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TA S T E R E A L M P R E C I NC T I S I N T H E C E N T R E OF A F OODI E HOT SP OT. W E SE RV E U P BA RTON ' S BE ST P L AC E S TO E AT.

FEMINIST PIN-UP GIRL From model to author to human rights advocate and cyberhate campaigner. We talk to Tara Moss about her transformation from blonde clotheshorse to red-headed spokesperson for women, her role as a mother and her love of snakes and tattoos. Words by Emma Macdonald ⋅ Photography by Kelly Tunney ... C ON T I N U E D

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CONTENTS THE NEW NEWCASTLE

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I T ’ S A R E GIONA L C E N T R E U N DE RG OI NG A R E NA I S SA NC E AT L IGH T N I NG SPE E D. M E ET T H E N EW N EWC A ST L E . PAGE

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TA K I N G T H E H I G H R OA D DE L IGH T I N DE ST I NAT IONS A L I T T L E OF F T H E BE AT E N PAT H I N OU R TOU R OF SOM E OF C A N BE R R A' S MOST LU X U R IOUS DE ST I NAT IONS . PAGE

MAKER 'S MARK I N A WOR L D OB SE S SE D W I T H SPE E D A N D C ON V E N I E NC E , I S T H E R E ROOM F OR A RT I ST S W HO C ON T I N U E TO M A K E T H I NGS W I T H T H E I R OW N H A N D S? PAGE

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2 6 0 0 O N A P L AT E

D EC I P H E R I N G T H E D I E T SUGA R IS BA D. FAT IS BA D. M ACROS A R E I N. GR A I NS A R E OU T. W E CU T T H ROUGH T H E CON F USION A N D SHOW YOU HOW TO PU T A DV ICE I N TO PR ACT ICE W I T H T WO DEL ICIOUS, H E A LT H Y R ECI PES. PAGE

O N T H E R OA D AG A I N W E TA L K TO SOM E OF C A N BE R R A' S MOST W E L L T R AV E L L E D C I T I Z E NS A BOU T M A I N TA I N I NG W E L L BE I NG W H I L E ON T H E ROA D.

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HYPER REAL: ART S U R PA S S I N G R E A L I T Y

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'A P P Y T R A I L S

W E L C OM E TO H U M A N I T Y A M P L I F I E D. W E GET U P C L OSE A N D PE R SONA L W I T H T H E NAT IONA L GA L L E RY OF AUST R A L I A' S L AT E ST BL O C K BUST E R E X H I BI T ION. PAGE

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COVER STORY

ONC E W E IGH T E D D OW N BY I T S P OL I T IC A L P OSTC ODE , BA RTON I S FA ST BE C OM I NG A F OODI E HOT SP OT—F OR EV E RY T Y PE OF DI N E R . PAGE

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F I V E A PP S YOU SHOU L DN ' T L E AV E HOM E W I T HOU T. PAGE

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INSIDER GUIDE D ON ’ T M I S S C A N BE R R A’ S M UST‑D O E X PE R I E NCE S .

C A P I TA L B E AT – M U S I C A L E X P E R I E N C ES N OT TO M I S S T H E L I V E M USIC BU F F ' S U LT I M AT E GU I DE TO T H E C A N BE R R A SC E N E . PAGE

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FEMINIST PIN-UP GIRL F ROM MODE L TO AU T HOR TO H U M A N R IGH T S A DVO C AT E A N D C Y BE R H AT E C A M PA IGN E R . W E TA L K TO T H E EV E R- SU R P R I SI NG TA R A MOS S . STA RT S ON T H E C OV E R A N D C ON T I N U E S ON PAGE 6

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T H E L E A N WA R D R O B E L E S S I S MOR E W H E N I T C OM E S TO SP R I NG/SU M M E R DR E S SI NG. PAGE

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... C ON T I N U E D F ROM PAGE 01

FEMINIST PIN-UP GIRL TARA MOSS SUBVERTS STEREOTYPES and confounds expectations on many levels. Standing 1.85 metres tall, Moss began a career on the international modelling circuit at 14. At 44, she is a respected, thoughtful yet forthright member of Australia’s new wave of feminist thinkers—a challenging chasm to breach in anyone’s books.

Harrowingly, Moss has faced both virtual and sexual abuse over her lifetime, which she outlines in her 2014 broadly-acclaimed and largely autobiographical title, The Fictional Woman.

MOSS IS, UNDERSTANDABLY, a busy woman.

She has also faced the continued judgement from those who feel her past exposure as a one-dimensional blonde (she has recently dyed her hair a striking red) in the glossy pages of magazines cancels out any intellectual and literary credibility she may have amassed in her professional sphere.

“Frankly, when I was younger I never thought I would or could become Dr Moss. When I was a teenager and my mother passed away I couldn’t complete my high school exams—I was too caught in my grief—so I had in my head that was it. But decades later I have not only my high school certificate completed but my Doctor of Social Sciences underway...It’s important to back yourself,” says Moss.

In fact, early in her career, she underwent a lie-detector test to prove she actually wrote the words to the books published under her name.

Indeed, it is online abuse which brought Moss to Canberra this winter when she presented a National Press Club address live to the nation. In it, she told of the technological epidemic in which women are targeted, almost as a matter of course, with death and rape threats, sexual harassment, image-based abuse, stalking and more when they make their presence and opinions on the internet known. She would know, she’s been there. IN 2016, TARA MOSS HOSTED, co‑executive produced and co-wrote Cyberhate with Tara Moss, an ABC documentary delving into the noxious territory of gender-based internet violence—ranging from doxing to so-called revenge porn, and the broader impacts of cyberhate on the community, women’s mental health, politics and democracy itself. Moss is no stranger to anonymous, indiscriminate vitriol—it’s been levelled at her publicly since she began to publish her first crime fiction works in the late 1990s but has intensified and gone online in the era of social media. Before Twitter, she endured a mountain of copy published in celebrity pages finding endless interest in her three marriages, tattoos, fondness for gothic and steampunk culture, gruesome choice of the crimefiction genre, and a predilection for owning pet snakes.

Image by Kelly Tunney

travelled to the Syrian border of Lebanon in 2015 to highlight the refugee crisis taking place there.

The self-described “unremarkable student”, who dropped out of her Canadian high school to earn her way in front of the camera, is now four years into her Doctor of Social Sciences at the University of Sydney’s Gender and Cultural Studies Department and the author of 11 books published across 19 countries.

Meanwhile, the woman who looks to have materialised straight out of a bygone 1950s pin-up poster (think a carefully curated vintage wardrobe, signature strong red lip and cinched waist), is actually in the vanguard of combatting one of the most modern of social scourges—cyberhate.

TA R A M O S S

In the meantime, she suggests “Block, ban, report and get support” as a proactive first step.

But the level of depravity, lack of humanity, threats of rape/death/harm that now ping their way into her social feeds has her truly concerned about the country’s lack of formal protections for those on the receiving end—particularly women from less privileged backgrounds than her own.

“I can’t really speak to what credibility other people feel I have, intellectual or otherwise, of course. How people perceive me is something I’ve learned to overlook, particularly after years of being treated like a dumb blonde, but suffice to say I am comfortable with my own intellectual credibility.

“I am...coming to understand what I am capable of, and the power of speaking out and remaining determined.” “I am, year-by-year, also coming to understand what I am capable of, and the power of speaking out and remaining determined, whether writing a book, reporting on a murder at Manus Island or advocating for positive political or social change. Belief in who you are is more important than the perceptions of others.” WHEN YOU CONSIDER what she has achieved in recent years, Moss has been an enormous influence for good. She is an advocate for the rights of women and children. She has been a long-standing ambassador for the Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children since 2000 and has been a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador for the past 10 years.

The Canberra trip was segued between two other keynote addresses in a speaking tour which sees her regularly having to leave the Blue Mountains hideaway that she shares with her daughter and husband of nearly 10 years, Berndt Sellheim—a philosopher, poet and novelist. Moss is loath to leave home and her family but is blunt that she is currently the primary wage earner and, as such, sacrifices must be made. “My husband and I share responsibly for looking after our family, but we do it in different ways. In some respects, I have what some people might consider the ‘male’ role of breadwinning, and my husband is the brilliant cook, but neither of us believe in those outdated gender roles,” she says. “We share the load to make things work and we both contribute what we are best able to, depending on our strengths and our preferences. For us that means something different than the next couple. So yes, I may be on the road giving talks in different states for four days and on the fifth I will be cleaning, or doing admin, or some other chore that makes things work.” She is also grateful her daughter is being raised by “a smart, connected, hands-on parent. I hope that gives our daughter a sense of how things should be. I hope the world she enters as an adult woman will be a more fair, safe and equitable world.” Moss says motherhood made her “more fierce”. “I have been more active politically since I became a parent. It has focused me on the responsibilities beyond myself, and that means a responsibility to be part of making the world safer and more equitable.” While Moss is the first to admit she has suffered immensely under the weight of the “model-turned-author” tag, she also confounds expectations that that chapter of her life is closed. “In a publishing landscape that is increasingly tough for journalists, novelists and poets, modelling gave me some financial independence. It didn’t make me rich, but I paid my way and I was able to financially look after my family, and for that I am grateful.

The arrival of her adored daughter Sapphira in 2011 expanded Moss’ desire to advocate for mothers and babies and she became a UNICEF Patron for Breastfeeding for the Baby Friendly Heath Initiative, taking on a larger role as UNICEF’s National Ambassador for Child Survival in 2013.

“I enjoy photography, design and particularly vintage fashion, but modelling as an industry is truly a mixed bag. I had some dark times, which I wrote about in The Fictional Woman. These days I have no modelling contracts, but I think there is some value in brands hiring older, 40+ models in an industry where the age of the model and the consumer is rarely matched. I wouldn’t rule out more modelling in the future with an ethical brand I enjoy.”

Moss was recognised for her humanitarian efforts in publishing a blog which broke for the first time the events surrounding the alleged murder of Reza Barati inside the Australian-run Manus Island Immigration Detention Centre in 2014. The next year she

But chances are, with her PhD being finalised, another book in the pipeline and her influence as a thought leader on steep trajectory, you will probably hear from Tara Moss long before you next see her in a fashion shoot. ¡

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FOOD & WINE PAG E

FOOD & WINE

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2600 ON A PLATE

Once weighted down by its political postcode, Barton is fast becoming a foodie hotspot—and there's something for every taste. Words by Amanda Whitley

Wine buffs

Traditionalists

Caffiends

OT TOMAN CUISINE

RITUAL

If it’s hip nonchalance and culinary gimmicks you’re after, best look elsewhere. But if you’re seeking the best Turkish food outside of Istanbul, Ottoman Cuisine is the place to be. A stalwart of the Canberra dining scene, this elegant art deco pavilion is surrounded by gardens, water features and palm trees—an escape from the political machinations which surround it.

An airy oasis at the base of the Little National Hotel, Ritual does such a brisk trade on weekday mornings that they’ve invested in a PA to ensure the hordes of public servants are promptly caffeinated. Great brews coupled with a small menu of toasts (we love the Avo and Goats Cheese with Dukkah), toasties (The Reuben wins most popular vote), one salad that they don’t dare replace, and a selection of baked goods make Ritual a winner.

Recently earning a coveted two hats in the Good Food Guide, Ottoman's food is every bit as impressive today as when it first opened in nearby Manuka in 1992. Inspired by Chef Serif Kaya’s culinary heritage, Ottoman’s dishes are consistently hatted— and while they may sound and look simple, there’s a complexity of flavour that speaks to a mastery of the genre.

VINCENT Wine bar-cum-restaurant Vincent should be out of place in a suburb that likes to play by the rules, but its refusal to toe the traditional line makes it an exciting find for foodies and wine buffs alike. From its unconventional serpentine table layout to its unapologetic single dessert option, expect the unexpected when it comes to Vincent. Its interior is dark and moody, one wall devoted to Scrabble tiles spelling out a menu of eleven dishes: five small plates, five large and one sweet choice to finish. A carefully curated list of local and international wines is designed to perfectly match each dish.

D ON ’ T L E AV E W I T HOU T T RY I NG Dolma: Atlantic salmon, Queensland king prawns and shitake mushrooms wrapped in vine-leaves, crispy battered, served with piquant red wine sauce. Generous chunks of succulent of salmon are wrapped with their companion ingredients in vine-leaves before hitting the deep-fryer. Instantly addictive, this is the dish that turns traditional dolmades on their head. 9 Broughton St, Barton | Open for Lunch, Tuesday to Friday: noon - 2.30pm, and Dinner, Tuesday to Saturday: 6pm to 10pm | 02 6273 6111 | ottomancuisine.com.au

D ON ' T L E AV E W I T HOU T T RY I NG Peking duck: coriander, orange, chilli and cashew.

The Chairman & Yip is something of a Canberra institution, its original CBD digs the scene of many a power lunch since it opened its doors 25 years ago. In 2016, it was merged with sister restaurant Malamay into its Barton HQ—the result, a sophisticated space which brings together the best elements of Cantonese and Szechuan cooking, served with care. 1 Burbury Close, Barton | Open for lunch Tuesday to Friday: 12 noon – 2:30pm; dinner Tuesday to Saturday: 6pm – 10:30pm | 02 6162 1220 | chairmangroup. com.au/chairmanyip

The key word when it comes to Little Bird is ‘fresh’. A bright and light-filled eatery with inviting breakfast and lunch offerings, it’s an uncomplicated and satisfying choice. Traditional favourites sit comfortably on its menu, but are elevated beyond the ‘same old’ through the use of pristine produce and an experimental edge. Those with a sweet tooth will want to linger by the cabinet boasting a dizzying array of cakes baked fresh in-house.

Couple a creamy cappuccino with one of Ritual’s chocolate chip cookies (with a Rolo in the middle for an oozy caramel surprise!). A caffeine and sugar hit in one fell swoop. 21 National Circuit, Barton | Open Monday to Friday: 7.30am–3.30pm | 0432 329 390 | ritualbarton.com

D ON ’ T L E AV E W I T HOU T T RY I NG Maple-roasted pumpkin salad with beetroot, quinoa, fetta, sumac, avocado with smoky baba ganoush. Delicious enough to convert the most strident carnivore, this hearty salad packs a real flavour punch: sweet, tangy, smoky all in one mouthful.

And then there’s... BUVET TE BISTRO & WINE BAR

Corner of Macquarie and Broughton Streets, Barton | Open Tuesday and Saturday: 4pm – 10pm, Wednesday to Friday: 12pm - 10pm | 02 6273 7773 | vincentrestaurant.com.au

THE CHAIRMAN & YIP

LIT TLE BIRD

D ON ’ T L E AV E W I T HOU T T RY I NG

Corner of Macquarie and Broughton Streets, Barton | Open Monday to Friday: 7am – 3pm, Saturday and Sunday: 8am to 2pm | littlebirdbarton.com

Every mouthful is an adventure with this dish. Succulent pieces of duck are sandwiched between layers of crispy wontons, with a surprising addition of tart raspberries cutting perfectly through the rich flavours. Wash it down with a glass of Domaine De Triennes Rosé 2016.

Power lunchers

Ladies (and men) who brunch

Oh-so-French, Buvette is a little slice of Paris in the Parliamentary Triangle. Relax with a glass of wine from the Canberra region or further afield while sharing charcuterie and cheese, or indulge in the full all-day dining experience. D ON ’ T L E AV E W I T HOU T T RY I NG Eye fillet beef and scallop pepper hotpot: traditional Cantonese cooking with bold bursts of black pepper, and just as appealing as it was 20 years ago. Juicy beef, tender scallops and an explosion of flavour in every mouthful.

18 National Circuit, Barton. buvette.com.au L I LO TA N G It’s elegant Japanese fine-dining meets izakaya raffishness—full of flavour and matched by an impressive Sake list of more than 25 varieties. 1 Burbury Close, Barton. chairmangroup.com.au/lilotang

M A P L E + C LOV E Maple + Clove is all about serving wholefoods as close as possible to their natural state, with little or no refinement or processing. Being healthy has never been so tasty. 7 Burbury Close, Barton. mapleandclove.com.au O S TA N I LO U N G E + B A R Whatever your appetite, Ostani truly delivers with a range of Europeaninspired dishes. The traditional oven-fired pizzas are the stars here: from Salsiccia E Taleggio with Italian sausage, chorizo, taleggio cheese, caramelised onions and thyme; to the eastern influences of hoisin duck. 18 National Circuit, Barton. ostani.com.au

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ART PAG E

ART

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HYPER REAL: ART SURPASSING REALITY Welcome to humanity amplified. Words by Emma Macdonald

“It is a potent genre, which sits at the nexus of science, technology and the human body and speaks directly to people before the meanings can be explored fully,” she says.

SHE HOLDS THE BABY with tenderness and longing – her age spots, wrinkles and silky grey hair contrasting with the perfect plump skin and accompanying fuzz of a newborn.

In recent decades, hyperrealism has expanded from static sculpture to include a range of different expressions. Uncanny figures with painted silicone skin, glass eyes and human hair will feature alongside immersive digital art.

It is an intimate observation on the circle of life. And lifelike it is. Unspeakably so. Upon closer inspection, you see the cool composition of silicone, the lifeless eyes, the too-perfect skin, and realise it is not real. It is hyper real.

The exhibition includes the monochromatic displays of George Segal, the dismembered body parts of Maurizio Cattelan, the psychological disembodiment of Shaune Gladwell’s VR work, Paul McCarthy and Ronnie van Hout’s human clones, and AES+F’s digital exploration of the media as a hyperreality in itself.

Sam Jink’s acclaimed 2010 work, Woman and Child, draws a warm emotional rush from observers. But when visitors attend the National Gallery of Australia’s (NGA) new major exhibition—Hyper Real—the sculptures are likely to induce reactions far more complex. A genetically-engineered baby by internationally acclaimed Australian artist, Patricia Piccinini, is so real, yet so disturbingly distorted, that it is likely to evoke an immediate sense of unease. Likewise, it’s confronting to conceptualise Marc uinn’s Self 2011—a sculpture of the artist’s head molded from 10 pints of his own frozen blood. In a sense, it is a head like your own, and eerily lifelike in looks and composition, yet it is completely manufactured.

“It makes you feel, instantly, an emotion. Later on, you can unpack why you reacted the way you did.”

Including a diverse range of hyperrealist sculpture, the NGA’s presentation features 49 artworks by 31 artists, significantly expanding upon the travelling show curated by Dr Otto Letze of the Institute for Cultural Exchange, Germany.

Gallery visitors can also expect a 360-degree digital display and to be immersed in virtual reality—a personal favourite of NGA Director Gerard Vaughan. Hyper Real stirs many emotions—awe, fascination, joy and even fear.

Welcome to humanity amplified. According to NGA Senior Curator of Global Contemporary Art Practice, Jaklyn Babington, Hyper Real probes issues of contemporary existence—genetic modification, gender politics, and the posthuman body. It raises questions about what is real and what is not. What is living and what is inanimate.

And, of course, Patricia Piccinini—the woman best known to Canberrans for her controversial Skywhale—will be showing in force. Her sculpture Bootflower—a hybrid human/animal/plant/consumer object— has been reimagined for the NGA setting, with a site-specific mirrored room. It is one which should not be missed.

Hyperrealism in sculpture developed in the 1960s and 1970s when artists began to play with the human form to produce works of extreme lifelikeness. Artists often use advanced specialist techniques—largely adopted from the special effects industry—to achieve ultrarealistic skin, bodies, faces and eyes. Going beyond the norm—in more ways than one—Hyper Real charts the evolution of this incredible genre since its inception to the present, and into the future with the inclusion of works in both static and kinetic sculpture, bioart, digital and virtual reality forms.  By creating human replicas and alternate worlds that transgress the boundaries between inanimate and animate, human and non-human, natural and synthetic and real and virtual, hyperreal works can make the familiar appear strange, causing viewers a momentary struggle in distinguishing between reality and imagination. It is that momentary struggle that Babington says will ultimately provide the most lasting impact of the exhibition. “It makes you feel, instantly, an emotion. Later on, you can unpack why you reacted the way you did.”

It contains nudity, and therefore comes with information for parents to decide which works are suitable for their children. The exhibition is accompanied by a children’s audio tour, which brings to life the characters of the artworks providing insight into the themes, ideas and concepts. The exhibition charts the evolution of hyperrealism into the 21st century and presents a compelling chronicle of the human condition. Hyper Real is showing at the NGA until 18 February 2018.

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MUSIC PAG E

MUSIC

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CAPITAL BEAT - MUSICAL EXPERIENCES NOT TO MISS Whether you are in Canberra for a night, or a week, there is plenty to listen to if you have a hankering for a live music experience. We bring you the best of the intimate underground venues plus the big-ticket events worth booking a seat at. Words by Emma Macdonald

SY M PH O N Y I N T H E PA R K

CANBERRA I N T E R N AT I O N A L M US I C FES T IVA L

Fancy a little Killer Queen Symphony delivered by the esteemed Canberra Symphony Orchestra? The CSO has an impressive line-up of events scheduled throughout 2018 but this one turns the traditional symphony on its head.

For 11 exhilarating days each year, musicians from around the globe gather in Canberra to make music and create a feast for the eyes and ears. It’s not just the way it sounds; it’s the way it feels. Being up close. Seeing the precise movements; sensing the connection between performers. Following the journey of a piece of music from start to finish.

Paying homage to those glamorous British rockstars who brought a few orchestral movements into the top 10 during their reign of 1980s airwaves—Queen— Symphony in The Park will feature John Blunt looking and sounding uncannily like the late Freddie Mercury. It kicks off at 7.30pm and is a free event sponsored by the ACT Government. 11 March 2018 | Stage 88, Commonwealth Park | cso.org.au/events

T H E N AT I O N A L FO LK FES T IVA L

That’s the Canberra International Music Festival. Intimate performances, exceptional musicianship, in some of the capital’s most iconic settings. It's classical music, and more. The program includes early music, contemporary music, world music and occasionally a hint of jazz.

Drawing local and international acts and attracting crowds verging on 50,000, the affectionately-nicknamed ‘Folkie” is an Easter tradition and one of Canberra’s biggest tourism drawcards.

The 2018 Festival planning is already well-advanced, so save the dates and be sure to immerse yourselves in Canberra's beautiful autumn weather and rich musical landscape.

Delivering high-quality traditional and contemporary grooves as well as plenty of the “quirky and the endearing”, the Folk Festival has an extremely loyal following. It also has a strong incidental entertainment quotient due to a vibrant festival atmosphere of themed bars, food and market stalls, circus performers and roving musicians.

26 April to 6 May, 2018 | Various locations | cimf.org.au

Ainslie Arts Centre has a beautifully restored concert hall that hosts a wide range of performances, including a number hosted by the Australian National University’s School of Music. It also lights up with regular jazz performances. Check the website for what’s on in any given week and immerse yourself in the historic heart of the arts scene. Open seven days. Ainslie Arts Centre | Elouera Street, Braddon | agac.com.au Gorman Arts Centre | 55 Ainslie Avenue, Braddon | agac.com.au

Open seven days – check website for hours | 76 Alinga Street, Melbourne Building, Canberra City | smithsalternative.com.

TILLEY’S DEVINE CAFÉ GALLERY Over its long and iconic local history, Tilley’s has been a destination for some of the country’s best-known singers and alternative performers—think the Church, Diesel and Clare Bowditch. Singers from around the world have enjoyed the experience of connecting to an audience in an intimate space—replete with old-fashioned wooden booths and art deco nostalgia. Now the thriving café hosts regular Saturday night jazz and a smaller playlist of artists. Saturday Jazz from 7pm | Lyneham Shops, Brigalow Street Lyneham | tilleys.com.au

Open seven days | 7 Akuna Street, Civic | transitbar.com.au

BE YOND Q

GROOVIN’ THE MOO

25 November | Commonwealth Park | spilt-milk.com.au

If you are after fringe performances ranging from the Canberra Children’s Choir to poetry readings (actually wildly-popular) then it is worth a look at the range of programs provided by the twin centres, both a brief walk from Canberra’s CBD.

Located in the heart of the CBD, Transit Bar is for those who don’t mind a loud night out with a lot of people. Usually drawing a strong uni crowd, the bar prides itself on its craft beer selection and books some large acts given its relatively small confines. There’s also a proud history of DJ talent who have rocked the house.

29 March to 2 April, 2018 | Exhibition Park Canberra | folkfestival.org.au

The summer music, food and art festival brings some of the hottest national acts to the ACT to mosh the day and night away in Commonwealth Park. But unless you’ve already secured tickets to Spilt Milk 2017 then don’t get too excited, as this year’s event is sold out. No surprise there given Lorde and Vance Joy are part of the line-up. Next year’s event is likely to draw strong interest so stay in the loop on their website.

Once a bookstore and café for the literary lot, Smith's Alternative was purchased in 2015 by Canberra Musicians Club founder and event coordinator Nigel McRae. Located in the iconic if slightly crumbling Melbourne Building in the centre of Civic, and open 365 days a year, Smith's houses non-genre specific, local and touring music, theatre, cabaret and burlesque.

THE TRANSIT BAR

Listen and relax, or learn an instrument yourself—there are more than 500 individual concerts showcasing musical styles and genres as diverse as acoustic, bluegrass, roots, blues, Celtic, country, world and gypsy. Whether you are new to folk or returning to it, contemporary folk cultures are showcased alongside the best of vintage Oz-folk and older traditions.

S P I LT M I L K

S M I T H ’ S A LT E R N AT I V E

AINSLIE AND GORMAN ARTS CENTRES BRADDON

The touring national concert hits Canberra in autumn each year and takes over the campus at the University of Canberra (UC). It always attracts a star international line-up as artists collectively weave their way from venues across South Australia, Western Australia, the Victorian goldfields, to the Hunter and Atherton Tablelands—before landing, of course, on the sporting oval of the UC. No news on next year’s line up yet but you can keep an eye on their website for dates and artist announcements. Date TBC | University of Canberra, Bruce | gtm.net.au.

Freshly relocated from Curtin Shops to new digs in Cooleman Court, Beyond Q mixes a little of everything with a relaxed little performance space showcasing local, interstate and occasional international vocalists, classical guitarists, jazz bands, sliding steel guitars, Irish jigs, piano recitals, choirs, bluegrass, blues, flutes, harps and trumpets. A BYO service is available as well as a themed menu to broaden the experience in a “speakeasy” surrounds. Open seven days | 11 Brierly Street, Weston Arcade, Weston Creek | beyondq.com.au

A B I T E T O E AT Staying in suburbia, A Bite To Eat not only offers a brilliant and wide array of menu items, but an enthusiastic crowd gathers each Sunday night for live music and tapas from 5pm. Offerings are a mix of mainly local artists but occasionally showcase interstate and international acts edging towards contemporary folk, jazz and offbeat catering to all demographics. Live Music Sundays, 5pm-7pm | Chifley Shops, Eggleston Crescent, Chifley | abitetoeat.net.au

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THE NEW NEWCASTLE

LIVING THE

Newie lifestyle

It’s a regional centre undergoing a renaissance at lightning speed. Newcastle today is not the Newcastle of five years ago—nor barely even the same city it was this time last year. Words by Emma Macdonald ⋅ Photography by Earl Carter

From a dip in the iconic Ocean Baths, to a table at a hatted restaurant or a gig at an historic church-turned-concert venue, Newcastle is surfing off a wave of cool, not coal. We take you on a quick tour of a city reborn and brimming with style and energ y.

SHOPPING Head along Darby Street in the centre of town for some edgy fashion that will set you apart. Abicus stocks men's and women's staples from Karen Walker, Vanishing Elephant, or Dr Denim, and if your outfit is not hip enough, you can up the ante with a purchase from their selection of vinyl records and vintage Polaroid cameras.

Newcastle City Farmers Market at the Broadmeadow Showground is a feast in the making. Buy fruit and veggies direct from the farmer—or artisanal foodstuffs direct from the maker. Brave the 10,000-strong crowds on the first Saturday of every month and line up for freshest produce to scoff on the spot or stock the fridge for later. newcastlecityfarmersmarkets.com.au

Abicus | 103 Darby Street, Cooks Hill C U LT U R E Ramjet stocks an impressive mix of retro, rockabilly, classic and vintage-inspired pieces, including labels such as Dear Creatures, Totem, Heart of Haute, Folter, and Ruby Belle. The apparel is sourced from Australia, the UK, USA, and Brazil and includes a range of vintage American cowboy boots. Ramjet | 78 Darby Street, Cooks Hill Of course, this is all being played out alongside a magnificent waterfront – breaking waves to one side, ships docking at heavy mining infrastructure on the other. Feeding into city’s revival has been a massive injection of both residential and commercial development from Canberra property conglomerate Doma Group. In a canny assessment of the city’s impending growth spurt—and importing many of the lessons it has learnt while helping grow Canberra out of its awkward public-service-town adolescence into the “Cool Little Capital”—Doma has become a dominant force in the rebirth of Newcastle.

A WORKING-CLASS PORT, forged off the back of steel and mining, Newcastle has been reinventing itself over two decades. But a confluence of events since 2013 has channeled unprecedented private and government dollars into the region while kick-starting something of a population explosion. While a $500 million-plus New South Wales (NSW) Government investment program, Revitalising Newcastle, has been welcomed, this is dwarfed by the billions of dollars in private and corporate investment flowing into the CBD. Meanwhile, the removal of the heavy rail line and construction of light rail through the city centre, and the completion of an inner‑city campus for Newcastle University with 3000 new student accommodation places and plans for a further 7000, is bringing a new look and feel. These days, Newcastle is every inch a hipster haven. Its nascent food scene has erupted into new restaurants, cafes, markets and galleries on streets where public art abounds and quaint historic coastal town features are preserved alongside now covetable industrial grunge.

According to Gavin, there are many similarities between Canberra and Newcastle, although more recently the cost of property in Newcastle has begun to surpass Canberra.

Meanwhile, Colliers Newcastle Managing Director Chris Chapman said the city’s growth showed no signs of slowing and Doma would realise further opportunities in the region.

“There is a massive NSW Government investment in the city as the second largest in NSW and with investment in ports, transport and universities it has become a great alternative to those escaping the rat race of Sydney.

He said the city had helped secure its own bright future through adopting clever manufacturing, powering a high-class education system, improving its health services across the Hunter, Central Coast and New England, and investing in hospitality and world-class tourism with the Hunter Vineyards, Port Stephens and whale watching (which now hosts 20 major cruise ship visits each season).

“With exquisite beaches, a laid-back lifestyle and great job prospects, it is fast becoming the city of choice for younger people to study and stay, live, work and play.”

“These days, Newcastle is every inch a hipster haven” According to General Manager of Development Gavin Edgar, Doma’s injection of more than $90 million of equity into key developments makes it one of the biggest investors in the regional centre. Five major projects are either being approved, under way, or nearing completion. These include Bishopsgate—a $20 million, 37-dwelling complex, and Edition—a 71-dwelling mixeduse development worth $38.5 million. Meanwhile, things are moving apace at Honeysuckle Drive, with Doma acquiring more than 7000 square metres of land at number 21. At number 42 Honeysuckle Drive, a $45 million 149-room Little National Hotel will replicate Canberra’s award-winning boutique hotel and be built alongside 62 residential apartments, five serviced apartments and 1000 squares of restaurant and commercial space.  A development application for 48 units and commercial space at 1 Merewether St, to be known as The Crossing, has also been recently lodged.

He noted a larger percentage of sea-changers were also turning their focus to Newcastle which is serviced by QANTAS, Jetstar, Virgin, Regional Express and Air Pelican. “We find the way of doing business in Newcastle is very similar to Canberra and relationships, trust and loyalty are all valued qualities. In Newcastle, like Canberra, respect comes from doing what you say you will do.” Doma has cemented its reputation and established firm relationships with industry stakeholders in the region, giving it considerable corporate clout as new developments continue to roll out. To give some idea of the extent of the revolution taking place, there are currently more than 40 major projects underway across a compact 3km square land mass from Newcastle Beach to Wickham, running between Newcastle Harbour and Newcastle West.

Chris noted the atmosphere of Newcastle was unique, with the historic East End bounded by a massive working harbour followed by pristine beaches and kilometres of coastal walks. All of that, plus the fact it is just two hours from Sydney but with half of Sydney’s residential property prices, a lower cost of living and arguably higher amenities means Newcastle is now struggling to accommodate all those who come to visit, then want to stay. Chris envisages that in the next two-tofive years, several thousand new residents will move into the CBD as the first stage of light rail is completed. The second university, cruise terminal, new courthouse development, annual Supercars event will become well established and new Government offices situated around the Transport Interchange will inject further activity into the city centre. Within the decade, 10,000 new residents will be based in and around the CBD, alongside new businesses and commercial buildings while the light rail will be extended out to key inner suburban areas drawing a thoroughfare of vibrant daytime and night-time culture to those who have secured a foothold in the booming port. Newcastle’s future has never looked brighter, nor busier.

48 Watt Street is a unique event space bringing new life to an old church. The 110-year-old church stopped holding services in 2010, and now creates a beautiful setting for intimate live performaces against a backdrop of stained glass underneath grand vaulted ceilings. Over the past year it has hosted the likes of Vera Blue, Dan Sultan, Sarah Blasko, Katie Noonan and Josh Pyke. Renew Newcastle has been renting empty spaces in unused buildings on a thirty-day basis, and moving the young creatives in. Everyone from zine makers, designers, poets, artists, singers and seamstresses are in on the game. The renaissance of the inner-city owes much to this movement - a social enterprise giving artists, designers and creatives the chance to display their work and beautiful the CBD. Head on down to Hunter Street to check them out.

E AT Willows Home Traders first started a decade ago in Maitland Willows on Darby Street. It has a frontage onto the in-crowd and never disappoints with statement furniture pieces by Middle of Nowhere, and General Eclectic and artworks by Warranbrooke and Ali Macnabney‑Stevens. Willow Home Traders Darby Street | 89 Darby Street, Cooks Hill Of course, not all good shopping ends at the top of Darby Street. Head on over to Hunter Street for a taste of the exotic Asian, Indian and Moroccan-inspired clothes and homewares on offer at The Deck. The Deck | 93 Hunter Street Newcastle

Forget the Newcastle of old which catered to hungry and high-viz mining industry types. Instead you can fill up on the greenest of green breakfast bowls brimming with kale, quinoa, avocado, seeds, nuts and lemon at the Blue Door Café. The staff serving you have the glow of good health and surfing and the place is almost impossible to get a table at on peak weekend brunch sittings. Blue Door Café | 363-365 Hunter Street Doughheads doughnuts can undo some of that good organic work in an instant with a torpedo hit of sugar straight from their maple bacon, peppermint crunch, pina colada, or salted caramel concoctions, baked fresh in‑store each day. Doughheads | 17a, 200 Union Street, The Junction

MARKETS There is not a weekend where Novacastrians cannot find a suitable market to attend. Hunt&Gather is a monthly event taking place every third Saturday at various locales. It showcases the work of designers, artists, musicians, collectors and food lovers from the region and beyond. huntandgatherevents.com

If it’s just fine coffee you’re after, look no further than Hubro. Their cold brews are legendary and brothers Duncan and Tim Hughes make sure every coffee, using Silverskin Coffee Roasters beans, is top notch. So is the small, but perfectly-formed snack menu that can refuel you for more of that Darby Street action. Hubro | 1a/295 Darby Street, Cooks Hill

One of the city’s best restaurants is Subo, a hatted modern bistro offering fine-dining with a local bent. The restaurant offers a set five-course menu exclusively which changes with the seasons and is guaranteed to impress with attention to detail and a strong focus on perfectly-executed seafood. Subo | 551D Hunter Street, Newcastle West Parry Street Garage combines perfectly the trio of a wood-fired pizza oven, long bar and supply of leather chesterfields. There is certainly no tell-tale evidence that this place used to actually service motor vehicles as the Derive Architecture & Design space is dark and dreamy. Parry Street Garage | 106 Parry Street, Newcastle West

G E T M OV I N G The ocean frontage of Newcastle and its sunny disposition make it a city ripe for walking. Or cycling. Hire a bike and explore the foreshore path, or amble around the recently completed Anzac Memorial Walk, which reaches from Strzelecki Lookout to Bar Beach. Any visit to Newcastle would be incomplete without a dip in the iconic Ocean or Merewether Baths. It is here you get just about the most perfect impression of Newcastle there is— surf, sun and sand. Enjoy!

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MAKER’S MARK In a convenience-obsessed world where mass production is rife and where consumers wants things ‘now’ and for a cheap price, is there room for artists who continue to make things with their own hands? We find out what motivates three such artists and how they ensure their craft is respected. Words by Belinda Neame and Amanda Whitley ⋅ Photography by Tim Bean

THE CROSSING Richilde Flavell GI R L NOM A D C E R A M IC S

THE CROSSING DEVELOPED BY

DEVELOPED BY

SOLD BY

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She grew up in a New South Wales commune, spending her twenties moving around Australia, Europe and India. But it was discovering her love for Ceramics at the ANU School of Art and Design that prompted Richilde Flavell to put down roots in Canberra. “I’ve always admired people who can fix and make things with their hands, so I decided to train to be one of those people”. After completing a Bachelor of Visual Arts in 2015, Richilde worked at Craft ACT: Craft + Design Centre while honing her skills and building up her business, Girl Nomad Ceramics, in her studio at the Watson Art Centre. It’s an accessible and inviting space. People can pop into her studio, meet her as the maker and see the process first-hand. Richilde feels that connection translates into respect for the objects in a way that sparks a connection with the hand-made ethos.

“There has been a huge surge in popularity for the handmade over the past few years and it is only increasing,” she says. “I’ve seen it in the classes I teach at the Canberra Potters Society, with students telling me their experience of making pottery increases their understanding and appreciation of the hand made and I’m sure this experience translates across mediums”. Richilde’s debut at Canberra’s Art Not Apart festival in 2012 saw her exposed to new audiences, including the owners of hipperthan-hip NewActon café Mocan and Green Grout, who placed an order for plates. They’re the perfect fit for the eatery’s sustainable, local focus and provide a tactile, earthy background for Mocan’s edible art. For Richilde, though, the beauty is in the process. “Throwing on the pottery wheel makes me feel whole and grounded. I feel like I’m doing something worthwhile and that working with clay is an honest and genuine use of my time.”

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Peter Bollington C U R IOUS TA L E S There’s something special about passing down knowledge and skills through generations. For Peter Bollington, his love of timber and furniture-making was inherited from his father and grandfathers. As a child, Peter would watch them—rapt— as they worked with different materials. Design remained a passion as he grew, and he enrolled to study Interior Design course at Canberra Institute of Technology. It was a guest lecturer (an ex-graduate from the fine furniture workshop at the ANU School of Art) who set Peter’s journey on a very different path, guiding him towards this course of study. As well as the history of art and design, Peter studied the properties of timber and traditional joinery techniques used in the craft of fine furniture. He says he feels like the craft “chose him”.

“I was always drawn to the medium of timber, there is a beautiful warmth found in timber that is not found in any other medium,” says Peter. Peter and his wife Thea travelled widely, moving back to Canberra in 2015 where they established Meet Gather Collect, a retail space which celebrates Australian designer wares, combined with Curious Tales Furniture. The timing was perfect, Peter observing a strong shift in people appreciating and wanting locally-crafted, individually-made pieces. “Many customers will be searching for a piece that fits within their house and lifestyle, they come into the shop and see a design they like, we then talk about how we can tailor it to their needs. “I will often then meet them at their house to discuss various aspects and considerations in the design and measure the space, meaning they will have a product unique to their environment.”

Recognising that this is a career that involves really hard, hands-on work, Peter has never been more fulfilled.

“I was always drawn to the medium of timber, there is a beautiful warmth found in timber that is not found in any other medium.”

“It is a beautiful thing to see a design come to life from an early concept sketch into a realised piece of furniture, to know that single crafted piece of furniture encompasses a specific moment in time and seeing the joy and appreciation for the piece shown by the client is like nothing else.” Peter is optimistic about the future of the fine furniture industry, but urges a focus on both sustainable practices and the combination of modern technologies with the logic behind traditional techniques. “It will also be dependent on customers remaining passionate about supporting local businesses, knowing that they will not only have a piece of furniture that will last for generations but also strengthen the local economy.”

Alison Jackson

about it and that spreads interest in the dying art”.

A L I SON JAC K SON

While mass-produced pieces are popular in contemporary society, Alison says she has seen a swing back to handmade pieces. Indeed, because Alison’s pieces are—well, so perfect—one of her biggest challenges has been ensuring her customers realise that everything is actually handmade by her.

Alison Jackson has been a tinkerer and a maker for as long as she can remember. Encouraged by her father, she learnt to use a metal lathe and, together, they made little projects in the workshop under the house. At the age of 12, Alison was introduced to jewellery-making—the rest, as they say, is history. Jewellery-making consumed every Tuesday afternoon throughout Alison’s high school years, and she focussed on it as a career, studying Gold and Silversmithing at the ANU School of Art. She now works as a silversmith and jeweller, also teaching classes from her workshop space, Pocket Studio. “Traditional Silversmithing is diminishing,” says Alison. “And even if students only ever made one piece the traditional, labour intensive way, in my eyes that means they gain a better understanding of it. They talk

“There is something very special about making things by hand. A sense of achievement and wonder...”

Choosing a career in the creative industries is not an easy path, and Alison says support for these creative industries is imperative to keeping them alive—starting with quality technical training. Sadly, however, many institutions are reducing hours and staff, which greatly impacts the quality of education provided. “There is something very special about making things by hand. A sense of achievement and wonder, and I think that is amplified when you’re able to make pieces that go out into the wide world for others to enjoy for many years to come.”

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HER SPRING/SUMMER STYLE

The lean wardrobe

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LO O K 1 . Achieve classic, cool sophistication for work by teaming the architectural crepe knit top with matching skirt. Pop a linen jacket over the top, keeping the tie loose or knotting at the back. Complete this easy-yet-elegant summer look with slides, on-trend cane bag and sunglasses. The perfect desk-to-dinner ensemble.

I’ve always believed in style over trends, quality over quantity. In a world of excess, our approach to our wardrobe should be fewer, better things. Think essential wardrobe pieces for the modern woman who wants comfort and practicality without sacrificing style. Embracing femininity that is free from expectations. An opportunity to wear all your clothes in a multitude of different ways.

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In the spirit of spring, when we declutter to make way for new thoughts and possibilities, this edition focuses on the ‘lean wardrobe’.

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M E E T C A R A H O, O U R FA S H I O N S T Y L I S T B R I N G I N G YO U T H I S S E A S O N ’ S LO O K S .

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LO O K 2 . The shirt dress—an essential in every style-savvy woman's wardrobe and an outfit-in-one. Wear it loose and relaxed, or draw in the tie to accentuate the waist. Team back with slides and a textured bag for effortless chic or choose from an armory of accessories: slides, bag, sunglasses and Panama hat.

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Born into Australian fashion royalty, Cara cut her teeth working in fashion business management for eight years, before establishing her niche styling Australia’s celebrities for red carpet events and television. With a strong portfolio of clients from TV, fashion and the corporate worlds in both Sydney and Canberra, Cara is passionate about helping people establish their signature look, whilst paying homage to trends.

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“I am a huge advocate of soft relaxed tailoring, knitwear and tonal palettes, that allow you to mix and match to create a myriad of outfits for work, weekend and going out,” she says of her personal style philosophy. “In other words, wear your clothes; don’t let them wear you.” LO O K 3 . 11

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A camisole, well-cut pants and soft tailored blazer combine for the ultimate in pared-back minimalism. The ultimate in versatility, it does double‑duty as workwear or a casual weekend outfit. Complete the look with slides, structural jewellery and this season's hottest accessory— the cane bag.

PERSONAL ST YLING SERVICE Cara offers personal fashion styling and image consultancy services for both men and women, accommodating budget and lifestyle requirements. To make your appointment or to find out more, please, call Cara on 0421 489 688.

P R O D U C T D E TA I L S THIS PAGE 1 Scanlan Theodore Crepe Knit Tie Front Tank ($300) scanlantheodore.com 2 Rag & Bone Straw Panama hat ($285) netaporter.com

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3 Cult Gaia Ark mini acrylic clutch ($370) netaporter.com

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4 Silk Bird Palazzo Short ($240) scanlantheodore.com 5 Scanlan Theodore Powdered Viscose Eyelet Dress ($500) scanlantheodore.com 6 Scanlan Theodore Crepe Knit Skirt ($400) scanlantheodore.com

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7 Hermes oasis mules ($1,055) australia.hermes.com 8 Hermes Clic H enamel bracelet ($900) australia.hermes.com

OPPOSITE PAGE 9 Illesteva Milan III round-frame acetate and gold-tone mirrored sunglasses ($360) netaporter.com 10 Viktoria & Woods Testament Blazer ($430) viktoriaandwoods.com.au 11 The Row Biggins Matte-satin Camisole ($460) netaporter.com 12 Camilla & Marc Ettore Pant ($399) camillaandmarc.com

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Casual chic is always on the agenda, no matter what your lifestyle. Take a basic summer short that extra step without sacrificing comfort. Style with crisp white cotton or the crepe knit top and layer with the linen blazer for cooler moments. Finish with stylish yet simple accessories.

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HIS AUTUMN/WINTER STYLE

The lean wardrobe

LO O K 1 . Create a smart-yet-relaxed ‘Casual Friday’ look by teaming a linen blazer with a high-quality polo t-shirt and tonal trousers. Keep the look polished by tucking the tee into your pants, and accessorise with a textured belt. Complete the look with white leather trainers and set the benchmark for office attire.

Eleven pieces, four ways It all started with the white sneakers, and the casualisation of the traditional menswear market ensued. Now, the largest growing fashion segment is effortless-yet-elegant resortwear—pieces that can take you from barbeque to boardroom. Invest in a handful of well-made pieces that will stand the test of time, and make your mornings easier by adopting a lean wardrobe.

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P R O D U C T D E TA I L S THIS PAGE 1 Lanvin Slim-Fit Grosgrain-Trimmed Cotton-Piqué Polo Shirt ($277) mrporter.com

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2 Jacques Marie Mage Jules Square-Frame Tortoiseshell Acetate and Gold-Tone Sunglasses ($525) mrporter.com

A pair of good-quality tailored shorts can be one of the most versatile items in your wardrobe. Achieving a polished look without sacrificing comfort by focusing on the detail—tuck the tee into the shorts, and style back with a focus-pulling textured belt. Now layer: add a linen, tonal blazer and leave unbuttoned for an effortless vibe. Complete the look with this season’s slipper-like take on the classic loafer.

3 Incotex white linen shirt ($199) mrporter.com 4 Oliver Spencer Theobald Unstructured Linen and Cotton-Blend Blazer ($495) www.mrporter.com 5 Country Road Slim Garment Dye Jean ($109) countryroad.com.au 6 Valextra Versatile Pebble-Grain Leather Holdall ($4,835) mrporter.com.au 7 Polo Ralph Lauren Striped Slub Cotton-Jersey T-shirt ($75) ralphlauren.com.au 8 Incotex Slim-Fit Linen and Cotton-Blend Shorts ($250) mrporter.com 9 Adidas Originals Stan Smith Primeknit Shoes ($120) mrporter.com 10 Berluti Leather-Trimmed Woven Cotton Belt ($325) mrporter.com 11 Polo Ralph Lauren Cotton-Twill Baseball Cap ($60) ralphlauren.com.au

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12 Tod’s men’s mules tods.com

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Weekend wear is all about comfort. Team your chinos or dyed denim with a classic striped tee and layer an open linen shirt over the top. Up the casual offduty vibe by drawing attention to the cuffs—roll them back on your shirt and up on your pants. Style with crisp white leather trainers and a white or marle grey cap.

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With warmer days comes an increase in al fresco engagements requiring sartorial effort but demanding comfort and practicality. Team a navy-and-white striped tee with tonal tailored shorts and an open buttoned linen shirt for a look that oozes casual sophistication. Cuff your shirt sleeves, slip on a pair of open back loafers and top with a crisp white cap.

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TAKING THE HIGH ROAD: CANBERRA’S LUXURY TRAIL Canberra does luxury a little bit differently to other cities—in a refined, curated and understated way. You won’t find ostentatious shopping strips boasting the usual arm candy of the international jet set—think Chanel, Prada or Louis Vuitton. Instead you can delight in destinations a little off the beaten path, partaking of shopping, just browsing, or relaxing in rarefied surrounds which whisper—rather than shout—indulgence. B A BY P I N K

Words by Emma Macdonald

Baby Pink is the little sister of one of Canberra’s most successful clothing stores. Pink Ink in Braddon was on the frontier of the restoration of Canberra’s hippest suburb—now its Deakin sibling brings labels to the city it has never been able to source before.

H A L E GY M + S PA The newest addition to the Realm Precinct, Hale Gym and Spa is the ultimate luxury destination for those who want to rid themselves of the stresses and strains of a heavy shopping day with either a vigorous workout or indulgent beauty treatment. H O M E B Y C R E AT I O N S + C R E AT I O N S J E W E L L E R S

Nothing says luxury more than taking the time to contemplate the universe from within the confines of the cave-like plunge pool or to sweat out life’s frustrations in the infrared sauna.

Home by Creations/Creations Jewellers moves you away from garments and on to gifts. If you need something for someone (or for yourself, no judgement either way), then it is very hard to walk through the Style Arcade in Manuka without stopping to purchase at least one—or seven—items.

An extensive spa menu of facial treatments, body scrubs, massages and therapies carried out in high-end private treatment rooms ensures there is something to match everyone’s desires, while for others, just some alone time in the Scandi-inspired lounge breathing in the candle-scented atmosphere is complete and utter luxury.

The family-run Creations empire includes a giftware, homeware and award-winning jewellery shop. If it’s an iconic Alessi kettle you’re after, some Iittala glassware or a limited-edition Fink jug, then stop into the first shop you pass off Franklin Street.

L U S S O BY PA R I S A relative newcomer to the scene, Lusso by Paris speaks immediately of a higher-order of shopping once you enter the Manuka marble and brass-accented store. Lusso is the creation of Paris O’Donnell and literally translates to “luxury” in Italian. Paris attends fashion weeks in Paris, New York, Milan, and London to peruse the collections and work out the best items for her clients, selling clothing, shoes, handbags, leather and faux fur jackets—the latter selling like hot cakes in a frosty winter city within such close proximity to the snowfields. And if you are in the market for Italian shoes, Lusso stocks Alberto Zago, Giser Albano, Kentia, Le Pepe, Luciano Padovan, Moda di Fausto and Reda Milano. Rather refreshingly, the store pledges to only stock one size per style for each exclusive brand—ensuring these investment pieces retain their value for owners wanting to make a statement. Lusso by Paris | Shop 3 M Centre, Bougainville St Manuka | lussobyparis.com

Venture into the arcade a little further and get ready for some of those familiar Missoni zig-zags as the homewares shop inspires you with up-market bath products, and enough Voluspa candles to sink a ship. Of course, if money is no object, save your spending for the last shop on the left, Creations Jewellers, where Ben PrestonBlack’s signature free-form jewellery designs have been receiving national awards and international commissions. So much sparkle in one store it is hard to look away. Creations Jewellery and Homewares | Style Arcade, Manuka | creationsjewellers.com.au

Hale Gym + Spa | 10-14 Macquarie Street, Barton | halehealth.com.au DESIGNCRAF T Designcraft was founded in 1991 as a small furniture and joinery company in a tiny workshop in the township of Queanbeyan. Now it is the Canberra’s premier destination for Australian and international furniture, accessories and design objects, lighting and rugs. Bob and Joanne Fenderson established their company through the thick of a recession— holding firm to their commitment to manufacture the highest quality joinery and furniture locally, and to honour fine furniture design globally. That exacting attitude earned fans from the beginning and before long, Designcraft set up its first commercial furniture showroom in Fyshwick showcasing the craftsmanship of some of the best makers in the business. By 2004, Designcraft moved into a sleek new purpose-built factory and showroom in Hume—bringing together both parts of the business under one roof. There, the 1200 square metre two-storey showroom houses some of the most iconic designs from companies, like Walter Knoll which is celebrating its 150th year in business in 2015, Herman Miller, and Fritz Hansen, a Danish furniture design company that has been crafting timeless design since 1872. Australian-sourced pieces come from contemporary Melbourne design house TAIT, Adam Goodrum, Ross Didier, and Kate Stokes from Cocoflip in Melbourne. Designcraft | Corner Sheppard St and Monaro Hwy, Hume |  designcraft.net.au

CANBERRA CENTRE’S B E AU T Y P R E C I N C T Yes, it’s in a shopping centre but this isn’t your usual mall experience. Lush marble and metallic finishes and a hanging garden turn the high street into a truly luxe destination. Lovers of all things beauty will delight in the precinct’s range of internationallyrenowned and local brands and services, including Inglot, 3INA, L’Occitane, Seoul Flower and—the jewel in its crown— Mecca Maxima. Mecca Maxima’s new Australian-first concept store boasts a blockbuster line-up of cult names including NARS, Hourglass, Smashbox, Urban Decay, Stila, Too Faced, Kevyn Aucoin and Ciaté. If you’re a little overwhelmed by the dizzying array of products on offer, Canberra Centre’s Beauty Concierge is on hand to provide beauty, fragrance and wellbeing advice. Canberra Centre Beauty Precinct | Bunda Street, Canberra City | canberracentre.com.au

For starters, there’s IRO from Paris, Transit from Italy and McQ by McQueen, which is only stocked by premium boutiques worldwide. Furs from Mode & Affaire have, quite understandably, drawn a lot of local love over the winter months—as have the cashmere knits from Cashmerism. Other labels include Beau Coops, Baum und Pferdgarten and White and Warren with Baby Pink pitching itself to the seeker of luxury weekend wear in particular. A little tricky to find at first, Baby Pink is tucked away behind Double Shot café in Deakin, making the luxury of brunch and browsing an accessible one. Baby Pink | Duff Place, Deakin Court, Deakin | pinkinkboutique.com.au/ baby-pink/

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DECIPHERING THE DIET

Juicy Pork Burgers RECIPE FROM THE HALE METHOD – 12 WEEK NUTRITION PLAN

Nutrition is a rapidly evolving science. It’s like a giant puzzle, with millions of different pieces of research coming together to build a big picture. This research has defined the fundamentals of what keeps us healthy; however, many details remain elusive.

INGREDIENTS 500g pork mince 1 red onion, finely chopped 3 garlic cloves, crushed

Words by Kate Freeman, Registered Nutritionist

½ bunch fresh basil, finely chopped ¼ cup wholemeal flour 1 egg Salt and pepper ½ tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil

NUTRITION ADVICE GETS CONFUSING when we focus too much on these details and fail to see the bigger picture. The truth is, if you’re not consistently nailing the basics, it doesn’t matter whether you cut out gluten, or eat more zinc rich foods, you’ll make little-to-no progress. Achieving fundamentals in your diet day-to-day is the best place to start, and consistently applying them will cover off everything your body needs. That includes macronutrients (‘macro’ meaning large)— carbohydrates, fats and protein—and micronutrients (‘micro’ meaning small) like vitamins, minerals and antioxidants and everything in between. I don’t count my carbohydrates, or my intake of zinc or vitamin C. I know that if I stick to the basics, these things will work themselves out. And if my goals become more specific and I need to make changes, the foundation of my diet is in a good place to make some tweaks.

T H E D E V I L I N T H E D E TA I L

Many who follow a low fat diet focus solely on reducing fat, rather than trying to improve overall diet quality; as a result, the rest of their diet is high in refined carbohydrates and sugar and low in fibre, vitamins and minerals. It’s a similar story for those who quit sugar—they may have cut sugar from their diet but haven’t met their daily vegetable serves, consumed enough fibre, or have eaten too much processed, high fat foods. This too is a poor dietary pattern. My advice? Rather than focussing on individual nutrients, take a step back and focus on your diet as a whole.

“Is it fat or sugar that we should be worried about? Neither and both.”

“Fat is bad for you.” “Sugar is toxic.” What’s the truth? If you’re a child of the 80s or 90s, you’ll have grown up in the low fat era—a time when we ate low fat diets in the name of health, and more specifically, weight loss. Fat was to blame for everything from heart disease to obesity and if we could just cut it out, then all would be well. However, more recently, it’s become all about the low sugar lifestyle. Today’s ‘experts’ claim that the 80s got it wrong—it wasn’t fat that was to blame, it was sugar— and it’s been demonised for obesity, heart disease, depression, anxiety and more. So, is it fat or sugar that we should be worried about? The answer: neither and both. Both the low fat and the low sugar approaches fail to address the key fundamentals of nutrition, which are: consuming adequate vegetables and fruit, dietary fibre and a wide variety of foods to ensure all vitamin and mineral needs are met.

This isn’t just common sense—a scientific review of different weight loss diets found macronutrient breakdown (whether it was low carb/high fat or high carb/ low fat) didn’t matter. As long as the individual achieved good diet quality and the diet suited their lifestyle long term, it was effective.

A R E YO U N A I L I N G T H E B A S I C S ? Your everyday diet should include these key fundamentals. Protein Protein makes up the building blocks of your body and comes from meat, chicken, poultry, eggs, dairy, legumes, soy and other vegetarian products. It’s also in nuts, seeds and whole grains, in much smaller amounts. Your protein should come from minimally‑processed sources: choose steak instead of sausages, chicken breast instead of schnitzel, fresh fish fillets instead of battered cutlets, and plain milk instead of ice cream!

Aim to include an unprocessed protein-rich food at the majority of your main meals during the day. Fibre The more we study the gut, the more we understand the importance of it functioning effectively. Good gut health is most influenced by your fibre intake, and if you’re not hitting you daily fibre targets, you’ll experience problems with not only your gut, but also your health long-term. Fibre comes from plant-based foods and promotes health by feeding good bacteria, binding to water and cholesterol, removing toxins and helping you stay regular. Generally, the less processed the food, the more fibre it contains. You’ll want to be including plenty of vegetables and/or salad, fruit, whole grains like rye, rice, quinoa, beans, lentils, chick peas and whole nuts and seeds.

6 small wholegrain bread rolls 3 cups baby rocket 1 red capsicum, thinly sliced 6 tbsp. aioli

METHOD Place the pork mince, onion, garlic, basil, flour and egg in a bowl. Mix thoroughly to combine. Roll into 6 large burger patties. Heat the oil in a large frying pan or on a BBQ plate. Cook the burger patties over medium heat for 3-4 minutes each side until golden on the outside and cooked through. Serve each burger with a bread rolls, baby rocket, capsicum strips and a dollop of aioli. The meat patties can be refrigerated once cooled and re-heated for subsequent meals. Enjoy!

Volume When I say volume, I’m talking about the size of the meal. Big meals, full of healthy wholefoods, help us stay in control of our appetite, manage a healthy weight and meet our daily nutrient needs. We live in a sedentary environment which means we have lower energy needs then our ancestors. We’re more likely to be sitting in an office chair than chasing down a wooly mammoth, yet our nutrient needs are just as high. In order to maintain a healthy weight, we need to moderate our energy intake, whilst ensuring we stay full, satisfied and give our body adequate nutrition. Filling your plate with minimally-processed protein and fibre-rich foods, plus a high amount of non-starchy vegetables, means that we can eat a larger volume of food on a lower amount of energy. This concept is key to achieving successful long-term weight management and good nutrition. Achieving the basics is vital when embarking on a strength and fitness training program. If you’re looking to build muscle and reduce body fat, ensuring you’re consuming adequate protein, plenty of fibre and lots of fresh whole foods. Once your diet quality is good—and you’re applying the recommendations above— then, and only then, do you need to focus on the nitty gritty of nutrition, specific to your goals and health.

Pancakes with caramelised bananas and yoghurt INGREDIENTS 2 large ripe bananas, sliced 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1 tbsp. butter 1 tbsp. brown sugar

SERVES 6

1 ½ cups wholemeal self-raising flour 2 cups buttermilk 2 eggs, lightly beaten Cooking spray 1 cup natural yoghurt METHOD In a small frying pan, melt butter over medium heat. Add sugar and stir until dissolved. Add bananas and vanilla extract and stir until golden brown and soft. Set aside. In a mixing bowl combine flour, buttermilk and eggs and beat with a whisk or electric beater until smooth. Lightly spray a fry pan with olive oil and cook ¼ cup of mixture for each pancake. Serve 3-4 pancakes topped with caramelised bananas and yoghurt. Enjoy!

SERVES 4

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ON THE ROAD AGAIN. We talk to frequent flyers about how they beat the stress of business travel: staying calm away from the comforts of home, managing their workloads, and maintaining their wellbeing while on the road.

‘APPY TRAILS

Words by Emma Macdonald

Five Travel Apps You Shouldn’t Leave Home Without.

MICHELLE HEYMAN

LEAN TIMMS F R E E L A N C E T R AV E L , F O O D A N D LIFEST YLE PHOTOGR APHER

JAMILA RIZVI

PAC K P O I N T

AU T H O R , C O M M E N TAT O R AND CARE AMBASSADOR

Free. Android and iOs. If the thought of packing sends your blood pressure sky-high, this is the app for you. Just enter the details of your trip, and what’s on the agenda—beach holiday, business meetings, fancy dinner—and PackPoint does the rest. It will suggest a packing list based on the weather forecast and your activities, right down to how many pairs of socks!

M AT I L DA S I N C E 2 0 1 0 2 0 1 6 O LY M P I A N Lean Timms is living every avid instagrammer’s dream. With almost 50,000 followers, her eye for a beautiful moment in time is earning her a living—and sending her around the world in what appears to be a steady rotation.

What is your travel schedule like? Life as a professional sportswoman means Michelle’s bag is pretty much being packed or unpacked on any given week. The award-winning women’s soccer player and influential LGBTQI role model is also a brand ambassador for a number of major corporations. With the Matildas on a world-beating streak, a punishing training schedule is in place to stay at the top. The team travels domestically every second week and internationally up to four times a year across Asia, Europe and the United States.

Lean hits the road for approximately six of every 12 months for her online photographic business—travelling both domestically and internationally. She has just returned from six weeks shooting across France, Denmark, Sweden and the Faroe Islands.

How do you stay calm? “When I'm on the road, my schedule can often be really packed. My general routine as a photographer sees me shooting on location in the daylight hours and either editing my photos or heading out and exploring the wine and food scene in the evenings. “This can become tiring, so to stay focused I make an effort to take some time out to recharge and be on when I need to be on. I'll always find the time to do this, even with a packed schedule. I'll get up an hour earlier to have a slow breakfast or cup of tea or take a bath and listen to music in the evenings.” Stress usually arises due to early morning flights—Lean packs well in advance and tries to get to bed early in order to wind down before going to sleep.

“I make an effort to take some time out to recharge and be on when I need to be on.”

The best part of a career that entails regular travel? “Exploring the countries and cities and being able to rank them on a ‘bucket list’ for future travel.”

How do you make a home away from home? I instantly feel more at ease if I can head to the market to top up the fridge, cook breakfasts and the occasional dinner in, light the fire or some candles, have an in‑house washer and dryer etc.”

The best part of travel? “Travel inspires me greatly—mostly visually (I am a visual person after all). I comb places for colour, light and style inspiration. I'm also appreciative of and inspired by every texture, taste and scent. From the local markets, the farms, or from the Michelin star restaurant... I love it all. When I'm overseas, I also really enjoy learning about people’s day-to day-routines and the way they simply live. I find this inspiring. My biggest bursts of inspiration come from driving between destinations on open roads or the day after I arrive home from a really great trip, when I've got time to reflect and think about how I'm going to apply all the inspiring things I experienced during my travels to my life at home.”

“I always set my watch to the next time zone prior to arrival—this helps my mind and body adjust as soon as we land.”

The worst? “Managing things like my diet and hydration as hours of travel can mess up my regular routine.”

How do you manage stress and tiredness? “Given that our days are thoroughly planned, it does alleviate some of the stress as I know little details about the trip like duration of flight, meal break and believe it or not—even my nap time! I always set my watch to the next time zone prior to arrival—this helps my mind and body adjust as soon as we land.”

Is it more difficult to stay game-fit while juggling travel? “It can be tricky staying game-fit, but we tend to fly domestically a day before the game so we can still get a good rest before game time. Internationally, we'd have a week in the country to rejuvenate, acclimatise, and adjust to the time zone. “With long haul flights, I always make sure to stretch and walk the aisles, double the amount of water I'd drink normally, take a good book and a colouring-in book to alleviate boredom and stress.”

I travel a lot for work, (Jamila is a regular guest on The Project, The Drum and the Today Show) usually spending at least a couple of nights away from home every week. I minimise the hassle involved by doing everything I can to keep my packing light. Ideally, I would only ever travel with carry-on because then I can skip the waiting at a baggage carousel and there's no risk of my bag being lost. I also schedule flights later in the day because I'm a morning person. That way when my brain is operating at its best I have time and space to work and that leaves me free to relax when I'm in the air.

packpnt.com WIFI MAP Free. $4.99 for Pro Travel version. Android and iOs. If we were update Maslow’s famous Hierachy of Needs, it’s a safe bet that WiFi would be included. WiFi Map is a must for travellers looking to avoid hefty roaming fees, helping users to find free wifi hotspots all over the world—cities, airports, small towns and remote areas. Upgrade to Pro to access an offline map which guides you to the nearest signal even if you’re not connected. wifimap.io

How do you cope with the constant flying?

You have a toddler and husband at home. How do you manage the separation?

Being on and off planes all the time makes me anxious but drinking lots of water, going to bed early and chatting to my neighbour on the flight make this more manageable. I always pack gym clothes, knowing that an early morning run would also help reduce stress. But my good intentions rarely bear fruit!

I really miss my family when I'm away for longer periods and thank the technology gods for the gift of FaceTime. I travel with computer and phone chargers, plus battery life extenders in my handbag, which may sound like overkill but it means I'm never disconnected from my kid, my husband... or a podcast.

AROUNDME Free. Android, iOs and Windows Phone. Hungry and looking for inspiration? Just need to find the closest ATM? AroundMe allows you to search for the nearest restaurants, banks, petrol stations and more. Book an hotel, find a movie schedule nearby or discover the local pharmacy—it’s like a virtual concierge in your pocket! aroundmeapp.com TRIPLINGO Free. Android and iOs. With direct flights to Wellington and Singapore (and Doha in February 2018), Canberra is now a true international launchpad, and that’s where you’ll need TripLingo. Designed to equip travellers with the language skills they’ll need to get around their chosen destination, TripLingo has an interactive phrasebook (including slang), culture notes with basic tips on manners and etiquette, and safety tools to help you communicate in an emergency. triplingo.com GOOGLE TRIPS Free. Android and iOs. Google Trips gathers your travel information (reservations, confirmation numbers and more) from Gmail and Inbox, then organises it automatically into a one place—plus, the entire app is available offline, so you can see your info wherever you are. But wait, there’s more. It can automatically map out a half day or a full day itinerary with suggestions for things to see and do. Don’t like what you see? Tap the "magic wand" to see more nearby sights. get.google.com/trips

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W H AT ' S O N

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INSIDER GUIDE C A N B E R R A B A L LO O N S P EC TAC U L A R

OUR MUST-DO EXPERIENCES FOR SS17

handmadecanberra.com.au

balloonspectacular.com.au

20 O C TOBE R 2017 TO 18 F E BRUA RY 2018 NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA

NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY

portrait.gov.au/exhibitions/starstruck-2017

Handmade Market showcases more than 260 Australian designers and makers and their home-grown wares. You'll find fashion, furniture, sculpture, ceramics, children’s toys and clothing, jewellery, accessories and an indoor gourmet food & wine hall under the one roof.

Wake up to the view of hot air balloons floating across the city during the Canberra Balloon Spectacular. Held over nine days, more than 30 hot air balloons from across the globe take to the sky. Each day from 6:15am pilots begin inflating their balloons on the lawns of Old Parliament House before ascending into the sky and creating a picturesque backdrop for Canberra’s national attractions.

EXHIBITION PARK IN CANBERRA

HYPER REAL

10 NOV E M BE R 2017 TO 4 M A RCH 2018

In an unprecedented partnership, the National Portrait Gallery and National Film and Sound Archive of Australia (NFSA) present a new star-studded exhibition, Starstruck: Australian Movie Portraits. Starstruck explores the striking, beautiful portraiture emerging from 100 years of Australian movies. Drawn predominantly from the NFSA’s superb collection, the show will feature imagery of beloved Australian actors and iconic films, as well as highlighting the lesser-known early years of our film industry.

LAWNS OF OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE, KING EDWARD TERRACE, PARKES

8 – 10 DE C E M BE R 2017

Words by Amanda Whitley

S TA R S T R U C K : AU S T R A L I A N M OV I E P O R T R A I T S

10 – 18 M A RC H 2018

HANDMADE CHRISTMAS M A R K E T D EC E M B E R

Canberra comes alive in the warmer months, shrugging off its winter coat and buzzing with experiences for every taste.

This blockbuster exhibition is a compelling chronicle of the cycles of life, our constant need for connection and explores the fundamental question: what makes us human?

S U M M E R N AT S 4 – 7 JA N UA RY 2018

It features major works from early American pioneers George Segal, John De Andrea and Duane Hanson; celebrated Australian artists Patricia Piccinini, Ron Mueck and Sam Jinks; international masters Maurizio Cattelan, Berlinde de Bruyckere, Evan Penny and many more. Lovers And Luggers : Publicity Shot featuring Shirley Ann Richards Lloyd Hughes And Elaine Hamill (1937).

EXHIBITION PARK IN CANBERRA

Summernats serves up Australia’s most epic auto action. Check out the street machine judging competition, burnout battle, two nights of live music, horsepower heroics, and more. It’s all set against a backdrop of burnt rubber, rock and roll, and one of Australia’s biggest motor retail trade shows. summernats.com.au

nga.gov.au/hyperreal

Photograph by Martin Ollman

DAY O F T H E D E A D F I ES TA 4 NOV E M BE R 2017 AINSLIE ARTS CENTRE

ENLIGHTEN

Experience the vibes and atmosphere of a Latin America Fiesta at this family-friendly celebration of music, dance, art and the amazing tradition of Dia De Muertos. There’ll be live music, DJs, art and cultural exhibitions, market and food stalls, piñata's, face painting and authentic Lucha Libre (Mexican Wrestling). Hosted by local Latin band Los Chavos.

2 – 17 M A RC H 2018 PARLIAMENTARY TRIANGLE

enlightencanberra.com.au

facebook.com/Day.of.the.Dead. Fiesta.Canberra

AU S T R A L I A DAY F I R E W O R KS S P EC TAC U L A R 26 JA N UA RY 2018

MAMMA MIA! 24 NOV E M BE R – 17 DE C E M BE R 2017

CANBERR A NAR A C A N D L E F ES T I VA L 28 O C TOBE R 2017 CANBERRA NARA PEACE PARK & LENNOX GARDENS, FLYNN DRIVE, YARRALUMLA

The Canberra Nara Candle Festival celebrates Canberra’s relationship with Sister City, Nara. Highlights include Japanese food and cultural activities such as calligraphy, origami, lanternmaking, martial arts demonstrations and entertainment. The centrepiece is a display of 2,000 candles, lit at dusk by festival volunteers, creating a beautiful river of candlelight weaving its way around the Nara Peace Park. events.act.gov.au/nara

CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE More than 60 million people all around the world have fallen in love with this ultimate feel-good musical. Inspired by ABBA’s classic songs, it tells of a young bride-to-be on the eve of her wedding, seeking to discover her father’s identity. She brings three men from her mother’s past back to the Greek island they last visited 20 years ago. canberratheatrecentre.com.au

Enlighten transforms Canberra’s Parliamentary Triangle into a vibrant arts precinct with free entertainment such as talented street artists and international musical acts—all set against a backdrop of stunning architectural projections that shine a light on some of Australia's most iconic attractions.

REGATTA POINT, PARKES There's no better way to celebrate Australia Day than by enjoying the Fireworks Spectacular on the shores of Lake Burley Griffin. The best vantage points are Regatta Point, the lawns of the National Library or Rond Terrace. Pack your picnic and a rug and enjoy the range of entertainment—from 9pm the sky above Lake Burley Griffin comes to life with a dazzling firework display set to a truly Aussie soundtrack.

N AT I O N A L F O L K F ES T I VA L 29 M A RC H – 2 A P R I L 2018 EXHIBITION PARK, CANBERRA Join the celebration of traditional and contemporary folk life at the National Folk Festival with a program designed to inspire, enliven and entertain. With more than 200 acts representing diverse styles such as acoustic, blues, roots, bluegrass, world, Celtic, traditional, gypsy and country in a program including music, dance, spoken word, film, circus and traditional crafts, there is something for everyone. folkfestival.org.au

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SPACE CRAFT. Whether you’re working or playing, the MINI Clubman is big on space, style and substance. It’s packed with innovative technology and safety features such as navigation, reversing camera and MINI Connected now as standard. Add sumptuous finishes and sophisticated looks and you have the ultimate car-about-town. See for yourself what the MINI Clubman is up to. Book a test drive at Rolfe Classic MINI Garage today. ROLFE CLASSIC MINI GARAGE 3-5 Botany Street, Phillip. Ph (02) 6208 4222. rolfeclassic.minigarage.com.au

THE MINI CLUBMAN. UP TO SOMETHING BIG.

Profile for Little National Post

The Little National Post 5th Edition  

The Little National Post (LNP) is the ultimate Canberra concierge, telling our hotel guests everything they never knew they needed to know a...

The Little National Post 5th Edition  

The Little National Post (LNP) is the ultimate Canberra concierge, telling our hotel guests everything they never knew they needed to know a...