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A VOTER’S FIELD GUIDE

NEWS CULTURE EVENTS IOWA CITY CEDAR RAPIDS

E T A K ! E O N

ISSUE 243 May 16–June 5, 2018

Exploring the new democratic ecosystems of Iowa

INSIDE EMMA GOLDMAN

A BETTER CLASS OF PORNO

JOAN OSBORNE AT ARTS FEST


EMBRACING COMPLEXITY Hancher’s Embracing Complexity project focuses on Islamic art and Muslim artists in an effort to build community and understanding. The rich and varied first season of the project is coming to a close, but look—and join us—for more exceptional events during the 2018-2019 Hancher season.

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1 KJ Sanchez

September 7, 2017

2 Eid al-Adha Dinner

UI Muslim Student Association

September 9, 2017

3 Niyaz

The Fourth Light Project September 30, 2017

4 G. Willow Wilson

A Superhero for Generation Why

October 8, 2017

5 Amir ElSaffar

and Rivers of Sound February 8, 2018

6 Karim Abdul-Jabbar

A collaboration with the University Lecture Committee

March 25, 2018

7 Feathers of Fire: A Persian Epic April 4, 2018

8 Bassem Youssef

Part of Mission Creek Festival

April 7, 2018

9 Reading: Muslims in Iowa April 10, 2018

Photos 1–6, 8–9: Miriam Alarcón Avila


Photo © iAMSHOOTER.COM

Zeshan Bagewadi and the Transistors Born in Chicago to Indian Muslim immigrants, Zeshan Bagewadi’s musical identity was formed at the harmonious intersection of two worlds. As he was growing up, his parent’s love of their native Indo-Pakistani music collided with the sounds of his father’s extensive blues, soul, and R&B collection. Bagewadi brings all of those influences to the stage, creating a unifying and soulful sound from seemingly disparate traditions. He and his band will perform at the Friday Night Concert Series and then play a Saturday show in Hancher’s backyard. Both concerts are free; no tickets required.

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TH

ANNIVERSARY SEASON

Great Artists. Great Audiences. Hancher Performances. Discover more at hancher.uiowa.edu.

Friday, May 25 6:30 to 9:30 pm

Friday night Concert Series in Downtown Iowa City

A collaboration with Summer of the Arts

Saturday, May 26 2:00 pm Lynch Snyder Green (Outside Hancher Auditorium)

SEASON SPONSOR: WEST MUSIC EVENT SPONSORS: Anonymous Family Foundation H. Dee and Myrene Hoover

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Hancher in advance at (319) 335-1158.

Hancher's Embracing Complexity project is made possible in part by a grant from the Associatioof Performing Arts Professionals – Building Bridges: Arts, Culture, and Identity, a component of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art.


Summerfest Bichina Bia Congo

Quad Cities Ballet Folklorico

JUNE 9, 2018 11 A . M .–10 P. M . Free and open to the public!

Join Grinnell College for a daylong celebration of learning and discovery for curious minds of all ages.

Glitter Truck

Family Fun Food Entertainment Art History Music Science

FO R MORE IN FOR M ATI ON AN D A COM PLETE SC H EDU LE

www.grinnell.edu/summerfest | summerfest@grinnell.edu


VOL. 25 ISSUE 243 May 16–June 5, 2018 ALWAYS FREE LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM

PUBLISHER MATTHEW STEELE DIGITAL DIRECTOR DREW BULMAN ART DIRECTOR JORDAN SELLERGREN MANAGING EDITOR EMMA MCCLATCHEY ARTS EDITOR GENEVIEVE TRAINOR NEWS DIRECTOR PAUL BRENNAN VISUAL REPORTER—PHOTO ZAK NEUMANN VISUAL REPORTER­—VIDEO JASON SMITH FOOD & DRINK DIRECTOR FRANKIE SCHNECKLOTH DISTRIBUTION MANAGER TREVOR LEE HOPKINS VENUE ACCOUNT MANAGER, CALENDAR EDITOR JOSHUA PRESTON MARKETING COORDINATOR, GRAPHIC DESIGNER JAV DUCKER

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Voting in Iowa has changed. Here’s a how-to and a who-that.

One of the first feminist health clinics is also one of the last.

Joan Osborne will fill Iowa City with the chill sound of the ’90s.

PAUL BRENNAN

MIKE KUHLENBECK

DAN BOSCALJON

6 - Interactions 10 - Voting Guide 12 - Community 14 - Bread & Butter 16 - Sex & Love

18 - Hot Tin Roof 20 - A-List 21 - Events Calendar 33 - Ad Index

35 - Straight Dope 37 - Astrology 38 - Local Albums 39 - Crossword

A Guide for the Perplexed

Emma Goldman Today

Joan of Arts Fest

ADVERTISING ADS@LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM LISTINGS CALENDAR@ LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM CONTRIBUTORS CECIL ADAMS, NATALIE BENWAY, DAN BOSCALJON, JEFF FASANO, RACHEL FOTHERINGHAM, BLAIR GAUNTT, STU HARTLEP, MIKE KUHLENBECK, JOHN MARTINEK, MICHAEL ROEDER, NIKKI SCHEEL, TOM TOMORROW, SAM LOCKE WARD SUBMISSIONS EDITOR@LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM DISTRIBUTION REQUESTS DISTRO@ LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM CREATIVE SERVICES CREATIVE@ LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM CONTACT (319) 855-1474, 623 S DUBUQUE ST, IOWA CITY, IA 52240

PROUDLY SERVING THE CRANDIC SINCE 2001

Little Village is an independent, community-supported news and culture publication based in Iowa City. Through journalism, essays and events, we work to improve our community in the Iowa City, Coralville and Cedar Rapids area according to a few core values: environmental sustainability, affordability and access, economic and labor justice, racial justice, gender equity, quality healthcare, quality education and critical culture. Letters to the editor(s) are always welcome. We reserve the right to fact check and edit for length and clarity. Please send letters, comments or corrections to editor@littlevillagemag.com. Little Village is always free; all contents are the licensed work of the contributor and of the publication. If you would like to reprint or collaborate on new content, reach us at lv@ littlevillagemag.com. To browse back issues, visit us at 623 S Dubuque St, Iowa City, or online at issuu.com/littlevillage.

A VOTER’S FIELD GUIDE

NEWS CULTURE EVENTS IOWA CITY CEDAR RAPIDS

E T A K ! O N E

ISSUE 243 May 16–JUnE 5, 2018

Exploring the new democratic ecosystems of Iowa

INSIDE EMMA GOLDMAN

A BETTER CLASS OF PORNO

JOAN OSBORNE AT ARTS FEST

Jordan Sellergren

POWERED BY CAFE DEL SOL ROASTING LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV243 May 16–June 5, 2018 5


SuperSuperheroeS heroeS Wanted

INTERACTIONS LV encourages community members, including candidates for office, to submit letters to Editor@LittleVillageMag.com. To be considered for print publication, letters should be under 500 words. Preference is given to letters that have not been published elsewhere.

‘She knows it’s unconstitutional’: Gov. Reynolds signs the nation’s most severe abortion restrictions into law Little bit tough today to hold my head up as a proud Iowan. Feels a bit like the rest of the country is laughing at us. How far have we fallen in just a few short years. —Beth S. I would think she’d be surrounded by zygotes, embryos and fetuses since this bill protects them while doing nothing for the children standing in the room by her. —Gregory D.

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it is the job of culture to promote responsible sex and awareness of the responsibilities of womanhood. Abortion is the taking of life no matter how you justify it. It is an avoidable tragedy —Jeff P.

Believe it or not, liberals understand your perspective quite well. They disagree with your conclusions, however reasoned you believe them to be. All that is immaterial. The difference is you wish to use the power of the state to enforce your beliefs on others. Don’t like abortion? Cool. Don’t have one. —Alex P.

Your Village: What was Secret Pizza? I found them once! I was having speakers installed in my pickup at a shop downtown and smelled pizza! I asked the pizza maker, and wound up with a large pepperoni! —Kevin K. Yes!!! We loved Secret Pizza and were able to find the location in the summer of ‘92. We received a free pizza. —Matt A.


F U T I L E W R A T H

S A M LO C K E WA R D

It was a sad day when the free pizza turned into a two liter of RC. —Tommy L. I worked at Secret Pizza for about two years off and on. Roger was the most amazing boss imaginable. I could tell stories about my experience. Someone needs to make a documentary. I lived in his mobile home for about a year. Roger was one of the best businessmen I have ever met. He didn’t follow any rules. — Clodborse B.

Nepotism and Iowa politicians back in the news, after Gov. Reynolds gives her father a job This used to be the kind of thing that would get people run out of office; now people just shrug. —Edward K.

‘My God, doesn’t it feel good when Republicans vote like Republicans?’: Iowa legislature passes extreme antiabortion bill Wouldn’t it feel good if an elected official voted to do what was the best for the most people and stopped labeling themselves as Republican or Democrat. —Candace S. I just don’t like the idea they are going to use my money to support the law in court. —James J. Republican hierarchy doesn’t really want to overturn Roe. It’s the best tool they have to get a large block of voters to turn out and vote for them. —Bruce B.

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV243 May 16–June 5, 2018 7


INTERACTIONS Cinco da Blues supports KCCK’s blues library

En Español: Don’t ask me where I’m from

We are so supported by this radio station! Thank you KCCK for keeping the Blues alive! —Tanya E. You won’t be blue after this show! —Dick M.

S T R E S S F R A C T U R E S

Tu eres 100% Colombiana y 100% americana. Y solo las personas que te queremos y conocemos sabemos eso y es un orgullo tener a mi sobrina en el top 10 de la excelencia, y cuando se llega a ese nivel lo de menos es saber de dónde es. JOHN

MARTINEK

/LittleVillage READER POLL: It’s almost townie time in Iowa City! What will you do once the student population recedes? 11% Hang on the Pentacrest 38% Hit downtown hard 9% Ride bike on the sidewalk 42% ALL THE FESTIVALS

Si no la pregunta es quien es? Quien es para que sea tan pila, tan inteligente y el temor que le genera a los demás por tener una persona tan fuerte a su lado. —Edwin “...whenever I say I’m from North Carolina, I’m authentically American for Americans. But when I say that I was born in Bogota, Colombia, I moved to the U.S. when I was 8 and that I’ve lived the rest of my life in North Carolina, then I don’t have an authentic identity.” I hate this. I love this. I love the immigrant story so much, I believe so strongly in it, I want to know! Every time I hear it, it reinforces my love of the country I believe we are & what I want it to be. Where are you from? It’s the equivalent of greeting others with “have you eaten?” These greetings exist! I’m eligible for D.A.R. All the pilgrims are buried on Cole Hill; James Cole was my 7th g-grandpa. I don’t know the immigrant story for my family. I worry about the American Indian effect. It’s all important. Just because someone asks, doesn’t mean they are being judgmental or rude. They might be jealous of your knowledge of multiculturalism, family and story. Appreciate love! —Genie Z.

Life’s Celebrations...

Made from Scratch Make Scratch cupcakes part of every celebration: Cedar Falls | Waterloo | West Des Moines | Corallville 1-855-833-5719 | scratchcupcakery.com 8 May 16–June 5, 2018 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV243


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319-248-0561


COMMUNITY

A Field Guide to Voting in Iowa

Primary Election Tuesday, June 5

Specific to Johnson and Linn County

General Election Tuesday, Nov. 6

E

lections for governor in Iowa tend to be sedate, even dull, affairs, just like the man who won most of them over the last four decades, Terry Branstad. But things are different this year, so Little Village prepared this short guide for your hike to the ballot box. Branstad’s spoor: He’s in Beijing now, but before leaving

Iowa, Terry Branstad thoroughly marked his territory. Last year, he signed into law two major changes to voting. The first is a requirement that voters show a specific kind of ID. Proponents say it stops in-person voter fraud, a winning-the-lotteryand-dropping-dead-the-sameday-rare occurrence. Branstad also slashed hours for early voting. Proponents say it will

Yes!

Vote early! Check out your options: Johnson County johnson-county.com/dept_ auditor_elections.aspx?id=22232 Linn County linncounty.org/377/ Absentee-Voting

Democrats are numerous but not varied: Watching Branstad’s feral offspring—the rampaging Republicans who ran the 201718 legislative session—enact a

right-wing agenda has left the Democrats unusually focused and eager to turn things around before Iowa becomes North Kansas. It’s also left them with six candidates for governor, all of whom agree on the big issues. That’s great for party unity, but may result in a primary with no clear winner. And under Iowa law, if no one gets 35 percent of the vote in a primary, the

Are you registered to vote?

Is it more than two weeks before election day?

Yes

save money, but the savings are negligible and inconvenience considerable. Why pass these measures? Maybe because both have been shown to decrease the number of Democratic votes.

No idea. Check at sos.iowa.gov/elections/ voterreg/regtovote/search.aspx

No

The six forms of valid ID for voting: an Iowa driver’s license, an Iowa non-operators’ ID, a military ID, a veterans ID, passport or a new state-issued voter ID card.

But I don’t

have an ID

!

If you don’t have one of the six approved forms and you are already registered to vote, you can cast a vote in your designated precinct by signing an oath attesting to your identity. This option ends next year.

10 May 16–June 5, 2018 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV243

Is it more than two weeks before election day?

No

Register in-person on election day. Find your polling place. Bring your ID and proof of residence. A drivers license fulfills both!

Bring your ID to vote!

No.

Register to vote online: visit mymvd.iowadot.gov and select “Voter Registration”

Yes Do you have a drivers license, ID or passport?

Yes

No

Get a voter ID! To register by mail, call 319-356-6004 and request a voter ID form. Fill out and send to your county auditor: Johnson County Auditor 913 S Dubuque St, Ste 101, Iowa City, IA 52240 Linn County Election Services 935 2nd St SW, Cedar Rapids, IA 52404

Can I skip the mail?

Yep, register for your voter ID in person at your auditor’s office.


IOWA’S DEMOCRATIC GUBERNATORIAL SPECIMEN Grew up: Columbus Junction Resides: Des Moines Occupation: State Senator, Attorney

Grew up: Spencer Resides: Coralville Occupation: RN, SEIU local president

Grew up: Des Moines Resides: Des Moines Occupation: Retired

Nate Boulton

Cathy Glasson

Fred Hubbell

youngest candidate, but he’s already deep into

candidates plan to do, Glasson is willing to

man, Hubbell hasn’t been shy about using his

retirement planning. In January, Boulton and

take a big step further. They want universal

money for good causes. Nobody in Dubuque

fellow Democrat Iowa Treasurer Michael Fitz-

health care? Glasson wants single-payer.

would sell Planned Parenthood a building for

gerald unveiled an ambitious plan to provide

They support unions? Glasson’s campaign

its clinic, so Hubbell bought it one. He’s from a

Roth IRAs for private-sector workers without

is unionized. Now is not the time for half-

family that’s been a civic leader in Iowa since the

retirement benefits.

measures, Glasson says.

1850s.

Habitat: Union halls. Boulton’s only in his first

Habitat: Wherever Tom Joad said he’d

Habitat: Board rooms and Terrace Hill, the

term as a state senator, but he’s already a

be. (Read your Steinbeck or look it up on

governor’s mansion. Terrace Hill belonged to

favorite of unions across Iowa, and he’s got the

YouTube.)

Hubbell’s family until 1971, when they donated it

Distinctive feature: At 37, Boulton is the

Distinctive feature: Whatever other

endorsements to prove it.

Distinctive feature: A wealthy, retired business-

to the state.

Grew up: Waterloo Resides: Des Moines Occupation: Physician, health care management exec.

Grew up: Montgomery County Resides: Des Moines Occupation: TBD by election

Grew up: Davenport Resides: Ames Occupation: Administrator, ISU

Andy McGuire

John Norris

Ross Wilburn

detailed plan to address Iowa’s mental health

who? Everybody in this race. At what? Every-

public office more times than all the other Dem-

and substance abuse problems isn’t surprising

thing in this race. Governing? He’s run important

ocratic primary candidates combined. He served

because she’s a physician. That her own mental

but unglamorous offices at the state, national

three terms on the Iowa City Council, 2000 to

health is excellent is a little surprising—she was

and international level. Campaigning? He’s been

2011. Elected by his fellow councilmembers to

chair of the Iowa Democratic Party during the

doing it since 1988, when he worked for Jesse

serve a term as mayor in 2006, Wilburn made

last presidential cycle. Remember what that

Jackson.

history as Iowa City’s first black mayor.

was like?

Habitat: The halls of power and rural Iowa.

Habitat: The former Iowa City mayor now lives

Habitat: Wherever people who once de-

Norris says Democrats need to make rebuilding

in Ames. It’s a puzzling migratory pattern. Of

nounced each other as Hillbots or Bernie Bros

ties with rural Iowans a priority, for the health of

course, Ames does have great water. (Google

now coexist peacefully.

both the party and the state.

“Hooray for Ames!” Seriously, Google it.)

Distinctive feature: That McGuire has a

Illustrations by Blair Gauntt

Distinctive feature: More experience. More than

Distinctive feature: Wilburn has been elected to

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV243 May 16–June 5, 2018 11


COMMUNITY nominee is selected at the state party convention. That means the nominee would be chosen by the 1,000 delegates to the June 16 convention who were elected at this year’s caucuses. How that happens is TBD. Kevin Geiken, executive director of the Iowa Democratic Party, told Little Village the guidelines are still being written by the delegates on the convention’s rules committee, and won’t be published until just before the primary. “Our goal is that the nominating process, if that’s what the convention becomes, is transparent, accessible and fair,” Geiken said. The endangered lesser Branstad: Branstad’s parting gift to Iowa was the installation of his hand-picked successor, Kim Reynolds, as governor. This is Reynolds’ first run for statewide office without Branstad on the ticket, and things aren’t going smoothly. Her campaign manager was arrested for public intoxication in 2017, and then quit earlier this year. Polls show her job approval rating stuck below 50 percent. She’s recently signed some very unpopular legislation (draconian abortion restrictions, the “sanctuary cities” bill). But none of that matters in the primary, because Reynolds is running unopposed. Miscellaneous fauna: There are two Libertarians on the June ballot, Marco Battaglia and Jake Porter. Standard journalistic practice says we should pretend each has some small chance of winning in November, but frankly, the only way either one gets into the governor’s mansion next year is as part of a tour group. ––Paul Brennan

12 May 16–June 5, 2018

The Heart of the Fight After surviving 45 years of protests and firebombs, the Emma Goldman Clinic’s biggest challenge may still be ahead. • BY MIKE KUHLENBECK

T

he passing of a controversial anti-abortion bill in the Iowa Senate on May 2—signed by Kim Reynolds on May 4—puts the future of reproductive rights in jeopardy for many Iowans. As opponents plan to take up this fight with the courts, groups such as the Iowa City-based Emma Goldman Clinic (EGC) will continue providing education and services. The EGC started as a collective of 12 women—made up of students, mothers and workers—operating out of the women’s center on the University of Iowa campus. They opened the clinic at 227 N Dubuque St in Iowa City in 1973, nine months after the U.S. Supreme Court decision on Roe v. Wade overturned Iowa’s archaic abortion statutes dating back to the 19th century. For 45 years, the clinic has provided gynecological services, birth control, abortion and assistance to those seeking it. The clinic is named after the Lithuanianborn revolutionary Emma Goldman (18691940), who, after immigrating to the U.S., championed causes such as women’s rights and reproductive rights (birth control, abortion and free medical care) during a time when even speaking about such issues could land someone in jail. The organizers wanted to honor Goldman’s “challenging spirit”—a bit of an understatement for one of the founders of anarcha-feminism. The EGC has changed their leadership model throughout the years in order to fulfill

their mission statement to “promote respectful, client-centered and participatory health care through informed decision making, client rights, advocacy and expansion, and support of pregnancy choices.” Director of Health Services Francine Thompson has been working at the clinic for more than 30 years (31 years in July). Raised in a family of activists, Thompson was carrying picket signs and attending protests with her mother to combat discrimination and support civil rights at a young age. Thompson is originally from Waterloo and learned about the EGC when she was visiting her sister in Iowa City. “I saw an advertisement for a position, and I was excited,” Thompson told Little Village. Thompson is responsible for the services provided at the clinic and is involved with community outreach. Since the founding of EGC, the organization has confronted numerous challenges. “Women’s healthcare has always been under a microscope,” Thompson said. “Just surviving has been an amazing feat. There are now only 13 clinics in the U.S. that identify as feminist, nonprofit and that provide abortion care. I believe that we may just be the oldest nonprofit clinic providing abortions that has been in continuous operation.” Since the ruling on Roe v. Wade by the highest court in the land, there has been a backlash from the anti-abortion movement, with efforts often centered on targeting clinics


Francine Thompson, EGC’s director of health services, in front of the original wooden sign. Photo by Zak Neumann

and health professionals that provide abortions. Thompson recalled the time EGC was firebombed in 1978. According to an article from The Daily Iowan published shortly after the attack, the clinic “suffered minor roof damage from a fire caused by three Molotov cocktails thrown at the rear of the building.” Forty years after the firebombing, the clinic continues to face ongoing threats of intimidation. Every Thursday and Friday protesters demonstrate outside the clinic with between two to 20 participants at a time.

The most dangerous proposal, according to Thompson, is what has been called the “fetal heartbeat bill” or Senate File 359. Iowa already has some of the harshest restrictions on abortion on the books compared to other states, banning most abortions after 20 weeks. The heartbeat bill, which passed in the Iowa Senate after a late night debate in a vote of 51-46 on the morning of May 2, would criminalize most abortions if a heartbeat is detected, which can be as early as six weeks. “Many people may not even know that they’re pregnant in six weeks,” Thompson said. “This puts a heavy time restraint on an already time-sensitive situation. Add in the time that people must take to take off work, find childcare and transportation—the bill’s intention is to eliminate abortions, but it is disguised as a concern for the fetus. It’s been proven by multiple medical studies that a fetus does not feel pain.” Senate Bill 359 will be challenged by groups such as Planned Parenthood and the Iowa branch of the American Civil Liberties Union. Thompson said it diverts time, energy and dollars to respond to these efforts. “These are resources that could be better utilized toward the provision of reproductive health care,” she said. The stigma associated with abortion continues to be one of the most foreboding in U.S. culture. Many pro-choice activists, including Thompson, are calling for a widespread movement similar to Me Too and Time’s Up to help educate the public and remove this social burden from the shoulders of those who have had abortions. “There is still a lot of silence and shame associated with the decision,” Thompson said. “Abortion is continuing to work on its Me Too campaign. If we can get a movement like that, it will make an impact.” Thompson said she and her EGC colleagues will continue to move forward in the wake of the “heartbeat” bill’s passage in the Iowa congress. “We are proud of the work we do and the care that we provide for the people of the Midwest,” Thompson said. “We plan to continue to reach out to marginalized groups that often get the short end of the stick when it comes to healthcare.”

“Women’s healthcare has always been under a microscope.”

—Francine Thompson Representatives from the Newman Catholic Church and Johnson County Right to Life have dispatched protesters, as well as other activists. The demonstrations are peaceful—often involving standing with signs or holding prayer along the sidewalk and right-of-way outside the clinic’s front entrance—but can be received as bullying or shaming by EGC’s clients as they enter or exit. The UI student group Hawks for Choice has worked with EGC by escorting clients to their cars for support and safety. The biggest threats looming over the clinic come not from these protesters, but from the Iowa legislature. Since the Republican party has taken control of the governorship (under Terry Branstad and Kim Reynolds) and the state legislature, its representatives have renewed their attacks on reproductive rights. For example, Planned Parenthood clinics were forced to close their doors in Bettendorf, Burlington, Keokuk and Sioux City due to a lack of legislative funding, shutting out nearly 15,000 Iowans from their health care providers. Aside from cutting necessary funds and limiting access, they have proposed measures to outlaw most abortions. Other proposals would have a devastating impact on the work of EGC and other abortion providers, including requiring clients to provide reasons for seeking an abortion through paperwork and forcing clients to look at ultrasound pictures.

Mike Kuhlenbeck is a journalist and a member of the National Writers Union UAW Local 1981 / AFL – CIO based in Des Moines.

Wendy Stokesbary, LMHC, LLC Licensed Mental Health Counselor

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BREAD & BUTTER LV Recommends

Drinkin’ & Votin’

uc

water. Both drinks double down on the rum with two different blends each; the Good To Mama adds banana liqueur and charred pineapple for a sweetly tropical refresher, whereas their Where The Boats Go cocktail blends jalapeño, cilantro and lemon balm with coconut milk for a zesty, slightly spicy but tempered drink. Basta also offers something delightfully consumable on the rum front: their signature Caipirissima cocktail. After you’ve cast your vote, use your sunny perch on their patio to express your thanks for those hard-working Americans that came before you. Because of them, you can sip on this rum-y, minty, boozy treat free of taxes from British parliament.

Ja vD

T

he Sugar Act of 1764, which imposed taxes on sugar and molasses imported from the West Indies, was a big instigator of the “no taxation without representation” movement that helped spark the American Revolution. Colonists weren’t really interested in putting that sugar in their tea, or that molasses on their toast—the sugar and molasses were being used to make rum, which was both delicious and safer to drink than the water. The seasonal cocktail menu at Cobble Hill Eatery & Dispensary has two great rum-based cocktails that are quite quaffable for those moments when you’re feeling inspired by colonists of yore or avoiding

ke r

You may not have learned in school, but the U.S. was founded on booze. Celebrate your civic duty by raising a glass to freedom.

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LittleVillageMag.com/Dining

T

homas Jefferson went deeply into debt importing wines from Europe for his extensive wine cellar. Jefferson collected more than 20,000 bottles of wine, but claimed he didn’t drink that much. “My measure is a perfectly sober one of three or four glasses at dinner, and not a drop at any other time,” he wrote to a friend. “But as to those three or four glasses I am very fond.” Though not nearly as staggering as Jefferson’s personal collection of 20,000 wines, the selection of rare and unique house wines at Brix Cheese and Wine Shop presents quite the drinking dilemma. Thankfully, the genius half-glass option allows one to sample wine as Jefferson would, consuming three or four glasses in one sitting without feeling the ill-effects of over-indulgent behavior. If you don’t see something by the glass that tickles your fancy, the well-curated selection available by the bottle is certain to deliver something interesting. But you’re on your own as far as responsible imbibing is concerned.

B

oston Tea Partier Samuel Adams, the Founding Father found on beer bottles, believed drinking American-made beer was a way of declaring independence. He encouraged patriots to boycott English beer and “bring our own October Beer [a strong beer] into fashion again.” Of course, Sam had a financial interest in this kind of patriotism— he’d inherited his father’s failing malt business. “Strong beer, or malt for those who incline to brew it themselves; to be sold by Samuel Adams, at a very reasonable rate,” read a 1751 ad in a Boston newspaper.. The dusky interior of Sanctuary Pub will transport you back to colonial days. The authentic pub vibes of this cozy wood-paneled bar offer respite for weary voters alongside a wide selection of beers. The Sanctuary consistently presents the best beers available on the local and international front at a very reasonable rate, and the addition of live music, typically of the jazz or folk variety, makes this south-of-downtown watering hole the place to go for lively connection with fellow community members.

A

t the same time George Washington, the founding-est of all our Founding Fathers, was serving as our first president, he was also one of the country’s leading producers of whiskey, thanks to the distillery on his Mount Vernon plantation. These days, the distilling operation at local darling Cedar Ridge Winery and Distillery certainly outshines old Georgie’s setup. The tasting room of this Cedar Rapids distillery is also thankfully not on a plantation, but does offer beautiful views of the hearty crop of grapes used to produce the label’s wine. With five whiskies and bourbons in their award-winning portfolio, there’s also plenty to sample in the tasting room or at the bar from single malt to malted rye, wheat whiskey to reserve bourbons. Cedar Ridge even ventures into mixology with their creative spin on classic cocktails such as the Honey Pepper Penicillin, the Provencal or a Salted Caramel Old Fashioned. ––Frankie Schneckloth

Magic the Gathering. Warhammer. X-Wing. L5R. Warmachine. Pokemon. HeroClix. GoT. Blood Bowl. LotR. Board Games. RPGs. Dice. Minis. Kidrobot Vinyl. Gaming & collectible supplies. Retro games & toys. Huge Magic singles inventory plus we buy/trade MtG cards. Weekly drafts, FNM, league play, and frequent tourneys. Now buying retro video games & toys! Bring in your Nintendo NES, SNES, N64, Gamecube, Sega, WiiU, Xbox 360, PS1-2-3, and older used games, consoles, action figures and toys for cash or trade credit! Fun atmosphere & the best customer service around!

702 S. Gilbert St., Suite #104, Iowa City Tel: 319-333-1260 Email: chg@criticalhitgames.net www.criticalhitgames.net LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV243 May 16–June 5, 2018 15


Fri. June 1 5-8pm

SEX & LOVE

PORN WITH A SIDE OF POWER

during Gallery Walk

Feminist porn isn’t just about showing genuine female orgasms. It gives porn watchers (a.k.a. everyone) a platform to pick their preferences. BY NATALIE BENWAY

Check Point: An Introduction to Child’s Play

a performative installation

Illustrations by Aly High

by Chelsea A. Flowers

T

in the PUBLIC SPACE ONE gallery free & open to the public 120 N. Dubuque St.

publicspaceone.com 319-855-1985

ired of all the faked orgasms, bleached buttholes and forced blow jobs of mainstream porn? Maybe you can’t get enough, but feel guilty supporting creators with dubious ethics. Are you female, male or nonbinary? Then feminist pornography is for you! Our reasons for searching out porn are varied: We might watch it to get off, build our skills, get in the mood, relax or explore our fantasies and desires. While the most active consumers of mainstream porn are men—Pornhub reported that 75 percent of their viewers in 2016 were male—women are certainly getting in on the action. Marie Claire released a survey of over 3,000 readers in 2015 exploring women and porn. Nearly a third of women surveyed reported watching porn weekly. “Porn for women” was Pornhub’s top trending search term last year. Unfortunately, the vast majority of porn caters to the fantasies of a minority of society— straight men. In the Marie Claire poll, 56 percent of women who said they were conflicted

about watching porn reported they were concerned about contributing to an industry that treats women poorly and perpetuates negative gender and racial stereotypes. Feminist porn may be a cruelty-free alternative. For a film or website to be considered “feminist,” according to Good for the Her— the Toronto-based sex shop where people of all genders, sexes, orientations and desires can find sex toys, books, DVDs, workshops and more, which organizes the Feminist Porn Awards—at least one of the following criteria needs to be met: • A woman must have been involved in the production, writing or direction of the work. • The work must convey genuine female pleasure. • The piece must expand the boundaries of sexual representation and challenge mainstream porn stereotypes. “A lot of people don’t understand they have a choice when it comes to porn,” said Alison Lee, a Good for Her manager and


national theatre live: macbeth

PAY FOR PORN

saturday, july 14 @ 2pm

SPONSORED BY M.C. GINSBERG & KRUI 89.7 FM

(YEAH, REALLY)

I

t may seem frivolous to spend money on porn in this day and age, but as one Glamour article puts it, “Free Porn is

Probably Not Feminist Porn—No Matter What it Looks Like.” Purchasing videos or memberships not only supports ethical creators and diverse performers, it literally lets you take ownership of your preferences. Here are some worthwhile companies in which to consider investing. Most cost around a dollar a day, even less when you sign up for multi-month packages, and offer trial memberships and/or a few free clips. • BrightDesire.com • CrashPadSeries.com • Feminist Porn Awards selections (feministpornawards.com/ feminist-online-porn/) • LustCinema.com • PinkLabel.tv • PuckerUp.com (the website of feminist filmmaker and author Tristan Taormino, where you can browse her books, porn movies, sex ed guides and more.) • TRENCHCOATx.com • XConfessions.com

wednesday, may 16

drop the mic

PRESENTED BY THE HOOK | INTIMATE AT THE ENGLERT Saturday, may 19

national theatre live: young marx SPONSORED BY M.C. GINSBERG monday, may 28

Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness & Friends saturday, june 9

national theatre live: follies SPONSORED BY M.C. GINSBERG

event organizer for the Feminist Porn Awards, in an interview with the Good Men Project. “They think that the mainstream, big-porn machine is all that exists, and there was nobody in the mainstream porn industry who was recognizing that not all porn was the same. Showing the world that there’s a lot of different porn out there that can actually be really interesting and empowering is an important goal of the awards.”

Cont. >> on p. 36

saturday, july 14

national theatre live: macbeth SPONSORED BY M.C. GINSBERG & KRUI 89.7 FM august 6-11

acting out!

The Englert Theatre’s Summer Youth Acting Camp

englert.org 221 E. Washington St, Iowa City (319) 688-2653


CULTURE Hot Tin Roof is a program to showcase current literary work produced in Iowa City. The series is organized and juried by representatives of two IC-based cultural advocacy organizations: Iowa City UNESCO City of Literature and Little Village magazine, with financial support from M.C. Ginsberg Objects of Art.

Hot Tin Roof: May

Air Time

T

he rush began outside Coralville, the stream of Cedar Rapids traffic angling in on 218, cars shouldering their way off I-380. More, from 10th Avenue, 1st Avenue, Hawkins Drive— Iowa City drivers who had waited, staying cool indoors until they barely had time to get to school or work. Rolling smoothly, seemingly under control. Forgetting how small the margin of control often is—one car length, or the width of a yellow line. For Joy DiLorenzo, driving east on Grand Avenue, nothing had gone wrong so far, despite the day’s many opportunities for disaster. Her interview with the overnight emergency room doctor was in the can, four good minutes by her estimate. She had even drawn out a comment on the unusually high number of ER cases in the past month, and the question was stuck in the middle, hard to snip out. Little things they never covered in Advanced TV Production. Iowa City stories were hard to sell. Fields had predictably tried to convince her to do the piece at St. Luke’s instead. He had only called her, finally, when the 2nd-anchor crew was going down anyway for an arraignment story. In return for driving, she got the spare cam. Period. Joy filmed the doctor, then her own lead-in and trailer, alone. She headed back to the Johnson County courthouse a good hour early. At home on the Iowa campus, she caught the light perfectly at Highway 6 and took the Burlington Street bridge. Uphill now, with the parking ramp to her left. Both eastbound lanes were full but moving well, most of the real traffic was behind. Slowing a fraction, aiming for an opening to her right, when a gray Corolla crossed the centerline, coming straight for her. Sideways, actually. Sliding and spinning at the same time. Joy saw it in slow motion, with time to appreciate the lighting and focus. Good camera work. She flicked the wheel hard left, sensing the gap without needing to look. The oncoming car swept toward her 18 May 16–June 5, 2018 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV243

right front, past it. No impact! New headlights staring close. You’re in the wrong lane, cut it back. Tensed for collision; hoping. Going to miss? Within a foot, in the clear, then her front wheels broke loose, darting right, just as the first car tagged her in the rear. Bang and a shock, spinning her faster, vision dissolving in a centrifugal blur. Sliding on something, her mind blandly reported, hear it? Tires are rubbing, not squealing. She hit the right hand curb and half-spun to a shuddering halt. Pointed downhill, braced tight for the next crash that didn’t come, she had spun uphill and was out of the melee. The Toyota was sideways across both eastbound lanes, t-boned by a pickup. A tangled string of cars blocked the other side, rear-enders, mostly. As she watched, another car edged gently into the mess. People rubbernecking, unsure whether to stay in their disabled cars or chance getting out. Ought to ... Joy suddenly came to life. She snatched the videocam out of the rear, foot slipping on a greasy film coating the pavement. No time to reflect, already setting up the initial shot in her head. Get a wide one from here and back up. Make sure the station logo shows on the van; they’ll love it. Cross over. She held her position as a car broke over the crest, obviously too fast. Through the lens she saw the driver’s eyes widen in close-up. Panning with it as the car slid, jumped the curb and caught a pole. Come on! Now, Joy DiLorenzo ran, blindly trusting that no other cars were coming, keeping the film button down, framing the scene. The men in the car were stirring, and she came around, pointing the camera uphill again. She could see smoke, steam, smell the hot antifreeze and something like soap. Gasoline, too. They were waving at her, waving her away, and Joy had time for one step back before orange flame burst out everywhere, filling the lens. The concussion knocked her back, but she landed in a crouch, cradling the precious camera. Scrambling up. Her face

stung. If I’m burned I don’t want to know, yet. The fireball rose and swirled away in a black pall. She heard people, high-pitched, a sound she knew without hearing the words. She saw where they were looking. Somewhere in the center of the pileup a gas tank had exploded, and at the base of the leaping flames a small SUV was roasting to a metallic cinder. Inside, a man, or woman, impossible to tell already; Joy fervently hoped they were already dead. But this was not so, and she filmed it to the last, knowing what would be said if she didn’t. Enough memory left to grab a word with the unwilling fire commander, and a small bite with the police. Yes, there appeared to be some foreign substance on the road. No, it was too soon to assess. The officers were too wary to say anything definite on camera. Done, except for one thing. Joy turned to the crowd and held up the camera. “I need someone who knows how to use this,” she told them. “I can show you most of it.” She found a media student who had been filming with his own minicam. Someone lent her a mirror. The burns were slight, like a bad sunburn, and Joy tugged the crisped hair on one side into place, reeling off her trailing piece in one take. The damn van even started, and she drove it away. Carr and Ellman and Bobbi Grissom were standing outside the courthouse, watching the column of smoke as she pulled up. Then they noticed her scorched cheek and torn suit, and the long crease in the van’s tail. And the strain, mixed with triumph, on her face. “Can somebody else drive?” asked Joy DiLorenzo. “I’m not real safe just now.” Stu Hartlep is a retired teacher and long-time Cedar Rapids resident. He published a short piece in Hemmings Classic Car magazine and worked for an educational publishing firm in his college days. Currently, he is conducting a fiction writing workshop at Kirkwood Community College.


August 10th August 12th, 2018

NewBo City Market / Cedar Rapids

fieldsofyogis.org Yoga + Music

+ Community


CULTURE Iowa Arts Festival: Joan Osborne w/ Pieta Brown, Downtown Iowa City, Friday, June 1, Free Photo by Jeff Fasano

A-List

What if Joan Osborne Was One of Us? Mining the American songbook for success. • BY DAN BOSCALJON

A

mong an excellently curated set of local gems and national talent, the Iowa Arts Festival’s featured performer for Friday night, June 1 is Joan Osborne, who claimed notoriety with her 1995 song “One of Us.” The biggest single off her album Relish, “One of Us” also served as the theme to Joan of Arcadia and hit heavy rotations on MTV and pretty much any contemporary rock station. The song, written by Eric Bazilian of The Hooters, quickly became a sonic staple for the 15-to-35-year-old set and propelled Relish to triple platinum status, peaking at number nine on the Billboard charts. The 20 May 16–June 5, 2018 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV243

Grammy-nominated album resonated with the alt-contemporary style of the time, with soft-voiced chanteuses singing over the slight sounds of guitars—a genre that remains a fixture at coffee houses today. In a recent interview, Osborne said that Relish’s success put her in the spotlight in a way she “didn’t anticipate.” “It was amazing—I became known in countries I’d never been to and I had all these people who were interested in what I was doing, and I had invitations to do interesting things and work with my heroes,” she said. “On the other hand, there were aspects that I wasn’t prepared for and wasn’t comfortable

with: doing tons of interviews, being recognized on the street, feeling like I couldn’t have much privacy or take time to myself.” Overall, though, she credits her long career in part to Relish and the people who “bought the album, saw it wasn’t the one song and have been fans since.” One element that positioned Relish apart from some of its peers was a deeper relationship to religion in its lyrics. The song “One of Us” raised the ire of Christian culture critics who betrayed their impoverished theology by arguing that the hypothetical of the chorus— “What if God was one of us/Just a slob like one of us/Just a stranger on the bus trying to make his way home”—was somehow blasphemous instead of seeing how the chorus balanced the criticism of God’s infinitude found in the opening lines (“If God had a name what would it be?/And would you call it to his face?/If you were faced with it”). Beyond this, the album contains an opening track paying homage to a reimagined St. Theresa and a cover of Bob Dylan’s “Man in the Long Black Coat,” an apocalyptic song that plays implicitly on the themes of “One of Us.” Osborne’s religious sensitivities were forged in her Kentucky Catholic upbringing, although she did not stay long in the church. Her sense now is that “the sacred is everywhere around us—not just in churches and not just in sacred texts.” This vision underlies much of Osborne’s approach to music. “Music is one of the tools we have that lets us get closer to God, to the sacred,” she said. “There’s something magic about what it does to people, whether you look at the physical nature of how the vibrations affect us or in terms of soul or emotions, in ways that other everyday things can’t. It’s a gift, or a tool to have that connection.” In addition to Catholicism and Buddhism, she credits Walt Whitman, whom she calls “one of the great poets who recognizes the sacred in the ordinary” and someone who can take “an ordinary moment and seeing a lens to the infinite” as part of what has sharpened her approach to music. Part of her long career since Relish has been based in becoming deeply immersed

Cont. >> on p. 28


EDITORS’ PICKS AWARD-WINNING DOCUMENTARY

RBG

MAY•AZAKI

SPIRITED AWAY

OPENS MAY 18

C E DA R R A P I D S • I OWA C I T Y A R E A MAY 19, 20 & 23

FILMSCENE AT BIG GROVE

DAZED & CONFUSED

EVENTS

MON, MAY 21

MAY 16-JUNE 5, 2018 Planning an event? Submit event info to calendar@littlevillagemag.com. Include event name, date, time, venue, street address, admission price and a brief description (no all-caps, exclamation points or advertising verbiage, please). To find more events, visit littlevillagemag.com/calendar. AREA EVENTS PRESENTED BY GRINNELL COLLEGE SUMMERFEST

SCIENCE ON SCREEN

THE BABADOOK

TUE, MAY 22

LATE SHIFT 4-YEAR ANNIVERSARY

FOXY BROWN

IOWA-BASED DOCUMENTARY

OPENS MAY 25 Nikki Scheel

SAVING BRINTON

WED, MAY 23

MAY•AZAKI

PRINCESS MONONOKE

SUMMER ROOFTOP SERIES

AIRPLANE! NOW

2

SCREENS!

MAY 16, 27, 30

SUN, MAY 27

WEDS., MAY 16 LIVE PERFORMANCE POETRY

17

THU., MAY

‘Camelot,’ Old Creamery Theatre, Amana,

Hook Presents: Drop the Mic, Englert

2 p.m., $12-31.50 Lerner and Loewe’s classic

Theatre, Iowa City, 7:30 p.m., $5-8

musical gets a new update, cutting the show from three hours to two with a newly adapted book by

COUNTRY SUPERGROUP

David Lee and new orchestrations by Steve Orich.

Traveller w/ Izaak Opatz, Dusk, Codfish

Runs through 5/20.

Hollow Barnstormers, Maquoketa, 8 p.m., $20-25

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV243 May 16–June 5, 2018 21


EDITORS’ PICKS

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/CALENDAR

Adrian Todd Zuniga in conversation w/ Brandon Taylor, Prairie Lights Books & Cafe,

ALISABETH VON PRESLEY ROCKS;

LIVE HIP HOP

OCEANA BRING THE FOLK

Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free Literary Death Match creator

AVP & Oceana: Unplugged, Giving Tree

Security Culture w/ the Port Authority, Snailmate, Coolzey, Blue Moose Tap House,

reads from his latest, ‘Collision Theory’

Theater, Marion, 8 p.m., $20

Iowa City, 9 p.m., $5

18

FRI., MAY

Summer Shop Crawl, Downtown Iowa City, 5

p.m., $15 Visit participating retailers for drinks and via Red House Records

appetizers! GET YOUR SHROOM ON

Houby Days, Czech Village, Cedar Rapids, 5 p.m., Free SINGER/SONGWRITER

Nick Stika, Sanctuary Pub, Iowa City, 6 p.m., Free FOLK SUPERSTAR

The 17th Taste of Czech & Slovak, National

Charlie Parr w/ Tommy Santee Klaws, The Mill, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $12-15 Keen observations, a

Czech & Slovak Museum & Library, Cedar Rapids, 7

gracious humility and incredible musical skill combine to make this Minnesota folk phenom a can’t-miss act. His

p.m., Free-$15 They will also have kolaches for sale.

16th recording, ‘Dog,’ came out last September.

*This is not a drill.*

Democratic Primary

for Supervisor

Proven. Liberal. Innovative. Leader.

Election June 5th

Democrat    

 

Raised minimum wage Increased sustainability, trails

and conservation Built six solar arrays Increased funding for social services and affordable housing Strong union record Fiscal responsibility

www.janellerettig.com

There are three people running. You can vote for up to two people. For more early voting information: www.janellerettig.com

In the past eight years, I have worked everyday to reflect the progressive values of the people of Johnson County. I never stop trying to make our County a better, healthier and more welcoming place. I would appreciate your vote on or before June 5th.

#electionsmatter

Paid for by Rettig for Supervisor | 319-330-0916 | Facebook/Instagram: RettigforSupervisor | Twitter: JanelleRettig | 110 Shrader Rd, Iowa City 52245

22 May 16–June 5, 2018 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV243


EDITORS’ PICKS

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/CALENDAR MAY-AZAKI!

Special Event: ‘Spirited Away,’ FilmScene, Iowa City, 10 a.m., $8-9 Addt’l screenings: 5/20, 5/23

‘Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat,’ Theatre Cedar Rapids, 7:30 p.m., $31-40 New shows added! Runs through 6/3 AUBURN, IOWA ROOTS ROCK

King of the Tramps w/ El Tejon, The Mill, Jordan Sellergren

Iowa City, 8 p.m., $8 A CLASSIC VOICE OF ROCK AND ROLL

Eric Burdon & the Animals, Riverside Casino

19

SAT., MAY

and Golf Resort, 8 p.m., $20-55

Houby Days, Czech Village, Cedar Rapids, 8 a.m., Free Pay homage to all things fungus with the 41st annual Houby Days, a three-day festival dedicated to all things mushroom. Don’t worry, houby haters—there’s fun for folks who don’t like mushrooms, too: parade, carnival and

DON’T FORGET THE $35 5K AT 8 A.M.!

concerts, to name a few. Check out Wooden

Marion Arts Festival, Uptown Marion,

Nickel Lottery at 7 p.m.!

20

SUN.,

MAY

DAY THREE: REVENGE OF THE SHROOM!

Houby Days, Czech Village, Cedar Rapids,

9 a.m., Free

8 a.m., Free

EMIL VIKLICKÝ’S

GRAND MORAVIA TRIO Featuring Ernie Adams and Petr Dvorský

May 30, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

Internationally acclaimed jazz pianist Emil Viklický will return to offer concert-goers his unique and expressive take on Moravian Jazz, and this time he’s bringing two spectacular guests! Joining Emil will be double bass player Petr Dvorsky from the Czech Republic, and for the first time in Cedar Rapids, the world-class drummer from Chicago, Ernie Adams.

Tickets at NCSML.org/emilviklicky $25 VIP Front Rows $18 General Admission $10 Student Admission 1400 Inspiration Pl SW Cedar Rapids, IA 52404 319-362-8500

SPONSORED BY:

Tom and Le Ann Kadlec in honor of Bev and Gene Kadlec

Duane & Kay Nesetril

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV243 May 16–June 5, 2018 23


ON SALE NOW AT

LITTLEVILLAGE TICKETS.COM NEW PIONEER CO-OP The Secrets to Success in Ketogenic Eating NewPi Cedar Rapids

May 22, 6 p.m. DIY: Hands-on Mother’s Day Aromatherapy Gifts

EDITORS’ PICKS CLOSING PERFORMANCE

‘Camelot,’ Old Creamery Theatre, Amana, 2 p.m., $12-31.50

MON.,

21

WED., MAY 23 SURF ROCK/PSYCHOBILLY

Southern Culture On the Skids w/ the Surf Zombies, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $15-20

MAY

FilmScene, Iowa City, 10 p.m., $4 Classic

STUDENT PERFORMANCES

blaxploitation flick with the incomparable Pam Grier

City Ballet of Iowa Spring Concerts 2018, Coralville Center for the Performing Arts, 6:30 p.m., $7-12

Late Shift At the Grindhouse 4-Year Anniversary Week 2: ‘Foxy Brown,’

THU., MAY 24

NewPi Coralville

Jimmy Newquist w/ Dickie, Dick’s Tap &

June 26, 6 p.m.

Shake Room, Cedar Rapids, 7 p.m., $25-30 Solo tour of the Caroline’s Spine guitarist

NewPi Cedar Rapids

June 27, 6 p.m.

LIVE JAZZ!

The Blake Shaw Trio, Sanctuary Pub, Iowa City, 8 p.m., Free

DOWNTOWN IOWA CITY

Downtown Block Party June 23, 5 p.m. FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH (CEDAR RAPIDS) Ride, Flow & Glow: A Fundraiser for Feed Iowa First June 2, 8:15 a.m.

25

FRI., MAY

Summer Shop Crawl May 18, 5 p.m.

WIPE THAT FACE OFF YOUR HEAD, BITCH!

METALCORE STRAIGHT FROM THE SOUTH

FilmScene at Big Grove: ‘Dazed and Confused,’ Big Grove Brewery & Taproom, Iowa

Born of Osiris w/ Fit for a King, Gideon, Currents, Doppelgänger, Blue Moose Tap

City, 8 p.m., Free We keep getting older, but this

House, Iowa City, 5:30 p.m., $18-20

seminal flick stays the same age. Catch the 1993 Richard Linklater classic free at Big Grove! A portion of the proceeds from all food and drink sold during FilmScene at Big Grove events goes right back to

BIG GROVE BREWERY Magic Giant with Tall Heights and Halfloves June 5, 8 p.m. WILLOW & STOCK Make and Take Floral Design Workshop June 15, 6 p.m.

tix L I T T L E V I L L aG E T I C K E T S .C O M

No fees for event organizers, low fees for ticket purchasers. Start selling tickets today—it’s free! Tickets@LittleVillageMag.com

FilmScene.

22

TUES.,

MAY

DISCOVER EXACTLY WHY YOU’RE SCARED

Science On Screen: ‘The Babadook,’

THE BLUES MEETS INDIAN TRADITIONAL MUSIC

FilmScene, Iowa City, 7 p.m.,

Downtown Iowa City, 6:30 p.m., Free Chicago’s

$8-10.50 The Science on

Zeshan Bagewadi grew up surrounded by music—

Screen series continues with

both the Indo-Pakistani sounds that reminded his

this 2014 Australian fright fest

parents of their home and the blues, soul and R&B

and an interactive discussion

that his father loved. He and his band play his

following on exactly why and

melded music again on Saturday, May 26 on the

how fear affects our brains.

Hancher lawn at 2 p.m. (also free). Video still from

Zeshan Bagewadi and the Transistors,

“Cryin’ in the Streets”


#IMOMSO HARD

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/CALENDAR Run of the Mill Productions: ‘Exit, Pursued by a Bear,’ The Mill, Iowa City, 7 p.m., $10-15 Runs through 5/27

Dr. Z’s Experiment, Big Grove Brewery & Taproom, Iowa City, 9 p.m., Free Cedar Rapids jam band with jazz roots NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE JAM BAND

Starship Pilgrims w/ Benjamin Cartel, Dick’s Tap & Shake Room, Cedar Rapids, 9:30 p.m., $8-10

26

SAT.,

MAY

MAY-AZAKI!

MOM’S NIGHT OUT

Special Event: ‘Princess Mononoke,’ FilmScene, Iowa City, 10 a.m., $8-9 Addt’l

Doug Kelly Photography

screenings: 5/27 and 5/30

JUNE 2 @ 8:00PM

MCGRATH AMPHITHEATRE BUY TICKETS ONLINE MCGRATHAMPHITHEATRE.COM, AT THE U.S.CELLULAR CENTER BOX OFFICE OR AT 800.745.3000

Iowa Renaissance Festival, Middle Amana, 10 a.m., Free-$39 Travel back in time to the 27th Annual Iowa Renaissance Festival and Gathering o’ Celts! Five-day passes are available; current and retired military get in free on Memorial Day with ID. Runs through June 3! LILTING PIANO AND INTOXICATING VOCALS

Hadiza, Sanctuary Pub, Iowa City, 8 p.m., Free BENEFIT FOR KCCK’S JAZZ ED PROGRAMS!

Heartland Trio w/ Blake Shaw/Dan Padley Duo, Clinton Street Social Club, Iowa City, 8:30 p.m., $10

Providing the Iowa City community with a unique programming alternative in music, news, and sports


Presented by

EDITORS’ PICKS

FRIDAYS AT 6:30 PM IOWA AVENUE AT CLINTON ST

18th City High West High and

Jazz Ensembles

Sponsor: West Music PSYCHEDELIC BLUES ROCK FROM MICHIGAN

25th

Zeshan Bagewadi

Presented by: Hancher Stage Sponsor: Kum & Go Rain Location: Chauncey Swan Parking Ramp

www.summeroftheARTS.org

Kim will help you find your way HOME kimschillig@gmail.com 310.795.2133 V/T

Arbor Creek w/ Copper Smoke Trails, Starship Pilgrims, Iowa City Yacht Club, 9 p.m., $7

SUN., MAY 27

MAY

LOOKS LIKE YOU PICKED THE WRONG WEEK TO

Plum Grove historical home is opening for the season,

QUIT GOING TO MOVIES

and you’re invited! Johnson County weavers, spinners,

Rooftop: ‘Airplane!,’ FilmScene, Iowa City, 8

scholars and historians will bring you back to the

p.m., $15

beginnings of Iowa City’s history.

SAMPLE 1800S FOOD!

Plum Grove Season Opening, Johnson County Historical Society, Iowa City, 1 p.m., Free

CS L I T T L E V I L L A G E C R E AT I V E S E R V I C E S GRAPHIC DESIGN MOBILE WEBSITES C U S T O M A D C A M PA I G N S LOGOS AND BRANDING PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEO

ADVERTISING • AUTOGRAPHS BACK ISSUES • MERCH

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28

MON.,

littlevillagecreative.com

Zak Neumann

MAY


LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/CALENDAR THE PEN AND THE PIANO TOUR

Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness & Friends w/ Allen Stone, Zac Clark, Bob Oxblood, Englert Theatre, Iowa City, 7:30 p.m., $37.50

TUES., MAY 29

THU., MAY 31 OPENING PERFORMANCE!

‘The Savannah Sipping Society,’ Old Creamery Theatre, Amana, 2 p.m., $12-31.50 Hot yoga, cocktails and Southern sass OPENING NIGHT!

Revival Theatre Company Presents: ‘The Bridges of Madison County,’ Dows Fine Arts Center, Cedar Rapids, 7:30 p.m., $20-40 Runs

MEET AT MASARYK PARK

through 6/3

New Bohemia Walking Tour with Mark Stoffer Hunter, Czech Village, Cedar Rapids, 6

The Reunion Beatles: Fantasy Tribute,

p.m., $5-7 First Street and 16th Avenue SE

Englert Theatre, Iowa City, 7:30 p.m., $32-52 “The

FIND IT

concert we believe they would have done.”

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Turnbuckle II Comedy and Music Festival, Codfish Hollow Barnstormers,

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CULTURE

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Black Earth Gallery >> Cont. from p. 20 and embedded in the American songbook. This ability to inhabit a number of musical truths is incarnated in her musical corpus; her albums often include at least one cover, and she’s put out a series of albums that are exclusively her interpretations of other work. “I’ve loved covers since I started singing— then, it was in the school choir,” Osborne said. “I reserve the right to try out a song and, if I’m not doing anything interesting, to not let anyone else hear it.” Her most recent album is the appropriately named The Songs of Bob Dylan (2017), which encapsulates a fascination with the poet laureate that has been present throughout her career (including covers of his “The Man in the Long Black Coat” and “Make You Feel My Love”). Osborne says that by the time she started hearing music, “he’d already had an incredible impact on culture,” and she was immersed in Dylan “on the radio, or when a nun would play his song on the guitar.” She recalls being struck, in particular, by “Masters of War” and the song’s ability to still speak to our moment despite being 50 years old. Her hope is to continue to develop a series of cover recordings, following a tradition started by Ella Fitzgerald (who did eight or nine albums of covers), and perhaps moving into other artists she sees as great, including Lou Reed, Lucinda Williams, Neil Young, Paul Simon, Nick Cave and the Grateful Dead. Osborne’s connection to the Dead runs deep: She had a stint performing with them, which strengthened her working knowledge of songcraft. “For me, it was a steep learning curve— they have hundreds of songs and change the set list completely from one night to the next ... it was a bootcamp in this kind of American songwriting,” she said. “It was great—the songs were of such high quality.” She was also impressed by their audiences, which she describes as “welcoming,” and notes that, as a group, they emerge “not just to hear the music, but also to connect with the community.” This sentiment seems particularly appropriate for the Iowa Arts Festival, which continues to provide the eastern Iowa community with an excuse to gather together and find something sacred in the midst of everyday life. Dan Boscaljon is a freelance inquisitor based in Iowa City. 28 May 16–June 5, 2018 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV243

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SAT., JUNE TRAMPLED BY TURTLES AND MORE!

2

Iowa Arts Festival, Downtown Iowa City, 5 p.m., Free KYLE KINANE, KRISTEN TOOMEY AND MORE!

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EDITORS’ PICKS

3

4

JUNE

MON., JUNE

ENJOY AN ENERGIZING DAY OUTSIDE

LECTURE AND PERFORMANCE

Ride, Flow & Grow: A fundraiser for Feed Iowa First, First Congregational Church,

The Des Moines Metro Opera Presents: ‘The Mythical Slavic Mermaid,’ National Czech

Iowa City, 8:15 a.m., $30

& Slovak Museum & Library, Cedar

SOUL SHERPA AND MORE!

Rapids, 7 p.m., Free In honor of the 125th anniversary of Antonin Dvor˘ák’s

Iowa Arts Festival, Downtown

visit to Spillville, Iowa, Des Moines

Iowa City, 5 p.m., Free

Metro Opera presents selections from

SUN.,

the piece he was inspired to write CLOSING PERFORMANCE

there. ‘Rusalka’ is named for the

‘Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat,’

Slavic equivalent of a mermaid or siren. Refreshments follow.

Theatre Cedar Rapids, 2:30 p.m., $31-40

TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE, CINEMAPHILES

Inconceivable! Movie Trivia Night, FilmScene, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $40

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FrEE LIve Music Iowa CIty 30 May 16–June 5, 2018 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV243

Image via Des Moines Metro Opera


5

TUE., JUNE

ONGOING MONDAYS Open Mic, The

Paradiso, Fairfield, 8 p.m., Free Open

8 p.m., Free Retrofit Vinyl w/ DJ Olaz Fük,

Mill, Iowa City, 8 p.m., Free Honeycombs

Stage, Studio 13, Iowa City, 10 p.m.,

Dick’s Tap & Shake Room, Cedar Rapids,

of Comedy, Iowa City Yacht Club, 9

Free Late Shift at the Grindhouse, Film

9 p.m., Free

p.m., $3

Scene, Iowa City, 10 p.m., $4 Talk Art,

TUESDAYS

Blues Jam, Parlor

The Mill, Iowa City, 10:30 p.m., Free

FRIDAYS NewBo Open Coffee,

(2nd & 4th Wednesdays)

Roasters Coffeehouse in NewBo City Market, Cedar Rapids, 8 a.m., Free (2nd

PROGRESSIVE METALCORE FROM L.A.

City Pub and Eatery, Cedar Rapids, 7

Volumes w/ Upon A Burning Body, the White Noise, CONVICTIONS, Manhattan Blockade, Cetana, Gabe’s, Iowa

p.m., Free Yahoo Drummers, Public Space

THURSDAYS I.C. Press Co-op

One, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free Weekly

open shop, Public Space One, Iowa City,

Center, Cedar Rapids, 6:30 p.m., $40

Old-Timey Jam Session, Trumpet Blossom

4 p.m., Free Kids Meditation Class Iowa

FAC Dance Party, The Union, Iowa City,

Cafe, Iowa City, 7:30 p.m., Free Karaoke,

City, Quaker Friends Meeting House, Iowa

7 p.m. Sasha Belle Presents: Friday Night

City, 6 p.m., $20-25

Studio 13, Iowa City, 9 p.m., Free

City, 5:45 p.m., $5 Iowa City Meditation

Drag & Dance Party, Studio 13, Iowa City,

Karaoke Tuesdays, The Mill, Iowa City, 10

Class: How To Transform Your Life, Quaker

10:30 p.m., $5 SoulShake, Gabe’s, Iowa

p.m., Free

Friends Meeting House, Iowa City,

City, 10 p.m., Free

Alexandra Fuller, Prairie Lights Books & Cafe, Iowa City, 7 p.m.,

6:30 p.m., $5-10 Novel Conversations,

& 4th Fridays) Friday Night Out, Ceramics

Free A reading from ‘Quiet Until

WEDNESDAYS Gentle Yoga,

Coralville Community Library, 7 p.m.,

SATURDAYS Pop-Up Market,

the Thaw,’ about the Lakota of Pine

Public Space One, Iowa City, 5 p.m.,

Free (3rd Thursday) Thursday Night Live

NewBo City Market, Cedar Rapids, 10

Ridge

$5-10 Break Dance Group, Public Space

Open Mic, Uptown Bill’s, Iowa City, 7

am Family Storytime, Iowa City Public

One, Iowa City, 6 p.m., Free Burlington

p.m., Free Daddy-O, Parlor City Pub

Library, 10:30 a.m., Free I.C. Press Co-op

Street Bluegrass Band, The Mill, Iowa City,

and Eatery, Cedar Rapids, 7 p.m., Free

Open Shop, Public Space One, Iowa City,

6 p.m., $5 (2nd & 4th Wednesdays)

Underground Open Mic, Open Jam and

12 p.m., Free Elation Dance Party, Studio

Bluegrass Jam, The Mill, Iowa City, 7

Mug Night, Yacht Club, 8 p.m., Free Live

13, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $5

p.m., Free (3rd Wednesday) Open Mic

Jazz, Clinton Street Social Club, Iowa

Night, Penguin’s Comedy Club, Cedar

City, 8 p.m., Free (1st & 3rd Thursdays)

SUNDAYS Pub Quiz, The Mill,

Rapids, 8 p.m., Free Open Mic, Cafe

Karaoke Thursday, Studio 13, Iowa City,

Iowa City, 9 p.m., $1

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THE STRAIGHT DOPE

BY CECIL ADAMS

All lucrative plants are grown in multiple locations, as far as I know. So why is coca only cultivated in South America? —Pardel Lux

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hinking about that retirement nest egg, Pardel? Buying a hillside in Sonoma County and getting into the biz? Legal niceties notwithstanding, it could probably be done—coca’s well adapted to its native environment, but with a sufficiently green thumb you could grow it in a variety of climes. As to why you don’t see it much beyond South America in practice, well, you’re looking at the usual historical contingencies: colonialism, drug panics, international conventions, world wars, yada yada. Let’s start with the socio-botanical angle. Hailing from the genus Erythroxylum, coca’s indigenous to the Andes, where for millennia people have been cultivating a few species whose leaves they chew as a stimulant. Anthropologists have theorized that chewing coca may offset adverse effects of high-altitude life, helping the body retain heat and use energy more effectively under exertion. And for most of history there wasn’t any overwhelming incentive for the practice to spread downhill: As an intoxicant, coca leaf packs no more punch than a strong cup of coffee. Spanish colonists in South America paid it little mind, being understandably focused on things like gold and silver. Thus it wasn’t until the late 1800s that coca really showed up on the world’s radar, once German chemists managed to isolate and purify its active ingredient, the alkaloid cocaine. Western doctors used it topically as an anesthetic, but saw serious potential in its stimulant properties when ingested. Sigmund Freud, a big fan to say the least, touted it as a potential cure for ailments from depression to asthma. Its tendency to induce feelings of exhilaration and euphoria didn’t make it any less popular. Unregulated cocaine quickly found its way into legit pharmaceutical practice and dodgy patent medicines alike (not to mention one extremely well-known soft drink). By 1900 the United States was importing something like 1,000 tons of coca a year from Peru, the world’s major supplier until other countries got hip. The Dutch soon become dominant players, growing coca in the colonial East Indies and processing it back in Amsterdam. The Japanese, meanwhile, started plantations on what’s now Taiwan. At this point it looked like the plant was on the verge of breaking out globally. What happened? Ultimately, it was the U.S.—the “prime mover” in the changing fortunes of cocaine, according to drug-trade historian Paul Gootenberg— which in the early 20th century began an international drive for cocaine prohibition. By this time, addiction problems among both therapeutic and recreational users had become

impossible to ignore. But our about-face on coke was complicated: Valid public-health concerns intermingled with a good old American moral freak-out (remember, we prohibited alcohol around then too). The result? “In one generation,” Gootenberg writes, the view of cocaine in Western medical circles went “from a possible modern panacea to an unscientific ‘mania.’” The U.S. restricted the drug at home and leaned on other nations to crack down. It took a while, but we got our way. The Dutch weren’t thrilled about dismantling their state-run coke works, but in the interest of international amity, they eased off the throttle. The final blow to legitimate global coke production was World War II, which scrambled national industries, finished imperial Japan and cemented the U.S. as a global superpower. Per Gootenberg, the year 1945 “marked the complete shutdown of any autonomous cocaine networks that had persisted before the war.” The German and Japanese pharmaceutical infrastructure lay in ruins, and U.S. occupying forces were in position to implement America’s anti-drug stance. Coca cultivation had effectively been driven back where it started: the Andes. Needless to say, America didn’t stop flexing its muscles there. Turning an eye to our southern neighbors, the U.S. pushed hard-line coca-eradication policies throughout the hemisphere; in 1961, a UN narcotics agreement pledged to wipe out even the traditional chewing of coca leaf within 25 years. Irony fans will note that this same 25-year period happens to be when the U.S. made itself into an enormous customer base for South American coke. And of course this morass of conflicting incentives—zero tolerance on one hand, massive demand on the other—meant we spent the latter half of the 20th century playing cocaine whacka-mole in Latin America: zapping facilities only to send them deeper into the jungle, further into the mountains, over a porous border, etc. So despite appearances, Pardel, coca cultivation is in fact on the move. A few years ago a plantation was discovered in the state of Chiapas, in southern Mexico—as far as anyone knows, the first of its kind that far north. “My only question is why it took so long,” one drug-policy expert told Vice News. Chiapas, after all, has got “cheap labor, remote land and good climate. Add corruption, crushing poverty and poor infrastructure for other types of commerce, and you’ve got a perfect storm.” When you put it that way, we should start seeing U.S. coca in no time.

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV243 May 16–June 5, 2018 35


SEX & LOVE >> Cont. from p. 17 There’s a lot of folks who think feminist porn is the softer, more emotional option— and if that’s what you’re into, you’ll most definitely find it. But you’ll also find a lot of other options that include bondage and kink, queer, fantasy and trans porn. You’ll find diverse bodies, diverse genders and a range of sexual acts. You will find women with and without body hair, stars with and without breast implants and threesomes of all varieties. “Watching [porn] can increase confidence in the bedroom for men and women, as well as electrify the atmosphere and introduce ideas for different role-plays or sexual practices,” feminist porn filmmaker Erika Lust, who is featured in the Netflix series Hot Girls Wanted: Turned On, recently told ol’ Gwennie Paltrow’s Goop Magazine for the publication’s book The Sex Issue, released May 1. “The possibilities are endless.” Lust has taken her audience’s fantasies even further with her erotica series XConfessions, started in 2013. She asks folks to submit their sexual fantasies anonymously on the web and then makes them into films. Lust told Mashable in March that after reading the letters, she noticed many people felt different or ashamed for their “perversions.” I’ve seen plenty of clients in my therapy practice express shame for what they were secretly looking at while masturbating, and terrified to share it with their partners for fear of seeming weird or deviant. By being willing to be vulnerable with your partner and sharing what you think might be different or “perverted,” you might find they feel the same way about some of their turn-ons. And if they don’t share the same interests, an open conversation with a partner who is willing to listen without judgment has the possibility to transform shame. Lust explained to Mashable that she wants to provide an opportunity for folks to not only explore but understand their so-called perversions. With an understanding of our sexual desires and interests, we can move closer to acceptance and exploration of our sexuality. Natalie Benway LISW is a psychotherapist in private practice in Coralville. She has a certification in sexuality studies from the University of Iowa and is currently pursuing additional licensure with the American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors and Therapists. 36 May 16–June 5, 2018 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV243

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/PERKS

READER PERKS


ASTR OLOGY

BY ROB BREZSNY

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A chemist named Marcellus Gilmore Edson got a patent on peanut butter in 1884. A businessperson named George Bayle started selling peanut butter as a snack in 1894. In 1901, a genius named Julia Davis Chandler published the first recipe for a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. In 1922, another pioneer came up with a new process for producing peanut butter that made it taste better and last longer. In 1928, two trailblazers invented loaves of sliced bread, setting the stage for the ascension of the peanut butter and jelly sandwich to its full glory. According to my analysis, Taurus, you’re part way through your own process of generating a very practical marvel. I suspect you’re now at a phase equivalent to Chandler’s original recipe. Onward! Keep going! GEMINI (May 21-June 20): One of the most popular brands of candy in North America is Milk Duds. They’re irregularly shaped globs of chocolate caramel. When they were first invented in 1926, the manufacturer’s plan was to make them perfect little spheres. But with the rather primitive technology available at that time, this proved impossible. The finished products were blobs, not globes. They tasted good, though. Workers jokingly suggested that the new confection’s name include “dud,” a word meaning “failure” or “flop.” Having sold well now for more than 90 years, Milk Duds have proved that success doesn’t necessarily require perfection. Who knows? Maybe their dud-ness has been an essential part of their charm. I suspect there’s a metaphorical version of Milk Duds in your future, Gemini. CANCER (June 21-July 22): In my vision of your life in the coming weeks, you’re hunting for the intimate power that you lost a while back. After many twists and trials, you find it almost by accident in a seemingly unimportant location, a place you have paid little attention to for a long time. When you recognize it, and realize you can reclaim it, your demeanor transforms. Your eyes brighten, your skin glows, your body language awakens. A vivid hope arises in your imagination: how to make that oncelost, now-rediscovered power come alive again and be of use to you in the present time. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The etymological dictionary says that the English slang word “cool” meant “calmly audacious” as far back as 1825. The term “groovy” was first used by jazz musicians in the 1930s to signify “performing well without grandstanding.” “Hip,” which was originally “hep,” was also popularized by the jazz community. It meant, “informed, aware, up-to-date.” I’m bringing these words to your attention because I regard them as your words of power in the coming weeks. You can be and should be as hip, cool and groovy as you have been in a long time.

吀栀爀攀攀 匀琀愀最攀猀 䔀洀攀爀最椀渀最 䄀爀琀椀猀琀 倀愀瘀椀氀椀漀渀 䌀栀椀氀搀爀攀渀ᤠ猀 䄀挀琀椀瘀椀琀椀攀猀 䌀甀氀椀渀愀爀礀 刀漀眀 䘀唀一 匀琀漀瀀猀 愀渀搀 洀漀爀攀℀ 倀刀䔀匀䔀一吀䔀䐀 䈀夀

猀甀洀洀攀爀漀昀琀栀攀䄀刀吀匀⸀漀爀最

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I hope you will seek out influences that give you grinning power over your worries. I hope you’ll be daring enough to risk a breakthrough in service to your most demanding dream. I hope you will make an effort to understand yourself as your best teacher might understand you. I hope you will find out how to summon more faith in yourself—a faith not rooted in lazy wishes but in a rigorous self-assessment. Now here’s my prediction: You will fulfill at least one of my hopes and probably more. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The Polish pianist Ignacy Jan Paderewski once performed for England’s Queen Victoria. Since she possessed that bygone era’s equivalent of a backstage pass, she was able to converse with him after the show. “You’re a genius,” she told him, having been impressed with his artistry. “Perhaps, Your Majesty,” Paderewski said. “But before that I was a drudge.” He meant that he had labored long and hard before reaching the mastery the queen attributed to him. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you Libras are currently in an extended “drudge” phase of your own. That’s a good thing! Take maximum advantage of this opportunity to slowly and surely improve your skills.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The ancient Greek poet Simonides was among the first of his profession to charge a fee for his services. He made money by composing verses on demand. On one occasion, he was asked to write a stirring tribute to the victor of a mule race. He declined, declaring that his sensibilities were too fine to create art for such a vulgar activity. In response, his potential patron dramatically boosted the proposed price. Soon thereafter, Simonides produced a rousing ode that included the phrase “wind-swift steeds.” I offer the poet as a role model for you in the coming weeks, Scorpio. Be more flexible than usual about what you’ll do to get the reward you’d like. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Here’s the operative metaphor for you these days: You’re like a painter who has had a vision of an interesting work of art you could create—but who lacks some of the paint colors you would require to actualize this art. You may also need new types of brushes you haven’t used before. So here’s how I suggest you proceed: Be aggressive in tracking down the missing ingredients or tools that will enable you to accomplish your as-yet imaginary masterpiece. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Useful revelations and provocative epiphanies are headed your way. But they probably won’t arrive sheathed in sweetness and light, accompanied by tinkling swells of celestial music. It’s more likely they’ll come barging in with a clatter, bringing bristly marvels and rough hope. In a related matter: At least one breakthrough is in your imminent future. But this blessing is more likely to resemble a wrestle in the mud than a dance on a mountaintop. None of this should be a problem, however! I suggest you enjoy the rugged but interesting fun. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): One of the saddest aspects of our lives as humans is the disparity between love and romance. Real love is hard work. It’s unselfish, unwavering and rooted in generous empathy. Romance, on the other hand, tends to be capricious and inconstant, often dependent on the fluctuations of mood and chemistry. Is there anything you could do about this crazy-making problem, Aquarius? Could you maybe arrange for your romantic experiences to be more thoroughly suffused with the primal power of unconditional love? I think this is a realistic request, especially in the coming weeks. You will have exceptional potential to bring more compassion and spiritual affection into your practice of intimacy. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In accordance with astrological omens, I invite you to dream up new rituals. The traditional observances and ceremonies bequeathed to you by your family and culture may satisfy your need for comfort and nostalgia, but not your need for renewal and reinvention. Imagine celebrating homemade rites of passage designed not for who you once were but for the new person you’ve become. You may be delighted to discover how much power they provide you to shape your life’s long-term cycles. Ready to conjure up a new ritual right now? Take a piece of paper and write down two fears that inhibit your drive to create a totally interesting kind of success for yourself. Then burn that paper and those fears in the kitchen sink while chanting “I am a swashbuckling incinerator of fears!” ARIES (March 21-April 19): According to my assessment of the astrological omens, your duty right now is to be a brave observer and fair-minded intermediary and honest storyteller. Your people need you to help them do the right thing. They require your influence in order to make good decisions. So if you encounter lazy communication, dispel it with your clear and concise speech. If you find that foggy thinking has started to infect important discussions, inject your clear and concise insights.

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV243 May 16–June 5, 2018 37


LOCAL ALBUMS

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Adele, Sia or Lorde. The shift is not entirely surprising; it’s a transition that was foreshadowed in her catalog with covers of Kid Cudi’s “Pursuit of Happiness” and Lady Gaga’s “Bad Romance” on her Covered Up With Flowers EP. Castles is Lissie’s most consistent work yet—even if it does lean away from her roots in folk rock. I’ll admit that my

LISSIE

Castles www.lissie.com

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issie’s 2016 album My Wild West centered around being homesick for the Midwest. But now that she’s living here in northeast Iowa on her own “40 acres in the sun” (to quote that album’s “Hero”), she’s apparently having boyfriend issues on her latest, Castles. There are at least three places where she out-and-out just says she wants a man, she wants a diamond ring. The record has a kind of corny sentimentality I’m not used to in a contemporary album. But she seems OK with it. The universal themes of broken hearts, healing and hope for a lasting love anchor this album, contributing to it’s pop credentials. The first track released before the album came out was “Boyfriend,” featuring slow-burning, ’90s-R&B-style rhythm and synths, and Lissie delivering her smokiest vocals. The lyrics, if taken out of context, read like a country pop song: “White water flowing on the rocks in the sunshine/Drinking red wine in the summertime/Night swimming, skinny dipping, love in the moonlight/And it’s all mine.” She says in the chorus that she doesn’t want a boyfriend or a lover, she wants a man—specifically one from the heartland (which works nicely as a double entendre). The transition to a more pastoral and rural existence seemingly should have resulted in another album favoring guitar driven songs like her last two did. Instead, we are treated to this new version of Lissie: a highly polished pop (dare I say) “diva” who can stand confidently next to 38 May 16–June 5, 2018 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV243

identifications on Bandcamp range from hardcore punk to thrash music, but their Facebook claims they produce “punk bullshit,” which couldn’t be a more fitting classification in the most favorable sense. Piss Exorcist’s new album fits the punk genre, and it does it well, but with a spice of scatological vulgarity. At a moment in which the DIY scene of Eastern Iowa has developed a complacency within their mainstream punk niche, Piss Exorcist seems to parody the genre and what it means to the region. “Flea Bomb” opens the collection with a screech of feedback and a driving guitar riff. The song immediately accelerates and then, a scream from the vocalist, Juliette Enloe, of the word “fleas.” Throughout the album, Piss Exorcist includes words that are designed to repulse. Even the song names are examples of this—with phrases like “flea bomb,” “mouth rot” and “heat rash”—playing off the gross, not just the offensive, which is refreshingly uncomfortable. The energetic instrumentation, through the guitar riffs, drum beats and screamed lyrics, is addictive. The increase in tempos and occasional breakdowns following create a stimulating need to thrash the body in time with the music. The hardedged musicality of this album produced a fervent energy through the musicians’ own intensity. The album is “bullshit,” in that these basic elements don’t exercise experimentation within the genre; instead, the genre merges with the radical lyricism of vocals that arrest you with their crudeness, in an amalgamation of the obscene and proper punk. Iowa City’s DIY scene has an abundance of punk bands that play similar music to Piss Exorcist’s album—the qualities that define proper punk. But by adding a layer of shock, Piss Exorcist challenges local musicians’ satisfaction with the punk mainstream.

Lissie’s most consistent work yet— even if it does lean away from her roots in folk rock. picture of her will always be brandishing a Fender Telecaster, but even with fewer guitar songs, this is a fantastic record and demonstrates her versatility and strength as a songwriter. On track five, “Best Days,” she sings, “’Cause the best days of our lives are coming for us/Waiting to be realized … I want more best days.” With Castles, we’re seeing Lissie’s best days, and she’s on a path to more. —Michael Roeder

PISS EXORCIST

Piss Exorcist pissexorcist.bandcamp.com

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rom the depths of the Eastern Iowa punk scene comes Piss Exorcist’s self-titled album, released this past February. The Piss Exorcist

—Rachel Fotheringham


DUDE, WHERE’S YOUR KARMA?

BY FRANCIS HEANEY

The American Values Club Crossword is edited by Ben Tausig.

ACROSS 1. Class for some immigrants: Abbr. 4. “___ aren’t the droids you’re looking for ...” 9. What a cad may come back as 15. ___-Puf (old fabric softener brand) 16. 600 percent of a 49-Across 17. Aim for the sky 18. Appliances that remove moisture but add lemon flavor? 21. Musical with the song “Another Pyramid” 22. Nickname for Rory’s mom on Gilmore Girls 23. Exciting 24. “Check it out, dude— actual female sheep!” 29. School on the Charles River: Abbr. 30. “Take Me ___” (song for Faith Hill, Mary J. Blige, Wyclef Jean, Bob Dylan or Carly Simon) 31. Reprehensible modern portmanteau 34. Old Pontiac that looks to me like it has nostrils on

its hood 37. Fabric used for theater backdrops 39. Film about metal? 40. Jawaharlal with a distinctive jacket 42. He left the Eagle before Buzz 44. Egg containers 45. Trees in the birch family 47. Christopher who played Judge Doom and Doc Brown 49. Kitchen meas. 50. Piece of reading material? 52. Lisa of songwriting and Jeph of Marvel Television 54. Make an effort 55. Selfies taken when relaxing alone? 60. “Thimble Theatre” surname 61. Suggestion 62. Weird Al song with the line “Tell me why I bid on Shatner’s old toupee” 63. Try to explain why you’re selling Viagra from Stockholm via online chat? 70. A Wrinkle in Time author Madeleine LV242 ANSWERS 71. Make sense 72. Comedian A B B E K EGS AMP E R E SOU T H A S I A GOA L I E Philips who P A T HO L OG I C A L L I A R shares his name T I R E DO I T S NO A P O C A L Y P S E N OW with a music C A N A L I RON S I N F O genre H A U L R P I T UN E U P E S P P E P S I S S C E N T 73. Longtime CBS A C T I ON POS E newsman Charles TWE R P E ND E A R P F C H E A R S T E E K C A R A 74. Pioneers O T T O R I C E D P U L E S 75. Tentative WH I R L P OO L B A T H A C S I T OO WA I T taste CR Y P T OCURR E NC I E S RUN S I N D I A N E L A N E E X C I T E Y AMS E L S A

DOWN 1 2 1. Abbr. 15 formed by deleting 18 “lished” 2. Part of a 21 flight 3. Role for 24 Donald in Solo 4. Sheriff Woody, e.g. 34 35 5. Cabinet dept. 40 headed (as of today 45 anyway —ed.) by 50 a surgeon for some 54 reason 6. Dir. from 60 New York to wherever 63 you end up if you go 70 that direc73 tion 7. Comedic bungler like Ilana on Broad City, e.g. 8. Exaggerated cry of pain 9. Subject of many a protest song 10. That, with feminine Spanish nouns 11. Brand for those who are late 12. One concerned with pitches and rosin 13. Buggers 14. “___ we forget ...” 19. Annual Met event 20. Came out even 25. Has no doubts 26. Old ___ (London

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theatre) 27. Role for Donald in Atlanta 28. Mo. in an Earth, Wind & Fire hit 29. What an ass may come back as 32. Quaint places to stay 33. Kurt Cobain vocal sound 34. What a jerk may come back as 35. Fax forerunners 36. Beatles song with an exclamation point 38. What a heel may come

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back as 41. Hinge (on) 43. Be imposingly big and close 46. Rockwell of Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri 48. Haw preceder 51. Celebrate 53. The Giving Tree author Silverstein 56. Word before bore or wave 57. Awards won by Fun Home and Hamilton 58. Terrell who duetted

with Marvin Gaye 59. Early online admin 60. City where you can visit Akershus Fortress 64. Amnesty International is one: Abbr. 65. ___-pitch softball 66. Become hyphenated, perhaps 67. “Get a room!” inciter, for short 68. One may be hormonal: Abbr. 69. Cratedigger’s finds

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV243 May 16–June 5, 2018 39


PRESENTED BY VERIDIAN CREDIT UNION

Friday, June 1 4-10:30 p.m. 5-11 p.m. 5-8 p.m. 5:30 p.m.

Main Stage 7 p.m. 9 p.m.

Culinary Row Beverage Garden Art Fair Carnival Parade through downtown Pieta Brown Joan Osborne

Saturday, June 2 10 a.m.–7 p.m. Art Fair 11 a.m.–3 p.m. ABC’s: Arts, Books & Children Family Stage 11a.m.–7 p.m. Linn Street LIVE Stage 11 a.m.–10:30 p.m. Culinary Row 12– 11 p.m. Beverage Garden

Main Stage 10 a.m. 11:30 a.m. 12:45 p.m. 2:15 p.m. 4:15 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 9 p.m.

Iowa City Community Band DanceWorks Chicago The Awful Purdies The Recliners Kevin B.F. Burt & Big Medicine SOUND CHECKS Parker Millsap Trampled by Turtles

Sunday, June 3 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Art Fair Emerging Artist Pavilion 11 a.m.–3 p.m. Children’s Global Village Family Stage 11a.m.–4 p.m. Culinary Row 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Linn Street LIVE Stage 12–4 p.m. Beverage Garden

Main Stage 10 a.m. 11:30 a.m. 1 p.m. 2:45 p.m.

High Water Mark NonProphet James Tutson & the Rollback Soul Sherpa

ACCESSIBILITY SHUTTLE 401-584-2787 SPONSORED BY KIM SCHILLIG, REALTOR ®️

Little Village issue 243 - May 16 - June 5, 2018  

Little Village | The Iowa City and Cedar Rapids Area's News and Culture Magazine

Little Village issue 243 - May 16 - June 5, 2018  

Little Village | The Iowa City and Cedar Rapids Area's News and Culture Magazine

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