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OCTOBER 2017


Flawless. Exceptional Diamonds. Curated by Sotheby’s.

SALON OPEN NEW BOND STREET, LONDON. SOTHEBYSDIAMONDS.COM


OCTOBER 2017

48 A New Breed of Collector While using social media to convey his passion for art, Yusaku Maezawa is setting auction-room records. By Anthony Calnek

54 Cultivating China’s New Terroir The Yunnan region could become winemaking’s next Shangri-La. By Mark Ellwood

58 Risqué Business Photographer Steven Klein and the co-founders of Visionaire reveal their provocative new collaboration. By Stephanie Sporn

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PHOTOGRAPH BY JULIAN CASSADY

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FEATURES


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G STA A D S EO U L

KU WA I T T

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LO N D O N


OCTOBER 2017

10 The Scene WineCrush and ArtCrush in Aspen, Old Masters in London and the La Mer Wave Walk in New York

15 Access Yves Saint Laurent museums debut in Paris and Marrakesh, post-Tiananmen art at the Guggenheim, the best of Pacific Standard Time in LA and more

28 Art at Every Price Point Classical Chinese paintings, jewellery, wine, sculpture and more can be found at the Hong Kong autumn auctions

30 The Collector’s Eye From Parisian vintage couture dealer Didier Ludot, a special auction dedicated to the little black dress

32 Curated Wallpaper* magazine editor Tony Chambers picks designs by Ron Arad, Jasper Morrison and other innovators

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PHOTOGRAPH BY JOSHUA MCHUGH

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DEPARTMENTS


10/10 000 From any given harvest, the average number of eaux-de-vie with the potential to one day join this blend are a rare few: only 10 out of 10 000. Selection is not only a science. It is an art.

MADE OF PRECISION PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY. Imported Cognac Hennessy®, 40% Alc./Vol. (80˚). ©2017 Imported by Moët Hennessy USA, Inc., New York, NY. HENNESSY is a registered trademark.


OCTOBER 2017

DEPARTMENTS 34 At Home With Art Laid-back and elegant, designer Robert Stilin’s interiors are welcoming environments for art

38 The Art of Giving The New York Academy of Art’s annual Take Home a Nude auction and party is always a crowd pleaser

40 Extraordinary Properties Streamlined and airy, midcentury modern homes continue to draw fans

44 The Reginato Files Aerin Lauder on fragrance, jewels and what it takes to live beautifully

62 Sotheby’s This Season

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A calendar of auctions and exhibitions worldwide, plus selected sale highlights

74 Sotheby’s International Realty Property Showcase

84 Anatomy of an Artwork A John Quincy Adams daguerreotype is one of the earliest photographs of an American president to come to market

48 (Top) Visionaire magazine co-founders Cecilia Dean and James Kaliardos.

PHOTOGRAPH BY FRANÇOIS NARS

PHOTOGRAPH BY KAORI NISHIDA

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What if I live to100? Should I make life simpler? Do I have the right financial plan? Life in later years is changing. You may want to remain hands on. Take a step back. Or pursue other passions. As time goes by, you might need to reconsider your financial plan. Through careful investment strategies, we can work together to navigate whatever the future holds. Here’s to a long, healthy, and fulfilling life. For some of life’s questions, you’re not alone. Together we can find an answer.

ubs.com /live-to-100 The value of investments can go down as well as up. Your capital and income is at risk. In the UK, UBS AG is authorized by the Prudential Regulation Authority and subject to regulation by the Financial Conduct Authority and limited regulation by the Prudential Regulation Authority. © UBS 2017. All rights reserved.


AN EXTRAORDINARY COLLABORATION

ON THE COVER This exquisite residence stands out from other properties by combining a clean and modern aesthetic with a warm atmosphere. Completely renovated, the redesigned interior features hardwood floors, open spaces and floor-to-ceiling windows that illuminate the entirety of the main living area. $5,450,000 PROPERTY ID: T2R6GG

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S

otheby’s has been uniting collectors with world-class works of art since 1744, and 273 years later it has grown into one of the world’s leading full-service art businesses. Innovation is in the company’s DNA. It was that spirit that led to the launch, in 1976, of an exceptional real estate company bearing the Sotheby’s name. The Sotheby’s International Realty® brand is a commanding presence in the representation of the world’s most remarkable properties. With more than 20,000 independent sales associates located in approximately 850 offices in 65 countries and territories worldwide, the Sotheby’s International Realty network artfully unites extraordinary homes with extraordinary lives throughout the world. Art & Home was created at the heart of our partnership and demonstrates the unique synergy that exists between the worlds of art and real estate. Lavishly produced, Art & Home speaks to the sophisticated reader with a passion for fine art, beautiful environments and, of course, exquisite homes – all the elements of an extraordinary life.

Please note that all lots are sold subject to our Conditions of Sale and Terms of Guarantee or Conditions of Business and the Authenticity Guarantee, as applicable, which are printed in the back of the catalogue for the respective sale. All lots are sold “AS IS,” in the condition they are in at the time of the auction, in accordance of the Conditions of Sale or the Conditions of Business, as applicable. The respective catalogues can be found at www.sothebys.com. Sotheby’s, Inc. License No. 1216058. © Sotheby’s, Inc. 2017. Information here within is correct at the time of printing.


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THE SCENE

PREVIEWS, PARTIES AND CHARITY GALAS AROUND THE WORLD

Anderson Ranch Recognition Dinner

Aspen top Jane Nathanson and Marc Nathanson centre Mera Rubell, Don Rubell and Wangechi Mutu bottom Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn and Nicolas Rohatyn

WineCrush + ArtCrush Aspen top Sukanya Rajaratnam and Marc Dennis bottom Jill Bernstein, Gayle Stoffel and Marilyn Fields WineCrush + ArtCrush

WineCrush + ArtCrush Aspen top Amy Phelan and Lance Armstrong centre Simon and Tina Beriro bottom Eleanore De Sole and Domenico De Sole

SAMANTHA NANDEZ/BFA.COM

OWEN KOLASINSKI/BFA.COM

ARIA ISADORA/BFA.COM

Aspen top Jamie Fletcher and Ellere Fletcher centre Heidi Zuckerman and Lawrence Weiner bottom Aram Moshayedi and Adam Weinberg

WINECRUSH + ARTCRUSH 2–4 August Aspen, Colorado Following John and Amy Phelan’s annual WineCrush dinner, Sotheby’s Tad Smith, along with Domenico and Eleanore De Sole, welcomed guests to a festive celebratory dinner for the Aspen Art Museum. The museum’s 2017 ArtCrush gala and benefit auction raised $2.8 million, and artist Lawrence Weiner was recognised with the Aspen Award for Art.

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SOTHEBY’S

ANDERSON RANCH RECOGNITION DINNER 20 July Aspen, Colorado Art world luminaries gathered at the historic Hotel Jerome to celebrate the 21st annual Recognition Dinner benefitting the Anderson Ranch Arts Center. Artist Wangechi Mutu received the centre’s National Artist Award, Jan and Ronnie Greenberg the Service to the Arts Award, and gallerist Ann Korologos the Extraordinary Leadership Award.


RONALD PHILLIPS FINE ANTIQUE ENGLISH FURNITURE

A HIGHLY IMPORTANT GEORGE III GILTWOOD MIRROR BY THOMAS CHIPPENDALE FROM HAREWOOD HOUSE EXHIBITING AT TEFAF NEW YORK FALL 28TH OCTOBER-1ST NOVEMBER 26 BRUTON STREET, LONDON W1J 6QL +44 (0)20 7493 2341 ADVICE @ RONALDPHILLIPS.CO.UK RONALDPHILLIPSANTIQUES.COM


THE SCENE

PREVIEWS, PARTIES AND CHARITY GALAS AROUND THE WORLD

Opera and Old Masters

London top Dr Matt Wright, Karena Gulyava and Stephen Somerville centre Princess Alexandra Lobkowicz and Prince William Lobkowicz bottom Charles Plante, Christopher Butterworth, Deirdre Butterworth and Rory O’Donnald

La Mer & Project 0 La Mer & Project 0 New York top Bernadette Fowler, Morgan Fowler, Bernard Fowler and Rashida Fowler bottom Matthew Domescek and Chloe Wise

New York top Jane Hudis and Sandra Main bottom left Dree Hemingway bottom right Vashtie

La Mer & Project 0

CHARLES ROUSSEL/BFA.COM

KATE COWDREY/SOTHEBY’S

New York Anne Verhallen and Patricia van der Vliet

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SOTHEBY’S

LA MER & PROJECT 0

OPERA AND OLD MASTERS

21 June

4 July

Sotheby’s New York

Sotheby’s London

La Mer teamed up with Project 0 for the La Mer Wave Walk, a public art venture benefitting the luxury beauty brand’s Blue Heart Oceans Fund, which protects marine habitats. Wave-inspired sculptures were installed around New York City and a party was held at Sotheby’s, where Kevin Doyle led a live auction that raised nearly $200,000.

Hundreds of guests enjoyed spectacular floral displays from By Appointment Only Design while previewing works from Sotheby’s London’s Old Masters and Treasures auctions. Artists from The Royal Opera gave an exclusive recital of arias by Catalani, Liszt and Puccini, and Lord Astor discussed the new book Villa Astor: Paradise Restored on the Amalfi Coast.


P H I LI P ALEX I U S DE LÁSZLÓ Buda pest 1869 – 1937 L ondon

Portrait of Helen Beatrice Myfanwy Hughes Signed and dated lower left: de Laszlo/1931. X; numbered 276 and inscribed in John de Laszlo’s hand Helen Hughes, aged 17, daughter of / Rt Hon. William Hughes, late Prime/Minister of Australia on the reverse Oil on board: 20 × 16 in / 50.8 × 40.6 cm

Email: paintings@richardgreen.com www.richardgreen.com

Society Portraits 1888–1945

On view for sale at

Exhibition opens Wednesday 20th September A fully illustrated catalogue is available

147 New Bond Street, London W1S 2TS Telephone: +44 (0)20 7493 3939


Sotheby’s guide to global museum exhibitions, art fairs and more.

NALINI MALANI IN PARIS

ACCESS

CHINESE ART AFTER 1989

FRIEZE LONDON

PACIFIC STANDARD TIME

Yves Saint Laurent in Djemaa el Fna square in Marrakesh.

SANS PAREIL

© REGINALD GRAY

SAINT LAURENT FOREVER Yves Saint Laurent was not a man to discard things. His drawings, photographs, couture sketches and design prototypes dating back to the founding of his couture house in 1962, along with thousands of garments and accessories, are now part of the Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent Foundation. To properly display them, Bergé, who was Saint Laurent’s longtime partner, has seen to the creation of two museums, one in Paris and the other in

Marrakesh, in Jardin Majorelle, the botanical garden that the couple had bought in 1980 to save it from modern development. There, Paris-based architectural firm Studio KO has created a 4,000-square-metre area, which includes a permanent exhibition space that pays homage to Morocco in its use of local stone and terracotta and to the couturier with the inclusion of brickwork lattices echoing the patterns of thread

within fabric. The Paris museum is remaining inside the legendary YSL hôtel particulier, but it has been re-envisioned by set and exhibition designer Nathalie Crinière and, fittingly, interior decorator Jacques Grange: it was Grange, after all, who decorated Saint Laurent’s Villa Oasis in Marrakesh and Villa Mabrouka in Tangier. Musée Yves Saint Laurent, Paris and Marrakesh, opening 3 October. —HARRIET SALISBURY

SOTHEBY’S

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CHROMOTHERAPY

GENTLE GENIUS One of the cornerstones of the late Ernst Beyeler’s collection was art by Paul Klee. A new retrospective focusing on the Swiss-German artist’s abstractions offers the chance to experience his fantastic, expressive and witty creations using Beyeler’s holdings as well as loans covering the artist’s output from 1913 onward. Klee valued the purity of original ideas and never ceased experimenting. Applying paint in unusual ways to materials such as burlap, cardboard panel and muslin, he used abstraction to explore nature, architecture, music and fictional characters. Having developed a deep interest in colour theory, Klee saw it as a way to escape from his natural cynicism into the optimistic nobility of art. Writing about Klee in 1916, fellow artist Oskar Schlemmer noted: “He is everything; profound, gentle and many more of the good things, and this because he is innovative.” Paul Klee, Fondation Beyeler, Basel, 1 October–21 January 2018. –HS

BUILDING A MONUMENT TO TIME

MAN OF THE HOUR Ever since childhood, Illinois-based real estate magnate Cameel Halim has been fascinated by the way things work. “I used to take my alarm clock apart,” he confesses. “Although I never put it back together again.” As an adult, his curiosity led him to amass one of the world’s most impressive collections of timepieces and glasswork. This autumn, Halim is unveiling a selection of his holdings with the opening of the Halim Time and Glass Museum in Evanston, Illinois. There, visitors can peruse galleries lined with rare automatons and pocket watches, plus an array of 18th-century Chinese clocks. “No place in the world can come close to us outside the Forbidden City’s museum,” says Halim, referring to the remarkable mechanical timepiece collection in Beijing’s Palace Museum. Personally designed by Halim, his wife and three daughters, the displays include video monitors playing each timepiece in motion. Also on view are glass mosaics, vases

and windows – a testament to the ingenuity of glass production in late 19th-century America. “It was a big revolution,” Halim notes. “Europeans had been creating stained-glass art since the fifth century, but always with one layer of glass that they painted. The Americans were the first to use layers to paint with glass.” Beyond showing famed makers such as Louis Comfort Tiffany, Halim has made an effort to highlight lesser-known glass artists, including Helen Maitland Armstrong, Frederick Lamb and Mary Tillinghast. Halim, who immigrated from Egypt in 1968, is excited to share his collection with his adopted home after twelve years of planning. “I think after you collect for a while, you realise that all these treasures don’t belong to you,” he says. “They’ve been in a lot of hands, and you’re just holding on to them. I think that this really belongs to the public.” Halim Time and Glass Museum, Evanston, Illinois, opening September 2017. —ALEXANDRA OWENS

FONDATION BEYELER, RIEHEN/BASEL, BEYELER COLLECTION/PHOTO: ROBERT BAYER

An automaton elephant clock from the Halim Time and Glass Museum.

Paul Klee’s Boote in der Überflutung, 1937, in coloured paste on wrapping paper, mounted on cardboard.


Nalini Malani and her family had to flee India after Partition in 1947. This dislocation became a focus for the 71-year-old artist’s long and varied career, during which she has examined the effects of violence and exile. Informed by mythology and ranging from wall drawings, paintings and installations to shadow play and theatre, Malani’s full output is now the subject of the Centre Pompidou’s first major show dedicated to an Indian artist. Much anticipated are the world premieres of films made by the artist between 1969 and 1976, when she was studying in Paris and meeting directors such as Jean-Luc Godard and Alain Resnais. Nalini Malani: The Rebellion of the Dead Retrospective 1969–2018, Centre Pompidou, Paris, 18 October–8 January 2018. —EMMA JONES

Nalini Malani’s installation Hamletmachine, 2000.

The 2016 edition of Frieze Masters.

THE FUN OF THE FAIRS

LONDON TIME What will be new at Frieze London? It’s sex – more specifically, Sex Work, a section dedicated to galleries and women artists working at the historic edges of feminism. The cult of Marxist-Leninism is exposed in Under the Silent Eye of Lenin, an installation-performance by Luanda-based Kiluanji Kia Henda looking at witchcraft during Angola’s civil war and in Cold War science-fiction narratives. Meanwhile, Frieze Masters effortlessly spans thousands of years in its Collections section curated by Sir Norman Rosenthal. It includes ancient Andean textiles (from London’s Paul Hughes Fine Arts), Japanese prints by a 19th-century child prodigy (from Israel Goldman of London) and Marcel Breuer’s tubular-steel furniture for the Bauhaus (from Galerie Ulrich Fiedler in Berlin). To see more exceptional design, collectors will want to hit PAD, where historic, modern and contemporary furniture and objects can be found alongside everything from tribal art to jewellery and wallpaper. This year’s standouts include an Alberto Giacometti-designed lamp (at Galerie Alexandre Biaggi) and a Greek bronze helmet (from Phoenix Ancient Art). PAD London, Berkeley Square, 2–8 October; Frieze London and Frieze Masters, Regent’s Park, 5–8 October. —HS

AGENTS OF CHANGE Among the tumultuous events of 1989 – the fall of the Berlin Wall and a win for Solidarity in the Polish elections, among others – perhaps none had more impact on art than the protests in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square. Since then, China has come to play a central role in the global conversation. For the Guggenheim’s survey of Chinese contemporary art, curator Alexandra Munroe takes Tiananmen as her starting point and ends with the 2008 Beijing Olympics, spanning a period that began with utopianism and closed with a sense of conflicted euphoria. Video, performance, installation, painting, photography and land art show how Chinese artists have been both agents and skeptics in their country’s far-reaching socioeconomic and cultural revolution. Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 6 October–7 January 2018; travels to Guggenheim Museum Bilbao and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. —EJ

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SOTHEBY’S

RMB City: A Second Life City Planning, a 2007 video by China Tracy (aka Cao Fei).

FRIEZE MASTERS, PHOTOGRAPH BY MARK BLOWER

DISLOCATED LIVES

CENTRE POMPIDOU, MUSÉE NATIONAL D’ART MODERNE, PARIS, PHOTO © ARARIO GALLERY

RECLAIMING THE PAST

SOLOMON R GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM, NEW YORK, PURCHASED WITH FUNDS CONTRIBUTED BY THE YOUNG COLLECTORS COUNCIL, WITH ADDITIONAL FUNDS CONTRIBUTED BY SHANGHAI TANG, 2008 © CAO FEI

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THROCKMORTON FINE ART

SURREALISMO Ojos de México

September 21st - December 2nd 2017 Image: Manuel Álvarez Bravo,Parábola óptica / Optical Parabole,1931

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CITY FOCUS: LOS ANGELES

Soul Searching

PACIFIC STANDARD TIME: LA/LA Taking Shape

Francisco Artigas’s and Fernando Luna’s House at 131 Rocas, Jardines del Pedregal, Mexico City, 1966, is part of LACMA’s Found In Translation exhibition.

ollowing the success of its first edition, in 2011, the sprawling, multi-venue Pacific Standard Time returns this autumn with a focus on the vital cultural connections between Latin America and Los Angeles. Starting 15 September and continuing through early 2018, more than 70 arts institutions across Southern California are presenting scholarly museum exhibitions, gallery shows and educational programmes to collectively rewrite – and, in certain cases, to re-right – the dynamic ongoing histories and synergies between Latino and Latin American cultures in the US and beyond. Prepare for a busy autumn: there are more than 90 projects, shows and installations happening regionwide. We have chosen a few highlights from galleries and our Museum Network partners.

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From gold to concrete, feathers to stones and shells to metals, two shows at the Getty Center celebrate centuries of Latin America’s material innovations. Golden Kingdoms: Luxury and Legacy in the Ancient Americas tracks the evolution of goldworking between 1000 BC and the 16th century, bringing insights into how the Incans, Aztecs and others infused these art objects with spiritual meaning and purpose. From the collection of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros comes Making Art Concrete, which dives into the ways in which the Concrete art movement used industrial materials to articulate new forms of abstraction. “It was truly an international avant-garde movement,” explains co-curator Aleca Le Blanc, adding that the genre’s continued resonance is due to its practitioners’ “willingness to look past traditional media and process and to consider viewer participation.” The Getty Center, Los Angeles: Golden Kingdoms: Luxury and Legacy in the Ancient Americas, 16 September–28 January 2018; Making Art Concrete: Works from Argentina and Brazil in the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, 16 September–11 February 2018.

Three exhibitions at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) each offer a different thread to follow through the continuing history of Latino and Latin American art. Eagerly awaited is the retrospective of painter Carlos Almaraz, who died of AIDS in 1989 at age 48. A co-founder of Los Four, an influential collective of Chicano artists, Almaraz’s canvasses manage to be both darkly political and sublime. A Universal History of Infamy is one section of a three-part show introducing a new generation of artists who are puncturing traditional definitions of Latin American identity. Meanwhile, Found In Translation traces the ways in which 20th-century designers in California and Mexico influenced one another, sometimes in surprising ways.

“After Richard Neutra gave his first lecture in Mexico in 1937, architects there looked to his California houses as inspiration, and Neutra helped bring recognition of Mexican achievements back to California,” says LACMA decorative arts and design curator Wendy Kaplan. Los Angeles County Museum of Art: Playing with Fire: Paintings by Carlos Almaraz, through 3 December; A Universal History of Infamy, through 19 February 2018; Found In Translation: Design in California and Mexico, 1915–1985, 17 September–1 April 2018.

Earth, Wind and Fire With its rich flora, fauna, climates and terrains, Latin America has inspired artists and scientists throughout history, expanding our knowledge and perception of the natural world. Drawings, paintings, rare books and objects from the Huntington Library’s collection trace myriad visions of Latin America, from indigenous productions to colonial projections. Visual Voyages: Images of Latin American Nature from Columbus to Darwin, Huntington Library, San Marino, 16 September–8 January 2018.

PHOTOGRAPH BY ROBERTO AND FERNANDO LUNA, 1996 © ROBERTO AND FERNANDO LUNA COURTESY LACMA COLECCIÓN PATRICIA PHELPS DE CISNEROS PROMISED GIFT TO THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK THROUGH THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN FUND IN HONOR OF TOMÁS ORINOCO GRIFFIN-CISNEROS IMAGE COURTESY WALTER DE CASTRO COURTESY THE GETTY CENTER COURTESY ALEJANDRA VON HARTZ GALLERY ©MARIE ORENSANZ COURTESY HAMMER MUSEUM PHOTOGRAPH BY PEPE ITURRALDE © THE ESTATE OF GILBERT "MAGU" LUJÁN COURTESY UC IRVINE © HUNTINGTON LIBRARY © NAUFUS RAMÍREZ-FIGUEROA COURTESY LAMA

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Art Without Borders

Women of Influence: 3 Shows The Hammer fills its galleries with more than 100 Latino and Latin American female artists whose experimental works and unconventional ideas altered art’s evolution. Shining new light on icons as well as lesser-known practitioners, this exhibition is the first to place their influence in a cultural and political context. Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960–1985, The Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, 15 September– 31 December.

Part platform for cultural exchange, part boundaries-blind commercial exhibition, proyectosLA showcases contemporary and Modern art from nineteen of Latin America’s most esteemed galleries. Founded by collector Tracy O’Brien, art adviser Teresa Iturralde and brand strategist Patricia Fajer (pictured below) the event will take place in an open-plan space designed by Mexican architect Ezequiel Farca. Curators Luiza Teixeira de Freitas and Claudia Segura have titled the exhibition Here the border is you, selecting paintings, sculptures and more from Brazil’s Galeria Nara Roesler and Galeria Vermelho, Argentina’s Nora Fisch and Henrique Faria, Chile’s Isabel Aninat, Mexico’s Galería OMR and Joségarcía, Peru’s Revolver Galería and still others from Guatemala, Colombia and the US. ProyectosLA, Wərkärtz Studio, Downtown Los Angeles, 16 September–28 October.

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“An artist is like an alchemist,” said Anna Maria Maiolino, “who in seeking to transform metal into gold, ends up transmuting his own being.” A survey of Maiolino’s sculptures, woodcuts, films and performances doubles as a portrait of the multidisciplinary Italian-Brazilian artist as mother, migrant and pioneering creative mind. Anna Maria Maiolino, MOCA Grand, Los Angeles, through 31 December.

This celebrity-owned, private European village in Beverly Hills sits on its own promontory hilltop providing explosive city-to-ocean views. With two separate parcels and addresses, this sprawling compound features pool with cabana, koi ponds, outdoor fireplace and fountains leading to a studio bungalow and two-storey guest cottage, as well as a separate approximately 3,000-squarefoot contemporary two-level home with a kitchen, bedroom and bathroom on each floor.

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The first Los Angeles exhibition of acclaimed Brazilian contemporary artist Adriana Varejão showcases two decades of her sumptuous and slyly political works, including a selection of her blue-and-white Azulejão (“big tile”) paintings and Transborroco, her sole video installation to date. Adriana Varejão: Interiors, Gagosian, Beverly Hills, 14 September–25 October.

Myth Making Gilbert Luján (1940–2011) was a force in the Chicano movement and a co-founder of Los Four who produced dreamlike murals, paintings and sculptures possessed of a ferocious yet tender spirit. His first survey explores the mythologies he created, which helped redefine Chicano identity. Aztlán to Magulandia: The Journey of Chicano Artist Gilbert ‘Magu’ Luján, Contemporary Arts Center Gallery, Irvine, 7 October– 16 December. —JENNIFER KRASINSKI

(This page, from top) Marie Orensanz’s, Limitada (Limited), 1978, at The Hammer; the founders of ProyectosLA; Gilbert Luján’s El Fireboy y El Mingo, 1988, at the CACG. (Opposite, from top) Willys de Castro’s Active Object (red/white cube), 1962, in the Getty’s Making Art Concrete; Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa’s A Brief History of Architecture in Guatemala, 2010–13, in LACMA’s A Universal History of Infamy; José María Carbonell’s Loranthus, at the Huntington.

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Access the world’s most extraordinary museums. museumnetwork.sothebys.com

SOTHEBY’S MUSEUM NETWORK MUSEUMNETWORK.SOTHEBYS.COM MUSEUMNETWORK@SOTHEBYS.COM SOTHEBY’S, INC. LICENSE NO. 1216058. © SOTHEBY’S, INC. 2017

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ACCESS

MUST-SEE EXHIBITIONS AROUND THE WORLD

MUSEUMS

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum: Jiang Zhi’s Object in Drawer (detail), 1997.

NEW YORK The Museum of Modern Art (MoMa) 23 September–1 January 2018 MAX ERNST: BEYOND PAINTING

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum 6 October–7 January 2018 ART AND CHINA AFTER 1989: THEATER OF THE WORLD

The Met Breuer 11 October–2 January 2018 MODERNISM ON THE GANGES: RAGHUBIR SINGH PHOTOGRAPHS

The Frick Collection 24 October– 11 March 2018 VERONESE IN MURANO: TWO VENETIAN RENAISSANCE MASTERPIECES RESTORED

ONTARIO Art Gallery of Ontario 21 October–28 January 2018 FLORINE STETTHEIMER: PAINTING POETRY

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SOTHEBY’S

PHILADELPHIA Philadelphia Museum of Art 3 November– 19 February 2018 OLD MASTERS NOW: CELEBRATING THE JOHNSON COLLECTION

SEATTLE Seattle Art Museum (SAM) 19 October–15 January 2018 ANDREW WYETH: IN RETROSPECT

TEXAS The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFA) 8 October–28 January 2018 THE GLAMOUR AND ROMANCE OF OSCAR DE LA RENTA

EUROPE

AMSTERDAM

Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam 23 September–3 June 2018 ‘I AM A NATIVE FOREIGNER’

MÁLAGA

Grand Palais

Museo Picasso Málaga

11 October–22 January 2018

10 October–28 January 2018

GAUGUIN THE ALCHEMIST

ANTWERP

WE ARE COMPLETELY FREE. WOMEN ARTISTS AND SURREALISM

Museum aan de Stroom (MAS)

LAUSANNE

18 October–14 January 2018

Musée de l'Elysée

DAZZLING DESIRE

25 October–7 January 2018

BASEL

GUS VAN SANT: ICONS

VERSAILLES Chateau de Versailles 24 October–25 February 2018 VISITORS TO VERSAILLES (1682–1789)

VIENNA Leopold Museum

Kunstmuseum Basel

LONDON

7 October–7 January 2018

Tate Britain

22 September– 8 January 2018

12 September–21 January 2018

ANTON KOLIG

WOMANHOOD: EROS, POWER, MORALITY, AND DEATH AROUND 1500

HUMLEBÆK Louisiana Museum of Modern Art 21 September–30 December RINEKE DIJKSTRA: THE ONE AND THE MANY

Van Gogh Museum

MADRID

13 October–7 January 2018

Museo Nacional Del Prado

THE DUTCH IN PARIS 1789–1914

25 October–4 March 2018 THE SPIRIT OF PAINTING: CAI GUO-QIANG AT THE PRADO

RACHEL WHITEREAD

Royal Academy of Arts 7 October–3 January 2018 DALÍ / DUCHAMP

The Photographers’ Gallery 20 October–11 February 2018 INSTANT STORIES: WIM WENDERS’ POLAROIDS

PARIS Centre Georges Pompidou 4 October–29 January 2018 ANDRÉ DERAIN 1904-1914. THE RADICAL DECADE

ASIA

TOKYO Nezu Museum 14 September–22 October SUPPORTING THE BUDDHIST IMAGE: LOTUS FLOWER, SACRED BEAST, DEVA AND DEMON

COURTESY THE ARTIST COURTESY THE SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM

AMERICAS


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ACCESS

THIS SEASON’S LEADING INTERNATIONAL ART FAIRS

ART FAIRS

Paris Photo: Evangelia Kranioti, still from Obscuro Barroco, 2016, from Galerie Sator.

BOGOTÁ ARTBO

MIAMI Art Miami 5–10 DECEMBER VIP DAY 5 DECEMBER

26–29 OCTOBER VIP DAY 26 OCTOBER

Design Miami/ 6–10 DECEMBER

EUROPE & MIDDLE EAST

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FIAC 19–22 OCTOBER

Scope Miami Beach VIP DAY 5 DECEMBER

27 JANUARY–4 FEBRUARY 2018

2–5 NOVEMBER

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VIP DAY 26 JANUARY 2018

HONG KONG Fine Art Asia 30 SEPTEMBER–3 OCTOBER VIP DAY 29 SEPTEMBER

Ink Asia 15–17 DECEMBER VIP DAY 14 DECEMBER

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Paris Photo

Korea International Art Fair

9–12 NOVEMBER

21–24 SEPTEMBER

VIP DAY 8 NOVEMBER

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AKAA (Also Known As Africa)

SHANGHAI

VIP DAY 31 JANUARY 2018

10–12 NOVEMBER

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VIP DAY 9 NOVEMBER

7–10 DECEMBER

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4–8 OCTOBER

TORINO

6–10 DECEMBER

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Art Basel Miami Beach

Texas Contemporary

7–10 DECEMBER

20–22 OCTOBER

VIP DAY 6 DECEMBER

IFPDA Print Fair

ASIA

VIP DAY 18 OCTOBER

VIP DAY 6 DECEMBER

NEW YORK

Asia Now 18–22 OCTOBER

Sculpture Objects Functional Art and Design Fair (SOFA CHICAGO)

VIP DAY 19 OCTOBER

PARIS

6–8 OCTOBER

VIP DAY 5 DECEMBER

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17–21 JANUARY 2018 VIP DAY 16 JANUARY 2018

CHICAGO

6–10 DECEMBER

London Art Fair

GENEVA artgenève 1–4 FEBRUARY 2018

26–29 OCTOBER

Superfine!

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8–10 DECEMBER

1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair

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Artissima International Art Fair

West Bund Art and Design 10–12 NOVEMBER VIP DAY 9 NOVEMBER

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Frieze London & Frieze Masters

viennacontemporary

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Louise Fishman “Line Drive” 2010 Oil on linen Courtesy of Cheim & Read, New York

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ART AT EVERY PRICE POINT An extraordinary range of accessible art and collectibles can be found at Sotheby’s autumn auctions in Hong Kong.

UNDER $10,000

$10,000–$25,000

ROLEX A stainless-steel automatic centreseconds diver’s wristwatch with bracelet, ref. 5513 “Metres First” submariner, circa 1967 HK$26,000–50,000 ($3,300–6,400) Important Watches

$25,000–$50,000

DOMAINE DE LA ROMANÉE-CONTI La Tâche 1990, two bottles HK$60,000–90,000 ($7,500–11,000) Wines from the Cellar of Fux Restaurant

ZHAO SHAO’ANG Lighthouse, 1961 HK$280,000–500,000 ($36,000–64,000) Fine Chinese Paintings

2 October, Hong Kong

30 September, Hong Kong

2 October, Hong Kong

CARTIER A lady’s pink-gold and diamondset asymmetric “Baignoire S” wristwatch, circa 2010 HK$240,000–350,000 ($31,000–45,000) Important Watches

2 October, Hong Kong

INDIEGUERILLAS Portable Art Is Good For You VII: (The Birth of) The Cheerful and The Beautiful PseudoCool, 2010 HK$50,000–70,000 ($6,400–8,950) Modern & Contemporary Southeast Asian Art

Ruby and diamond bangle, Buccellati HK$160,000–260,000 ($20,500–33,300) Magnificent Jewels & Jadeite

A bronze figure of Simhamukha, Tibet, 17th century HK$300,000–500,000 ($38,500–64,000) The Heart of Tantra – Buddhist Art Including Property from the Nyingjei Lam Collection

3 October, Hong Kong

3 October, Hong Kong

1 October, Hong Kong

HIDENORI YAMAGUCHI Crossroad: Okachimachi (detail), 2016 HK$50,000–80,000 ($6,426–10,282) Contemporary Ink Art: Confluence

H MOSER & CIE A limited-edition “Perpetual 1” palladium perpetualcalendar wristwatch with seven-day power reserve indication, circa 2014 HK$100,000–180,000 ($12,900–23,100) Important Watches

2 October, Hong Kong

Gem set and diamond demi-parure, Bulgari HK$320,000–650,000 ($41,000–83,500) Magnificent Jewels & Jadeite

3 October, Hong Kong

2 October, Hong Kong

EDUARDO CASTRILLO Calmness in Organic Form, 2009 HK$60,000–90,000 ($7,712–11,568) Modern & Contemporary Southeast Asian Art

1 October, Hong Kong

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Pair of jadeite, sapphire and diamond pendent earrings, Cartier HK$110,000–160,000 ($14,100–20,500) Magnificent Jewels & Jadeite

3 October, Hong Kong


Visit sothebys.com/hk for the full auction and pre-sale exhibition information.

$50,000–$100,000

$100,000–$250,000

Ruby, diamond and emerald brooch/pendant HK$680,000–850,000 ($87,000–109,000) Magnificent Jewels & Jadeite

$250,000 AND ABOVE

A longquan celadon carved “peony” meiping, Song dynasty HK$1,200,000–1,800,000 ($154,000–230,000) Song – Important Chinese Ceramics from the Le Cong Tang Collection

3 October, Hong Kong

Paraíba tourmaline and diamond ring HK$8,750,000–11,000,000 ($1,120,000–1,410,000) Magnificent Jewels & Jadeite

3 October, Hong Kong

3 October, Hong Kong

WANG DUO Jue Liang Tie, album of sixteen leaves (one shown) HK$1,200,000–1,800,000 ($154,000–230,000) Fine Classical Chinese Paintings

Emerald and diamond necklace HK$6,300,000–8,500,000 ($810,000–1,090,000) Magnificent Jewels & Jadeite

1 October, Hong Kong

3 October, Hong Kong A superbly carved bambooroot “pine tree” waterpot attributed to Zhu He, Jiading School, late Ming dynasty HK$400,000–600,000 ($51,300–77,000) Water, Pine and Stone Retreat Collection – Treasures

KUSAMA YAYOI Pumpkin (HHP), 1998 HK$1,000,000–1,500,000 ($128,534–192,800) Modern and Contemporary Art Evening

30 September, Hong Kong

3 October, Hong Kong

RICHARD MILLE An extremely fine and important sapphire tonneau-form skeletonised tourbillon wristwatch, RM56-02, no. 10/10, circa 2015 Estimate upon request Important Watches

Two diamond clip brooches, Van Cleef & Arpels HK$480,000–650,000 ($61,500–83,500) Magnificent Jewels & Jadeite

3 October, Hong Kong

2 October, Hong Kong

WU CHANGSHUO Autumn Foliage and Blossoms, 1915 HK$500,000–700,000 ($64,000–90,000) Fine Chinese Paintings

JU MING Single Whip, 1980 HK$1,200,000–2,000,000 ($154,000–257,000) Modern Asian Art

1 October, Hong Kong

XU BEIHONG Galloping horse on grassland, 1939 HK$4,800,000–6,000,000 ($615,000–770,000) Fine Chinese Paintings

2 October, Hong Kong

2 October, Hong Kong

SOTHEBY’S

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COLLECTOR’S EYE

HERMÈS Rare cotton “Hermeselle” dress printed with trompe-l’œil details, Spring/Summer 1952 €1,000–1,200 ($1,150–1,400)

“I love this Hermeselle-style piece. This little black dress with trompe l’œil painted pockets and collar is made of cotton and can also be worn on the beach.”

ETERNAL NOIR As Karl Lagerfeld once noted, a little black dress will never leave you overdressed or underdressed. This autumn, a sale of 140 museum-quality garments from vintage couture dealer Didier Ludot honours this timeless wardrobe staple. Here, the style connoisseur and collector explains five standout looks.

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BALENCIAGA Marescot lace baby-doll dress, Autumn/Winter 1958 Haute Couture €2,000–3,000 ($2,300–3,450)

“I very much appreciate the sensuality of the tight sheath pink satin underdress, which is seen through a black lace baby-doll overdress. The lace was made by the prestigious firm Marescot.”


CHANEL Silk chiffon cocktail dress with taffeta bow, 1960 Haute Couture €2,500–3,000 ($2,850–3,450)

JUNYA WATANABE “Zipper” dress, Spring/Summer 2005 €1,000–1,500 ($1,150–1,750)

“I was seduced by the African feel of this dress, designed by Rei Kawakubo’s apprentice Junya Watanabe, who worked under Kawakubo at Comme des Garçons.”

GIVENCHY Duchess satin dinner dress, Autumn/Winter 1956–57 Haute Couture €1,800–2,500 ($2,100–2,850)

“For me, this style is the quintessence of the little black dress. I chose a picture of this dress for the poster for my 1996 exhibition at the Printemps Haussmann department store in Paris.”

“This is an especially important dress because it shows the elegance of Delphine Seyrig, who is wearing the exact same dress in Alain Resnais’s dreamlike 1961 film Last Year at Marienbad.” 1921–2010 The Little Black Dress – Collection Didier Ludot will be exhibited in Paris from 28–30 September & 2 October. Auction: 3 October. Enquiries: +33 1 53 05 53 05.

SOTHEBY’S

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CURATED

RON ARAD All Light Long, 2002 £50,000–70,000 ($64,000–90,000)

“Arad is the eternal innovator and experimenter – always pushing the potential of new technology – and here he really flexes his material muscles. Carbon-coated honeycomb paper makes this huge table as strong as an ox, yet light as a feather.”

MATERIAL WHIRL Guest curating Sotheby’s Design auction, Wallpaper* editor in chief Tony Chambers picks works by leading creators who have engaged with materials in innovative ways.

JORIS LAARMAN Bone Rocker, 2008 £170,000–200,000 ($218,000–256,000)

“This is a mesmerising mix of natural, organic form and digital-technology production. Resulting from extensive scientific and material research and using computer algorithms to simulate natural growth, Laarman’s marble resin Bone Rocker is a kind of high-tech art nouveau. If Mother Nature designed a chair, it would probably look like this.”

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PABLO REINOSO

Design: Living in a Material World will be exhibited in London from 13–16 October. Auction: 17 October. Enquiries: +44 20 7293 5568.

Vertical Bench, 2011 £30,000–50,000 ($39,000–64,000)

“Is it seating? Is it a wall-hanging sculpture? Is it a plate of wooden spaghetti? Whichever way you look at it, it’s a talking point and a magnificent manipulation of material, form and function.”

STUDIO JOB Cabinet from the Perished collection, 2006 £40,000–60,000 ($52,000–77,000)

“Playful and joyful at first glance, there is often a dark humour lurking beneath the studio’s work. This cabinet, made from Makassar ebonyveneered wood with maple inlay, incorporates the fine crafts of French 17th-century marquetry found in pieces by André-Charles Boulle” – a true merging of traditional techniques and modern digital production.”

JASPER MORRISON Wing Nut Chair, 1985 £10,000–15,000 ($13,000–20,000)

“A piece of huge interest and importance, as it was designed and hand-built by Morrison himself while a student at the Royal College of Art in 1985. There are many clues in the simplicity of form, materials and construction to what he would go on to create and stand for over the subsequent 30-plus years.”


AT HOME WITH ART

LOW-KEY LUXURIOUS For designer Robert Stilin, a home should be as liveable as it is chic, writes Stephanie Sporn.

PHOTOGRAPH BY JOSHUA MCHUGH

How would you describe your approach to design? Mixing and layering different mediums is what I do in my practice. It’s how I view the world and how I view living and collecting. People don’t just buy art or design. They buy different pieces and have to put them together. Combining a variety of art and objects shows how things play off one another and create a mood and feeling.

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© DUMMY COPYRIGHT FILL IN WITH REAL TEXT

“We all want things that look beautiful, but if they’re uncomfortable and not functional, who cares?” says Robert Stilin, the New York- and Hamptons-based designer known for interiors that manage to be both laid-back and opulent. “I like homes that feel very real,” he continues. “I am not interested in creating showplaces.” Indeed, Stilin’s designs are anything but ostentatious. By combining clean-lined furnishings from various eras with refined, tactile materials, Stilin creates a sense of warmth and comfort – the ideal environments for his clients’ diverse art collections. With a 2016 nomination to Architectural Digest’s AD100 list and projects ranging from a 50-acre, park-like family compound in Louisville, Kentucky, to a country house in Bridgehampton for a couple who ardently collect contemporary art, Stilin is busy these days. Yet this summer, he found time to select items from Sotheby’s Contemporary Living Online: Prints, Photographs and Design auction and created vignettes around them. Stilin spoke with Stephanie Sporn about his early influences, favourite artists and tips for incorporating art into a home.


© DUMMY COPYRIGHT FILL IN WITH REAL TEXT

In Robert Stilin’s space for a previous Kips Bay Decorator Show House, a Damien Hirst painting floats above the mantel, while a 1970s Kappa chair sits alongside works by Richard Prince.

Caption here for the image on the right. Try not to put the caption on the picture if you can help it.


Are most of your clients experienced art collectors? They all have an affinity for art. I have everyone from budding collectors to people who have been collecting for decades. Some are very independent; others work with an adviser. I always teach them and encourage them to collect. Art adds so much value to your life, and I personally cannot imagine a home without it. Do you follow any guidelines to incorporate art into a room? I don’t think people should live in museums – clean white boxes with perfect lighting to showcase art and furniture. My clients don’t want to own warehouses full of art: they want to live with their art. People create so much fear about these valuable objects. Yes, art is expensive, but it is meant to be lived with.

Any mentors in particular? Early on, someone who had a big impact on me was collector Beth Rudin DeWoody. Travelling and shopping with her opened my eyes and taught me to search beyond the obvious things that attracted me. Also, all the people I’ve worked with over the years at Sotheby’s are like walking encyclopedias of art. The art world is really intimidating, less so now than twenty years ago, when I felt there was this natural disdain for designers. I was insecure about it, but I absorbed everything over time. The people that I have met at auction houses and galleries – along with designers, dealers, artists and collectors sharing opportunities and sources – all have been my education.

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You are also a collector. What kind of art do you live with? I’ve been collecting photography for 30 years. I love large-scale images, foldings and hangings. I also collect paintings, works on paper, et cetera, and I own works by 150-plus artists. I like to live in a very layered way. A few names that come to mind are Richard Misrach, Frank Thiel, Wade Guyton, John Chamberlain, Damien Hirst, Jack Pierson and Stanley Whitney. What is your advice to new collectors? Don’t overthink. Don’t make things too special and too precious. Larry Gagosian once said to me, “Do you like the painting? Can you afford it? If the answers are yes, then you should buy it.” He says that to people all the time: if you can afford it and you like it, buy it. Enjoy beautiful things and make them part of your life. Do a reasonable amount of homework, but don’t overanalyse. Art should be fun and make you feel good. # Stephanie Sporn is a staff writer for sothebys.com.

PORTRAIT BY RICHARD PHIBBS

How did you break into the design world? As a kid I used to sketch cars and houses, but I was raised in a family that didn’t see design as an option for me. My dad was an entrepreneur; I was studying business. It wasn’t until after college that circumstances in my life evolved. Around 1989 I opened a sophisticated design store in Palm Beach that had new and vintage furniture, art and objects. One day a couple came in wanting to buy everything and asked if I could help with their house. I didn’t necessarily know how to do that, but I just taught myself along the way. Travelling and a lot of amazing mentors in the design and art worlds are how I got myself to where I am today.

PHOTOGRAPH BY STEPHEN KENT JOHNSON

(Above) Artworks by Julian Schnabel and Richard Misrach are mixed with a custom sofa, vintage furnishings and a Swedish pile rug in a layered interior by Robert Stilin (right).


D ol ce St i l Nov o

w ww. sm e g. com


THE ART OF GIVING

BODIES OF WORK Kathleen White previews the New York Academy of Art’s Take Home a Nude auction. Unsurprisingly, art’s most traditional subject, the nude, is also one of its most controversial. From Michelangelo’s David to Robert Mapplethorpe’s erotic photographs, works of art featuring unclad human figures have reliably captured our attention. For more than two decades, the New York Academy of Art has playfully acknowledged that fact with its annual Take Home a Nude gala and benefit auction. “As they say, a picture is worth a thousand words,” says academy president David Kratz. The 11 October event, hosted by Sotheby’s, will honour painter John Alexander. Current and former students along with such artists as Ryan McGinness, Philip Pearlstein and Spencer Tunick are contributing nudes, but the auction also offers works with other subjects and in varied styles, which all reflect the academy’s dedication to rigorous formal training. “We want to show a range of our artists’ points of view,” says Kratz, noting the inclusion of text-driven works and neon sculpture alongside figurative paintings and drawings. While the graduate programme is grounded in tradition, “we look for artists whose work is very much part of the current dialogue,” says Kratz. For Amy Cappellazzo, head of Sotheby’s Fine Art Division and this year’s event chairperson, “the essential foundations of art-making that the academy teaches have never been more urgent. Sotheby’s has long supported the academy and its vital work,” she says. “We are more excited than ever to collaborate.” For the academy, the gala is “an opportunity to show our best work at one of the most prestigious venues in the world,” says Kratz. “And it’s high-energy fun – what could be better?” " Kathleen White is a staff writer for sothebys.com. Take Home a Nude Art Party and Auction. 11 October, Sotheby’s New York. Tickets: nyaa.com/nude. Enquiries: than@nyaa.edu.

(Left) Among the works to be offered in the New York Academy of Art’s Take Home a Nude auction is Spencer Tunick’s photograph Colombia, 2016.

SOTHEBY’S

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EXTRAORDINARY PROPERTIES

A FINE LINE Streamlined and airy, midcentury modern homes continue to draw countless fans, finds Iyna Bort Caruso.

NEW CANAAN

© DUMMY COPYRIGHT FILL IN WITH REAL TEXT

CONNECTICUT

Sculptural elements, natural light and clear views of the surrounding landscape combine to make this exceptional midcentury modern house an unprecedented experience in living. Staying true to architect Eliot Noyes’s original vision, the renovations by architect Joeb Moore and builder David Prutting preserved his sophisticated approach while making the home conform to today’s standards. Natural materials such as wood and stone add warmth, and the house’s remarkable proportions are enhanced by the expansive use of glass. $6,950,000 Property ID: XXQC6F | sir.com William Pitt Sotheby’s International Realty Fatou Niang +1 212 961 7428 Inger Stringfellow +1 203 321 9361

Midcentury modern may be to architecture what rock and roll – according to singer-songwriter Neil Young – is to popular music: it can never die. Begun in the late 1930s, the modernist style took hold after World War II as new materials and building techniques allowed architects to break with the forms and methods of the past. Decades on, midcentury modern’s clean lines, open floor plans and expansive windows continue to appeal. Architect Carib Daniel Martin renovated the midcentury modern house in Kensington, Maryland, that now serves as both his residence and office. He says he’s attracted to its simplicity and airiness and to the way homes of this era effectively “straddle two worlds: they have a modernist feel but are still connected to the more traditional idea of what a home is.” This, he believes, “is why people feel comfortable in them.” On the other side of the country, midcentury modern architects and builders left legacies in California, particularly in Palm Springs and the San Francisco Bay Area. “We are fortunate to have an inventory of homes built in the 1950s by developer Joseph Eichler, the pioneer who brought midcentury modern to the masses,” says Michael Dreyfus of Golden Gate Sotheby’s International Realty in Palo Alto. “The homes were able to deliver so much in less space. You can get three and four bedrooms in a very small footprint,” he continues, noting that buyers still like the efficiency. More recently, Dreyfus has noticed midcentury modern elements in new construction. “Younger buyers in Silicon Valley are more design-oriented, and there’s something about the style that’s captured people’s imaginations,” he says. Museum exhibitions trumpet the style’s culture-shaping impact, architectural walking tours sell out, and events such as Modernism Week, a biannual festival in Palm Springs, draw thousands of fans to buildings by William Krisel, Richard Neutra and Donald Wexler. Yes, fans – just like rock and roll. # New York-based writer Iyna Bort Caruso has contributed to The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Newsday and others.

SOTHEBY’S

41


PORTLAND OREGON

(Above) This original midcentury Van Evera Bailey estate is located on top of the city’s Hessler Hills. Entirely remodelled to make the most of the property’s light, organic warmth and extensive outdoor spaces, this residence continues to honour the modern lines of the era in which it was created. $2,495,000 Property ID:56CXQQ | sir.com Cascade Sotheby’s International Realty Kristen Kohnstamm +1 503 709 4518

AMAGANSETT NEW YORK

(Right) A modernist gem, this iconic retreat is a fully restored original from noted architect Richard Bender’s early 1960s Amenity project, a cluster of linear, light-infused beach cottages occupying a twenty-acre private enclave. Deftly curated by its owner, this sublime twobedroom, one-and-a-half-bath home is a study in simplicity. $2,100,000 Property ID: 0047542 | sir.com Sotheby’s International Realty – East Hampton Brokerage Rylan Jacka +1 516 702 5707 Bayard Fenwick +1 646 373 1479

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SOTHEBY’S


DENVER COLORADO

(Left) This exquisite residence stands out from other properties by combining a clean and modern aesthetic with a warm atmosphere. Completely renovated, the redesigned interior features hardwood floors, open spaces and floor-to-ceiling windows that illuminate the entirety of the main living area. $5,450,000 Property ID: T2R6GG | sir.com LIV Sotheby’s International Realty Josh Behr +1 303 903 9525 Linda Behr +1 720 275 7726

MARIN COUNTY CALIFORNIA

(Below) The pure lines and modern appeal of midcentury design are on full display throughout this stunning masterpiece. Designed by renowned architect Edward Hageman and owned by the same family for more than 50 years, this one-of-a-kind gated estate offers complete privacy, awe-inspiring bay views and California living at its very finest. Price upon request | sir.com Golden Gate Sotheby’s International Realty Thomas Henthorne +1 415 847 5584

SOTHEBY’S

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THE REGINATO FILES

JAMES REGINATO

IN FULL BLOOM From new fragrances to fine jewels, Aerin Lauder’s impeccable taste knows no bounds.

(Above) A gold, rock-crystal and diamond ring by David Webb ($4,000–6,000) from the Collection of Aerin Lauder Zinterhofer, Sold to Benefit the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. (Opposite) Aerin Lauder at home in New York wearing the above ring.

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Aerin Lauder has no doubt her childhood visits to her famous grandmother Estée’s houses in Manhattan, Palm Beach and East Hampton were deeply formative experiences. “My earliest memories are of how she smelled and her jewellery,” she recalls, in a telling association of fragrance, aesthetics and glamour. “When I was really little, I would reach up and grab the jewellery she left on her dresser. I was fascinated by these incredible objects.” With the upcoming Fine Jewels sale at Sotheby’s New York on 17 October, Lauder – who worked for two decades in various divisions of Estée Lauder, Inc., before launching her own global luxury lifestyle brand AERIN in 2012 – has an opportunity to link her long-standing loves of fragrance and jewels. As she prepares to launch the new AERIN Tuberose Collection, which features Tuberose Le Jour (for daytime) and Tuberose Le Soir (for nightime), Lauder is partnering with Sotheby’s to explore this inescapable dichotomy among the auction’s offerings. She is also consigning two gems of her own, the proceeds from which will benefit the Breast Cancer Research Foundation (BCRF), an organisation founded by her aunt Evelyn in 1993 that today stands as the largest private funder of breast cancer research in the world. Lauder says she has always enjoyed picking different types of adornment depending on the time of day. “For day, I love really fun, wonderful, dramatic pieces of gold. At night, I like to incorporate stones and wear, for example,

a big cocktail ring.” The two items she has donated to the sale illustrate her taste: perfect for day is her gold, rock-crystal and diamond ring by David Webb, while a glamorous night on the town calls for a gold-and-diamond ring by Van Cleef & Arpels. Whatever the hour, Lauder believes it is of utmost importance that jewellery be memorable – an opinion she inherited from her illustrious ancestor. “My grandmother loved big, iconic pieces,” she says. “She liked to wear just one great jewel, with a great dress and handbag. She taught me the idea that less is more.” Such was Aerin Lauder’s inspiration when she launched her own company five years ago. Founded on the principle that living beautifully should be easy, the brand develops tailored collections in the realms of beauty, fashion accessories and home decor, which are available on her website and at select retailers. “For a busy woman, true luxury is having your options pre-edited for you,” Lauder explains. “It was the way my grandmother started her business, too. She started with just four or five products. We like to do things in a small, focused way. The idea is, you don’t have to have so much, but just have a few great pieces.” With her new fragrance collection, Lauder tells the story of one of nature’s most perfect flowers, the tuberose. Long held as a symbol of love and friendship, this prized blossom reveals different scent impressions at dawn and dusk. Hence, Lauder’s Tuberose Le Jour offers the dew-touched aroma of this flower at sunrise,


PHOTOGRAPH BY JULIAN CASSADY


“TRUE LUXURY IS HAVING YOUR OPTIONS PRE-EDITED FOR YOU,” LAUDER EXPLAINS.

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while Tuberose Le Soir evokes its opulent, intoxicating aura at sunset. “Tuberose Le Jour was inspired by the magical fields of tuberose flowers grown in India, where people gather buds at dawn to preserve their bright, fresh floralcy,” says Lauder. At night, the flower takes on a distinctly different character. “The fully opened petals are harvested only at sunset,” she explains. “I was fascinated to have experienced how the fragrance changed, becoming increasingly rich.” It shouldn’t come as a surprise that the tuberose was one of her grandmother’s favourite flowers. “Even today, when I smell one, it reminds me of her. My grandmother loved fragrance and told me never to leave the house without it. She was always testing new fragrances, but she especially loved Beautiful,” Lauder recalls, referring to the Estée Lauder scent launched in 1985. “She had an incredible nose and a passion for flowers. She loved very feminine Bulgarian roses and white flowers in general. Her houses, especially her tables, always had the most beautiful arrangements.” To refine her own horticultural knowledge and her nose, this summer Lauder toured some of England’s great gardens, including those at Chatsworth in Derbyshire and Badminton in Gloucestershire, seats of the Dukes of Devonshire and Beaufort, respectively. “The beauty of the English countryside is amazing. Everything looks so effortless and easy, yet

luxurious and warm,” Lauder reports. “I’ve never seen geraniums like I saw there. In America, you just find hot pink or red. In England I saw purple, sparkling pink and climbing geraniums, which I had never seen before. It was magic.” Another wellspring for Lauder are the gardens of her home in East Hampton, which she inherited from her grandmother. The house, decorated largely in her favourite shades of blue and white, is a refuge she shares with her husband, their teenage boys, plus three dogs. “Weekends are all family time. We love to go sailing, bike riding, barbecueing.” But for Lauder, even weekend casual has its limits: no matter what, she dresses for dinner. On a recent safari in Tanzania, for instance, she pulled out a Stella McCartney ruffled lace blouse, which she dressed up with a piece of jewellery. Wherever she is, Lauder seeks out museums and galleries, as befits the daughter of esteemed collectors and philanthropists Ronald and Jo Carole Lauder. Her father, a former US ambassador to Austria, founded the Neue Galerie in New York in 2001. Her mother has been a longtime leading trustee of New York’s Museum of Modern Art, one of the institutions Aerin also supports, along with the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where she has been a Met Gala co-chair. In her rare downtime, a favourite occupation consists in browsing through auction catalogues. “From the jewellery catalogues, I have gotten a lot of ideas for packaging for my products,” Lauder says. “I get so much inspiration from them.” It’s only apt that the Fine Jewels sale should now get a little inspiration from Lauder herself. $ James Reginato is writer-at-large of Vanity Fair and author of Great Houses, Modern Aristocrats (Rizzoli). Fine Jewels will be exhibited at Sotheby’s New York from 13–17 October. Auction: 17 October. Enquiries: +1 212 606 7392. sothebys.com/finejewels.

(Above) AERIN’s recently launched fragrances: Tuberose Le Jour and Tuberose Le Soir.


“I love coral David Webb pieces. They represent timeless elegance and go perfectly with white or black fashion.” PAIR OF CORAL AND DIAMOND EARCLIPS, DAVID WEBB

“A diamond and gold bow is the perfect complement to a classic black cocktail dress.”

$6,000–8,000

GOLD AND DIAMOND “CHEVEUX D’ANGE” NECKLACE, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, FRANCE $10,000–15,000

DAY AND NIGHT “Safari-inspired style. I love the idea of adding a little animal charm to your day.”

Inspired by her new fragrances, Tuberose Le Jour and Le Soir, Aerin Lauder picks her favourites from Sotheby’s Fine Jewels sale.

DIAMOND AND EMERALD BRACELET, CARTIER $40,000–60,000

“For the evening, this is one of my favourite vintage diamond cocktail rings. It’s feminine, pretty and an easy finishing touch.” From the Collection of Aerin Lauder Zinterhofer, Sold to Benefit the Breast Cancer Research Foundation

VAN CLEEF DIAMOND EAR CLIPS $30,000–50,000

GOLD AND DIAMOND RING, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

“There is nothing more classic than a great pair of diamond earrings for evening.”

$8,000–12,000

“These David Webb earrings define classic elegance. I would wear them for a fun night out.” PAIR OF CULTURED PEARL AND DIAMOND EARCLIPS, DAVID WEBB

“I love to use birds and flowers as accessories during the day. This brooch reminds me of my grandmother, Estée.” GEM-SET BROOCH, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, FRANCE, CIRCA 1957 $10,000–15,000

$6,000–8,000

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Collector Yusaku Maezawaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tastes range from contemporary art to 20th-century design and Japanese ceramics. Here he poses with a group of 17th-century Oribe ware. Photograph by Yasunari Kikuma.

PHOTOGRAPH BY YASUNARI KIKUMA; MAKE UP BY SHINO; RETOUCHING BY MIKI STUDIO; SPECIAL THANKS TO IINO MEDIA PRO & LIGHT UP

A NE OF


W BREED COLLECTOR JAPAN’S YUSAKU MAEZAWA MAKES HIS MARK

By setting auction-room records and using social media to convey his passion for art, Yusaku Maezawa is

© DUMMY COPYRIGHT FILL IN WITH REAL TEXT

redefining the megacollector, reports Anthony Calnek.

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Y

usaku Maezawa is ready for his close-up. For his photo shoot with leading Japanese magazine photographer Yasunari Kikuma, the 41-year-old e-commerce entrepreneur arrives with a game attitude. Maezawa has brought to Kikuma’s studio a few options from his personal wardrobe, and Kikuma selects a simple black T-shirt and jeans, then asks him to take off his shoes. The shoot will take place in front of a solid blue backdrop, the colour chosen to echo the palette of Jean-Michel Basquiat’s Untitled, a 1982 painting that Maezawa bought at a recent Sotheby’s auction for a record $110.5 million. The barefoot look is a nod to Basquiat, who famously posed shoeless for a 1985 New York Times Magazine cover story that helped rocket him to art world fame just three years before his untimely death. Maezawa “is like a model,” says Kikuma. He should know: The photographer has shot Kate Moss, Victoria Beckham and Penélope Cruz for publications including Vogue Japan and Dazed. “He is a very, very creative person,” Kikuma continues. In just twenty minutes, the youthful businessman – who played drums for a rock band before founding e-commerce giant Start Today and its offshoot Zozotown – has adopted a series of playful poses, then switches to a more Zen-like posture with some rare 17th-century Japanese ceramics he brought from home. “It was so much fun to work with him,” concludes Kikuma. “Maybe more than with a normal model!” Maezawa has been getting a lot of practice posing for the camera. The Basquiat auction, which took place in New York in May, captured the world’s attention. Within days, the collector was interviewed and photographed for newspapers around the globe, including The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal in the US, Germany’s Die Welt and the Chinese edition of the Financial Times. According to the Journal, Maezawa’s purchases have “almost single-handedly shifted prices skyward for Basquiat.”

(Clockwise from top left) Images from Maezawa’s Instagram feed: with a Donald Judd stack sculpture; a Corten steel sculpture in his home; announcing the Basquiat purchase at Sotheby’s; Japanese ceramics; The Wall Street Journal profile.

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Works by On Kawara and Donald Judd from Maezawa’s collection, exhibited in 2014 under the auspices of the Contemporary Art Foundation.

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Before the May auction, it was widely expected that the 1982 Basquiat would edge out the artist’s previous record of $57.3 million, which Maezawa had also set, in 2016. But even the most jaded auction aficionados found themselves holding their breaths in the Sotheby’s saleroom that May evening. Auctioneer Oliver Barker started the bidding at $57 million, and the price swiftly rose to $68 million, offered by a telephone bidder. That bidder, it turned out, was Maezawa, who was watching the simulcast of the auction from his Tokyo home in a time zone twelve hours ahead, calmly phoning in his bids as his staff watched with mounting nervousness. Barker was poised theatrically, announcing “fair warning now,” and about to bring the gavel down, when a new bidder in the room raised his paddle. It is unheard-of for a bidder to enter the contest at such a dizzying altitude, and gasps could be heard in the room. This was followed by complete silence from the crowd, as the two determined bidders went back and forth for several minutes until finally, $30 million later, the phone bidder took the painting with a $98 million bid. (The final price includes the buyer’s premium.) Then the next phase in the drama began unfolding. Generally, when the $100 million bar is broken at auction, rumours abound concerning the identity of the buyer. Such was the case when Edvard Munch’s The Scream sold at Sotheby’s in 2012 for $120 million to an anonymous phone bidder, inciting weeks of speculation about the owner’s identity until The Wall Street Journal reported that it was a prominent New York collector. That was not the case with the Basquiat sale. Within a few minutes, Maezawa’s 200,000 followers on Instagram and Twitter learned that he was the painting’s new owner. Posting a photo of himself taken a few days earlier during a private viewing of the painting in New York, Maezawa wrote: “I am happy to announce that I just won this masterpiece. When I first encountered this painting, I was struck with so much excitement and gratitude for my love of art. I want to share that experience with as many people as possible.” Soon, the world learned a tremendous amount about Maezawa’s wide and deep commitment to collecting. The best place to start is on Instagram. To follow @yusaku2020 is to enter a world where art is a defining feature of everyday life. There you’ll find photos he frequently posts of new additions to his collection and how they are displayed in his home, such as a Richard Prince nurse painting in a stairwell and prized 20thcentury design classics by Jean Prouvé in the living room. He also frequently includes pictures documenting his visits to museums and galleries

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around the world, time spent with artists like Ai Weiwei and Takashi Murakami, his tours of fabled French wine cellars and even his appearance at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Met Gala. In an interview over email, I asked Maezawa for his views on social media and the way it may be changing the staid art world. “I believe information sharing and openness allow things to become more fairly evaluated,” he replied. “My announcement of the Basquiat purchase on Instagram has provided an opportunity for the world to reassess and acknowledge the outstanding talent of the artist. On the other hand, I also look for the works of completely unknown and young artists on Instagram and actually purchase their works if I feel the quality is good.” Social media provides an accessible window into Maezawa’s world, but for those who have been following his journey as a collector for many years, the picture is much richer and more complex. According to Amy Cappellazzo, chairman of


“I LIKE TO SHARE WHAT I LOVE WITH EVERYONE.”

KAORI NISHIDA

(Clockwise from top) Exhibitions organised by Maezawa’s Contemporary Art Foundation: Generation Y: 1977, featuring works by Adrian Ghenie and others (2016); Onko Chishin, featuring works by On Kawara and Donald Judd (2014); and Jean Prouvé: The Constructor (2016).

Sotheby’s Fine Art Division, “Yusaku Maezawa is an incredibly brave, innovative and passionate collector who is not bound by convention. His vision is all his own – guided by his instinct, sensibility and eye for quality. His approach to building a collection is organic and transcends typical boundaries, like geographical origin or historical period. The results are impressive and represent collecting at the highest level.” If courage and innovation are the characteristics that have guided Maezawa’s journey as a collector, it is a desire to share his art widely – and not just through social media – that truly sets him apart. In 2012 in Tokyo, he started the Contemporary Art Foundation (CAF), which organises exhibitions and gives grants to young artists and musicians. The foundation’s innovative programming dovetails with Maezawa’s collecting interests, as in a recent exhibition of Jean Prouvé furniture designs it staged at the French ambassador’s official residence in Tokyo, and a 2014 show that juxtaposed the conceptual art of On Kawara with minimalist sculpture by Donald Judd. Kawara and Judd are two artists Maezawa cites as representative of his collection, along with Basquiat, Jeff Koons and Pablo Picasso. Maezawa’s interests aren’t limited to art market favourites. “I am also fascinated by artists of my own generation and those younger than me. I believe art has no boundaries, and my passion is equally strong for many other categories. My collection includes not only contemporary art, but also design by Jean Royère and Japanese antique ceramics such as Oribe and Raku.” Does he take a varied approach to collecting art, design and antiquities? “I don’t feel any differences,” he replies. “I want to live surrounded by beautiful things.” Putting his collection on view through the CAF’s exhibitions and giving young emerging artists opportunities makes Maezawa happy: “I like to share what I love with everyone,” he says. That impulse has led him to plan a museum to showcase his holdings in Chiba City, his hometown, some 40 kilometres from downtown Tokyo. Yet beyond acknowledging that the museum is in the planning stages, Maezawa remains mum about its schedule or even who its architect will be. All that seems certain is that when the collector decides to reveal details, it will be through social media. So make sure to keep following @yusaku2020. * Anthony Calnek is editor in chief of Sotheby’s magazine.

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Cultivating China’s

NEW TERROIR The Yunnan region could become winemaking’s next Shangri-La, reports Mark Ellwood.


n a rural corner of the Himalayan foothills, deep in the north of China’s southwestern Yunnan province, Frenchman Maxence Dulou rules an unlikely fiefdom: a patchwork of vineyards bolted precariously to steep slopes dotted with small villages. So wildly does the terroir vary, Dulou confides, that he had to carve the land into more than 300 distinct portions, each individually mapped and managed. In every lot, fruit-keeping, pruning, irrigation and weeding are customised, with the work conducted by local farmers who tend to the vines by hand. In Yunnan, each acre requires 1,400 hours of labour per year, about four times more than what is bestowed on even the best Bordeaux or Burgundy. “If you wanted to do this in France, people would say, ‘You are crazy,’” Dulou says. “But in China, we have the people for it, people who understand the plants.” The product of such painstaking cultivation is Ao Yun, a new wine that Dulou hopes will shatter the perception of Chinese wine among oenophiles. A 90 per cent Cabernet Sauvignon and 10 per cent Cabernet Franc blend, Ao Yun is grown at altitudes up to 8,500 feet – hence its name, which means “roaming above the clouds” – and produced in highly limited quantities: only 24,000 bottles are available worldwide. The first vintage, 2013, was released a year ago, and 2014’s has just come to market. While clearly in command of this ambitious enterprise, Dulou didn’t create Ao Yun by himself: from the outset, luxury brand LVMH underwrote the project, which was directed by wine division head Jean-Guillaume Prats. Several years ago, Prats saw clear parallels between rural Yunnan and several of the world’s finest winemaking regions. “It’s like Bordeaux in terms of weather patterns, and like the remote villages of Spain where people have farmed for generations,” Prats noted recently, adding: “The extraordinary landscapes resemble the Uco Valley in Argentina, and the light and blue sky are like Stellenbosch in South Africa.” It was in South Africa, in fact, that Prats first met and was impressed by the Bordeaux-born Dulou, who was then working in one of the country’s vineyards. The combination of his experience in France and his ability to translate it on a new continent made Dulou perfectly suited for the task when, after surveying various potential locations across China’s Middle Kingdom, Prats took a 50-year lease on this breathtaking area in Yunnan. Making the long-term commitment of leading LVMH’s China project, Dulou once again moved continents, along with his Chilean-born wife and two young children. There were already vines under cultivation in Yunnan’s rural heartland, brought there by a French missionary in the late 19th century, but production was small-scale and largely stymied since the Cultural Revolution. Dulou was instantly

COURTESY LVMH

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LVMH’s newest prestige wine is grown in the Himalayan foothills.

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COURTESY LVMH

“AGRICULTURE HERE HASN’T CHANGED IN A HUNDRED YEARS,” SAYS WINEMAKER MAXENCE DULOU, “AND OUR AMBITION WAS TO KEEP IT THAT WAY.”


smitten by this unexpected location – and not just because older vines like these would allow production to ramp up much more rapidly than starting from scratch. “The villages here – Adong, Xidang, Sinong and Shuori – are a patchwork of walnut trees, corn fields, barley and vineyards. Agriculture here hasn’t changed in 100 years, and our ambition was to keep it that way,” he says. The chance to hand-tend the vines was unmissable, as was the opportunity to meticulously compose a wine using grapes from discrete small holdings: with the four villages sitting at different altitudes, their terroirs and levels of sun vary wildly, allowing for much nuance. Although these possibilities were intertwined with obvious logistical challenges, Dulou was not deterred – on the contrary. The first and largest obstacle lay in the remoteness of the vineyards, a gruelling day’s drive through the mountains from the Yunnan capital of Kunming. Dulou rapidly recognised that Ao Yun’s operation would need to be self-sufficient: if equipment malfunctioned, for example, he and his team needed to fix it themselves rather than wait two weeks or more until a repairman could reach them. Another difficulty resided in the frequency of power outages, which put such processes as bottling at risk if the electricity cut out during operation. After several such incidents, Dulou installed a backup generator as a safeguard and has kept many other processes electricity-free: for instance, de-stemming is done manually, thus avoiding potential mechanical hiccups. The extremes of weather and climate presented another challenge. The valleys are so steep-sided that they receive restricted hours of sunshine even in midsummer. As a result, grape-picking usually takes place in late October, around 160 days after flowering, as opposed to the typical 120-day turnaround in Bordeaux. But the climate here has unexpected upsides, too: the dry, thin air keeps pests and diseases like botrytis and mildew largely at bay, so farming can be organic and pesticide-free. Vinification at such altitudes was also groundbreaking, and Dulou tinkered with the process like a mad scientist, exploring how the low levels of oxygen impact yeast, maceration and extraction. Ultimately, Ao Yun’s custom-built cellar was sited in the highest village, Adong, at around 8,500 feet. Housed in a round, earth-walled building, it is intended to blend seamlessly with the existing local architecture. Ao Yun is not the only premium wine originating in China. Another LVMH subsidiary, Chandon, already produces a champagne-style sparkling wine in the northern region of Ningxia. Several years ago, Italian conglomerate Illva snapped up a sizable share of Changyu, the country’s oldest winemaker, and has since helped the producer upgrade both its technical facilities and its quality. As a result, Changyu’s $900 million Wine City – a kind of oenophile’s theme park in Yantai – relies on Italian-made machines for production and bottling. But will such Old World expertise applied to new and existing Chinese winemakers persuade wine lovers worldwide to sample their Cabernets and bubblies? Perhaps Ao Yun will begin to answer this question. Sotheby’s wine

expert Nicholas Jackson seems to think so. “I feel this is the first great Chinese wine. In terms of wine style, a lot of people have said it is like Bordeaux, but I don’t see that,” Jackson says. “I think it has a unique nose and palate, a freshness and saline character that balance the power, and a local herbal streak that comes from that inclusion of 10 per cent Cabernet Franc. Will it sustain? I don’t see why not, given the quality of this first vintage.” Unsurprisingly, LVMH’s Prats agrees: “Allow me to dream, and I would like it to be like Penfolds Grange,” he says, referring to the famed Australian wine. “An iconic New World wine that is perceived as something unique, with very few counterparts – a benchmark wine that carries a mystique.” That is a lofty aim, but one that Dulou might well achieve. After all, his new region of choice has long been thought of as the seat of the mythical Shangri-La. #

(Above) Ao Yun’s 2013 vintage. (Opposite) Winemaker Maxence Dulou.

New York-based Mark Ellwood writes regularly for Bloomberg, Departures and WSJ Magazine. Ao Yun 2013 and 2014 are available at Sotheby’s Wine Retail in New York ($295) and Hong Kong (HK$2,380). Enquiries: New York: +1 212 894 1990; Hong Kong: +852 2886 7888; wine@sothebys.com.

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Photographer-provocateur Steven Klein and the co-founders of Visionaire spoke with Stephanie Sporn about their forthcoming collaboration, dark humour and killer heels.

RISQUĂ&#x2030; B


USINESS


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ommit to something,” reads the tagline on the photograph of a woman wearing diamond earrings and little else, breastfeeding twins over a plate of steak tartare. If Equinox was looking to turn heads with its recent ad campaign, the elite fitness brand has succeeded. This startling image was created by Steven Klein, the photographer whose own “something” is an artistic vision that is seductive, transgressive and gender-bending. Saturated colour, highcontrast tonality and pointed storytelling are typical of Klein, whose background in film informs his fashion editorials and luxury-brand campaigns with cinematic magnetism and suspense. Klein says his models and celebrity subjects “are fearless when they can understand the difference between making pretty pictures versus interesting photographs.” “Ugliness and beauty are in the eye of the beholder,” adds Klein, keenly aware that his daring work has caused shock waves over the years. When he photographs A-list stars such as Brad Pitt, Naomi Campbell or Lady Gaga, he often portrays them in scenarios that are erotic, foreboding and sometimes violent. In a 2003 sound and video installation, for instance, the photographer cast Madonna as a performance artist living out her most abject fears: in one scene, the pop star, surrounded by coyotes ready to pounce, is in a backbend and tied to a pole. Bondage, extreme poses, constricting clothing and dangerously vertical footwear are preferred Klein tropes. In his photograph Killer Heels, Klein shows female feet clad in devil-red stilettos after they have irrevocably scratched a car hood. The work, a 34-by-60-inch still from his video for the 2014 Brooklyn Museum exhibition of the same name, will be offered directly from Klein’s studio in Sotheby’s Photographs sale on 5 October. As one of the most in-demand imagemakers working today, Klein is a favourite contributor to major fashion glossies such as Vogue and W. Yet one of his longest-running and closest collaborations has been with Visionaire, the influential, high-concept art and style publication that has come to define a certain brand of downtown New York cool. At its launch in 1991, Visionaire was the brainchild of the ultra-hip trio of Cecilia Dean, a student and model, and James Kaliardos and Stephen Gan, classmates at the Parsons School of Design (Gan left Visionaire in 2014). Their creation challenged the traditional magazine format: rather than as issues, Visionaire would be released in editions built around a theme and created in collaboration with artists,

(Previous pages) Steven Klein’s Killer Heels, 2014 (estimate $18,000–22,000), will be offered at Sotheby’s New York on 5 October.

(This page, from top) Klein’s portrait of Alexander McQueen in Visionaire 58 SPIRIT, a tribute to the late designer, and a Klein image from Visionaire 31 BLUE. (Opposite) Visionaire 67 FETISH, which includes a set of eleven-by-fourteen-inch photos by Klein, to be released this autumn.

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ALL IMAGES © STEVEN KLEIN STUDIO, COURTESY VISIONAIRE

“I TRY TO CREATE INTRIGUE THROUGH THE RIDICULOUS AND THE MACABRE,” SAYS KLEIN.

photographers, designers and performers – Mario Testino, Alexander McQueen and David Bowie, to name a few. The editions, numbering 66 so far, have been sculptural objects by contemporary artists, such as nesting-doll toys with designs by painter Alex Katz; more ephemeral, as in a set of 21 vials of experimental fragrances each paired with a picture by an international photographer; or in the form of provocative images that artists couldn’t easily publish elsewhere. “We were always – and still are – not afraid to publish highly controversial or explicit imagery,” says Dean, adding that Visionaire has remained advertisement-free “so photographers can express themselves without the usual commercial constraints.” Klein’s first appearance was in 1993’s Visionaire 8 THE ORIENT, which began an ongoing creative dialogue. “Steven is a visionary,” says Kaliardos. “There’s no one like him. His identity is so clear, yet he has been able to traverse many different styles and atmospheres.” Klein’s work has been featured in nearly a third of Visionaire’s editions, but the photographer has not had one devoted entirely to himself – until now. The forthcoming Visionaire 67 FETISH is all Klein, comprising ten neverbefore-seen photographs enclosed in a sleek three-piece black box produced in an edition of 200. (It will be unveiled this autumn at Sotheby’s New York.) “Visionaire 67 FETISH is the absolute, unadulterated embracing of photography and Steven’s imagination,” says Dean. “By delivering something tactile, we are paying homage to the art and

craft of real photography and printing.” Kaliardos adds that the collectible format is “a remedy to the current nature of the disposable modern fashion editorial.” Appropriately, in Klein’s Visionaire 67 FETISH series, pleasure and pain are intertwined. In one photo, leopard pumps stomp over a blindfolded man’s face. In another, a pointy crimson stiletto stabs the crotch of a decapitated Ken doll. This edition also includes a version of Killer Heels, the work that Klein is offering at Sotheby’s. “I love the juxtaposition,” says Dean, noting how both stilettos and cars are clichéd symbols of female and male desirability. “It could seem like the woman has been forced to do something against her will, but my interpretation is that she is alone and seeking sweet revenge by ruining a man’s prized possession: his car.” Klein specialises in cultivating that kind of ambiguity. “I try to create intrigue through the ridiculous and the macabre,” he says. “For me, it is a balance of dark humour and a study of sculptural objects. The heels have strong personalities – some of them are killers.” # Stephanie Sporn is a staff writer at sothebys.com and has written about art and culture for The Hollywood Reporter, DuJour, Refinery29 and others. Photographs will be on view in New York 30 September–4 October. Auction: 5 October. Enquiries: +1 212 894 1149. For more information about Visionaire 67 FETISH or previous editions, please contact sales@visionaireworld.com. Issue 67 can be purchased on visionaireworld.com.

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CALENDAR

OCTOBER 2017

Upcoming auctions and exhibitions in North America, Europe and Asia. All Sotheby’s exhibitions are free and open to the public.

OCTOBER

2 IMPORTANT WATCHES Exhibition 28 Sept–1 Oct Auction 2 Oct, Hong Kong

FINE CHINESE PAINTINGS Exhibition 28 Sept–1 Oct Auction 2 Oct, Hong Kong

(Above)

Formerly From the Collection of Mrs. Severance Millikin, Cleveland, Ohio Emerald, ruby and diamond brooch, Van Cleef & Arpels, Paris, circa 1957 $10,000–15,000 Fine Jewels

17 October, New York (Below) An exceptional and rare inlaid gilt-bronze figure of Manjushri, Nepal, 14th century HK$15,000,000– 25,000,000 The Heart of Tantra – Buddhist Art

3 October, Hong Kong

CONTEMPORARY INK ART: CONFLUENCE Exhibition 28 Sept–1 Oct Auction 2 Oct, Hong Kong

3 1921–2010 THE LITTLE BLACK DRESS – COLLECTION DIDIER LUDOT Exhibition 28–30 Sept & 2 Oct, Paris Auction 3 Oct, Paris The following Hong Kong auctions will be held on 3 October, with presale exhibitions from 28 Sept–2 Oct.

MAGNIFICENT JEWELS & JADEITE IMPORTANT CHINESE ART SONG – IMPORTANT CERAMICS FROM THE LE CONG TANG COLLECTION

1 S|2 Selling Exhibition

ROBERT GRAHAM: SELECTED WORKS 1978–2004 8 Sept–6 Oct, New York S|2 Selling Exhibition

ROBERT INDIANA: WORKS FROM THE COLLECTION OF HERBERT LUST 8 Sept–6 Oct, New York Selling Exhibition

AMERICAN SCULPTURE: BEYOND LIMITS 9 Sept–29 Oct, Chatsworth, Derbyshire Selling Exhibition

SOTHEBY’S DIAMONDS 28 Sept–3 Oct, Hong Kong

THE BEST OF THE BEST – THE MQJ COLLECTION OF MING FURNITURE Exhibition 29 Sept–2 Oct Hong Kong

FINEST AND RAREST WINES Auction 29–30 Sept Hong Kong

WINES FROM THE CELLAR OF FUX RESTAURANT Auction 30 Sept, Hong Kong

MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY ART EVENING Exhibition 28–30 Sept Auction 30 Sept, Hong Kong The following Hong Kong auctions will be held on 1 October, with presale exhibitions from 28–30 Sept.

WINE, PINE AND STONE RETREAT COLLECTION – TREASURES

MODERN & CONTEMPORARY SOUTHEAST ASIAN ART

THREE MASTERPIECES FROM THE COLLECTION OF AN ENGLISH LADY

FINE CLASSICAL CHINESE PAINTINGS

THE HEART OF TANTRA – BUDDHIST ART THE EDWARD T. CHOW “BAJIXIANG” BOWL

The following Hong Kong auctions will be held on 1 October, with presale exhibitions from 28 Sept–1 Oct.

MODERN ASIAN ART CONTEMPORARY ART MORITA SHIRYU: BOKUJIN

A Colombian emerald and diamond parure, Van Cleef & Arpels (necklace shown) HK$16,000,000– 24,000,000 Magnificent Jewels & Jadeite

3 October, Hong Kong

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SOTHEBY’S


(Above) ALEXANDER CALDER Untitled, 1960 £1,800,000–2,500,000 Contemporary Art Evening

5 October, London (Left) A stainless-steel automatic centreseconds diver’s wristwatch with bracelet, ref. 5513, “Metres First” submariner, circa 1967 HK$26,000– 50,000 Important Watches

2 October, Hong Kong

6 CONTEMPORARY ART DAY Exhibition 30 Sept–5 Oct Auction 6 Oct, London

BAUHAUS_DEFINING A CENTURY Exhibition 30 Sept–5 Oct Auction 6 Oct, London

AMERICAN ART Exhibition 30 Sept–5 Oct Auction 6 Oct, New York

5 CONTEMPORARY ART EVENING Exhibition 30 Sept–5 Oct Auction 5 Oct, London

IN CONTEXT – ITALIAN ART Exhibition 30 Sept–5 Oct Auction 5 Oct, London

PHOTOGRAPHS Exhibition 30 Sept–4 Oct Auction 5 Oct, New York

RM SOTHEBY’S HERSHEY Exhibition 5–6 Oct Auction 5–6 Oct, Hershey, Pennsylvania

9 10 S|2 Selling Exhibition

EL SALAHI WILLIAM TURNBULL 9 Oct–17 Nov, London

BIBLIOTHÈQUE R. & B. L. – ROMANTIC WORKS Exhibition 6–9 Oct Auction 10 Oct, Paris

12 13 IMPORTANT JEWELS & JADEITE Exhibition 28 Sept–2 Oct & 7–10 Oct Auction 12 Oct, Hong Kong

17

Online Auction

OLD MASTERS ONLINE: VENICE Exhibition 13–26 Oct, New York Auction 13–26 Oct, Online

FINE TIMEPIECES Exhibition 28 Sept–1 Oct & 7–11 Oct Auction 13 Oct, Hong Kong

Online Auction

OLD MASTER COPIES ONLINE: IMITATION AND INFLUENCE Exhibition 27–30 Oct, London Auction 17–30 Oct, Online

DESIGN: LIVING IN A MATERIAL WORLD Exhibition 13–17 Oct Auction 17 Oct, London

FINE JEWELS Exhibition 13–17 Oct Auction 17 Oct, New York

18 Selling Exhibition

ETERNAL WATER: PAINTINGS BY WUCIUS WONG 18–30 Oct, Hong Kong

FINEST & RAREST WINES Auction 18 Oct, London

An unusual doucai and famille-rose inscribed “autumn” moonflask, Qianlong mark and period HK$12,000,000– 18,000,000 Important Chinese Art

3 October, Hong Kong

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CALENDAR

OCTOBER

21 DADA, SURREALISM & BEYOND: THE DR. ARTHUR BRANDT COLLECTION

19 MODERNITY: FROM RODIN TO SOULAGES Auction 19 Oct, Paris

COLLECTIONS & CURIOSITIES Exhibition 13–17 Oct Auction 19 Oct, New York

Auction 21 Oct, Paris

23 25 ARTS OF THE ISLAMIC WORLD (Above) A portrait of a prince holding a falcon, style of Muhammad Hasan, Persia, Qajar, circa 1820 £60,000–80,000 Arts of the Islamic World

25 October, London (Below) LUCIO FONTANA La Silla Barroca, 1946 £500,000–700,000 In Context – Italian Art

5 October, London

Exhibition 20–24 Oct Auction 25 Oct, London

MODERN & CONTEMPORARY SOUTH ASIAN ART Exhibition 20–24 Oct Auction 25 Oct, London

27 COLLECTIONS: EUROPEAN DECORATIVE ARTS Exhibition 13–26 Oct Auction 27 Oct, New York

30 BOOKS & MANUSCRIPTS Auction 30 Oct, Paris

20TH CENTURY ART/ MIDDLE EAST Exhibition 20–23 October Auction 23 Oct, London

PRINTS & MULTIPLES Exhibition 20–23 Oct Auction 23–24 Oct, New York

DIEGO GIACOMETTI Guéridon arbre au hibou, circa 1980 €150,000–200,000 Design

31 October, Paris

26 FINE AUTOGRAPH LETTERS AND MANUSCRIPTS FROM A DISTINGUISHED PRIVATE COLLECTION, PART I: MUSIC Exhibition 21–25 Oct Auction 26 Oct, London

THE MAGNIFICENT BOTANICAL LIBRARY OF D. F. ALLEN Exhibition 21–25 Oct Auction 26 Oct, New York

31 COLLECTIONS Exhibition 28–30 Oct Auction 31 Oct–1 Nov London

DESIGN Auction 31 Oct, Paris

Sotheby’s New York 1334 York Avenue Hours: Mon–Sat 10 am–5 pm Sun 1 pm–5 pm +1 212 606 7000 Sotheby’s London 34–35 New Bond Street Hours: Mon–Fri 9 am–4:30 pm Weekends noon–5 pm +44 (0)20 7293 5000 Sotheby’s Paris 76 rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré Hours: Mon–Sat 10 am–6 pm +33 1 53 05 53 05 Sotheby’s Hong Kong 5/F One Pacific Place 88 Queensway, Hong Kong Hours: Mon–Fri 10 am–6 pm Sun 11 am–5 pm +852 2524 8121 Sotheby’s Hong Kong auctions and exhibitions are held at the Hong Kong Convention & Exhibition Centre 1 Expo Drive Wanchai, Hong Kong Hours: Daily 10 am–6:30 pm +852 2524 8121 Visit sothebys.com/onview for the latest exhibition information.

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GLOBAL SALE HIGHLIGHTS

JEAN DUBUFFET Cortège, 1961 £2,700,000–3,500,000 Contemporary Art Evening

5 October, London

SOTHEBY’S

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GLOBAL SALE HIGHLIGHTS

O

ne of the highlights from this sale, which encompasses works produced under Islamic

patronage, is this oil painting from an important private collection, depicting a prince with a falcon, the embodiment of the courtly elegance of Qajar Persia. A magnificent coat embroidered with thousands of Basra seed pearls speaks to the luxury of the Maharajas’ courts in late 19th-century India, while the splendour of Ottoman textile production is represented by an outstanding 16thcentury çatma panel.

(Left) A magnificent royal coat embroidered with Basra seed pearls, India, 19th century £150,000–250,000 (Far left) A portrait of a prince holding a falcon, style of Muhammad Hasan, Persia, Qajar, circa 1820 £60,000–80,000 Arts of the Islamic World

25 October, London

66

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A

sensational new sale will take place at Sotheby’s Paris during the week of the FIAC fair.

Modernity: From Rodin to Soulages focuses on the major artists that shaped modernity, from the emergence of the avant-garde to the present day. This highly curated selection seeks to generate thought-provoking dialogues between the works of seminal artists and key movements along the aesthetic development of the 20th century.

(Above) MAN RAY Tearful Woman, 1935 €300,000–400,000 (Right) PIERRE SOULAGES Peinture 65 x 81 cm, 2 août 1975 €300,000–500,000 Modernity: From Rodin to Soulages

19 October, Paris

SOTHEBY’S

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GLOBAL SALE HIGHLIGHTS

B

eyond Limits 2017 brings the searing abstract vision of American art to the rolling

hills of Derbyshire in a one-off Americanthemed exhibition. Following the success of our British-themed show in 2015, Sotheby’s has brought together monumental sculpture from the foremost post-war American artists in one of the most iconic settings in Britain. Highlights include sculptures by Tony Smith, Louise Nevelson, Mark di Suvero, Robert Indiana and Richard Serra, along with the only complete set of early sculptures by Julian Schnabel.

JULIAN SCHNABEL Golem, 1986 Price upon request Selling Exhibition American Sculpture: Beyond Limits

15 September–12 November Chatsworth, Derbyshire

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W

ith its deeply romantic

the water, perfectly lent themselves to

lagoon and rich cultural

the genre of vedutism: in the 18th and

history, Venice has

19th centuries, views of La Serenissima

enchanted visitors for centuries. The

were commissioned and acquired by

historic prosperity of the Venetian

Grand Tourists, who wished to possess

Republic gave rise to wealthy patrons

reminders of the city’s beauty. Sotheby’s

keen to celebrate its splendour, and the

is thrilled to present its first online auction

city became a magnificent artistic centre.

of Old Masters, which will be accompanied

Its unique topography and superb

by an exhibition of the paintings in New

architecture, perched miraculously above

York from 13–26 October.

FRANCESCO ZANIN Venice, The Scuola Grande di San Marco and the Campo Santi Giovanni e Paolo $15,000–20,000 Old Masters Online: Venice

13–26 October, Online

SOTHEBY’S

69


GLOBAL SALE HIGHLIGHTS

T

his season we celebrate the art

addition to our regular offerings of

of collecting by honouring the

English and Continental silver. Ceramics

curiosity cabinet. Showcasing

highlights include a pair of Sèvres vases

the allure of acquiring rare and unique

with covers, French biscuit figures and

objects, the catalogue features a number

Mintons and Sèvres pâte-sur-pâte

of Kunstkammer-inspired vignettes. Silver

vases, among other English and

and vertu standouts include animal and

Continental wares. Starting estimates

marine figures by Buccellati, Chinese and

range from $2,000 to $60,000, with

Japanese export vases, Viennese enamel,

many lots offered without reserve.

hardstone and rock-crystal objects, in

A selection of works from the sale, including silver figures by Buccellati, a Meissen nodding pagoda and a Flight, Barr & Barr “Japan” pattern crested part dinner service Estimates range from $2,000–9,000 Collections & Curiosities

19 October, New York

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SOTHEBY’S


PHOTOGRAPHS BY DARIN SCHNABEL © 2017 COURTESY RM SOTHEBY’S

(Above) 1935 Duesenberg Model J Cabriolet by d’Ieteren, Engine no. J-519 $1,500,000–2,000,000 (Below) The Thomas F. Derro Collection, including the 1935 Duesenberg Offered entirely without reserve RM Sotheby’s Hershey

5–6 October Hershey, Pennsylvania

SOTHEBY’S

71


GLOBAL SALE HIGHLIGHTS

T

he inaugural sale of Himalayan and Chinese Buddhist works of art commences with a section

of 21 early Tibetan bronze sculptures from the renowned Nyingjei Lam collection, formerly on loan to the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, and the Rubin Museum of Art, New York. These works are now being sold for the benefit of charities in India. Other highlights include a monumental early standing bronze figure of Maitreya from an American private collection and a 14th-century Nepalese gilt-bronze figure of Manjushri, originally given by the King of Nepal to the Canadian diplomat Chester Ronning. Ϸ⻸㬴ჹ℁ᄴౕ仆⍜仃䓓ૉ⦗៶䯲͚ࣷస҈ ᪆㬊㶀⣺৮ᄵൡ喑⪣͚࠲᠙ᙵ઱៺䈐䘕ܳ喑 ᪙ॵ㤖㫖䖀᝭㫼㺬㫼ᬖ᱌䞲䕍‫׼‬ι࡮̭ᄷ喑 ౴ᰫՌᆂ➈≒䭬ϭ㣘᳄ࢇ➖乕ࣷ㈽㈱傜䈀㬊 㶀ࢇ➖乕喑‫ڣ‬ᩣ⯷ᄴᘍⓑ࢝Ꮣ҈᪆౅倁喑҉ ᙵ઱⩕䕁ȡᄵ៺⣺৮䖱ᰶ㒻స⻮ϧᩣ㫼䢼䛾 䞲ᑹ߿҈⿸‫׼‬喑Вࣷᅩ⇷❫స⢸䈵εߍᠬ๔ ใϑჅChester Ronning͸࡮ఈ̓㈭䢼䛾䞲 ᪴₷౽‫׼‬ȡ

An important monumental giltbronze standing figure of Maitreya, Yuan dynasty ٰ 䢼䛾䞲 ᑹ ߿ ҈⿸‫׼‬

HK$20,000,000– 30,000,000 The Heart of Tantra – Buddhist Art Including Property from the Nyingjei Lam Collection

3 October, Hong Kong ჳᚔ⻗ ᓰ 㤖㫖䖀 ⣺㫼 ࣷ ‫ڣ‬Ѓ҈ ᪆㬊 㶀㇫৮ 仆⍜ 10ᰵ3 ᬒ

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SOTHEBY’S


T

his sale consists of three

⁐ॵ㠞՘ຠट䯲㧱̶க喑ᖶ◧ᬻ⌲⣺৮喑

outstanding masterpieces of

1960–1980ᎡА‫ڒ‬㫼喑ҳ⎽ᰶ㋿ȡ仃ᣕᬻა

Chinese art from the Ming and

ᓤแ咺㑽喑䱿㟞ᤛ℘ໆ⪘แ咺᜽䰆喑㿍ა⿝

Qing dynasties, acquired from the

ҠҸ喑ᬖ᫩1968ᎡᰫౕᲞ᫦䮣⨤Ⴅᰰᆂ㻪䮠

1960s to the 1980s, all with extensive

݄ӈ䈋ȡओใιக‫◧ݴ‬䯺ₐᢽ㊟⥧⦜䰟咺㈸

provenance: an exceptional Xuande-

๖⤰⨣ࣷΫ䮳㉘ᾭ䰟咺⺒删㈸マ喑౴◧ጒ㇫

marked porcelain jar painted in rich tones

㬊㊂͸৮ȡ

of cobalt blue with a pair of “makaras,” which was included in the 1968 Oriental An exceptional blue and white “makara” jar, Xuande mark and period

Ceramics Society exhibition; a magnificent

ᬻაᓤ 䱿㟞แ咺㑽 Ȩ๔ᬻაᓤ Ꭱ㸪ȩ 

three-clawed dragon; and a superb

HK$30,000,000– 40,000,000

Yongzheng-period Imperial cloisonné enamel tianqiuping decorated with a Qianlong-period zitan box carved with dragons and a phoenix.

Three Masterpieces from the Collection of an English Lady

3 October, Hong Kong 咺ᖖⓑ ᫪ 㠞՘ ຠट䛺 㺮ᩣ㫼 仆⍜ 10 ᰵ 3 ᬒ

SOTHEBY’S

73


Explore our selection of extraordinary homes currently for sale around the world.

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ELSIE BAY ANGUILLA

Oceanfront and Sustainable Villa Four bedroom, four bath, private pool, views of St. Maarten, secluded beach. Love Shack Villa restored to its West Indies authenticity complimented by modern technology. Ideal sanctuary, comfort, charm. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID FVM85K ANGUILLA PROPERTIES SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY SCOTT L. HAUSER +1 264 498 0123 ANGUILLA.PROPERTIES@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$4,100,000 US

HARBOUR ISLAND BAHAMAS

La Bagatelle Private, just under one acre estate with a private 2,000 sq. ft. cottage, offers 268 ft. of historic Dunmore Street South frontage. One bedroom, one and one half bath cottage. Incredible potential for estate home. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID 5TNC84 DAMIANOS SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY JAMES MALCOLM +1 242 376 9858 JAMES.MALCOLM@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$2,095,000 US

ST. BARTH CARIBBEAN

St. Barth’s Most Spectacular Estate Nine bedrooms including a caretaker residence. Panoramic views including, the islands of Saba and Statia and year round sunsets. Private five bedroom main residence, two bedroom guest house, and two pools. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID 9KSEEX ST. BARTH PROPERTIES SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY TOM SMYTH +1 508 570 4481, +590 590 29 90 10 TOM.SMYTH@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

€46,000,000

PROVIDENCIALES TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS

Grace Bay Beachfront Saving Grace’s beautiful and enduring Colonial design match its breathtaking views of seven miles of white sand, glittering turquoise sea and surf-topped coral reef beyond. Four bedrooms. 5,159 sq. ft. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID KVDPVM TURKS & CAICOS SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY NINA SIEGENTHALER +1 649 231 0707 NINA.SIEGENTHALER@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$7,950,000 US

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SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY PROPERTY SHOWCASE

SAINT PAUL DE VENCE, FRENCH RIVIERA FRANCE

Le Jardin des Arts – A Brand New Development Brand-new luxury real estate complex at the heart of 23,000 sq. m. of landscaped Mediterranean gardens, offering views across the sea, the village of Saint-Paul and the surrounding countryside. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID XH6XNT CÔTE D’AZUR SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY LAURENCE CHALEIL +33 4 92 92 12 88 LAURENCE.CHALEIL@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

PRICE UPON REQUEST

OAKVILLE, ONTARIO CANADA

Most Modern Neoclassic Estate The magnificent Neoclassic estate, in one acre of land. This is truly a majestic and glorious modern manor, which achieves the summit of the art and redefines expectations of luxury suburban living. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID 465N5Y SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY CANADA KINGSLEY QIN +1 905 845 0024 KQIN@SOTHEBYSREALTY.CA

$17,900,000 CAD

PARADISE VALLEY ARIZONA

Truly One-of-a-Kind Great Garage Estate One acre estate, in gated Clearview Edition community at the heart of Paradise Valley. Elevated lot with Camelback Mountain views. Patio areas, fountain, rose gardens. Car lover’s dream with seven car garage. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID QMD9XR RUSS LYON SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY FRANK AAZAMI, THOMAS O’LEARY +1 480 266 0240 FRANK.AAZAMI@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$2,750,000

SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA

Chateau de Vigne Chateau de Vigne comprises 50 acres of land, of which over 32 acres are prime Chardonnay and Pinot Noir vineyard with an estate building site. A perfect vineyard estate for elegant wine country living. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 1190573 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY WINE COUNTRY BROKERAGE CONSTANCE SHARPE +1 707 484 3094 CONSTANCE.SHARPE@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$3,950,000

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GATEWAY COLORADO

West Creek Ranch Presenting one of the most significant listings in the American West, West Creek Ranch, is a spectacularly diverse private land and estate property boasting one of the finest residences and land parcels in the world. The expansive property encompasses unique land formations including the soaring precambrian rock cliff walls of Unaweep Canyon, and majestic high-plateau country with magnificent views of the La Sal Mountains of Utah. On-ranch treasures include a bear and mountain lion habitat, real dinosaur footprints, and the historic ruins of Driggs Mansion. The main residence features 22,000 sq. ft. of indoor living space with exquisite finishes and craftsmanship throughout. Also included in the sale, are irrigated equestrian and bison pastures, fishing ponds, a grass airstrip and hangar, helipad, stables, astronomical observatory, and trout stream. West Creek Ranch is an iconic and majestic treasure to be explored and discovered for generations to come. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID E5WQ3B LIV SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY KERRY ENDSLEY +1 303 570 0267 KERRY.ENDSLEY@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$149,000,000

BOULDER COLORADO

Tranquil Estate and Equestrian Property Breathtaking combination of elegance and sophistication, a tranquil estate and equestrian property with stunning views and amenities of a five-star resort just over seven miles from Boulder. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID F9FCQH LIV SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY JEFF ERICKSON, CARLISS ERICKSON +1 303 589 2741 JEFF.ERICKSON@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$5,995,000

BRECKENRIDGE COLORADO

Mountain Masterpiece with Sweeping Views Experience panoramic views of the Rocky Mountains and golf course with five bedrooms and six bathrooms, over 5,449 sq. ft. Fully furnished with timeless finishes, just 15 minutes to Breckenridge. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID 26NXD2 LIV SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY JACK WOLFE +1 970 368 0018 JACK.WOLFE@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$3,000,000

SOTHEBY’S

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SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY PROPERTY SHOWCASE

HAMILTON MONTANA

Ultimate Western Farmhouse 25,000 sq. ft. estate on 17 acres. Multiple private guest quarters, four-stall horse barn, grotto style pool, underground shooting range. Part of exclusive Stock Farm Club with Tom Fazio designed golf course. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID 4Z8T5T GLACIER SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY DAWN MADDUX +1 406 550 4131 DAWN.MADDUX@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$27,500,000

CHICAGO ILLINOIS

Unprecedented Urban Estate 25,000 sq. ft. masterpiece on Chicago’s finest street. On more than eight city lots. Manicured grounds, multiple fountains, reflecting pool, antique garden pavilion transport you to another world in the heart of the city. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID CF7PGF JAMESON SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY TIM SALM, MATT LEUTHEUSER +1 312 929 1564, +1 312 929 1562 TIM.SALM@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$50,000,000

CHICAGO ILLINOIS

310 South Michigan, Unit 2600 Extraordinary brand new condo boasts breathtaking, panoramic lake and city views, incredible 72 ft. wall of windows, dramatic 13 ft. ceilings. Over 4,300 sq. ft. of perfection, designed with the finest materials. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID 8FDKRG JAMESON SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY NANCY TASSONE +1 312 215 9701 NANCY.TASSONE@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$4,450,000

NEWPORT RHODE ISLAND

The Bird House High above Ocean Drive, with beautiful coastline views, a stunning state-of-the-art shingle style masterpiece blends exquisite classic detail with the finest systems, including geothermal heat and cooling systems. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM GUSTAVE WHITE SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY +1 401 849 3000

$12,500,000

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NEWPORT RHODE ISLAND

Harbor Watch Water views from custom shingle-style directly across from Newport Harbor. Four en suite bedrooms including master with balcony. Beautifully landscaped and private with three bedroom guest cottage. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID FMTSD3 GUSTAVE WHITE SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY +1 401 849 3000

$6,950,000

NARRAGANSETT RHODE ISLAND

404 Ocean Road “Shore Acres” is an oceanfront retreat nestled on nearly two acres on the shores of Narragansett. Over 5,200 sq. ft. interior provides plenty of room for guests with two floors of living space. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID 5WPVYY MOTT & CHACE SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY BENJAMIN SCUNGIO +1 401 789 8899 BENJAMIN.SCUNGIO@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$4,295,000

DOUGLAS MASSACHUSETTS

229 Main Street The Schuster Mansion circa 1939 is a brilliant example of early 20th century architecture set on a gentle sloping hill overlooking 45 acres in the Blackstone River Valley. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM MOTT & CHACE SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY AMY DOORLEY +1 401 314 3000 AMY.DOORLEY@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$2,750,000

BOSTON MASSACHUSETTS

Four Seasons Residence Spacious two bedroom, two bath unit at the Four Seasons Residences. Expansive entertaining area and an oversized master bedroom with custom walk-in closet and spa bath. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID QW62YX GIBSON SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY MICHAEL L. CARUCCI +1 617 901 7600 MICHAEL.CARUCCI@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$3,495,000

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SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY PROPERTY SHOWCASE

BOSTON MASSACHUSETTS

Historic Masterpiece Award-winning single family residence in Boston’s prestigious Beacon Hill. Breathtaking views of Boston and the Charles River. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID KDYVT3 GIBSON SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY MICHAEL L. CARUCCI +1 617 901 7600 MICHAEL.CARUCCI@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$3,750,000

GREENWICH CONNECTICUT

French Road Shingle style home secluded on two and one half acres with pool, Har-Tru tennis court, 1,694 sq. ft. tennis/guest house plus second, smaller 781 sq. ft. cottage. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 0068571 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY GREENWICH BROKERAGE JOSEPH BARBIERI +1 203 618 3112 JOSEPH.BARBIERI@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$9,250,000

MIDDLETOWN NEW JERSEY

Oak Hill Colonial Spectacular home located on a desirable cul-de-sac with over 4,900 sq. ft. of living with open floor plan. Newly finished basement offers an additional 1,500 sq. ft. Private backyard with inground pool. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID CQM85E HERITAGE HOUSE SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY +1 800 715 1390 HHSIR.LISTINGS@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$1,240,000

SOUTHAMPTON NEW YORK

Southampton Village, South of Highway Convenient location to the world’s most beautiful beaches, historic Village shops and chic restaurants. Farrington Close is the most desired and private condo compound in the Hamptons. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 0057395 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY SOUTHAMPTON BROKERAGE ANN MARIE DEANE +1 516 885 7433 ANNMARIE.DEANE@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$1,749,000

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NEW YORK NEW YORK

340 East 72nd Street, Apartment 6S This grandly scaled, classic 9-room residence boasts sunny tree-lined views in a boutique white-glove pre-war cooperative. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 0139426 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY DOWNTOWN MANHATTAN BROKERAGE JEREMY V. STEIN +1 212 431 2427 JEREMY.STEIN@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$4,995,000

NEW YORK NEW YORK

Edwardian Mansion Impeccably restored 1915 late Victorian-early Edwardian Mansion on just under a quarter of an acre with development rights, a private driveway, and parking for several cars. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 0139572 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY DOWNTOWN MANHATTAN BROKERAGE MICHAEL BOLLA +1 917 957 6630 MICHAEL.BOLLA@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$3,995,000

NEW YORK NEW YORK

898 Park Avenue, Floor 3 This triple mint apartment features a 38 ft. by 19 ft. wide living room with a ceiling height of 10 ft., two bedrooms, library and fireplace. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 00111549 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE EVA J. MOHR +1 212 606 7736 EVA.MOHR@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$4,750,000

NEW YORK NEW YORK

The Woolworth Tower Residences The Woolworth Tower Residences offers a club-like intimacy while surrounded by restaurants, hotels and shopping. This three bedroom offers over 14 ft. ceilings, and 3,282 sq. ft. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 00111259 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE STAN PONTE, JOSHUA JUDGE +1 212 418 1222 STAN.PONTE@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

PRICE UPON REQUEST

SOTHEBY’S

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SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY PROPERTY SHOWCASE

NEW YORK NEW YORK

16 East 69th Street This 33 ft. wide, five story red brick and limestone mansion that stands as a superb example of Neo-Georgian revival architecture in America. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 00111621 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE SERENA BOARDMAN +1 212 606 7611 SERENA.BOARDMAN@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$45,000,000

NEW YORK NEW YORK

The Carlton Mansion 19 East 61st Street. Exquisite blend of a private 35 ft. wide, five story limestone mansion with luxury amenities and services including pool and gym. Grand living and unsurpassed luxury. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 00111247 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE NIKKI FIELD +1 212 606 7669 NIKKI.FIELD@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$40,000,000

NEW YORK NEW YORK

15 East 90th Street Over 25 ft. wide, 10,000 plus sq. ft. on beautiful Upper East Side block just off Fifth Avenue next to Carnegie Mansion. Five bedrooms, five full bathrooms, three half bathrooms. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 00111646 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE RANDALL GIANOPULOS, STAN PONTE +1 212 606 7622, +1 212 606 4109

$23,500,000

NEW YORK NEW YORK

31 West 21st Street, Floor 9 This 4,776 sq. ft. loft is one of the most unique loft spaces available in the Flatiron District. Distinguished by a stunning great room with soaring 11 ft. ceilings and a wall of windows. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 00111510 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE SERENA BOARDMAN, JONATHAN L. BANKS, KERRY SCHMIDT +1 212 606 7611, +1 212 606 7781, +1 212 606 7795

$9,000,000

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SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

NEW YORK NEW YORK

845 United Nations Plaza, Apartment 52B Three bedrooms and three and one half bathrooms. Enjoy panoramic scenery from the floor to ceiling windows with views of the Empire State Building, the Chrysler building, East River and the South City Skyline. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 00111616 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE ELIZABETH L. SAMPLE, BRENDA S. POWERS +1 212 606 7685, +1 212 606 7653 ELIZABETH.SAMPLE@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$6,750,000

NEW YORK NEW YORK

20 West 53rd Street, Apartment 22A Luxury living in this sprawling two bedroom, two and one half bath apartment on the 22nd floor at the Baccarat Hotel and Residences with magnificent skyline views from expansive floor to ceiling windows. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 00111284 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE KEVIN B. BROWN +1 212 606 7748 KEVIN.BROWN@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$5,995,000

NEW YORK NEW YORK

1170 Fifth Ave, Apartment 10B Stunning Central Park views and beautiful light flood this rarely available four bedroom, high floor, corner pre-war Classic 9. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 00111312 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE CATHY TAUB +1 212 606 7772 CATHY.TAUB@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$5,195,000

NEW YORK NEW YORK

213 East 71st Street Penthouse Fully renovated five bedroom apartment in pre-war 20 ft. wide townhouse. Spacious and sun-filled home comprises top three floors and has a gracious layout with three fireplaces and two planted terraces. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 00111565 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE JULIE B. HASCOE +1 212 606 7695 JULIE.HOSCOE@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$4,995,000

SOTHEBY’S

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ANATOMY OF AN ARTWORK

THE OLDEST PRESIDENTIAL PORTRAIT When he posed for this portrait, John Quincy Adams

studio of Philip Haas. This recently rediscovered plate is

(1767–1848) had completed his term as the sixth American

believed to be the earliest photograph of an American

president (1825–29), but he was still serving his country

president to come to market in many years and is possibly the

as a congressman from Massachusetts. An indefatigable

earliest extant photograph of the man himself. An invaluable

diarist, Adams documented the sitting in entries for 8 and

document, this daguerreotype crystallizes a remarkable

16 March 1843, when he twice visited the Washington, DC,

moment in the history of photography and American politics.

PHILIP HAAS John Quincy Adams, 1843 $150,000–250,000 Photographs, New York Exhibition: 30 September–4 October Auction: 5 October Enquiries: +1 212 894 1149

1 2

3

4 5

1. INNOVATION Philip Haas may have learned the process of printing images on chemically treated metal in 1839, the year it was invented in Paris. As the first widely available photographic process, daguerreotypes were immensely popular.

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2. POWER Not only was Adams the sixth US president and son of the second president, but he was also a Massachusetts senator, congressman and diplomat. Adams knew about governing, as evident in his commanding facial expression.

3. STUDIO The lamp, furniture, books and other props pictured here are believed to be the backdrop of Haas’s Washington, DC, studio. Although Haas was an accomplished daguerreotypist and lithographer, few of his portraits are known today.

4. IN WRITING Adams writes in his diary about visiting “Mr Haas’s shop” twice and describes the wondrousness of the technique: “The operation is performed in half a minute; but is yet altogether incomprehensible to me.”

5. PROVENANCE This daguerreotype comes directly from the descendants of Horace Everett (1779–1851), a colleague of Adams who was a congressman for Vermont from 1829–43. He is believed to have received this work as an inscribed gift from Adams.


DOU BL E TOU R BI L L ON 3 0 ° T E C HNIQU E Sapphire Case Unique edition of 8 pieces

BE L LUSSO L AS V E GAS

C E L LINI NEW YORK

DE B OU L LE DAL L AS

Casino Level . Palazzo Resort-Hotel-Casino Phone +1 702 650-2988 www.bellussojewelers.com

509 Madison Avenue at 53rd Street Phone +1 212 888-0505 www.cellinijewelers.com

6821 Preston Road Phone +1 214 522-2400 www.deboulle.com

FOR INFORMATION ∙ TIME ART DISTRIBUTION LLC Phone +1 212 221-8041 ∙ info@timeartdistribution.com

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Art & Home 2017 Issue 6  

Sotheby’s has been uniting collectors with world-class works of art since 1744, and 273 years later it has grown into one of the world’s lea...

Art & Home 2017 Issue 6  

Sotheby’s has been uniting collectors with world-class works of art since 1744, and 273 years later it has grown into one of the world’s lea...

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