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ISSUE 280 Mar. 4–17, 2020

A L W A Y S

F R E E

PLUS!

‘A Long and Terrifying Trip’

Targets of Modi’s government, two friends fled

India for Iowa,

risking their lives along the way.

Sean Phelan, Grammy winner

Be Quiet for a Better World LV RECOMMENDS:

La Bendición Pupuseria & Restaurante ART OPENING:

For Women/ By Women


$10 STUDENT TICKETS

CLUB

Dreamers’ Circus Sunday, March 8, 5:30 pm & 8:00 pm Nikolaj Busk (piano and accordion), Ale Carr (Nordic cittern), and Rune Tonsgaard Sørensen (violin) view their Nordic folk roots as a point of departure rather than a fixed destination. The trio blends this adventurous attitude with outstanding musicianship to recast tradition into something startlingly original. Rune Tonsgaard Sørensen is also the first violinist for the Danish String Quartet, performing at Hancher on May 4. TICKETS:

EVENT SPONSORS:

ADULT: $25 (5:30 PM) | $15 (8:00 PM)

Dale and Linda Baker

COLLEGE STUDENT: $10 (5:30 PM) | $10 (8:00 PM) YOUTH: $10 (5:30 PM) | $10 (8:00 PM)

$10 STUDENT TICKETS

CLUB

Melissa Aldana Quartet Wednesday, March 25, 6:30 pm & 9:00 pm Chilean saxophonist Melissa Aldana first picked up the alto, but an encounter with the music of Sonny Rollins led to a switch to tenor. When she was 24, she became the first female—and first South American musician—to win the Thelonious Monk International Jazz Saxophone Competition. The Chicago Tribune says, “Aldana stands as an irrepressibly creative phrase-maker, sidestepping cliché at almost every turn.” She’ll bring that irrepressible energy to the intimate space of Club Hancher. TICKETS:

EVENT SPONSORS:

ADULT: $25 (6:30 PM) | $15 (9:00 PM)

Jerry and Judy Musser

COLLEGE STUDENT: $10 (6:30 PM) | $10 (9:00 PM) YOUTH: $10 (6:30 PM) | $10 (9:00 PM)

Discover more at hancher.uiowa.edu Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Hancher in advance at (319) 335-1158.


Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater

$10

STUDENT TICKETS

Robert Battle, Artistic Director Matthew Rushing, Associate Artistic Director

Tuesday, March 10, 7:30 pm The extraordinary dancers of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater make their first appearance on the new Hancher stage with a program that will be undeniably revelatory. Artistic Director Robert Battle has remained true to the vision of his predecessors—Ailey himself and Judith Jamison—while also expanding the company’s work with a wide array of choreographers. The performance will close with Revelations, Ailey’s masterwork that is as powerful today as it was when it debuted in 1960. PROGRAM:

EVENT PARTNERS:

BUSK Aszure Barton, choreographer Ode Jamar Roberts, choreographer Revelations Alvin Ailey, choreographer

John and Ellen Buchanan Ed and Patricia Folsom The McIntyre Foundation Robert and Kathleen Staley

TICKETS: ADULT: $75 | $65 | $55 COLLEGE STUDENT: $67 | $10 YOUTH: $37 | $10

Solomon Dumas. Photo by Andrew Eccles

Order online hancher.uiowa.edu Call (319) 335-1160 or 800-HANCHER Accessibility Services (319) 335-1158

Discover more at hancher.uiowa.edu Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Hancher in advance at (319) 335-1158.


Los Angeles Master Chorale

Lagrime di San Pietro (Tears of St. Peter)

$10

STUDENT TICKETS

Orlando di Lasso, composer Peter Sellars, stage director Saturday, March 28, 7:30 pm A Renaissance masterpiece—depicting the grief of St. Peter after his disavowal of Christ—is brought stirringly to the concert hall by one of the country’s finest vocal ensembles. Famed director Peter Sellars crafted this dramatically staged performance piece, focusing the themes through a contemporary lens and suggesting that we must all grapple with — and accept responsibility for— the mistakes made in our personal pasts. TICKETS: ADULT: $65 | $55 | $45 COLLEGE STUDENT: $58 | $10 YOUTH: $32 | $10

Order online hancher.uiowa.edu Call (319) 335-1160 or 800-HANCHER

EVENT PARTNERS: Pat Gauron Bob and Peggy Rakel

Photo: Tao Ruspoli and Marie Noorbergen

Accessibility Services (319) 335-1158

Discover more at hancher.uiowa.edu Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Hancher in advance at (319) 335-1158.


VOL. 28 ISSUE 280 Mar. 4–17, 2020 ALWAYS FREE LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM

“chaman,” Isabel Barbuzza,

PUBLISHER MATTHEW STEELE

from the

DIGITAL DIRECTOR DREW BULMAN

series

ART DIRECTOR JORDAN SELLERGREN

Postcards

MANAGING EDITOR

from

EMMA MCCLATCHEY

Colombia

ARTS EDITOR GENEVIEVE TRAINOR NEWS DIRECTOR PAUL BRENNAN

Courtesy

VISUAL REPORTER—PHOTO

of the

ZAK NEUMANN

artist

VISUAL REPORTER­—VIDEO JASON SMITH STAFF WRITER/EDITOR IZABELA ZALUSKA FOOD & DRINK DIRECTOR FRANKIE SCHNECKLOTH DISTRIBUTION BRIAN JOHANNESSEN, DAI GWILLIAM,

12

20

26

Climbing the Wall

Local Boy Makes Good

One for the Books

Two men’s perilous journey through Latin America to the U.S.-Mexico border.

From Lizzo to Migos, audio engineer Sean Phelan has mixed his way to the top.

A women-centric exhibition hints at an inclusive future for art in Iowa City.

IKRAM BASRA

GENEVIEVE TRAINOR

RACHEL WACHTER

6 - Interactions 8 - Brock About Town 12 - Shubham Singh 16 - UR Here 18 - Bread & Butter

20 - Sean Phelan 26 - A-List 27 - Staff Picks 31 - Events Calendar 45 - Ad Index

46 - Your Village 49 - Astrology 51 - Local Albums 52 - Local Books 55 - Crossword

NORBERT SARSFIELD, NICOLE ELDRIDGE MARKETING COORDINATOR, GRAPHIC DESIGNER JAV DUCKER ENGAGEMENT EDITOR CELINE ROBINS ADVERTISING ADS@LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM LISTINGS CALENDAR@LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM CONTRIBUTORS JOEL ANDERSON, IKRAM BASRA, AUDREY BROCK, BRIDGET CHRISTIAN, THOMAS DEAN, MATT FALDUTO, MELANIE HANSON, BETH HUDSON, BRYAN LAMB, GLEN LOWRY, JOHN MARTINEK, K. MICHAEL MOORE, JULIAN PRINDLE, TRY REIS, ANDREA SHRIVER, TOM TOMORROW, PAIGE UNDERWOOD, RACHEL WACHTER, SAM LOCKE WARD, KENT WILLIAMS, RACHEL WINSLOW, YANA YATSUK. SUBMISSIONS EDITOR@LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM DISTRIBUTION REQUESTS DISTRO@LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM CREATIVE SERVICES CREATIVE@LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM CONTACT (319) 855-1474, 623 S DUBUQUE ST, IOWA CITY, IA 52240

Proudly serving

THE CRANDIC since 2001

Little Village is an independent, community-supported news and culture publication based in Iowa City. Through journalism, essays and events, we work to improve our community in the Iowa City, Coralville and Cedar Rapids area according to a few core values: environmental sustainability, affordability and access, economic and labor justice, racial justice, gender equity, quality healthcare, quality education and critical culture. Letters to the editor(s) are always welcome. We reserve the right to fact check and edit for length and clarity. Please send letters, comments or corrections to editor@littlevillagemag.com. Little Village is always free; all contents are the licensed work of the contributor and of the publication. If you would like to reprint or collaborate on new content, reach us at lv@littlevillagemag.com. To browse back issues, visit us at 623 S Dubuque St, Iowa City, or online at issuu.com/littlevillage.

ISSUE 280 Mar. 4–17, 2020

A L W A Y S

F R E E

PLUS!

sean Phelan, graMMy winner

‘A Long and Terrifying Trip’

Be QuieT for a BeTTer world LV RECOMMENDS:

TargeTs of Modi’s governMenT, Two friends fled

la Bendición PuPuseria & resTauranTe ART OPENING:

india for iowa,

for woMen/ By woMen

risking Their lives along The way.

Cover by Glen Lowry

POWERED BY CAFE DEL SOL ROASTING LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV280 Mar. 4–17, 2020 5


INTERACTIONS time now for ghosts a group exhibition of artists exploring the natural world with an Afrofuturist lens, curated by Jamillah Hinson

March 6-29

Public Space One

229 N. Gilbert OPENING RECEPTION Friday, March 6, 5-8pm WORKSHOP

with artist/writer/organizer Franchesca LaMarre

Saturday, March 7, 1pm

For more details, visit:

publicspaceone.com/cas

Supported by:

LV encourages community members, including candidates for office, to submit letters to Editor@LittleVillageMag.com. To be considered for print publication, letters should be under 500 words. Preference is given to letters that have not been published elsewhere.

CORRECTION: The

profile of Royceann Porter published in issue 279 referred to her husband as “Michael Porter.” Mr. Porter’s first name is Anthony. Little Village regrets the error.

Iowa Senate approves anti-abortion constitutional amendment on a party-line vote The wars they raise, the poor they neglect, the children they abuse, the... Yes, let us talk about the most egregious violations of human rights. —Pam H.

Royceann Porter’s journey, from overcoming ‘culture shock’ in rural Iowa to making Johnson County history She is such a mover and shaker—respect! —Pam H.W. Johnson County Sheriff Lonny Pulkrabek is running for the Iowa House of Representatives 30 years in the JoCo Sheriff’s department, 16 as Sheriff, he’ll be a great addition to the legislature. —Bob L. Really excited for Lonny! He will be a great representative. —Stacy C.


HAVE AN OPINION?

F U T I L E W R A T H

S A M LO C K E WA R D

BETTER WRITE ABOUT IT! SEND LETTERS TO EDITOR@LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM

The guy who couldn’t figure out how to keep his tank from getting stuck in the landfill now wants to tackle statewide issues. —Ryan P. Justice Susan Christensen elected chief justice of the Iowa Supreme Court Unless you are a billionaire, watch your rights start disappearing. —Tim A. Dave Jacoby announces he’s running for his 10th term in the Iowa House Such a good man, had a great impact on my life and many others. —Lisa D.B. Breaking: A jury has convicted Jerry Burns of first-degree murder in the death of Michelle Martinko. DNA evidence and genetic genealogy had revived the cold case decades after Martinko was found murdered in the Westdale Mall parking lot. Rest In Peace, Michelle. Justice doesn’t have a time limit. —Jake R. Two houses represent a forgotten period of segregation in Iowa City, University of Iowa history Nice article. My father Henry Black rented to students. Starting in the 1940s, he gladly rented to blacks and whites, mixed couples, and students from the LGBT community and put them all in the same house. That’s how Iowa City got Gaslight Village on Brown Street. Wonderful place for me to grow up … Henry was an amazing father and a very progressive man. Born in 1902, saw the world completely differently than other white men from his generation and home town. I really miss him. —George B.

Look for Census info in your mailbox mid-March. By April 1, 2020, every home will receive an invitation to participate in the 2020 Census. Beginning March 12, you can respond one of three ways:

For more info about the Census and why it matters, visit

2020CENSUS.GOV


INTERACTIONS LV Recommends: Vivian’s Soul Food It’s fantastic—great music, feeling and the food!!!! —Jeri L.H. We just [ate] there Wed night! Excellent on all accounts. The collard greens are perfect, red beans and rice I could just eat a giant plate full, and chicken perfectly crispy and tender. Also had gooood mac n cheese and cornbread. —Marianne S.

Fresh off Trump praise, Grassley kicks off 40th ‘Full Grassley’ with closeddoor events in Eastern Iowa When he visits Johnson County on his “full Grassley,” it’s at 75 mph on I-80. —Margaret K. I would enjoy being allowed at one of his “let your voice be heard” tours, but he doesn’t WANT to hear my voice, apparently. —Billie M.M.

/LittleVillage

READER POLL What’s your favorite euphemism for your period?

11.1% Aunt Flo’s visiting

16.7% On the rag 22.2% Shark Week

B R O C K A B O U T T O W N

AU D R E Y B R O C K

STAGE FRIGHT Last weekend was Floodwater Comedy Festival, Iowa City’s annual celebration of all things funny and memento mori for its comedians. (“Oh my God, it’s February again. I should do one of my new routines, but I feel like I’ve barely written anything since last year. What am I doing with my life? If I don’t get my act together, I’m going to be a nursing home optometrist’s assistant forever.”) I love Floodwater because it gets the whole community involved in something that normally takes place only in seedy bar basements. It’s the perfect thing to invite your parents to. Now, my parents are very supportive about my decision to throw my life away, and normally I’m not prone to stage fright, but there’s something about looking out into the audience and seeing the faces of the people who raised me that takes me right back to report card day. This year, I think I did a pretty good job of managing that anxiety. I didn’t puke or nothin’! So, for all my shameless attention hogs out there, here are my best tips for reducing performance anxiety: Is there a little voice in the back of your head that keeps saying, “You’ll never be good enough?” #relatable! Play some soothing instrumental music—I like Ravi Shankar, but anything with wind chimes will do—and then slowly crank it up until you can no longer hear your negative internal monologue. Your ears might bleed a little, but it’s a small price to pay for peace of mind. Burn off some of that anxiety, and a few calories, by getting some exercise. Sure, you might feel kind of silly doing jumping jacks in the green room, but next to the lady who has a pre-show ritual involving healing crystals or the guy who keeps going outside “for some fresh air,” nobody’s even going to notice. Take a few shots of the alcoholic beverage of your choice. Note: This is an emergency measure and I cannot guarantee that it won’t backfire on you. Last year, I had a gin and tonic before I went onstage at a competition and I ended up crying in the middle of my set because I remembered kittens. Selfmedicate at your own risk.

50% THE CURSE

Just drive to one of those rural counties where he feels safe and call him to task for his adherence to this horrid administration. —Dan B. 86-year-old Chuck Grassley says he might run for reelection in 2022 You are the poster boy for why we need term limits! —Margie D. Heard him speak 2.14.2020 in Coralville. Painful to hear as he tried to explain drug price legislation. He, like Trump, is not good for Iowa. Yes, he needs to retire. —Mc M. Well, I tried multiple approaches in emails to get him to stand tall and be something Iowans could be proud of, not to be another drump lapdog, to protect Iowans and the citizens of this country and to vote for witnesses during the Senate trial. I received

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM


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STAY HEALTHY, STAY SAFE, STOP THE SPREAD OF VIRUSES

AND GO WASH YOUR HANDS! LOVE, LITTLE VILLAGE

10 Mar. 4–17, 2020 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV280

INTERACTIONS

responses, all hollow, all towing the partisan line verbiage. However, that was more than I ever received to the same messages sent to the “make them squeal” piece of work who needs to be a one-term wonder. —Neal P. North Liberty Community Pantry is holding a toilet paper drive Thank you so much for sharing our

story! Every roll makes a difference! —North Liberty Community Food Pantry ‘Cats’ is back out of the bag as FilmScene hosts four special screenings Why didn’t this die before its very first opening anywhere?! —Pam H. Okay. This is a MUST. Culture was born and I need to witness. —Ellie R.

S T R E S S F R A C T U R E S

JOHN

MARTINEK


Photo by Zak Neumann


COMMUNITY

An Immigration Story Jungle roads, border crossings, a detention center—Shubham and Ankit risked their lives to come to Iowa. And their struggle isn’t over. BY IKRAM BASRA

S

hubham Singh is lean, 5-foot-5 and just 22 years old. Once a civil engineering student at a technology institute in India, now Singh works in the kitchen at Masala, an Indian restaurant here in Iowa City. He is waiting for his request for political asylum to be processed by U.S. immigration. We drink tea on his afternoon break, and he tells me the fantastic story of how he and Ankit Ankit, 19, his friend and co-worker, came to be here. Singh is pleasant and well-spoken, but just learning English, so he speaks Punjabi. In translation, here is the story of their 10-month ordeal to reach Iowa City. India I came to America to escape what is happening in India. I do not support the ruling party’s policies, as the government of India has moved away from democracy. The Modi government claims we no longer have the right to protest. When Ankit and I protested the actions of some powerful people that were harming the poor, we became targets. We were harassed constantly. When they threatened to kill us, we decided to leave India and come to the United States where we would be safe. First, we tried to get visas in India, but our applications were rejected. Then I learned we needed to apply for political asylum. We met with agents who explained that we needed to apply at the U.S. border with Mexico. This seemed very dangerous, but there was no other option—it was too dangerous to stay in India. I am from Haryana, and the agents wanted almost $25,000 U.S. I have heard people from other places in India have paid less. For what we paid, they said we would be taken all the way to the U.S. border, and from there, they would tell us what to do. We borrowed a lot of money for their help. 12 Mar. 4–17, 2020 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV280

Glen Lowry

Now that we are working, we send payments back every month. Ecuador and Columbia The agents arranged for us to fly to Ecuador because a visa is not required to enter there. Our agent in India had a network of partner agents everywhere along our journey. Some of these agents took care of us in Ecuador. We didn’t know their names. They had our pictures and took us on a small bus. For the next four months, until we got to Mexico, we hid in the daytime and travelled at night, when the police were not as active. Sometimes we walked, sometimes we took a bus and sometimes we went by car. When we went by car, there was another car in front and behind us to watch for police. We stayed in homes or hotels, depending on where we were, and travelled at night. From the start, we were afraid. We didn’t speak Spanish, we

didn’t know the people we were depending on and we were avoiding authorities. When we finally got to Medellin in Colombia from Ecuador, the agents left us near a United Nations camp. At the camp, we were given a “country-out pass.” This is a legal document that gives you a status in the country but requires you to leave the country within 20 days. They didn’t know we were headed for America, and I don’t think they cared about that. Their only concern was that we leave Colombia within 20 days. If you don’t leave in that time, you can be jailed for three months. The police don’t detain people who have a valid country-out pass, and it helps later with getting a boat from Colombia to Panama. The agents took us from Medellin to Turbo, a small city on the northern coast of Colombia. Many boats sail from here to Panama. Migrants with the country-out pass


LittleVillageMag.com

travel on government-sanctioned boats which have bodyguards onboard. Some of these boats are not safe. If you pay more to the agents, you get a safer boat. It takes about three to four hours to reach Panama on these boats. Medellin does not provide a country-out pass to non-adult travelers. For this reason, underage migrants take private boats, which are illegal and more dangerous. These boats typically carry more people than is permitted, and they are not in the best condition. They can take more than 10 hours to cross to Panama. I know someone who was stuck at sea for four days because their private boat broke down. They were lucky—a ship spotted them, gave them food and water and fixed the boat. Panama and Costa Rica When we disembarked in Panama, our agent found us and took us to his settlement. We would cross the jungle at night to avoid gangs that prey on migrants, he said. He also took our passports because he told us it was too dangerous to travel with these through the jungle. He said he would send them ahead to the agent in Mexico, where we might or might not get them back. (We didn’t.) We walked for four hours in the dark until we reached a mountainous place. He told us to sleep there, and he would be back in the morning, but the next day he never came back. We finally continued by ourselves, through the jungle at night. We followed the trash left behind by people who’d gone before us. There are three mountains to cross in the Panama jungle. How long it takes to cross them depends upon your stamina. If you are strong enough to carry your food and walk, then you will be fine. Otherwise you walk without food and water, and you have to risk getting supplies from villages along the way. Gangs from small villages near the jungle have guns and steal people’s belongings. We were told that it was safest to just give them what they ask for—people who resist have been killed. Of our group of 27, seven continued across these mountains, and 20 stayed to travel more slowly. We learned later that a gang came upon the 20 people we left behind and stole their money, their clothes, even their food and water. Our group of seven included a small family with an 8-year-old child. It took us four days to cross on foot. We came to a river that leads out of the jungle. We followed it for LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV280 Mar. 4–17, 2020 13


COMMUNITY two days. We walked along the banks, but the river wound back and forth a lot, so we were constantly crossing back and forth across the river. It helps to know how to swim. When I was there, it had rained, and the water was high and moving fast. I saw the dead bodies of two women and three men floating in the water. After crossing the jungle, we were still in Panama when we saw another UN camp. It had security officers to protect migrants from gangs, and it was the first time we felt safe. We no longer had passports, but the camp workers gave us food and water. They also interrogated us and registered us as immigrants without passports. About 150 people of many nationalities arrive at a UN camp every day, and that many people move on. In Panama, the UN security forces loaded us onto buses and took us to

THE WATER WAS HIGH AND MOVING FAST. I SAW THE DEAD BODIES OF TWO WOMEN AND THREE MEN FLOATING IN THE WATER. camps in different states of Panama. After a 10-hour bus ride, we arrived at a new camp and completed our immigration formalities. Eventually, they loaded us onto four buses and took us to Costa Rica, where we were registered at another UN camp and were given another country-out pass good for 20 days. In Costa Rica, we met with our agents and travelled by bus to Nicaragua. Nicaragua, Honduras and Guatemala Nicaragua is mostly jungle. We were left near a UN camp where we followed the same process we’d followed in Colombia, Panama and Costa Rica. To move on from the camp, we connected with our original agent in India, but we decided to make our own arrangements instead. In Nicaragua, the more you pay, the better your agent. A good agent can get you through the jungle in 30 minutes. An ineffective agent might lead you on a route that takes up to eight hours, and the Nicaraguan jungle is even more dangerous than the jungle in Panama. In the Nicaraguan jungle, you will definitely be attacked by gangs and the only safe approach is limiting how long you are there. For this reason, we paid an extra $150 each for a good 14 Mar. 4–17, 2020 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV280

Shubham Singh in the Masala kitchen. Ikram Basra

agent to help us get to Honduras. They dropped us near the border, we crossed the jungle quickly and new agents met us on the Honduran side with a bus. In Honduras, we were kept in a room until we travelled by bus to Guatemala at night. When we got to Guatemala City, the agent who was supposed to meet us at the bus depot never came. We learned via WhatsApp that he had been arrested. While we waited a few days for someone else to come, we pretended to be beggars at the bus station. Since we didn’t speak the language, we didn’t dare talk to anyone, so we didn’t eat during that time. Mexico From Guatemala, we crossed a small river to enter Mexico at Tapachula. Here, there is another UN camp. In Mexico, every city has a UN camp. They all follow the same process as in every country we’d entered.

We received a country-out pass that required us to leave Mexico in 20 days, and again we were told that if we stayed longer, we could be jailed for three months. Because of changes to U.S. immigration policy, people were waiting for up to three months in Mexico to file for asylum, but their status in Mexico is illegal after 20 days. In our case, we left Tapachula and travelled north, sometimes by bus and through the jungle by foot. We saw very little of the places we travelled because we only moved at night. Mexico was the first country we really saw after Ecuador. For the first 20 days, we could move around some. Unfortunately, it took 45 days to reach Mexicali at the U.S.-Mexico border. Because our status became illegal before we could reach the border, we were detained several times for as long as three days without food and water. But each time, we were released, and we continued north.


LittleVillageMag.com

Five months after we’d left India, we reached America’s southern border. To enter the United States, we needed to cross over a wall that is 40 feet tall. We used a pipe attached to the wall as support to climb, and as we crossed over, the agents in Mexico filmed us. This was their proof for the agents in India that we had reached our destination. They showed this to our families in India and received our final payment. The United States of America Once we were on American soil, U.S. border forces picked us up and took us to a post where we stayed the night. They interrogated us there, and sent us by bus to the Aurora Detention Facility in Colorado. This facility has more than a thousand people. We stayed in a hall with 60 people; about a third of them were from South Asia (India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, etc.). The others were from all over the world. At this facility, they took our statements. Those people who were able to prove they were not safe in their home countries could stay. Those who could not prove this were sent back. We were kept here for five months and seven days, and then they approved our cases. After that, we filed for political asylum and each of us provided a $4,000 bond. A friend from India was working here at Masala, and he asked the owner, Sam Singh, if he would give Ankit and me jobs. He said he was happy to help, and he arranged our travel and helped us to get set up in an apartment. Now, we are waiting for our asylum cases to be processed. We are very happy here. The people in Iowa City make us feel very welcome, and it is so good to feel safe. After many months eating bread and soda, and then the food at the facility, we are also happy to cook (and eat) Indian food. Our only concern is that we cannot afford health insurance. I had some back problems, and a friend told me about the free medical clinic. I’m better now; I will go there if I need care. Eventually, I will learn English so I can study engineering here in the United States, but first I need to work and pay off the loans I took out to get here. It was a long and terrifying trip, but now that I am here drinking tea with you, it was worth it. Ikram Basra is enrolled in the Iowa Playwrights Workshop at the University of Iowa. He is a former television news producer and reporter in Pakistan.

FilmScene made national news when we dedicated our entire month of March to films made by women. Now, we’ve broadened that initiative and prioritized spotlighting female and non-binary filmmakers all year long.

Check out our website for more, and don't miss these highlights:

ORDINARY LOVE OPENS MARCH 6

PORTRAIT OF A LADY ON FIRE OPENS MARCH 13

THE OATH BIJOU FILM FORUM MARCH 10 | 6PM

HOLY TRINITY PRIDE AT FILMSCENE MARCH 19 | 6PM

ICFILMSCENE.ORG ON THE PED MALL | AT THE CHAUNCEY LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV280 Mar. 4–17, 2020 15


COMMUNITY UR Here

Weathering the Brainstorm Want to be part of a healthy group? First master solitude and silence. BY THOMAS DEAN

I

magine a city council meeting where a citizen walks up to the microphone during the public comment period and says, “I would like to devote my time to being silent in order for all of us gathered here to consider our individual parts in this public issue we are discussing.” Imagine a community forum where, rather than PowerPoint presentations and multiple easel pads and markers being broken out immediately, the moderator starts off by saying, “For the first 30 minutes, I would like you all to think quietly and write down your thoughts on the challenges and possible solutions to our issues.” I suspect many would believe madness—or at least time-wasting—would ensue in such scenarios. But perhaps we do need more solitude and silence in our community-building. This past fall, I was privileged to be selected to attend a Growing Edge retreat led by author, teacher and activist Parker Palmer and singer, songwriter, poet and activist Carrie Newcomer. The retreat was conducted using the “Circle of Trust” approach pioneered by Palmer and the organization he founded, the Center for Courage and Renewal (CCR). The overall goal of the Circle of Trust approach is to bridge gaps between our inner and outer lives, what Palmer calls our “soul and role,” in order to be more effective at creating social change and strengthening our common life. One of the important principles is the paradox of “solitude and community.” They are complementary necessities, not opposites; as Palmer says in his book A Hidden Wholeness (Jossey-Bass, 2009), “Solitude does not necessarily mean living apart from others; rather, it means never living apart from one’s self. It is not about the absence of other people—it is about being fully present to ourselves, whether or not we are with others. Community does not necessarily mean living face-to-face with others; rather, it means never losing the awareness that we are connected to each other. It is not about the presence of other people—it is about being fully open to the reality of relationship, whether or not we are alone.”

16 Mar. 4–17, 2020 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV280

Gaby / Flickr

and suspending judgment and the desire to “fix” others. Silence also plays an important role. “Trust and learn from the silence,” CCR teaches. “Silence is a gift in our noisy world, and a way of knowing in itself. Treat silence as “SILENCE IS A GIFT IN OUR NOISY WORLD, a member of the group. AND A WAY OF KNOWING IN ITSELF. TREAT After someone has spoken, take time to reflect SILENCE AS A MEMBER OF THE GROUP. without immediately AFTER SOMEONE HAS SPOKEN, TAKE TIME filling the space with TO REFLECT WITHOUT IMMEDIATELY FILLING words.” In fact, if you as an individual need THE SPACE WITH WORDS.” to be silent, perhaps as part of the solitude you are practicing, that is to be respected—and challenge each other without being judgmenheld—by the entire group. tal, directive or invasive.” Iowa City can be a difficult place for those Circle of Trust practices honor both soliwho value solitude and silence. Its social, tude and community; promote deep listening cultural and public pace and processes can be and being fully present, honest, open and loud and frenetic. There can be great pressure inquisitive; respecting others in the group; Inner work requires solitude and community, according to the description of Circle of Trust principles on the CCR website. “Participants take an inner journey in community where we learn how to evoke and

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Parker Palmer A Hidden Wholeness JOSSEY-BASS

Susan Cain Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking CROWN PUBLISHING GROUP


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to “participate” in ways that may not be comfortable or even productive for some. Of course, that flurry is a sign of great engagement and creativity, which makes our community special—no doubt about that. And of course, much brilliant individual work—done in solitude, even silence—goes into the high quality of life we enjoy here. But our community could perhaps be even stronger if there was more space for solitude (and silence) in our public life, allowing us all to work from and understand our individual strengths in the best ways, which can include participating in community betterment by more solitary and silent means. Harking back to my community forum example above, our current model of “brainstorming” in the workplace and, often, in public discourse was developed by advertising mogul Alex Osborn in the 1930s through the 1950s. You’re likely familiar with this process: get in a group, be freewheeling, criticize no ideas, go for quantity of ideas, etc. As noted by Susan Cain in her book Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking, the problem is that since the 1960s (starting with research by University of Minnesota psychology professor Marvin Dunnette), study after study has shown this group brainstorming process doesn’t work well—and the larger the group, the worse the performance. Much more effective—in generating both quantity and quality of ideas—is a process whereby individuals brainstorm ideas on their own which are then pooled, giving equal weight to ideas from both extroverted and introverted group members. Certainly in Iowa City, citizens have opportunities to think and express themselves individually on public issues, but, if we extrapolate a bit, even a common group process such as brainstorming can benefit from a “solitude in community” approach that leads to a stronger outcome in our common life. I have pondered the solitude and community idea for several months now, having found it a refreshing experience in the Circle of Trust-oriented retreat last fall. I have not yet developed any specific suggestions for improving our community processes here at home—in fact, I’m still working to understand what this all means. But I have felt moved to share a general call for more space for solitude in our community, and for holding silence better in the boisterous and wonderful place we call home. Thomas Dean, indeed, loves peace and quiet.

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a Bendición Pupuseria & Restaurante, a family-owned business serving food from El Salvador, opened at the turn of the new year. You can find it in the strip mall at the corner of 1st Avenue and 2nd Street in Coralville, the same building that houses the likes of Chez Grace, Global Market and the late great Nile Ethiopian Restaurant. The new eatery’s featured item is the pupusa. For those Midwesterners like myself who may not have tried one yet, a pupusa is a hand-sized tortilla filled with melted cheese and other ingredients such as pork, beans, vegetables, jalapeños or loroco. The tortillas are thick and earthy, and the cheese inside melts into them for a smooth combination of flavor.

THE SIMPLICITY OF THE INGREDIENTS—TORTILLA, CHEESE, SALSA, CABBAGE AND VINEGAR—MAKE FOR A MARVELOUS BLEND THAT HITS DIFFERENT POINTS OF THE PALATE. K. Michael Moore

The pupusas themselves are a rare treat for the Iowa City area, and just a few easily make a filling and tasty lunch or light supper. They are purchased individually, in any combination desired, served with a thin salsa and curtido, a cabbage and vinegar slaw. The simplicity of the ingredients—tortilla, cheese, salsa, cabbage and vinegar—make for a marvelous blend that hits different points of the palate. They are delightful. La Bendicion serves eight varieties of pupusa, allowing patrons to experience multiple combinations. While pupusas are the signature menu item, setting this new restaurant apart, they 18 Mar. 4–17, 2020 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV280

are not the only trick up La Bendicion’s proverbial sleeve. Other options include seafood, beef or cow’s feet soup, tamales, fried plantains and a short list of entrees: Carne Azada, Carmarones in Crème Sauce, Pollo Frito and a few other Salvadoran dishes, as well as a sizable salad topped with chicken. The Carne Azada is among the best I’ve had in the area, pounded thin, nicely tender and seasoned perfectly. The shrimp in crème sauce is another highlight of the menu. The sauce is simple, complementing the perfect pop of flavor in each piece rather than overpowering the shrimp. Each entrée comes with rice, a side salad,

tortillas and refried beans. Portions are generous and well plated, and the staff is friendly. Put simply, La Bendición offers a mouthwatering new take on regional food in Coralville. The brilliance of the menu is rooted in its simplicity—in the grounded flavors and home-crafted recipes. This is a dining experience which feels (and tastes!) more like being invited to a shared meal in someone’s home than at a restaurant. It’s a great spot for a business lunch, a casual date or just a low-key exploration of El Salvadoran foods. —K. Michael Moore


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CULTURE

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Sean Phelan in his studio. Julian Prindle

The Engineer Cedar Rapids native Sean Phelan on managing to triangulate a successful career in the music industry. BY GENEVIEVE TRAINOR

“I

moved directly on out to Los Angeles, sight unseen. Just did kinda the cliche: pack your bags and go.” Sean Phelan is self-effacing when he tells his story, as though it all happened to him—as though he’s the luckiest guy in the world. But demand is rising for the skills of the engineer and mixer from Cedar Rapids, who has worked with everyone from Pharrell Williams and Mary J. Blige to Migos—he engineered their 2018 album Culture II—and current phenom Roddy Ricch, whose track “The Box” recently hit a seventh week at number one on the Billboard Hot 100. Phelan is also credited on Lizzo’s Cuz I

Love You, including the song “Jerome,” which won Lizzo a Grammy award this year for Best Traditional R&B Performance. Sphere Studios, where he’s worked in the past, was the studio that called him in on the Lizzo album back in 2018. “It was great to see it come to fruition, have some legs to it,” Phelan said. “It’s kind of rare … 80 percent of the stuff may never see the light of day, then all of a sudden that 20 percent shines a light on everything else. … That was a really cool experience, but just kind of happenstance.” Born in Mason City, Phelan’s family moved to Cedar Rapids when he was just a baby. Music has been baked into him since birth: Both his parents were music teachers. And his brother is guitarist Ryan Phelan (Dr. Z’s Experiment), a key player on the current Cedar Rapids music scene. He calls music “a pivotal part of growing up.” He and his siblings took Suzuki piano lessons from the time they were 6 years old. Phelan graduated in 2001 from Washington High School in Cedar Rapids. “I did band, choir, and all that stuff—mostly for the easy As a lot of the time, and also

because it was kind of just second nature.” He was primarily a percussionist, then, and he went to the University of Northern Iowa right after high school on a percussion scholarship. But he only stayed “for a little bit.” He “got the production bug” and transferred to Full Sail University in Florida, known for its audio engineering program and networking opportunities. After graduation, he headed for L.A.—“just packed up my old car and drove it on out from Florida.” He started in 2006 as an errand boy for Larrabee North studio, fetching “whatever artists could come up with, their wildest dreams.” He was drawn there by the studio’s reputation as one of the top mixing studios in town, and by the presence of one mixer in particular who, Phelan said, he was hoping to model his career after. “I was constantly, as a student (and still am), searching through credits and seeing who worked on what, trying to tie dots together … trying to learn the behind-the-scene. And one name that came up on a lot of the projects I really liked was Manny Marroquin.” Phelan calls Marroquin “a living legend in his own right.” He decided to reach out to him


CULTURE over email, taking a stab by just grabbing an address he found on a website. “I wasn’t getting anything back!” Phelan said. “I was doing these stupid updates, you know, when you just have blind, young ambition. It’s like, ‘Hey Manny, I’m on my fourth month of school here, and I’m learning about this,’ just kind of giving him updates. And I didn’t really hear anything back. And I was like, ‘Ah, forget about it. I’m not going to email him anymore. This is dumb; nobody’s getting these.’” A couple of months went by and suddenly, Phelan said, he got a response. “He’s like, ‘Oh, you should be on your such-and-such month of school by now,’ ‘Thanks for reaching out’—so he was keeping up with it, without reaching back.” Marroquin offered more than just a re-

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(Phelan has writing or production credits on many of the tracks on Green’s 2015 album Heart Blanche). Now, in addition to his freelance work as an engineer and mixer, he’s a studio owner. Silver Lining Studios, in Sherman Oaks, California is a three-room studio that he both works out of and rents out to producers—a “sound hotel” he called it, for everyone from people just getting started in their careers to multi-platinum Grammy winners just looking for a space to create for a day. And the tasks he’s undertaking are just as versatile. Sometimes he’ll be recording or producing vocals, programming drums or putting keyboards on. But sometimes, he said, “you might just be there to plug in a laptop and get people coffee some days, too.” That versatility to what he does now—“you kind of have to be a chameleon in a sense,” he said—is something that HE LOVES JUST HELPING PEOPLE MAKE Phelan says he loves. MUSIC: THE OPPORTUNITY TO “FLOAT “Every single day you walk in here—I’m UNDER THE RADAR,” HE SAID, “BUT STILL walking in the front BE AROUND A LOT OF CREATIVE GENIUSES, door right now; I really don’t know what I’m A LOT OF DIFFERENT PEOPLE WHO ARE walking into! You don’t CHANGING CULTURE.” really know what your day’s going to entail; you don’t know who’s going to come by. Especially being in Los sponse. He told Phelan that if he ever made it Angeles—you can have the craziest things out to L.A., he should check in with him about happening, or nothing at all.” an internship. But he also says he loves just helping “I can literally remember the day in class when I got that email. I was like, ‘Oh my gosh, people make music: the opportunity to “float under the radar,” he said, “but still be around a I made it!’ Little did I know an internship lot of creative geniuses, a lot of different peomeant no pay, meant no—but it was just the ple who are changing culture and moving the opportunity to even do that.” needle on different creative mediums. That’s He ended up getting that gig, grabbing also what really excites me: you’re just close coffee for the man he admired rather than enough to it, but just far enough removed from working under him (“I wouldn’t necessarily it as well, where you can live your own private call him a mentor as much as something I was chasing after”). But the two have worked often life.” He credits his early and immersive introductogether since. Marroquin mixed the title track tion to music for being able to create this kind of Lizzo’s Cuz I Love You, which Phelan also of versatile existence. engineered. And Phelan says he sends him “More than anything, it taught me how projects regularly. to interact with musicians and speak their “It’s kind of come full circle now,” he said. language, in a sense. I wouldn’t call myself a After Larrabee North, Phelan had a chance virtuoso by any means—I just know enough to to move into actually doing the work, as an be dangerous. But I can assist in anything.” assistant in a small private studio. But after the Much of the work he gets called in on are first couple of months, he started to freelance. productions that, he says, are at “the 75 perHe took a lot of work at Paramount Recording cent mark.” He compares it to framing a great Studios in Hollywood as one of their on-call painting. engineers, and he also worked on some long“That’s where I come in a lot of times: term projects, such as with Cee-Lo Green


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‘How can we put this all together to actually see a finished, thorough project?’ And whether that includes maybe remaking the drums, or re-recording, maybe do some strings, maybe put a choir on it. That’s the producing that I’m more involved in. It’s not necessarily from the origin point, it’s more from the finishing aspect. Just putting that final gloss coat on it.” Phelan refers to Silver Lining as a “boutique studio,” which he keeps well-stocked with top notch gear. Even though he acknowledges that records are made “all the way from in bedrooms to million-dollar studios,” he believes in having “the best of the best, because you’re going up against everything.” And the most important element of that, he says, is the microphone. “It’s our hammer as a craftsman, basically,” he said. His favorite is the Telefunken 251; he uses it daily. “But it’s really also a game of computers,” he said. “Having to constantly expand your wealth of knowledge … It’s constantly evolving. There’s always a new plug-in that pops up, a new sound or reference, some new piece of gear that pops up. You have to know all the old and all the new.” To keep up to date, he stays curious—he learns from everyone he works alongside and every producer that comes through his studio. “It’s a combination of stealing and learning,” he said, laughing. But he also regularly attends the National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) convention to see what’s new and fresh. “Engineering has kind of become a whole different industry of its own now—different schools, different online tutorials. It’s kind of the Wild West of music production; everyone’s getting into it … the knowledge is always expanding.” When he talks about his craft, it’s clear that there is more than luck at play in his success. Phelan is savvy and passionate, and his laidback demeanor doesn’t quite manage to mask how driven he is. His fervor and dedication make it clear why artists and producers keep coming back to him on projects—and it’s only a matter of time before young, ambitious college kids are noticing that his name keeps popping up on all their favorite tracks. Genevieve Trainor loves the finishing aspect of editing, putting a final gloss coat on a great piece of writing. Perhaps instead of “editor,” she’ll start calling herself an “engineer and mixer”—of words.


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THU 03.12 The Host Country w/ Brother Trucker, Hannah Frey

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Women’s Work Women artists are historically underserved. The Stanley Museum is determined to be different. BY RACHEL WACHTER

O

nly 11 percent of art purchased by major U.S. museums from 2008-18 was created by women, according to a joint investigation by Artnet News and In Other Words. This off-putting statistic suggests that women artists are too often overlooked, and their message ignored. As the University of Iowa builds out its art collection, curators and artists in the community are determined to close this gender gap. Just in time for Women’s History Month, 21 women artists will show work at the Hudson River Gallery in Coralville. The For Women/By Women exhibition opens March 6 with a reception at 6 p.m. From sculpture to prints, painting to assemblage, there will be a vast and delightfully varied display of artwork to behold. Half of the proceeds from the work sold during the show, which runs through April 11, will go directly into the Kathleen A. Edwards Fund for Contemporary Art by American Women, a special fund for the University of Iowa Stanley Museum of Art. The museum, which broke ground in June 2019, is set to complete construction in 2022—and it will have space to fill. Established by Edwards (a long-time former curator of the Stanley Museum) and Michael S. Hayslett in 2018,

benefit will reach beyond that specific group. Onlookers of all genders will have the chance to be inspired by art that might not have made it into a museum without support from endowed purchase funds like the Kathleen A. Edwards Fund. The Hudson River “ART HELPS US PROCESS WHAT IS MOST Gallery—named by DIFFICULT AND WHAT IS MOST BEAUTIFUL owner Nick Hotek as a nod to his home state of AND JOYFUL IN LIFE, AND MUSEUMS New York—has been a PROVIDE SPACE AND STRUCTURE FOR running gallery in Iowa City for 25 years. Hotek US TO ENGAGE WITH COMPLEX TOPICS IN said that one of the CONSTRUCTIVE AND REFLECTIVE WAYS.” benefits of last year’s relocation to Coralville is the new ground-level space that allows for cohesiveness and access the fund will ensure that women have a for all. This space also permits this special strong presence within the new Stanley. group of women to have their art out on disThough For Women/By Women is aimed play separately, but together. at supporting modern women artists, the 26 Mar. 4–17, 2020 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV280

Artist and UI printmaking professor Anita Jung removes a fresh print from its plate. Rachel Wachter

For Women/By Women exhibition, Hudson River Gallery, opens Friday, March 6, reception at 6 p.m.

The gallery walls are painted stark white and the space allows for natural light to stream though the windows. However, Hotek says, “the space is pretty cool at night, too.” With the clean background and rolling, portable wall panels, the gallery can be arranged to accommodate the needs of any show. Hotek has never had this many artists in one show, he said. “I’ve had three or four at once. It’s exciting to be a part of something that has never been done [like this] before.” The idea for the exhibit came from Edwards, who approached Hotek and asked him if he would be willing to open up the gallery to raise money toward the fund she had established. Hotek—who notes that he has always been surrounded by women artists


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in his family and throughout his life, and who was also among the many who helped evacuate the Stanley Museum during the 2008 flood—quickly said yes, and the pair got to work on invitations. Hotek recalls that they received nearly instant responses, all saying “yes,” from everyone they reached out to. Among the 21 featured artists are some of the UI’s own Studio Art program professors. Printmaking professor Anita Jung will be participating, along with associate professor, director of graduate studies and sculptor Isabel Barbuzza; assistant professors of painting and drawing TJ Dedeaux-Norris and Laurel Farrin; Susan Chrysler White, program head of painting and drawing; and associate professor of intermedia Rachel Williams. “[UI] has a huge legacy of women artists! From Elizabeth Catlett to [Miriam] Schapiro and Ana Mendieta, all legendary women,” Jung said, working on the printmaking floor of the UI Visual Arts Building to turn what some might consider garbage into one-of-a-kind pieces of art. Jung believes that efforts like By Women/For Women will further that legacy, she said. To her, it is “an honor to be a part of the show, as it is a celebration of Iowa City.” She thinks back fondly on the old UI Museum of Art on N Riverside Drive, and is excited for the new Stanley Museum to debut, saying she’s “so proud of the work that has been done [by museum staff] without an actual museum.” With its new location on Madison Street, in close proximity to the Main Library, Jung said she feels the museum will attract a diverse patronage and enrich the UI campus. Tilly Woodward, curator of academic and community outreach for the Grinnell College Museum of Art and a participating oil painter, is also energized to be part of this event. “It feels so good to come together as a group to support young women in the arts. I am honored to be included with this group of artists,” Woodward said. On the enduring value of campus museums, she said, “Art helps us process what is most difficult and what is most beautiful and joyful in life, and museums

WHAT ARE WE DOING? STAFF PICKS: JAN. 22-FEB. 4, 2020

WEDNESDAY, MAR. 4

The Chieftains

Hancher, Iowa City, 7:30 p.m., $10-65

Classic Irish band the Chieftains was formed in Dublin in 1962—that’s 58 years of phenomenal worldwide performances (multi-instrumentalist Paddy Moloney is the only member who’s been with the band from the outset, but Kevin Conneff and Matt Molloy have rounded out the lineup since the late ’70s). They’re known for taking traditional music and making it relevant to each generation and each place they visit, without straying far from their roots. —Genevieve Trainor

THURSDAY, MAR. 5

Girls on the Run’s 9th Annual Lunafest

FilmScene, Iowa City, 5:30 p.m., $45-60 Lunafest is a trav-

eling film festival created by LUNA Bar (yes, the nutrition bars aimed at women). Featuring all films written and directed by women, LUNA allows local nonprofits to host the

festival, with 15 percent of proceeds going to the Breast Cancer Fund and the other 85 percent going to the host charity or other org of their choice. Here in Eastern Iowa, that 85 percent goes to Girls on the Run of Eastern Iowa, a branch of the national organization, which pairs mentors with girls to train for 5K runs, building confidence and knowledge about social, emotional and physical health. This opening event includes a silent auction, appetizers and desserts. There are also encore screenings March 6, 7 and 8 that run $10 for students, $15 for adults.

FRIDAY, MARCH 6

2020 Spring Gallery Walk

Downtown Iowa City, 5 p.m., Free So far there are

almost 20 shops participating in this year’s gallery walk, and each shop will carry different art! What’s nice is that the walk is self-guided, so you have three hours to get your shopping, eating and art-gazing done. And since spring is in the title, that means warmer weather is right around the corner— right? —Izabela Zaluska

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV280 Mar. 4–17, 2020 27


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provide space and structure for us to engage with complex topics in constructive and reflective ways.” Work will also be presented by Iowan painters Susan Hargus, Nancy Purington and Sue Hettmansperger, along with fellow artists Satomi Kawaii, Susan Coleman, Kathy Edwards Hayslett, Elizabeth Munger, Lauren Tucci, Trudi StarbeckMiller, Jillian Moore, Christine

Flavin, Jane Gilmor, Laura Young and Cheryl Jacobsen. Rachel Wachter is a student of art history and studio art at the University of Iowa. She can often be found with a pen and paper, a cat in her lap and a snack within reach—planning her next travel destination or documenting her latest flea market find. She is pursuing a career as an historical preservationist.


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WHAT ARE WE DOING? STAFF PICKS: JAN. 22-FEB. 4, 2020

CEDAR RAPIDS/IOWA CITY SATURDAY, MAR. 7

The Get Down Roller Skate Party

GameOn Sports CR, Cedar Rapids, 7 p.m., $21.50 I’ve taken

FRIDAY, MAR. 6

ICCT Presents: ‘Company’

Johnson County Fairgrounds, Iowa City, 7:30 p.m., $11-19 (opening night; runs through March 15) I could say I’m going

IOWA CITY EASTSIDE

to see Iowa City Community Theatre’s Company because of its whip-smart book and lyrics, nuanced portrayal of adult relationships and quintessential Sondheim tunes, but the truth is I have no choice. Little Village’s own Celine Robins is playing Amy, and after putting in a lot

of practice to master the fast-paced “Getting Married Today” (considered by many to be the first rap song in a Broadway musical), she’s determined all her coworkers see it, even issuing a few veiled threats around the office. So while I’ll be something of a captive audience member, I fully expect to laugh, cry and hum along with ICCT’s contemporary take on one of the best musicals of the ’70s. If you enjoyed Adam Driver’s rendition of “Being Alive” in Marriage Story, just wait till you hear the song in its original context. —Emma McClatchey

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up roller skating as a hobby in the last year, but find few opportunities to practice outside of doing figure eights in the relatively flat parking lot near my apartment. While I intend to give derby a try, I’m thrilled to see a non-competitive skating event in the area. DJ CJ and DJ Salad Days will help the Get Down Roller Skate Party live up to its name; skates will be available for rent (on a first-come-first-serve basis); and a number of arts and crafts vendors will be slinging their goods on the sidelines. The grooviest-dressed guests will also have a chance to win the costume contest. Lace up and get your Xanadu on! —EM

WEDNESDAY, MAR. 11

My Cousin Vinny FilmScene—Ped Mall, Iowa City, 7:30 p.m., Free-$5 This screening of the

classic 1992 comedy is presented by the University of Iowa Student Legal Services and the University of Iowa College of Law, so never let it be said that lawyers are no fun. My Cousin Vinny was a breakout role for Marisa Tomei, who I had loved since she was on A Different World in ’87—and


LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM

CALENDAR EVENTS AROUND THE CRANDIC MAR. 4-17, 2020 Planning an event? Submit event info to calendar@littlevillagemag. com. Include event name, date, time, venue, street address, admission price and a brief description (no all-caps, exclamation points or advertising verbiage, please). To find more events, visit littlevillagemag.com/calendar. Please check venue listing in case details have changed.

THERE’S EVEN MORE

Use the Little Village app to discover events, invite friends and add plans to your calendar. LittleVillageMag.com/app

= Get tickets at littlevillagetickets.com

Wed., Mar. 4 Iowa City Open Coffee, Merge, Iowa City, 8 a.m., Free (Weekly) Reel Representation: ‘Daughters, Mothers, Us,’ FilmScene—PedMall, Iowa City,

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6 p.m., Free The Chieftains, Hancher Auditorium, Iowa City, 7:30 p.m., $10-65 Open Mic Night, Penguin’s Comedy Club, Cedar Rapids, 8 p.m., Free (Weekly) American Arson w/ Cowpoke, Rosemask, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 8 p.m., Free An R-Rated Magic Show, Coralville Center for the Performing Arts, Coralville, 8 p.m., $28 Karaoke with Vidal, Moco Game Room & Hot

319.855.1474

littlevillagecreative.com

Dog Bar, Cedar Rapids, 9 p.m., Free (Weekly) Underground Karaoke with Spencer, Yacht Club, Iowa City, 9 p.m., Free (Weekly) LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV280 Mar. 4–17, 2020 31


WHAT ARE WE DOING? STAFF PICKS: JAN. 22-FEB. 4, 2020

CEDAR RAPIDS/IOWA CITY THURSDAY, MAR. 12

Our Sisters’ Many Hats,

Coe College—Hickok Hall, Cedar Rapids, 6 p.m., Free As a bona fide wearer of an

inordinate amount of hats myself, this presentation sounds fantastic. The African American Museum of Iowa will look at the past 164 years of black women in Iowa and the many hats they’ve worn, the many roles they’ve played for the people around them. —GT

train out of my home state of Jersey, is the Atomic Bitchwax: the quintessential stoner rock of my wasted youth. They’ve got a distinct NJ sound that you’ll get lost inside. There’s no excuse to miss this show, Iowa City. —GT

SATURDAY, MAR. 14

Dr. Z’s Experiment

The Mill, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $7 Once you finish

reading the profile of Sean Phelan in this issue, make sure to jet down to The Mill to catch his brother Ryan’s band, Dr. Z’s

Andrea Shriver

she got an Oscar for her trouble. Since the show is sponsored by UI groups, the yutes will get in free. —GT

THURSDAY, MAR. 12

Weedeater, Bridget Christian / public domain

Weedeater & the Goddamn Gallows w/ the Atomic Bitchwax, Worshipper, Heavyweight Wildwood Smokehouse & Saloon, Iowa City, 7 p.m., $23

IOWA CITY OLD TRAIN DEPOT

This is a great bill all around, but the key component, barreling in like a freight

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by Jen Loeb Wombat w/ Jean-François Charles, Gabi Vanek, Trumpet Blossom, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $8 Open Stage, Studio 13, Iowa City, 10 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Experiment. The long-time Cedar Rapids mainstay doesn’t play down in Iowa City all that often, so this is a rare treat. Ryan Phelan’s guitar work is some of the best in the region, and the rest of the band (Ben Franklin, Steve Shriver, Luke Viertel and Jeremiah Murphy) is fantastic as well, so if you like your tunes jammy with a rock solid underpinning of jazz, don’t miss out.

Late Shift at the Grindhouse: ‘Black Samurai,’ FilmScene—Chauncey, Iowa City, 10 p.m., $4 (Weekly)

Thu., Mar. 5 Eclipse: Video and Live Performance,

CSPS HALL 1 1 0 3 3RD ST S E CE D A R RA P I D S , I A 52 40 1 ( 31 9)36 4- 15 80

TUESDAY, MAR. 17

www.legionarts.org

Wylde Nept

The Revelers Mar 13

Longbranch, Cedar Rapids, 7 p.m., Free It’s a given that if it’s St.

Patrick’s Day, Wylde Nept, Eastern Iowa’s tectonic Irish band, is playing somewhere. For the past several years, it’s been outside the immediate area—which, I guess, is fair, as they also have a long-standing Cedar Rapids tradition of playing the SaPaDaPaSo hooley fundraiser each year, as well as a “St. Practice Day” at The Mill in Iowa City early in the month. It would be unfair for our region to claim all of their attention. But this year, on the evening of March 17, they’re showing up in CR again, for a show at the Longbranch. I know it’s mid-week, but don’t miss your shot to hear fantastic traditional songs along with their seamlessly integrated originals on the day itself. —GT

Rapids, 5:30 p.m., Free Therapy Thursday, NewBo City Market, 5:30 p.m., Free (Weekly) Reel Representation: Lunafest Opening Night, FilmScene—Chauncey, Iowa City, 5:30 p.m., $45-60 Champagne Irish Dancers, Iowa City Public Library, 6 p.m., Free Transform Your Life, Quaker Friends Meeting House, Iowa City, 6:30 p.m., $5-10 (Weekly) Line Dancing and Lessons, Wildwood Smokehouse & Saloon, Iowa City, 6:30 p.m., Free (Weekly) Thursday Night Live Open Mic, Uptown Bill’s, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free (Weekly) Daddy-O, Parlor City Pub and Eatery, Cedar Rapids, 7 p.m., Free (Weekly) Mod Sun w/ Psychedelic Sidekick, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 7 p.m., $20

Upcoming Events: EVERY MONDAY - PARCHMENT LOUNGE - 6:30 PM free write session hosted by Iowa Writer's House EVERY WEDNESDAY - ANDREW'S BAR EXAM - 7:00 PM

Simpsons Trivia Night, Big Grove Brewery, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free Ray Blue: A Fundraiser for the Academy for Scholastic and Personal Success, CSPS Legion Arts, Cedar Rapids, 7:30 p.m., $10-25 Live Jazz, Clinton Street Social Club, Iowa

MAR 6

The Tornadoes

MAR 8

Chris Merz Very Happy Band

MAR 8

U of I Jazz Jam

Iowa City, 8 p.m., $7

MAR 13

Cole "the Piano Man" Thomas

Cedar Rapids, 9 p.m., Free (Weekly)

MAR 14

Coppers & Brass

Trumpet Blossom, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $7

MAR 20

Robert Johnson and Dave Moore

MAR 21

Saul Lubaroff Trio at the Sanctuary

MAR 27

Steve Grismore Trio

8 PM 8 PM

8 PM 6 PM

kimschillig@gmail.com 310.795.2133 V/T

Art Walk of NewBo District, NewBo, Cedar

Iowa City Meditation Class: How To

6 PM

Kim will help you find your way HOME

CSPS Legion Arts, Cedar Rapids, 5 p.m., Free

8 PM 8 PM 8 PM

MONDAYS ARE HAPPY HOUR EVERY HOUR! SUNDAYS ARE 1/2 OFF ALL PIZZA ALL DAY! (319) 351-5692 • 405 S GILBERT ST, IOWA CITY

City, 8 p.m., Free (1st & 3rd Thursdays) Karaoke Thursday, Studio 13, Iowa City, 8 p.m., Free (Weekly) Dark Family w/ Todd Partridge, The Mill, Vinyl Swap, Moco Game Room & Hot Dog Bar, Diners w/ Penny Peach Jr., Cowpoke, DJ Loomer Thirsty Thursday Dance Party, Yacht Club, Iowa City, 10 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Fri., Mar. 6 NewBo Open Coffee, Roasters Coffeehouse in NewBo City Market, Cedar Rapids, 8 a.m., Free (2nd & 4th Fridays) Equalitea Party: Beer Release + Benefit Show, Big Grove Brewery, Iowa CIty, 5 p.m., $5 suggested donation Opening Reception: time now for ghosts, LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV280 Mar. 4–17, 2020 33


EDITORS’ PICKS

Charles Heidsieck Champagne Dinner w/ Brix and Goosetown Cafe

Public Space One—Center for

DMVU & TVBOO w/ Space

Afrofuturist Studies, Iowa City, 5 p.m.,

Wizard, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $16

Free

‘26 Pebbles,’ Giving Tree Theater,

2020 Spring Gallery Walk,

Marion, 8 p.m., $27-37 (Opening night

Downtown Iowa City, 5 p.m., Free

—through Mar. 22)

Reel Representation: Lunafest

Greg Hahn, Penguin’s, Cedar Rapids,

Encore, FilmScene—Chauncey, Iowa

8 p.m., $22-25

City, 6 p.m., $10-15

The Tornadoes, Sanctuary Pub, Iowa

Friday Night Live: Cowpoke, Wild

City, 8 p.m., Free

Culture Kombucha, Iowa City, 7 p.m.,

Latin Night w/ FUZE, Yacht Club,

Free

Iowa City, 9 p.m., $5-10 (Weekly)

Coppers & Brass, Lowe Park, Marion,

SoulShake, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 10

7 p.m., Free

p.m., Free (Weekly)

FAC Dance Party, The Union, Iowa

Sasha Belle Presents: Friday

City, 7 p.m. (Weekly)

Night Drag & Dance Party, Studio

Ray Blue: Benefit for the

13, Iowa City, 10:30 p.m., $5 (Weekly)

Academy for Scholastic & Personal Success, The Mill, Iowa

Sat, Mar. 7

City, 7 p.m., $20

Family Storytime, Iowa City Public

Orchestra Iowa Masterworks IV:

Library, 10:30 a.m., Free (Weekly)

Rebellious Russians, Coralville

The Picture Show: ‘Willy Wonka

Center for the Performing Arts,

and the Chocolate Factory,’

Coralville, 7:30 p.m., $18-38

FilmScene—Chauncey, Iowa City, 11

Iowa City Community Theatre:

a.m., Free-$5

‘Company!’, Johnson County

Champagne Irish Dancers, Cedar

Fairgrounds, Iowa City, 7:30 p.m., $11-

Rapids Public Library, 11:30 a.m., Free

19 (Opening night—through Mar. 15)

Fri., Apr. 10, 5:30 p.m. Goosetown Cafe

DVIP Lee County Soup Supper Fundraiser Mar. 9, 5:30 pm / Angelini's Restaurant, Keokuk, IA

Make and Take Floral Design Workshop Mar. 27, Apr. 10 & Apr. 24 / Willow & Stock

rk andma city l a w an io

DVIP Presents: Forty Years Forward

A conference for advocates, community members, & professionals to create safer futures for victim-survivors focusing on intimate partner violence and human trafficking Feb. 22, 10 am / New Pioneer Co-op Cedar Rapids

ZPS Presents: Midwest Elevation 2020 Jul. 18, 9 am - Jul. 19, 12 pm Coralville Marriott Hotel & Conference Center

Farm to Street Dinner 2020 Aug. 13, 5 pm / Northside Market Place

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LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM Reel Representation: Lunafest Encore, FilmScene—Chauncey, Iowa City, 2 p.m., $10-15 Refugee and Immigrant Association International Women’s Day Dinner, Drury Inn and Suites, Coralville, 4 p.m., Free The Get Down Roller Skate Party, GameOn Sports CR, Cedar Rapids, 7 p.m., $21.50 Sweet Cacophony, Uptown Bill’s, Iowa City, 7 p.m., $5-10 suggested donation Halfloves w/ David Zollo & the Body Electric, Tyler Stuck, CSPS Legion Arts, Cedar Rapids, 7:30 p.m., $10-15 Orchestra Iowa Masterworks IV: Rebellious Russians, Paramount Theatre, Cedar Rapids, 7:30 p.m., $16-56 Guster: An Evening of Acoustic Music & Improv, Englert Theatre, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $21-56 Greg Hahn, Penguin’s, Cedar Rapids, 8 p.m., $22-25 Chris Merz Very Happy Band, Sanctuary Pub, Iowa City, 8 p.m., Free Elation Dance Party, Studio 13, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $5 (Weekly) Julie Mehretu, Entropia (review), 2004. Lithograph and screenprint on Arches 88 paper Printed by Cole Rogers, assisted by Mia Keeler, Tyler Starr, Joanne Price, and Zac Adams. Published by Highpoint Editions and Walker Art Center, Minneapolis

Wylde Nept, The Mill, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $12-15 MySpace Emo Prom w/ Taking Back Emo, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 10 p.m., $10

DAMON DAVIS

Reel Representation: Bijou After Hours Presents ‘Juno,’ FilmScene—Chauncey, Iowa

JANUARY 24 – MARCH 15, 2020

City, 10 p.m., Free-$7

EXCAVATIONS: THE PRINTS OF JULIE MEHRETU

Sun., Mar. 8

JANUARY 24 – APRIL 5, 2020 For program information, visit grinnell.edu/museum

The Picture Show: ‘Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory,’ FilmScene—Chauncey, Iowa City, 11 a.m., Free-$5 ‘Wheel of Murder,’ Old Creamery Theatre, Kalona, 1 p.m., $52 (Final performance) Sunday Funday, Iowa City Public Library, Iowa

Free admission and new hours!

City, 2 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Sunday 1 – 5 p.m.; Monday-Wednesday 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Reel Representation: Lunafest Encore,

Thursday 11 a.m. – 9 p.m.; Friday-Saturday 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.

FilmScene—Chauncey, Iowa City, 2 p.m., $10-15 Reading: Cynthia Beebe, ‘Boots In the Ashes,’ Prairie Lights, Iowa City, 2 p.m., Free Dreamers’ Circus, Hancher—Strauss Hall, Iowa City, 5:30 p.m. & 8 p.m., $10-25 U of I Jazz Jam, Sanctuary Pub, Iowa City, 8 p.m., Free Vino Vérité: ‘Bloody Nose, Empty Pockets,’ FilmScene—Chauncey, Iowa CIty, 7 p.m., $10-20 Nate Bargatze, Paramount Theatre, Cedar Rapids, 7 p.m., $35-149.75 Dope Day, The Mill, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free Seckond Chaynce, Wildwood Smokehouse & Saloon, Iowa City, 7 p.m., $20 Ryan M. Brewer, Miss Christine, Hannah Frey, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $7


WHAT ARE WE DOING? LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/CALENDAR

Rachel Winslow

via Holy Wave’s Bandcamp page

QUAD CITIES

Brent Penny w/ TBA, RozzTox, Rock Island, Thursday, March 5, 8 p.m., $5-10 sliding scale Minneapolis-based artist Brent Penny

crafts endearing bedroom pop songs that can comfort one’s distressed soul. The self-proclaimed sad boy’s ballads are filled with raw, storytelling lyrics accompanied by glistening electro-pop melodies and the occasional omnichord appearance. Brent’s live shows feel personal, as if he knows what you’re going through and is singing right to you, and you, and everyone in the crowd on a deeper level. —Paige Underwood

She Rocks Drum Camp for Girls, QC Rock Academy, Davenport, Saturday, March 7, 10 a.m., $50 QC Rock Academy and Tools for Empowering Girls (subsidiary of Crowned Enterprises LLC) are joining forces for this special experience to get young girls excited about playing drums. In this half day workshop, girls ages 11-14 are invited to learn about the powerful percussion instrument through exercises on drumming, self-awareness and how to build self-confidence. No drumming experience is necessary for this workshop. Sign up online at toolsforempoweringwomen.com/shop. —P.U.

Holy Wave w/ the Golden Fleece, Rozz-Tox, Rock Island, Thursday, March 12, 8 p.m., free

Freaky folk! Holy Wave is coming all the way from Austin on their first trip of 2020. They’re actually headed to a music festival in Ohio, but they’re stopping to see us first because we’re special and they’ve missed us and they want to tell us all about their upcoming album. It’s going to be more fun than any of us should have on a Thursday night. —M.H.

Condor & Jaybird Vinyl Release Show w/ Mountain Swallower, Harakiri, Michi Farias, Village Theatre, Davenport, Friday, March 13, 7 p.m., $5

Condor & Jaybird always put on a show, and this is an occasion that calls for a big one. For one thing, The Glory (read a review on pg. 51) is the last in a trilogy that includes previous releases The Kingdom and The Power. A limited number of vinyl copies are available, so get there early and catch Harakiri (MN), Michi Farias (MI) and The Return (deep breath) of local favorite: Mountain. Effing. SWALLOWER. —M.H.

Surf Zombies, Bootleg Hill Honey Meads, Davenport, Saturday, March 7, 7 p.m., free

Bryan Lamb

Surf Zombies is one of those rare bands that sounds exactly like its name. The artists use speed-induced psychic curses to raise genre from the dead. They put the spirit in Spirit Award. Bootleg’s tapping their lemon mead for the occasion. —Melanie Hanson LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV280 Mar. 4–17, 2020 37


EDITORS’ PICKS

Mon., Mar. 9

Reading: Sue Taylor, ‘Grant Wood’s

Midwest Waves w/ Tag Along Friend,

Secrets,’ Prairie Lights, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free

Cancer/Leo, Nik Sorak, Trumpet Blossom, Iowa

Fundraiser, Angelini’s Restaurant, Keokuk, 5:30

Weekly Old-Timey Jam Sessions, Trumpet

City, 9 p.m., $7

p.m., $7

Blossom Cafe, Iowa City, 7:30 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Reel Representation: Late Shift at the

Open Mic, The Mill, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater,

Grindhouse: ‘The Slumber Party Massacre,’

(Weekly)

Hancher Auditorium, Iowa City, 7:20 p.m., $10-

FilmScene—Chauncey, Iowa City, 10 p.m., $4

Summer Salt w/ Okey Dokey, Breakup Shoes,

75

(Weekly)

Gabe’s, Iowa City, 7 p.m., $16-$18

Karaoke with Vidal, Moco Game Room & Hot

Comedy Open Mic with Spencer & Dan,

Dog Bar, Cedar Rapids, 9 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Thu., Mar. 12

Yacht Club, Iowa City, 9 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Dance Party with DJ Jamaican Daddy,

‘Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story,’ Old

Say Anything Karaoke, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 10

Yacht Club, Iowa City, 9 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Creamery Theatre, Amana, 2 p.m., $12-32.50

p.m., Free (Weekly)

Comedy & Karaoke, Studio 13, Iowa City, 9

(Opening performance—through April 5)

Tue., Mar. 10

p.m., Free (Weekly)

The Picture Show: ‘Willy Wonka and the

Wed., Mar. 11

Chocolate Factory,’ FilmScene—Chauncey,

Reel Representation: Bijou Film Forum Presents ‘The Oath,’ FilmScene—Chauncey,

Burlington Street Bluegrass Band, The Mill,

In Her Steps: Women’s History Tour,

Iowa City, 6 p.m., $7

Iowa City, 6 p.m., $5 (2nd & 4th Wednesdays)

Brucemore, Cedar Rapids, 5:30 p.m., $5-15

Open Mic, Moco Game Room & Hot Dog Bar,

Robin Hemley in Conversation with Inara

Our Sisters’ Many Hats, Coe College—Hickok

Cedar Rapids, 7 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Verzemnieks, Prairie Lights, Iowa City, 7 p.m.,

Hall, Cedar Rapids, 6 p.m., Free

Blues Jam, Parlor City Pub and Eatery, Cedar

Free

Reading: Dennis Green, M and M Books,

Rapids, 7 p.m., Free (Weekly)

My Cousin Vinny, FilmScene—Ped Mall, Iowa

Cedar Rapids, 6 p.m., Free

Sanction w/ SeeYouSpaceCowboy,

City, 7:30 p.m., Free-$5

Weedeater & the Goddamn Gallows,

Vamachara, Typecast, Crow Killer, Gabe’s, Iowa

Black Jacket Symphony Presents: Pink

the Atomic Bitchwax, Worshipper,

City, 7 p.m., $12-15

Floyd’s ‘Dark Side of the Moon,’ Paramount

Heavyweight, Wildwood Smokehouse & Saloon,

Theatre, Cedar Rapids, 8 p.m., $25-30

Iowa City, 7 p.m., $23

Lee County Soup Supper

Iowa City, 3:30 p.m., Free-$5

IOWA CITY DOWNTOWN

Open 7 days a week

38 Mar. 4–17, 2020 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV280


LOCAL RESTAURANTS +

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1. ENTER AN ADDRESS 2. SELECT SOME EATS 3. ENJOY VIGOROUSLY

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Come to Groundswell Cafe for healthy, fresh, and locally-sourced food. Your tips and donations provide meals for those who cannot afford to pay.

Located just off I-380! 201 3rd Ave. SW, Cedar Rapids, Iowa

319-200-2791 • groundswell.hub25.org/cafe Vegan and vegetarian options available!

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L E F LA

A F E TH

T N I JO

ree t S n in L . N 206

ity C a t, Iow


WHAT ARE WE DOING? LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/CALENDAR

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM

DES MOINES JANUARY 8-21, 2020

The Host Country w/ Brother Trucker, Hannah Frey, The Mill, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $12-15

Fri., Mar. 13

microphone over a wall of feedback asking the audience how it felt to know that Black Lips were the voice of their generation. Kind of a grandiose claim, but I suppose it’s all just part of the band’s too-punk-for-punk antics. Now, I haven’t seen the band live in over a decade, but from everything I’ve heard, those antics remain very much intact.

Friday Night Out, Ceramics Center, Cedar Rapids, 6:30 p.m., $40 (2nd Friday) Friday Night Live: Michael Hamlett, Wild Culture Kombucha, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free Young Footlighters Presents: ‘Treasure Island,’ Coralville Center for the Performing Arts, Coralville, 7 p.m., $12-17

Flix Fanfest: The Boondock Saints, Flix Brewhouse, March 17, 6:45 p.m., $7

Get to more events! LittleVillageMag.com/app

Music at the Museum: Fareed Haque with Tony Monaco and Paul Wertico, Nat’l Czech & Slovak Museum, Cedar Rapids, 7 p.m., $8-12 Ward Davis w/ Josh Morningstar, Wildwood Smokehouse & Saloon, Iowa City, 7 p.m., $20 The Revelers, CSPS Legion Arts, Cedar Rapids, 8 p.m., $17-21 Gladie w/ Sugar Shield, The Mill, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $10-13 Mark Sweeny feat. Kevin Patterson, Penguin’s, Cedar Rapids, 8 p.m., $13-15 Cole “The Piano Man” Thomas, Sanctuary Pub, Iowa City, 8 p.m., Free Femme Decks w/ MATT RISSI, Miss Conduct, Yacht Club, Iowa City, 10 p.m., $5 Late Shift at the Grindhouse Special Event: ‘Friday the 13th Part VIII— Jason Takes Manhattan,’ FilmScene— Chauncey, Iowa City, 10 p.m., $10

Raw Space w/ Goldblums, Pleasants, Lizard McGuire & the Marshmallows, Vaudeville Mews, March 5, 10 p.m., $5 At first, the mu-

sic of Wisconsin’s Raw Space was reminding me of all the Dan Deacon/Wham City stuff coming out of Baltimore in the early 2000s. But the more I thought about it, the more I realized that doesn’t give the Midwest proper credit. After all, there have been plenty of excellent electronic music projects from the heartland that have gone on to some level of prominence nationally. I’m thinking of the Show is the Rainbow or Plack Blague out of Nebraska; Vacation Dad and MJ MJ Records out of the Twin Cities; or Wet Hair and nearly everything else on Night People Records, previously of Iowa City. Raw Space’s swirling electronic melodies and proud, no-computer production have all the elements of Midwestern electronics. It’s lo-fi by nature of the piles of old synthesizers and drum machines involved in its construction, and it’s almost entirely self-recorded. But mostly, it’s messy, it’s fun and it’s raw.

I felt obligated to write about something relating to St. Patrick’s Day, but the only thing worthwhile I could find on-theme outside of the usual drunken shenanigans downtown was this showing of Boondock Saints at Flix Brewhouse. Admittedly, it has become an every-college-guy’s favorite film stereotype, but it was pretty great when it was released. Ironically, the film actually turns 21 this year, and Flix is putting together a special menu and beers to mark the occasion. I wish they would double-feature it with Overnight, the documentary about the making of the film. It details the rise and sudden fall of the film’s writer/director, Troy Duffy, following the breakout success of Boondock Saints. The whole thing drips with disdain for the film industry and its boon-or-break balancing act. It’s pretty incredible, but I suppose you can’t expect anyone to sit around and watch a documentary on St. Patrick’s Day. So bring on the gunfights and bottles of Bushmills, and let’s celebrate the holiday like it’s 1999. —Trey Reis

Black Lips w/ Poppy Jean Crawford, Wooly’s, March 8, 8:30 p.m., $16-18

The first time I saw Black Lips live, my brother warned me to “be on guard because their fans are wild, but the band is fucking crazy.” Indeed, there were two guitar casualties, numerous broken strings and enough sweat and spit for the show to live up to the band’s rowdy reputation. I remember the singer, Cole Alexander, shouting into the

Yana Yatsuk via Facebook

NO MO FOMO

Joel Anderson

(Opening night —through Mar. 15)

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV280 Mar. 4–17, 2020 41


Winter provides a unique perspective and highlights the changing beauty to the outdoors. These colder months of the year allow for hiking, snowshoeing, wildlife watching, photography, and much more.

AWARDED BEST PUB 2015, 2016 & 2018

WINTER FUN

in linn county parks

SLEDDING

The area next to Red Cedar Lodge at Squaw Creek Park and a hill by Woodpecker Lodge at Pinicon Ridge Park are popular for sledding during the winter months.

CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING

Linn County Conservation trails that are available for cross-country skiing include: Matsell Bridge Natural Area 5 miles Morgan Creek Park 3.8 miles Squaw Creek Park 3.5 miles Wickiup Hill Learning Center 3.3 miles Pinicon Ridge Park 1.5 miles 4” of snow is required for our equipment to be able to groom trails. Tracks are first “rolled” and then “groomed”. Hikers, horses, and dogs are encouraged to stay off the Nordic ski track.

WINTER SAFETY TIPS

Dress in layers for the weather Wear bright colors Keep hydrated Only venture on ice more than 4” thick

ICE FISHING

Ice fishing opportunities are abundant along the Wapsipinicon and Cedar rivers.

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Sat., Mar. 14 Iowa City Taproom 3rd Anniversary Party & Color TV Release, Big Grove

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WATERLOO/CEDAR FALLS

Brewery, Iowa City, 10 a.m., Free 2020 NewBo Euchre Tournament, NewBo City Market, Cedar Rapids, 10 a.m., $20 Movement and Meaning Workshops with Shiara and Maleeha, Sycamore Rooms, Iowa City, 11 a.m., $10-75 Family Folk Machine’s Community Folk Sing, Uptown Bill’s, Iowa City, 3 p.m., Free (2nd Saturday) Coppers & Brass, Sanctuary Pub, Iowa City, 6 p.m., Free Scott Stilwell, Uptown Bill’s, Iowa City, 7 p.m., $5-10 suggested donation Hawkamania XV, Wildwood Smokehouse & Saloon, Iowa City, 7 p.m., $10-20 Cal Scruby w/ Young Zorro, Vegas, Yacht Club, Iowa City, 7 p.m., $12-35 Glass Mansions, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 8 p.m., Free Mark Sweeny feat. Kevin Patterson, Penguin’s, Cedar Rapids, 8 p.m., $13-15 Dr. Z’s Experiment, The Mill, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $7 via yamatodrummers.com

Kahraman Hafla, Trumpet Blossom, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $10-15 Nxbel & Friends (Ugly Bass Edition), Gabe’s, Iowa City, 9 p.m.,

Sun., Mar. 15 3rd Annual Big Grove Brrrewery Ride, Big Grove Brewery, Iowa City (and Solon), 10 a.m., Free Artifactory Presents: June Art In The Afternoon, The Center, Iowa City, 1 p.m., Free (3rd Sunday) ‘Stages,’ Riverside Theatre, Iowa City, 2 p.m., $10-30 (Final performance) Calan, CSPS Legion Arts, Cedar Rapids, 7 p.m., $24-29

Tue., Mar. 17 SaPaDaPaSo 45th Annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade, Downtown Cedar Rapids, 1 p.m., Free Kellen O’Cullom, Lion Bridge Brewery, Cedar Rapids, 3:30 p.m., Free St. Patrick’s Day Karaoke w/ Soft Lips, Studio 13, Iowa City, 5 p.m., Free Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood Live, Paramount Theatre, Cedar Rapids, 6:30 p.m., $28-48

Yamato: The drummers of Japan, Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center, Cedar Falls, Sunday, March 8, 4 p.m., $1-46.75 Hailing from Japan’s Nara Prefecture, Wadaiko Yamato have racked up a whopping total of over 4,000 live performances in more than 50 countries since they formed in 1993. They tour for six to 10 months out of each year, playing original works. Their 2019-20 program is called Jhonetsu, or Passion. The dozen performers kick off each show hitting a drum made from a 400-year-old tree. This blend of tradition and ancient ways with a full-body athletic, energetic experience promises to be something to behold.

Women in Red: Wikipedia Editathon, University of Northern Iowa—Rod Library, Cedar Falls, Tuesday, March 10, 6 p.m., Free

Northern Iowa Feminists is hosting this “editathon” event in honor of Women’s History Month. The goal? To “take back some female history”! Editathons have become common ways to train new Wikipedia editors, and ones centered on women are among the most prevalent, in an effort to reframe the biases against women that often arise online.

St. Patrick’s Brunch, Grout Museum District, Waterloo, Sunday, March 15, 9 a.m., $12 The Friends of the Grout Historic Houses are presenting

their annual St. Patrick’s Brunch, which raises money for the preservation of these historic buildings. The brunch menu includes ham, egg strata, assorted pastries, fruit, coffee and complimentary champagne. LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV280 Mar. 4–17, 2020 43


PRESENTED BY

Vino Vérité is a series of thought-provoking, chance-taking, and visually-arresting films paired with hand-selected wines and dessert. B The Ross Brothers' fifth feature is a beguiling nonfiction experiment, a mosaic of disparate lives, teetering between dignity and debauchery, reckoning with the past as they face an uncertain future, and singing as their ship goes down.

7PM SUNDAY MARCH 8 Directors Bill and Turner Ross in person $25 Public | $15 FilmScene Members | $10 Students Includes film, wine tasting, hors d’oeuvres & filmmaker reception

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YOUR VILLAGE I’d like to know more about Emma Harvat, the first woman mayor of Iowa City. —Rebecca, Iowa City

H

er name does live on in Iowa City—the chamber where the city council meets is named for her, as is a small park in the Peninsula neighborhood—but Emma Harvat’s contemporaries would have been surprised at how the memory of her has faded. Because for a few months in 1922, after she became mayor of Iowa City, Harvat was one of the most famous women in the country. Harvat was the first woman to serve as mayor of a city with a population of more than 10,000, and newspapers across the country, and even a few in Europe and Asia, wrote stories about her and the city’s new “petticoat administration.” Harvat herself would never have used a frivolous (and sexist) term like that. A tall woman with an imposing physique and serious countenance, she cultivated a no-nonsense style. When she was sworn in as mayor in June 1922, Harvat kept her remarks brief. After thanking the city council, she simply said, “You

know where I stand, and I have only one thing to say. It is this: I propose to do my duty as mayor of Iowa City.” Emma J. Harvat was born in Iowa City in 1870. Her parents, Joseph and Mary Harvat, were Czech immigrants who settled in the Goosetown neighborhood, and Emma was the ninth of their 10 children. When he first arrived in Iowa, Joseph was a day-laborer, but eventually he started his own business, Harvat Meat Market. The Harvats were Catholic, and Emma attended parochial school before going to the Iowa City Academy (later called University High) and Williams Commercial College (also located in Iowa City, also now gone) to learn clerical skills. By the time she was 19, she was as a clerk at Lee Welch Book Store (now Iowa Book), and supporting her younger sister, Clara. Their parents had died, and their brothers and sisters had either moved away or started their own families. Clara enrolled at the University of Iowa in 1893, with Emma helping pay the tuition. After Clara graduated three years later, she married and moved out of town. Now Emma fully

focused on business. By 1902 she’d saved enough money to quit Lee Welch and buy a rival bookstore. Two years later, she turned a profit by selling that store to her former employers. Harvat took her money, and moved to Kirksville, Missouri. In Kirksville, she owned a series of successful businesses and by the time Harvat was 43, she

NEWSPAPERS ACROSS THE COUNTRY, AND EVEN A FEW IN EUROPE AND ASIA, WROTE STORIES ABOUT HER AND THE CITY’S NEW “PETTICOAT ADMINISTRATION.” had enough money to retire. In 1913, she moved back to Iowa City to enjoy her retirement. Harvat rented a room in the home of Theresa Stach, a widow whose family owned a downtown shoe store. Also living in the house was Theresa’s daughter, Mary. Seven years younger than Harvat, and known to everyone as May, she quickly became the most important person in Harvat’s life. Combining their money—May had inherited

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BY PAUL BRENNAN

$2,500 when her father died—the two opened Harvat & Stach, the first ready-to-wear women’s clothing store in the area. It was an immediate success. Ready-to-wear clothing was new at the time, and it was very much associated with the increasing independence of women. Such clothes meant women who could afford them no longer had to spend time making their own. Harvat dealt with the business side of things, Stach handled the fashion. But Havart and Stach were more than just business partners. Until Havart’s death in 1949, they were domestic partners as well. Stach is often referred to as Havart’s “lifelong companion,” which may have been a euphemism for something deeper. The two lived together—in 1919, they had a house built at the corner of Gilbert and Davenport Streets—and accounts of their lives make them sound like a married couple. When the 19th Amendment, guaranteeing the right of women to vote, was ratified in 1920, politically active women in Iowa wanted to expand their roles. Harvat wasn’t one of them. She later claimed to have never been interested

in politics. But in 1921, when the local women’s branch of the Republican Party asked her to run for city council, Harvat agreed. She won easily. It was a tumultuous time in Iowa City. The city was growing rapidly. Prohibition started in 1920. Bootlegging was now a major business in eastern Iowa. In 1922, state and federal agents conducted sweepings raids in the area, resulting in 86 indictments. Just after that, Mayor Ingalls Swisher unexpectedly fired the chief of police—provoking public outrage—and when the council wouldn’t confirm his inexperienced choice for chief, Swisher immediately resigned. The council elected Harvat to complete his term, believing her business experience was what the city needed. (By then, she and Stach had sold their store and become real estate developers.) Harvat’s approach to governing was business-like, but she also believed Iowa City’s morals needed improving. Shortly after becoming mayor, Harvat told a reporter she wanted a city free from corrupting influences, so parents could send their children to UI without worrying about a daughter becoming a “brazen flapper” or a son turning into a jazz-loving “cake eater.”

Harvat’s combination of a focus on bottom-line efficiency (paving streets, creating a zoning commission, making city financial information public) and moralizing (lecturing drunks, banning the movies of an “immoral” Hollywood star) proved popular enough to get her elected by voters to a new term in 1923, but when she ran for reelection in 1925 she was narrowly defeated. Out of office, Harvat continued her real estate work and remained active in public affairs. In 1935, she ran for city council, but lost in a landslide. Emma Harvat died on May 30, 1949, at age 79. May Stach would live for another 23 years, dying in 1972 at age 95. The house they shared for 30 years still stands, and in 2000, the Emma J. Harvat and Mary E. Stach house was added to the National Registry of Historic Places. Have a question about what’s going on in your community? Ask Little Village. Submit your question through the Your Village feature on our homepage, or email us at editor@littlevillagemag.com.

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV280 Mar. 4–17, 2020 47


IOWA CITY NORTHSIDE MARKETPLACE

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48 Mar. 4–17, 2020 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV280


ASTROLOGY

BY ROB BREZSNEY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In 1637, renowned English poet John Milton wrote “Lycidas,” a poetic elegy in honor of a friend. Reading it today, almost four centuries later, we are struck by how archaic and obscure the language is, with phrases like “O ye laurels” and “Ah! who hath reft my dearest pledge?” A famous 20th-century Piscean poet named Robert Lowell was well-educated enough to understand Milton’s meaning, but also decided to “translate” all of “Lycidas” into plainspoken modern English. I’d love to see you engage in comparable activities during the coming weeks, Pisces: updating the past, reshaping and reinterpreting your old stories, revising the ways you talk about and think about key memories. ARIES (March 21-April 19): Progress rarely unfolds in a glorious, ever-rising upward arc. The more usual pattern is gradual and uneven. Each modest ascent is followed by a phase of retrenchment and integration. In the best-case scenario, the most recent ascent reaches a higher level than the previous ascent. By my estimate, you’re in one of those periods of retrenchment and integration right now, Aries. It’s understandable if you feel a bit unenthusiastic about it. But I’m here to tell you that it’s crucial to your next ascent. Let it work its subtle magic.

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You are most likely to be in sweet alignment with cosmic rhythms if you regard the next three weeks as a time of graduation. I encourage you to take inventory of the lessons you’ve been studying since your birthday in 2019. How have you done in your efforts to foster interesting, synergistic intimacy? Are you more passionately devoted to what you love? Have you responded brightly as life has pushed you to upgrade the vigor and rigor of your commitments? Just for fun, give yourself a grade for those “classes,” as well as any others that have been important. Then—again, just for fun—draw up a homemade diploma for yourself to commemorate and honor your work. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Are you ready to seize a more proactive role in shaping what happens in the environments you share with cohorts? Do you have any interest in exerting leadership to enhance the well-being of the groups that are important to you? Now is an excellent time to take brave actions that will raise the spirits and boost the fortunes of allies whose fates are intermingled with yours. I hope you’ll be a role model for the art of pleasing oneself while being of service to others. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Cancerian author Lionel Trilling (1905–1975) was an influential intellectual and literary critic. One of his heroes was another influential intellectual and literary critic, Edmund Wilson. On one occasion, Trilling was using a urinal in a men’s room at the New School for Social Research in New York. Imagine how excited he was when Wilson, whom he had never met, arrived to use the urinal right next to his. Now imagine his further buoyancy when Wilson not only spoke to Trilling but also expressed familiarity with his work. I foresee similar luck or serendipity coming your way soon: seemingly unlikely encounters with interesting resources and happy accidents that inspire your self-confidence. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Poet Conee Berdera delivered a poignant message to her most valuable possession: the flesh and blood vehicle that serves as sanctuary for all her yearnings, powers and actions. “My beloved body,” she writes, “I am so sorry I did not love you enough.” Near the poem’s end she vows “to love and cherish” her body. I wish she would have been even more forceful, saying something like, “From now on, dear body, I promise to always know exactly what you need and give it to you with all my ingenuity and panache.” Would you consider making such a vow to your own most valuable possession, Leo? It’s a favorable time to do so.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Luckily, the turning point you have arrived at doesn’t present you with 20 different possible futures. You don’t have to choose from among a welter of paths headed in disparate directions. There are only a few viable options to study and think about. Still, I’d like to see you further narrow down the alternatives. I hope you’ll use the process of elimination as you get even clearer about what you don’t want. Let your fine mind gather a wealth of detailed information and objective evidence, then hand over the final decision to your intuition. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Certain artists are beyond my full comprehension. Maybe I’m not smart enough to understand their creations or I’m not deep enough to fathom why their work is considered important. For example, I don’t enjoy or admire the operas of Wagner or the art of Mark Rothko. Same with the music of Drake or the novels of Raymond Carter or the art of Andy Warhol. The problem is with me, not them. I don’t try to claim they’re overrated or mediocre. Now I urge you to do what I just did, Libra, only on a broader scale. Acknowledge that some of the people and ideas and art and situations you can’t appreciate are not necessarily faulty or wrong or inadequate. Their value may simply be impossible for you to recognize. It’s a perfect time for you to undertake this humble work. I suspect it will be liberating. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpio-born Ralph Bakshi has made animated films and TV shows for over 60 years. His work has been influential. “I’m the biggest ripped-off cartoonist in the history of the world,” he says. Milder versions of his experience are not uncommon for many Scorpios. People are prone to copying you and borrowing from you and even stealing from you. They don’t always consciously know they’re doing it, and they may not offer you proper appreciation. I’m guessing that something like this phenomenon may be happening for you right now. My advice? First, be pleased about how much clout you’re wielding. Second, if anyone is borrowing from you without making the proper acknowledgment, speak up about it. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Vainly I sought nourishment in shadows and errors,” wrote author Jorge Luis Borges. We have all been guilty of miscalculations like those. Each of us has sometimes put our faith in people and ideas that weren’t worthy of us. None of us is so wise that we always choose influences that provide the healthiest fuel. That’s the bad news, Sagittarius. The good news is that you now have excellent instincts about where to find the best long-term nourishment. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Poet Adrienne Rich wrote, “When a woman tells the truth she is creating the possibility for more truth around her.” I believe this same assertion is true about people of all genders. I also suspect that right now you are in a particularly pivotal position to be a candid revealer: to enhance and refine everyone’s truth-telling by being a paragon of honesty yourself. To achieve the best results, I encourage you to think creatively about what exactly it means for you to tell the deep and entire truth. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Through some odd Aquarian-like quirk, astrologers have come to harbor the apparently paradoxical view that your sign is ruled by both Saturn and Uranus. At first glance, that’s crazy! Saturn is the planet of discipline, responsibility, conservatism, diligence and order. Uranus is the planet of awakening, surprise, rebellion, barrier-breaking and liberation. How can you Aquarians incorporate the energies of both? Well, that would require a lengthy explanation beyond the scope of this horoscope. But I will tell you this: During the rest of the year 2020, you will have more potential to successfully coordinate your inner Saturn and your inner Uranus than you have had in years. Homework: Meditate on how you will do just that. LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV280 Mar. 4–17, 2020 49


50 Mar. 4–17, 2020 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV280


LOCAL ALBUMS

Tall Doozy Sad Girls With Bible Names TALLDOOZY.BANDCAMP.COM

T

all Doozy is a project from veteran Iowa City hip-hop producer Tyler James, a.k.a. Jim Swim, in collaboration with singer Mary Bozaan. Previous Jim Swim releases explored various flavors of hip hop, and include other fruitful collaborations with MCs like Tyler Stück and ADE. Sad Girls With Bible Names lands more squarely in R&B territory. Most of the tracks here sound as though they started on the guitar instead of with samples and drum machines. The guitar chord sequences lead to songs with more of a pop feel. But they hew close to the hip hop aesthetic, anchored in sparse beats with a deep head-nod feel. Bozaan pushes the lush, melodic sound further with her sweet alto, touched with a hint of smoke. She sings quietly, close to the microphone, recalling Billie Holiday and Corinne Bailey Rae. On “Yours Always,” Bozaan croons, “Lessons lost in dresser drawers / take the honey leave the store / Ha I’m a gangsta now” over laidback, sleepy keys and guitars. The joke is that she’s a gangsta only in her imagination. This is underlined by the reverb on the “gangsta now” refrain, recalling the way Ken Nordine’s Word Jazz project used effects to signify inner monologue. The gentle keyboards float in an ocean of reverb, a la Boards of Canada. But Boards starts with hip hop and drifts away into their

Submit albums for review: Little Village, 623 S Dubuque St., IC, IA 52240

own imagination. Tall Doozy goes the other way, borrowing Boards’ texture but keeping the songs in the foreground. “Try For Me” encapsulates the Tall Doozy project. Jim Swim’s laid back, autotuned rapping/singing has a tight rhyme scheme and stumbly-graceful triplet flow: “It’s a shame I’m possessed by what’s less than best in me, genetic destiny, can’t let it rest in peace …” Bazaan’s hook, with multi-tracked harmony, sounds effortless but also full of longing: “Try for me, fighting the thing that fills your mind.” The use of autotuning is a cliche, but it’s a big part of Sad Girls’ sonic texture. If you’re familiar with the Lil Wayne oeuvre, you know how Auto-Tune sounds when you crank up the pitch correction. James deploys it subtly to add emphasis to vocals, then turns it off, letting Bazaan’s natural voice shine. It’s more a

Condor & Jaybird The Glory CONDOR-JAYBIRD.BANDCAMP.COM

Condor & Jaybird Vinyl Release Show w/ Mountain Swallower, Harakiri, Michi Farias, Village Theatre, Davenport, Friday, March 13, 7 p.m., $5

A

full-bodied chord progression, disguised as a bridge (where the other shoe just never drops) closes out Condor & Jaybird’s latest album, and it marks the end of an era: the completion of a trilogy six years in the making. First there was The Kingdom, “REMEMBER” IS EERILY then The Power—now, BEAUTIFUL, ESPECIALLY The Glory is the climax of IN THE FINAL MOVEMENT sonorous occult mysticism WHERE IT FADES INTO REpowered by light, friendVERBERATING TONES JUST ship and more substances than went into any Hunter DISCORDANT ENOUGH TO S. Thompson feature. BE UNSETTLING. The Glory is Condor sable brush touch than a Krylon & Jaybird’s fourth studio album, spray-paint blast. but it’s their first made entirely Tall Doozy is hip hop/R&B “in-house,” so to speak. Guitaristmade a long way from the urban singer Jeramie Anderson recorded crucibles that forged it. It’s Iowa and produced. Anderson is one of music, peculiar to this locale. three veteran members, the others Young artists are tempted to imibeing the illusive Connor “He tate their heroes, but Bozaan and Was Just Here” Lyle and drumJames have left mimicry behind. mer Bryson Foster, who’s already They took the lessons of Drake declared a favorite song from the and Lauryn Hill onboard, but album: found their own voices. “’Sleep’ showcases everyone When Bozaan’s voice soars pretty nicely while staying poppy on the hook for “Come Up,” the and experimental at the same music feels like dreaming about time,” Foster says, referencing the flying. A through line in Jim fourth track. Swim’s music, from his first EP Experimental is always the titled Half Woke, is finding the word of the day for Condor & music at the borders of sleep. Sad Jaybird. For example, “Sleep”— Girls is James and Bozaan’s lucid which is also the favorite of newdream. —Kent Williams comer to the band, bassist Dave

“The Sound Guy” Perry—owes a lot to ’50s- and ’60s-era pop harmonies. Some of Perry and Fosters’ fondness for the song is likely due to the playful flow of thumpery drums and scales that trip around the land of Oz. But then immediately after that, the song “Time”—which, at the moment, is my own favorite—is a rock opera, making use of the track layering the group is so fond of. The technique might make new listeners expect the band members to number in the double digits. In fact, there are more robust examples of this on the album, but I feel like revealing where qualifies as a spoiler. “Remember” is eerily beautiful, especially in the final movement where it fades into reverberating tones just discordant enough to be unsettling; Ari Aster (Hereditary, Midsommar) should include it in the soundtrack for his next horror film. “Monster” is another headbanger that makes me want to lock the band in a studio until they’ve produced a spiritual sequel to the Who’s Tommy. That doesn’t even cover half of the album, but I’m running out of room here, so you’ll just have to add it to your iTunes queue. Or, better yet, grab one of the limited number of vinyl copies they’ll have available at their record release show. Also on the bill are Minnesota’s Harakiri, long-time friends to the Quad Cities music scene, and the original bridge-gazer Mountain Swallower, back from a hiatus. In the realm of Good vs. Evil, it’s generally accepted—and has been since Milton’s Paradise Lost—that the latter is much more fun and exciting. Condor & Jaybird reject that premise; their mythological/quasi-biblical trilogy celebrates that mirth and ecstasy fall within the sphere of virtue, well within our reach, even as we enjoy the filth of mortal existence. —Melanie Hanson

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV280 Mar. 4–17, 2020 51


LOCAL BOOKS

Jon Cone and Rauan Klassnik An Ice Cream Truck Stalled at the Bottom of the World PLAYS INVERSE PRESS

M

ost plays tell a story, taking audiences for a ride of plot twists and turns, perhaps inspiring laughter or tears or heartbreak along the way. Other plays take a different road, focusing more on tone and mood—a journey evoking difficult-to-process feelings and challenging audiences in ways that

stick long after the play is over. An Ice Cream Truck Stalled at the Bottom of the World by Jon Cone and Rauan Klassnik is a collection of plays that takes the latter track. No play in the collection is very long—some are as short as five pages—but there is so much packed into each page they require multiple readings just to absorb the action and embrace the tone. Two characters recur in each play: Pog and Gomey. They are described as “men, barely.” Gomey is the more aggressive of the two, while Pog feels more like a blank slate. Neither are fully realized characters in the script, though with smart choices by the actors, they could become so. The only other named character is Artaud, the French theater artist who created the Theatre of Cruelty movement, which focused on assaulting the

senses of the audience. The real Artaud’s influence is clear, as most of these plays have stage directions suggesting vague but intense sounds, such as “the pained roar of something like a lion” or “Music plays low. The overall effect is modern but foreign, vital but bloodless.” The stage directions throughout all of the plays are often illogical and suggestive of mood rather than reality. My favorite is “Kittens roam freely all corners of the known universe for the duration of this performance.” As a director, my first thought is, “What the heck am I supposed to do with that?” And my next thought is, “OK, let’s think about how to suggest that to the audience.” These plays challenge directors and actors alike, and that’s a powerful point in their favor. There’s also an absurdist bent to this collection of plays. Pog

and Gomey evoke the main characters from Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, though neither appears to be waiting for anything—they are purposeless and uncertain. Still, there’s a sense of uncomfortable longing that glides through every play. It’s never clear what anyone is longing for, but that is most likely the point. As noted, none of the plays have a clear plot, but all exude and elicit those intractable emotions, from anger to sadness to confusion. One of the most powerful effects of theater is to challenge the audience. But challenging the audience is just the beginning of what these plays do. Cone and Klassnik have created a series of plays that confound our senses, confuse our minds and force us to confront discomfort. You will not emerge from these stories unscathed. —Matt Falduto

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Submit books for review: Little Village, 623 S Dubuque St., IC, IA 52240

Dennis Green Traitor HAPPY HOUR PUBLISHING

Reading: Dennis Green, M and M Books, Cedar Rapids, Thursday, March 12, 6 p.m., Free

A

n intriguing idea, sympathetic characters and a fast-moving plot make Traitor by Iowan Dennis Green a great read for lovers of exciting sci-fi. Traitor is the final book in a trilogy that began with Traveler

and Prisoner, and though I have not read the first two, I thoroughly enjoyed the third. However, I would recommend that readers start with the first two, as it took me time to get up to speed with the plot. Parallel worlds with different versions of the same people are standard science fiction fare, but Green kicks this idea up a notch with his premise: If one person is good at something, more of the same person is better. The main character, Trav, has a special talent. He can travel between different time streams—he can even change the probability that something will happen. In the previous books, Trav’s long-term friendship with brilliant quantum physicist Dr. Sam Markus has led to his recruitment by a Sam analogue who is trying to repair rips in the Multiverse. They have discovered the

existence of another Sam analogue, who they call “The Boss”—a man who is determined to recreate reality in his own image. And to do this, he needs an army. An army of Travs.

THE HEROES ARE GENUINELY HEROIC IN A REALISTIC WAY AS THEY RISK THEIR LIVES TO SAVE OTHERS. At the beginning of Traitor, Trav is stranded in a time-stream where Sam is dead. He has no memory of being a Traveler, and he has no connection with his friend Morgan or his former girlfriend, Mary. Jolted into recollection and hunted by his own analogues, he rejoins his

friends in his former time stream as they decide how to defeat the Boss. Because the Multiverse is collapsing, Trav is gaining new powers, and if the Boss has his way, Trav and his friends will cease to exist. Despite the hectic pace of the plot, it is the wonderful characters who are the stars of this show. Trav is protective to a fault of the people he loves, and Sam is intelligent and quirky. Sophie, the young girl who is the only other known Traveler, is well-portrayed—never too cute or too precocious. The heroes are genuinely heroic in a realistic way as they risk their lives to save others. Traitor and its companion books are great choices for those who want their science fiction action-oriented with a side of excellent character development. —Beth Wheeler

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SMEAR CAMPAIGN

BY R O N WA L D E N

LittleVillageMag.com

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20. Uproar 21. Green Card company 22. Run the table 24. Barely managed, with “out” 26. Binary choices? 33. Pawn storage container 37. Missile tracking org. in WarGames 38. Comedy writer Scovell who cowrote Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In

39. Exchanges 42. Fair offering 43. Real thinker 45. Streaming channel 47. Billund, Denmark, for 57-Down, e.g. 50. Pump, for one 51. Maul handle 56. To boot 59. Vexillologist’s interest 63. Spencer of Good Morning America

64. Get ready to call the shots? 67. Goes along (with) 68. Sodium ___ (polluting compound in acid rain) 69. Higher-ups 70. Cop movie command ... or what you might do with the items spelled out by the shaded letters

DOWN 40. Quid ___ quo 1. Banters with wit 41. Darn, say 2. “Hogwash!” 44. “Not buyin’ it ...” 3. Golden Globe winner for 46. Word with bitter or Casino business 4. Came up 48. A snap to use 5. Decay 49. Where “Neil A.” gave the Moon 2 stars and com6. Cube farm cry mented ‘nice views, but to 7. Contact solution brand dusty and no atmosphere, 8. Many an MIT grad wont go back!’ 9. Branson’s range 52. Siri alternative 10. Louisiana governor 53. Fanatical John ___ Edwards 54. Exchange 11. Napkin neighbor, con55. ___ pants (Aladdin ventionally outfit) 12. Sch. for little ones 56. Rhyme scheme for 13. In need of hot stones the first quatrain of a 14. “Don’t Let It End” band Shakespearean sonnet 18. Attendee 57. BrickHeadz maker 23. Addl. epistolary after58. Some 35mm cameras, thought for short 25. Longest division of 60. QB stat geological time 61. Trail mix, in a back27. Cord-cutters, for short ronym 28. “Hot damn!” 62. Start waking up 29. Spot-on 65. “___-haw!” 30. Chi-town paper 66. Groundbreaking 31. 2019 America’s Got Talent judge Dwyane 32. Took too LV279 ANSWERS much, briefly GEMS R AMP S K I DD 33. Closing Bell A XON EME R Y A CR E B E T O S A T O N M EWL channel C H OWC H OWC H A C H A 34. Title shared by P A U L O E L ROY A S P I R E P A L A U chart-toppers for BOON QU A S I S Z A Enrique Iglesias CHUGCHUGCHOCHOS SON L I EGE R E N I and Mariah Carey DROP S A DOR E S A S S E T T H EOC 35. Jack of Rio CH I CH I CH I NCH I N Lobo T OGA S H I N E EMA J URN S MA NGA T A T A 36. Small flatP E S T Y I K E S S X SW fishes

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Profile for Little Village Magazine

Little Village magazine issue 280: Mar. 4-17, 2020  

Little Village | The Iowa City and Cedar Rapids Area's News and Culture Magazine

Little Village magazine issue 280: Mar. 4-17, 2020  

Little Village | The Iowa City and Cedar Rapids Area's News and Culture Magazine

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