to computer data transmission, message switching facilities, real-time and on-line inquiry stations. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 490-231 Systems Analysis. (New Course.)

490-251 Data Processing Field Project 3 Cr. Each student selects a project to complete. Upon approval, he develops an information system, documents and programs it for implementation. All projects to include hands-on assembly, testing, debugging and processing. A written report is required, giving a complete explanation of the programming method, the assembly and processing techniques, the diagnostic and debugging procedures used. Lecture o hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisites: 490-221 Programming Systems and 490-231 Systems Analysis. (Formerly251 Data Processing Field Project. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Data Processing 221 or concurrent enrollment.)

490-260 Cooperative Field Experience 9 Cr. Limited to students in the Cooperative Field Experience Program. Full-time employment in an approved area under College supervision. Requirements for credit will be a minimum of 350 clock hours of approved work, a report from the employer, term report by student and on-the-job visits by the coordinator of the department. Lecture o hours. Laboratory 35 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. (New Course.)

490-261 Cooperative Field Experience 9 Cr. Continuation of 490-260 Cooperative Field Experience. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 35 hours. Prerequisite: 490-260 Cooperative Field Experience. (New Course.)

162


Dental Hygiene 500 500-101 Preclinical Dental Hygiene 2 Cr. Techniques of removing stains and deposits from the teeth. Students practice on manikins and then apply the instruments in the mouth. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Dental Hygiene Program. (Formerly 101 Preclinical Dental Hygiene. 6 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: Open only to Dental Hygiene students.)

500-102 Head and Neck Anatomy and Tooth Morphology 4 Cr. Study of anatomy of oral structures including the teeth and their environmental and supporting tissues. Lectures on nomenclature, morphology, structure, function and occlusion of the teeth. Identification, drawing, and carving of some permanent and deciduous teeth. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Dental Hygiene Program. (Formerly 102 Head and Neck Anatomy and Tooth Morphology. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Open only to Dental Hygiene students.)

163


DENTAL HYGIENE 500

500-103 Oral Hygiene 2 Cr. History of dentistry and development of dental hygiene. Introduction to medico-dental terminology. Study of the formation of calculus and stains, principles of preventive dentistry and instrument sharpening. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Dental Hygiene Program. (Formerly 101 Preclinical Dental Hygiene. 6 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: Open only to Dental Hygiene students.)

500-104 General and Oral Histology 2 Cr. Origin and structure of tissues, histology and embryology of teeth, face and oral cavity. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Dental Hygiene Program. (Formerly 122 Gmeral and Oral Histo-Pathology. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 102.)

500-111 Preclinical Dental Hygiene 2 Cr. Continuation of 500-101 Preclinical Dental Hygiene and techniques of fluoride application. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 500-101 Preclinical Dental Hygiene. (Formerly 101 Preclinical Dental Hygiene. 6 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratm"] 9 hours. Prerequisite: Open only to Dental Hygiene students.)

500-112 Head and Neck Anatomy and Tooth Morphology 4 Cr. Continuation of 500-102 Head and Neck Anatomy and Tooth Morphology. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 500-102 Head and Neck Anatomy and Tooth Morphology. (Formerly 102 Head mId Neck Anatomy and Tooth Morphology. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Open only to Dental Hygiene students.)

500-113 Oral Hygiene 3 Cr. Study of the principles and methods of patient education, sterilization, fluoride, supplementary oral health techniques and clinic procedures. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 500-103 Oral Hygiene. (Formerly 101 Preclinical Dental Hygiene. 6 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: Open only to Dental Hygiene students.)

500-122 General and Oral Pathology 2 Cr. Introduction to general pathology. Inflammation, necrosis, retrograde changes, pathological process in diseases caused by bacteria, viruses and other organisms. Clinical pathology of diseases affecting

164


DENTAL HYGIENE 500

teeth and their supporting structures. Visual differentiation between normal and abnormal tissues. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 500-104 General and Oral Histology. (Formerly 122 General and Oral Histo-Pathology. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 102.)

500-124 Periodontics 2 Cr. Etiology and classification of periodontal disease and principles of periodontology. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 500-104 General and Oral Histology. (Formerly 121 Clinical Dental Hygiene. 3 Semestet路 Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Hygime 102.)

500-130 Dental Materials 5 Cr. Physical properties of dental materials and basic principles of their preparation. General manipulative techniques and various phases of laboratory techniques discussed and demonstrated. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 500-122 General and Oral Pathology. (Formerly 221 Dental Materials. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 201.)

500-131 Clinical Dental Hygiene 3 Cr. Students perform oral prophylaxis, expose radiographs, apply topical fluoride to the teeth and give patient education to adult and child patients in the clinic. Laboratory hours refer to hours in clinic. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 500-122 General and Oral Pathology. (Formerly 121 Clinical Dental Hygiene. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 102.)

500-132 Radiology 3 Cr. History and development of the X-ray, its nature and properties. Safety precautions and uses of the X-ray in dentistry. Theory and practice in the fundamentals of oral radiographic technique. Film place!J).ent, tube angulation, processing and mounting of films. A specific number of radiodontic examinations and hours in darkroom procedures are required throughout the two-year Dental Hygiene Program. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 500-122 General and Oral Pathology. (Formerly 123 Radiology. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 102.)

165


DENTAL HYGIENE 500

500-201 Clinical Dental Hygiene 4 Cr. Continuation of 500-131 Clinical Dental Hygiene. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: 500-131 Clinical Dental Hygiene. (Formerly 201 Clinical Dental Hygiene. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 132 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 121.)

500-203 Pharmacology and Anesthesiology 4 Cr. Drugs and anesthetics, with emphasis on those used in the dental office. Discussion of the origin of drugs and anesthetics, physical and chemical properties, preparation, mode of administration and effects on body systems. Preoperative and postoperative patient care. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 500-130 Dental Materials. (Formerly 233 Pharmacology,. Anesthesiology and Dental Emergencies. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Dmtal Hygiene 202')

500-204 Public Health 2 Cr. Historical development of public health practices in the United States as they relate to dental hygiene. Present administrative organizations and their functions and services. Exploration of present public health concepts. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 500-130 Dental Materials. (Formerly 232 Health Education and Public Health. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 202.)

500-205 Dental Assisting 1 Cr. Application of principles learned in 500-130 Dental Materials by assisting the dental students at Case Western Reserve University School of Dentistry. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 500-130 Dental Materials. (Formerly 202 Clinical Dmtal Hygiene. 5 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 201.)

500-211 Clinical Dental Hygiene 5 Cr. Continuation of 500-201 Clinical Dental Hygiene. Special assignments in dental departments of Veterans Administration, Metropolitan General and Highland View Hospitals to further acquaint students with diverse mouth conditions. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: 500-201 Clinical Dental Hygiene. (Formerly 202 Clinical Dental Hygime. 5 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Hygime 201.)

166


DENTAL HYGIENE 500

500-223 First Aid 2 Cr. General first aid instruction, treatment, required equipment and materials. Students participate in courses offered by the American Red Cross. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 500-223 Pharmacology and Anesthesiology. (Formerly 233 Pharmacology, Anesthesiology and Dental Emergencies. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 202.)

167


DENTAL HYGIENE 500

500-224 Dental Health Education 3 Cr. Analysis of concepts, techniques of presentation and goals of dental health education. Major emphasis is on preparation and use of lesson plans and instructional materials in dental health. Classroom instruction in dental health in the elementary and secondary schools. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 500-204 Public Health. (Formerly 232 Health Education and Public Healtb. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 202.)

500-230 Dental Specialties 5 Cr. Lectures by dental specialists in the fields of endodontics, operative dentistry, orthodontics, pedodontics, periodontics, prosthetics, research and surgery to enable students to gain a knowledge of all phases of dentistry. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 500-223 First Aid. (Formerly 222 Dental Specialties. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 201.)

500-231 Clinical Dental Hygiene 5 Cr. Continuation of 500-211 Clinical Dental Hygiene. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: 500-211 Clinical Dental Hygiene. (Formerly 231 Clinical Dental Hygiene. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hout'S. Laboratory 9 boU1's. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 202')

500-234 Dental Ethics and Jurisprudence 3 Cr. Future of dentistry and role of the dental hygienist in her profession and association. Relationship of dental hygienist to other members of the dental health team. Principles of professional ethics. Laws and regulations related to dentistry and dental hygiene. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 500-223 First Aid. (Formerly 234 Dental Etbics and Jurisprudence. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hom's. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 202.)

500-235 Dental Office Management 1 Cr. Introduction to office administration covering all phases of a dental office. Reception of patients, use of telephone, inventory records, recording, billing, filing, banking procedures and care of equipment. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 500-223 First Aid. (Formerly 220 Office Management. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 201.)

168


Economics 520 520-100 Economics for Business and Industry 3 Cr. Practical course in the principles of economics designed to provide an understanding of the structure, organization and operation of our economy; its relation to our social and political welfare and to our standard of living. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 100 Economics for Business and Industry. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

520-101 Principles of Economics 3 Cr. An introduction to the scope and method of economics; scarcity and resource allocation; basic demand-supply analysis; American capitalism and its basic components; fundamental questions and the market economy; money and banking; monetary policy and the Federal Reserve. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 201 Principles of Economics. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

520-102 Principles of Economics 3 Cr. A continuation of 520-101 Principles of Economics. National income analysis and the business cycle; modern employment theory; fiscal policy and theory; synthesis of fiscal and monetary policy; the theory of the firm and the theory of consumer behavior; price and output determination by market structure. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 520-101 Principles of Economics. (Formerly 202 Principles of Economics. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Economics 201.)

520-103 Principles of Economics 3 Cr. Continuation of 520-102 Principles of Economics. Factor resource prices; the price system and equilibrium analysis; current domestic economic problems. Monopoly, social unbalance, agriculture, collective bargaining and poverty; international trade; the theory of economic growth in developed and underdeveloped countries. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 520-102 Principles of Economics. (Formerly 202 Principles of Economics. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hoUt'S. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Economics 201.)

169


ECONOMICS 520jEDUCATION 530jELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY 540

520-151 Development of the American Economy 4 Cr. Evolutionary development of our economic system from medieval times to present. Designed for better understanding of the economic life. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 151 Development of American Eco11Omy. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

Education 530 3 Cr. 530-101 Introduction to Education Designed to introduce the student to the broad and complex field of public education. Emphasis on personal and professional characteristics required for successful teaching. Note: This course cannot be utilized for purposes of direct teaching credential application in Ohio . . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 101 Introduction to Education. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

Electrical-Electronic Technology 540 2 Cr. 540-100 Electrical-Electronic Orientation Designed to acquaint the student with his career field, employment trends and typical future technical assignments. Instruction in the use of the slide rule and engineering problem solving. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 100 Electrical-Electronic Orientation. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

540-140

Magnetics, Electromagnetic Induction and 3 Cr. Direct Current Machines Fundamentals of magnetic circuits, inductance and electromagnetic induction. Direct current generator-motor principles and construction. Efficiency, rating and application of dynamos. Voltage, current, excitation, torque, speed and speed regulation, armature reaction and power losses. Rotating amplifiers and D.C; machines for automation. Practical laboratory experiences with D.C. machines. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours.

170


ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY 540

Prerequisites: 550-125 Electric Circuits and 690-101 Algebra. (Formerly 140 Direct Current Machines. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 125.)

540-150 Alternating Current Machines 3 Cr. Theory of alternating current machinery. Construction, characteristics and operation of induction, synchronous and single-phase motors, synchronous generators, converters and transformers, both single and polyphase. Practical laboratory experience with machinery. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 550-127 Electric Circuits or concurrent enrollment. (Formerly 201 Alternating Current Machines. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hom'S. Prerequisite: Engineering 130.)

3 Cr. 540-160 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits Fundamentals of vacuum tubes and semiconductors. Circuit applications including rectifier and basic power supply circuits as well as filter networks. Vacuum triode characteristics. Practical laboratory experience with circuits involving semiconductors, zener, tunnel and vacuum diodes. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 550-127 Electric Circuits or concurrent enrollment. (Formerly 160 Basic Electronics. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 130 or taken concurrently.)

171


ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY 540

2 Cr. 540-211 Electrical Construction and Application Wiring systems for light, heat and power. Transmission and distribution systems. Switches, contactors, relays and circuit breakers. Wire, cable and conduit applications. Feeder and branch circuit protection. Safety and grounding practices. Demonstrations will be used to familiarize students with equipment. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 540-150 Alternating Current Machines. (Formerly 211 Electrical Construction and Application. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Electrical-Electronic Technology 201')

540-235 Communication Transmission 3 Cr. Fundamentals of A.M. radio transmission and receiving. Emphasis on tuned and coupled circuits, R.F. amplifiers and oscillators, modulation and demodulation of A.M. waves. A.M. receiver circuitry. Practical laboratory experience with audio components and circuits as well as the construction and alignment of a superheterodyne receiver. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 540-261 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits or concurrent enrollment. (Formerly 235 Communication Transmission. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Electrical-Electronic Technology 231 or taken concurrently.)

540-236 Communication Transmission 3 Cr. Continuation of 540-235 Communication Transmission. Emphasis on frequency modulation, transmission lines, antennas and propagation. Telephone transmission, advanced radio transmission and receiving systems. Laboratory experience with radio and telephone equipment. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 540-235 Communication Transmission. (Formerly 235 Communication Transmission. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Electrical-Electronic Technology 231 or taken concurrently.)

540-241 Electrical Drafting 3 Cr. Specific applications of drafting techniques to describe electrical circuits and systems, motor control diagrams and electrical construction. Graphic symbols and conventions. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 550-121 Engineering Drafting. (Formerly 241 Electrical Power Blueprints and Drafting. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 121.)

172


ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY 540

540-250 Industrial Electronics 3 Cr. Rectification and control as related to the electrical requirements of industrial devices. Switching, control, counting and timing circuits and equipment. Tube and solid state power supplies. Regulation of voltage and current. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 540-260 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits or concurrent enrollment. (Formerly 221 Industrial Electronics. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: Physics 101 and Electrical-Electronic Technology 160.)

540-251 Industrial Electronics 3 Cr. A continuation of 540-250 Industrial Electronics. Topics covered include phototubes, photorelays, photo transistors, transistor timers, magnetic amplifiers, synchro generators and motors, servomechanisms, electronic heat, welding and motor controls. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 540-250 Industrial Electronics and 540-261 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits or concurrent enrollment. (Formerly 221 Industrial Electronics. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours, Prerequisites: Physics 101 and Electrical-Electronic Technology 160.)

540-252 Logic, Pulse and Switching Circuitry 3 Cr. Elements of logic, pulse and switching circuitry. Emphasis on number systems and Boolean algebra, clipping and clamping circuits. The transistor as a switch, bistable, monostable and astable multivibrators, pulse amplifiers and blocking oscillators. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 540-261 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits or concurrent enrollment. (Formerly 251 Computer Circuitry. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Electrical-Electronic Technology 231 or taken concurrently.)

540-253 Computer Circuitry 3 Cr. Application of logic, pulse and switching circuits to computers. Codes and introduction to machine language. Emphasis on counters and shift registers, timing and control, computer arithmetic operations and memory systems. Input-output equipment, analog to digital and digital to analog conversion. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 540-252 Logic, Pulse and Switching Circuitry. (Formerly 251 Computer Circuitry. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Electrical-Electronic Technology 231 or taken concurrently.)

173


ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY 540

3 Cr. 540-260 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits Transistor characteristics and theory of operation. Transistor biasing and thermal stabilization. Small signal and low frequency amplifier circuits. Field effect transistors. Practical laboratory experience with transistor and triode amplifier circuits. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 540-160 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits. (Formerly 231 Semi-Conductors. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Electrical-Electronic Technology 160.)

540-261 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits 3 Cr. A continuation of 540-260 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits with emphasis on amplifiers, feedback amplifiers, untuned sine wave and negative resistance oscillators, large signal amplifiers, integrated circuits and regulated power supplies. Laboratory experience with cascaded transistor amplifiers, power amplifiers, phase inverters, SCR's and amplifier integrated circuits. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 540-260 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits. (Formerly 231 Semi-Conductors. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Electrical-Electronic Technology 160.)

540-262 Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation 3 Cr. Principles of electronic measuring and test instruments. Basic meters in D.C. and A.C. measurements. Comparison and bridge type measurements. Electronic meters, oscilloscopes and component testing devices. Practical laboratory experience with instrument circuits, operation, calibration and measurement. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 540-260 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits or concurrent enrollment. (Formerly 261 Electrical Measurement and Instrumentation. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Electrical-Electronic Technology 221.)

3 Cr. 540-263 Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation Circuitry, operation and calibration of the more sophisticated electronic instruments. Included are recorders and transducers, signal generators, frequency measuring devices, digital instruments and the analog computer. Basic control systems are examined. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 540-251 Industrial Electronics, 540-252 Logic, Pulse and Switching Circuitry and 540-262 Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation. (Formerly 261 Electrical Measurement and Instrumentation. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Electrical-Electronic Technology 221.)

174


ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY 540/ ENGINEERING 550

540-265 Automation and Electronic Controls a Cr. Introduction to the various automatic control systems and their components. Emphasis on servomechanisms and other feedback control systems. Electrical, electronic, mechanical, hydraulic and pneumatic components as they relate to control systems. Basics of control circuitry. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 540-251 Industrial Electronics and 540-263 Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation. (Formerly 265 Automation and Electronic Controls. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratoty 2 hours. Prerequisites: Electrical-Electronic Technology 201 and 221.)

540-271 Solid State Circuit Analysis a Cr. Introduction to network terminology. Geometry and equilibrium equations, methodology of solution. Circuit elements and sources, circuit response to step functions and review of semiconductor theory. Switching circuit design. Functions and characteristics of transistors and mode circuits. Prerequisites: 540-261 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits and 690-152 Analytic Geometry and Calculus. (Formerly 271 Solid State Circuit Analysis. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Mathematics 152 and Electrical-Electronic Technology 231.)

a Cr. 540-275 Introduction to Microcircuits Developing science of microminiature electronic circuits and components. Characteristics, fabrication and applications. Prerequisite: 540-261 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits or equivalent. (Formerly 275 Introduction to Microcircuits. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Electrical-Electronic Technology 231 or its equivalent with permission ofthe instructor.)

Engineering 550 2 Cr. 550-100 Slide Rule Introduction to the theory and application of the slide rule as a computational device. Guided problem solving with log-log trigonometric slide rules will be featured. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 100 Slide Rule. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

175


ENGINEERING 550

550-101 Metallurgy 3 Cr. Physical and mechanical behavior of pure metals and alloys. Specific metal systems are examined to illustrate various phenomena. Introduction to metallography and physical testing. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 101 Basic Metallurgy. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

550-102 Metallurgy 3 Cr~ A continuation of 550-101 Metallurgy with special emphasis on phase changes of metals. Heat treatment of steel is introduced. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 550-101 Metallurgy. (Formerly 102 Physical Metallurgy. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 101.)

550-103 Metallurgy 3 Cr. Non-ferrous metals and alloys, high and low temperature effects upon metals, wear and corrosion. Extractive and powder metallurgy. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 550-102 Metallurgy. (Formerly 102 Physical Metallurgy. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 101.)


ENGINEERING 550

550-111 Principles of Air Conditioning and Refrigeration 4 Cr. States of matter, pressures, temperature and energy conversion. Cooling aspects of air conditioning. Systems and control devices. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-101 Algebra. (Formerly 111 Principles of Refrigeration. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

550-112 Engineering Report Construction 3 Cr. Oral, written and graphic methods of communication for the engineer and technician. Provides practice in preparation of technical reports. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 112 Engineering Report Construction. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

550-121 Engineering Drawing 3 Cr. Principles and practice in orthographic and pictorial drawing and sketching. Lettering, applied geometry and use of instruments. Sectional and auxiliary views. Dimensioning systems as applicable to production drawing. Graphic data representation. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 121 Engineering Drawing. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

550-122 Engineering Drawing 3 Cr. Elements of machine drawing, electronic diagrams, piping and welding drawing, intersections and developments. Precision dimensioning as dictated by shop processes. Working drawings, methods of reproduction and control. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 550-121 Engineering Drawing. (Formerly 122 Engineering Drawing. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 121.)

550-123 Engineering Drawing 3 Cr. Drafting principles and applications pertinent to working drawings. Tool drawings, design drawing and applications of standard parts. Technical illustration is introduced together with applications of special drafting aids and techniques. Graphical mathematics methods and media are included. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 550-122 Engineering Drawing. (Formerly 122 Engineering Drawing. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 121.)

177


ENGINEERING 550

550-125 Electric Circuits 3 Cr. Direct current circuit fundamentals with emphasis on electron theory of current flow, electrical quantities and their units of measurement, sources of EMF, Ohm's law, electrical energy and power relationships. Series, parallel and series-parallel circuits, voltage dividers. Kirchhoff's laws, Thevenin's and Norton's theorems. Practicallal?oratory experience in the construction of working circuits and the evaluation of their performance. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 125 Principles of Electricity - D.C. Circuits. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Pre1'equisite: None.)

550-126 Electric Circuits 3 Cr. Fundamentals of alternating current circuits with emphasis on capacitance, sinusoidal voltage and current, reactance, vectors and phasors, impedance, power in A.C. circuits. Practical laboratory experience with A.C. instruments including oscilloscopes, capacitance testing and the evaluation of reactive circuits. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 540-140 Magnetics, Electromagnetic Induction and Direct Current Machines or concurrent enrollment, and 550-125 Electric Circuits. (Formerly 130 Principles of Electricity - A.C. Circuits. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: Mathematics 101 and Engineering 125.)

550-127 Electric Circuits 3 Cr. Continuation of 550-126 Electric Circuits. Emphasis on resonance, transformer action, three-phase systems and harmonics. Practical laboratory experience with various combinations of series and parallel reactive circuits, resonant circuits and transformers. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 550-126 Electric Circuits and 690-105 Trigonometry. (Formerly 130 Principles of Electricity - A.C. Circuits. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: Mathematics 101 and Engineering 125.)

550-151 Applied Mechanics 3 Cr. Basic engineering statics. Includes study of force systems, center of gravity, equilibrium, friction and moment of inertia. Force analysis as related to structures. Application of statics to fluids and beams. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 690-101 Algebra and 690-105 Trigonometry, or concurrent enrollment. (Formerly 151 Applied Mechanics. 3 Semester Cr. Lectltre 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Mathematics 101 and 103. Mathematics 103 may be taken concurrently.)

178


ENGINEERING 550

550-211 Introduction to Surveying 3 Cr. Applications and care of surveying instruments. Techniques and practice in taping. Use of transit and level in horizontal and vertical measurement, differential and profile. Emphasis on accurate recording of field data in note form. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 690-105 Trigonometry and 550-121 Engineering Drawing, or equivalent. (Formerly 211 Introduction to Surveying. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: Mathematics 103 and Building Construction Technology 121.)

550-212 Surveying 3 Cr. A continuation of 550-211 Introduction to Surveying with emphasis on contour work, drainage and grading, and layout of vertical curves. Topographic stadia and plane table work will be introduced. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 550-211 Introduction to Surveying. (Formerly 211 Introduction to Surveying. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: Mathematics 103 and Building Construction Technology 121.)

550-251 Mechanics and Strength of Materials 3 Cr. Kinematics with applications to particles and rigid bodies. Kinetics including dynamic equilibrium, angular motion and center of percussion. Concepts of work, energy and power. Introduction to the mechanics of materials including a study of stress, strain and torsion. Practical evaluation of theoretical concepts in the testing laboratory. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 550-151 Applied Mechanics. (Formerly 201 Strength of Materials. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 151.)

550-252 Strength of Materials 3 Cr. A study of the reaction of engineering materials to factors affecting their deformation. Topics covered include shear and moment in beams, beam stresses and deflections, combined stresses, welded, bolted and riveted connections, effects of forces acting upon columns. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 550-251 Mechanics and Strength of Materials. (Formerly 201 Strength of Materials. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 151')

179


English 560 560-091 Essentials of \Vritten Communication 3 Cr. Intensive practice in written composition and basic language skills. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Placement by department. (Formerly 091 Reading and Composition. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: None.)

560-092 Essentials of Written Communication 3 Cr. Intensive practice in written composition with emphasis on the organization of ideas into paragraphs and short themes. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-091 Essentials of Written Communication or placement by department. (Formerly 092 Reading and Composition. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: None.)

560-093 Essentials of Written Communication 3 Cr. Continued intensive practice in written composition with emphasis on the incorporation of sources into short themes and/or reports. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-092 Essentials of Written Communication or placement by department. (Formerly 092 Reading and Composition. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: None.)

560-095 Reading Improvement 3 Cr. Principles underlying efficient reading applied in daily practice with emphasis on study techniques. Group instruction in comprehension, vocabulary and learning skills. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 095 Reading Improvement. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

560-096 Reading Improvement 3 Cr. Extended practice in the areas of comprehension, vocabulary and rate of purposeful reading at the college level. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-095 Reading Improvement or placement by department. (Formerly 096 Reading Improvement. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Pret'equisite: Grade of C or better in English 095 or placement on a standardized reading test at the 50th percentile.)

180


ENGLISH 560

560-097 Reading Improvement 3 Cr. Emphasis on speed, comprehension and critical interpretation of college-level material. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-096 Reading Improvement or placement by department. (Formerly 096 Reading Improvement. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in English 095 or placement on a standardized reading test at the 50th percetltile.)

560-101 College Composition 3 Cr. Careful and critical study of rhetorical principles of writing. Emphasis on the writing of expository essays. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: Placement by department. (Formerly 101 College Composition. 3 Semester Cr. Leetm'e 3 hours. Laboratory 0 bours. Prerequisite: Placement by counselor.)

560-102 College Composition 3 Cr. Continuation of 560-101 College Composition. Emphasis on style, argumentation and research procedures. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 560-101 College Composition. (Formerly 102 College Composition. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 bours. Laboratory 0 bours. Prerequisite: English 101.)

560-103 College Composition 3 Cr. Continuation of 560-102 College Composition. Emphasis on the critical and interpretative writing about literature. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-102 College Composition . . (Formerly 102 College Composition. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 bours. Pt'erequisite: English 101.)

560-221 Survey of British Literature 3 Cr. Study of British literature's major works from the beginning through the age of Milton. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-103 College Composition. (Formerly 221 British Literature. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 bours. Laboratory 0 bours. Prerequisite: English 102.)

560-222 Survey of British Literature 3 Cr. Study of British literature's major works from Restoration through the Romantic Period. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-103 College Composition. (Formerly 222 British Literature. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 bours. Prerequisite: English 102.)

181


ENGLISH 560

560-223 Survey of British Literature 3 Cr. Study of British literature's major works from the Victorian Period to the present. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-103 College Composition. (Formerly 222 British Literature. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: English 102.)

560-231 Survey of American Literature 3 Cr. Reading and analysis of notable American literary works from Bradford through Thoreau. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-103 College Composition. (Formerly 231 American Literature. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: English 102 or equivalent.)

560-232 Survey of American Literature . 3 Cr. Reading and analysis of notable American literary works from Hawthorne through Clemens. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-103 College Composition. (Formerly 232 American Literature. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Erzglish 102.)

560-233 Survey of American Literature 3 Cr. Reading and analysis of notable American literary works from James to the present. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-103 College Composition. (Formerly 232 American Literature. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: English 102.)

560-241 Introduction to Literature: Poetry 3 Cr. Critical analysis of the forms and art of poetry. The emphasis is on the poetic function of language. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-103 College Composition. (New Course.)

560-271 Shakespeare 4 Cr. A comprehensive reading course which includes a representative selection of Shakespeare's plays: comedies, tragedies and histories. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-103 College Composition. (Formerly 271 Shakespeare. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: English 102.)

182


Fire Technology 570 570-100 Organization for Fire Protection 3 Cr. Qrganizational procedures of the fire services. Includes the structure and function of battalion and company as components of municipal organizations. Discussion topics include personnel management and training, fire equipment and apparatus. Communications, records and reports, insurance rating systems and the law as it pertains to the fire services. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 100 Organization for Fire Protection. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

570-110 Fire-Fighting Tactics 4 Cr. Techniques and procedures of fire fighting. Emphasis on the individual fireman's role at the fire scene. Methods of extinguishing fires, lifesaving procedures and special fire-fighting equipment. Salvage, prevention of rekindling and overhauling. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 570-100 Organization for Fire Protection. (Formerly 110 Fire-Fighting Tactics. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Fire Technology 100.)

570-120 Fire Protection Systems 4 Cr. Design and operation of fire protection systems. Includes water distribution, detection, alarm and watchman services, and protection systems for special hazards. Detailed examination of carbon dioxide, dry chemical, foam and water spray systems. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 120 Fire Protection Systems. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

570-210 Fire-Fighting Tactics and Command 4 Cr. Group operations and command strategy. Pre-planning of fire-fighting operations, size-up at the fire, employment of personnel and equipment. Analysis of specific tactical problems. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 570-110 Fire-Fighting Tactics. (Formerly 210 Fire-Fighting Tactics and Command. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Fire Technology 110.)

183


FIRE TECHNOLOGY 570

3 Cr. 570-220 Chemistry of Hazardous Materials Analysis of chemical reaction as the causative agent of fire. Includes redox reactions, reaction rates, toxic compounds and hazardous combinations of chemicals. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 480-101 Introductory Chemistry or one year of high school chemistry. (Formerly 220 Chemistry of Hazardous Materials. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry or Chemistry 101.)

570-221 Chemistry of Hazardous Materials 3 Cr. Continuation of 570-220 Chemistry of Hazardous Materials with emphasis on hazards of radioactive materials, poison gases and LP gases. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 570-220 Chemistry of Hazardous Materials. (Formerly 220 Chemistry of Hazardous Materials. 4 Semester Cr. Lectm'e 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101 or one year of high school chemistry.)

570-230 Fire Prevention Practices 3 Cr. Study of buildings and other structures. Emphasis on fire prevention procedures and practices. Fire ratings of materials. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 570-120 Fire Protection Systems. (Formerly 230 Fire Prevention Practices. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Fire Technology 120.)

570-231 Fire Prevention Practices 3 Cr. Inspection practices as they pertain to fire prevention. Storage of explosive flammables, codes and fire ordinances, and examination of heating systems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 570-230 Fire Protection Practices. (Formerly 231 Fire Preve1ltion Practices. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Fire Technology 230.)

570-235 Fire Investigation Methods 3 Cr. Principles of fire investigation. Collection and presentation of arson evidence in court. Arson laws, interrogation of witnesses and applications of photography. Preparation of reports and adjustments of insured losses. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 235 Fire Investigation Methods. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

570-240 Fire Hydraulics 2 Cr. Introduction to hydraulic theory. Drafting of water, velocity and discharge, friction loss, engine and nozzle pressure, fire streams and

184


FIRE TECHNOLOGY 570/ FRENCH 590

pressure losses in flowing hydrants. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 690-095 Algebra or one year of high school algebra. (Formerly 240 Fire Hydraulics. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 095 or one year of high school algebra.)

570-241 Fire Hydraulics 2 Cr. Continuation of 570-240 Fire Hydraulics with emphasis on flow and pump testing and hydraulics applications in fire service. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 570-240 Fire Hydraulics. (F01'1nerly 240 Fire Hydraulics. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 095 or one year of high school algebra.)

570-250 Municipal Public Relations 3 Cr. Aspects of public relations as pertinent to municipal services. Building goodwill, handling complaints and follow-up. Personal contacts, publicity and promotional efforts. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 250 Municipal Public Relations. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

570-260 Personnel Training Methods 4 Cr. Introduction to methods of instruction and applications of audiovisual equipment. Testing and evaluation, and preparation of materials. Special emphasis on planning an organizational training program. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Fonnerly 260 Personnel Training Methods. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Pre1'equisite: None.)

Food Service Management (See Hotel-Restaurant Management 580)

French 590 590-101 Beginning French 4 Cr. Introduction to French with emphasis on speaking, reading and writing through multiple approach. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in 560-101 College Composition. (Fonnerly 101 Beginning French. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in English 101.)

185


FRENCH 590

590-102 Beginning French 4 Cr. Further practice of fundamentals through speaking, reading and writing on assigned topics of French culture. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 590-101 Beginning French or one year of high school French. (Formerly 102 Beginning French. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: French 101 or two years of high school French.)

590-103 Beginning French 4 Cr. Continuation of 590-102 Beginning French. Practice in constructing sentences and expressing thoughts in French through spontaneous discussions chosen from selected readings and cultural topics. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 590-102 Beginning French or two years of high school French. (Formerly 102 Beginning French. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 4 hours. Labot'atory 1 hour. Prerequisite: French 101 or two years of high school French.)

4 Cr. 590-201 Intermediate French Introduction to more advanced vocabulary and speech patterns in order to facilitate the transition from simple to complex reading material, acquainting the student with French literature and civilization. Systematic review of grammar. Laboratory drill. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 590-103 Beginning French or two years of high school French. (Formerly 201 Intermediate French. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: French 102 or three years of high school French.)

4 Cr. 590-202 Intermediate French Strengthening facility of oral and written expression in the language. Building of more advanced vocabulary and sentence structure by means of selections from French literature. Laboratory drill. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 590-201 Intermediate French or two years of high school French. (Formerly 202 Intermediate French. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: French 201 or four years of high school French.)

186


4 Cr. 590-203 Intermediate French Oral and written expression in the foreign language are further developed. Literary selections are to be discussed to gain deeper understanding and appreciation of French thought and culture. Laboratory drill. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 590-202 Intermediate French or three years of high school French. (Formerly 202 Intermediate French. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: French 201 or four years of high school French.)

187


FRENCH 590/ GEOGRAPHY 600

590-251 French Conversation and Composition 4 Cr. Discussion of topics of everyday life, colloquialisms, vocabulary distinctions and improvement of speech patterns. Practice in writing compositions. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 590-203 Intermediate French or concurrent enrollment with consent of department, or three years of high school French. (Formerly 251 French Conversati011 and Composition. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: French 202.)

590-252 French Civilization and Literature 4 Cr. Introduction to the civilization and literature of France. Emphasis on the interrelationship between history and geography of France and its culture. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 590-203 Intermediate French or concurrent enrollment with consent of department, or three years of high school French. (Fonnerly 252 French Civilization and Literature. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: French 202.)

Geography 600 600-101 Elements of Physical Geography 4 Cr. Introductory study of geography's physical elements. Includes earthsun relationships, maps, elements and controls of climate. Landforms, erosion and deposition, water resources, vegetation associations and soil types. World distributions, causal relationships and significance to men are stressed. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Fonnerly 101 Elements of Physical Geography. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Nom.)

600-102 World Regional Geography 4 Cr. Geographical study of selected world regions. Landforms, climate, peoples, problems of cultural and political differences. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 102 World Regional Geography. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

188


GEOGRAPHY 600/ GERMAN 610

600-103 Economic Geography 4 Cr. The study of areal variation on the earth's surface in man's activities related to producing, exchanging and consuming wealth. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (New Course.)

German 610 610-101 Beginning German 4 Cr. Introduction to German with emphasis on speaking, reading, writing and grammar through multiple approach. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in 560-101 College Composition. (Formerly 101 Beginning German. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in English 101.)

610路102 Beginning German 4 Cr. Further practice of fundamentals through practice in speaking, reading and writing on assigned topics of German culture. Continuation of intensive study of grammar and vocabulary. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 610-101 Beginning German or one year of high school German. (Formerly 102 Beginning German. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: German 101 01' two yeat'S of high school German.)

610-103 Beginning German 4 Cr. More advanced conversation and composition based on selected readings and cultural topics. Review of grammar. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 610-103 Beginning German or two years of high school German. (Formerly 102 Beginning German. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 4 hours. Labomtory 1 hour. Pre1<equisite: German 101 01' two years of high school German.)

610-201 Intermediate German 4 Cr. A study of the major developments of German literature and culture. Selected grammar review. Emphasis on oral facility. Laboratory drill. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 610-103 Beginning German or two years of high school German. (Formerly 201 Intermediate German. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: German 102 01' three years of high school German.)

189


GERMAN 610/ HEALTH 620/ HISTORY 630

610-202 Intermediate German 4 Cr. Emphasis on oral and written expression. Building of more advanced vocabulary and sentence structure through more difficult prose. Continued laboratory practice. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 610-201 Intermediate German or two years of high school German. (Formerly 202 Intermediate German. 4 Semeste1' Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: German 201 or four years of high school German.)

4 Cr. 610-203 Intermediate German Continued study in literature and civilization. Increasing emphasis on conversation and free composition. Continued laboratory practice. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 610-202 Intermediate German or three years of high school German. (Formerly 202 Intermediate German. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Ge1'1nan 201 or four years of high school German.)

Health 620 4 Cr. 620-101 Health Education Introduction to the meaning and scope of health as related to the individual, family and community. Focus on an introspective view of physical, emotional and social factors. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 101 Health Edttcation. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

History 630 3 Cr. 630-101 Man and Civilization Major trends in the development of Western and Asiatic civilizations from ancient Eurasian times to the fall of Byzantium (1453). Basic approach - use of documents as well as textual materials. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 101 Man and Civilization. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

190


HISTORY 630

3 Cr. 630-102 Man and Civilization Major problems - cultural, political, economic and religious - in the development of Western and non-Western civilizations from the fall of Byzantium to the Congress of Vienna (1453-1815). Basic approach - use of documents as well as textual materials. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 630-101 Man and Civilization. (Formerly 102 Man and Civilization. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: History 101.)

3 Cr. 630-103 Man and Civilization Major problems - cultural, political, economic and religious - in the development of Western and non-Western civilizations since the Congress of Vienna (1815) to the present. Basic approach - use of documents as well as textual materials. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 630-102 Man and Civilization. (Formerly 102 Man and Civilization. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: History 101.)

630-151 United States History to 1841 3 Cr. American development from discovery, colonial foundations, movement for independence and early years of the Republic through Jackson's administration. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 151 United States History to 1865. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

630-152 United States History from 1841 to 1896 3 Cr. Jacksonian Democracy through the Populist Movement with emphasis on the domestic economic and political developments. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 630-151 United States History to 1841. (Formerly 152 United States History, 1865 to Present. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: History 151.)

630-153 United States History from 1896 to the Present 3 Cr. Populist Movement to the present emphasizing the reform movements, two world wars and the rise of America as a world power. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 630-152 United States History from 1841 to 1896. (Formerly 152 United States History, 1865 to Present. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: History 151.)

191


HISTORY 630/ HOME ECONOMICS 640

630-201 History of Russia 4 Cr. Growth, development and decline of the Kievan State. Evolution of the Muscovite tsardom and the expansion of the Russian Empire to 1917. Considers geopolitical, social, cultural and intellectual developments. Emphasis on the theory of tsardom, which led to the emergence of a distinct civilization in Russia. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 630-103 Man and Civilization. (Formerly 201 History of Russia. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Labomtory 0 hours. Prerequisite: History 101.)

630-202 History of Africa 4 Cr. General survey of African history. Special emphasis on political, economic and social problems of the 19th and 20th centuries. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 630-103 Man and Civilization. (Formerly 202 History of Africa. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: History 101.)

630-251 Economic History of the United States 3 Cr. Economic factors in American history and their impact on social, economic and political life. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 630-153 United States History from 1896 to the Present. (Formerly 251 Economic History of the United States. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

Home Economics 640 4 Cr. 640-121 Foods and Nutrition Introduction to the basic principles of nutrition. Common nutritional factors underlying good health, weight control and the understanding of a balanced diet. Explores good composition and the nutritional aspects of careful preparation. 480-102 Introductory Chemistry recommended. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 121 Foods and Nutrition. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101 recommended.)

192


Hotel- Restaurant Management 580 (Formerly Food Service Management) 580-130 Introduction to Hospitality Management 3 Cr. Course of orientation in the history, growth and development of the food and lodging industry. Provides basic information in organization, personnel management, sales promotion, purchasing, production control and accounting, including the study of techniques and procedures of modern management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 130 Introduction to Food Service Management. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

580-132

Sanitation and Safety in Food and Lodging Establishments 2 Cr. A study of sanitation practices, methods and techniques in food handling and in lodging establishments. A preview of local and federallaws pertaining to food sanitation. A study of elementary bacteriology, food protection, dishwashing utensil sanitization, practical problems in public health protection, safety and accident prevention. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (New Course.)

193


HOTEL-RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT 580

580-135 Basic Food Preparation 3 Cr. Production and use of food and materials, development of standards of food preparation; the study of basic principles in cookery. Principles in menu planning and use of standard recipes. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 135 Basic Food Preparation. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Food Service Management 130.)

580-136 Food Production Technology 3 Cr. Production and use of food and materials, development of standards of food preparation; the effect of these factors upon the economics, nutritive value and aesthetic appeal of foods. The study of basic principles in cookery. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 135 Basic Food Preparation. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Food Service Management 130.)

580-137 Introduction to Quantity Food Production 4 Cr. Introduction to the various types and practices of large volume food service institutions, with elnphasis on operational differences, varied menu construction, raw material estimates, large volume preparation techniques and the use of institutional equipment. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 8 hours. Prerequisite: 580-135 Basic Food Preparation. (Fo17nerly 170 Introduction to Quantity Food Management. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Food Service Managemmt 135.)

3 Cr. 580-230 Hotel-Motel Front Office Procedure Techniques in the vital public relations responsibilities and necessary basics of human relations for the front office staff. Outlines coordinating ties between front office and management. Outlines procedures, accounting principles, employee relations. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. (New Course.)

580-231 Advanced Food Preparation 3 Cr. Major emphasis will be on estimates of raw materials needed, preparation of foods in volume and the use of institutional food service equipment. A study of work organization of food preparation processes. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 580-137 Introduction to Quantity Food Production. (Formerly 231 Advanced Food Preparatiotz. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Food Service Management 135.)

194


HOTEL-RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT 580

580-232 Hotel-Motel Sales Promotion 3 Cr. Sales promotion techniques and ideas. Special emphasis on the organization and functioning of a sales department and the need for sales planning. Sales tools and selling techniques used to secure room, food and beverage, and group business. Advertising, community relations, internal selling, personal selling and telephone selling. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. (New Course.)

580-236 Layout and Equipment 3 Cr. Layout and design of food service facilities. The study, planning and evaluation of actual layouts. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 580-135 Basic Food Preparation. (Fonnerly 236 Layout and Equipment. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Food Service Management 135.)

580-241 Food and Beverage Control 3 Cr. The essential principles and procedures of effective food and beverage control. Adaptations to various types of operations are practiced. All steps in the control process are covered with special emphasis on calculating food costs, establishing standards and production planning. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 580-137 Introduction to Quantity Food Production. (Formerly 270 Advanced Food and Beverage Management. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: Food Service Management 170.)

580-251 Advanced Food and Beverage Management 3 Cr. Basic principles of volume food service and the analysis of food management problems, including a consideration of the following topics: job analysis methods; selection, control, supervision and training of personnel; work plans and schedules; labor and food cost control; purchasing; equipment use and care; menu planning; and sanitation and safety. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 580-137 Introduction to Quantity Food Production. (Formerly 270 Advanced Food and Beverage Management. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: Food Service Management 170.)

195


HOTEL-RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT 580/ INDUSTRIAL SUPERVISION 650

580-260 Cooperative Field Experience 9 Cr. Limited to students in the Cooperative Field Experience Program. Full-time employment in an approved office or distributive training center under College supervision. Requirements for credit .will be a minimum of 400 clock hours of approved work, a report from employer, term report by student and on-the-job visits by the Coordinator of Hotel-Restaurant Management. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 40 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 260 Cooperative Field Experience. 6 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 20 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

580-261 Cooperative Field Experience 9 Cr. Continuation of 580-260 Cooperative Field Experience. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 40 hours. Prerequisite: 580-260 Cooperative Field Experience. (Formerly 261 Cooperative Field Experience. 6 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 20 hours. Prerequisite: Food Service Management 260.)

580-272 Hotel-Motel Maintenance and Engineering 3 Cr. A study of preventive maintenance procedures and the organization of the engineering department. Improvement in ability to diagnose many common mechanical problems and to take steps to correct them. Study of electrical systems, acoustics, plumbing, heating, ventilation, refrigeration and air conditioning, elevators. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. (New Course.)

Industrial Supervision 650 650-111 Practical Psychology for Supervisors 3 Cr. Management and employee motivation. Analysis of human needs and employee morale. Selecting supervisors. Training employees. Working conditions, worker efficiency and job performance. Industrial leadership, organizational behavior and human relations. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 111 Practical Psychology for Supervisors. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

196


INDUSTRIAL SUPERVISION 650

650-121 Elements of Supervision 3 Cr. Supervisory techniques in everyday foremanship. Effective communication. Instructing employees. Significance of leadership, production functions, competitive quality control and cost reduction on company profitability. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 121 Elements of Supervision. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

650-122 Men, Machinery and Materials 3 Cr. The interrelation and manpower of machines and materials. Layouts, work flow and productivity. Systems, procedures and computers. Material handling and specifications. Management of work force, production and inventory. Automation, labor peace and profits. Overtime and fringe benefits. Retirement. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650-121 Elements of Supervision or work experience. (Formerly 122 Men, Machinery and Materials. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Industrial Supervision 121.)

650-125 Elements of Time Study 3 Cr. Time study requirements, equipment and elements. Standard time data. Methods and uses of time standards. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650-121 Elements of Supervision or equivalent, or industrial experience. (New Course.)

650-126 Principles of Work Simplification 3 Cr. Approach, purpose and procedure of operation analysis. Manufacturing process and working conditions. Principles of motion economy. Man and machine process charts. Flow process charts. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650-121 Elements of Supervision or equivalent, or industrial experience. (New Course.)

650-127 Work Simplification Practices 2 Cr. Material handling and plant layout. Plant location. Feasibility reports. Special assignments. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 650-121 Elements of Supervision or equivalent, or industrial experience. (New Course.)

197


INDUSTRIAL SUPERVISION 650

650-128 Measured Motions, Job Analysis and Incentives 2 Cr. Methods, time and measurements. Application procedures and identified motions. Principles of limiting motions. Wage incentive plans. Basic motion times. Work sampling. Job analysis and job evaluation. Development of base rates. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 650-121 Elements of Supervision or equivalent, or llldustrial experience. (New Course.)

650-131 Basic Management Techniques 3 Cr. Practical supervisory training. Patterns of good management. Selection, placement and training of employees. Development of employees' attitude for greater efficiency and productivity. Cost reductions. Quality improvements. Increased production. Knowledge of machinery, materials and maintenance. Trends in automation. Understanding labor contracts and settling grievances. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650-121 Elements of Supervision or 650-122 Men, Machinery and Materials, or equivalent. (Formerly 131 Basic Management Techniques. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Industrial Supervision 122 or equivalent.)

650-134 Employee and Plant Safety 3 Cr. Safety and protection of employees and company property. First aid and disaster training. Selection and training of guards. Maintenance of fences, roads, fire equipment, emergency exits and sewage disposal. Safeguarding of mechanical and electrical equipment, water supplies, utilities and buildings. Individual protection against unsafe practices, explosions, fumes, chemicals, fires and other emergencies. Workmen's compensation. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650-122 Men, Machinery and Materials or equivalent. (Formerly 134 Employee and Piant Safety. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

650-140 Industrial Organization and Management 3 Cr. Industrial organization, management functions and communications. Business expansion, financing, manufacturing, market structure and sales service. Selection, recruitment, placement and training of executive personnel. Policies, personnel administration of the organization, compensations, benefits and other activities. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650-121 Elements of Supervision or 650-131 Basic Management Techniques, or equivalent. (Formerly 140 Industrial Organization and Management. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 bours. Prerequisite: Industrial Supervision 121 or equivalent.)

198


650-201 Product Sales and Development 3 Cr. Market research, production capacity, quality control, competition, prestige and new products. Distribution methods. Sales order analysis, forecasting, promotion and services. Work force analysis and sales training. Product improvement. Competition in prices and marketing. Volume sales. New products, methods and machinery. Market analysis. Patents and copyrights. Obsolescence and creativity. Company ratings according to sales, net income and category of manufactured products. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650-122 Men, Machinery and Materials or equivalent. ~ (Formerly 201 Product Sales and Development. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Industrial Supervision 122 or equivalent.)

650-211 Pre-Retirement Planning 2 Cr. Retirement counseling. Seniority rights and retiring in stages. Helping employees to face retirement problems. Pensions, Social Security and other benefits. Family health, housing and budgets for older employees. Recreation and leisure time. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 211 Pre-Retirement Planning. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

199


INDUSTRIAL SUPERVISION 650

650-221 Supervisory Reporting and Decision Making 3 Cr. Preparation of reports and memorandums for recording data and reaching decisions. Employer-employee communication. Preparation and use of graphs and tables. Effective oral communication and group thinking. How decisions are made and communicated by management. Understanding technical reports. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-091 Essentials of Written Communication or equivalent. (Formerly 221 Communications in Industry. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: English 091.)

650-231 Labor-Management Relations 2 Cr. Trade unions. Labor laws. Essentials of contract negotiations, interpretations and arbitration. Introduction of job improvements, changes in work loads and rates. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650-131 Basic Management Techniques. (Formerly 231 Labor-Management Relations. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Industrial Supervision 122, 131.)

650-232 Collective Bargaining and Labor Laws 3 Cr. Effective collective bargaining today. Management rights, NLRB functions. Representation and elections. Unfair labor practices. Union security and management rights. Strikes. Seniority. Productivity and collective bargaining activities. The future of collective bargaining. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650-231 Labor-Management Relations. (New Course.)

650-233 Basic Employee Relations 3 Cr. Labor force. Recruitment. Employee relations applied to welfare, safety, compensations, benefits, grievances and their effect on tile community. Application of job evaluation, time studies and incentives. Employee behavior and discipline. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 650-121 Elements of Supervision or equivalent. (Formerly 231 Labor-Management Relations. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Industrial Supervision 122, 131.)

200


INDUSTRIAL SUPERVISION 650

650-241 Personnel Management 3 Cr. Problems, practices and policies in the management of people. Leadership, motivation and direction of employees towards managementemployee-oriented goals. Employment practices. Administration of management-union relationships, benefit programs and employee compensations. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650-121 Elements of Supervision or industrial experience. (Formerly 241 Personnel Management. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Industrial Supervision 121 or industrial experience.)

650-242 Wage and Salary Administration 3 Cr. Compensation theory and policy. Wage and salary structures. Job evaluation. Pay rates of individuals. Incentive plans. Profit sharing. Indirect compensation. Compensation of managers and professionals. Wage and salary control. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650-121 Elements of Supervision or industrial experience. (New Course.)

650-251 Industrial Corporate Finance 3 Cr. Corporate financial behavior and patterns. Sources and uses of funds. Capital structure. Capital budgeting. Return from investment. Corporate annual reports. Balance sheet and income statement. Management of cash and cash flow. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 520-103 Principles of Economics or financial management experience. (Formerly 251 Industrial Corporate Finance. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Economics 201, 202 or financial management experience.)

650-261 Statistical Quality Control 3 Cr. Application of statistical techniques in the analysis of data for the control of product quality and costs. Control charts, sampling systems and procedures. Correction of product variability. Theory of probability fundamentals. Solution of statistical problems related to specifications, production or inspection. Statistical approach of acceptance sampling. Statistical quality control as a decision-making tool. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-102 Algebra. (Formerly 261 Statistical Quality Control. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or 115.)

201


INDUSTRIAL SUPERVISION 650

650-271 Production, Quality and Cost Control 3 Cr. Explanation and application of the control methods used in the various stages of the manufacturing process, such as control of raw materials, equipment design, and operation and product control. Procedures for the control of production planning, inventory, product quality, operating costs and budgetary control. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650-121 Elements of Supervision or 650-131 Basic Management Techniques, or equivalent. (Formerly 271 Production, Quality a1zd Cost Control. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratot'Y 0 hours. Prerequisite: Industrial Supervision 124 or industrial experience.)

650-281 Program Evaluation and Research Techniques 3 Cr. Application of PERT and methodology for complete project planning, scheduling and control. Usable understanding of PERT. Network system design as a project planning and analysis device for progress evaluation and completion dates. Establishment and operation of the "Critical Path Method" (CPM). Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 650-131 Basic Management Techniques or management experience. (Formerly 281 Program Evaluation and Research Technique (PERT). 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Industrial Supervision 131 or management experience.)

650-291 Materials Handling and Plant Layout 3 Cr. The purpose, scope, transportation of materials, selection of equipment, objectives and cost of material handling are integrated with plant layout, materials and product flows, and the effective arrangement of manufacturing and service facilities. Emphasis is also placed on the coordination which is necessary between materials handling, plant layout, production planning and control, methods engineering, process engineering and production techniques. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Preferably industrial experience. (New Course.)

650-292 Materials Handling and Plant Layout 3 Cr. Continuation of 650-291 Materials Handling and Plant Layout with emphasis on material handling equipment, materials flow, space allocation and related topics. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Industrial experience. (New Course.)

202


Journalism 660 660-120 News Writing and Reporting 3 Cr. Nature and function of the mass media. Career opportunities. J ournalistic principles. News gathering and writing articles. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 560-101 College Composition or concurrent enrollment. (Formerly 121 News Writing and Reporting. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: English 10 1 or concurrent enrollment.)

660-121 News Writing and Reporting 3 Cr. Continuation of 660-120 News Writing and Reporting. News gathering and writing articles. Principal problems confronting journalists and their newspapers. Special attention to large, contemporary papers. Introduction to interpretative reporting. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 660-120 News Writing and Reporting. (Formerly 122 News Writing and Reporting. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Journalism 121.)

660-122 News Writing and Reporting 3 Cr. Continuation of 660-121 News Writing and Reporting. Further development of interpretative reporting, using the community as a laboratory. Greater emphasis on journalistic specialties and writing for the broadcast media. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 660-121 News Writing and Reporting. (Formerly 122 News Writing and Reporting. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Journalism 121.)

203


JOURNALISM 660

660-123 Staff Practice 1 Cr. Class laboratory experience in assembling, making-up and publishing the College newspaper. Detailed weekly analysis of the effectiveness of the news stories written and published as well as of the overall presentation of the College newspaper. Students are assigned to the College newspaper staff. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in 660-120 News Writing and Reporting or consent of instructor. (Formerly 123 Staff Practice. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Journalism 121, 122,20101' 202 - 01' permission of the instructor.)

1 Cr. 660-124 Staff Practice Continuation of 660-123 Staff Practice. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 660-123 Staff Practice and concurrent enrollment in 660-121 News Writing and Reporting. (Formerly 124 Staff Practice. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Journalism 121, 122,201 01' 202 - 01' permission of the instructor.)

1 Cr. 660-125 Staff Practice Continuation of 660-124 Staff Practice. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 660-124 Staff Practice and concurrent enrollment in 660-122 News Writing and Reporting. (Formerly 124 Staff Practice. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent erz1'Ollment in Journalism 121, 122, 201 or 202 - 01' permission of the instructor.)

1 Cr. 660-126 Staff Practice Continuation of 660-125 Staff Practice. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 660-125 Staff Practice and concurrent enrollment in 660-201 News Editing or consent of instructor. (Formerly 125 Staff Practice. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Journalism 121, 122, 201 01' 202 - or permission ofthe instructor.)

660-127 Staff Practice 1 Cr. Continuation of 660-126 Staff Practice. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 660-126 Staff Practice and concurrent enrollment in 660-202 Feature Writing or consent of instructor. (Formerly 126 Staff Practice. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Journalism 121, 122, 201 or 202 - 01' permission ofthe instructor.)

204


JOURNALISM 660

660-128 Staff Practice 1 Cr. Continuation of 660-127 Staff Practice. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 660-127 Staff Practice or consent of instructor. (Formerly 126 Staff Practice. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Journalism 121, 122, 201 or 202 - or permission o[ the instructor.)

660-151 Broadcast Journalism 4 Cr. News reading, news preparation, news reporting on audio tape, video tape, film and live camera for television and radio. Covers Federal Communications Commission rules and regulations on news. Fundamentals of what makes a story and how to get it. The art of interviewing. Field work, study of radio and television history. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 151 Broadcast Journalism. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

660-201 News Editing 4 Cr. Copy desk methods. Copy and proof reading, headline writing, newspaper make-up and style. Introduction to newspaper law, including libel, right of privacy and press privileges. Editorial writing, problems and policy. Examination of major contemporary American newspapers. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 660-120 News Writing and Reporting. (Formerly 201 News Editing. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Journalism 121.)

660-202 Feature Writing 4 Cr. Study, planning, writing of factual articles for newspaper and magazine publication. Examination of current markets. Emphasis on human interest reporting. Special emphasis on student production of a major article. Students use the community as a writing laboratory. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 660-121 News Writing and Reporting or consent of instructor. (Formerly 202 Feature Writing. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Journalism 122 or permission 0[ the instructor.)

205


Law Enforcement 670 670-101 Introduction to Law Enforcement 4 Cr. A philosophical and historical background of law enforcement including the development and objectives of police services from ancient and feudal backgrounds up to the present time in the United States. Explanation of federal, state, local and private law enforcement agencies. Role of enforcing officer in government and the processes of justice. Qualities and qualifications of the individual entering law enforcement work. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 101 Introduction to Law Enforcement. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

4 Cr. 670-111 Patrol Procedures Advantages and disadvantages of methods of patrol, and the objectives, activities of the patrol officer. Preparation for and observation on patrol, note-taking and narrative type of report. How to handle incidents of high frequency, and emphasis on public and race relations in patrol operations. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670-101 Introduction to Law Enforcement or in-service personnel. (Formerly 111 Patrol Procedures. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Law Enforcement 101 or permission of the instructor.)


LAW ENFORCEMENT 670

3 Cr. 670-121 Criminal Law Substantive criminal laws most often violated will be discussed in depth with emphasis on Ohio statutes and decisions. Jurisdiction, arrest procedure and the importance of criminal law at the enforcement level. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 121 Criminal and Related Laws. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Law Enforcement 101 or permission of the instructor.)

670-122 Criminal Law 3 Cr. Continuation of 670-121 Criminal Law. Criminal liability, related laws of procedure, search and seizure, and admissibility of evidence so seized. Terms and definitions. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670-121 Criminal Law. (Formerly 141 Criminal Evidence and Procedure. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Law Enforcement 121 or permission of the instructor.)

670-123 Laws of Evidence 3 Cr. Continuation of 670-122 Criminal Law with emphasis on evidence in criminal prosecutions. Hearsay rule and exceptions, admissions and confessions, ruling case law and effect on procedures will be emphasized in this course. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670-122 Criminal Law. (Formerly 141 Criminal Evidence and Procedure. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Law Enforcement 121 or permission of the instmctor.)

670-131 Industrial Security 3 Cr. Organization and management of industrial security units. Protection of facilities, installations. Manpower, planning for emergencies and riot control. Technical and legal problems, police power of personnel, detection and prevention of thefts. Security clearances, wartime measures, sabotage and espionage in plants. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 131 Industrial Security. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

670路201 Delinquency Prevention and Control 3 Cr. Problem of juvenile delinquency, police programs and community resources for prevention of juvenile delinquency are presented. Juvenile court organization and procedure, detention, filing and police procedures in enforcement of juvenile code. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670-121 Criminal Law. (Formerly 201 Juvenile Procedure and Crime Prevention. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Law Enforcement 121 or permission of the instructor.)

207


LAW ENFORCEMENT 670

670-211 Investigation and Interrogation 3 Cr. Fundamental principles and techniques applicable in police investigation from incidence to trial. Use of communications systems, records and principles. Specific procedures in more frequent violations will be individually presented. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 路hours. Prerequisite: 670-121 Criminal Law or in-service personnel. (Formerly 211 Investigation and Interrogation. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hou1"S. Prerequisite: Law Enforcement 141 or permission ofthe instructor.)

670-221 Police Administration 3 Cr. Principles of organization and management, the evaluation of administrative devices. Organization according to function with emphasis on application of these principles to line function. Regulation and motivation of personnel, and principles of leadership. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670-101 Introduction to Law Enforcement. (Formerly 221 Police Administration. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Law Enforcement 101 or permission of the instructor.)

670-222 Police Administration 3 Cr. Continuation of 670-221 Police Administration with emphasis on staff functions. Pay and other inducements, personnel recruitment, employment of administrative principles and processes of operation to the staff functions. Computer usage and other steps useful to management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670-221 Police Administration. (Formerly 221 Police Administration. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Law Enforcement 101 or permission ofthe instructor.)

2 Cr. 670-231 Fundamentals of Traffic Control History of traffic development and duties of agencies responsible fo!' highway traffic administration. Causes of accidents and traffic congestion. Basic principles of traffic law enforcement, accident investigation and direction of traffic. Study of traffic code and uniform traffic code devices. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670-101 Introduction to Law Enforcement. (Formerly231 Traffic Control and Investigation. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Law Enforcement 101 or permission of the instructor.)

208


LAW ENFORCEMENT 670

670-232 Accident Investigation 3 Cr. Purposes of accident investigation, procedures to be used, including interviewing of persons involved and witnesses. Determination of speed from skid marks. Preparation and use of statistics obtained from the investigation of accidents. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 670-231 Fundamentals of Traffic Control. (Formerly 241 Advanced Traffic Studies. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Law Enforcement 231 or permission of the instructor.)

3 Cr. 670-233 Traffic Law Enforcement An explanation of purposes of traffic law enforcement and techniques to be used, including selective enforcement and enforcement at accident scenes. Legal authority of police, preparation and presentation of traffic cases. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 670-231 Fundamentals of Traffic Control. (Formerly 241 Advanced Traffic Studies. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Law Enforcement 231 or permission of the instructor.)

670-251 Crime Laboratory Techniques 2 Cr. Frequently used police laboratory procedures explained and practiced. Latent fingerprint work and tool mark comparison. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Limited to Law Enforcement majors and in-service police officers. (Formerly 251 Crime Laboratory Techniques. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Major in Law Enforcement. Also open to in-service personnel.)

670-252 Crime Laboratory Techniques 2 Cr. Continuation of 670-251 Crime Laboratory Techniques with emphasis on firearms, identification, laboratory techniques applicable to trace evidence search. Trip to crime laboratory. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 670-251 Crime Laboratory Techniques. (Formerly 251 Crime Laboratory Techniques. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Major in Law Enforcement. Also open to in-service personnel.)

209


Library Technology 680 680-101 Introduction to Library Organization 3 Cr. General course in the purposes and uses of the library. Introduction to reference, cataloguing, circulation, acquisitions and all other activities of the library. Library terminology. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 101 IntroductiOtl to Library Organization. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

680-102 Introduction to Library Organization 2 Cr. Continuation of 680-101 Introduction to Library Organization with further discussion of library functions. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 680-101 Introduction to Library Organization. (Formerly 101 Introduction to Library Organization. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

680-121 Library Acquisition Procedures 3 Cr. Various methods of ordering and processing books. Processing of periodicals, pamphlets, records, picture collections and their inventory. Introduction to making order lists for purchases, checking shipments and invoices. Keeping bindery records. Computation of costs with a survey of elementary bookkeeping techniques. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 680-102 Introduction to Library Organization. (Formerly 121 Library Acquisition Procedures. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Library Technology 101.)

680-122 Library Acquisition Procedures 2 Cr. Continuation of 680-121 Library Acquisition Procedures with emphasis on making order lists, checking shipments and invoices. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 680-121 Library Acquisition Procedures. (Formerly 121 Library Acquisition Procedures. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Library Technology 101.)

680-151 Basic Cataloguing and Classification 3 Cr. Cataloguing and classification systems for books and other materials. Preparation of catalogue cards. Dewey Decimal and LC classification systems. Procedures and uses of several filing systems. Card copying. Bibliographic searching procedures. Practice in filing in the

210


LIBRARY TECHNOLOGY 680

various library catalogues - dictionary catalogue, authority files and shelf list. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 680-122 Library Acquisition Procedures. (Formerly 151 Basic Cataloguing and Classifications. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Library Technology 121.)

680-152 Basic Cataloguing and Classification 2 Cr. Continuation of 680-151 Basic Cataloguing and Classification with emphasis on practice in filing and using various types of files. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 680-151 Basic Cataloguing and Classification. (Formerly 151 Basic Cataloguing and Classifications. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Library Technology 121.)

3 Cr. 680-202 Educational Media The identification of available educational media, emphasizing basic skills and proper use in libraries. Criteria for evaluation and selection are developed. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 201 Audio-Visual Equipment. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

3 Cr. 680-252 Information Sources Use of encyclopedias, yearbooks, dictionaries, directories and other general reference works. The Readers' Guide to Periodical Literature and other indexes. Practice in the preparation of simple book lists and bibliographies. Practice in information searches on simple reference questions. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 680-102 Introduction to Library Organization. (Formerly 251 Information Sources and Circulation. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Library Technology 101.)

2 Cr. 680-253 Circulation The study of various charging systems now in use in school, college' and public libraries. Routines involved in charging, discharging, methods of handling overdues, reserves, renewals and all other aspects of circulation control. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 680-102 Introduction to Library Organization. (Formerly 251 Information Sources and Circulation. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hourj. Prerequisite: Library Technology 101.)

211


212


Mathematics 690 690-091 College Arithmetic 3 Cr. Basic properties of sets. Fundamental properties of the natural numbers, integers, rationals and real numbers. Applications of the rationals including decimal and per cent notation. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 091 College Arithmetic. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

3 Cr. 690-095 Algebra Sets, real numbers, algebraic symbolism, factoring, basic algebraic operations and linear equations. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-091 College Arithmetic or equivalent. (Formerly 095 Basic Algebra. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 091 or equivalent.)

690-101 Algebra 3 Cr. Functions and graphs. Systems of linear equations. Application and techniques of problem solving. Exponents and radicals. Introduction to complex numbers, quadratic equations. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-095 Algebra or one year of high school algebra. (Formerly 101 Intermediate Algebra. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 095 or one year of high school algebra.)

690-102 Algebra 3 Cr. Algebraic operations, conic sections, systems of equations. Inequalities. Applications and techniques of problem solving. Logarithms. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-101 Algebra or one and one-half years of high school algebra. (Formerly 101 Intermediate Algebra. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 095 or one year of high school algebra.)

213


MATHEMATICS 690

690-103 Geometry 3 Cr. A study of geometry as a logical system. Deductive and inductive reasoning. Locus, algebraic and geometric inequalities, congruencies. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-101 Algebra or one and one-half years of algebra. (New Course.)

690-104 Geometry 3 Cr. Similarity, polygonal and circular regions, constructions, further anatomy of proof, non-Euclidean geometry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-103 Geometry. (New Course.)

690-105 Trigonometry 4 Cr. Properties of the trigonometric, logarithmic and exponential functions. Trigonometric identities and equations. Applications. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 690-102 Algebra or two years of high school algebra, and 690-104 Geometry or one year of plane geometry recommended. (Formerly 103 Trigonometry. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory a hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or two years of high school algebra. One year ofgeometry is recommended.)

690-111 Fundamentals of Mathematics 3 Cr. Algebra of sets. Structure of arithmetic and algebra. Basic concepts of Euclidean geometry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Two years of high school mathematics including algebra and geometry. (Formerly 111 Fundamentals of Mathematics. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory a hours. Prerequisite: Two years of high school mathematics including algebra and geometry, or the equivalent.)

3 Cr. 690-112 Fundamentals of Mathematics Applications of algebra. Analytic geometry. Polynomial calculus and applications. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-111 Fundamentals of Mathematics. (Formerly 112 Fundamentals of Mathematics. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory a hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 111.)

214


MATHEMATICS 690

3 Cr. 690-113 Fundamentals of Mathematics Trigonometric functions and applications. Statistics in the social and biological sciences. Probability. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-112 Fundamentals of Mathematics. (Formerly 112 Fundamentals of Mathematics. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 111.)

690-115 College Algebra 4 Cr. Theory of equations and inequalities. Matrices and determinants. Binomial theorem. Sequences and series. Mathematical induction. Probability. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-102 Algebra or two years of high school algebra. (Formerly 115 College Algebra. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or one and one-halfyears of high school algebra. One year ofplane geometry is recommended.)

690-121 Elementary Mathematical Analysis 4 Cr. Sets, ordered fields, functions, theory of equations, inequalities, sequences, series, mathematical induction, determinants and matrices. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 690-102 Algebra and 690-104 Geometry or equivalent; or three years of high school mathematics including two years of algebra, one year of geometry and trigonometry. (Formerly 121 Elementary Mathematical Analysis. 5 Semester Cr. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or two and one-halfyears of high school mathematics, including algebra and geometry.)

690-122 Elementary Mathematical Analysis 4 Cr. Properties of the trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions. Algebra of vectors. Limits and continuity. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-121 Elementary Mathematical Analysis. (Formerly 121 Elementary Mathematical Analysis. 5 Semester Cr. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or two and one-halfyears of high school mathematics, including algebra and geometry.)

690-141 Elementary Probability and Statistics 4 Cr. Organization and analysis of data, elementary probability, permutations and combinations. Normal distribution, binomial distribution, random sampling, test of hypotheses, estimation, and chi-square distribution, regression and correlation. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 690-102 Algebra or equivalent. (Formerly 221 Elementary Probability and Statistics. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101.)

215


MATHEMATICS 690

690-151 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 5 Cr. Cartesian coordinates. Functions and graphs. Limits and continuity. Differentiation of algebraic functions. Applications. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-122 Elementary Mathematical Analysis or four years of high school mathematics, including algebra, geometry and trigonometry. ; (Formerly 151 Analytic Geometry and Calculus. 5 Semester Cr. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Mathematics 103 and 115 or MathelJUttics 121; or one and one-halfyears of high school algebra, om year ofplane geometry and one-halfyear oftrigonometry.)

690-152 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 5 Cr. Antiderivatives. Definite integral. Applications of the definite integral. Conics. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-151 Analytic Geometry and Calculus. (Formerly 152 Analytic Geometry and CalculttS. 5 Semester Cr. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 151.)

690-153 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 5 Cr. Transcendental functions. Techniques of integration. Polar coordinates. Parametric equations. Improper integrals. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-152 Analytic Geometry and Calculus. (Formerly 152 Analytic Geometry and Calculus. 5 Semester Cr. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 151.)

690-154 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 5 Cr. Analytic geometry of three-dimensional space. Vectors. Partial differentiation. Multiple integrals. Infinite senes. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-153 Analytic Geometry and Calculus. (Formerly 251 Analytic Geometry and Calculus. 5 Semester Cr. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 152.)

690-252 Differential Equations 5 Cr. Differential equations of first, second and higher order. Simultaneous, linear and homogeneous equations. Solution by power series. Laplace transform. Applications. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 690-154 Analytic Geometry and Calculus. (Formerly 252 Differential Equatio1lS. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 251.)

216


Mechanical Technology 700 700-100 Mechanical Technology Orientation 2 Cr. Designed to acquaint the student with his career field, employment trends and typical future technical assignments. Instruction on the use of the slide rule and engineering problem solving. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 100 Mechanical Technology Orientation. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

3 Cr. 700-150 Machine Tools Fundamentals of metal cutting theory and factors affecting machinability. Cutting tools, speeds and feeds, cutting fluids, metal cutting and grinding machines, measurement and gaging. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 160 Machine Tools and Fabricati01z. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture;] hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

700-151 Metal Fabrication Methods 3 Cr. Various metal fabrication methods are discussed and experienced. Oxyacetylene, electro arc and tungsten inert gas welding. Brazing, soldering, low-temperature and resistance welding. Fasteners, adhesives and sheet metal joining and forming are covered. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 160 Machine Tools and Fabrication. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Notle.)

700-152 Manufacturing Processes 3 Cr. Theory and application of manufacturing methods and processes as related to modern industry. Introduction to process and physical metallurgy. Hot and cold forming of metals and plastics, heat treating and finishing methods are highlighted. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 150 Manufacturing Processes. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

217


700-201 Industrial Hydraulics 4 Cr. Oil hydraulics systems with applications to modern industrial uses such as transfer of power and automatic control of machines. Pumps, filters, valves, cylinders and accumulators as components of working circuits. Laboratory experience includes construction and testing of practical hydraulic circuits. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 690-095 Algebra and 780-101 Introductory Physics or equivalent. (Formerly 201 Industrial Hydraulics. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: Mathematics 095 and Physics 101 or their equivalents.)

218


MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY 700

700-211 Mechanical Design 4 Cr. Mechanisms, including design and analysis. Kinematics of machine elements. Gears, gear trains, linkages, cams, bearings and lubrication are covered. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 550-122 Engineering Drawing and 550-251 Mechanics and Strength of Materials. (Formerly 211 Mechanical Design. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: Engineering 122 and 201')

700-221 Applied Instrumentation - Measurement 3 Cr. Theory and practice applicable to industrial measuring instruments. Pressure, flow, temperature, liquid level and recording devices are analyzed. Practical lab experience. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 780-101 Introductory Physics or equivalent. (Formerly 221 Applied Instrumentation. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Physics 101.)

700-222 Applied Instrumentation - Control 3 Cr. Principles and techniques of automatic control elements and systems. Various types of controllers and ancillary instrumentation are introduced as elements of the control system. Laboratory experience in developing simulated control loops. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 700-221 Applied Instrumentation - Measurement. (Formerly 221 Applied Instrumentation. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Physics 101.)

700-231 Tool Design - Cutting Tools 3 Cr. Metal cutting tools, their applications and principles of design. Detailed exploration of tool geometry and forces acting on cutting tools. Examines practical design problems, including a variety of single-point and multiple-edge cutting tools. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 690-105 Trigonometry and 550-121 Engineering Drawing. (Formerly 231 Tool Design I - Cutting Tools. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: Mathematics 103 and Engineering 121, or Cleveland State University Courses TI201, 202, 212 and 222.)

219


MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY 700

700-232 Tool Design - Gages 3 Cr. Shop, inspection and reference gages; their definition, application and factors affecting their design. Examines practical gage design problems. Emphasis on special fixed-sized gage design. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 700-231 Tool Design - Cutting Tools. (Formerly 232 Tool Design II - Gages. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Mechanical Technology 231 or Cleveland State University Course TI231.)

700-233 Tool Design - Jigs 3 Cr. Practical design of jigs is approached through a study of standardized jig details and their application to the various types of jigs from the simple to the more complex. Practical design problems are worked to solution on the drawing board. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 700-232 Tool Design - Gages. (Formerly 233 Tool Design III - Jigs. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Mechanical Technology 232 or Cleveland State University Course TI232.)

700-234 Tool Design - Fixtures 3 Cr. Study and design of various types of cast, fabricated and welded fixtures applicable to milling, boring, honing, broaching, tapping, grinding and welding operations. Fixture components and design applications are covered in detail. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 700-233 Tool Design - Jigs. (Formerly 234 Tool Design IV - Fixtures. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Mechanical Technology 233 or Cleveland State University Course TI 233.)

700-237 Tool Engineering 3 Cr. Covers production planning, estimating and economic tooling as applicable to the manufacturing process. Selection of process operations for manufacturing is reviewed. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisites: 690-105 Trigonometry and 700-232 Tool Design Gages or equivalent. (Formerly 237 Tool Engineering. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Mathematics 103 and Mechanical Technology 232 or equivalent.)

220


Medical Assisting 710 710-101 Medical Assisting Orientation 1 Cr. Designed to acquaint the student with medical assisting as an occupation. The scope of the medical field as a whole. Duties, responsibilities and professional liabilities are discussed. Community health facilities are visited to observe medical assistants at work. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 101 Medical Assisting Orientation. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

710-102 Medical Terminology 2 Cr. Vocabulary and terms used by medical personnel. Usage and spelling of medical terms. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 102 Medical Terminology. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

710-103 Medical Terminology 2 Cr. Continuation of 710-102 Medical Terminology with emphasis on specialized medical terms and systems. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 710-102 Medical Terminology or equivalent. (Formerly 102 Medical Terminology. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

710-201 Medical Assisting Office Procedures 2 Cr. Medical histories, records, insurance forms, medical terms and vocabulary. Responsibilities of assisting in the examining room. Observation of medical assistant work activity in doctors' offices and community health facilities. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 710-103 Medical Terminology. (Formerly 201 Medical Assisting Office Procedures. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Medical Assisting 102.)

710-202 Medical Assisting Office Procedures 3 Cr. Continuation of 710-201 Medical Assisting Office Procedures with emphasis on work activity in the doctor's office. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 710-201 Medical Assisting Office Procedures. (Formerly 201 Medical Assisting Office Procedures. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Medical Assisting 102.)

221


MEDICAL ASSISTING 710/ MUSIC 720

710-203 Medical Laboratory Procedures 3 Cr. Lectures and practical laboratory experience in routine clinical laboratory procedures. Study of tests performed in the physician's office. Review of common medical instruments, drugs and related subjects. An introduction to clinical pathology. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 710-103 Medical Terminology or equivalent. (Formerly 202 Medical Assisting Laboratory Procedures. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Medical Assisting 201.)

710-204 Medical Laboratory Procedures 3 Cr. Continuation of 710-203 Medical Laboratory Procedures including clinical chemistry, laboratory techniques and special tests. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: 710-203 Medical Laboratory Procedures. (Formerly 202 Medical Assisting Laboratory Procedures. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Medical Assisting 201.)

710-251 Medical Assisting Ethics 1 Cr. Medical assisting ethics, negligence and breach of duty. Employment and interview procedures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 710-101 Medical Assisting Orientation, 710-102 Medical Terminology, 710-201 Medical Assisting Office Procedures and 710-203 Medical Laboratory Procedures. (Formerly 101 Medica! Assistillg Orientation. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

I

hour.

Music 720 3 Cr. 720-100 Fundamentals of Music Preparatory course in the rudiments of music. Includes notation, rhythm, scales, key signatures, intervals, treble and bass clefs. Elementary sight singing and ear training. Introductory keyboard harmony. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 100 Fundamentals of Music. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

222


MUSIC 720

720-103 Music Appreciation 3 Cr. No previous technical knowledge of music required. Study of basic music materials, form and style. Lectures, illustrations, live musical performances and listening to records. Historical survey of music via compositions from the 17th century to the present. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 103 Music Appreciation. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

720-107 Harmony 5 Cr. Theory and musicianship for music majors. Sight singing, ear training, basic harmonic progressions, triads, primary and secondary chords. Root positions, inversions and non-chord tones. Keyboard harmony, rhythmic, melodic and harmonic dictation. Course divided into four general areas. Harmony occupies two sessions; ear training and sight singing, two; keyboard harmony, one. Practice sessions are on the student's own time. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 720-100 Fundamentals of Music or equivalent. (Formerly 107 Harmony. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 bOllI's. Laboratory 0 bours. Prerequisite: Music 100 or equivalent.)

720-108 Harmony 5 Cr. Continuation of 720-107 Harmony. Miscellaneous triad usages. Further study of non-harmonic tones, seventh chords and modulations. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 720-107 Harmony. (Formerly 108 Harmony. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Music 107.)

720-109 Harmony 5 Cr. Continuation of 720-108 Harmony. Diminished seventh chords, altered chords, advanced modulation and harmonic analysis. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 720-108 Harmony. (Formerly 108 Harmony. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 bours. Prerequisite: Music 107.)

1 Cr. 720-115 Choral Ensemble Includes music particularly suitable for a small chorus: madrigals, motets, cantatas, opera. Renaissance through contemporary works. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: By audition only. (New Course.)

223


1 Cr. 720-116 Choral Ensemble Continuation of 720-115 Choral Ensemble. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 720-115 Choral Ensemble. (New Course.)

720-117 Choral Ensemble 1 Cr. Continuation of 720-116 Choral Ensemble. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 720-116 Choral Ensemble. (New Course.)

720-119 Choir 1 Cr. Concentration on vocal problems and techniques. Development of standard repertoire for mixed voices. Sacred and secular, accompanied and a cappella. School and public performances are required. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. (Formerly 111 Choir. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Admission by audition.)

224


MUSIC 720

720-120 Choir 1 Cr. Continuation of 720-119 Choir. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 720-119 Choir. (Formerly 112 Choir. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Music 111.)

720-121 Choir 1 Cr. Continuation of 720-120 Choir. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 720-120 Choir. (Formerly 112 Choir. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Music 111.)

720-123 Elementary Class Voice 2 Cr. Basic techniques of voice production: breathing, diction, projection, tone-color and interpretation. Progressive vocal exercises and studies. Application of principles to simpler songs in English. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 720-103 Music Appreciation and 720-169 Elementary Class Piano, or departmental approval. (Formerly 113 Elemmtary Voice. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Music 103, 151 or permission of instructor.)

720-124 Elementary Class Voice 2 Cr. Continuation of 720-123 Elementary Class Voice. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 720-123 Elementary Class Voice. (Formerly 114 Elementary Voice. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Music 113.)

720-125 Elementary Class Voice 2 Cr. Continuation of 720-124 Elementary Class Voice. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 720-124 Elementary Class Voice. (Formerly 114 Elementary Voice. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Music 113.)

720-151 Music for Elementary Education 3 Cr. Designed to orient elementary teachers to the role of music in the child's growth and development. Emphasis on creating a musical environment in the elementary school classroom. The study of the child's voice. Basic theory, including piano keyboard, musical symbols and terms. Use of the autoharp, recorder and rhythm instruments. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 151 Music for Elemmtary Education. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

225


MUSIC 720

720-155 Stage Band 1 Cr. A course providing opportunity for the performance of music for the modern big band as well as experience playing in small "combo" groups. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. (New Course.)

720-156 Stage Band 1 Cr. Continuation of 720-155 Stage Band. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 720-155 Stage Band. (New Course.)

720-157 Stage Band 1 Cr. Continuation of 720-156 Stage Band. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 720-156 Stage Band. (New Course.)

720-159 Concert Band 1 Cr. Open to all students by audition. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. (New Course.)

1 Cr. 720-160 Concert Band Continuation of 720-159 Concert Band. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 720-159 Concert Band. (New Course.)

1 Cr. 720-161 Concert Band Continuation of 720-160 Concert Band. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 720-160 Concert Band. (New Course.)

720-163 Instrumental Ensemble 1 Cr. Designed to develop the individual's ability to perform in instrumental ensemble groups. Music selected and determined by needs and capabilities of the class. Public performance is part of the course. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. (Formerly 153 Instrumental Ensemble. 1 Semester Cr. Lectlire 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Ability to perform music of moderate difficulty on a standard orchestral instrument. Some high school instrumental experience desirable.)

226


MUSIC 720

720 164 Instrumental Ensemble 1 Cr. Continuation of 720-163 Instrumental Ensemble. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 720-163 Instrumental Ensemble. a

(Formerly 154 Imtrumental Ememble. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours.) Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Music 153.)

720-165 Instrumental Ensemble 1 Cr. Continuation of 720-164 Instrumental Ensemble. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 720-164 Instrumental Ensemble. (Formerly 154 Imtrumental Ensemble. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 bours. Prerequisite: Music 153.)

720 169 Elementary Class Piano 2 Cr. Basic piano techniques for students who do not intend to major in music. Exercises to develop technical facility. Improvisation of simple accompaniments to given melodies. Sight reading, memorization, repertoire and basic theory. Student should have access to piano for practice. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. a

(Formedy 171 Beginning Piano. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 bours. Prerequisite: Studmts should bave access to a piano for practicing.)

720-170 Elementary Class Piano 2 Cr. Continuation of 720-169 Elementary Class Piano. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 720-169 Elementary Class Piano. (Formerly 172 Beginning Piano. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 bours. Prerequisite: Music 171.)

720-171 Elementary Class Piano 2 Cr. Continuation of 720-170 Elementary Class Piano. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 720-170 Elementary Class Piano. (Formedy 172 Beginning Piano. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Music 171.)

720-173 Applied Music 3 Cr. Individual instruction in the following: piano, voice, violin, viola, violoncello, string bass, flute, clarinet, oboe, bassoon, French horn, trumpet-cornet, trombone, baritone-euphonium, tuba, percussion and organ. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 18 hours. Prerequisite: Permission by departmental audition. (New Course).

227


MUSIC 720

3 Cr. 720-174 Applied Music Continuation of 720-173 Applied Music. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 18 hours. Prerequisite: 720-173 Applied Music. (New Course.)

720-175 Applied Music 3 Cr. Continuation of 720-174 Applied Music. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 18 hours. Prerequisite: 720-174 Applied Music. (New Course.)

720-183 Applied Music 1 Cr. Individual instruction in the following: piano, voice, violin, viola, violoncello, string bass, flute, clarinet, oboe, bassoon, French horn, trumpet-cornet, trombone, baritone-euphonium, tuba, percussion and organ. Lecture 112 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. (New Course.)

720-184 Applied Music 1 Cr. Continuation of 720-183 Applied Music. Lecture 112 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 720-183 Applied Music. (New Course.)

720-185 Applied Music 1 Cr. Continuation of 720-184 Applied Music. Lecture 112 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 720-184 Applied Music. (New Course.)

720-191 Music History and Literature 3 Cr. Designed for students who plan to major in music and others with some musical background. Chronological analysis of major works in the literature from early times through the 16th century. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 105 Music History and Literature. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Music 100 or permission of instructor.)

228


229


MUSIC 720

720-192 Music History and Literature 3 Cr. Study of history and literature from the 17th through the 18th century. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 720-191 Music History and Literature or departmental approval. (Formerly 106 Music History and Literature. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Music 100 or permissi011 of instructor.)

720-193 Music History and Literature 3 Cr. Study of history and literature from the 19th through the 20th century. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 720-192 Music History and Literature or departmental approval. (Formerly 106 Music History and Literature. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Music 100 or permission ofinstructor.)

720-215 Choral Ensemble 1 Cr. Includes music particularly suitable for a small chorus: madrigals, motets, cantatas, opera. Renaissance through contemporary works. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 720-117 Choral Ensemble. (New Course.)

1 Cr. 720-216 Choral Ensemble Continuation of 720-215 Choral Ensemble. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 720-215 Choral Ensemble. (New Course.)

1 Cr. 720-217 Choral Ensemble Continuation of 720-216 Choral Ensemble. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 720-216 Choral Ensemble. (New Course.)

1 Cr. 720-219 Choir Concentration on vocal problems and techniques. Continuation of 720-121 Choir. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 720-121 Choir. (Formerly 211 Choir. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Music 112.)

230


MUSIC 720

720-220 Choir lCr. Continuation of 720-219 Choir. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 720-219 Choir. (Formerly 212 Choir. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Music 211.)

720-221 Choir 1 Cr. Continuation of 720-220 Choir. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 720-220 Choir. (Formerly 212 Choir. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Music 211.)

720-255 Stage Band 1 Cr. Continuation of 720-157 Stage Band. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 720-157 Stage Band. (New Course.)

720-256 Stage Band 1 Cr. Continuation of 720-255 Stage Band. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 720-255 Stage Band. (New Course.)

720-257 Stage Band 1 Cr. Continuation of 720-256 Stage Band. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 720-256 Stage Band. (New Course.)

1 Cr. 720-259 Concert Band Continuation of 720-161 Concert Band. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 720-161 Concert Band. (New Course.)

1 Cr. 720-260 Concert Ba~nd Continuation of 720-259 Concert Band. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 720-259 Concert Band. (New Course.)

231


MUSIC 720

720-261 Concert Band 1 Cr. Continuation of 720-260 Concert Band. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 720-260 Concert Band. (New Course.)

1 Cr. 720-263 Instrumental Ensemble Continuation of 720-165 Instrumental Ensemble. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 720-165 Instrumental Ensemble. (Formerly 253 Instrumental Ensemble. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Music 154.)

720-264 Instrumental Ensemble 1 Cr. Continuation of 720-263 Instrumental Ensemble. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 720-263 Instrumental Ensemble. (Formerly 254 Instrumental Ensemble. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Music 253.)

1 Cr. 720-265 Instrumental Ensemble Continuation of 720-264 Instrumental Ensemble. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 720-265 Instrumental Ensemble. (Formerly 254 Instrumental Ensemble. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Pret'equisite: Music 253.)

2 Cr. 720-269 Intermediate Class Piano Building a repertoire consisting of compositions by composers from the Baroque period to the 20th century. Emphasis on building of technique. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 720-171 Elementary Class Piano or departmental approval. (Formerly 271 Intermediate Piano. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Music 172 or permission of the instructor.)

720-270 Intermediate Class Piano 2 Cr. Continuation of 720-269 Intermediate Class Piano. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 720-269 Intermediate Class Piano. (Formerly 272 Intermediate Piano. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Music 271.)

232


MUSIC 720

720-271 Intermediate Class Piano 2 Cr. Continuation of 720-270 Intermediate Class Piano. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 720-270 Intermediate Class Piano. (Formerly 272 Intermediate Piano. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Music 271.)

720-273 Applied Music 3 Cr. Continuation of 720-175 Applied Music. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 18 hours. Prerequisite: 720-175 Applied Music. (New Course.)

720-274 Applied Music 3 Cr. Continuation of 720-273 Applied Music. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 18 hours. Prerequisite: 720-273 Applied Music. (New Course.)

720-275 Applied Music 3 Cr. Continuation of 720-274 Applied Music. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 18 hours. Prerequisite: 720-274 Applied Music. (New Course.)

720-283 Applied Music 1 Cr. Continuation of 720-185 Applied Music. Lecture V2 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 720-185 Applied Music. (New Course.)

720-284 Applied Music 1 Cr. Continuation of 720-283 Applied Music. Lecture 1f2 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 720-283 Applied Music. (New Course.)

720-285 Applied Music 1 Cr. Continuation of 720-284 Applied Music. Lecture 1/2 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: 720-284 Applied Music. (New Course.)

233


Nursery School Assisting 730 730-101 Introduction to Nursery Education 3 Cr. Purposes and functions of the nursery school. Organization, programs, equipment, needs of the preschool child and teaching techniques. Supervised observation. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 101 Introduction to Nursery Education. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

730-102 Introduction to Nursery Education 3 Cr. Continuation of 730-101 Introduction to Nursery Education with emphasis on curriculum and program development. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 730-101 Introduction to Nursery Education. (Formerly 101 Introduction to Nursery Education. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

730-120 Preschool Literature and Language 2 Cr. Language skills and the importance of communication in the development of a preschool child. An interpretative and critical study of all forms of literature as a basis for selection of stories for children two to six. Practice in the art of reading and story telling. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 730-101 Introduction to Nursery Education. (Formerly 121 Preschool Literature and Language. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

730-121 Preschool Literature and Language 3 Cr. Continuation of 730-120 Preschool Literature and Language with emphasis on curriculum and program development. Lecture 3 hours. Labora tory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 730-120 Preschool Literature and Language. (Formerly 121 Preschool Literature and Language. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hom路s. Prerequisite: None.)

3 Cr. 730-122 Preschool Art Students in a workshop setting are acquainted with a rich and meaningful variety of curriculum experiences in art for preschool children. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 730-102 Introduction to Nursery Education. (Formerly 122 Preschool Art, Science and Music. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Nursery School Assisting 101 or 121.)

234


235


NURSERY SCHOOL ASSISTING 730

730-123 Preschool Science 3 Cr. Students in a workshop setting are acquainted with a rich and meaningful variety of curriculum experiences in science for preschool children. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 730-122 Preschool Art. (Formerly 122 Preschool Art, Science and Music. 4 Semester Cr. Lectm'e 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Nursery School Assisting 10101' 121.)

730-124 Music for Preschool Children 3 Cr. Music for preschool children with emphasis on songs and instruments. Includes the fundamentals of music to enable the student to plan simple accompaniments. Skill in use of instruments emphasized. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 730-101 Introduction to Nursery Education and 720-100 Fundamentals of Music, or departmental consent. (Formerly 220 Music for Nursery Education. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: Nursery School Assistillg 101 and Music 171.)

730-220 Child Management 3 Cr. Guidance and management of preschool children within an educational program based on interpretation of child growth principles in practice. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 810-201 Child Growth and Development with concurrent enrollment in 730-230 Nursery School Participation and departmental approval. (Formerly 221 Child Mallagement. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: COllcurrent enrollment ill Nursery School Assisting 231.)

730-230 Nursery School Participation 5 Cr. Actual participation in preschool teaching under supervision to develop practical skills. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 7 hours. Prerequisites: 730-121 Preschool Literature and Language, 730-123 Preschool Science, 730-124 Music for Preschool Children and departmental approval. (Formerly 231 Nursery School Participation. 6 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 8 hours. Prerequisites: Nursery School Assistillg 101, 122 and 220.)

730-231 Nursery School Participation 5 Cr. Continuation of 730-230 Nursery School Participation with emphasis on additional experience with young children in an organized group. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 7 hours. Prerequisite: 730-230 Nursery School Participation. (Formerly 231 Nursery School Participatioll. 6 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 8 hours. Prerequisites: Nursery School Assisting 101, 122 alld 220.)

236


Nursing 740 740-101 Nursing 6 Cr. Basic nursing problems presented by patients regardless of the specific health problems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 101 Fundamentals of Nursing. 5 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

740-102 Nursing 6 Cr. Major nursing problems related to normal and abnormal physiological processes. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisites: 740-101 Nursing and 440-121 Principles of Medical Science. (Formerly 102 Fundamentals of Nursing. 5 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisites: Nursing 101 and Biology 121 or equivalent.)

237


NURSING 740

740-103 Nursing 6 Cr. Continuation of 740-102 Nursing. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisites: 740-102 Nursing and 440-122 Principles of Medical Science. (Formerly 102 FU11damentals of Nursing. 5 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisites: Nursing 101 and Biology 121 or equivalent.)

740-203 Nursing 11 Cr. Care of patients of all ages with nursing problems arising from fluid and electrolyte and hormonal imbalance. Present trends in nursing, major nursing organizations and career opportunities. Lecture 7 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisites: 740-103 Nursing, 440-123 Principles of Medical Science and 810-201 Child Growth and Development. (Formerly 20 1 Nursing of Infants, Children and Adults. lOSemester Cr. Lecture 6 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisites: Nursing 102 and Biology 122.)

740-204 Nursing 11 Cr. Nursing care of patients of all ages with problems of circulation, ventilation and limited motion. Present trends in nursing. Ethical, legal and occupational responsibilities of nurses. Lecture 7 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisites: 740-103 Nursing, 440-123 Principles of Medical Science and 810-201 Child Growth and Development. (Formerly 201 Nursing of Infants, Childrm and Adults. 10 Semester Cr. Lecture 6 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisites: Nursing 102 and Biology 122.)

740-205 Nursing 5 Cr. Nursing intervention in the care of patients manifesting patterns of anxiety, withdrawal, projection, aggression and socially unacceptable behavior. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisites: 740-103 Nursing, 440-123 Principles of Medical Science and 810-201 Child Growth and Development. (Formerly 202 Nursing of Infants, Childrm and Adults. 12 Semester Cr. Lecture 8 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: Nursing 201')

740-206 Nursing 6 Cr. Nursing care of women before, during and after delivery. Care of newborn infants. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisites: 740-103 Nursing, 440-123 Principles of Medical Science and 810-201 Child Growth and Development. (Formerly 202 Nursing of Infants, Children and Adults. 12 Semeste~ Cr. Lecture 8 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: Nursing 201.)

238


Philosophy 750 750-101 Introduction to Philosophy 4 Cr. Study and analysis of basic problems dealing with man's understanding of the origin and meaning of the universe as viewed by different schools of philosophy. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite. None. (Formerly 101 Introduction to Philosophy. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

750-102 Introduction to Logic 4 Cr. Basic rules and systems of formal logic. Examines syllogisms and the elements of modern symbolic logic concepts of mathematics. Explores scientific reasoning and language usage. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 750-101 Introduction to Philosophy. (Formerly 102 Introduction to Logic. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hoUl's. Prerequisite: Philosophy 101.)

750-201 Comparative World Religion 4 Cr. A study of the origin, nature and meaning of major world religions: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism and Confucianism. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 201 Comparative Warld Religion. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

4 Cr. 750-202 Ethics A study of systems and problems of human conduct and their application to man's moral problems and decisions. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 202 Ethics. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Philosophy 101.)

4 Cr. 750-203 Introduction to Scientific Method The study of formation of scientific concepts and examination of the structure of scientific investigation and its methods. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 750-101 Introduction to Philosophy or 750-102 Introduction to Logic. (Formerly 203 Introduction to Scientific Method. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Philosophy 101. Philosophy 102 recommended.)

239


Physical Education 760 760-103 Archery and Badminton (Coeducational) 1 Cr. Instruction and participation in archery and badminton. Skill development, rules, strategy and safety practices. Stresses value as lifetime activities. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. (New Course.)

760-105 Basketball and Volleyball (Men) 1 Cr. Development of individual proficiency in basketball and volleyball, including history, rules and strategy. Appreciation of team play. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. (New Course.)

760-106 Basketball and Volleyball (Women) 1 Cr. Development of individual proficiency in basketball and volleyball, including history, rules and strategy. Appreciation of team play. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. (New Course.)

760-108 Bowling and Golf (Coeducational) 1 Cr. Instruction and participation in bowling. Instruction and development of golf skills. Includes history, rules and etiquette of both sports, with stress on value as lifetime activities. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. (New Course.)

760-109 Recreational Activities (Coeducational) 1 Cr. Introduction to games of low organization such as table tennis, shuffleboard, darts, horseshoes. Participation with a focus on lifetime value in future leisure time. Includes history, rules and etiquette as well as exposure to organization of games and contests. Lecture o hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. (New Course.)

240


PHYSICAL EDUCATION 760

760-115 Adapted Physical Education (Coeducational) 1 Cr. Designed for students unable to participate in regular physical education because of temporary or permanent limitations. Programs of individual exercises and recreational activities as determined by student limitations and specific remedial conditions. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 115 Adapted Physical Education (Coeducational}. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Nom.)

760-117 Body Conditioning (Men) 1 Cr. Knowledge, understanding and appreciation of the intrinsic values of physical fitness and body strength. Participation in calisthenics, gymnastics, weight training and various exercise programs geared to individual needs. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. (New Course.)

760-119 Body Dynamics (Women) 1 Cr. Knowledge, understanding, appreciation and body skills for efficient movement. Participation in calisthenics, gymnastics and various exercise programs. Analysis of individual posture and anatomical problems, with discussions of grooming and styling. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. (New Course.)

760-121 Social Dancing (Coeducational) 1 Cr. Instruction and practice in the fundamental steps of a variety of popular dances. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 121 Social Dancing (Coeducational}. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

760-123 Square and Folk Dancing (Coeducational) 1 Cr. Development of proficiency in folk and square dancing. Includes history and etiquette. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. (New Course.)

241


760-125 Creative Rhythms (Coeducational) 1 Cr. Development of proficiency in fundamentals of locomotor skills and rhythm activities. Includes modern dance and jazz, with emphasis on creating new forms from familiar media. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. (New Course.)

760-131 Beginning Swimming (Coeducational) 1 Cr. Instruction and practice for non-swimmers in the fundamental strokes and skills leading to deep water swimming and water safety. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 111 Beginning Swimming (Coeducational). 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

760-133 Intermediate Swimming (Coeducational) 1 Cr. Instruction and practice in the popular swimming strokes, with an emphasis on the development of form and endurance. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-131 Beginning Swimming (Coeducational) or equivalent. (Formerly 211 Intermediate Swimming (Coeducational). 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Ability to swim in deep water.)

242


760-135 Advanced Swimming and Diving (Coeducational) 1 Cr. Development of proficiency in advanced swimming techniques and diving. Includes competitive and synchronized swimming, and exposure to water polo and other water games. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-133 Intermediate Swimming (Coeducational) or consent of instructor. (New Course.)

760-137 Senior Life Saving (Coeducational) 1 Cr. Review of standard strokes and basic diving techniques. Preparation leading to completion of tests in qualification for the American Red, Cross Senior Lifesaving Certificate. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Ability to dive from edge of pool and swim 440 yards, using a variety of strokes. (Formerly 113 Senior Lifesaving (Coeducational). 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Ability to dive from edge ofpool and swim 440 years using a variety ofstrokes.)

243


PHYSICAL EDUCATION 760

760-139 Water Safety Instruction (Coeducational) 1 Cr. Practical and theoretical analysis of individual water safety, small craft safety, swimming skills and lifesaving techniques. Students are to demonstrate methods of class organization, instruction, supervision and examination. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Possession of current Lifesaving Certificate. (Formerly 114 Water Safety Instruction (Coeducational). 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Eighteen years of age or older and possession of a current Lifesaving Certificate.)

760-140 Water Safety Instruction (Coeducational) 1 Cr. Completion of required activities and satisfaction of time requirements and various tests as dictated by the American Red Cross. Successful completion of the course qualifies a student as a water safety instructor. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-139 Water Safety Instruction (Coeducational). (Formerly 114 Water Safety Instruction (Coeducational). 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Eighteen years of age or older and possession of a current Lifesaving Certificate.)

760-141 Wrestling (Men) 1 Cr. Instruction and participation in wrestling as an individual sport. Emphasis on development of skills, physical condition and knowledge needed in competitive wrestling. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. (New Course.)

760-143 Fencing (Coeducational) 1 Cr. Instruction and participation in the elements of foil fencing. Emphasis placed on development of skills, rules and safety for the beginner. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. (New Course.)

760-144 Fencing (Coeducational) 1 Cr. Instruction and participation in sabre epee fencing. Emphasis placed on development of skills, rules, strategy and safety. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 760-143 Fencing (Coeducational) or consent of instructor. (New Course.)

244


Physical Science 770 770-101 Introduction to Physical Science 3 Cr. A unified, elementary, non-mathematical survey of the physical universe. Emphasis on scientific method, science history and modern developments. Introduces basic concepts of matter and energy, the structure of the universe through lecture-demonstration and text assignments. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 101 Introduction to Physical Science. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

770-102 Introduction to Physical Science 3 Cr. Continuation of 770-101 Introduction to Physical Science. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 770-1Q1 Introduction to Physical Science or departmental approval. (Formerly 102 Introduction to Physical Science. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Physical Science 101.)

770-103 Introduction to Physical Science 3 Cr. Continuation of 770-102 Introduction to Physical Science. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 770-102 Introduction to Physical Science or departmental approval. (Formerly 102 Introduction to Physical Science. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Physical Science 101.)

Physics 780 780-101 Introductory Physics 4 Cr. Introduction to elementary classical mechanics with emphasis on behavior of bodies under the influence of equilibrium and non-equilibrium forces. Study of rotational and translational motion. Selected topics from theory of fluids. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or equivalent. (Formerly 101 Introductory Physics. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra.)

245


PHYSICS 780

780-102 Introductory Physics 4 Cr. Development of oscillatory phenomena with topics from simple harmonic motion, waves on a string and electromagnetic waves. Applications to such areas as direct current and alternating current circuits and optics. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 780-101 Introductory Physics. (Formerly 102 Introductory Physics. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Physics 101.)

780-103 Introductory Physics 4 Cr. The laws of thermodynamics and such central concepts as specific heat. Topics from modern physics such as special relativity, atomic spectra, photoelectric and laser phenomena, atomic and nuclear physics, with emphasis on their influence on modern technology. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 780-102 Introductory Physics. (Formerly 102 Introductory Physics. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Physics 101.)

780-121 Engineering Physics 4 Cr. First quarter of a four-quarter sequence. Study of basic physical quantities, operations with vectors and scalars. Introduction to mechanics. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 690-151 Analytic Geometry and Calculus or concurrent enrollment. High school physics recommended. (Formerly 121 Engineering Physics. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Problem section 2 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 151 or taken concurrently. High school physics recommended.)

246


PHYSICS 780/ PLANT OPERATION SERVICES 790

780-122 Engineering Physics 4 Cr. Continuation of 780-122 Engineering Physics. Heat, thermodynamwith mechanics. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 780-121 Engineering Physics and 690-152 Analytic Geometry and Calculus, or concurrent enrollment in the latter. (Formerly 121 Engineering Physics. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Problem section 2 hours. Prerequisites: Mathematics 151 or taken concurrently. High school physics recommended.)

780-221 Engineering Physics 5 Cr. Continuation of 780-122 Engineering Physics. Heat, thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases, electricity and magnetism. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 780-122 Engineering Physics and 690-153 Analytic Geometry and Calculus, or concurrent enrollment in the latter. (Formerly 221 Engineering Physics. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: Physics 121 and Mathematics 152. The latter may be taken concurrently.)

780-222 Engineering Physics 5 Cr. Continuation of 780-221 Engineering Physics. Optics, atomic and nuclear physics. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 780-221 Engineering Physics and 690-154 Analytic Geometry and Calculus, or concurrent enrollment in the latter. (Formerly 222 Engineering Physics. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: Physics 221 and Mathematics 251. The latter may be taken concurrently.)

Plant Operation Services 790 790-101 Boiler, Turbine and Compressor Operations 3 Cr. Generation of steam and electric power. Theory and practice of powerhouse operations. Design, layout function, operation and maintenance of boilers, compressors, turbines, heating and ventilating equipment. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 101 Boiler, Turbine and Compressor Operations. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

790-111 Softeners, Cooling Towers and Filters 3 Cr. Water usage and purification. Industrial filtration. Design, layout, function, operation and maintenance of water softeners, cooling towers and filters. Theory and practice of filtration systems in industry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 111 Softeners, Cooling Towers and Filters. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

247


Political Science 800 4 Cr. 800-101 American National Government Nature, purpose and forms of the American government. Relationship between function and structure. Dynamics of political change. Outstanding governmental problems of modern society. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 101 American National Govennnent. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

800-102 State and Local Government 4 Cr. American governmental structures and functions below the national level. Emphasis on functions and interrelationships with special attention to Ohio state and local government. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 800-101 American National Government. (Formerly 103 State and Local Government. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Political Science 101.)

800-103 Liberal-Democratic Governments 3 Cr. A study of Liberal-Democratic political systems: Great Britain, France and Germany. Governing political concepts, institutions, processes, problems and prospects. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 800-101 American National Government. (Formerly 102 Comparative Government. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Political Science 101.)

800-104 Communist Governments 3 Cr. A study of communist political systems: Soviet Union, China and Eastern Europe. Governing political concepts, institutions, processes, problems and prospects. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 800-101 American National Government. (Formerly 102 Comparative Government. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Political Science 101.)

800-201 Contemporary World Affairs 4 Cr. Problem study of modern international relations and of the forces which confront policymakers. Special emphasis on current areas of crisis. Designed primarily for students who seek an understanding of the United States in a tense and highly competitive political world. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 630-102 Man and Civilization. 630-103 Man and Civilization is recommended. (Formerly 201 Contemporary World Affairs. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: History 101 and 102 recommended.)

248


Psychology 810 810-101 General Psychology 3 Cr. Introduction to fundamental psychological concepts and principles derived from a scientific approach to the study of human and animal behavior. Emphasis on methodology, biological bases of behavior and learning. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 101 General Psychology. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

810-102 General Psychology 3 Cr. Continuation of 810-101 General Psychology. Emphasis on motivation, emotion and dynamics of personality. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 810-101 General Psychology. (Formerly 101 General Psychology. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

810路201 Child Growth and Development 4 Cr. Growth, development and guidance of the child from conception through puberty. Interpretation and significance of creativeness, adjustment abilities and child-adult relationships. Emphasis on both physiological growth stages of the child. Note: This course cannot be utilized for purposes of direct teaching credential application in Ohio. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 810-102 General Psychology. (Formerly 201 Child Growth and Development. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 101.)

810-203 Educational Psychology 4 Cr. Introduction to major psychological factors in the school learningteaching situation. Concepts in human development related to problems in the school situation. Teacher's role in motivation, conceptual learning and problem solving. Development of emotional behavior, attitudes and values. Learning of skills, retention and transfer. Measurement of student abilities and achievement. Note: This course cannot be utilized for purposes of direct teaching credential application in Ohio. 530-101 Introduction to Education recommended. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 810-102 General Psychology. (Formerly 203 Educational Psychology. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. Education 101 recommended.)

249


PSYCHOLOGY 810/ RUSSIAN 820

810-205 Dynamics of Human Behavior 4 Cr. The interpretation of human behavior with special emphasis on motivation, emotion and the adjustment process. The implications of theory and methodology in the study of personality. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: 810-102 General Psychology and sophomore standing, or special permission of the department. (New Course.)

Russian 820 820-101 Beginning Russian 4 Cr. Introduction to modern Russian with emphasis on speaking, reading and writing through multiple approach. Basic study of grammar and pronunciation. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in 560-101 College Composition. (Formerly 101 Beginning Russian. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in E1zglish 101.)

820-102 Beginning Russian 4 Cr. Study of grammar. Oral and written exercises. Reading of elementary texts. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 820-101 Beginning Russian or one year of high school Russian. (Formerly 102 Beginning Russian. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Russian 101 or two years of high school Russian.)

820-103 Beginning Russian 4 Cr. Strengthening facility of oral expression through discussions and study of speech patterns. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 820-102 Beginning Russian or two years of high school Russian. (Formerly 102 Beginning Russian. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Russian 101 or two years of high school Russian.)

4 Cr. 820-201 Intermediate Russian Introduction to more advanced vocabulary and speech patterns. Systematic review of grammar. Reading of stories and plays by outstanding 19th and 20th century writers. Laboratory practice. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 820-103 Beginning Russian or two years of high school Russian. (Formerly 201 Intermediate Russian. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Russian 102 or three years of high school Russian.)

250


JJ])IJH

PSYCHOLOGY 810/ RUSSIAN 820

JK]) 820-202 Intermediate Russian 4 Cr. Strengthening of oral and written facility of expression. Building of more advanced vocabulary and sentence structure. Review of grammar. Laboratory practice. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 820-201 Intermediate Russian or two years of high school Russian. (Formerly 202 Intermediate Russian. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Russian 201 or four years of high school Russian.)

820-203 Intermediate Russian 4 Cr. Further readings and discussions on literary masterpieces in Russian for understanding and appreciation of Russian thought and culture. Oral reports on works by outstanding Russian writers. Review of grammar. Laboratory practice. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 820-202 Intermediate Russian or three years of high school Russian. (Formerly 202 Intermediate Russian. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Russian 201 or four years of high school Russian.)

Secretarial Science 830 830-101 Typewriting 2 Cr. Fundamentals of keyboard techniques and operation of the typewriter. Not open to students having more than one semester of high school typing or the equivalent within the last two years. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 101 Beginning Typing. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

830-102 Typewriting 2 Cr. Continuation of 830-101 Typewriting with an introduction to business letters and problem typing. Not open to students having more than two senlesters of high school typing or the equivalent within the last two years. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 830-101 Typewriting or equivalent. (Formerly 101 Beginning Typing. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

251


SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 830

830-103 Typewriting 2 Cr. Continuation of 830-102 Typewriting with emphasis on technical papers, business reports and job application procedures. Not open to students having more than two semesters of high school typing or the equivalent within the last two years. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 830-102 Typewriting or equivalent. (Formerly 102 Intermediate Typing. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 101 or consent of the instructor.)

830-105 Office Machines 4 Cr. Instruction and practice in the essential operations of the ten-key and full-key adding-listing machines, rotary and printing calculators. Applications in solving business-related problems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 410-107 Business Mathematics or concurrent enrollment. (Formerly 105 Introduction to Business Machines. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Business 107 01' taken concurrently.)

830-106 Filing and Records Control 3 Cr. Instruction and practice in the preparation of office records for temporary and permanent storage. Includes alphabetic, geographic, numeric and subject filing systems. Detailed study of both mechanical and manual filing methods. Emphasis on classification systems and the retrieval of filed information. Retention and disposition of all kinds of office records. 830-101 Typewriting recommended. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 106 Filing and Records Control. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 101 or the equivalent.)


SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 830

830-110 Shorthand 3 Cr. Mastery of the Diamond Jubilee Edition of Gregg Shorthand for Colleges. Reading, writing' and transcription practice in preparation for speed dictation and transcription in more advanced courses in shorthand. Not open to students having more than one semester of high school shorthand or the equivalent within the last two years. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 830-101 Typewriting recommended. (Formerly 103 Beginning Shorthand. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

830-111 Shorthand 3 Cr. Continuation of 830-110 Shorthand. A brief and intensive review of shorthand theory. Instruction in the taking of dictation and the preparation of typed transcripts from shorthand notes. The development of speed and accuracy. Emphasis on the production of mailable letters. Not open to students having more than two semesters of high school shorthand or the equivalent within the last two years. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 830-110 Shorthand or equivalent, and 830-101 Typewriting or equivalent. (Formerly 104 Intermediate Shorthand. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 103 or consent of the instructor.)

3 Cr. 830-112 Shorthand Continuation of 830-111 Shorthand. Additional instruction and practice in the taking of dictation and the transcription of shorthand notes. Continued emphasis on the development of speed and accuracy and the production of mailable letters. Not open to students having more than one year of high school shorthand or the equivalent within the last two years. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 830-111 Shorthand or equivalent, and 830-102 Typewriting or equivalent. (Formerly 104 Intermediate Shorthand. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 103 or consent of the instructor.)

830-150 Business Communications 3 Cr. Extensive and detailed examination of oral and written communicative techniques used in business. Letters, memorandums and reports. Analysis of conference and meeting techniques, and business addresses and talks. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: . 560-101 College Composition and 780-101 Fundamentals of Oral Communication. (Formerly 200 Business Communication. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: English 101 and Speech 101.)

253


SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 830

830-200 Advanced Typewriting 2 Cr. Intensive training in speed and accuracy applied to general office typing, including tabulations, rough drafts, manuscripts and business letters. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 830-103 Typewriting or equivalent. (Fonnerly 201 Advanced Typing. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 102 or consent ofthe instructor.)

830-201 Advanced Typewriting 2 Cr. Continuation of 830-200 Advanced Typewriting with emphasis on speed and accuracy, and the preparation of masters for duplication. Instruction in the operation of duplicating machines. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 830-200 Advanced Typewriting or equivalent. (Formerly 202 Advanced Typing. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 201 or consent of the imtructor.)

830-202 Advanced Typewriting 2 Cr. Superior production standards practiced in the planning, editing and preparing of complex business and technical reports. Instruction in the use of voice-writing machines. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 830-201 Advanced Typewriting or equivalent. (Formerly 202 Advanced Typing. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 201 or coment ofthe imtructor.)

3 Cr. 830-203 Advanced Shorthand Practice in integrating previously acquired shorthand skills. Emphasis on rapid, accurate note-taking and transcription. Not open to students having more than three semesters of high school shorthand or the equivalent within the last two years. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 830-103 Typewriting or the equivalent, and 830-112 Shorthand or the equivalent. (Fonnerly 203 Advanced Shorthand. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 104 or two years of high school shorthand.)

254


SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 830

Advanced Shorthand 3 Cr. Continuation of 830-203 Advanced Shorthand. Emphasis on the preparation of mailable letters for job competency. Not open to students having more than two years of high school shorthand or the equivalent within the last two years. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 830-200 Advanced Typewriting or the equivalent, and 830-203 Advanced Shorthand or the equivalent.

830-204

(Formerly 204 Advanced Shorthand. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 203 or consent of the instructor.)

Executive Shorthand 3 Cr. Office-style dictation with emphasis on technical material. Superior production standards as practiced in rapid, accurate note-taking and preparation of mailable letters. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 830-201 Advanced Typewriting and 830-204 Advanced Shorthand.

830-205

(Formerly 204 Advanced Shorthand. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 203 or consent ofthe instructor.)

Legal Shorthand 3 Cr. Practice in note-taking and transcription for the advanced shorthand student. Preparation of legal correspondence, pleadings, testimonies and depositions. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 830-201 Advanced Typewriting and 830-204 Advanced Shorthand. 460-215 Business Law or concurrent enrollment.

830-206

(Formerly 205 Legal Shorthand. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 203 or consent ofthe instructor.)

Medical Shorthand 3 Cr. Designed to give advanced shorthand students practice in note-taking and transcription of medical reports, diagnoses, case histories and correspondence. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: 830-201 Advanced Typewriting and 830-204 Advanced Shorthand. 710-103 Medical Terminology or concurrent enrollment.

830-207

(Formerly 206 Medical Shorthand. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 203 or consent ofthe instructor.)


SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 830/ SOCIAL SCIENCE 840

830-250 Office Methods and Procedures 4 Cr. A finishing course for Secretarial Science majors. The course is designed to integrate and extend previously learned knowledges and skills, and to develop to the production level techniques and responsibilities common to most office work through performance of typical tasks. To develop an understanding of office procedures, the flow of work in offices, the interrelationship of offices, and the teamwork necessary in the production of office work so that the transition from college to office will be easier to make. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: 830-200 Advanced Typewriting. (Formerly 250 Office Methods and Procedures. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 201.)

830-260 Cooperative Field Experience 9 Cr. Limited to students in the Cooperative Field Experience Program. Full-time employment in an approved area under College supervision. Requirements for credit will be a minimum of 350 clock hours of approved work, a report from the employer, term report by student and on-the-job visits by the coordinator of the department. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 35 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. (New Course.)

830-261 Cooperative Field Experience 9 Cr. Continuation of 830-260 Cooperative Field Experience. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 35 hours. Prerequisite: 830-260 Cooperative Field Experience. (New Course.)

Social Science 840 840-103 Introduction to Social Science 3 Cr. An interdisciplinary approach to the social sciences outlining the roles of the separate disciplines as they pertain to anthropologicalsociological and psychological behavior of man. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 102 Introduction to Social Science. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Social Science 101. Note: Students who have completed Economics 151 or Sociology 102 may not take Social Science 102 for credit.)

256


SOCIAL SCIENCE 840/ SOCIOLOGY 850

840-104 Introduction to Social Science 3 Cr. An interdisciplinary approach to the social sciences outlining the roles of the separate disciplines as they pertain to the economic and political behavior of man. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 840-103 Introduction to Social Science. (Formerly 101 Introduction to Social Science. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. Note: Students who have completed Political Science 101 or History 151 may not take Social Science 101 for credit.)

3 Cr. 840-105 Introduction to Social Science An interdisciplinary approach to the social sciences through selected topics and readings on the behavior of man. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 840-104 Introduction to Social Science. (Formerly 101 Introduction to Social Science. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. Note: Students who have completed Political Science 101 or History 151 may not take Social Science 101 for credit.)

Sociology 850 850-101 Introductory Sociology 4 Cr. Survey of the principles, theory, concepts and research lnethods used in sociology. Intensive study of such concepts as culture, social organization, norms, status and social stratification. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 101 Introductory Sociology. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

850-102 Social Institutions 4 Cr. Examination of the concepts developed in the introductory course as they relate to the family, religion, education, urban community and other such institutions. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 850-101 Introductory Sociology. (Formerly 102 Social Institutiom. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Sociology 101.)

850-121 Marriage and Family Life 3 Cr. Preparation for marriage. Factors in mate selection. Personality adjustments in marriage and family. Dating, courtship, engagement and marital adjustments. Parent-child relations. Family disorganization and programs of improvement. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: 850-101 Introductory Sociology or 810-102 General Psychology. (Formerly 121 Marriage and Family Life. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or Psychology 101.)

257


SOCIOLOGY 850/ SPANISH 860

850-201 Social Problems 4 Cr. The pathology of modern American society, including topics such as juvenile delinquency, adult crime, alcoholism, mental health, rural-urban conflict or other problems of current concern. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 850-101 Introductory Sociology. (Formerly 201 Social Problems. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Sociology 101.)

Spanish 860 860-101 Beginning Spanish 4 Cr. A functional course with emphasis on spoken language. Introduction to grammar through cultural approach and written exercises. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in 560-101 College Composition. (Formerly 101 Begillllillg Spallish. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll ill Ellglish 101.)

860-102 Beginning Spanish 4 Cr. Further study of grammar with oral and written exercises. Development of conversational proficiency. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 860-101 Beginning Spanish. (Formerly 102 Begillllillg Spallish. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Spallish 101 or two years of high school Spallish.)

860-103 Beginning Spanish 4 Cr. Further study of grammar. Vocabulary building with stress on Spanish idioms. Continued emphasis on development of oral and written skills. Laboratory drill. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 860-102 Beginning Spanish or two years of high school Spanish. (Formerly 102 Begillllillg Spallish. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Spallish 101 or two years of high school Spallish.)

860-201 Intermediate Spanish 4 Cr. Study of major developments in Spanish literature and civilization from the historic period to the Moorish conquest. Intensive exercises in written and oral expression. Grammar review. Laboratory practice. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour.

258


SPANISH 860/ SPEECH 870

Prerequisite: 860-103 Beginning Spanish or two years of high school Spanish. (Formerly 201 Intermediate Spanish. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Spanish 102 or three years of high school Spanish.)

860-202 Intermediate Spanish 4 Cr. Spanish literature and civilization from the ninth century to the end of the 15th century, with stress on EI Cid and the Romancero. Intensive exercise in written and oral expression. Grammar review. Continued laboratory practice. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 860-201 Intermediate Spanish or two years of high school Spanish. (Formerly 202 Intermediate Spanish. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Spanish 201 or four years of high school Spanish.)

860-203 Intermediate Spanish 4 Cr. Study of the works of Spanish authors, from Cervantes to modern times, whose primary interest was critical examination of themselves and their society. Intensive exercise in written and oral expression. Continued laboratory practice. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: 860-202 Intermediate Spanish or three years of high school Spanish. (Formerly 202 Intermediate Spanish. 4 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Spanish 201 or four years of high school Spanish.)

Speech 870 870-091 Basic Speech Training 4 Cr. Group drill and individual instruction designed to help students achieve adequate proficiency in use of voice and production of speech sounds. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (Formerly 091 Basic Oral Communication. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

4 Cr. 870-101 Fundamentals of Oral Communication Effective oral communication. Application of principles to a variety of practical speaking situations. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 101 Principles of Public Speaking. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

259


SPEECH 870

870-105 Voice and Articulation 4 Cr. A practical course in the application of both theory and technique to conscious vocal control, and the development of articulation and pronunciation standards. Individual and group practice. Performance through exercises and readings. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None. (New Course.)

870-121 Group Discussion 4 Cr. Designed to develop more effective participation in small groups through an understanding and practical application of the knowledge, attitudes and methods of group discussion. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (New Course.)

870-205 Oral Interpretation 4 Cr. Development of the student's oral ability to interpret various types of written material with understanding and appreciation. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 870-105 Voice and Articulation or consent of the instructor. (Formerly 102 Oral Interpretation. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Speech 101.)

870-211 Argumentation and Debate 2 Cr. Discovering, selecting and evaluating evidence. Its arrangement into orderly, persuasive oral and written argument. Special emphasis on causes and effects of prejudice, remedies and the inft.uence of language on human behavior. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 870-101 Fundamentals of Oral Communication or consent of instructor. (Formerly 211 Argumentation and Debate. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

870-212 Argumentation and Debate 2 Cr. Application of the principles of argumentation through extensive practice in several forms of debate. Participation in intercollegiate debate and individual events. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 870-211 Argumentation and Debate or consent of instructor. (Formerly 211 Argumentation and Debate. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

260


Theatre Arts 890 890-101 Introduction to Theatre 3 Cr. A survey of the elements of the theatre, such as acting, directing, designing, play analysis and production techniques. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 101 Introduction to the Theatre. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

890-121 History of the Theatre 3 Cr. Survey of dramatic presentations, conventions and techniques from classical Greece through the 18th century. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 121 History of the Theatre. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Nom.)

890-122 History of the Theatre 3 Cr. Survey of dramatic presentations, conventions and techniques from the 19th century to the present. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 121 History of the Theatre. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

890-150 Fundamentals of Acting 3 Cr. Theory and practice of the basic techniques of acting: body movement, voice production and diction. Introduction to scene study. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. (Formerly 151 Fundamentals of Acting. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. (Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

261


THEATRE ARTS 890

890-151 Fundamentals of Acting 3 Cr. Continuation of 890-150 Fundamentals of Acting. Lecture 3 hours. Labora tory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 890-150 Fundamentals of Acting. (Formerly 152 Fundamentals of Acting. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Theatre Arts 151.)

890-152 Fundamentals of Acting 3 Cr. Continuation of 890-151 Fundamentals of Acting. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 890-151 Fundamentals of Acting. (Formerly 152 Fundamentals of Acting. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Theatre Arts 151.)

890-153 Stagecrafts 1 Cr. Workshop in technical theatre. Scenery, lighting, costumes, properties and sound by assignment in campus theatrical productions. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in 890-150 Fundamentals of Acting or departmental approval. (Formerly 153 Rehearsal and Performance. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollmmt in Theatre Arts 151, 152 or COllSent of the instructor.)

890-154 Stage crafts 1 Cr. Continuation of 890-153 Stagecrafts. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 890-153 Stage crafts or departmental approval. (Formerly 154 Rehearsal and Performance. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Theatre Arts 153 or consent of the instructor.)

890-155 Stagecrafts 1 Cr. Continuation of 890-154 Stagecrafts. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 890-154 Stagecrafts or departmental approval. (Formerly 154 Rehearsal and Performance. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hout'S. Prerequisite: Theatre Arts 153 or consent of the instructor.)

890-171 Radio and Television Production 2 Cr. Survey of the broadcasting industry, its history and place in our society. Examination of technical areas, advertising, writing, programming and analysis. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (Formerly 171 Radio and TV Production. 2 Semester Cr. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.)

263


THEATRE ARTS 890

890-250 Advanced Acting 3 Cr. Scene study, methods of characterization. Consideration of styles of acting. Refinement of acting techniques of the individual student. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 890-152 Fundamentals of Acting or consent of instructor. (Formerly 251 Advanced Acting. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Theatre Arts 152.)

890-251 Advanced Acting 3 Cr. Continuation of 890-250 Advanced Acting. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 890-250 Advanced Acting. (Formerly 252 Advanced Acting. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Minimum grade ofC in Theatre Arts 251')

890-252 Advanced Acting 3 Cr. Continuation of 890-251 Advanced Acting. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 890-251 Advanced Acting. (Formerly 252 Advanced Acting. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in Theatre Arts 251.)

890-253 Stagecrafts 1 Cr. Continuation of 890-155 Stagecrafts. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 890-155 Stagecrafts or departmental approval. (Formerly 253 Rehearsal and Performance. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Theatre Arts 154 or consent of the instructor.)

890-254 Stagecrafts 1 Cr. Continuation of 890-253 Stagecrafts. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 890-253 Stagecrafts or departmental approval. (Formerly 254 Rehearsal and Performance. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Theatre Arts 253 or consent of the instructor.)

890-255 Stage crafts 1 Cr. Continuation of 890-254 Stagecrafts. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 890-254 Stagecrafts or departmental approval (Formerly 254 Rehearsal and Performance. 1 Semester Cr. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Theatre Arts 253 or conserzt of the instructor.)

264


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Transportation 900 900-121 Transportation Principles 3 Cr. Survey of the American transportation systems, tariffs and classification. Traffic regulations and industrial traffic management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 520-100 Economics for Business and Industry. (Formerly 121 Transportation Principles. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.)

265


TRANSPORTATION 900

900-122 Transportation Principles a Cr. Continuation of 900-121 Transportation Principles. Emphasis on modes of transportation and their interrelation. Transport via motor, rail, water and air. How they combine to make the total transportation picture. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 900-121 Transportation Principles or consent of instructor. (Formerly 122 Transportqtion Principles. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Transportation 121 or permission of instructor.)

a Cr. 900-221 Tariffs and Classifications Through routes and rates-in-transit privileges. Technical tariffs and various rate interpretations. Over-charges and under-charges, loss and damage, import and export. Emphasis on theoretical considerations. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 900-122 Transportation Principles. (Formerly 221 Tariffs and Classifications. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Transportation 122.)

900-222 Tariffs and Classifications 3 Cr. A continuation of 900-221 Tariffs and Classifications. Uniform freight classifications, classification committee procedure, and their phases of tariff and classification. Emphasis on practical applications. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 900-221 Tariffs and Classifications. (Formerly 221 Tariffi and Classificatio?ls. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Transpo1路tation 122.)

900-231 Transportation Regulations a Cr. Local, state and federal legislative acts regulating the transportation systems. Includes the Public Utilities Commission Act, Interstate Commerce Act and Civil Aeronautics Board Act. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 900-122 Transportation Principles. (Formerly 231 Transportation Regulatio1lS. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Transportation 122.)

900-241 Industrial Traffic Management 4 Cr. Basic principles of the transportation function operating within a commercial company. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: 900-122 Transportation Principles. (Formerly 241 Industrial Traffic Management. 3 Semester Cr. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Transportation 122.)

266


Transfer or University Parallel Curriculums Transfer or University Parallel curriculums in Liberal Arts and professional fields such as Business Administration, Education and Engineering are planned in consultation with the student's counselor. The courses parallel the curriculums of the four-year college or university to which the student plans to transfer. It is the responsibility of the student to acquaint himself with, and to follow the requirements of, the institution to which he intends to transfer. In general, transfer students specialize at the senior institution during the junior and senior year. Typical course work during the freshman and sophomore years involves the following subject areas: College Composition British or American Literature American or World History Science Mathematics Social Sciences Humanities Students intending to major in Liberal Arts usually complete two years of a foreign language, or the equivalent, at the college level. Students planning to pursue a Baccalaureate degree in Business Administration need at least a year of college-level mathematics (including algebra) as preparation for later courses involving statistics and other quantitative methods. Engineering students take a concentration of courses in theoretical mathematics. The College offers preparatory or refresher courses in English composition, reading comprehension, speech and mathematics for students who are deficient in basic skills areas. Such courses are not designed for transfer but are intended to provide students with an opportunity to improve their skills.

268


Career Program Listed in alphebetical order on the following pages are suggested quarter sequences for each of the 21 two-year Associate degree curriculums in the Career Program. These sequences are intended to be a guide in the scheduling of the student's course work. Each student should confer with a counselor on course selection prior to, or at the time of, registration. The Career Program Offices' staff and faculty will be happy to discuss any aspect of these programs. The Career Program encompasses four general categories: Business, Engineering, Health and Public Service Technologies. With the approval of the appropriate dean, students may take substitutions for courses not required for graduation and courses outside the area of concentration.

269


Career Program Suggested Quarter Sequences

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Associate in Science Degree in Building Construction Technology

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Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Engineering 550-211 Introduction to Surveying 550-251 Mechanics and Strength of Materials Building Construction Technology 450-221 Building Equipment 450-241 Principles of Structural Design Psychology 810-101 General Psychology

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English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Building Construction Technology 450-122 Architectural Drawing Physics 780-101 Introductory Physics Mathematics 690-105 Trigonometry

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs. 3 3 3 4

Psychology 810-102 General Psychology Building Construction Technology 450-222 Building Equipment 450-231 Contracts and Specifications 450-242 Principles of Structural Design Engineering 550-212 Surveying 550-252 Strength of Materials

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English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Building Construction Technology 450-123 Architectural Drawing Engineering 550-151 Applied Mechanics Physics 780-102 Introductory Physics

SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs. 3 3 3 3 4 16

Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Economics 520-100 Economics for Business and Industry Building Construction Technology 450-223 Building Equipment 450-232 Construction Estimating 450-243 Principles of Concrete Design 450-251 Construction Procedures

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FOURTH QUARTER

FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Business (General) 460-108 Introduction to Business Accounting 410-107 Business Mathematics 410-121 Principles of Accounting

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Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

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SECOND QUARTER

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Data Processing 490-101 Electronic Data Processing Elective Accounting 410-122 Principles of Accounting

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Cr. Hrs.

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Secretarial Science 830-150 Business Communications Accounting 410-222 Intermediate Accounting 410-231 Cost Accounting

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SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English or Speech (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Economics 520-100 Economics for Business and Industry or 520-101 Principles of Economics Accounting 410-123 Principles of Accounting

3

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Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

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Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) t Accounting 410-123 Principles of Accounting Business (General) 460-201 Principles of Marketing 460-213 Business Law

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FIFTH QUARTER

SECOND QUARTER Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Economics 520-100 Economics for Business and Industry** Accounting 410-121 Principles of Accounting Business (General) 460-216 Introduction to Industrial Purchasing

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SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410-122 Principles of Accounting Business (General) 460-112 Business Management

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SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FOURTH QUARTER

FIRST QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Mathematics 690-101 Algebra ** Business (General) 460-108 Introduction to Business Data Processing 490-101 Electronic Data Processing

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SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs.

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FIRST QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410-107 Business Mathematics Hotel-Restaurant Management 580-130 Introduction to Hospitality Management 580-132 Sanitation and Safety in Food and Lodging Establishments 580-135 Basic Food Preparation

3

Hotel-Restaurant Management 580-260 Cooperative Field Experience

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FOURTH QUARTER 3

3 2

3 15

Cr. Hrs. Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business (General) 460-213 Business Law Hotel-Restaurant Management 580-230 Hotel-Motel Front Office Procedure 580-231 Advanced Food Preparation

3 3 3 3 3 15

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SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)** Accounting 410-121 Principles of Accounting Hotel-Restaurant Management 580-136 Food Production Technology

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs. 3 3 1 3 3

Accounting 410-122 Principles of Accounting Hotel-Restaurant Management 580-137 Introduction to Quantity Food Production *English 560-101, 560-102 and Speech 870-101 recommended. ** Psychology 810-101 and 810-102 recommended. t-..J 00

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Cr. Hrs. 3 3 3 3 3 15

3 16

THIRD QUARTER Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)**

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) t Economics 520-100 Economics for Business and Industry Hotel-Restaurant Management 580-232 Hotel-Motel Sales Promotion 580-241 Food and Beverage Control

SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs. 3 1 3 3 3 4 17

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business (General) 460-214 Business Law Hotel-Restaurant Management 580-236 Layout and Equipment 580-251 Advanced Food and Beverage Management 580-272 Hotel-Motel Maintenance and Engineering

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Associate in Science Degree in Business with Concentration in Purchasing

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Purchases of materials, supplies and equipment represent a large part of a business or industrial firm's total cost of operation. Purchasing, because of its importance, is often designated as a separate responsibility to be handled by one or more individuals. Purchasing agents and their assistants are responsible for obtaining raw materials, goods and services at the lowest cost consistent with required quality. The majority of the nation's purchasing personnel are employed in manufacturing firms. Many also work in government agencies, public utilities, schools and hospitals. SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE

FOURTH QUARTER

FIRST QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410-107 Business Mathematics Business (General) 460-108 Introduction to Business Data Processing 490-101 Electronic Data Processing

3

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3 3 4

16

3

3

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Business (General) 460-201 Principles of Marketing 460-216 Introduction to Industrial Purchasing Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

5 3 1

15

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FIFTH QUARTER

SECOND QUARTER Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Economics 520-100 Economics for Business and Industry** Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Secretarial Science 830-150 Business Communications Accounting 410-121 Principles of Accounting Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

3 3 3

Business (General) 460-217 Intermediate Purchasing 460-213 Business Law 460Elective :j:

3

Cr. Hrs. 3 3 3 3 4 16

3 1 16 SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Business (General) 460-112 Business Management Accounting 410-122 Principles of Accounting Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) t

3

Cr. Hrs. Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) t

3 5 3 1 15

*English 560-101, 560-102 and Speech 870-101 recommended. **Economics 520-101 and 520-102 may be substituted.

Business (General) 460-218 Purchasing Management 460-214 Business Law 460-220 Human Relations in Business

t Psychology 810-101

3 3 3 3 3 15

and 810-102 recommended. :j: Student may elect a course from among offerings in the General Business area - a course not required in this program.

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Associate in Science Degree in Business with Concentration in Retailing The success of any retail establishment depends in large measure upon its managers. A graduate of this curriculum may seek employment as management trainee, buyer, floor supervisor or promotion assistant with a retail establishment.

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FOURTH QUARTER

FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)** Accounting 410-107 Business Mathematics Business (General) 460-108 Introduction to Business

3

Cr. Hrs.

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) t

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Accounting 410-123 Principles of Accounting Business (General) 460-152 Salesmanship 460-155 Principles of Retailing

3 3

3 3 3

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3 16

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FIFTH QUARTER

SECOND QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Economics 520-100 Economics for Business and Industry*** Accounting 410-121 Principles of Accounting

3 3 1 3

*English 560-101, 560-102 and Speech 870-101 recommended. ** Psychology 810-101 and 810-102 recommended.

3 3 3 4 3 16

3 3 16 SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410-122 Principles of Accounting Business (General) 460-201 Principles of Marketing

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Secretarial Science 830-150 Business Communications Business (General) 460-213 Business Law 460-225 Principles of Advertising 460-157 Principles of Retailing

Cr. Hrs. 3 3 1 3 5 15

Cr. Hrs. Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business (General) 460-214 Business Law 460-220 Human Relations in Business 460-256 Retail Buying and Merchandising 460Elective t

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Associate in Science Degree in Business with Concentration in Salesmanship

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SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE FOURTH QUARTER

FIRST QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business (General) 460-108 Introduction to Business Accounting 410-107 Business Mathematics

3

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) t

1

3 3

3 16

3

3

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Secretarial Science 830-150 Business Communications Business (General) 460-216 Introduction to Industrial Purchasing 460-152 Salesmanship

3

3 3 15

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FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)** Economics 520-100 Economics for Business and Industry*** Accounting 410-111 Practical Accounting

3 3 1

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business (General) 460-154 Sales Promotion 460-213 Business Law 460Electivet

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Cr. Hrs.

*English 560-101, 560-102 and Speech 870-101 recommended.

3

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THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business (General) 460-201 Principles of Marketing

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 1 3 5 15

Elective Business (General) 460-214 Business Law 460-220 Human Relations in Business 460-225 Advertising 460-252 Sales Management

3 3 3 4 3 16

** Psychology 810-101 and 810-102 recommended. ***Economics 520-101 and 520-102 may be substituted. t Sociology 850-101 recommended. t Student may elect courses of his choice from among offerings in the General Business area - courses not required in this program.

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SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE

FOURTH QUARTER

FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410-107 Business Mathematics Secretarial Science 830-101 Typewriting** 830-110 Shorthand**

3

Cr. Hrs.

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

1

3 2 3 15

3

3

3

Accounting 410-111 Practical Accounting Secretarial Science 830-150 Business Communications 830-200 Advanced Typewriting 830-203 Advanced Shorthand

3

3 2 3 17


SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Secretarial Science 830-102 Typewriting** 830-105 Office Machines 830-111 Shorthand **

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs. 3

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3 1

2 4

Business (General) 460-220 Human Relations in Business Secretarial Science 830-201 Advanced Typewriting 830-204 Advanced Shorthand

3 16

3

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

3 1 2

3 3 15 *English 560-101, 560-102 and 560-103. Speech 870-101 may be substituted for English 560-103. **Substitute electives if completed elsewhere.

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SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER English or Speech (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Secretarial Science 830-103 Typewriting** 830-106 Filing and Records Control 830-112 Shorthand**

Cr. Hrs.

Elective Secretarial Science 830-202 Advanced Typewriting 830-205 Executive Shorthand t 830-250 Office Methods and Procedures

3 3 1

2 3 4

16

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People who help move goods and people through the air and water and over land account for a sizable segment of the nation's work force. This two-year curriculum is designed to prepare students for clerical, supervisory and administrative positions with a carrier or an industrial traffic department. Career possibilities include rate analyst, traffic claims agent, terminal office manager, reservations salesman, traffic expediter and scheduler. Employment opportunities are available with truck, bus, water, rail and air carriers.

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE

FOURTH QUARTER

FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting 410-107 Business Mathematics Business (General) 460-108 Introduction to Business Secretarial Science 830-101 Typewriting

3 3 1 3 3 2 15

Cr. Hrs.

Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) ** Secretarial Science 830-150 Business Communications Business (General) 460-213 Business Law 460-220 Human Relations in Business Transportation 900-221 Tariffs and Classifications

1

3 3 3 3 3 16

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SECOND QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Economics 520-151 Development of the American Economy Transportation 900-121 Transportation Principles

3 3 1 4

Business (General) 460-214 Business Law Accounting 410-111 Practical Accounting Transportation 900-222 Tariffs and Classifications

3 14

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 15

3 3

3 5

Cr. Hrs.

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) t Business (General) 460-215 Business Law Transportation 900-231 Transportation Regulations 900-241 Industrial Traffic Management

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3 3

SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business (General) 460-201 Principles of Marketing Transportation 900-122 Transportation Principles

Cr. Hrs.

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Asso ciate in Scie nce Degr ee in Busi ness with Conc entra tion in Who lesal ing

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factory to consum er. Whole salers assemb le Whole saling plays a vital role in the movem ent of goods from their custom ers to purcha se mercha ndise hundre ds, someti mes thousa nds, of similar produc ts. They enable widely scatter ed manufa cturers . Leadin g from one or a few nearby wholes ale firms rather than from many and appare l, home applian ces, machin ery employ ers are compa nies that sell food produc ts, drugs, dry goods and buildin g materi als.

SUGGE STED QUAR TER SEQUE NCE

FIRST QUAR TER English (See Specific Gradua tion Require ments)* Social Science (See Specific Gradua tion Require ments) Health or Physica l Educat ion (See Specific Gradua tion Require ments) Human ities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathem atics (See Electiv e Gradua tion Require ments)* * Busines s (General) 460-108 Introdu ction to Busines s Accoun ting 410-107 Busine ss Mathem atics

FOURT H QUAR TER Cr. Hrs. 3

3 1

3 3 3 16

Human ities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathem atics (See Electiv e Gradua tion Require ments) t Busines s (General) 460-216 Introdu ction to Industr ial Purcha sing 460-152 Salesm anship 460-220 Human Relatio ns in Busines s

Cr. Hrs. 3 3

3 3 3

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English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)*** Economics 520-100 Economics for Business and Industry **** Accounting 410-111 Practical Accounting

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs. 3

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) t

3

3 3

Secretarial Science 830-150 Business Communications Business (General) 460-213 Business Law 460-253 Wholesaling 460Elective t

3

Cr. Hrs. 3 3 3 3 4

3 19

15 THIRD QUARTER

SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Business (General) 460-201 Principles of Marketing Data Processing 490-101 Electronic Data Processing

3 3

1 5

Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Business (General) 460-112 Business Management 460-214 Business Law 460-252 Sales Management 460Elective t

Cr. Hrs. 1

5 3 3 3 15

4

16

*English 560-101, 560-102 and Speech 870-101 recommended. **Sociology 850-101 recommended. ***Geography 600-103 recommended.

**** Economics 520-101 and 520-102 may be substituted. t Psychology 810-101 and 810-102 recommended. t Other courses for additional requirements in area are being developed.

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Associate in Science Degree in Dental Hygiene Dental hygienists work in school systems' dental health programs, for health agencies, on government research programs and as teachers. Working under the supervision of a dentist, dental hygienists check and clean teeth, chart tooth conditions, take radiographs, apply fluoride, impart dental health information, sterilize instruments, and perform other chairside and office duties. Upon successful completion of this curriculum, the student is eligible to take a licensing examination prescribed by the board of dental examiners of the state in which she chooses to practice. THIRD QUARTER Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology 440-123 Principles of Medical Science Psychology 810-101 General Psychology Dental Hygiene 500-130 Dental Materials 500-131 Clinical Dental Hygiene 500-132 Radiology

Cr. Hrs. 1 3

3 5 3 3 18

SUMMER SESSION Cr. Hrs. Sociology 850-101 Introductory Sociology Speech 870-101 Fundamentals of Oral Communication Home Economics 640-121 Foods and Nutrition

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FOURTH QUARTER

FIRST QUARTER

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology 440-121 Principles of Medical Science Dental Hygiene 500-101 Preclinical Dental Hygiene 500-102 Head and Neck Anatomy and Tooth Morphology 500-103 Oral Hygiene 500-104 General and Oral Histology

Cr. Hrs. 3 1 3 2 4 2 2 17

SECOND QUARTER

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology 440-122 Principles of Medical Science Dental Hygiene 500-111 Preclinical Dental Hygiene 500-112 Head and Neck Anatomy and Tooth Morphology 500-113 Oral Hygiene 500-122 General and Oral Pathology 500-124 Periodontics *English 560-101 and 560-102. **Social Science 840-103, 840-104 and 840-105.

Cr. Hrs. 3 1 3 2 4 3 2 2 20

Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) ** Biology 440-124 Principles of Medical Science Dental Hygiene 500-201 Clinical Dental Hygiene 500-203 Pharmacology and Anesthesiology 2,00-204 Public Health 500-205 Dental Assisting

Cr. Hrs. 3 3 4 4 2 1 17

FIFTH QUARTER

Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements)** Biology 440-221 Microbiology Dental Hygiene 500-211 Clinical Dental Hygiene 500-223 First Aid 500-224 Dental Health Education

Cr. Hrs. 3 4 5 2 3 17

SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements)** Dental Hygiene 500-230 Dental Specialties 500-231 Clinical Dental Hygiene 500-234 Dental Ethics and Jurisprudence 500-235 Dental Office Management Psychology 810-102 General Psychology

3 5 5 3 1 3 20

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FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Electrical-Electronic Technology 540-100 Electrical-Electronic Orientation Engineering 550-121 Engineering Drawing 550-125 Electric Circuits Mathematics 690-102 Algebra* Physics 780-101 Introductory Physics

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Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Economics 520-100 Economics for Business and Industry Electrical-Electronic Technology 540-250 Industrial Electronics 540-260 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits 540-262 Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation

3

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SECON D QUAR TER

English (See Specific Gradua tion Require ments) Health or Physica l Educat ion (See Specific Gradua tion Require ments) Mathem atics 690-105 Trigono metry Engine ering 550-112 Engine ering Report Constru ction 550-126 Electric Circuits Electric al-Elect ronic Techno logy 540-140 Magnet ics, Electro magnet ic Inducti on and Direct Curren t Machin es THIRD QUAR TER

English (See Specific Gradua tion Require ments) Mathem atics 690-115 College Algebr a Engine ering 550-127 Electric Circuits Electric al-Elect ronic Techno logy 540-150 Alterna ting Curren t Machin es 540-160 Semico nductor and Electro nic Circuits

FIFTH QUAR TER Cr. Hrs. 3 1 4 3 3

3 17 Cr. Hrs. 3 4 3 3 3 16

*Studen ts may begin the mathem atics sequenc e at a higher level depend ing upon prior accomp lishmen ts in this area.

Social Science (See Specific Gradua tion Require ments) Psycho logy 810-101 Genera l Psycho logy Electrical-Electronic Techno logy 540-235 Commu nication Transm ission 540-251 Industr ial Electro nics 540-252 Logic, Pulse and Switchi ng Circuit ry 540-261 Semico nductor and Electro nic Circuits

Cr. Hrs. 3 3 3 3 3 3 18

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Social Science (See Specific Gradua tion Require ments) Psycho logy 810-102 General Psycho logy Health or Physica l Educat ion (See Specific Gradua tion Require ments) Electric al-Elect ronic Techno logy 540-211 Electric al Constru ction and Applica tion 540-236 Commu nication Transm ission 540-253 Compu ter Circuitr y 540-263 Electro nic Measur ement and Instrum entatio n

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Associate in Science Degree in Fire Technology This curriculum offers a balanced and broad education to students who plan to enter fire service as a career. It also helps active firemen upgrade themselves for advancement within the service. Included are such specialized areas of instruction as fire prevention, inspection, fire protection systems and municipal public relations.

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE

FOURTH QUARTER

FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Mathematics 690-101 Algebra* Fire Technology 570-100 Organization for Fire Protection

3 3 1

3 3 13

Cr. Hrs.

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Fire Technology 570-230 Fire Prevention Practices Chemistry 480-101 Introductory Chemistry Industrial Supervision 650-111 Practical Psychology for Supervisors

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English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Physics 780-101 Introductory Physics Fire Technology 570-110 Fire-Fighting Tactics Elective

THIRD QUARTER

Speech (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Fire Technology 570-120 Fire Protection Systems 570-210 Fire-Fighting Tactics and Command

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs. 3 3 1 4

4 2 17

SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs. 4

3 1

4 4

16

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Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Fire Technology 570-221 Chemistry of Hazardous Materials 570-241 Fire Hydraulics 570-250 Municipal Public Relations 570-260 Personnel Training Methods

Cr. Hrs. 3 3 3 3 3 2 17

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FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Mathematics 690-101 Algebra** Industrial Supervision 650-121 Elements of Supervision

3 3

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3 3

13

Cr. Hrs. Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) 3 Data Processing 490-101 Electronic Data Processing 4 Mathematics 690- Elective 2 Industrial Supervision 650-111 Practical Psychology for Supervisors or 650-221 Supervisory Reporting and Decision Making 3 650-126 Principles of Work Simplification 3 650-128 Measured Motions, Job Analysis and Incentives ~ 17


SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Transportation 900-121 Transportation Principles Accounting 410-121 Principles of Accounting Industrial Supervision 650-122 Men, Machinery and Materials

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs. 3

3 1 3 3

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Engineering 550-121 Engineering Drawing Industrial Supervision 650-127 Work Simplification Practices 650-231 Labor-Management Relations 650-241 Personnel Management 650-291 Materials Handling and Plant Layout

Cr. Hrs. 3

3 2 2 3

3 16

3

16

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Industrial Supervision 650-125 Elements of Time Study 650-131 Basic Management Techniques Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs. 3 3 1 3 3

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Industrial Supervision 650-134 Employee and Plant Safety 650-140 Industrial Organization and Management or 650-232 Collective Bargaining and Labor Laws 650-233 Basic Employee Relations 650-271 Production, Quality and Cost Control 650-292 Materials Handling and Plant Layout

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Associate in Science Degree in Law Enforcement

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FOURTH QUARTER

FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Law Enforcement 670-101 Introduction to Law Enforcement 670-121 Criminal Law

3 3 3 4

3 16

Cr. Hrs.

Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)** Sociology 850-101 Introductory Sociology Psychology 810-101 General Psychology Law Enforcement 670-221 Police Administration 670-231 Fundamentals of Traffic Control 670-251 Crime Laboratory Techniques

1 4

3 3 2 2 15

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SECOND QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)** Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Law Enforcement 670-111 Patrol Procedures 670-122 Criminal Law

3 3

1

3

Cr. Hrs.

Sociology 850-201 Social Problems Data Processing 490-101 Electronic Data Processing Law Enforcement 670-222 Police Administration 670-232 Accident Investigation 670-252 Crime Laboratory Techniques

4 4

3 3 2

16 4 3

17

THIRD QUARTER

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements)** Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Law Enforcement 670-123 Laws of Evidence 670-201 Delinquency Prevention and Control

SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs. 3

3 1

3

Cr. Hrs.

Psychology 810-201 Child Growth and Development Data Processing 490-201 Computer Programming Law Enforcement 670-131 Industrial Security or 670Elective 670-211 Investigation and Interrogation 670-233 Traffic Law Enforcement

3 3 16

4 4 3 3 3 17

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Associate in Science Degree in Library Technology

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This curriculum is designed to prepare the student for a career as a paraprofessional in a public, school or speciallibrary, under the supervision of a librarian or supervisory assistant. The course of study has been developed as preparation for the performance of such library functions as reviewing, acquiring, cataloguing and filing new materials. In addition, students are taught the skills of working with the public in furnishing reference information and assisting in bibliographic searches.

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE

FIRST QUARTER

FOURTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Secretarial Science 830-101 Typewriting* Elective 560-095 Reading Improvement or 850-101 Introductory Sociology Library Technology 680-101 Introduction to Library Organization

3 3 2 3

or 4 3 14 or 15

Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) English 560-221 Survey of British Literature or 560-231 Survey of American Literature Psychology 810-101 General Psychology Secretarial Science 830-250 Office Methods and Procedures Library Technology 680-122 Library Acquisition Procedures 680-151 Basic Cataloguing and Classifica tion

1

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2 3

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English (See Specific Gradua tion Require ments) Social Science (See Specific Gradua tion Require ments) Secreta rial Science 830-102 Typewr iting Busines s (General) 460-220 Human Relatio ns in Busines s Art 430-101 Art Apprec iation or Music 720-103 Music Apprec iation Library Techno logy 680-102 Introdu ction to Library Organiz ation THIRD QUAR TER

FIFTH QUAR TER Cr. Hrs. 3 3 2 3

3 2 16 Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Gradua tion Require ments) Social Science (See Specific Gradua tion Require ments) Health or Physica l Educat ion (See Specific Gradua tion Require ments) Secreta rial Science 830-103 Typewr iting Library Techno logy 680-121 Library Acquisi tion Procedu res 680-202 Educati onal Media

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3 3 1 2 3 3 15

Cr. Hrs. 1 4 3 2 2 3 15

SIXTH QUAR TER Cr. Hrs.

Econom ics 520-151 Develo pment of the Americ an Econom y Data Process ing 490-101 Electro nic Data Process ing Secretarial Science 830-105 Office Machin es 830-106 Filing and Record s Control Library Techno logy 680-253 Circula tion

4 4

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Associate in Science Degree in Mechanical Technology

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FOURTH QUARTER

FIRST QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Physics 780-101 Introductory Physics Engineering 550-121 Engineering Drawing Mathematics 690-102 Algebra* Mechanical Technology 700-100 Mechanical Technology Orientation 700-150 Machine Tools

3

4 3 3

2 3 18

Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) I-lealth or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Electrical-Electronic Technology 540-140 Magnetics, Electromagnetic Induction and Direct Current Machines Engineering 550-112 Engineering Report Construction 550-251 Mechanics and Strength of Materials }jrfechanical Technology 700-201 Industrial Hydraulics

3

1 3

3 3

4 17


FIFTH QUARTER

SECOND QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Engineering 550-122 Engineering Drawing Mathematics 690-105 Trigonometry Physics 780-102 Introductory Physics Mechanical Technology 700-151 Metal Fabrication Methods

3 3 4 4

3 17

1 3 3 3 4

3 17

SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Mathematics 690-115 College Algebra Engineering 550-125 Electric Circuits 550-151 Applied Mechanics Mechanical Technology 700-152 Manufacturing Processes

Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Engineering 550-252 Strength of Materials Psychology 810-101 General Psychology 1V1echanical Technology 700-211 Mechanical Design 700-221 Applied InstrumentationMeasurement

3 4

3 3 3 16

*Students may begin mathematics sequence at a higher level depending upon prior accomplishments in this area.

Cr. Hrs.

Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Economics 520~100 Economics for Business and Industry Psychology 810-102 General Psychology Engineering 550-123 Engineering Drawing or 550-126 Electric Circuits Jl,lechanical Technology 700-222 Applied Instrumentation-Control

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The medical assistant works for a physician in a clinic, hospital or in private practice. This curriculum examines medical principles and terminology, office procedures, basic accounting and basic laboratory procedures. The medical assistant is qualified to run the doctor's office and free him from routine duties. Other career opportunities exist in pharmaceutical and surgical supply companies, public health agencies, medical publishing companies and prepaid medical care agencies.

SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE

FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology 440-121 Principles of Medical Science 440-122 Principles of Medical Science Secretarial Science 830-101 Typewriting* Medical Assisting 710-101 Medical Assisting Orieritation

3

3 1 3

3 2

Biology 440-125 Principles of Medical Science Psychology 810-101 General Psychology Accounting 410-111 Practical Accounting Secretarial Science 830Elective 830-200 Advanced Typewriting Medical Assisting 710-201 Medical Assisting Office Procedures

3

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English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology 440-123 Principles of Medical Science Secretarial Science 830-102 Typewriting Medical Assisting 710-102 Medical Terminology

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs. 3 3 1 3 2 2 14

THIRD QUARTER

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)t Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology 440-124 Principles of Medical Science Secretarial Science 830-103 Typewriting 830-106 Filing and Records Control Medical Assisting 710-103 Medical Terminology

Cr. Hrs.

Biology 440-221 Microbiology Psychology 810-102 General Psychology Secretarial Science 830-110 Shorthand or 830-201 Advanced Typewriting Medical Assisting 710-202 Medical Assisting Office Procedures 710-203 Medical Laboratory Procedures

4 3 3 or 2 3 3 15 or 16

SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs. 3 3 1 3 2 3 2 17

Sociology 850-101 Introductory Sociology Elective Secretarial Science 830-105 Office Machines 830-111 Shorthand or 830-202 Advanced Typewriting Medical Assisting 710-204 Medical Laboratory Procedures 710-251 Medical Assisting Ethics

Cr. Hrs. 4 3 4 3 or 2 3 1 17 or 18

*Students may begin at a higher level of typing depending upon skill. tSpeech 870-101 may be substituted.

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FIRST QUARTER

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology 810-101 General Psychology Sociology 850-101 Introductory Sociology Nursery School Assisting 730-101 Introduction to Nursery Education

Cr. Hrs.

Cr. Hrs. 3 3 3

4

3 16

Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Physical Science 770-102 Introduction to Physical Science Psychology 810-201 Child Growth and Development Nursery School Assisting 730-123 Preschool Science 730-124 Music for Preschool Children

1

3 4

3 3 14


SECOND QUARTER

FIFTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Music 720-100 Fundamentals of Music Psychology 810-102 General Psychology Nursery School Assisting 730-102 Introduction to Nursery Education 730-120 Preschool Literature and Language

Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Physical Science 770-103 Introduction to Physical Science Sociology 850-201 Social Problems Nursery School Assisting 730-220 Child Management 730-230 Nursery School Participation

3 3

3 3 3 2 17

THIRD QUARTER

1

3 4

3 5 16

SIXTH QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Physical Science 770-101 Introduction to Physical Science Nursery School Assisting 730-121 Preschool Literature and Language 730-122 Preschool Art

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 3 3

3 15

Cr. Hrs.

Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Sociology 850-121 Marriage and Family Life Elective Home Economics 640-121 Foods and Nutrition Nursery School Assisting 730-231 Nursery School Participation 730Elective *

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Associate in Science Degree in Nursing This curriculum combines nursing instruction and experience with general education as preparation for a career in registered nursing. Clinical experience includes caring for all age groups - infancy to senior adulthood - in medical, surgical, obstetrical and psychiatric settings at major Cuyahoga County health facilities. Graduates are eligible to take the examination leading to state licensure as a registered nurse (R.N.) qualified for a position as general duty nurse in a clinic or hospital. Students interested in entering this Career Program are asked to obtain a satisfactory score on a reading test approved by the College. SUGGESTED QUARTER SEQUENCE

FOURTH QUARTER

FIR.ST QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology 810-101 General Psychology Biology 440-121 Principles of Medical Science Nursing 740-101 Nursing

3 1

3 3 6

16

Cr. Hrs.

Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology 440-124 Principles of Medical Science Nursing 740-203 Nursing*

3

3 11 17


FIFTH QUARTER

SECOND QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology 810-102 General Psychology Biology 440-122 Principles of Medical Science Nursing 740-102 Nursing

3 1

3

Cr. Hrs.

Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology 440-125 Principles of Medical Science Nursing 740-205 Nursing* 740-206 Nursing*

3

3

5 6 17

6 16

SIXTH QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology 810-201 Child Growth and Development Biology 440-123 Principles of Medical Science Nursing 740-103 Nursing

3

3 1

4

Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology 440-221 Microbiology Nursing 740-204 N ursing*

Cr. Hrs. 3 4

11

18 3 6 17

*Nursing in the fourth, fifth and sixth quarters may be taken in any sequence.

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Full- Time Faculty


318


319


320


Full- Tim,e FaClllty

321


FuZZ- Time Faculty and Staff METROPOLITAN CAMPUS PAPPAS, CHARLES N. Vice President and Campus Director B.S., Central Michigan University M.A., University of Michigan Ph. D., Ohio State University

1965

BLOYER, RUSSELL O. Dean of Student Services B.S., Bemidji State College M.A., Colorado State College Ed. D., Arizona State University

1967

LIGUORI, FRANK E. Dean of Business Administration B.S., University of Pittsburgh M. Ed., University of Pittsburgh Ph. D., University of Pittsburgh

1967

STEVENSON, DAVID Dean of Arts and Sciences B.A., University of Michigan M.A., University of Michigan Ph. D.路, University of Michigan

1966

SUTTON, FRED C. 1963 Dean of Technical-Occupational Education Ph. B., University of Chicago B.A., State University of Iowa M. Ed., University of Pittsburgh Ed. D., Wayne State University TRAICOFF, GEORGE, JR. Dean of Community Services B.S., Miami University M. Ed., Kent State University Ed. D., Indiana University

322

AGNOR, HERBERT E., JR. 1965 Counselor B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute M. Ed., Ohio University ALPERN, GERTRUDE (Mrs.) 1964 Instructor of History and Political Science B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., Columbia University ANDERSON, DAVID M. Instructor of Data Processing B.S., Capital University

1967

ATKINS, HELEN K. (Mrs.) Instructor of Medical Assisting B.S., LeMoyne College

1967

7967 AULT, DARL E. Coordinator of Marketing B.A., Bowling Green State University M.B.A., Northwestern University M. Ed., Bowling Green State University

BAILEY, IRWIN T. Business Manager B.A., University of Michigan M.B.A., University of Michigan

1966

BAKER, BETTIE J. Associate Professor of History B.A., University of Michigan M.A., University of Michigan

7964

BAKER, JOAN B. Counselor B.A., Heidelberg College M.A., Kent State University

7968

1967


BANKS, ROBERT C. Instructor of Chemistry B.A., Western Reserve University

1967

BARBER, SHARON C. (Mrs.) Instructor of Psychology B.S., Indiana State University M.A., Indiana State University

1966

BEAL, CARRIE A. (R.N.) Assistant Professor of Nursing B.A., Ashland College M.E., University of Pittsburgh

1966

BELL, LYNN S. Department Head of Engineering Technologies B.S., Miami University M.A., Western Reserve University

1964

BERWICK, JUDITH L. 1966 Assistant to the Director of Placement and Student Financial Aid B.S., Bowling Green State University 1964 BLANCO, GALO W. Coordinator of Industrial Supervision and Chemical Technology B.S., University of Michigan M.S., University of Michigan Ph. D., University of Wisconsin

BROWN, HARVEY A. 1967 Instructor of Business B.B.A., Western Reserve University J.D., Cleveland-Marshall Law School BROWNING, RICHARD J. 1964 Associate Professor of Speech B.S., Ohio State University M.S., North Dakota State University BUCKEY, GINA A. (R.D.H.) Instructor of Dental Hygiene B.S., Ohio State University

1968

BURKE, TERRENCE W. Instructor of English B.S., Loyola University M.A., Purdue University

1966

BURNSIDE, HELEN H. (Mrs.-R.N.) 1964 Department Chairman of Nursing Education (Leave of Absence) B.S., Simmons College M.A., Columbia University CAHOON, GENEVIEVE M. (Mrs.) 1965 Assistant Professor of Health Education B.S., University of Pittsburgh M. Ed., University of Pittsburgh

BONICA, JACQUELINE Counselor B.S., Kent State University M.A., John Carroll University

1967

CANDON, MARIAN W. (R.N.) Associate Professor of Nursing B.S., Ohio State University M.S., Western Reserve University

1964

BONNER, JOHNETTA (R.N.) Assistant Professor of Nursing B.S.N., Boston University M.S.N., Wayne State University

1965

CANNON, LOWELL N. Instructor of Mathematics B.S., Kent State University M.A., Kent State University

1967

BOWMAN, FRANCISE L. (R.N.) Assistant Professor of Nursing B.S.N.P., Duquesne University M. Lit., University of Pittsburgh

1966

BOYER, ELIZABETH M. (Mrs.) 1966 Assistant Professor of Business B.S., Bowling Green State University L.L.B., Cleveland-Marshall Law School L.L.M., Western Reserve University J.D., Clev..eland-Marshall Law School BRASHARES, EDITH O. (Mrs.) 1963 Associate Professor of Political Science B.A., University of Nebraska M.A., University of Michigan

CARBONE, JOHN M. 1968 Counselor B.S., North Texas State University M.S., North Texas State University CARRINGTON, SAMUEL R. Counselor for Project SEARCH B.A., Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State University

1968

CARRINGTON, WINSTON H. 1966 Assistant Professor of Engineering Technology B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute M.S., University of Alabama

323


CHITWOOD, FRANCES (Mrs.) 1964 Instructor of English B.S.E., Arkansas State Teachers College M.A., University of Arkansas

DESLONDE, ROSALIE D. (Mrs.) Instructor of Biology B.S., Fisk University M.S., Howard University

CISE, JOHN P. Instructor of Physics B.S." Xavier University

1965

DODGE, JAMES K. (Capt.) 1964 Coordinator of Law Enforcement B.A., Ohio State University L.L.B., Cleveland-Marshall Law School

CLOVESKO, JOSEPH F. Assistant Professor of Biology B.S., Clarion State College M.S., Western Reserve University

1964

COLEMAN, JOHN S. Assistant Professor of Economics B.A., Eastern Michigan University M.A., University of Michigan M.A.T.E., Purdue University

1966

DUINO, RUSSELL A. 1965 Assistant Librarian B.A., Gannon College M. Lit., University of Pittsburgh M.S.L.S., Western Reserve University DUNKLE, SIDNEY W. Instructor of Biology B.S., Baldwin-Wallace College M.S., University of Wyoming

1966

1967 COLLINS, RAYMOND B. Campus Librarian B.A., Western Reserve University M.S.L.S., Western Reserve University

EHRLICH, ANITA Instructor of English B.A., City College of New York M.A., University of Iowa

1967

CONLIN, MARY L. (Mrs.) Instructor of English B.A., Western Reserve University

ELISH, RAYMOND D. Assistant Professor of Psychology and Social Science B.S., Kent State University M. Ed., Kent State University

1967

ELVE, JOHN L. Instructor of English B.A., Hope College M.A., University of Arkansas

1966

FABRY, MARGARET J. (Mrs.) Assistant Professor of Mathematics M.A. equivalent, Pazmany Peter, Tvdomany Egyetem, Budapest, Hungary

1966

1964

1964 COOK, CULBRETH B. Director of Placement and Student Financial Aid B.A., University of Cincinnati M.A., Western Reserve University Ed. D., Western Reserve University 1966 COX, JOHN H. Assistant Professor of Music B.A., University of California (Berkeley) M.A., Western Reserve University CRABL~W.LLOYD

1%7

Instructor of Health, Physical Education and Recreation B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College M.A., Western Reserve University

324

1967

CURTISS, ADELAIDE B. Instructor of English B.A., Notre Dame College M.S.J., Northwestern University

1966

DAWSON, DIANA V. (Mrs.) Instructor of Foreign Languages B.A., Dunbartin of Holy Cross M.A., Western Reserve University

1966

FAUST, GEORGE H. 1963 Associate Professor of History B.A., Henderson State Teachers College M.A., University of Arkansas Ph. D., University of Chicago L.L.B., Cleveland-Marshall Law School FORDING, MARY J. (Mrs.) Assistant Professor of English B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University

1963

FRANK, NIHLE B. 1967 Instructor of Engineering Technologies B.S., Ohio University M.A., Ohio University


FREDMAN, RAYMOND M. Department Head of English, Journalism and Speech B.A., Augustana College M.A., Wayne State University

1967

FROMER, ELEANOR N. (Mrs.) 1965 Coordinator of Nursery School Assisting B.A., Ohio State University M.A:, Ohio State University FROST, JAMES A. 1966 Assistant Professor of English B.A., Ohio Northern University M.S., Bowling Green State University GAILIUSIS, JURA N. Instructor of Chemistry B.S., Notre Dame College M.S., Wayne State University

1966

GAINES, HAROLD L. Associate Professor of Sociology B.S., Kent State University M.A., Kent State University

1963

GARRETT, JOANNE M. (Mrs.-R.D.H.) Instructor of Dental Hygiene B.S., Columbia University M.S., Columbia University

1966

GASKER, HARRY R. Assistant Professor of Business B. Ed., Ashland College M.A., Western Reserve University

1964

GOLDSTAUB, WERNER A. 1964 Associate Professor of Foreign Languages B.A., University of Hamburg, Germany M.A., Western Reserve University GORMAN, PATRICIA M. (Mrs.) 1965 Assistant Professor of Physical Education B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University GRAM, FREDERICK Instructor of Physics B.S., University of Minnesota M.S., Purdue University

1967

GREGORICH, BARBARA J. Instructor of English B.A., Kent State University M.A., University of Wisconsin

1967

GWAREK, RICHARD P. Counselor B.A., Western Reserve University M. Ed., University of Toledo

1965

HABERMAN, DAVID A. Instructor of Art B.A., St. John's University M.F.A., University of Iowa

1967

HALLAN, CATHERINE J. (R.N.) Assistant Professor of Nursing B.S., St. John's College M.S., St. Louis University

1966

HARBERT, JOHN M. Assistant Professor of Biology B.A., Fairmont State College M.S., Western Reserve University

1966

HARDESTY, FLORENCE A. (Mrs.-R.N.) 1966 Assistant Professor of Nursing B.S.N., Western Reserve University M.S.N., Western Reserve University HARRIS, MAJOR L. Coordinator-Counselor of Project SEARCH B.S., Kent State University M. Ed., Kent State University

1966

HENDERSHOTT, MARCUS D. Instructor of Biology B.S., University of Michigan M.S., University of Michigan

1964

HERNLEY, CATHERINE (R.N.) College Nurse B.S., Western Reserve University

1967

HOLAN, CHERYL ANN (R.N.) Assistant Professor of Nursing B.S., Georgetown University M.A., John Carroll University

1966

HOLMAN, NAN S. Assistant Professor of English B.A., University of Michigan M.A., Kent State University

1966

HOLMGREN, DANIEL M. 1963 Department Head of Geography, History and Political Science B.A., Chico State College M.A., Western Reserve University Ph. D., Western Reserve University

325


HURLEY, JOHN A. 1963 Associate Professor of Education B.A., Marshall University M.A., Marshall University Ed. D., Western Reserve University JAMESON, ROBERT D. Instructor of Data Processing B.B.A., University of Miami M.B.A., Miami University

1966

JEFFERSON, CURTIS F. Department Head of Mathematics B.S., Paul Quinn College M.A., Denver University M.S., University of Notre Dame

1963

JENKINS, MIRIAM B. (Mrs.) Assistant Professor of English B.A., Ohio University M.A., Columbia University

1966

JOHNSON, DOROTHY T. (Mrs.) 1966 Assistant Professor of Library Technology B.S., University of Wisconsin M.L.S., Western Reserve University JOHNSON, EUGENE B. Counselor B.A., State University of Iowa M.A., Western Reserve University

1963

JOHNSON, WALTER H. Instructor of Economics B.S., University of Connecticut M.A., University of Connecticut

1968

JULIAN, MARSHA R. (Mrs.) Counselor B.A., Westminster College M.S., Westminster College

1966

KALE, LESTER W. Assistant Professor of Engineering Technology B.M.E., Ohio State University B.I.E., Ohio State University

1964

KARBERG, RICHARD E. Instructor of Art B.A., Stetson University M.A., Stetson University

7966

KIEPURA, ROBERT T. 7966 Instructor of Engineering Technology B. Me., General Motors Institute

326

KILGORE, JAMES C. Assistant Professor of English B.A., Wiley College M.A., University of Missouri

1966

KIRLIK, MICHAEL 1966 Associate Professor of Political Science B.S., California State Teachers College M.A., Georgetown University KLOSEK, STANLEY J. 7967 Assistant Professor of English B.A., Belmont Abbey College M.A., St. Louis University S.T.B., Gregorian Institute, Rome, Italy KOTNIK, LOUIS J. 7964 Department Head of Physical Science B.S., Case Institute of Technology M.S., Case Institute of Technology Ph. D., Case Institute of Technology KRAMER, GERALD U. Instructor of Art B.A., City College of New York M.A., Univel'sity of Iowa

1965

KRINSKY, BARNET 1965 Instructor of Physics B.S., Case Institute of Technology M.S., Case Institute of Technology KRUPNICK, GLORIA ANN Instructor of Sociology B.A., City College of New York M.A., Western Reserve University

1966

KRUSE, ROBERT D. 7966 Department Head of Health, Physical Education and Recreation B.S., Western Michigan University M.A., University of Michigan D.P.E., Springfield College LANG, ELIZABETH (Mrs.) Assistant Professor of Speech B.E., Moorhead State College M.A., Northwestern University

7965

LAQUATRA, MICHAEL J. Assistant Professor of English B.S., Kent State University M.A., Kent State University

7966

LAVER, STEVEN G. 1966 Assistant Professor of Data Processing B.S., Temple University J.D., Cleveland-Marshall Law School


LA WSON, ELDON E. Coordinator of Hotel- Restaurant Management B.A., Michigan State University

1966

MEADOWS, RICHARD N. Instructor of Theatre Arts B.S., Eastern Illinois University M.A., Western Reserve University

LA WSON, JOHN L. Associate Professor of Mathematics B.S., University of Chicago M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

1963

1965 MIKLIS, EMILY (Mrs.) Assistant Professor of Business B.B.A., Western Reserve University M.B.A., Case Western Reserve University

LOEWE, RALPH E. Associate Professor of English B.A., Ohio University M.A., Columbia University

1963

LONG, ERNEST S. 1964 Counselor-Psychologist B.A., Western Reserve University Ph. D., Western Reserve University LORENZO, CARNITA R (Mrs.-RN.) 1966 Assistant Professor of Nursing B.S., University of Louisville M.S., State University of New York LORION, JAMES E. Director of Admissions and Records B.A., Michigan State University M.A., University of Michigan

1963

LUCK, LAWRENCE 7967 Instructor of English B.S., Loyola University M.A., Bowling Green State University LUKACEVIC, EDWARD C. Assistant Professor of Biology B.S., Ohio University M.S., Ohio University

1966

LUTZ, HOWARD W. Counselor B.S., Wayne State University M. Ed., Miami University

1966

McCARTHY, WILLIAM R (P.E.) 1965 Assistant Professor of Engineering and Mechanical Technologies B.S.M.E., Johns Hopkins University M.S.M.E., Wichita Univel'sity McLELLAN, JOHN M. Associate Professor of Philosophy B.S., Western Resel've University B.A., Western Reserve University

1964

1967

MILES, KEITH E. Assistant to the Director of Admissions and Records B.B.A., Fenn College

1966

MILLER, TERESA J. Instructor of Sociology B.A., University of Akron M.A., Western Reserve University

1966

1963 MITCHELL, DAVID C. Associate Professor of Business B.B.A., Fenn College M.B.A., Western Reserve University 7966 MORGAN, LY NNE M. (RN.) College Nurse B.S.N., Western Reserve University

MORGENSTERN, JUNE R (Mrs.) Assistant Professor of Psychology B.S., Western Reserve University M.S., Western Reserve University

1964

MORROW, ELEANOR P. Counselor B.S., Ohio University M.A., Western Reserve University

1965

7963 MOSKAL, CHARLENE Instructor of Theatre Arts B.A., University of North Carolina M.A., Western Reserve University

NIXON, HESTER G. Associate Professor of Business B.A., Simpson College M.S., New York University

1963

NORTON, FAY-TYLER M. (Mrs.) Department Head of Social Science B.A., Louisiana State University Ph. D., Florida State Univel'sity

1964

OAKAR, MARY R Instructor of English B.A., Ul'suline College M.A., John Canoll University

1967

327


O'BRIEN, THOMAS P. Associate Professor of Mechanical Technology B.S. Ed., Kent State University M. Ed., Kent State University

1964

OWENS, LOVID Department Head of Secretarial Science and Accounting B.S., Ohio State University M.A., Ohio State University

1963

PARILLA, ROBERT E. 1964 Director of the Evening Program B.S., Kent State University M.S., University of New Hampshire PARISH, RICHARD J. Assistant Professor of Geography B.A., Kent State University M.A., Kent State University

1965

PERKO, JOANNE E. (R.N.) 1965 Instructor of Nursing B.S.N., St. John College M.N. Ed., University of Pittsburgh PERRY, JERRY P. Instructor of Speech B.A., Berea College M.A., State University of Iowa

1966

PICKUP, ANDREW T. 1963 Associate Professor of Psychology B.A., Bowling Green State University M.A., Bowling Green State University PLAGENS, DONALD J. 1966 Instructor of Business B.S., Central Michigan University M.A., Central Michigan University PLAVAC, GEORGE N. 1963 Assistant Professor of Business B.B.A., John Carroll University L.L.B., Cleveland-Marshall Law School L.L.M., Cleveland-Marshall Law School

328

POLLOCK, FRANCIS X. Instructor of Journalism B.A., St. Vincent College M.S., Columbia University

1966

PORTER, JACK O. Associate Professor of Mathematics B.S., Parsons College M.A., State College of Iowa

1963

PROSEN, ROSEMARY Assistant Professor of English B.S., Kent State University M.A., John Carroll University

1965

PUKA Y, MARILYN L. (Mrs.-R.N.) Instructor of Nursing B.S., Ohio State University M.A., Western Reserve University

1966

RAKOWSKY, CHRISTINE (Mrs.) Instructor of English B.A., Ursuline College M.A., John Carroll University

1966

REDSTONE, ELIZABETH R. Assistant Professor of Business B.S., University of Colorado M.A., Michigan State University

1966

REEVES, PAMELA W. (Mrs.) 1965 Assistant Librarian B.A., Smith College M.A., Western Reserve University M.S.L.S., Western Reserve University REYNOLDS, LEON W. 1966 Instructor of Chemistry B.S., Indiana Institute of Technology RICHARDS, BETTY J. Instructor of Data Processing B.A., Western Reserve University

1966

RIGGAR, WILANNA S. (Mrs.-R.N.) Instructor of Nursing B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College

1964

RIGGLE, GEORGE T. Instructor of Mathematics B.S., Purdue University M.S., University of Notre Dame

1967

RINI, MARTHA M. (R.N.) Instructor of Nursing B.S., St. Louis University M. Ed., John Carroll University

1966

ROBENSTINE, JAMES D. Coordinator of Marketing (Leave of Absence) B.S., Kent State University M.B.A., Kent State University

1963

RUBINS, ALEX Assistant Professor of Health, Physical Education and Recreation B.S., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University

1966


RUDY, GRANVILLE B. Department Head of Biology B.S., Fairmont State College M.S., West Virginia University

1965

RUSK, EVELYN H. (Mrs.) 1963 Counselor and Foreign Student Advisor B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University RUSSELL, CAROL P. (Mrs.) 1967 Assistant Director of Student Activities B.S., University of Utah M.S., University of Utah

SIKORA, LYNN HOLL (Mrs.) Director of Project EVE B.A., Bethany College

1966

SIMON, ADELLE (R.N.) 1966 Assistant Professor of Nursing B.S., Western Reserve University M.S., Western Reserve University SIMON, MAY K. (Mrs.) 1963 Department Head of Foreign Languages B.A., Hunter College M.A., Western Reserve University

SANTOS, OTTO, JR. Assistant Professor of Business B.S., John Carroll University M. Ed., Kent State University

1966

SCHEFFER, CORNELIUS Assistant Professor of Electrical-Electronic and Engineering Technologies B.S., U.S. Naval Academy M.S. Eng., Pennsylvania State University

1965

SCHMIDT, ANITA M. (R.N.) Assistant Professor of Nursing B.S., University of Dayton M.S., Marquette University

1965

1964 SOLIS, RUTH E. (Mrs.) Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages B.A., College of Wooster M.A., University of Kansas

SCHNURR, BARBARA J. (RD.H.) Coordinator of Dental Hygiene B.A., Ursuline College RD. H., Ohio State University

1964

SPEER, WALTER Bookstore Manager B.S., Dyke College

SEXTON, ROBERT W. Instructor of Business B.S., Boston College M.B.A., Harvard University

1965

SHAPIRO, RICHARD W. Instructor of Business B.S., University of Pittsburgh M.B.A., University of Pittsburgh

1966

SHEAR, MURIEL (Mrs.) Assistant Professor of Business B.B.A., City College of New York M.S.E., City College of New York

1965

SHRIVER, DAVID P. Instructor of History B.A., College of Wooster M.A., Western Reserve University

1966

1965 SLAGLE, NOEL A. Assistant Professor of Health Education B.S., Kent State University M.A., Kent State University

SOBEL, RONALD M. 1966 Assistant Professor of Social Science B.A., Fenn College M.A., Western Reserve University

1966

SPRONZ, LOUIS R 1966 Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene D.D.S., Ohio State University STARLING, RALPH H. Assistant Professor of Reading B.A., Ohio Northern University M.A., Western Reserve University

1966

TABER, MARGARET R (Mrs.-P.E.) Assistant Professor of Electrical-Electronic Technology B.E.E., Fenn College B.E.8., Fenn College M.S., Akron University

1964

THOMAS, LYNN J. D. Instructor of English B.A., University of Miami M.A., University of Miami

1967

329


THOMAS, WILLIAM A. (P.E.) 1964 Associate Professor of Electrical-Electronic and Engineering Technologies B.S., Case Institute of Technology M.S., Case Institute of Technology Ph. D., Yale University TSOLAINOS, JOHN N. Admissions Counselor B.S., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University

1964

ULRICH, EDMUND V. (Reg. Arch.) Instructor of Building Construction T~chnology B. Arch., Ohio State University

1967

VOELKER, NANCY J. (R.N.) 1965 Assistant Professor of Nursing B.S.N., Western Reserve University M.S.N., Western Reserve University WANG, BELLA (Mrs.) Assistant Professor of Mathematics B.S., National Central University, Nanking, China M.S., Western Reserve University

1965

1965 WOLFF, ERWIN Associate Professor of Foreign Languages Teach. Diploma, Berlin Teachers College (Germany) M.A., Western Reserve University

YAGER, GORDON A. (Reg. Arch.) Instructor of Building Construction Technology B. Arch., Ohio State University

1967

YOUNG, JERRY W. Director of Student Activities B.S., University of Utah M.A., Arizona State University

1967

ZANDER, CARL A. Instructor of Data Processing B.S., Ohio State University M.B.A., Akron University

1967

ZINNER, ELLIOTT Assistant Professor of Speech B.S., State University of New York (Geneseo) M.A., Ohio University

1967

ZUBRICKY, VERNE D. (R.N.) Assistant Professor of Nursing B.S., Western Reserve University M.S., Western Reserve University

1965

WATKINS, LOWELL A. 1964 Department Head of General Business B. Ed., Illinois State Normal University M.B.A., University of Denver WATZULIK, RICHARD M. 1964 Department Head of the Humanities B.S., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University Ph. D., Ohio State University

330

WEINER, RONALD R. Instructor of History B.A., University of the Americas M.A., Northern Illinois University

1965

WHANN, BRUCE M. Assistant Professor of Chemistry B.A., Westminster College M.S., Western Reserve University

1965

WILLIAMS, ISAIAH Counselor for Project SEARCH B.S., Wilberforce University

1967

WESTERN CAMPUS REED,DELL 1%6 Vice President and Campus Director A.A., El Dorado Junior College B.S., Kansas State Teachers College M.S., Kansas State Teachers College Ed. D., Michigan State University CORFIAS, JOHN C. 1962 Dean of Business Administration and Technologies B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University Ed. D., Western Reserve University SILK, BERNARD J. 1964 Dean of Arts and Sciences B.S., Kent State University M. Ed., Kent State University Ed. D., Western Reserve University


THURSTON, ALICE S. (Mrs.) 1965 Dean of Student Services (Leave of Absence) B.A., Denison University M.A., Northwestern University Ph. D., George Washington University ANECKI, LEO Assistant Professor of Biology B.S., Wisconsin State University M.E., Wisconsin State University

1966

BANKS, JAMES G. Instructor of History (Leave of Absence) B.S., Purdue University M.A., Kent State University

1966

BRZYTWA, VIRGINIA R. (Mrs.) Instructor of Psychology B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College M.S., Western Reserve University

1965

DEHN, FRANCES J. (Mrs.) 1965 Instructor of English B.S., Bowling Green State University M.A., Ohio State University DOBER, ROBERT F. Assistant Professor of Social Science and History B.S., John Carroll University M.A., John Carroll University

1967

DOMOTORFFY, ZSOLT J. Instructor of Mathematics B.S., John Carroll University M.S., John Carroll University

1964

D'ONOFRIO, MARIO L. InStructor of Foreign Languages B.A., Kent State University M.A., Ohio State University

1965

BUZASH, GEORGE 1965 Counselor B.S., Slippery Rock State College M. Ed., Pennsylvania State University

DOWDING, NANCY E. 1963 Counselor B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., Columbia University M.A., Western Reserve University Ph. D., Western Reserve University

1967 COOK, CHARLES M. Instructor of History and Political Science A.B., Central Michigan University M.A., Central Michigan University

EATON, ELINOR F. Assistant Professor of Geography B.A., Denison University M.A., Northwestern University

1967

COSNER, THURSTON L. 1965 Instructor of Psychology B.S., Pennsylvania State University M.A., Bowling Green State University

ESTENIK, JOHN F. Instructor of Biology B.S., John Carroll University M.S., John Carroll University

1967

CRANE, JOHN D. Instructor of Mathematics B.S., Baldwin-Wallace College M.S., Ohio State University

1966

EVANS, WALTER B. Director of Student Activities B.8.E., Ohio University M.A., Columbia University

1966

CRATTY, DAVID M. Instructor of English B.A., St. Mary's College M.A., Indiana University

1967

CURTIS, RICHARD C. Director of Admissions and Records B.A., Hiram College M. Ed., Kent State University

1964

FRAZIER, MARTHA B. (Mrs.) 1967 Instructor of Business Administration (Accounting) B.S.B.A., Washington University M.B.A., Washington University

DAVIDSON, JOSEPH A. 7966 Instructor of Business Administration (Marketing) B.B.A., Western Reserve University M.B.A., Western Reserve University

FRONTROTH, ARLENE E. 1966 Assistant Professor of Mathematics B.S., Indiana State Teachers College M.A., Arizona State University GUENTERT, ELEANOR C. (Mrs.) Instructor of Physics B.S., Purdue University M.S., Purdue University

1966

331


HALAREWICZ, MARTA (Mrs.) Instructor of French and German B.S., Kent State University M.A., Western Reserve University HERGENROEDER, ANGELA D. (Mrs.) Assistant Professor of Business Administration B.S., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University

1967

1964

1966

KUNKLE, BURTON E. Bookstore Manager B.A., Hiram College

1966

HINKO, PAUL M. Director of Placement and Student Financial Aid (Leave of Absence) B.S., John Carroll University M.A., John Carroll University

1966

1963 LAUGHLIN, ETHELREDA (Mrs.) Department Head of Mathematics and Science B.A., Western Reserve University M.S., Western Reserve University Ph. D., Western Reserve University

HOOVER, ROBERT J. Instructor of Art B.S., Youngstown University M. Ed., Kent State University

1966

LEONARD, JAMES F. Instructor of English B.A., Loyola University M.A., Loyola University

JONES, ALVIN H., JR. Counselor B.S., Kent State University M.A., University of Akron

1967

1966 LESNIAK, TED P. Counselor B.S., Bowling Green State University M.S., Bowling Green State University

KASSEBAUM, L. HARVEY Instructor of English B.A., Beloit College M.A., Kent State University

1967

LIEBAL, WILLIAM J. Assistant Professor of Business Administration (Leave of Absence) B.S., Youngstown University M. Ed., Kent State University

1966

KEMP, GEORGE P. Instructor of English B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College M.A., Kent State University

1964

LOTZ, RONALD W. Instructor of Sociology B.A., Kent State University M.A., Kent State University

1965

KENNEL, SOOK CHA-LEE (Mrs.) Instructor of English B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College M.A., Western Reserve University

1968

LUND, DARRELL R. Assistant Professor of Music B.S., Utah State University M.S., Utah State University

1966

McCULLOUGH, WILLIAM W. Business Manager B.A., Mount Union College

1966

McDOWELL, CHARLES Department Head of Social Sciences B.A., University of Washington M.A., Brandeis University M. Ed., Massachusetts State College (Boston) Ph. D., Brandeis University

1966

1967 KOHNER, WILLIAM M. Instructor of Business Administration (Economics) A.B., Miami University M.A., Northwestern University 1963 KORAL, JOHN J. Director of the Evening Program B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University M.S., Western Reserve University

332

KOV AR, JOSEPH L. Department Head of the Humanities B.A., State College, Aussiq, Cz-echoslovakia L.L.B., John Marshall University J.D., John Marshall University Ph. D., University of Prague, Czechoslovakia

1966


McGINTY, JAMES R Assistant Professor of Business Administration B.S., University of Dayton M.A., Western Reserve University

1966

MARCHISIO, KEVIN A. Instructor of History B.A., St. Michael's College M.A., Georgetown University

1966

MATTHEWS, RICHARD D. Associate Professor of English B.A., Ohio State University B.S., Ohio State University M.A., Ohio State University

1963

MAZZOTTA, DOUGLAS A. Instructor of Psychology B.A., Wayne State University M.A., University of Detroit

1967

MIELKE, ERNEST H. Counselor B.S., State University of Iowa M. Ed., University of Toledo

1967

1965 MILLER, CARL K. Instructor of Business Administration (Leave of Absence) B.S., Pennsylvania State University M.S., Pennsylvania State University

MILLER, WHARTON H. Campus Librarian B.A., Syracuse University M.S.L.S., Syracuse University

1966

MORROW, CHARLES A. Instructor of English B.S., John Carroll University M.A., Western Reserve University

1966

NAFT, THEODORE R Instructor of Speech B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University

1966

1967 NEEDHAM, JAMES E. Instructor of Business Administration B.s., University of Illinois M.B.A., Western Reserve University

1966 OTIS, MILO G. Instructor of Business Administration (A ccounting) B.S., Miami University M.B.A., Western Reserve University

PALMER, JOHN W. H. Associate Professor of Business Administration B.S., Kent State University M. Ed., Kent State University

1963

1967 PAPCUM, IDA D. (Mrs.-RN.) Director of the Nursing Program B.S.N. Ed., St. Louis University M.S.N., Western Reserve University

PISANELLI, MARIO J. Instructor of Health and Physical Education B.S., Kent State University M. Ed., Kent State University

1966

1966 PLUMER, BRUCE J. Assistant to the Director of Admissions and Records B.B.A., Ohio University 1967 RABA, ROGER L. Instructor of English and Journalism A.B., Ohio University B.S., Ohio University M.S., Ohio University

RAIMER, EDWARD A. Instructor of English and Speech A.B., John Carroll University M.A., John Carroll University

1967

1967 ROWE, LESLIE R Instructor of Business Administration (Economics) B.S., University of California (Berkeley) M.A., University of Arizona

SCHLICK, CAROL W. (Mrs.) Instructor of Speech (Leave of Absence) B.S., Miami University M.A., Miami University

1966

SCOTT, JAMES A. Department Head of Language Arts B.A., Kent State University M.A., Kent State University

1964

333


SEGO, MICHAEL A. Instructor of Political Science B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College M.A., Western Reserve University

1965

SHERIDAN, JAMES J. Instructor of English A.B., John Carroll University M.A., Western Reserve University

1967

SHIPMAN, JAMES K. 1966 Assistant Professor of Business Administration (Management) B.B.A., Fenn College M.B.A., Western Reserve University SHORT, RUTH P. (Mrs.) 1966 Instructor of Physical Education B.S.P.E., University of North Carolina M.S., Western Reserve University SHRIVER, JUNE A. (Mrs.) Instructor of Sociology B.A., Akron University M.A., Akron University

1966

SHUMAKER, PAUL E. Assistant Professor of Biology B.S., Defiance College M.A., Ohio State University M.S., University of Wyoming

1967

1966 SILVA, RITA C. Reference Librarian B.S., St. John College M.S.L.S., Western Reserve University

STOCH, EDWIN J. Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Education (Instructor in Charge) B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College M.A., Western Reserve University

1965

TIPPENS, DORA M. (Mrs.) Instructor of English B.S., Kent State University M.A., Kent State University

1967

TOBACK, PHYLLIS B. (Mrs.) Instructor of English A.B., Barnard College M.A., New York University

1967

1966

VINCENT, LAWRENCE C. Assistant Professor of Dramatics B.A., University of Michigan M.A., Western Reserve University

1965

WOLTERS, FLORENCE M. Instructor of Chemistry B.S., Ursuline College M.S., John Carroll University

1965

WOODHOUSE, ROBERT L. 1968 Instructor of Mathematics B.A., Case Institute of Technology WRIGHT, NORMA L. (R.N.) 1967 Instructor of Nursing B.S., Western Reserve University M.S.N., Western Reserve University YOUNG, ROBERT B. Counselor B.A., University of Rochester M.A., California State College (Los Angeles)

1967

ZUBAL, JOHN T. Assistant Professor of History B.S., Fordham University M.A., John Carroll University

1963

DISTRICT OFFICE

1967 VACHA, TERRANCE H. Instructor of Physics and Mathematics B.S., University of Dayton M.S., College of William and Mary

334

VENABLE, JOAN L. (R.N.) College Nurse B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College

CHAPMAN, CHARLES E. 1962 President B.S., Billings Polytechnic Institute M.A .. State University of Iowa Ed. D., University of California (Berkeley) LIVINGSTON, ALFRED M. Executive Vice President B.A., Chico State College M.A., University of California (Berkeley) Ed. D., University of California (Berkeley)

1965


BIELLO, DANTE N. 1965 Vice President of Finance and Business Affairs B.B.A., Western Reserve University M.B.A., Harvard University

Computation Center

BURROWS, WILLIAM W. Director of Nonacademic Personnel B.A., Western Reserve University

1968

SOLIN SKI, EDWARD M. 1965 Director (also Coordinator of the Instructional Program in Data Processing) B.E.8., Fenn College M.S.E.A., Case Institute of Technology 1966

CARMAN, ROBERT G. Director of College Relations B.A., Western Reserve University

1964

BRUSK, DONALD R. Systems Analyst B.B.A., Fenn College KOSIEWICZ, EDWARD L. Systems Coordinator B.E.S., Fenn College

1965

PRECHTL, CHARLES A. Operations Supervisor

1967

BERGER, LAWRENCE D. 1967 Artist-in-Residence Diploma, Juilliard School of Music

HICKOK, ERVIN (P.E.) 1966 Director of Physical Plant and Grounds B.S.M.E., Fenn College M.A., Western Reserve University JONES, ALBERT K. (C.P.A.) 1966 Director of Accounting and Budgeting B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University JUDSON, HARRY R. Director of Purchasing

1967

KENDRA, LAWRENCE M. 1967 Research Assistant B.B.A., Western Reserve University KURTZ, DONALD J. Assistant Director of Accounting and Budgeting

1967

NOBLE, CHARLES S. Director of Special Assistance A.A., Weber College B.S., Brigham Young University

1966

REHBURG, ROBERT H. (C.P.A.) Assistant Director of Accounting and Budgeting B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College

1967

ROSKIN, R. TERRANCE 1968 Assistant Director of College Relations A.A., Cuyahoga Community College SMITH, JAMES F. Purchasing Assistant B.A., John Carroll University

1967

District Library Services McWHINNEY, W. RUSSELL 1964 Director B.A., University of Pittsburgh M.A., University of Pittsburgh M.S.L.S., Western Reserve University DUFFETT, GORMAN L. 1966 Assistant Librarian for Cataloguing B.A., Marietta College M.A., Stanford University M.S.L.S., Western Reserve University KLAHRE, ETHEL S. 1965 Assistant Librarian for Acquisitions B.A., University of Akron B.S.L.S., Western Reserve University MILKO VIC, MILAN 1966 Acquisitions-Periodicals Librarian B.A., University of Salzburg, Austria M.S.L.S., Western Reserve University

335


Educational Media Center DECKER, RICHARD C. 1965 Director B. Music Ed., Baldwin-Wallace College M. Music Ed., Kent State University M. Audio-Visual, Kent State University FEDOR, JOHN, JR. 1966 Photographic Laboratory Technician GOMBRICH, IRENE M. Artist

1967

KNABLE, CHARLES H. Audio- Visual Assistant (Assigned to Western Campus Instructional Services Center)

1966

PENZES, JOSEPH A. Electronic Technician

1966

SOLTIS, JOHN C. 1967 Photographic Laboratory Technician TAKAHASHI, HARLAN M. Photographic Specialist

1965

Reprographic Center SIMAK, STEVE J. Supervisor

336

1966


Standing Committees COLLEGE-WIDE PROFESSIONAL WELFARE: (Chairman) George Faust, (Vice Chairman) Zsolt Domotorffy, (Secretary) Bruce Whann, Lynn Bell, John Corfias, Harold Gaines, James Needham and Paul Shumaker. CURRICULUM: (Chairman) Ruth Solis, (Secretary) Florence Wolters, Thurston Cosner, Frances Dehn, Eugene Johnson, Joseph Kovar, Emily Miklis, Barbara Schnurr, Robert Young and Verne Zubricky. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: (Chairman) David Stevenson, James Banks, George Buzash, Joseph Clovesko, Angela Hergenroeder, Ernest Long, Cornelius Scheffer and Alice Thurston. PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES: (Chairman) George Kemp, (Secretary) Nancy Dowding, Edith Brashares, Robert Dober, Daniel Holmgren, John Koral, Jack Porter and Fred Sutton. NONACADEMIC PERSONNEL: (Chairman) William Burrows, Irwin Bailey, Paul Hinko, James Lorion, William McCullough, Lovid Owens, Bernard Silk and Edward Solinski. SPECIAL PROJECTS: (Chairman), (Recording Secretary) Sidney Noble, Dante Biello, Mario D'Onofrio, Lawrence Kendra, Alfred Livingston, Ralph Loewe, Charles Pappas, Dell Reed, Ronald Sobel, Joan Venable and Bruce Whann. LIBRARY COUNCIL: (Chairman) Russell McWhinney, Raymond Collins and Wharton Miller.

339


METROPOLITAN CAMPUS ADMINISTRATION: Johnetta Bonner, Richard Browning, Harry Gasker, Marsha Julian, Michael Kirlik, Elizabeth Redstone and Bruce Whann. COMMUNITY SERVICES: Elizabeth Boyer, Mary Conlin, Joanne Garrett, Richard Gwarek, Richard Karberg, Stanley Klosek, .Carnita Lorenzo, Teresa Miller and Otto Santos. LIBRARY: Marian Candon, David Haberman, David Shriver, Louis Spronz, Ralph Starling and Verne Zubricky. STUDENT SERVICES: Werner Goldstaub, Cheryl Holan, Gloria Krupnick, Donald Plagens, Francis Pollock, Carol Russell and Jerry Young. FACULTY SENATE COUNCIL: (Chairman) Richard Parish, (Vice Chairman) George Faust, (Vice Chairman-Elect) Ralph Loewe, (Recording Secretary) Mark Hendershott and (Corresponding Secretary) Elizabeth Lang.

340


WESTERN CAMPUS ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL: John Corfias, Mario D'Onofrio, John Koral, Joseph Kovar, Ted Lesniak, William McCullough, Wharton Miller, Charles Morrow, Robert Pohm, Dell Reed, Kenneth Shipman, Bernard Silk and Alice Thurston. LIBRARY: Leo Anecki, Virginia Bryztwa, George Buzash, Angela Hergenroeder, Harvey Kassebaum, John Koral, Ida Papcum, Mario Pisanelli, Michael Sego and Lawrence Vincent. Ex officio: Wharton Miller. STUDENT AFFAIRS: James Banks, David Cratty, Walter Evans, Alvin Jones, Ernest Mielke, Theodore Naft, Edward Raimer, June Shriver, Dora Tippens and Norma Wright. Ex officio: Alice Thurston. PROGRAM: Martha Frazier, Darrell Lund, James McGinty, Robert Pohm, Bernard Silk and Lucille Snavely. FACULTY SENATE: (Chairman) Kenneth Shipman, (Vice Chairman) Edwin Stoch, (Recording Secretary and Treasurer) Joseph Davidson, (Corresponding Secretary) Rita Silva. PHYSICAL FACILITIES PLANNING: (Chairman) Dell Reed, Robert Dober, Arlene Frontroth, Joseph Kovar, James Leonard, William McCullough, Kenneth Shipman, Ruth Short and Alice Thurston.

341


344


34E


347


Index

349


A Absence from Class 100, 101 Academic Center, Eastern 3, 39, 86 Academic Center, Southeastern 3, 39, 86 Academic Credit in Escrow 81, 96 Academic Dismissal 92, 94, 95, 105 Academic Information 99-106 Academic Probation 92, 94, 95 Academic Side, The 99-106 Academic Warning Notices 103 Academic Year 13-15 Accounting 136-139 Accounting, Concentration in 274, 275 Accreditation 40, 43 Addresses of College Facilities 3, 46, 47, 50, 86, 123 Admissions 79-97 Admissions and Records 3,47,81-97, 106, 117, 118 Admissions and Records, Phone Numbers 3 Adult Education 30, 37, 40, 73, 74, 81-85 Advertising, Principles of 154 Advisory Committees 71 Algebra 213, 215 Anthropology 139 Argumentation and Debate 260 Art 140-143 Arts and Sciences Program 37, 50,68,70,97 Associate in Arts Degree 70, 110, 111 Associate in Science Degree 71, 111, 112 Attendance 100 Auditorium 51 Auditors 94

350


B

Biology 144-147 Board of Trustees 16, 17, 31, 90 Boiler, Turbine and Compressor Operations 247 Bookstore 4~ 51, 66, 88, 89 Botany, General 147 Broadcast Journalism 205 Building Construction Technology 148-150 Building Construction Technology, Concentration in Business (General) 151-155 Business Management, Concentration in 276, 277

272, 273

C

Cafeteria 47, 51, 58, 66 Calculus, Analytic Geometry and 216 Calendar of Instruction 13-15 Calligraphy 142 Campus Selection 86 Career Placement 119 Career Program 37, 46, 50, 68, 71, 97, 106, 269, 271-313 Career Program, Quarter Sequences 271-313 Certificates of Proficiency 71, 95, 112 Change of Degree Objective 95 Change of Status 96 Chapel 51 Chemical Technology 155, 156 Chemistry 156-159 Chemistry of Hazardous Materials 184 Child Growth and Development 249 Choir 224, 225, 230, 231 Choral Ensemble 223, 224, 230 Class Schedule 90, 93, 133 Class Standing, Definition of 106 Cleveland: NOW! A Great Place for Learning 25-29 Co-Curricular Activities 120-122 Code Used in Listing Course Descriptions 132 College Colors 122

351


College, History of 39, 40 College Quarter and Academic Year 13-15 College Relations 123 College Seal 42 Community Services Program 37, 50, 68, 73, 74 Commuter, The 120 Computation Center 47, 61, 66 Concert Band 226, 231, 232 Conferences, Student-Faculty 123 Counseling 3~ 73, 74, 86, 106, 116 Course Descriptions 131-266 Course Load 96 Course Numbering 132, 133 Credit by Examination 101 Credit Hours 133 Credit in Escrow 81,96 Cuyahoga Community College: TOMORROW! 60-65

D Data Processing 159-162 Data Processing, Concentration in 278, 279 Dean's List 103 Dental Hygiene 163-168 Dental Hygiene, Concentration in 294, 295 Description of Courses 131-266 Dismissal 92, 94, 95, 105 District Office 3, 123 Drawing, Architectural 148, 149 Drawing, Engineering 177 Drawing, Life 142, 143

E Eastern Academic Center Economics 169, 170 Education 170

352

3, 39, 86


Educational Objectives 30-32 Educational Media Center 47, 66 Elective Graduation Requirements 111, 112 Electrical-Electronic Technology 170-175 Electrical-Electronic Technology, Concentration in 296, 297 Employment, Guide for Combining College Attendance with Employment, Student 96, 118, 119 Engineering 175-179 Engineering Physics 246, 247 English 180-182 Enrollment 39, 40, 50, 60 Ethics 239 Evening Bulletin 13 Evening Classes 13, 39, 46, 50, 60, 73, 74, 116 Examination, Credit by 101 Examinations, Final 100

100

F Facilities 3, 39, 40, 45-67 Faculty 30, 35, 40, 46, 47, 51, 55, 120, 123, 269, 315-334 Faculty, Full-Time 315-334 Faculty-Staff Listing 322-336 Feature Writing 205 Federal Educational Opportunity Grants 118 Federal Work-Study Program 119 Fees 88, 94, 101 Fees, Refund of 89 Final Examinations 14, 15, 100 Finance, Principles of 136 Financial Aid Program 118, 119 Fire Technology 183-185 Fire Technology, Concentration in 298, 299 Food Service Management (See Hotel-Restaurant Management) Food Services 46, 47, 51, 58, 66 French 185-188 Full-Time Faculty and Staff Listing 322-336 Full-Time Students 39, 50, 60, 81-83, 96, 103, 112, 116, 118, 119

353


G General Education 37 Geography 188, 189 Geometry 214, 216 German 189,190 Grade-Point Average 92, 94-96, 102-105, 118, 119 Grades 92, 94-96, 100-105, 118, 119 Graduation Requirements 109-112 Grants-in-Aid 118, 119 Gymnasium 51, 57 Gymnastics Rooms 57

H

Health 190 Health Services 100, 117 History 190-192 History of Tri-C 39, 40 Home Economics 192 Honors 103 Hotel-Restaurant Management (Formerly Food Service Management) 193-196 Hotel-Restaurant Management, Concentration in 280, 281 Housing 123

I

Industrial Hydraulics 218 Industrial Security 207 Industrial Supervision 196-202 Industrial Supervision, Concentration in Instructional Fees 88, 94 Instructional Services Center 51 Instrumental Ensemble 226, 227, 232 Intercollegiate Competition 121, 122 International Students 91 Investments 137

354

300, 301


J

Journalism

203-205

L Laboratory Deposit 88 Law, Business 152, 153 Law, Criminal 207 Law Enforcement 206-209 Law Enforcement, Concentration in 302, 303 Library 30, 46, 47, 51, 55, 61, 66, 89, 106, 116 Library Technology 210, 211 Library Technology, Concentration in 304, 305 Little Theatre 46, 51 Loans 118, 119 Locations; College 3

M

Marketing, Principles of 152 Marriage and Family Life 257 Mathematics 213-216 Mechanical Technology 217-220 Mechanical Technology, Concentration in 306, 307 Medical Assisting 221, 222 Medical Assisting, Concentration in 308, 309 Memberships, College 40, 43, 122 Metallurgy 176 Metropolitan Campus 3, 39, 46, 47, 54-58, 86 Metropolitan Campus, New 28, 40, 46, 47,54, 55, 58, 60-67,86 Music 222-233 Music for Elementary Education 225 Music for Preschool Children 236

355


lV National Defense Student Loans 118, 119 Non-Credit Courses 50, 73, 74, 94, 112 Non-High School Graduates 81,96 Numbering of Courses 132, 133 Nursery School Assisting 234-236 Nursery School Assisting, Concentration in Nursing 237, 238 Nursing, Concentration in 312, 313 Nursing Student Loans 119

310, 311

o Objectives of the College 30-32 Office Management, Dental 168

P Parking 54, 61 Part-Time Students 13, 37, 39, 40, 50, 60, 70, 71, 73, 74, 81, 84, 85, 96, 103, 112, 116, 118, 119 Philosophy 239 Philosophy of the College 35 Physical Education 240-244 Physical Science 245 Physically Handicapped, Assistance to the 117 Physics 245-247 Placement, Student 118, 119 Placement Test (ACT) 81-83, 96, 117 Plant Operation Services 247 Political Science 248 Prerequisites 133 Preschool Art 234 Preschool Literature and Language 234 Preschool Science 236

356


Printmaking 143 Probation 92, 94, 95, 104, 105 Probation, Removal from 104, 105 Product Sales and Development 199 Program Changes 93 Program Evaluation and Research Techniques Programs of Instruction 37,69-74 Project EVE 73 "Project in Dance" 74 Project "New Careers" 73 Project SEARCH 73,74 Psychology 249, 250 Psychology, Practical, for Supervisors 196 Public Relations, Municipal 185 Purchasing 153 Purchasing, Concentration in 282, 283 Purposes of the College 36, 37

202

Q

Quality Points 100, 102 Quarter Calendar 13-15 Quarter Sequences, Career Program

271-313

R Radio and Television Production 263 Readmission 81, 94, 95 Refund of Fees 89 Registration 13-15, 81-86, 94 Repeating a Course 103 Residency Requirements 90 Retailing, Concentration in 284, 285 Retailing, Principles of 151, 152 Russian 250, 251

357


T Taxation 139 Team Names 122 Telephone Numbers, Admissions and Records 3 Theatre Arts 261-264 Transfer Students 81-85, 92 Transfer to Other Institutions 95, 103, 106, 133, 268 Transient Students 81-85 Transportation 265, 266 Transportation, Concentration in 290, 291 Transportation, Public 54 Trigonometry 214 Tuition Surcharges 90

u University Parallel

37, 68, 70, 95, 103, 106, 268

v Varsity Sports 121, 122 Veterans' Education 97

W

Western Campus 3, 39, 50-60, 86 West Word, The 120 Wholesaling 154 Wholesaling, Concentration in 292, 293 Withdrawing from a Class 103

359


CuyahOga Communi~ COllogo ~ 360

Dl1lee of COllege Relallons



1968-1969