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TA S T E OU R C H E F S SH A R E T H E I R FAVOU R I T E C OM F ORT F OOD R E C I PE S T H AT YOU C A N R E C R E AT E AT HOM E .

WEAR

THE POWER OF MANY... The most highly capped rugby player in Australia, Stephen Moore, talks about the importance of being part of a team, finding your ‘why’ in life and making it to the 2019 World Cup. Words by Kate Edwards ⋅ Photography by Martin Ollman & Stuart Walmsley

After agreeing to interview Stephen Moore at the Hotel Realm, I quickly realise that I’ve made a catastrophic mistake. With Super Rugby season in full swing, we are constantly interrupted by starryeyed males, ranging in age from 10 to 70, asking to have their photo taken with the Co-Captain of the Brumbies and 2015 Captain of the Wallabies. But not once does Steve seem annoyed or frustrated.

“I think the power of the mind is really underestimated, especially when it comes to sport.” C ON T I N U E D

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Instead he handles it all with grace and good humour, telling me that when you sign up to be a professional sports player, it’s all part of the package. And it seems this good natured philosophy runs as a constant throughout his life, helping him navigate the highs and lows and the pressures of being an international sporting leader whilst juggling the demands of fatherhood.

OU R FAVOU R I T E SE A SON I N T H E FA SH ION C A L E N DA R USH E R S I N N EW R ICH SH A DE S A N D T E XT U R E S.

T R AV E L C A N BE R R A I S T H E GAT EWAY TO A L P I N E C OU N T RY – W E’ V E F OU N D T H E BE ST P L AC E S TO E AT, STAY, SHOP A N D SK I .


CONTENTS B R A S S E Y H OT E L : A N E W L I F E , F O R A N O L D B E AU T Y ONC E A GU E ST HOUSE F OR M E M BE R S OF PA R L I A M E N T A N D G OV E R N M E N T OF F IC I A L S , BR A S SEY HOT E L I S BE I NG R E I N V E N T E D I N TO A F I V E - STA R DAY SPA A N D H E A LT H R ET R E AT. PAGE

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THE POWER OF MANY WA L L A BI E S C A P TA I N ST E P H E N MOOR E ON FA M E , FA M I LY, F U T U R E … A N D EV E RY T H I NG I N BET W E E N.

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“It’ so much more powerful achieving things as a team ... you get to share memories.”

Stephen Moore opens up about life at the helm of a major sporting team, the pressure of being in the spotlight and balancing family life. C ON T I N U E D

ON FAME…

So does this (the constant attention from fans passing by) happen a lot? It used to happen occasionally. But since the World Cup last year, it’s definitely happening a lot more.

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doing work with Deloitte here in Canberra working in change management. That opportunity allowed me to put into practice everything I’ve learnt about being part of a team and the importance of good leadership and establishing a good culture – which has become a real passion for me.

should all want the same thing.’ But if you look across the Wallabies, we’ve got guys that were born in Fiji and Samoa. I wasn’t born in Australia (Stephen was born in Saudi Arabia to Irish parents and moved to Australia when he was five). David (Pocock) was born in Zimbabwe. So by digging deep into our individual motivators, we realised that everyone’s ‘whys’ were very different to each other’s. For some people, it’s their culture. For others it’s their family.

O N F A M I LY…

Does it bother you? You do lose an element of privacy but I'm not uncomfortable with it. I'm very passionate about rugby and so I feel I have a personal responsibility to be a good ambassador for the sport – and to conduct myself in a certain way.

That’s pretty important when you’re a sportsperson in the public eye. Absolutely. I think there are some sports people who can’t handle being thrust into the spotlight and all the attention goes to their head. And they don’t think about how their behaviour has consequences on a greater level. Even the Wallabies had some problems with poor discipline and selfish behaviour – every team has its issues. But from my experience, the vast majority of my teammates over my career have been very focused on becoming the best person they can be.

O N T H E I M P O R TA N C E OF A GOOD TEAM…

Why is being part of a team so important for you? I think it’s so much more powerful achieving things as a team, rather than individual success. You get to share memories— the highs and the lows, form great relationships and have that camaraderie.

What makes a good team? It’s my belief that good people make good footballers. But it’s not about laying down rules and restrictions and getting people to fit a certain mould. That never works in my opinion. (Wallabies coach) Michael Cheika’s focus is very much on educating players – young players in particular – to become the best versions of themselves. And when you can start from there, everything will fall into place.

“Once we worked out what each of us stood for, we established a collective identity for us as a team ...” – STEPHEN MOORE

How do you go about achieving that? Last year, we were really big on getting people to focus on what is their ‘why’ in life. Asking questions like ‘What do you stand for?’ ‘What motivates you?’ And we’d never done that before. We always came from a place of ‘We’re all Aussies and we

What’s your ‘why’? For me, it’s about the legacy of the jersey. I’m a bit of a traditionalist in that sense. I grew up dreaming of playing for the Wallabies. So when I got that opportunity I wanted to make not only my family proud but also the people who played before me.

How does understanding your ‘why’ make you a better footballer? Well, it forms your identity – your selfbelief. Once we worked out what each of us stood for, we established a collective identity for us as a team – and it’s something we all keep to ourselves. So whether we’re on or off the field, it drives everything we do. When we lost the World Cup final last year, Michael Cheika said �I couldn’t be prouder of you guys because today we were that person and that’s all you want to be.’ He never talked about winning or losing.

How has that approach influenced you as a leader? It’s crucial for me to really find time to get an understanding of my teammates and dig deep. I think the power of the mind is really underestimated, especially when it comes to sport. So we would spend just as much time talking about what motivated us as much as we would about rugby. Because if you believe you can do something, you can do it. No matter what it is.

ON DEALING WITH THE HIGHS AND LOWS…

What have been the absolute highlights in your career? Having grown up in the golden age of rugby watching all my heroes such as John Eales and Tim Horan win the 1999 World Cup, and then having the opportunity to play with some of those guys, has been an amazing ride. My first Test match against Samoa in 2005 was a big moment – especially as I’d done a lot of hard work to get to that point. I was only 22.

A couple of games after that, we played South Africa in Johannesburg and I got to shake hands with Nelson Mandela at Ellis Park Stadium. It was a full house and there was a lot of emotion. So I was really conscious of what a momentous occasion it was. Another huge moment was my 50th test which was against South Africa in the Highveld – and we won – for the first time in something like 30 years. Completing my medicine degree was also really important to me. It wasn’t easy and it took me six years! I remember sitting for exams in South Africa and doing assignments on tour in the UK. But rugby has always given me the opportunity to juggle my priorities.

What about the lowlights? Things like losing Test cup finals – or any Test matches are a huge disappointment. Losing the Super Rugby finals with the Brumbies a couple of years ago was very tough. But I’m a big believer that you have to learn from those things – you take something out of it and turn it into a positive. Because once a game is over, it’s over – you can’t change the result. And as I’ve gotten older, I appreciate that a lot more and try to put the past behind me as quick as I can. I used to dwell on losses for days and days. But having a family has really put those things into perspective for me; I mean you come home after a loss and the kids still want you to do things with them, life goes on. In terms of injuries, one of the lowest points was my first Test match as captain of the Wallabies in 2014. I injured my knee in the first couple of minutes of play against France. It was pretty surreal. I had surgery two days later and missed out on the whole season.

You met your wife (Courtney) in South Africa. Yeah I met her while I was on tour there in 2008 – in a bar! Very romantic! And we got talking and then that was it – I had to leave the next day. But I got her details before I left and we stayed in touch. And she agreed to come out to Australia a few months later for a holiday. That was the start of our long distance relationship.

That must have been tough. It was tough – particularly with the time difference. I’d have to get up early so I could catch her before she went to bed, and she’d be getting ready to go to work in the morning when I’d try her at night. After about two years she agreed to move over here. I would never underestimate her giving up her life—her career, her friends, her family—to be with me. It was a huge sacrifice on her part.

Now that you have children (son Theodore is three, and daughter Darcy is 19 months), how do you balance your career with fatherhood? Well, I guess that makes it harder. Theodore was only a few weeks old when the season started back up and I had to go away. But you know that situation is not unique to rugby. Look at people in the military who are away for months at a time. So I don’t complain about it. I feel that I’m very lucky to get to travel the world, doing something that I love. But saying that, you do need to have supportive frameworks in place at home. That’s critical. Now that

we’ve got two children it becomes harder – particularly as Theodore is older now, he’s starting to really miss me when I’m gone. But I Skype them while I’m away and Courtney works very hard to explain to them what it’s about. And I guess I’m lucky in that they get to see me on TV, so they know where I am and have some context. We always find opportunities for when they can join me on tour, because otherwise it’s a long time to be apart.

ON THE FUTURE…

Where do you see yourself in five, 10 years time? I’ll be retired from rugby I’d say. We’re actually moving back to Brisbane next year so that we can be closer to my family and my mates – which I’m excited about. But I’m also feeling quite emotional about leaving the Brumbies – my teammates and coaches. I’ve been with them for eight years and I’d like to think I’ve made a contribution in that respect. But there comes a time in your life when you have to put your family first and it just means that Courtney and I will have that extra support in Brisbane that we don't have here. In terms of rugby and joining the Reds, the team has been struggling lately, so it’s an opportunity to go up there and make a difference – which I love. Other than that, my goal is to play in the 2019 World Cup. I’ll be 37 by then so I’m not taking it for granted that I’ll make it to that point – but that’s my goal. I’ve often thought about going over to Cambridge and studying for a year – something like modern history or philosophy. And beyond that, I’d like to pursue my passion around change management. I’ve seen how it can really make a difference from a rugby perspective, and I’m really looking forward to taking what I’ve learn in that sphere out into the wider business world.

O N T R AV ELLIN G …

What's the worst hotel you've ever stayed in? There’ve been some ordinary ones in Paris and Italy. We always room with someone else so you’ve got these two massive guys with heaps of gear squeezed into a tiny room with two single beds. And the bigger guys always have their feet hanging over the bed and that sort of thing.

What's your favourite hotel? I love Grosvenor House in London in Park Lane. It’s very old school and traditional. Every night they’ve got black tie balls on and I love seeing people walking around in all their finery. We don't often get to stay in those kinds of places so it gives you a whole insight into a different world.

How do you rate a good hotel? A good bed and a good shower are absolutely crucial for me. Because these days you don’t really spend that much time in your room. And particularly when you’re playing, you just want to come back have a good shower and know that you’re going to get a great night’s sleep. Good curtains to black the room out are also top on my list. Oh, and great coffee. You definitely have to have great coffee in the morning.

How is travelling different with kids? It’s been challenging! I remember when the family came and joined me for the World Cup and Courtney and I had a double bed, Theodore was on a little roller bed and Darcy was in this quarter cot all in the one room. And if you had to get up in the middle of the night, you had to tiptoe around. Because if anyone woke up, it was game over! But in saying that, they’re all the memories that you’re creating together and we’ll be able to talk about that when they get older. And I’m looking forward to when they can get older and they can appreciate it more (and we can have separate rooms)!

That must have been shattering! It was. But once again, I try and put a positive spin on these things. It’s just a game at the end of the day, and there are far more people out there who have worse things going on in their lives. So I focused on getting my knee right. But I also got to spend more time with my family and my kids, which was great. And I started

Cover and left hand page, photographed by Martin Ollman. Left and above, photographed by Stuart Walmsley.

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BRASSEY HOTEL: A NEW LIFE, FOR AN OLD BEAUTY

DI D YOU K NOW ?

COU N T RY- GA R DE N SET T I NG I N T H E CI T Y

“In the 1950s, Brassey House residents paid 6 pounds, 6 shillings a week for full board (food and meals), which was 50 per cent of our salary”.

Brassey Hotel’s reinstated garden landscape will provide a gorgeous backdrop for intimate weddings and events. The Realm Precinct offers a variety of accommodation options, at different price points.

Brassey Hotel is one of Canberra’s much-loved historical treasures. Now, Doma Hotels is breathing new life into the beautiful heritage-listed property by reinstating its idyllic country-style gardens, cosy courtyards and landscaped features – creating the ultimate setting for a five-star day spa and health retreat, at the iconic former guesthouse.

– TONY HOWKINS ( R E S I D E N T I N 1 9 5 4 –1 9 5 7 )

Words by Tiffany Bonasera

1929

When it opened in August 1927, Brassey Hotel was known as the Guest House at Telopea. It was later renamed Brassey House after Lord Thomas Brassey, Governor of Victoria at the time of Federation (from 1895-1901), though many locals believed Arthur Brassey, a prominent Acton landowner, deserved consideration for the naming rights. If the walls at Brassey could talk they’d have plenty of colourful stories to tell. Brassey started out as a guest house for Members of Parliament and government officials. It went on to become a place of residence for civil and military personnel, as well as ‘10 Pound Poms’ and British researchers such as Tony Howkins, who relocated to Canberra to take up appointments at the ANU in the 1950s. Since 1987, Brassey has operated as a hotel.

For new owners, Doma Group who own/operate Doma Hotels, developing a new narrative for Brassey Hotel, within the Realm Precinct, has involved preserving its welcoming (and popular) old-world charm while looking for ways to reinvigorate the generous space, particularly the gardens. “The Realm Precinct is a modern, urban development with bustling businesses, bars and restaurants,” explains, Jure Domazet, Managing Director, Doma Group.

National Archives of Australia: Brassey House, under construction 1929.

2016

Designed by Sydney-based architectural firm, Budden & Hood, the building’s symmetrical facade is a nod to American Colonial influences. If the characteristic dark brick walls could talk, we may be more the wiser about whether there’s any truth in a story that the building was built the wrong way around – that it should have faced in the opposite direction.

“A guest, absent for the evening, left his radiator beaming on his eiderdown – the smell of scorched feathers through the corridors soon attracted prompt extinguishing treatment!”

While we will probably never know if Brassey was constructed in reverse, we can be confident that its early residents have fond memories of staying there – albeit, the building’s lack of heating at the time did call for extreme and humorous measures, as former guest, Noel Francis, recalled in an article published in the Canberra Times:

Brassey Hotel – refreshed and ready in 2016

“The Brassey sits on a block of almost 9000sqm, with a design that creates some intimate garden settings. Our aim is to restore them to their full potential and provide private and quiet garden settings around the hotel where our patrons can escape the faster pace of life.” In line with its vision of re-establishing Brassey’s leafy surroundings into a destination for reflection and calm, Doma Hotels is refurbishing the lower level of the hotel into a five-star wellness centre, complete with an international-standard day spa and “beautiful” gym. “There really is no need to exercise in a rough or ugly space,” Domazet says. “The gym will be a place where guests can go to do a gentle workout or a challenging exercise session, and just take time out away from the rest of the world.”

Brassey Hotel's 75 guest rooms will feature new carpets, signature Doma luxe beds, TVs, window furnishings, Foxtel and free WiFi. As our guest, you will also have access to the new 24-hour g ym and Canberra’s best day spa – opening late 2016.

“We have had to reimagine the whole hotel to reposition the internal layout.”

The gym will have a general fitness area with cable machines and cardio equipment, open 24 hours for guests. It will also have a dedicated weights area and multi-purpose group room, plus a Pilates studio and separate yoga and spin studio. Better still, the concept will focus on indoor-outdoor integration. As part of the hotel’s landscape upgrades, there are plans to incorporate an outdoor gym and sprint track that will be cleverly concealed within one of the courtyards. As for the luxurious day spa, it will bring the five-star factor to the hotel with its “cave” hot spa, steam rooms, sauna and treatment rooms – making it the perfect place to rejuvenate. “The design of the wellness centre will be markedly different from other gym and day spa offerings in Canberra,” Jure enthuses. “It will provide a health retreat experience.” Brassey Hotel’s makeover extends to the rooms and reception, where the Doma Hotels team is seamlessly bringing together elements from its proud heritage with the property’s new direction as a health and wellness destination. “The external appearance of the building, set within the extensive landscape, gives Brassey Hotel its heritage-feel,” Jure says.

“The design of the wellness centre will be markedly different from other g ym and day spa offerings in Canberra. It will provide a health retreat experience.” – J U R E D O M A Z E T, M A N AG I N G D I R E C T O R , DOMA GROUP

From a design viewpoint, “timeless” best describes the way the interior of the hotel is being remodelled. It is reflected in the lamps and chandeliers to the wallpapers, carpets and curtains in the room and corridors. Distinctive details include the light-grey to white palette highlighted by deep blues, warm timbers, natural stone and dramatic black textures. According to Jure, the changes are a natural fit for the hotel, given the Realm Precinct already appeals to clients who are interested in health and wellbeing. “Evo Health Club [Hotel Realm] already has a loyal following, Maple + Clove is one of the first wholefoods cafes in Canberra, and we have our very own Hotel Realm Running Group. Our new retreat at Brassey has been designed to complement existing services and facilities,” he says. One wonders what Brassey’s early guests would think of its transformation into a health retreat. For Tony Howkins, who described Brassey as a “really happy place to live”, a gym workout may well have been a welcome alternative to the entertainment on offer at the time, “playing cards, talking and singing along with whoever could play the piano”.

“The new reception area will provide a better connection through from Belmore Gardens to Macquarie Street, and will embrace the use of the west porch as one of the key entries to the building.”

In addition to enjoying the room improvements, Brassey guests will also be able to hire bikes from the hotel, including locks and helmets. (See page 13)

When staying at Brassey, guests can access the five restaurants and bars located just across the road at Hotel Realm and Burbury Hotel and Apartments.

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MITCH PEARCE

THE BEE WHISPERER We humans have depended on honey bees for about 9000 years. So when there were signs of a massive bee shortage in Canberra, and subsequent pollination crisis, one schoolboy, encouraged by his mum, decided to do something about it. Four years on, Mitch Pearce, through his business Canberra Urban Honey, is restoring the population, one bee at a time, thanks to community partners such as Hotel Realm. Words by Kate Edwards

W H Y B U Y LO C A L H O N E Y ?

Unlike store honey that is heated and pasteurised, pure local honey contains: •

No added chemicals or sugar

Natural antibacterial properties

Local pollens that can help build up your immunity to hay fever

Enzymes, antioxidants and other beneficial compounds

A fuller flavour and stronger aroma.

“You know when bees are unhealthy,” the young man with the mohawk and spectacular tattoo sleeve tells me, before pulling on his beekeeper's jacket and hood. “The hive gives off this distinctive smell, and that’s a sign they aren’t doing so well.” With that, he picks up his smoker and heads towards the three hives housed on the roof of Hotel Realm, to do a routine check of the 180,000 or more bees that live there. I’m watching him (from a safe distance), as he carefully examines each frame, amidst a cloud of smoke and bees. Finally, he’s satisfied that the bees are healthy enough, despite the intense heatwave Canberra’s been experiencing. But he’s noticed that they’re not producing as much honey as they normally do. “The dry weather affects pollination,” he explains. “If plants aren’t flowering in the area, bees can’t produce honey.” His knowledge of bees – not to mention his skills in avoiding being stung by thousands of them – is highly impressive. But Mitch Pearce is no ordinary 21-year-old. As Australia's youngest urban commercial beekeeper and fourth generation apiarist, bees are in his blood. And their welfare is his number one priority. “There are some commercial beekeepers who are all about getting as much honey as they can out of their bees,” he explains. “But my family’s focus has always been on keeping our bees happy and healthy. Because ultimately, happy bees produce better honey.” And having received the first agricultural excellence award for urban honey at the Sydney Royal Easter Show, it seems the industry agrees with the philosophy that was instilled in him from a very young age. Despite growing up in Canberra, Mitch spent all his school holidays working in his family’s commercial beekeeping business in Inverell, first established by his great-great grandfather – Frank Turner – in 1928. “I’ve got photos of me as young as six after a big day working on the hives, looking absolutely exhausted,” he recalls. “I loved it.” But what about the stings? “We’ve all got hilarious stories of us leaping into dams to run away from the bees and being covered in welts,” he laughs. “It still happens now occasionally! Just the other day, I was painting the hive lids without my jacket on and someone nearby started laying down some really strong fertiliser. I thought, ‘If the smell’s

“Yeah, I used to ditch classes to go and sort out any problems with the hives ...”

called the Collective, is vice president of the Beekeepers Association of the ACT, an active member of the New South Wales Apiarists' Association Inc. and a sustainability activist. His passion and knowledge on all things to do with bees and sustainability have also made him an in-demand speaker in Canberra and New South Wales – including giving several talks at his former school.

bothering me, it’s going to bother the bees’. And sure enough, they whipped themselves into a frenzy and stung me all over the face and neck. I had to give a speech on beekeeping that night – not a great look.”

But despite the fact that he’s now at the helm of a rapidly growing business, Mitch isn’t interested in making lots of money or garnering awards. He is still genuinely in it for the bees.

When he wasn’t working on the hives in Inverell, Mitch spent his weekends selling his family’s honey at Canberra’s farmers markets. It was there that people first started to approach him about the apparent lack of bees in Canberra. Over the years, the complaints become more frequent and more urgent, with fears that Canberra was heading for a pollination crisis.

“Ultimately, my goal is to have one hive within five kilometres of every house in Canberra,” he enthuses. “Then I can feel satisfied that there’ll be enough bees to guarantee the sustainability of our environment.”

“You can’t grow local produce, if you don't have bees,” states Mitch. “And it really concerned us. So my mum encouraged me to do something about it – and that’s when Canberra Urban Honey was born.” As the first agricultural crowdfunded project in Australia, Mitch and his mum were able to transport five of the hives from their family’s business in Inverell to Canberra. It was only ever meant to be a hobby – a way of restoring the local bee population. But the response was overwhelming. Hotel Realm was the first corporate partner to get on board, offering to host hives on the hotel roof. This notable endorsement became the catalyst for many more requests to host hives throughout Canberra, and Mitch suddenly found himself trying to juggle college with a rapidly growing enterprise. “Yeah, I used to ditch classes to go and sort out any problems with the hives,” laughs Mitch. “Mum would call me in the middle of art class to tell me something was wrong, and I’d be off in a flash.” Whilst his school was not terribly supportive of his side business, a couple of teachers had great faith in Mitch’s project and would turn a “blind eye” to his absences, knowing that he had the potential to make a real difference. And Mitch did not disappoint. As well as heading up Canberra Urban Honey – with 40 hives throughout Canberra – he also developed an initiative to support beekeeping hobbyists,

F I V E T H I N G S O N LY A BEEKEEPER WOULD KNOW ABOUT BEES 1. They have a banana-scented

anger hormone. 2. The can recognise human faces. 3. Each colony of bees

smells different. 4. One bee will only make 1/12 of a

teaspoon of honey in its lifetime. 5. Bees communicate with

different smells and dances.

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“We needed to change – the city was not really us anymore ...” Over next two decades, Li went where his creative mind took him: burnt out, he worked away from the business overseas for a few years. On his return to Canberra he opened more restaurants – one grounded in seafood, the other specialising in the little known ‘Nonya’ cuisine of Malaysia. And then Jure Domazet, Doma Group’s Managing Director, came calling with an idea for an Asian eatery in Realm Precinct’s Burbury Hotel. The result was Malamay –  a ‘Sichuan fusion’ restaurant which won a loyal following for its spicy and flavoursome food and dramatic fit out. Sister restaurant Lilotang opened next door in 2015, providing elegant Japanese fine-dining meets izakaya raffishness – full of flavour and matched by an impressive saké list. While the Barton area began to develop into a renowned dining precinct, the Civic area around Chairman became peppered with chain eateries. The CBD was no longer the setting for the ‘power lunch’, with many government departments and private sector players shifting to the inner south. Li decided that Chairman would move too.

EAT. DRINK. PLAY. Buvette Bistro & Wine Bar

––– Words by Amanda Whitley

“We were over playing badminton and basketball during our spare time at university and thought, ‘what are we going to do?’,” Josiah says. “We loved food, all of us, so we went out and got part-time jobs waiting tables.” Each week, the meagre wage they earned would be spent on trying new places to eat, but they’d soon exhausted the Capital’s culinary offerings. After frequenting Civic’s The Dragon Inn, an unassuming Chinese eatery serving up big bowls of noodles and traditional Cantonese fare, Li says the group thought, ‘we could do that’. Within six months, the 18 year olds were looking for locations and making plans to bring their dream to fruition. It materialised in Window on The Orient, a 300-seat restaurant in suburban Belconnen. “In those days, the trend for Asian restaurants was still all red and gold dragons, and the waiters wore white shirts and a black bow tie,” Li says. “We changed the whole look – had bright yellow shirts, which were ‘wow!’ The whole place was – I still remember – pastel green with burgundy red trim.” From the time it opened, Window on The Orient was packed every sitting – 200 people for lunch, 300 for dinner. Somehow, a group of students with no restaurant experience had changed the face of Chinese restaurants in Canberra. That was the beginning of Li’s food empire – one that has spanned three decades and eight acclaimed restaurants:

Window on The Orient, China Tea Club, Madam Yip, The Chairman & Yip, Cape Cod, Lanterne Rooms, Malamay and, most recently, Lilotang. But it was the opening of ‘Chairman’ in 1992 that really put it on the map.

THE VIBE Literally translated, Buvette means “drinking hole”, but Hotel Realm’s French bistro and wine bar is much more than that. A labour of love for Doma Hotels’ Executive Chef, Fabien Wagnon, who was born and raised in Northern France, Buvette takes its culinary cues from timeless dishes of the classic French bistro.

Chairman was perhaps the city centre’s first serious culinary contender, and back then, the now-bustling Bunda Street restaurant row was just a dirt carpark. “The whole strip was really dark, but then we were so busy – so busy,” Li says. “We started to attract the corporate market and got more and more serious about our knowledge of food and wine. “And then (renowned food critic with Sydney Morning Herald) Terry Durack came in, I didn’t even know who he was, it was so embarrassing. I remember, long hair, big boy, sitting right in the middle of the restaurant and he ordered a whole duck.” The ‘duck’ in question was, in Durack’s words, a “crisper-than-crisp, crispy Sichuan duck” – simply roasted, broken into pieces and served with Asian pancakes, no garnish. And it became a cult favourite. “The next thing we knew, Terry Durack wrote his first ever big feature on a Canberra restaurant, like this was the best duck he ever had in his life,” Li says. “And then we were selling 50, 60 ducks every seating. It was mad.” That was the beginning of Chairman’s golden years – their Duck Pancake was much-imitated and the awards rained down.

Two sentimental favourites neatly demonstrate the evolution of the Chairman’s cuisine – and perhaps the sophistication of Canberra’s palate – over the past couple of decades: Chairman & Yip’s Scallop and Beef Pepper Hotpot and Malamay’s Oxtail Stew with Spices and Port. The former is traditional Cantonese cooking with bold bursts of black pepper, and just as appealing as it was back in the 1990s when it first burst onto diners’ tastebuds; but the tender meat with complex spices of the latter dish has a depth of flavour that’s hard to top. The response to the new Chairman has been overwhelmingly positive. Its large balcony has been reinvented as an airy covered “Chinese garden”, windows sporting transparent panels of red which make the whole section appear like a lantern. It brings a whole new energy to the space. It’s this constant evolution that keeps Li engaged, even after 30 years “on the floor”. “People actually find me crazy and say ‘at your age, you should be retiring from the floor’, but I need to connect with the customers. My heart on the floor is the same as when I was 21. “Every day you get new people, so every day is a different journey. And then that’s part of the reason why I am still passionate about what I do.”

A room with a view Ostani Lounge Bar and Restaurant is Hotel Realm’s home base, the perfect place to relax with an after-work drink or to meet friends for a casual meal. The centrepiece of the Garden Bar is the Ostani Pavilion, a stunning structure that provides shade in summer and cosy open–fire ambience in cooler weather.

THE VIBE Overlooking the city, lake and leafy Barton, The Burbury Hotel’s sunlit rooftop terrace hosts Canberra's most exclusive high tea with a selection of finely made French cakes and tarts, delicate savouries and traditional scones, accompanied with TWG fine teas and freshly brewed coffee. Add a class of Mumm Champagne for true indulgence.

M U S T H AV E

W H AT ’ S O N

W H AT ’ S O N

Every Saturday from 11.30am to 2.30pm, Buvette’s Petit Feast will reward late risers with a delectable brunch. For $65, including a glass of rosé, you can celebrate lazy weekends with savoury and sweet delights.

High Tea at The Burbury 1pm to 4pm Every Saturday and Sunday $50 for Traditional high tea or $60 for Champagne high tea

There are too many delicious delights to choose from, but if we had to select just two, it would be the bittersweet brownies, praline gânache, caramelised salted popcorn and the white chocolate and passionfruit crème brûlée.

Lilotang

Maple + Clove

Modern Japanese elegance

Healthy eating haven

THE VIBE

THE VIBE

It’s Japanese fine dining without the fuss. Bursts of salmon pink and sunshine yellow Manga adorn the walls of this hatted restaurant, the light and airy space complementing chef Shunsuke Ota’s delicate and balanced dishes.

Maple + Clove is all about serving wholefoods as close as possible to their natural state, with little or no refinement or processing. Expect to nourish your body with a delicious choice of foods that are dense in micronutrients, rich in antioxidants, free of unhealthy additives.

W H AT ’ S O N There’s always something happening at Ostani. Every Thursday, catch the Bubbles and Boards special, with a glass of sparkling for $5 with each board of charcuterie, cheese or dips. If you’re looking for a casual Queen’s Birthday celebration, don’t forget Ostani’s Sunday session on 12 June 2016.

But it was more than just a case of relocating – the decision was made to close Malamay and transition Chairman into a revamped space. The result is an eatery boasting a menu that brings together the best elements of the two.

“We tested the dishes and talked to our customers about the meals they loved. The ‘new’ Chairman menu has four of the traditional dishes and four Malamay dishes and the rest is new.”

High Tea at The Burbury

THE VIBE

“We prepared, we used a whole year preparing Chairman to move over,” Li says.

Since his first foray into the food industry over 30 years ago with a group of uni buddies, Josiah Li has become synonymous with Canberra’s best Asian cuisine – including Realm Precinct’s The Chairman & Yip and Lilotang – but his dining dynasty had its origins in boredom.

Relaxed drinks and dining

A little taste of France

“We decided we needed to change – the city was not really us anymore – and it was a painful decision because we’d been there for so long,” he says.

THE CHAIRMAN’S NEW CLOTHES

Ostani

M U S T H AV E

M U S T H AV E

French classics never go out of style. For dinner, start with Escargots à la Bourguignonne or Duck Liver Parfait and begin the journey to France (without the airfare!)

Ostani is the perfect place to share a meal, so take your pick of their famous wood-fire pizzas, add some tapas and settle in for the evening with a jug of sangria that serves four.

W H AT ’ S O N

W H AT ’ S O N Every Friday, shake up your happy hour at Lilotang’s Sake Bar. Enjoy a selection of sake and cocktails with perfectly paired snacks, like pork belly skewers or Lilotang’s signature wings. If a quick lunch is all you can fit in, grab a Bento box from 12–3pm Tuesday to Friday. In May, Lilotang will be showcasing its offerings in a special menu in the lead up to the announcement of The Australian Financial Review’s Top 100 Restaurants, and in June there’ll be a series of pop up dinners with a special guest chef from Sydney.

The Chairman & Yip Contemporary Chinese THE VIBE The Chairman and Yip has been a Canberra institution since it first opened in 1992 and has found a fitting new home in The Burbury Hotel. Expect mouth-watering traditional dishes and interesting new takes on Asian flavours matched with boutique wines and top notch service. W H AT ’ S O N In August, the team from sister restaurant, Chairman (HK), will be teaming up with the Canberra kitchen to bring an exciting Hong Kong Dinner series to Capital diners. If wine is your passion, you won’t want to miss Chairman’s Friday Night Wine Club, a sommelier hosted opportunity to try some amazing and unusual wines every Friday night.

M U S T H AV E

Chairman’s Lobster Roll is a moreish combination of East and West, while the Xian style spiced roast duck is a stunning example of its inventive cuisine.

The keen morning runners formerly known as the Maple + Clove Running Group now meets every Tuesday and Thursday at 6:15am at Hotel Realm Buvette. Catering to all running levels, the friendly group does a scenic circuit of around 5–6kms through the Parliamentary Triangle and Lake Burley Griffin, before gathering for coffee and a nutritious breakfast afterwards. The perfect healthy start to any day.

M U S T H AV E

M U S T H AV E

Umami-Jime Snapper Sashimi, Josephine Pear, Heirloom Tomato: the snapper is cured in a combination of konbu, soy sauce and dashi giving an umami flavour, and combined with sweet heirloom tomatoes and tart, crunchy pear.

For a weekend indulgence, we love the Banana Waffle—sweet buttermilk and spelt waffles served with caramelised banana, housemade orange spiced ricotta and 100 per cent vanilla bean gelato, drizzled in a gooey cinnamon spiced maple syrup.

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PEAK FITNESS

Summer Bodies Are Made In Winter

Prepare your body for the strength and endurance it takes to confidently tackle the slopes this snow season. Evo Health Club’s head coach, Matt Rodgers, has developed three high-intensity interval training (HIIT) sessions designed to help you achieve ski-specific results – right here at the Realm Precinct.

Motivation to exercise can freeze over when it’s winter, particularly in Canberra. While it’s hard(er) to get up and at ‘em when it’s dark and cold outside, summer bodies are made in sub-zero temperatures, when everyone else is still fast asleep.

S TA R T G E T T I N G YO U R S U M M E R B O DY R E A DY O N T H E R O A D T H I S W I N T E R . Y O U C A N S T A Y A C T I V E A N D B E A T T H E N A T I O N A L C A P I T A L’ S B I G C H I L L B Y H I T T I N G T H E S C E N I C R U N N I N G A N D C Y C L I N G L O O P S T H AT C O N V E N I E N T LY S U R R O U N D T H E R E A L M P R E C I N C T. B E S T O F A L L , I T ’ S P E R F E C T F O R A L L F I T N E S S L E V E L S .

Year-round exercise enthusiast, Chris Christis, who heads up the popular Hotel Realm Running Group, says joining like-minded people in a friendly, structured environment provides just the incentive to swap the comfort of your doona for an outdoor training run (or ride). “You will not have to start your fitness goals all over again when the weather warms up,” he says. “Plus, you get to finish with a hot cup of coffee and great conversation at Buvette.”

Words by Tiffany Bonasera

WHAT: Hotel Realm Running Group (formerly Maple + Clove Runners Group) WHEN: Every Tuesday and Thursday at 6.15am sharp WHERE: Meet at Buvette, located at the Hotel Realm (ground level) PA

WHO: Caters for all runners, at any level – hotel guests are welcome to join in

RK ES A

CONDITIONING 3–5 rounds — try to improve your time with each workout

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3–5 ROUNDS

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Burpees x 10

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Full dynamic body downward dog x 20 reps, full range of movement body weight squats x 20 reps x 3 rounds.

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Cycle Crunches x 50reps

WARM UP

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FINISH WITH Full body static stretching, incorporating yoga stretches, to assist with cooling down. Breathing drills for 3–5 minutes for post-training relaxation. LTH AV E

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STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING

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Summer bodies can be made on Canberra’s cycle loops, too! You can hire bikes from the terminal located outside Little National or Brassey Hotel, or ask our friendly hotel staff for alternative options.

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PRICE GUIDE: 1 hour only – $11 per hour 4 hours or more – $5.50 per hour 24 hours – $1.40 per hour

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CONDITIONING 3–5 rounds. 2km run — try to improve your time with each workout

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FINISH WITH Full body dynamic, static and band-assisted stretches.

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RUNNING LOOPS

Green: 3.43km

Realm running group: 6.3km

Short-cut

REALM PRECINCT

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PARLIAMENT HOUSE

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NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF AUSTRALIA

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OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

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NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA

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HIGH COURT OF AUSTRALIA

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NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY

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NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA

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Dynamic Side Bench Jumps x 20

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FINISH WITH Full body dynamic and static stretching with a 5 minute walk to cool the body down after physical activity.

Lateral Lunges x 20

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Single Leg Step ups x 20 (each leg)

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WARM UP Walk for 5 minutes to increase extremity blood flow and systemic warm up then Run 50m > 10 Lunges > Run 50m > 10 Squats > Run 50m > 10 Push ups x 3 Rounds.

For detailed cycling maps, visitcanberra.com.au

LAKE BURLE Y GRI FFIN

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Get outdoors – nearby park or playground

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40sec Dual Arm Slams: 20sec rest x continuous running clock for 10 minutes.

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Jump Lunges x 20 (10 each side)

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NOTE: Consult Evo’s trainers to ensure you’re using the most effective techniques.

Barbell High Bar Paused Squats 5 sets of 10 (2 sec pause at bottom of each rep)

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WARM UP Full dynamic body weight drills. Push ups, lunges, squats, chin ups, roll backs utilising full range of motion to promote mobility. 10 reps of each. 3–5 rounds, depending on training level. Always adjust exercises to suit individual ability.

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See the map for scenic running/walking loops, starting from the Realm Precinct.

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BATTLE ROPE INTERVALS

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Gym workout – Evo Health Club

DETAILS: Covers 5–6 kilometres travelling around the Parliamentary Triangle and Lake Burley Griffin. The average pace is a steady 5–6 minutes per kilometre. There are even some short-cuts for people just starting out

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Step Plank x 10reps

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Blue: 6.5km

Red: 7.93km

10 NATIONAL CARILLON

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4.

A WINTER ADVENTURE Canberra is the gateway to Alpine Country, but the slopes are just the tip of the iceberg, so to speak. On the three-hour scenic trip from Canberra to the Snowy Mountains, there’s plenty to discover: Here are our insider tips to make the most of your winter road trip.

3.

Words by Tania Ward

2. BREDBO TO COOMA

1. REALM PRECINCT TO BREDBO

T R AV E L T I M E: 3 0 M I N U T E S Once simply a fuel stop on the road to the mountains, in recent years, Cooma has become a hub of food and fashion. E X P LO R E

To learn about the history of the region and how it has influenced the present, the Snowy Hydro Discovery Centre on the way into town is a good primer, with interactive and informative exhibits for all ages and a café. E AT

T R AV E L T I M E: 6 0 M I N U T E S Head out of the city on the Monaro Highway and after about an hour’s drive (just enough time to work up an appetite!) you’ll reach Bredbo, a village that is famous for its year-round Christmas spirit and gourmet food. SHOP

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The Bredbo Christmas Barn is open June to December and you can immerse yourself in all things Christmas with a huge store packed to the brim with trees and decorations. It’s never too early to celebrate! E AT

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Feeling hungry? Snowy Mountains Gourmet Food gathers local produce together with wholesome, home-style cooking and it is a match made in heaven. Grab a coffee for the road and stock up on meats, smoked trout and more.

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For lunch, try Kettle and Seed. With coffee roasted on the premises and delicious treats plus daily sandwiches, Kettle and Seed brings a touch of city sophistication to Cooma. Bags of coffee beans are also available so you can get your fix wherever your road trip takes you. Another great option is The Lott, a cosy lunch spot with an open fire in winter. A regular in the Good Food Guide, The Lott is located within a 100-year-old wool store and focuses on regional and seasonal produce. SHOP

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If you’re in the mood for some retail therapy, take a wander around the showroom of online fashion giant, Birdsnest, for beautiful clothes, a unique shopping experience, and the opportunity to stock up on some winter necessities.

JINDABYNE TO THREDBO T R AV E L T I M E: 3 0 M I N U T E S DRINK

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Along the Alpine Way from Jindabyne to Thredbo, you can’t go past a visit to Wild Brumby Schnapps and Gin Distillery for a true mountains experience. Enjoy schnapps tasting with an infectious atmosphere.

COOMA TO JINDABYNE

E AT

T R AV E L T I M E: 45 M I N U T E S

Crackenback Farm Restaurant and Guesthouse is another hidden gem and local favourite with classic winter menu.

Back on the open road, you will come over the foothills and into Jindabyne to be greeted by sweeping views of the lake and surrounding mountains. If you choose to stay in ‘Jindy’, you’ll be spoilt for choice when it comes to food and entertainment. E AT

Parc serves some of the best coffee in Jindabyne according to the locals, and they do a great smoked trout salad. Parc is located in the National Parks Information Centre building so you can organise your trip and re-energise yourself all in the same place.

D E TA I L S 1

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Bredbo Christmas Barn, 23 Monaro Hwy, Bredbo. Open 10am – 5pm Thursday to Monday. 02 6454 4445. bredbochristmasbarn.com.au

Kettle and Seed, 47 Vale St, Cooma. Closed Sundays. 02 6452 5882. Facebook @kettleandseed The Lott, 177–179 Sharp St, Cooma. Open 7 days. 02 6452 1414. lott.com.au

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S TAY

The kitchen at the Black Bear Inn promises to deliver again for 2016. Refuel after a day on the mountain and maybe even share some schnapps with the locals.

If you’re in the market for accommodation at the snow, Lantern Apartments are a great option and they also book many other mountain lodges and chalets. Give them a call or drop in and they’ll match you up with the perfect mountain retreat.

Sante Churrasco is the place for a steak with its Brazilian-inspired menu and is always a crowd favourite. Bernti’s Mountain Inn has a great bar and atmosphere and is a Thredbo institution for a guaranteed fun night and delicious meal. On the mountain itself, the locals head to Karella for the afternoon—join in the fun with some schnapps and traditional mountain cuisine. Rumour has it the best coffee can be found at Frost Bite.

Keep an eye on thredbo.com.au for events throughout your stay, including the Flare Run and fireworks, a Thredbo tradition that happens on Thursday nights (for kids) and Saturday nights (all ages).

D E TA I L S Black Bear Inn, 30 Diggings Terrace, Thredbo. Open 7 days. 02 6457 6216. Sante Churrasco Brazilian Style BBQ, 4 Squatters Run, Mowamba Mall, Thredbo. Open for dinner Thursday to Sunday. 02 6457 6083.

If you can’t get enough of Birdsnest in Cooma, they have a store in Thredbo village so you can call in and chat fashion on and off the ski fields with Gabi and the rest of the team. Gabi is also one of the faces behind Snow Angel, an Australian après ski fashion collection now sold around the world. Snowsport is the place for snow wear, with various lines imported direct from Europe and a focus on fashion and functionality from the latest international designers.

Bernti’s Mountain Inn, 4 Mowamba Place, Thredbo. Open 7 days. 02 6457 6332. Birdsnest Thredbo, Thredbo Alpine Hotel, Village Square, Thredbo. Open 7 days. 1300 696 378. Snowsport, Mowamba Place, Thredbo. Open 7 days. 02 6457 6393. Lantern Apartments, 2 Banjo Drive, Thredbo. Open 7 days. 02 6457 6600. Kareela Hutte, Thredbo Supertrail, Thredbo Village. Open 8.30–4.30 pm in snow season, kareelahutte.com.au Frostbite Kiosk, High Noon, Thredbo. Open 7 days in snow season.

Birdsnest, 232 Sharp St, Cooma. Closed Sundays. 1300 696 378. birdsnest.com.au Snowy Hydro Discovery Centre, Lot 1, Monaro Hwy, Cooma. Open 7 days. snowymountains.com.au 3

Cocina Mexican Grill and Cantina, 33 Kosciuszko Rd, Jindabyne. Open for dinner Wednesday to Saturday. 02 6457 2888. cocina.net.au

THREDBO VILLAGE

C H A R LOT T E PAS S

Parc Café, 49 Kosciuszko Rd, Jindabyne. Open 7 days. 02 6456 2517. parcjindy.com.au

Thredbo has 480 hectares of snow riding whether you are a skier, boarder, sightseer or snowman builder. For beginners, there’s the gentle slope of Friday Flat, intermediates can step it up a gear at the Cruiser intermediate area, while confident skiers can have a crack at some of the most advanced terrain in the country.

Charlotte Pass is Australia’s only completely snowbound snow resort. With the village sitting at 1765m, it offers an intimate experience that is accessed exclusively via over–snow transport.

Sundance Bakehouse and Tea Rooms, Shop 13, Nuggets Crossing, Jindabyne. Open 7 days. 02 6456 2951.

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Whether you’re looking for an escape from work stress or need a stretch after hitting the slopes, Jindabyne Yoga Shala is a picturesque spot for yoga and everyone is welcome at classes that will revive the body and mind.

Snowy Mountains Gourmet Food, Monaro Hwy, Bredbo. Open 8am – 5pm 7 days. 02 6454 4200.

Sundance Bakehouse is a local legend, and has been described as serving the best pies in Australia. The chicken pie is a sure favourite; so make sure you taste it for yourself! CHILL

If you still have an appetite by the time you make it to Thredbo, this tiny village, with a touch of European charm, will not disappoint.

SHOP

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Cocina Mexican Grill has a fun, fresh take on all-things Mexican and will keep you warm, even if it is snowing outside.

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Thredbo

Jindabyne Yoga Shala, 12 Thredbo Terrace, Jindabyne. Morning and afternoon classes available. 0403 033 170. jindabyneyoga.com.au 4

Wild Brumby Schnapps, Corner of Wollondibby Rd and Alpine Way, Jindabyne. Open 7 days. 02 6457 1447. Crackenback Farm, 914 Alpine Way, Crackenback. Open 7 days. 02 6456 260.

On the Slopes The Snowy Mountains’ four winter resorts offer something for everyone. Perisher is the largest resort, Thredbo has the longest run, Charlotte Pass is only accessed by oversnow transport and Selwyn Snowfields is a fun family resort.

To hone your skills, the Thredbo Snow Sports School offers group and private lessons for all ages and ability levels. thredbo.com.au

PERISHER Perisher boasts an incredible 47 lifts accessing an immense 1245 hectares of varied snow-covered terrain, suitable for all ages and abilities. With four distinct resort areas – Perisher Valley, Guthega, Smiggin Holes and Blue Cow – sitting above the recognised snow-line, Perisher is renowned for its snow reliability and consistency, providing a true on-snow experience. Its world class Snowsports School offers skiing and snowboarding tuition for first timers right up to experts, across a variety of different programs designed to suit individual needs and ages. perisher.com.au

As Australia’s highest resort, Charlotte Pass receives some of the most consistent snowfalls delivering the best quality natural snow. Whether you’re a beginner testing out your snow legs on Easy Starter, an intermediate carving up Kosi Coaster, an experienced skier looking for adventure on Sidewinder or a hard-core rider after an adrenalin rush at Guthrie’s Chutes, you’ll find something to suit here. charlottepass.com.au

S ELW Y N S N OW FIELDS Widely known as the learn-to-ski resort with the motto ‘Friendly Family Fun’, Selwyn Snowfields—more commonly known as Mt Selwyn—is perfect for first timers by providing progressive terrain, working your way across the mountain from beginner slopes to intermediate and advanced trails. selwynsnow.com.au

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COMFORT FOOD When it’s cold outside, you want to warm up from the inside out. We asked our chefs to share their favourite comfort food recipes.

O S TA N I

Prawn Pasta FEW DISHES WARM THE STOMACH ( AND THE HEART ) BET TER THAN A STEAMING B O W L O F PA S TA . A D D A P U N C H Y S A U C E A N D F R E S H J U I C Y P R AW N S , A N D YO U H AV E T H E PE R FEC T W I N T E R D I S H .

Photography by Martin Ollman

SERVES 4

METHOD

INGREDIENTS

Fill a large saucepan with water and bring to the boil. Add a generous pinch of salt and one tablespoon of olive oil.

600g fresh linguine (saffron, squid ink or plain) 3 garlic cloves 1 small white or red onion small 60ml extra virgin olive oil 200g cherry tomatoes, washed and halved 10g butter 60ml dry white wine 24 tiger prawns, peeled 1 bunch of continental parsley sea salt black pepper 1 red chili, seeds removed.

Peel onions and halve then slice finely. Peel and finely slice garlic. Place two tablespoons of olive oil in the pot and warm over medium heat. Add the garlic, onions and chili. When the onion mix is soft but not coloured, increase the heat then add the peeled prawns and quickly pan fry then season and remove the prawns from pan and place aside. You want the prawns to be under cooked.

CHAIRMAN & YIP

Oxtail Stew with Spices & Port

Add the cherry tomatoes and cook for five minutes. Add the pasta to the boiling water and cook for two to three. When al dente, add to the pot with a bit of the cooking water from the pasta (around six tablespoons). Cook for one minute then add the prawns and flat parsley and season to taste. Finish off by tossing the butter through.

COOK UP A WINTER FEAST FOR F A M I LY A N D F R I E N D S W I T H T H I S R I C H A N D C O M P L E X D I S H T H AT W I L L WA R M Y O U F R O M T H E I N S I D E O U T.

SERVES 8 INGREDIENTS

BUVET TE

Soupe à l'Oignon S O U P E A L’ O I G N O N , O R F R E N C H O N I O N S O U P A S I T ’ S M O R E C O M M O N L Y K N O W N I N A U S T R A L I A , O R I G I N AT E D A S A H E A R T Y S O U P F O R PA R I S M A R K E T W O R K E R S W H O N E E D E D T O WA R M T H E M S E LV E S U P O N C O L D M O R N I N G S . I T ’ S E Q U A L LY D E L I C I O U S O N C O O L C A N B E R R A N I G H T S .

INGREDIENTS

METHOD

500g brown onions, sliced

Peel onions and quarter, then slice coarsely.

40g unsalted butter

Place butter and olive oil in a pot over medium heat. Add the onions and a pinch of salt and cook until caramelised, then add the white wine and reduce by a quarter.

20g extra virgin olive oil 150ml dry white wine (Riesling) 1.5L veal stock

Make a bouquet garni of the bay leaves and thyme by tying them together with some kitchen string and add it and veal stock to the pot. Reduce the liquid by three-quarters until you have a thick onion soup. Taste and season with salt and pepper.

4 to 8 slices of sourdough bread, depending on the appetite aged grated cheddar 2 bay leaves

Toast the sourdough and sprinkle a generous amount of grated cheese on top. Melt under a hot grill until golden.

1/4 of a bunch of thyme sea salt black pepper

Ladle the soup into four bowls and place toast on top. Bon appétit!

SERVES 4

5kg oxtail 500g brown onions, sliced 250g carrots, diced 1/4 bunch celery, diced 750g canned tomato puree 125g tomato paste 125g garlic cloves 3 black cardamon pods, cracked open 8g star anise 12g coriander seeds 18g cumin seeds 15g fennel seeds 1 fresh bay leaves 15g dried chilli 500ml port 15g sea salt 20g sugar 50g chicken stock 1/2 stick of cassia bark 1.5 stalks lemongrass, smashed and cut into 4cm pieces METHOD Toast spices in canola oil with garlic chill and lemongrass till fragrant. Add onions, carrots and celery and sweat until translucent. Bring to a high temperature and add tomato paste, port, and tomatoes. Cook for two hours on low. Trim oxtail and steam for two hours. Season stew and cook for a further two hours, then taste and adjust seasoning as necessary. When sauce is ready add to oxtail and steam for a further four hours. Enjoy!

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AUTUMN/WINTER STYLE 1

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Her A/W 2016 wardrobe

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Key looks for Autumn Winter 2016

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OLIVE, SAFFRON, CARAMEL AND SIENNA Pointing out that colours of falling autumn leaves will be ‘back in fashion’ for the cooler months seems a little obvious, but for AW16 we’ll be one with the environment. This season’s on-trend tones have a kick of warmth: Jason Wu for Boss touched on golden browns, warm khakis and burnt orange; Coach presented coats and corduroy jackets in an olive-tinged tan, and Proenza Schouler showed caramel golden leather boots to accent their signature striking monotones—blame the tail end of the '70s influence. Balance saffron, khaki and olives with navy or soften Bordeaux hues with nude blush. If you struggled to make the colour of the past few seasons of icy grey work, this new palette is universally more flattering.

M E E T C A R A H O, O U R FA S H I O N S T Y L I S T, B R I N G I N G YO U T H I S S E A S O N ’ S LO O K S . 3

Born into Australian Fashion royalty, Cara cut her teeth working in fashion business management for eight years, before establishing her niche styling Australia’s celebrities for red carpet events and television. With a strong portfolio of clients from TV, fashion and the corporate worlds in both Sydney and Canberra, Cara is passionate about helping people establish their signature look, whilst paying homage to trends.

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L E AT H E R A N D S U E D E

“I am a huge advocate of soft, relaxed tailoring, knitwear and tonal palettes, that allow you to mix and match to create a myriad of outfits for work, weekend and going out,” she says of her personal style philosophy. “In other words, wear your clothes; don’t let them wear you.”

If you only add two fabrics to your wardrobe this season, make them suede and leather. Leather is familiar, suede is a little trickier, but there’s no escaping this season's staple. The 70s’ trend continues to influence, and even if you can't bring yourself to adopt a spot of crochet or a platform, suede will tick this decade’s box in style. Think minimalist: a fringed bag, long-line vest or killer boots (ankle or knee high) will bring your current wardrobe into AW16. 4

PERSONAL ST YLING SERVICE

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THE SLIPPER MULE The shoe we can't get enough of this autumn is not only elegant and polished, but also the most comfortable style around— with a flat sole and effortless slip-on style, the slipper mule trend is one to embrace. Similar to a classic loafer in shape, slipper mules are polished enough to wear to the office with a tailored skirt and blouse, but work equally well with off-duty denim and chunky knit sweaters. While this season's fur-lined Gucci loafer has become a favourite among the style set, you’ll find versions of this must-have shoe for all budgets.

Cara offers personal fashion styling and image consultancy services for both men and women, accommodating budget and lifestyle requirements. To make your appointment or to find out more, please, call Cara on 0421 489 688. 10 12

FRINGING

P R O D U C T D E TA I L S 13

THIS PAGE 1 SOPHIE BILLIE BRAHE $2,680 from sophiebilliebrahe.com 2 DITA heartbreaker sunglasses $580 visiondirect.com.au 3 CHANEL Coco Mademoiselle parfum from $123 at davidjones.com 4 NARS lipstick rosecliff $44 5 SCANLAN & THEODORE khaki leather dress $1,400 from scanlantheodore.com 6 RALPH LAUREN knee high suede boot $1,100 1800 264 765 7 CAMILLA & MARC caustic blazer $680 from camillandmarc.com 8 Jennifer Behr hair tie $225 from jenniferbehr.com 9 SCANLAN & THEODORE tote bag $850 from scanlantheodore.com 10 CAMILLA & MARC Jacqueline coat in saffron $1,099 from camillaandmarc.com

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Capes, dresses, jackets, bags, boots, slippers, belts—this AW you’ll find fringing on almost every fashion staple this season, with tassels splashed across every major collection, including Burberry Prorsum's '70s take and Balmain's modern metallic lashings. Keep your look polished and versatile by injecting just one fringed item per outfit. P O LO N E C K S

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It’s all about the polo neck for autumn. Wear it under another knit for really cold days, under pinafores, tucked into wide leg trousers, or chunky over long skirts.

OPPOSITE PAGE 1 JOSEPH sweater $540 from matchesfashion.com 2 TOTEME shirt $390 from netaporter.com 3 TIFFANY & CO ZIEGFELD COLLECTION pearl earrings $300 from tiffany.com.au 4 CARTIER love bracelet POA 1800 13 00 00 5 SALVATORE FERRAGAMO Rosetta bag $1,184 from matchesfashion.com 6 BARBAJADA leather fringed and cashmere wrap $850 from netaporter.com 7 OROTON leather vest $895 from oroton.com.au 8 TOO FACED born this way foundation $62 from mecca.com 9 GIANVITO ROSSI suede ankle boots $1,200 from netaporter.com 10 CHLOÉ sunglasses $360 from farfetch.com 11 GUCCI Princetown Leather Horsebit Mule Slipper Flat $695 gucci.com.au 12 CHANEL LE VERNIS rouge noir $28 from davidjones.com.au 13 CAMILLA & MARC Ratio leather legging $899.00 from camillaandmarc.com

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AUTUMN/WINTER STYLE

Key looks for Autumn Winter 2016

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F U N C T I O N A L FA S H I O N 3

While envelope-pushers like J.W. Anderson continue to unpick traditional notions of gender through fashion, many designers are holding fast to the belief that outfitting men is more function, less flounce. This season we’re seeing ItalianEnglish brand Belstaff use Japanese layered technical nylon to make sleek parkas that skimp on weight but not warmth, Burberry swapping velvet blazers and leopard print coats for block-colour track tops, and the pocket as a winter staple. For a utilitarian piece that’ll see you through AW16 and beyond, consider adding a field jacket in a suede or muted leather to your shopping basket.

His A/W 2016 wardrobe

GILETS

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“The latest in men’s street style signals a return to traditionalism, but with a twist. From tartans to gilets, suedes to shearlings, AW16’s key trends are an amalgam of conventional meets contemporary.”

Still think body warmers are exclusively for John Deere drivers? Think again. Spurred on by AW16’s widespread interest in utility, designers are plucking the gilet from bumpkin obscurity and transplanting it to city streets. Quilted, leather trimmed, shearling, nylon, down—you name it, you’ll find it in a variety of colours and fabrications. Compact, insulating and an ideal between-season layering piece, there’s a lot to be said for adding one of these element deflectors to your wardrobe now.

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E ARTH TONES Otherwise referred to as autumnal colours, earth tones (ochre, russet, sienna, camel, khaki, browns and beige) are the palette of the season. Integrate into your AW16 wardrobe in a suede trucker jacket, chinos, boots and knitwear or pair earth tones with a simple denim shirt for an effortless on-trend weekend ensemble.

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SHEARLING Promising more of its log fire warmth and 1970s flair, shearling has made a return to all things outerwear but not in a way we’ve seen it before. For a casual look, go for shearling pieces featuring denim, or add black and dark charcoal for a more classic take on the trend.

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TA R TA N No longer solely the domain of private school uniforms, tartan re-emerges as one of this season’s most popular patterns. While tartans in traditional colourways are perfect for a classic vibe, don’t be afraid to experiment with bolder, brighter versions to leave a more vivid impression. Reds, mustards and bold greens will really leave an impression. If you’re not ready to rock a bold tartan suit, adopt the trend using accessories, which will lend a preppy edge without being too full on.

4

THE SUEDE SHOE

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Elvis had it wrong—brown suede shoes are what we should be singing about. With clean simple lines, a brown suede loafer, boot or slipper can be paired seamlessly with both neutrals and richer hues. Keep things classic with deep, dusty browns and team with staple pieces in shades of blue for a conventional yet cool interpretation of the trend. Avoid complicated styles and choose round-toe shoes for a sense of timelessness.

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1 GUCCI, jumper $650 from mrporter.com 2 SAINT LAURENT, Optical frames $340 from framesbroker.com 3 D R HARRIS, 3 piece safety razor $98 from shaverhut.com.au 4 TOM FORD, shirt $715 from tomford.com 5 FOREO, toothbrush $236 from foreo.com 6 HUGO BOSS, pants $239 from hugoboss.com/au 7 R.M. WILLIAMS, Comfort Craftsman Boots RRP $495 rmwilliams.com.au 8 BOTTEGA VENETA, cuff link case $721 9 TOM FORD, Tom Ford Noir parfum from davidjones.com.au 10 FRANCESCO MAGLIA, umbrella $330 from mrporter.com 11 LANVIN, tie $145 from matchesfashion.com 12 THOM, overcoat $3,673.96 from mrporter.com

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DENIM Denim will never go out of style, and this season sees a revival of denim shirts and jackets. For a tailored approach to street wear, update your wardrobe with relaxed button-down denim shirts in both light and dark tones of blue.

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ROUND SUNGL ASSES OPPOSITE PAGE 1 KINGSMAN, scarf $380 from mrporter.com 2 GANT RUGGER, denim shirt $135 from gant.com 3 MASSIMO ALBA, Henley t-shirt $125 from farfetch.com 4 A.P.C, cap $125 from eastdane.com 5 ROCK MOUNTAIN FEATHERBED, leather, shearling & down gilet $762 from mrporter.com 6 COMMON PROJECTS, midi top trainers $490 from revolveclothing.com.au 7 MASTER & DYNAMIC, MH40 headphones $569.95 from apple.com 8 BYREDO, Sunday Cologne Eau De Parfum - Vetiver, Bergamot, 100mL $260 from mecca.com 9 MAISON MARGIELA+ Mykita Aviator-Style Acetate Sunglasses, sunglasses $600 from mrporter.com 10 HUGO BOSS, pants $210 from mrporter.com 11 MIANSAI, wrap bracelet $119 from farfetch.com 12 BELSTAFF suede jacket $2,354 from mrporter.com 13 CLUB MONACO, jumper $245 from mrporter.com

Round sunglasses have proven to be the preferred choice of sunglasses. Despite their traditionalist origins, round sunglasses can be reinvented with modern shapes available, featuring more futuristic dimensions. Paired with bright hues, neutrals or all black looks, keep things simple and effortless with this style of sunglasses.

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Photography by Rebecca Doyle

T H E F O R AG E

INSIDER GUIDE

2 J U LY LITTLE NATIONAL CARPARK The Forage is Canberra’s premiere street food event, showcasing eats and drinks by local cafes, food trucks, wineries and breweries and it’s all happening in the Little National carpark! Pull up a hay bale and enjoy the spoils while listening to local tunes—it’s a great way to spend a Saturday afternoon!

OUR MUST-DO EXPERIENCES FOR AW/16 As the cooler weather descends on the capital, warm up by making the most of Canberra’s packed events calendar. You’ll want to stay longer when you see what’s in store.

theforage.com.au

Words by Amanda Whitley

THE TRUFFLE F ES T I VA L

FA I T H , FA S H I O N , F U S I O N

Photography by Marinco Kojdanovski ©Powerhouse Museum, Sydney

21 J U N E TO 31 AUGUST VARIOUS VENUES

27 M AY TO 4 SE P T E M BE R NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF AUSTRALIA

Photography by Martin Ollman

3 0 J U LY STARTRACK OVAL

Photography by Martin Ollman

membership.gwsgiants.com.au

MUSEUM OF AUSTRALIAN DEMOCRACY AT OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

A free community celebration of glass and glass-making, revealing the power of glass and light and featuring a range of spectacular hand-crafted glass for sale from nationally renowned artists. Participate in interactive glass making workshops with professional artists and see live glass blowing in the Hotshop or in the traditional way from a wood fired glass furnace outdoors.

How does the movie The Castle, the Yirrkala Bark Petitions and Albert Langer relate to this famous document, which sets rules limiting the power of the monarchy and safeguarding basic human rights and freedoms? Find out in the Museum of Australian Democracy’s exhibition, Magna Carta - An Australian Story. The exhibition links Australian stories with the ideas and spirit of this historic document showing how it's still current.

canberraglassworks.com

moadoph.gov.au

VENUES AROUND CANBERRA

Don't miss Australian Football League (AFL) action at its finest when the Giants take on Richmond in Round 19 of the AFL Toyota Premiership Season. Blockbuster club, the Richmond Tigers are appearing at StarTrack Oval for the very first time, and with both teams 2016 finals hopefuls, this game is set to attract a sell–out crowd.

U N T I L 3 0 J U N E 2016

CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

27 TO 29 M AY

Don't miss the inaugural Canberra Writers Festival as it brings together the national capital's literary, academic, business and political communities, and celebrates national and international authors across both fiction and non-fiction genres.

G I A N T S VS R I C H M O N D

M AG N A C A R TA – A N AU S T R A L I A N S TO RY

18 J U N E

2 0 1 6 N AT I O N A L C A P I TA L R A L LY

VARIOUS VENUES INCLUDING OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE, NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AUSTRALIA

canberrawritersfestival.com.au

naa.gov.au

D OM A HOT E L S P ROU D SP ON S OR

26 TO 28 AUGUST

trufflefestival.com.au

Exquisite garments, sleek fashion shoots, designers, retailers and bloggers. Discover emerging modest fashion trends and the work of a new generation of Muslim fashionistas. From swimmers and footy uniforms to hipster streetwear and elegant red carpet dresses, Faith, Fashion, Fusion showcases the work of Muslim designers and entrepreneurs making a mark on the local fashion industry.

WINTER GL ASS MARKETS

CANBERR A WRITERS F ES T I VA L

The Truffle Festival—Canberra Region is the ultimate foodie festival. Each year from June to August, more than 250 individual events are held across the region highlighting the rare Black Winter Truffle. Indulge in the special flavours and aromas of truffle dishes at local restaurants and cafes, join a hunt and see for yourself how the talented dogs unearth truffles, learn from the chefs and other truffle experts at a cooking class or demonstration, or pop along to a farmers' market.

Witness Australia’s finest rally drivers tackle some of the best roads in the country in Canberra's biggest motorsport event. The 2016 National Capital Rally promises three days of unforgettable action, attracting more than 10,000 spectators over three days. The event will be staged as the second round of the Australian Rally Championship, featuring prominent Australian rally drivers Mark Pedder and Eli Evans, along with an array of talented locals including Adrian Coppin, Mick Patton and rallying legend Neal Bates. nationalcapitalrally.com.au

F LO R I A D E 17 SE P T E M BE R TO 16 O C TOBE R COMMONWEALTH PARK

Floriade is the largest floral festival in the Southern Hemisphere. Celebrate the arrival of spring with cooking demonstrations, gardening tips, recreational activities for kids and families, entertainment and horticultural workshops all peppered with some high–profile celebrities to add some spice. Set amongst Canberra's Commonwealth Park on the picturesque shores of Lake Burley Griffin, Floriade's four-hectare site is filled with over a million blooms in a variety of themed garden beds designed to fit within an overarching theme each year. floriadeaustralia.com.au

F LO R I A D E N I G H T F ES T 28 SE P T E M BE R TO 1 O C TOBE R COMMONWEALTH PARK

When the sun sets on Commonwealth Park, Floriade NightFest will shine a light on Australia's biggest celebration of spring. From live music, stand-up comedy and hip DJs to cocktails, night markets and beautifully–lit garden beds, Floriade NightFest will transform the park into an illuminated wonderland over five magical nights. floriadeaustralia.com.au

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THE FINAL RELEASE ON KINGSTON ISLAND

ARTIST IMPRESSION

PENTHOUSE

ARTIST IMPRESSION

“Galley-style kitchens open onto the living room and outdoor area to create a sense of continuous space and open-plan living.”

“The Pier has been designed with a holistic approach to both architecture and interiors, resulting in a seamless relationship between inside and outside spaces”

JURE DOMAZET

HARLEN REGDEN

Director / Doma Group .

ARTIST IMPRESSION

Director / Regden Mathieson Architects .

KINGSTON FORESHORE PENTHOUSES Only 3 units remain, prices start from $1.2 million MIN EER 5

The already thriving Kingston Foreshore is set for its final and much anticipated island development. units will make a defining addition to the waterfront. The Pier’s exclusive penthouses have each been

BOOK A PRIVATE APPOINTMENT WITH A SALES AGENT

designed to maximise space, featuring generous living areas opening on to terraces with water views.

TO FIND OUT MORE

DOMA GROUP. With recent local developments Dockside and Bridge Point now complete, this trusted Canberra-based

ABOUT LIVING AT

residential and commercial development company are now bringing their local knowledge to their fifth

THE PIER.

Overlooking Lake Burley Griffin and the nearby Kingston Harbour, these architecturally designed residential

foreshore project, The Pier.

THEPIERK INGS TON.C OM. AU

1300 556 061

The Little National Post 2nd Edition  

By Doma Hotels

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