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U TA H C AT T L E M A N S EEDSTOCK EDITIO N

A special edition of the Utah Cattlemen’s Association official publication. www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


YCattleCompany ardleY

Bull Sale SATURDAY, March 12, 2016

Yardley cattle are not ordinary cattle, they have more performance, butt, depth, and thickness.

ALL BULLS ARE PAP & FERTILITY TESTED WITH ULTRASOUND DATA .

43rd Annual

200 BULLS SELL! 1:00 P.M. Mst Beaver, Ut

B l a c k S i m m e n ta l S , m a i n e a n j o u S , & a n g u S

3/4 Simmental. C266. Shocking Dream x Chrome BW 83 WW 793 One of the stoutest most correct high percentage Simmy bulls you will see all spring.

PB Simmental. C376. Upper Class x Blk Destiny BW 68 WW 705. 372 talks for himself with ample bone, depth, thickness, and mass.

1/2 Simmental. C308. Upgrade x New Edition. BW 77. C308 already has the look of a herd sire with all the credentials to be a great one.

5/8 Simmental. Utah x W101 (Pinion) BW 76 WW 725 Three breeds with generations of a solid genetic program to back them up..

5/8 Simmental. C321. Whirl Dream x Hot Pick. BW 75. WW 619. He has impeccable, fault free feet and structure with the depth, volume, shape, and muscling you need.

Maintainer. C276 Yardley Bold Brave x GCC Cerveza. BW 84. This bull will add style and functionality to a set of cows, a dose of Whiskey with our best Angus genetics.

Experience the Yardley Difference

PB Angus. C351 Mountain Pass x TC Freedom. BW 80 WW 787. C351 is the result of a life time of breeding the best to the best. Three breeds with generations of a solid genetic program to back them up.

PB Angus. C288 O’Riley Factor x Black Watch. BW 75 WW 696. His maternal grand dam was the producer of Yardley Mahogany. His daughters were some of the best Angus cows we own.

WHY DO BUYERS COME ACROSS THE COUNTRY TO BUY OUR CATTLE? This year we sent cattle to 22 states and Canada, from Pennsylvania to Michigan to California. THESE ARE NOT ORDINARY CATTLE. They have more eye appeal, conformation and good looks to top the market, AND they have gain-ability and performance to bring the top dollar. THEY HAVE MORE DEPTH, THICKNESS AND MUSCLING IN A MODERATE SIZED PACKAGE. THEY HAVE WORKED FOR MANY, MANY OTHERS AND THEY WILL WORK FOR YOU. 1. Their daughters will make the best cows you’ve ever had because they are backed by many generations of cow families selected for maternal traits. 2. Our cows winter on desert winter range where they get no hay and calve unassisted. 3. They have natural fleshing ability to stay fat on grass. They have to be structural-

Gib Yardley 435-310-0041 Steven Yardley 435-310-1725

3/4 Simmental. C342. GCC Hard as Steel x Power Surge. BW 88 WW 737. We absolutely love this bull with his powerful shape and design. He’s got it all in the right package!

ly correct to travel 2 or 3 miles to water and trail 25 miles to the summer range. 4. These bulls are wintered in big lots where they get lots of exercise and ½ grass hay and alfalfa and only 1% grain. 5. All bulls are performance tested and backed by our first year breeding guarantee. 6. You don’t have to pamper these bulls because they have proven themselves to adapt to all environments. 7. You are buying from a family that is honest and will treat you fairly. GIB YARDLEY IS A MASTER CATTLE BREEDER. He has been AIing for 49 years and has produced one of AMERICA’S greatest cow herds. He will be 83 years old in March and has never had anything else as a source of income.–

Call for a catalog!

Rodney Tiechart 801-824-8851 / jeanniegriswold@gmail.com

w w w . y a r d l e y c a t t l e c o . c o m

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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UTAH CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Serving Ranchers Since 1890 UCA PRESIDENT Joe Fuhriman, Nibley 1ST VICE PRESIDENT Mark Wintch, Wah Wah Valley 2ND VICE PRESIDENTS Colby Pace, Coalville Charles Redd, LaSal Laurie Munns, Hansel Valley Immediate Past President Don Anderson, Callao Executive Vice President Brent Tanner Utah Beef Council Director of Marketing Jacob Schmidt, RDN The Utah Cattlemen’s Association works to represent cattlemen in the legislative arena, provide educational information and assist with networking opportunities. If you own cattle and are not a current member, checkout our member benefits by visiting www.utahcattlemen.org The Utah Cattleman newsletter is published monthly with this onetime annual publication being sent in February. This publication is sent to all UCA members and its affliates as part of their annual dues as well as prospective members of the Utah Cattlemen’s Association. For advertising inquiries in future issues of this publication or in upcoming newsletters, contact Brent Tanner at (801) 355-5748 or utahbeef@aol.com POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the Utah Cattlemen’s Association 150 S 600 E, #10-B Salt Lake City, Utah 84102

Table of Contents Working For You uca navigates way For producers................5 checkoff always on issues forefront........................................................8 ncba representative shares love of industry.....................................................14. state ag commissioner is one of your own.............................................. 28. vew state veterinarian knows production and policy..................46

Interest & Education cache valley rancher takes uca reins for 2015-2016......................................... 20 innovation aids in predicting carcass quality...................................................... 34 marketing trends in the cow/calf chain...................................................... 38 the quality and quantity of the growing u.s. cowherd...................... 50 keeping meat on the dinner menu........... 54 do you have a mineral plan?........................ 58 the men leading your breed associations................................................ 70 unique utah ag program................................ 76 index of advertisers............................................ 86


Helping You Prepare for the Road that Lies Ahead By Brent Tanner, Utah Cattlemen’s Association Executive Vice President

E

very morning when I roll out of bed and start my day, I know one thing for certain: I will be on the road. No matter what lays ahead for the day, whether going into the Utah Cattlemen’s Association office, traveling out to the ranch, or off to some remote spot in Utah for a cattlemen’s meeting, I know I will be on the road every day. In Utah, we have roads of all kinds and conditions. Most days I travel a six-lane interstate freeway that moves a lot of cars. Other days I am on a two-lane highway headed out to a rural town. And on those rare days when I get to go out to the ranch, I have to travel on gravel roads and may not see another car for many miles. As I have logged many miles on the roads this year, I have thought how they are much like the cattle market and the way we as cattle producers react in different marketing situations. When the markets are great like we saw the past couple of years, we cruise down the six lane highway with no bumps flying at top speed. It doesn’t take much thought to prepare to go out on a well-groomed highway. Just hop in the car and drive on. The same was true in the cow/calf segment of our business the past two years. It didn’t take a lot of planning to make a little money in the cattle business. Margins for the cow/calf producer were large and the potential to make a profit was much greater than ever before in history. All indications are markets are changing and we are exiting the smoothly-paved road. When cattle markets start to tighten up, it then becomes like driving on Utah’s Highway 6, you had better sit up in your seat, put both hands on the wheel, pay a little more attention and be prepared for potential dangers. On our ranch, when we head down to the winter range on a very rough one lane gravel road, we would not even consider going without a spare tire. We know the conditions are highly probable that we will have a flat tire. So, what do we do? We prepare ourselves for the trip. We buy the best quality tires. We see to it that we have at least one spare tire for the trip. We have a working jack, and maybe even carry an air pump and a few tire plugs for the slow leaks. We know the road is going to be rough and rocky and we prepare accordingly. As cattlemen move into new marketing dynamics within the cattle industry this coming year, I hope we are preparing ourselves for a little rougher marketing trip. Some of the tools you may need are found in this publication. In

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

rocky markets, quality genetics in your herd will be a tool that will make your marketing smoother. It is always much easier to sell good quality cattle. Herd health will also be an important tool. Managing our cattle so that they are healthy and more marketable will smooth out some of the marketing bumps in the road. On the freeway every day, I see a lot of patchedtogether cars with balding tires. They make it down the road while it is smooth, but it wouldn’t take long for them to fall apart on a washboard gravel road. Are your genetics and herd management plans up to the quality the market will demand? It is time for each ranch to assess the road ahead. Are you only prepared for smooth sailing? Or do you have the tools in your management to drive through a few bumps in the road and a few low tires in the market? Cattlemen are a tough bunch. We work in less than optimal conditions every day. We know how to prepare for it and make it through the ups and downs. The Utah Cattlemen’s Association is out there every day trying to make the road smoother and take some of the risks out of the cattle business. We appreciate those cattlemen who are members of the association. If you are not a current member of the association, please make this the year to join. Maybe one of the issues we are working on is the plug in the leaking tire that will save your ranch from a blowout.

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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Sitz Spring Bull Sale 14th Annual

Selling

marCh 9, 2016

300 Yearling Bulls

12:30 pm mst • Dillon, mt

sitz JLs Powerball 667C

sitz resource 402C

Reg #18085613

Reg #18220552

Powerball x Thunder

Raven Powerball 53

CED BW WW YW SCR

+13 -1.6 +62 +107 +1.30

Resource x Upward

MILK +30 MARB +1.17 REA +.63 $W 89.96 $B 122.37

CED BW WW YW SCR

Sitz Ellunas Elite 656T

Sire of 667. 35 sons sell!

+5 +2.3 +69 +134 +1.24

MILK +34 MARB +.17 REA +.81 $W 79.65 $B 158.10

Dam of 402C and Investment. 15 sons sell!

A sample of the many good bulls that sell! Selling sons of Raven Powerball 53 Sitz Investment 660Z Sitz Reinvested 636A Sitz Logic Y46 SAV Resource 1441 VAR Reserve 1111 Barstow Cash

TAG

DOB

Sire Name

WW YW

SCR MILK MARB REA

567C

02/13/15

Raven Powerball 53

Sitz Top Seed 539X

11 -0.3

70

116

1.64

32

0.58

0.5

598C

02/08/15

Raven Powerball 53

O C C Juneau 807J

12 -0.4

60

100

0.59

31

.81

0.72

707C

01/29/15

Raven Powerball 53

KMK Alliance 6595 I87

12 -0.9

59

102

0.64

29

0.93 0.52

74.44 116.21

693C

01/29/15

Raven Powerball 53

Sitz Upward 307R

12 -1.2

66

118

1.89

32

0.85 0.48

689C

01/29/15

Raven Powerball 53

GDAR Game Day 449

17 -2.9

65

114 1.34

26

0.95 0.81

373C

03/24/15

Raven Powerball 53

Connealy Final Product

13

66

116 I+1.01 30

412C

02/04/15

S A V Resource 1441

Sitz Upward 307R

10 0.4

70

132

0.92

31

0.7

0.75

85.82

164.2

649C

02/01/15

Barstow Cash

A A R Ten X 7008 S A

16 -3.2

68

131

1.37

20

0.66

0.9

82.11 159.83

499C

03/03/15

Baldridge Next Step Y108 Connealy Homestead 1107 12 -0.5

62

109

0.78 26

73.11

CED BW

-2

$W

$B

BR

WR 205 WGT 113

807

104

744

91

106

754

84.79 141.16

88

105

747

86.52 111.34

88

106

756

I+0.72 I+0.65 77.79 121.49

85

105

796

ET

ET

739

79

102

725

75

105

749

0.54 0.71

100.47 117.24 101 86.7

125.16 100

127

523C

02/23/15

V A R Reserve 1111

Sitz Upward 307R

10 0.1

63

108

0.68 36

0.59 0.56

81.9

120.85 98

105

753

706C

01/29/15

Sitz Reinvested 636a

Connealy Final Product

11 -1.5

61

115

1.24 29

0.54 0.62

77.29 120.74 88

99

706

The Benefits of ull Buying a Sitz Bse heifer bulls! calving ea Large numbers of d return! sitz Value-adde trust! Confidence and mance records! Complete Perfor guarantee! 1st Year Breeding e! marketing servic The sitz Custom to 1,000 miles! Free Delivery up www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

MGS Name

Eye-appealing real world cattle that are economically relevant

Sale to Be Broadcast on Superior Livestock

1-800-431-4452

JiM sitz BoB sitz 406-683-5277 • (C) 406-925-9888 406-685-3360 sitzangus@gmail.com (C) 406-581-6448 jimsitz1@gmail.com sitzangus@3riversdbs.net 9100 MT Hwy 91N • Dillon, MT 59725 P.O. Box 129 Harrison, MT 59735 Joe Jones: Promotion/Marketing 208-670-2364

View our website at www.sitzangus.Com

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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Reminding of beef’s healthy attributes By Jacob Schmidt, RDN, Utah Beef Council Director of Marketing

T

he year 2015 was an eventful one for beef and the Beef Checkoff. National headlines were made when the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) released their Monograph evaluating cancer risk from red and processed meat. Internationally, IARC is known for its Monographs, which classifies agents as “known,” “probable” or “possible” carcinogens. IARC announced in November of 2014 that it would be evaluating red and processed meat with regard to cancer risk. The Beef Checkoff prepared research summaries and scientific references that were submitted, including comprehensive systematic evidence reviews to ensure that the balance of evidence would be considered. Overall, the IARC Working Group classified consumption of processed meat as “carcinogenic to humans” on the basis of sufficient evidence for colorectal cancer. Additionally, a positive association with the consumption of processed meat was found for stomach cancer. The Working Group classified consumption of red meat as “probably

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

carcinogenic to humans,” based on limited evidence that the consumption of red meat causes cancer in humans. The Beef Checkoff prepared for this release by prepping third -party responders and having additional information available as the Monograph was released. Additionally, the Beef Checkoff has developed education and communication resources that provide context and balanced perspectives on the role of diet and lifestyles in the development of cancer for consumer influencers (registered dietitians, medical professionals and academics) as well as the general public. So the question remains: Does red meat cause cancer? In short, the answer is no. The totality of the available evidence does not support an independent positive association between red meat and cancer. Based on scientific evidence, it’s unrealistic to isolate one single food that can cause or cure cancer. Research shows that when people have overall healthy lifestyles, they reduce their risks for chronic diseases, such as cancer – including one of the biggest risk factors, obesity. The best advice to improve all aspects of your health is to

eat a healthy, balanced diet, which includes lean meat, maintain a healthy weight, be physically active and of course, don’t smoke. So how can the Beef Checkoff and IARC disagree? For one, the studies that were looked at can only identify correlation, not causation. About half of the time there was no association found between red meat and cancer. Additionally, many of the associations are weak when found to be positive, and can be confounded by unhealthy diets and lifestyles. A team of independent scientists, supported through a research grant by the Beef Checkoff, conducted a comprehensive review of the same science that the panel looked at, and it is clear: Based on the evidence, there is no causal relationship between consuming beef and cancer. One of these scientists, Dominik Alexander, PhD, MSPH, commented saying, “The bottom line is the epidemiologic science on red meat ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


KELLER CATTLE CORP. Angus Bull Sale

MARCH 5, 2016 | 12:00 NOON MST Smithfield Livestock Auction | Smithfield, Utah

SITZ LOGIC

SAV REGISTRY

• Scale Crushing Performance • Length and Muscle • Balanced Trait • Excellent Females

• Best Females in the Business • The Easy Keeping Kind • Calving Ease • Excellent Phenotype

Y46

BW 2.4 WW 64 YW 117

2831

Milk 23 $W 60.25 $B 119.83

BW 2.4 WW 59 YW 105

Milk 23 $W 59.26 $B 131.54

ler Cattle Fall Harvest Online Female Sale COLE CREEK BLACK CEDAR

CONNEALY COURAGE

46P

25L

• Extreme Calving Ease • Moderate Framed • Heavy Muscling • Docility at its Finest BW -.5 WW 58 YW 96

Milk 18 $W 58.30 $B 80.89

September 27, 2014

• • • •

Maternal Excellence Balanced in Every Trait Multi-trait Outcross Sire Excellent Disposition

BW 2.2 WW 49 YW 90

Selling: Weaned Calves • Show Heifer Prospects • Bred Heifers • Bred Cows Other Sires KCC GAME DAY 2601 KCC RIGHT TIME 0740

Milk 21 $W 54.90 $B 84.91

HA WINDY 3410 SINCLAIR X-PLUS 2XX2

View more information at: kellercattle.com

120 Angus Bulls Sell - Two Year Olds - Long Yearlings - Mature Yearlings

David Keller SAUCTIONS.COM 435-757-9875

Paul Keller

435-512-4226 Paul Keller

David Keller 435-757-9875

www.KellerCattle.com 435-512-4226 www.kellercattle.com


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 consumption and cancer is best described as weak associations and an evidence base that has weakened over time. And most importantly, because red meat is consumed in the context of hundreds of other foods and is correlated with other behavioral factors, it is not valid to conclude red meat is an independent cause of cancer.” The IARC is not the only organization or group that provides recommendations for food and cancer risk. Major cancer organizations include lean red meat as part of a moderate, healthy diet within current dietary recommendations. They include the American Institute for Cancer Research, American Cancer Society, World Cancer Research Fund, and University of Texas MD Cancer Research Center. Consumption of lean beef is actually associated with improved nutrient intake and improved overall diet quality.

On average, Americans consume 5.7 ounces of protein foods each day (from meat, poultry, eggs, fish, seafood, nuts, seeds and soy products). And, on average, people eat about 1.5 ounces of beef daily. This level of consumption is well within the recommended dietary guidelines. The Beef Checkoff will continue to provide resources and consumer education pieces to help tell this story and highlight the positive nutrition benefits of beef. Beef is a powerful contributor to diet quality that provides protein and other key micronutrients for a relatively small amount of calories. The Beef Checkoff will continue to utilize sound science in helping to clear the confusion of beef ’s role in a healthy diet. The topic of diet and cancer is incredibly important and, as such, the Beef Checkoff is making available all the research regarding beef so you can see how we – and other experts -- have drawn our conclusion, that beef is not an independent risk factor for cancer. Visit FactsAboutBeef. com.

FOUR REASONS BEEF SUPPORTS YOUR NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION 1. Lean beef satisfies a heart healthy diet

Multiple research papers published from Penn State University Clinical Nutrition Research Center on the BOLD (Beef in an Optimal Lean Diet) study have shown that a heart healthy diet, including lean beef daily, leads to simultaneous reductions in a variety of risk factors for heart disease including total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol (often called ‘bad cholesterol’), and blood pressure.

2. Today’s beef is a satisfying lean protein choice to support your weight loss goals Protein plays an extremely important role in weight loss, and lean beef is equipped to provide you all the research-proven benefits. Research shows that protein rich food like lean beef may help increase feelings of fullness and control cravings, while also packing the ideal levels of a key compound called leucine, which helps your body build calorie burning muscle. 3. Lean beef is packed with nutrients you need, not excessive calories that you don’t Calorie-for-calorie, it is hard to beat all the nutrients you get from a single serving of lean beef. When you are watching and reducing your calorie intake to aid in your weight loss efforts, it can be hard to get all the nutrients that your body needs to stay nourished and energized.

4. With so many flavorful ways to prepare lean beef, you can keep your diet exciting and fresh

A major downfall of “healthy diets” is the doom and gloom associated with their bland menus.Lean beef brings the variety and flavors that you love with the health punch your body needs.

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VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


Adams Acres Tour of Duty 306 12-26-14 Sire: RB Tour of Duty 177,BW 76 , WW 705 , Ratio 107

Adams Acres Exclusive 916 01/07/2015 Sire: Riverbend Exclusive Y016, BW 76 , WW 719 , Ratio 106

#18267786 BW WW YW SC Doc Milk Marb RE $W $F $B +2.4 +70 +129 +.79 +21 +25 +.30 +.64 +71.46 +95.52 +143.90

Rimrock Tour of Duty 3051 1-18-15

Sire: R B Tour Of Duty 177, BW 77 , WW 804, Ratio 109

#18197203 BW WW YW SC Doc Milk Marb RE $W $F $B +.9 +64 +114 +.1.10 +27 +31 +.50 +.58 +76.61 +71.22 +143.78

BL Bullet Proof 471B 9/18/14 Sire: Y Axis, BW 88, WW 639, Ratio 112, PAP: 39

#18194010 BW WW YW Milk Marb RE $W $F $B +1.4 +66 +122 +29 I+.51 I+.48 +59.52 +93.86 +160.68

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

#LFM2044097 CED +10

BW WW YW MK CEM SC DOC 1.6 +80 +125 +27 +8 +0.95 +24

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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e v i l s u n Joir online! o WE HOPE TO SEE YOU AT THESE UPCOMING EVENTS... SHASTA LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD, COTTONWOOD, CALIF. CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE FEBRUARY 24

WYNDHAM HOTEL, VISALIA, CALIF. CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE MARCH 29

MAY 5

SHASTA LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD, COTTONWOOD, CALIF. CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE APRIL 20

bid online at www.wvmcattle.com

Family-owned and operated since 1989. We invite you to become a part of our family legacy. 12

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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FEBRUARY 2016


www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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We’re All In This Together By Dan McCarty, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Director of Industry and Affiliate Outreach

F

or a little over eight years now I have been bouncing around the 12 western states on behalf of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. I have had the unique experience to visit cattle producers in each state and visit ranches from the rainforests of Hawaii to the Great Basin of Nevada and Oregon to the Sonoran Desert in Arizona and to the green meadows of some of the highest altitude operations in the Rocky Mountains. I’ve visited multi-generation family outfits, wealthy absentee owner ranches, corporate operations and some of the most historic, well-known ranches in the United States. I have seen and had the opportunity to learn about nearly every business model that you can think of. That is probably why I found it funny that I had an “aha” moment while riding around my own neighborhood. Often times, on weekends when I’m not on the road for NCBA, and it’s not one of the busy seasons on our own operation – breeding, calving, haying, etc., I can be found riding shotgun in a veterinary truck. My wife is a solo-practitioner, mobile, large animal veterinarian. She is on call nearly every day of the year and her practice area covers parts of four counties in Western Colorado. She puts on well over 1000 miles per week so sometimes I go just to be a relief driver or sometimes simply to keep her awake on late night emergencies. The variety of different people in the cattle business and the number of different “niches” are as vast as there are colors in the Crayola box. On any given day, vet calls can range from the first time 4-H calf, to a large purebred operation, to the guy raising bucking bulls, to the miniature Hereford outfit, to a large progressive commercial ranch, finishing up with the guy that has two “pet” Holstein steers in his backyard. There are a lot of people in the cattle business that rely upon it for a living or a least a very large portion of their living. Every asset they call their own is somehow tied to their operation. The only time you see them in town is making a parts run, a grocery run or attending church. In our area, and I assume most others, there are

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

just as many, if not more, that are not in the cattle business “to make a living.” So what do all these different types of producers have in common? More than you may think. Just about every person I have ever met that owns cattle has a special place in their heart for them. Whether it’s the romantic notion of being involved in an industry that has such strong history in the west or maybe they prefer the company of bovines to people, cattle people tend to love cattle. Secondly, the end product of every cattle operation ends up in the same place – on the center of someone’s plate. Additionally, the work that the Utah Cattlemen’s Association and NCBA does each day impacts the future of their operation. UCA and NCBA are currently engaged in many issues that will impact all operations, regardless of why they are in business, what their business model is, or how big or small they may be. I think as member of these organizations, we need to try a little harder and do a better job of educating those that are not engaged on the issues and make sure they understand that the work UCA and NCBA ensures their ability to operate. We need everyone under the same tent if we are to win some of these battles. Additionally with this year being an election year, we have an opportunity to make sure we put individuals in leadership positions that will advocate on our behalf. Take the time to do your research and select the candidates that will not make it more difficult for us in agriculture to make a living and continue our legacies. Whether it’s the office of the President of the United States or a local county commissioner race, each one of those individuals will make decisions that impact our operations. Let’s take the time to make sure we have the right people in the right positions. For more information on NCBA membership and activities or NCBA producer education programs, contact me at dmccarty@beef.org.

VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


WA R D

Blue Ribbon Genetics Production Sale

Saturday •

March 19, 2016 • 1 p.m.

Anderson Livestock Auction, Willard, UT

Selling more than 100 Head of Registered Angus 2-year-old Bulls • Yearling Bulls • Bred and Open Heifers

Featured Sires Represented

A A R Ten X 7008 S A

CED +8

BEPD +.3

WEPD +68

YEPD +131

Milk +21

MARB +1.28

Werner War Party 2417

RE +.76

$B +191.19

CED +4

BEPD +1.5

WEPD +64

YEPD +122

Milk +41

MARB RE $B +.52 +1.19 +145.78

Other sires represented in offering:

Coleman Regis 904 ✶ Sitz Upward 307R ✶ SAV Final Answer 0035

For more information regarding the sale offering, call or email:

View our sale book online wardangusranch.com www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

PO Box 3816 Logan, UT 84323 Chris Ward 435-757-5140 chris@wardangusranch.com

Tony Ward Liberty, UT 84310 801-725-1669

UTAH CATTLEMAN SEEDSTOCK EDITION

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FEBRUARY 2016


29AN1941 OUTRIGHT

29AN1829 BROKEN BOW

237AN2394 TOUR OF DUTY

29AN1891 RAMPAGE

29AN1783 ABSOLUTE

29AN1934 ROCKMOUNT

6 Ways

ABS & AI Can Improve Your

PROF I T & EF F ICI ENC Y

1. PROVEN CALVING EASE 2. LONG TERM MATERNAL RETURN ON INVESTMENT 3. ADDED PERFORMANCE 4. IMPROVED EFFICIENCY 5. LESS COST THAN NATURAL SERVICE 6. FULL SERVICE CONVENIENCE

ABS offers the most comprehensive and convenient genetic service toolbox in the industry by combining reliable, high accuracy genetics and expert support at less cost than buying bulls. To order, contact your local ABS Representative or call 1.800.ABS.STUD. ©2016 ABS Global, Inc. • 1525 River Road, DeForest, WI 53532 • 608-846-3721 • www.absbeef .com


Shaw Cattle Co. Production Sale

February 17, 2016 - 12 p.m. (MST)

450 Hereford, Angus & Red Angus Bulls

Hereford AI sires include 755T, Red Bull, Hometown, Tested, Wonder, Peerless & On Target 936.

Angus AI sires include Cash, Substantial, Capitalist, Solution, Bullseye, Consensus & Excitement.

Red Angus AI sires include Pinnacle, Redemption, Conquest & Epic.

• •

First Season Breeding Guarantee All bulls are born and raised on our ranch. No Cooperators. • SIGHT UNSEEN PURCHASES FULLY GUARANTEED • Family Owned and Operated for over 65 years

Shaw Cattle Co.

22993 Howe Rd. Caldwell, ID 83607 www.shawcattle.com greg@shawcattle.com www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

S

Angus Hereford Red Angus

Greg: (208) 459-3029 Sam: (208) 880-9044 Tucker: (208) 899-0455 The Bull Business Ron Shurtz: (208) 431-3311 Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 19


Holding Tight to Tradition

by Paige Morgan for the Utah Cattlemen’s Association

Like many life-long ranchers, Cache Valley cattleman Joe Fuhriman, the newly-elected president of the Utah Cattlemen’s Association, says associations like UCA are more vital than ever and whether or not Utah beef producers are dues-paying members of the association, they are reaping the benefits. But if you aren’t a member your voice isn’t being heard. 20

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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f you travel on Highway 165 from Logan, Utah, heading into the more rural town of Nibley on a winter day, you may spot a metal sign on the highway reading “Elk Horn Ranch est. 1855.” A charming farm house and buildings rest peacefully in the winter snow. Young stock munches their hay as the sun begins to warm the valley. On slower days you will likely find the newly-elected Utah Cattleman’s Association President, Joe Fuhriman restoring one of his two old trucks or working on his “tiny house on wheels.” The tiny house on wheels was partly inspired by Tiny House Nation. With a few tweaks, Fuhriman thought his latest build would be a great place to stay while calving in the desert, West of Brigham City. Restoring and creating, VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


positions that others shy from, adding a subtle sense of it seems, are Joe’s personal outlet. “I like to make things,” Fuhriman says, “It helps humor that only the time-tested ranchers possess. me, when I am working on projects, I get ideas for other “There is always somebody that has to take the lead, projects or new things I want to do.” and it just kind of fell in my lap. It’s like they say ‘those Those with livestock and property will be quick that show up, get the job’,” Fuhriman laughed. to note that the work is never done. There’s always All joking aside, Fuhriman says he is looking forward something to be fed, a fence to fix or a piece of equipment to his position as president of the Utah Cattleman’s needing repair. It’s a fact of life, but a fact that not even Association. the UCA president would change. Ranching is in his “I’m always trying to learn and do better. I feel blood. honored to be where I’m at. Cache County hasn’t had a “It’s something I’ve felt all my life that I wanted to [UCA] president since 1956, and I think it’s about time,” do, so that’s what I have done. I feel very fortunate that he said. I’m able to do it. I’m happy that I have been able to keep As the number of legislators with agriculture the family property intact and in the family, hopefully for backgrounds or ties lessens, the importance of grassroots another generation.” associations like UCA grows. One of the first homestead sites in Cache Valley, the ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 22 Elk Horn Ranch holds a significance not only to the family but also to Latter-Day Saints and historic communities. For four generations the Fuhriman family has owned and ran the ranch, a fact that Fuhriman is proud to share. “My great grandfather purchased a portion of it [roughly 80 acres],” Fuhriman explained. “My grandfather kept that going and my father purchased some more; a home and a barn and a piece that was adjacent, and I’ve added to it as property comes available. We’ve tried to expand when we can, it’s definitely difficult now because everything is priced for development.” Like many of the agriculture land in the area, the Elk Horn is being eyed by developers but the Fuhriman family holds fast, declining offers as quickly as they come in. “I’ve seen a lot of change in my During his tenure as UCA president for 2015-2016, Fuhriman will still lifetime, they call it progress, makes you work as a full-rancher in addition to volunteering his time to travel wonder doesn’t it?,” Fuhriman said.“My and represent UCA. son is in the process of taking over, and I’m happy for that. The girls want to be part of it, they want to keep going. I thought they might want to take the money and run but they want to keep it all together.” In an age where it seems, agriculture has lost its voice, when the younger generation no longer wants to take part in time-honored traditions and hold fast to family legacies, the Fuhrimans have found strength in one another and in the comforts of their operation. Their family ranch, it seems, is more than a historic landmark but place to weather life’s storms, a place for contemplation and growth not only of livestock but also of character. The incoming UCA president is no stranger to helping others in their time Like many Utah beef operations, the Elk Horn Ranch is a familyof need. In 2007, he organized a hay managed ranch where Fuhriman works alongside his children to make drive to help out the ranchers affected by sure all the day-to-day duties can be accomplished. the Milford Flat fire. He’s quick to step into Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 21 www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 21 This is an issue that Fuhriman said he has stressed and will continue to stress throughout his presidency. “There are so many things going on that we will focus on. We want to keep our presence known and keep fighting for what we have been doing and continue trying to make the industry better. The cattlemen’s organization is an organization that is working for the cattleman and cattlewoman; defending issues that are pertinent to the industry. We do go to Washington, D.C., yearly, we do meet with legislators on a state and national level to defend issues that are going to be detrimental to the livestock industry and ag in general. It is an organization that is helping each producer in the state, whether or not they choose to join as a member. The only difference is if they don’t join, they can’t express their opinions,” Fuhriman stated. One of the issues weighing on the mind of not only members of the Utah Cattlemen’s Association but on agriculture producers nationwide is government overreach, specifically the Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service. “The government overreach is having a detrimental affect on ranchers. We’ve got issues with BLM and the Forest Service. They just don’t seem to care whether the livestock industry survives or not. There seems to be plenty of government overreach, and that isn’t the way it should be. There are a lot of issues that cattlemen are dealing with that they shouldn’t have to. The bureaucrats don’t want to follow the laws that are on the books and want to do things their way and their way isn’t always the best way. If we can keep some pressure there, it’s going to help the industry. It’s not going to happen over night. We realize that, but we’ve got to change some of these attitudes and feelings,” Fuhriman said.

As UCA’s president for the next two years, Fuhriman said with all the talk and changing attitudes and feelings, he would like to encourage new membership. “We do need membership. My membership becomes more valuable to me as time goes on. I see the needs and the effects of that membership. If other producers would join that would help. It doesn’t cost to belong, it actually pays,” he said. “The price of the membership is returned by incentives from UCA business sponsors, knowledge received from industry meetings and at our annual convention. It doesn’t do any good to go to the coffee shop and complain. Get out there where you can do some good.”

“I feel very fortunate that I’m able to live this lifestyle. I’m happy that I have been able to keep the family property intact and in the family, hopefully for another generation.” –Joe Fuhriman UCA President

Photos courtesy of Clear Creek Photography

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


Shandar Angus Ranch Sire Lineup SANKEYS JUSTIFIED 101

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition


9th Annual

PERFORMANCE TESTED

BULL & FEMALE SALE Saturday • February 27, 2016 • 1pm

Held at the Ranch – 7673 Hwy 40, Jensen, UT

A A R Ten X 7008 S A

CED +8, BW +.3, WW +68, YW +130, Milk +22, Marb +1.28, REA +.77, CW +61, Fat -.006, $W +86.80, $F +101.50, $G +51.58, $B +191.01

Connealy Black Granite CED +14, BW +.2, WW +62, YW +111, Milk +29, Marb +.60, REA +1.17, CW +46, Fat +.016, $W +74.39, $F +65.99, $G +40.70, $B +145.09

SELLING 55 Service Age Bulls 10-20 Females • All bulls will be semen, trich, and PAP tested. • Free feeding on all bulls until May 1, 2016 • $2.00/Day after May 1, 2016 until pickup

Deer Valley All In

CED +13, BW +0, WW +75, YW +129, Milk +39, Marb +.85, REA +.95, CW +54, Fat +.009, $W +93.87, $F +94.34, $G +44.61, $B +171.42

SIRES IN USE: RV EXAR R013, AAR Ten X 7008 SA, Connealy Black Granite, Deer Valley All In, Sitz Sensation 693A, VAR Discovery 2240 and GAR Prophet Randy Vincent 435/828-1111 Randan Vincent 435/828-1116 Jake Wilkins 435/828-8391 rvranch@easilink.com www.rvbarangus.com

For your free reference sale booklet, contact anyone in the office of the Sale Managers, TOM BURKE, KURT SCHAFF, JEREMY HAAG, AMERICAN ANGUS HALL OF FAME at the WORLD ANGUS HEADQUARTERS, Box 660, Smithville, MO 64089. Phone 816/532-0811. Fax 816/532-0851. Email: angushall@earthlink.net • www.angushall.com RVBarAngus_Full_16.indd 1

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

12/23/15 1:21 PM

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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“Best of the Best”

36 Annual Production Sale th

Monday, February 22, 2016 At the Ranch • Bruneau, Idaho

SPECIAL ATTRACTION: Selling the right to flush your pick of our entire first calf heifers. Numerous daughters of Miles McKee, Stockman, 88X, Trust, Hometown 10Y will be available to flush to the bull of your choice!

Lot 1 - C 092X MILES 5001 ET

240 Lots Sell • 144 Hereford Bulls • 29 Open Hereford Females • 1 Hereford Flush Pick • 66 Angus Bulls

BULLS INCLUDE TWO YEAR OLDS, JUNIOR & SENIOR BULLS COMPLETE PERFORMANCE DATA INCLUDING EPDS, PELVIC & SCROTAL MEASUREMENT, ULTRASOUND & CARACASS DATA

Catalog Available at www.hereford.com Live internet Bidding at

LOT 15 - C MILES 5034 ET

these lots were in Colyer’s 2015 string of pen bulls at Denver! BW 3.6 WW 56 YW 78 MK 35 IMF .06 URE .065 BW 3.6 WW 56 YW 78 MK 35 IMF .06 URE .065

This is a big stout son of Miles McKee who has added This is one of the very best bulls in the 2015 crop. He has been performance and look. If he was not born in December he would a standout all along and has done nothing but get better with be part of our pen of bulls going to Denver. His full brother will age. He was recently named Junior Bull Calf Champion in Reno be one of the more popular bulls in the sale and was a division and will be part of our Denver pen bulls. This bull has so much champion in Reno. This bull will be one of the heaviest in terms look and style but still has a tremendous amount of power and of WDA and is definite top pick. M&G Top 1%. performance. Top 1% Milk and M&G Top 10% REA

Lot 54 - C BLACK HAWK DOWN ET

Lot 85 - C X142 STOCKMAN 5261 ET

BW 4.1 WW 54 YW 84 MK 30 IMF .09 URE .58

BW 3.2 WW 63 YW 94 MK 28 IMF .09 URE .47

This is one of the best combination sires in the sale. He was This calf has been a standout all along and has done nothing but get better. We feel this is one of the best made calves we have named the Junior Bull Calf Champion in Reno. Many customers will appreciate this calf for being not only one of the top bulls in raised in a while. He reminds us a lot of his uncle Miles McKee the sale but also something they can use on nearly all of their with a big square hip and a killer hind leg. He is great fronted cows. This flush was mostly heifers and his sisters were the and has a ton of shape to his rib. His mother is just starting in main attraction at this year’s fall female sale. Top 5% WW and our donor program and this bull calf will be hard to top. He is M&G, Top 15% YLG and CHB one that could go any direciton. And with the maternal side of his pedigree we would expect his daughters to be nothing less than perfect. Top 10% for Milk and REA.

LOT 26 - C 88X RIBEYE 5072

BW 3.3 WW 62 YW 94 MK 28 IMF .08 URE .43

This was the heaviest natural bull calf weaned this season. He is a dark red son of “88X” who made his way to the top cut of bulls. He was in our pen of three in Denver because of his power and performance. His full sister was the top selling heifer in the 2013 fall sale and went on to be Reserve Grand Champion Female in the Junior Show at Denver. Top 5% WW and M&G

Lot 99 - C R98 COPPER 5321 ET

BW 4.8 WW 63 YW 96 MK 24 IMF .17 URE .35

Lot 97 and 99 are out of new sires “120Y” and “R98.” Both these bulls have tons of style and eye appeal. They are great fronted and could produce a killer show heifer. These brothers are the kind that when you get your first calves everyone wants to know what bull they are out of. These would make great sires to clean up a set of cows and get some good looking calves. Plus you have “R98” to back them up. They have a well balanced set of numbers and are in the top 10% for WW and SCR

Lot 60 - C 2052 4003 VIC 5192 ET

Lot 184 - CCC Black Granite 5026

Lot 176 - CCC Big Sky 5003

BW 2.9 WW 56 YW 88 MK 27 IMF .25 URE .45

BW -.7 WW 63 YW 112 MK 28 IMF .43 $B 123.20

BW 1.1 WW 56 YW 97 MK 24 IMF .81 $B 142.08

This will be one of the top picks. He is a son of “4003,” a new sire for us, out of arguably the best “88X” daughter we have. Her genetics have been some of the most popular and will continue to gain respect every year. This bull is extremely long, balanced and blends smooth from end to end. We love his hip structure and added extension to his front third. He will be a member of our pen of three bulls in Denver.

This is a unique bull. He is as muscular as they come with a ton of rib shape and volume.Mother is a first calf heifer with a fabulous udder. Lots of volume and capacity. She is now in our ET donor program. Look at the figures on this bull! Top 10% for CE, BW, WW and YW, top 15% MM, top 25% CW, top 4% REA and top 20%

Guy, Sherry & Katie Colyer (208) 845-2313 Kyle & Bobby Jean Colyer (208) 845-2098

GUY CELL (208) 599-0340 • GUY@HEREFORD.COM KYLE CELL (208) 250-3924

31058 Colyer Road Bruneau, ID 83604 Fax: (208) 845-2314

A top herd sire candidate. His dam has been one of our best and most consistent producers with ABWR of 97, AWWR of 102 and AYWR of 101 on 10 calves. Top 20% WW, top 30% YW, top 25% MARB and $B.


B A RKER CATTL E CO MPANY BULL & FEMALE PRODUCTION SALE

Tuesday, March 1, 2016 at the Burley Livestock Auction Yard, Burley, Idaho Sale Time: 1:00 pm • Lunch served at 11:30 am

SELLING 100 ANGUS, SMXAN, AND SIMMENTAL BULLS (Offering DNA 50k Tested Bulls)

B11 Lucky Charm bull (PB Simmental)

CU654 OReilly Factor (PB Angus)

50 SMXAN & ANGUS HEIFERS Offering 4 Free GeneMax Advantge DNA Heifer Selection Tests With each bull purchase ($200 value)

CR43 All Around (Simmental)

CS654 OReilly Factor (PB Angus)

Tom & Sally Ottley Ruel & Tyler Barker 208-312-3085 801-792-1036 208-638-5571 801-372-0996 Email: tosalott@atcnet.net

CAY51 J Bar J Night Ride (Simmental)

THESE BULLS SELL! See others offered on our website www.barkercattle.com


the cowboy way isn’t always the easy way By LuAnn Adams, Commissioner, Utah Department of Agriculture and Food

A

s a Box Elder County rancher, I experience the joy and challenges of working hard. I want to acknowledge how important I believe the beef industry is in Utah; not only from an economic perspective but for its positive impacts on the environment and on our children’s work ethic. Being raised on a farm or ranch teaches important lessons for people young and old. My husband Bob and I have worked in agriculture all of our lives, developing a deep love for the land and livestock on the many acres we manage. I was raised on a beet farm in Idaho and eventually settled in Box Elder County where by husband and I raised our family on a ranch. Bob considers himself lucky to have been introduced to conservation practices through his father, who saw value in investing in the health of the land. When Bob took over the ranch, he continued to uphold the conservation ethic his dad instilled in him. We have passed down our love for the land and livestock to the next generation, as we truly care about preserving our heritage for the future. Bob and I are partners with our two sons, Ben and Don. Together we manage the ranch, which is nestled at the base of the north Promontory mountains where the first transcontinental railroad starts its ascent over the Promontories. The ranch is a cow/calf operation where we strive to preserve our ranching heritage. Our family works together and we share a sense of accomplishment, knowing we’re part of something bigger than ourselves. Our children and grandchildren see every day how we live our lives. We have implemented a rotational grazing system supported by an extensive pipeline and fencing infrastructure, providing control of herd impact to reach the levels of range improvement needed. Such practices have led to improved production levels, health, and fertility in our land and cattle. Our ranch strives to breed top-quality genetics, while improving the health and wellbeing of the cattle, providing a satisfactory product to the consumer. We believe that offering a quality product is essential for the future of the cattle industry. I credit my time on our ranch, and the years I spent working for county government for helping me

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

understand the agriculture industry as well as the political system that can influence much of what I do. During my 19 years as a Box Elder County Clerk/ Recorder and Commissioner, I had the opportunity to interface with many other ranchers on important topics. I was instrumental in putting many Agriculture Protection Areas in place for Box Elder County. I had the opportunity to serve on the state’s Sage Grouse Committee that put Utah’s Sage Grouse Plan together, and I served on the BLM Resource Advisory Council (RAC). I was the County Commissioner for Public Lands and Agriculture. I attended monthly Conservation District meetings and co-chaired the Coordinated Resource Management (CRM) committees that put a resource plan together for western Box Elder County. These experiences have been invaluable as the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food works through issues that are critical to the livestock industry. One of the important realities of working on a ranch is that we all must pull together to get the hard work done. There’s no leaving the office early. On our ranch we ride for the brand. We work hard and do our best. We are committed, strive for excellence, loyalty, teamwork, and follow the rules. I have applied these farm and ranch principles to my work at the Department of Agriculture and Food. My theme here is, “Riding for the Brand.” These are the principles I ask my employees to follow. • Take Pride in Our Work • When You Make a Promise – Keep It • Be Tough, But be Fair • Live Each Day With Courage • Do What Has to be Done • Always Finish What You Start • Trust – Relationships Need to be Built • Risk Everything, Fear Nothing, Have No Regrets It may not be the easy way, but it is the cowboy way. I am excited about the future of Utah agriculture. LuAnn Adams is the Commissioner of the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food. She was appointed by Governor Gary. R. Herbert in January of 2014.

VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


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MARKETING PROGRAM • CUSTOM COLLECTION • INVITRO ORIGEN • SEMEN SALES

ORIgen YOUR COMPLETE GENETIC SOURCE

The ORIgen difference.. ORIgen was created by breeders, for breeders to give them a market for their genetics unlike any other system in the industry. The “BREEDER TO BREEDER” concept was built on the vision of bridging the gap between bull owners and the marketplace to give breeders direct access to the market and unlimited networking opportunities for their genetics among other breeders. This service connects bull owners to the beef industry where they can have a higher percentage of return and access to the largest semen sales network in the business while retaining control of their marketing strategy. ORIgen staff represents bull owners and promotes the ORIgen line-up at many industry events in the US and Canada. ORIgen provides a SUPPORT SYSTEM TO THE BULL OWNER that takes care of the sale, accounts receivable, partner payment distribution and product shipment. ORIgen has a STATE-OF-THE ART CUSTOM SEMEN COLLECTION FACILITY that is designed for the ultimate care and handling of beef bulls. Bull care is our number one priority; we follow stringent biosecurity protocol to protect the health of each individual animal. ORIgen takes pride in its expansive facility, which has four on-site barns, each with its own indoor collection arena and lab. Surrounding the barns are long bull runs designed for easy flow, low-stress handling, exercise promotion and protection from the elements. Bulls collected at ORIgen also have the advantage of being viewed by potential customers through staff-guided tours. ORIgen is one-of-a kind. Experience the ORIgen DIFFERENCE – contact us today!

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

866-867-4436

VOLUME 3

www.ORIgenBEEF.org •

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Ideal for moderate to high quality forages & enhances reproductive efficiency. Comes in steel, plastic or bio-barrel.

Brigade

Ideal for animals under stress, breeding stock, young calves and show cattle. Comes in steel or plastic.

Omega-lyx 12% Contains Omega-3 fatty acids. Ideal for bulls or females in preparation NEW! for breeding. Comes in steel.

Breed Up 28

Ideal for overcoming stress associated with calving and the breeding period. Comes with or without Bio-Mos®.

Crystalyx® is an excellent source of additional protein to ensure that medium to low quality forages are more thoroughly digested for increased utilization.

Am. Fork, UT 801-756-9604

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Salt Lake City, UT 801-972-3009

Cortez, CO 970-565-3077

Cedar City, UT* 435-586-2205

Hyde Park, UT 435-563-1604

Provo, UT 801-373-7680

St. George, UT 435-673-3631

Tremonton, UT 435-257-5419

Elko, NV 775-738-6233

Delta, UT 435-864-2110

Logan, UT 435-753-0181

Richfield, UT* 435-896-6461

Salina, UT 435-529-7407

Vernal, UT* 435-781-1616

Las Vegas, NV 702-837-1755

Draper, UT 801-571-0125

Ogden, UT* 801-394-8831

Riverton, UT* 801-254-3501

Sp. Fork, UT 801-798-7418

Preston, ID 208-852-0661

Farmington, NM 505-326-5005

Store Hours: Mon. – Sat. 8am – 7pm (*Open 8am – 8pm) Closed Sundays. Selection varies by store.


PREDICTING CARCASS QUALITY from Zoetis Animal Health

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new genomic test from Zoetis enables producers to affordably and accurately predict carcass quality (marbling), yield grades, grid merit and tenderness in a range of straight-bred or crossbred British and Continental breed animals that are less than 75 percent Black Angus. This easy-to-use new tool, named PredicGEN™, evaluates key carcass traits to inform producer decisions regarding replacement females, sire assignment and value predictions for feeder and fed cattle certification and marketing programs. PredicGEN aids in the selection and mating of replacement females and the marketing of feeder and fed cattle progeny for traits driving USDA quality grade and yield grade, carcass value and consumer satisfaction. The tool gives producers the ability to better differentiate value among young breeding and feeding animals, providing a more timely yet affordable option to traditional carcass and tenderness data collection. “PredicGEN enables us to connect the beef supply chain, from cow-calf producer to consumer, by informing selection, breeding and marketing decisions,” says Kent Andersen, Ph.D., associate director of technical services at Zoetis. “Ultimately, PredicGEN enables more rapid across-breed improvement in carcass and consumer traits, better informs price discovery of feeder and fed cattle and at the same time supports consumer-eating satisfaction and associated beef demand.” As carcass grid merit continues to impact the value of fed cattle, the ability to transfer that value throughout the beef supply chain rewards cow-calf producers for improving carcassand consumer-related traits, adds Andersen. By utilizing PredicGEN along with the selection of superior sires based on GE-EPDs, commercial cow-calf producers gain the insight to help ensure market-topping prices for feeder and fed cattle, Andersen says.

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

PredicGEN was developed using data from more than 10,000 harvested animals with recorded carcass marbling scores, USDA yield grades and high density genotypes. External validation of PredicGEN was completed across a range of commercial feed yard conditions, revealing favorable associations between genomic predictions and expressed carcass performance. PredicGEN results are presented as easily interpreted scores ranging from 1 to 100, with 50 as the benchmark average amongst the Zoetis reference population, now consisting of roughly 20,000 tested animals. PredicGEN scores for individual traits as well as the carcass grid merit index can then be used in a variety of selection, breeding and marketing decisions. Practical applications of PredicGEN were demonstrated in a collaborative study between Zoetis, Gardiner Angus Ranch, Triangle H Grain and Cattle, and Top Dollar Angus1. A group of 104 commercial, mixed-continental breed heifers were evaluated using PredicGEN and found to have an average marbling prediction of 36 (14 points below average). The top two-thirds, based on predicted genetic merit for marbling (average score of 44), were retained and bred to two proven Gardiner Angus bulls in the top 1 percent of Dollar Beef ($B) ranking. The resulting progeny tested with PredicGEN had an average marbling score of 72 (22 points above average), graded 95 percent Choice and higher, and generated $113 in carcass grid premiums. The results of this trial illustrate the significant increase in carcass value created in one generation through use of superior sires combined with PredicGEN results to inform selection, mating and marketing decisions. PredicGEN is intended for use in straight-bred and crossbred British and Continental breed beef animals that are less than 75 Percent Black Angus and thus is not suited for GeneMax® tests offered through Angus Genetics, Inc. and Zoetis. Similar to PredicGEN, GeneMax® Focus™ includes predictions for marbling, sire matching and feedlot gain, but is distributed exclusively through Angus Genetics, Inc. for use in animals that are 75 percent or more Black Angus breed composition. GeneMax® Advantage is also for 75 percent and higher Black Angus replacement females and includes the full complement of maternal, feedlot and carcass trait predictions delivered as economic indexes and outlier reporting. PredicGEN is the latest addition to the Zoetis portfolio of genomic tools for beef cattle producers. Through their range of genomic products, Zoetis enables cattlemen to make more informed decisions regarding genetic advancement, resulting in competitive, profitable beef operations. To order tests and learn more about PredicGEN and how it can be used to help inform selection, mating and marketing decisions, contact a Zoetis representative or visit PredicGEN. com. VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


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T W INE B AR R ANCH, WE RUN OUR CATTLE AT ELEVATIONS 6,700-10,000 FEET. BECAUSE OF THIS, WE HAVE BEEN PAP TESTING EVERY ANIMAL, BULL AND FEMALE, FOR 13 YEARS AND KEEPING ONLY CATTLE THAT WILL SCORE IN ACCEPTABLE RANGES FOR HIGH ALTITUDES. T HIS MEANS WE NOW HAVE ANIMALS WITH THREE GENERATIONS OF LOW PAP SCORES! E HAVE AN INTENSE AI PROGRAM UTILIZING A BALANCED TRAIT SELECTION FOR LOW BIRTH WEIGHTS WITH FAST GROWTH TO A YEAR OF AGE. C ATTLE EVALUATED SEVERAL TIMES EACH YEAR TO DETERMINE REPLACEMENTS AND BREEDING BULLS. ITHIN THE LAST DECADE, THE A NGUS POPULATION HAS IDENTIFIED SEVERAL GENETIC DEFECTS. U NDER THE CURRENT POLICY OF THE A MERICAN A NGUS A SSOCIATION, BREEDERS CAN REGISTER KNOWN CARRIERS. A T W INE B AR R ANCH, WE HAVE TAKEN THE APPROACH OF TESTING EVERY POTENTIAL CARRIER AND NOT SELLING ANY ANIMAL THAT TESTS POSITIVE. E GUARANTEE CUSTOMER SATISFACTION. I F WE CAN BE OF ASSISTANCE TO OUR CUSTOMERS, WE WELCOME THE CHANCE! FROM

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37


THE COW-CALF MARKET AT A GLANCE What buyers want, how producers are meeting demand and what the future may hold by Morgan Blackhurst for the Utah Cattlemen’s Association

C

ow-calf operations make up around 51 percent of the total beef inventory in the United States. Every rancher knows the sinking feeling after a bad year and the high from a good year that they hope will carry into the next. Although agriculture is the oldest industry in society, it is constantly evolving and adapting to meet the demands of a growing world. New technologies, consumer-driven programs and market analyses are all areas that ranchers should focus on to ensure profitable years when possible and prepare for years that may not be as great. Several cattle buying experts in the Intermountain West gave some insight into buying calves off the ranch and their observations when it comes to successful operations. Jim Albiston, from Utah’s Cache Valley, is a longtime cattle buyer with experience in the Midwest and the Intermountain West areas. He got his start in a packing plant in Utah and eventually moved to Nebraska to run a packing house. While in Nebraska, Albiston studied under cattle buyers and established an understanding for buying packing house cows before he moved back to Utah to continue his career in the cattle industry. When asked about his experiences over the years, Albiston said, “Agriculture is a good trade off. We have had some volatile markets. It’s the life we choose but at 50-yearsold it’s a little hard to change at this point. People we do business with are the salt of the earth people.” Shane Frost, out of the Uintah Basin, is a representative of Superior Livestock, which is based in Fort Worth, Texas. Frost considers himself a subcontractor in a sense. His roles in the industry vary day-to-day, but include videoing cattle, writing contracts, consigning sales, contacting buyers and marketing and delivering cattle. After introducing satellite video marketing to the world in 1987, Superior Livestock has continued to be a major player

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

in connecting sellers and buyers in the beef industry. Rick O’Brien, based in Salt Lake City, became the general manager of Producers Livestock three years ago after having a long career with the Farm Credit banking and lending system. O’Brien’s father was the manager at Producer’s North Salt Lake sale barn so O’Brien grew up in the company before he devoted 30 years to Farm Credit. Producers Livestock is headquartered in North Salt Lake, but there are branches in Jerome, Idaho; Salina, Utah; Greeley, Colo.; Vale, Ore.; and Madera, Calif.. The successful co-op offers resources to producers and buyers with profits being paid back to the co-op’s members.

A Changing Industry As each new generation takes over the family ranch, change is inevitable. Albiston has noticed a big change within the industry over the last couple of decades. “I can go back three generations with some of the families I’ve done business with and some of their old ways are gone,” says Albiston. He credits the younger generation coming into the ranching world with more knowledge – some have a college degree, but all have a thirst for learning new methods to progress their family’s operation. A progressive attitude and desire to attempt new approaches have led to the younger ranchers changing the methods and practices used on their family’s ranch for decades. “A lot of the younger generation coming up has a college education, and not that that is a requirement in ag, but it certainly does not hurt,” He said. Technological advances in beef production and agriculture as a whole can be felt daily by any rancher, buyer or consumer, whether they realize it or not. “Technology has sped things up dramatically. Thirty years ago, ranchers, buyers and other people in the industry

VOLUME 3

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were not in constant communication,” said Albiston. There is no doubt that the Internet has completely changed the industry, as far as researching genetics, selfeducating, networking amongst the agriculture world, and following up-to-date market reports. “The market has become very transparent. It’s no longer looking at the numbers from the week before in a newspaper. It’s instantaneous.” It’s pretty apparent that even older generations of producers have picked up on the touch-of-abutton access to current markets. “Even the older guys are getting market updates on the Internet,” chuckled Albiston. O’Brien says he believes that summer video sales are a great marketing tool that have brought in higher sale prices for ranchers everywhere by eliminating costs and providing access to buyers in a broader market. He advises one of the smartest thing a rancher can do at this point is use technology and video sales advances to increase their productivity while eliminating expenses and time spent traveling with calves.

What creates the most success?

Albiston also notes that that a lot of operations have changed their breeding programs. “They know what genetics to get because they know what genetics have paid them across the scales in the past and what makes their operation the best,” Albiston said. The common characteristic among top-producing ranches seems to be education. Because there are so many factors that go into raising calves, a good knowledge base sets up ranchers for success. “You have to know what the markets are doing all the time. Weather, your contacts, transportation costs, consumer demand – everything has to be instantaneous,” said Albiston. “Adaptability, implementing new technology, thoroughlyresearched genetics and timing can all lead to a more profitable operation.”

Is it here to stay? O’Brien says that different programs, like all-natural beef, change year-to-year but they are definitely consumer-driven. “These specialized production programs are increasing in trend, but they still only make up a small percentage of the total cattle offered,” he said. According to Albiston, other programs that have seemed successful within the beef industry include branded-beef programs like Certified Angus Beef. “The Angus people have done a really great job with that program. Even fast food chains like Arctic Circle have pushed CAB,” Albiston said. “Even though Certified Angus Beef is not talked about nearly as much as some other niche programs on the consumer level, it is still important to Angus producers and has been extremely successful on the retail level.” Sometimes marketing calves can be a confusing process, even for the most experienced cattle producers. Terminology like “slide,” “shrink” and “cwt” take time to fully comprehend. It is up to cattle marketing venues and representatives to ensure their buyers and sellers are familiar with all the lingo and fine details. Over the years, venues like Superior Livestock have also

As for Frost, he said he attributes the success of the top-producing ranches partly due to value-added programs, specifically a strong vaccination program. “It’s not mandatory, but it’s highly proven to be well worth the cost and the effort,” said Frost. He says that the preweaning shots in calves makes their health good enough that the buyers are willing to pay some higher premiums for them. Frost specifically mentioned Vac-34 and Vac-45 as being helpful with calves before shipping. In a world where organic, natural and never-ever programs are buzz words for cattle buyers, it is apparent that those niche markets don’t replace the need for good, sound animal health practices on the ranch. Albiston is also an advocate for value-added programs like vaccinations. “Every part of the chain has responsibility for making the best and safest product and for profitability,” He explains. “My theory and opinion, not based on scientific facts but just on what I’ve seen, is that there has been so much heifer retention lately. They get picked over at home and then at ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 40 the sale barn. The second user takes them home and breeds them. And sometimes, the ones that are sent to the feedyard can be the bottom of the barrel if producers aren’t careful what they are sending on down the line.” Some of the other practices that he said he believes consistently put the top producers above the rest include handling practices, staying in contact with your network and smart herd retention. Because of this practice there is not much performance from heifers, keeping steer carcass yields consistently higher going through the packing house. He has also noticed that overall, cow herds seem to be getting younger. “Younger and better,” as he describes it. O’Brien says he has noticed that ranchers who rely heavily on the fall run do not always get as high of profits. He explains Buyers gather at a Western Video Market Sale in Reno, Nev., to bid on that the market gets saturated with more calves from ranches throughout the West. available calves at that time of year. Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 39 www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 39

implemented producer incentive programs to make things more beneficial to their customers. Frost said recently Superior Livestock has come up with a new program called RightSlide, to eliminate the uncertainty of extra weight upon delivery of cattle. For calves, producers will receive $1 for every pound over base weight, and for feeders, $0.80 for every pound over base weight. For example, if your lot of calves with a base weight of 500 pounds sells for $300/cwt, you would receive $1,500 per head. With the RightSlide program, if the calves average 510 pounds at delivery, you will receive an extra $1.00 per pound over the base weight (each calf would sell for $1,510). Frost said that it took a while for buyers to understand the new slide system throughout 2015, but there were some pretty good premiums throughout the year that gives him hope in the program’s future. “The biggest thing ranchers need to do is sell cows for what they are going to weigh. Do not try to sell a cow at 1,450 pounds at the sale when you know she is going to weigh closer to 1,500 pounds when she reaches her destination,” Frost said. Frost explained Superior Livestock’s idea behind the program and name goes back to their philosophy of doing what is right and everything will work out in the end.

Future Markets With the cattle market fluctuating from day-to day, it’s hard to predict what exactly will happen with each shipment of calves, but staying informed and prepared is one of the major keys to success in the beef business. O’Brien says he

predicts that the beef industry will not see high prices like we did in early 2015 again anytime soon. “I expect more of a sideways market this year.” For Albiston, he said, “Last year we had record high calf prices. This year it was hard for the cow-calf man to give some of that equity back and they’ve had to. The crazy weather all over the country has made some guys that need to keep their cattle not want to because of different health issues and logistics.” The fortunate thing about the agriculture industry, in Albiston’s opinion, is that when ranchers and farmers do well they put their profits back into the economy. Whether it be buying a new tractor, improving facilities or purchasing more land, reinvesting in the agriculture field is vital to our economy as a whole and to individual operations of all sizes. The end goal is the same for all involved: sustainability and profit. While there is a certain romance to keeping the family farm as similar today as it was in grandpa’s time, it is not always practicable. The world and its food needs have changed dramatically over the last few decades, and the agriculture industry needs to adapt to these changes. Beef producers have access to resources and information that could potentially take their calf sales to another level. The value of research into successful practices and investment in smart genetics is unprecedented when talking about longevity of a ranch. Technology has made it easier for ranchers to connect with buyers, easier to stay current with the market and easier to market their cattle. In a consumer-driven industry, it is important to always have an understanding of the consumers’ demands while trying to maintain a successful operation.

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TOP REASONS TO CHOOSE TRIANGLE® VACCINES FOR YOUR HERD Safe for all ages and stages, giving you the confidence of proven protection • Contains only killed antigens • Safe for use in pregnant animals regardless of previous vaccination history

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Data on file, USDA Licensed Trial. Grooms DL, Coe P. Neutralizing antibody responses in preconditioned calves following vaccination for respiratory viruses. Vet Ther 2002;3(2):119–127. 3 Dubovi EJ, Gröhn YT, Brunner MA, Hertl JA. Response to modified-live and killed multivalent viral vaccine in regularly vaccinated, fresh dairy cows. Vet Ther 2000;1(1):49–58. 1 2

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 42 Always read and follow label instructions. Triangle and Pyramid are registered trademarks of Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. ©2015 Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. BIVI/TRIA/151006

VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


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Wed & Thurs, March 2 - 3, 2016 Winnemucca Cow Dog Trial Friday, March 4, 2016 Stock Horse Challenge & Horse Sale Preview Saturday, March 5, 2016 Ranch Hand Rodeo & Wild Horse Racing Ranch, Rope & Performance Horse Sale Sunday, March 6, 2016 Ranch Hand Rodeo & Wild Horse Racing

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L Y M A N L I V E S T O C K C AT T L E M E N T O C AT T L E M E N B U LL S A LE • S AT U R DAY • F E B RUA RY 2 7 • 1 P M • • P RO D U C E R ’ S L I V E S TO C K M A R K E T • S A L I NA , U T •

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background & insight from state veterinarian By Barry Pittman, DVM, State Veterinarian, Utah Department of Agriculture and Food

O

n Oct. 5, 2015, I began my tenure with the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food to serve as the Utah State Veterinarian, a position that has been vacant for months. I am serious, without cliché, when I say this is the best job I have ever had! It’s as if all my past education, training and job experience has occurred to prepare me for this position. Commissioner LuAnn Adams shares many like philosophies, principles, and progressive ideas which makes it very easy to work for her and represent the department. We also share an interest in geospatial information systems and their use in advancing agriculture. Her primary emphasis in “riding for the brand” is to always do the right thing and if something isn’t working, fix it. She has a strong belief in following laws, statutes, codes, and directives, but also listening to constituents’ questions and concerns. If it is decided something needs to be changed, we investigate the process and initiate procedures for the change when needed. It has been a great first few months working in the Animal Industry Division. I grew up in the beautiful and farm rich Shenandoah Valley in Virginia in the middle of apple orchards and Guernsey and Jersey dairy farms. My great-grandmother had a farm and my grandparents and parents raised and canned garden vegetables, fruits and other farm products that have influenced my family today to do the same here in Utah. I spent almost 29 years in the military, first in the U.S. Air Force and then the majority of the time in the U. S Army; the last 13 of those years as a veterinarian. I have been to 23 countries, mostly through military deployments. I served as the Director of the Emergency Programs Division for the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services after my military retirement. I also worked for the United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service/Veterinary Services (USDA APHIS

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VS) as well as the Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS). My master’s degree in Public Health was centered on food safety. The demographics and urban/rural interface concerning agriculture in Utah is unique and challenging. I have a passion for bicycling to decompress and exercise and almost daily I ride past examples of this interface. I live in Farr West and I see such diversity as small feeding operations surrounded by housing developments, small and midsize dairies located on busy roads sided by neighborhoods, and grazing pasture located adjacent to golf courses. One of the future concerns I see is to ensure we are educating our citizens concerning the importance of sustaining agriculture as our major economic base and discussing the need to coexist with expanding urban development. I also see a great need to educate our youth and keep them closely connected with what occurs at the farm and ranch as it relates to end of chain retail food purchases, otherwise coined as the “farm to table continuum.” Specifically related to the cattle industry, rapidly identifying diseases and performing animal disease traceability are extremely important to ensure continuity of business operations in the industry if and when there are outbreaks. For example, in 2015, vesicular stomatitis, a disease that causes similar clinical signs as foot and mouth disease, was more widespread than normally seen across multiple states, including Utah. This disease in cattle must always be treated as a foreign animal disease and biosecurity precautions exercised until laboratory samples are evaluated and confirmed. Two other diseases of concern in Utah as well as surrounding designated surveillance area (DSA) states of Idaho, Montana and Wyoming are brucellosis and tuberculosis. Since these diseases are endemic in certain wildlife populations (elk and bison, particularly) we must be vigilant in our calfhood vaccination program for brucellosis and our surveillance testing for tuberculosis.

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This is especially important considering elk follow certain migratory routes and cattle graze a multitude of BLM, other federal, state and private owned pasture lands. We have robust import/export programs in place as well as a great brand inspection program that enhances our ability to identify animals and their potential for disease spread. Working relationships are very important to provide needed synergy to our efforts to promote and protect animal health. I want to continue and possibly expand our current great relationships with USDA APHIS VS, USDA FSIS, Utah State University (Veterinary Science and Extension Services), Utah Veterinary Medical Association and especially with our animal industry focused state and national associations, councils, and stakeholders. I want to take this opportunity to thank these partners for their continued and awesome support. I would be remiss if I did not mention and give special recognition to the accredited veterinarians we have across the State and their diligence in recognizing, treating, and reporting diseases on a daily basis. I would also like to extend the same thanks and recognition to the livestock auction markets owners and personnel that operate weekly to facilitate the flow of healthy livestock. I am proud and humbled to represent Utah Department of Agriculture and Food in the great State of Utah.

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PAP tested by Dr. Tim Holt at 7,680 feet Tested Negative for Trich and BVD-PI Ultrasound Carcass Results available Sale Day Guaranteed for Fertility, Structure and Disposition Videos and photos available online prior to the sale

The FACTS about PAP at T-Heart • • •

We develop and PAP test our bulls at 7,680 feet. We PAP test our bulls twice, once at weaning and once at yearling, to ensure the best accuracy. If they pass twice in our elevation and environment, we feel more confident they will work for you. We are dedicated to being your trusted supplier for high altitude bulls.

Sire Groups Include:

HOOK’S XAVIER 14X • GW-WBF SUBSTANCE 820Y HOOK’S YELLOWSTONE 97Y • GIBBS 0689X CRIMSON TIDE

MARCH 26, 2016

HIGH ALTITUDE BULL SALE 1:00 PM (MT) • JOIN US AT THE RANCH IN LAGARITA, CO Shane & Beth Temple

T-HEART RANCH and L-CROSS RANCH Marty Ropp 406-581-7835 Garrett Thomas 936-714-4591 Clint Berry 417-844-1009 www.alliedgeneticresources.com

719-850-3082 • 719-850-3083 shane@t-heartranch.com Justin Warren 970-367-0035

www.t-heartranch.com

T-HEART RANCH HIGH ALTITUDE FEMALE SALE

48

FIRST WEEK OF DECEMBER • 1,000+ SIMMENTAL/SIMANGUS™ FEMALES

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


www.ipsencattle.com

3rd Annual

Internet BULL

SALE

• Angu s • Hereford • march 1, 2016 • 7 PM CLOSE OUT

LOT 2 - ICC ABOUT TIME 104B

LOT 7 - ICC HEADLINER 83B

LOT 13 - ICC REGIS 105B

(bw)+1.8 (ww)+50 (yw)+79 (m)+25 ($chb)+28

(bw)+2.6 (ww)+64 (yw)+113 (m)+23 ($b)+129.58

(bw)-0.1 (ww)+50 (yw)+82 (m)+18 ($b)+105.99

Extreme balance, eye appeal, and low bw!

Powerful, correct, stylish, and quiet!

Mass, depth, dimensions, and easy doing!

LOT 8 - ICC HEADLINER 95B

LOT 32 - ICC 119Z FINKS PRIDE 904 134

LOT 3 - ICC ABOUT TIME 627B

(bw)+5.9 (ww)+58 (yw)+90 (m)+31 ($chb)+30

(bw)+2.4 (ww)+52 (yw)+104 (m)+22 ($b)+115.23

A maternal brother to last year’s high selling Hereford bull!

Free-moving, long, and performance made!

(bw)+0.7 (ww)+51 (yw)+86 (m)+23 She sells AI bred 11/11/15 to Connealy Comrade 1835

Contact us for a sale catalog! 208-681-4794

An example of the quality females that sell!

A U C T I O N D E TA I L S

• Pictures and Videos will be available for viewing after Feb 15 • • Bulls are available to view at the ranch anytime • • Auction Format - open bidding from 7 am to 7 pm followed by a horse-race style finish • • All bulls will be semen and trich tested, and evaluated for soundness • • 100% SATISFACTION GUARANTEED •

go to www.IPSENC ATTLE.com for more details! angus • hereford

ICC

Ipsen Cattle Co.

Mark and Becky Ipsen | 4368 Dingle Rd | Dingle, ID | 83233 (208) 681-4794 | (208) 681-4793 | IPSENCAT TLECOMPANY @ YAHOO . COM | WWW . IPSENCAT TLE . COM


THE GROWING COWHERD by Justin Sexton, Certified Angus Beef Director of Supply Development

W

e’ve seen a declining inventory of beef cows since the 1970s, with a couple of partial recoveries. Now that a fairly steady 20-year decline hit bottom a year ago, we have to wonder how many cows our market and resources can sustain. CattleFax estimates the beef cow inventory grew from around 29 million at the start of 2014 to 30.7 million head as 2015 came to a close. Depending on consumer responses and producers’ ability to satisfy the growing demand for higher quality, some economists suggest the U.S. could support 33 million cows or more by the end of this decade. It remains to be seen how steady the expansion can be in the face of a nearly 30 percent decline in calf prices that could discourage producers from retaining as many replacement heifers. Those are big-picture concerns, and “big” is a word to examine in the smaller picture of individual cow size as well. Any talk about how big our cowherd can be must include how big our cows have become and why. As the cow inventory began to decline 40 years ago, carcass weight began a steady increase to nearly 300 pounds heavier now. Sometimes that increase was only 5 pounds a year, but sometimes, like last year, it was extreme. The 930-pound average steer weights seen in October were 30 pounds higher than the previous fall. The heavier carcass weights came from a favorable cost of gain and – for a long time – higher cattle prices. Carcass weights are leveling off but history suggests they will merely fall back to the lower average increase.

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

A 40-year trend that rewarded more pounds per animal certainly had an impact on the size of cows on farms and ranches. Feedyard demand for calves with the growth potential to hit heavier finished targets boosted demand for bulls with more growth genetics. Some producers are left with much larger cows and questions about whether they fit the ranch environment Matching the cow to the environment is a complex issue because no two are the same. Some say there are massive regions with similar enough environments for an “average cow.” I will grant that for the biological environment, but management and economics are very different, not only across state lines but across the road. How each rancher selects, culls, manages and markets their cowherd over time is a critical component of the environment. Matching cows to all those resources first requires a set of goals. To paraphrase Dirty Harry, a cow-calf producer has got to know their limitations. To begin making selection progress, you must determine what you can change, what you will not change and what you cannot change. Then design a program around those limitations. Marketing is one of the greatest operational limits because that’s where you have the least experience, and no individual can do much to change market demand. Therefore, make sure you are producing what the market demands: cattle with the genetics to gain and grade. The most common management limitation is calving difficulty in heifers. The typical shortage of labor means a

cow only fits her environment if she calves unassisted. When there is no surviving calf, its market suitability becomes less important. Many ranchers are willing to modify environment to help cows adapt nutritionally. Strategic supplementation or improved grazing systems can help cows express their genetic potential. An alternative is efficiency selection, using expected progeny differences (EPDs) based on residual gain or a weighted index such as the $EN from the American Angus Association. Simply reducing mature size may improve efficiency when comparing weaned calf weight per unit of cow weight, but forage consumed is not directly related to body mass. Residual feed intake testing has shown efficiency is not determined by size alone. The “growing” cowherd will continue to change the market, and how ranchers manage their operations. As this new year begins, spend time considering the opportunities and limitations in your operation that lead to better matching cows to your management, marketing and nutritional environments.

VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


THE CHOICE IS SIMPLE. Three reasons to use Angus now for long-term profitability.

1 2

3

Angus calves bring more premiums.

In the good times and bad, Angus-sired calves consistently outperform the competition. The 16-year “Here’s the Premium” study from Certified Angus Beef (CAB) shows Angus calves fetch higher prices than calves of any other breed. In fact, 2014 data show Angus calves brought a combined average of nearly $7 per cwt. more than all other calves of similar size and condition.

BREED

BW*

YW* MARB*

Angus

1.7

88

0.54

Hereford

6.0

50

-0.25

Red Angus

2.2

56

0.12

Simmental

5.6

82

-0.26

*Average 2013-born bull, adj. to Angus base, U.S. Meat Animal Research Center Across-breed EPD Adjustments, BIF 2015.

Angus offers lower birth weight, more growth and marbling.

No other breed offers a better balance of the traits you need to stay profitable. Compared to Hereford, Red Angus, Simmental and others, Angus bulls offer significantly lower birth weight, equal or greater yearling weight and substantially higher marbling.* And all registered Angus are backed by the industry’s most reliable genetic evaluation service. Quality is the pathway to growing beef demand.

Packers surveyed in 2013 reported paying nearly $50 million in premiums for cattle earning the Certified Angus Beef ® (CAB®) brand, and consumers continue to demand quality. In fact, during the 20082009 economic downturn, CAB® consumer demand continued recordsetting growth — proof that Angus genetics capture attention at all levels of the beef production chain, even when times get tough.

3201 Frederick Ave. • St. Joseph, MO • 64506 www.ANGUS.org To subscribe to the Angus Journal®, call 816.383.5200. Watch The Angus Report at 7:30 a.m. CST every Monday on RFD-TV.

ANGUS MEANS BUSINESS. www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

© 2015-2016 American Angus Association®

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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wher e Fullmer Crescent genetics can take Y O U !

There is

NO LIMIT

Moon

S ELLING 50 B ULLS BY P RIVATE T REATY A VAILABLE N OW ! Strong selection of low birthweigth and performance Angus Bulls!

Fully guaranteed • Sound • Functional We stand behind our product!

C ALL T ODAY • 435-231-2721

Connealy Capitalist 028 • AAA 16752262

Hoover Dam • AAA 16124994

ced (+10) bw (-.2) ww (+64) yw (+110) m (+15) $b (+104.72)

ced (+8) bw (-0.3) ww (+49) yw (+96) m (+27) $b (+132.72)

EF Complement 8088 • AAA 16198796

DR Sierra Cut 7404 • AAA +16047469

One of the most popular bulls in the breed for low birth weights, added shape, and eye appeal! Sons available!

ced (+13) bw (-0.1) ww (+63) yw (+117) m (+27) $b (129.68)

A proven low-birth weight sire with exceptional growth numbers! Several sons selling this spring!

A proven producer of functional udders, proven fertility, and docility. We have several sons available!

bw (+1.4) ww (+64) yw (+121) m (+25) $b (+119.31)

Retail Product’s best son whose producing perfect uddered females. Several sons and daughters for sale!

We’ve held a strong AI program since our beginning when we purchased our first cows from Sitz Angus in 1990. We feel that the female is the most important part of the bull, so we are stringent on our females. They’ve got to be sound, good uddered, efficient, and moderate framed is they want to last with us. We are proud of what we’ve built and would love to show them to you!

Located 10 miles south of Producers Livestock Auction!

PO Box 570130 Sigurd, UT 84657 (435) 231-2721 Chace (435) 231-2719


& 35th Annual Bull and Female Sale Monday, March 14th, 2016

at Spring Cove Ranch, Bliss, Idaho Spring Cove Ranch Angus since 1919

1:00 pm MDT

Selling 160 Angus Bulls & 75 Angus heifers 55 Hereford bulls & 20 Hereford Heifers 10 Red Angus bulls & Heifers

Selling Sons and Daughters sired by these breeding leading sires :

Selling sons of Basin Payweight 1682

Featuring sons of Basin Excitement

Selling 5 ET brothers out of the dam of CCA Emblazon 702 CED+11 BEPD+.1 WEPD+70 YEPD+118 MEPD+26 CW+65 Marb+.91 Rib+.62 SC+1.14 $W+77.99 $F+86.85 CED+11 BEPD-.1 WEPD+73 YEPD+129 MEPD+19 SC+.71 CW+44 Marb+.36 Rib+.58 $W+71.63 $F+97.83 $B+131.19 $B+182.37 Low birth with $W top 3% & $B top 1%

Selling sons of C Gohr 9158 About Time 1101 Selling the

1st

progeny of Sackmann Chief 325

Reg #17551876 Sire: S Chisum 6175 CED+5 BEPD +1.6 WEPD+66 YEPD+114 MEPD+21 SC +.14 CW+43 Marb+.48 Rib+.55 $W+74.03 $F+69.73 $B+127.39 Outcross performance genetics & $W top 5%

CED+0.3 BW+2.0 WW+51 YW+79 M+27 Milk & Growth +53 SC+.7 RIB+.59 MARB+.05 CHB+$25

Selling sons of Sitz Longevity 556Z

CED+5 BEPD-.3 WEPD+63 YEPD+115 MEPD+29 CW+20 Marb+.57 Rib+.37 SC+1.24 $W+76.72 $F+78.43 $B+77.46 Calving Ease with excellent phenotype & $W top 4% Commercial discounts on semen available

Selling sons, daughters of CCA Emblazon 702 CED+15 BEPD-1.0 WEPD+56 YEPD+100 MEPD+21 CW+36 Marb+.55 Rib+.54 SC+.58 $ W+62.07 $F+59.92 $B+124.33 Calving ease built to function in western range conditions.

JBB/AL Herefords

Spring Cove Ranch

Art and Stacy Butler 269 Spring Cove Rd Bliss, Idaho 83314 208-352-4332 www.springcoveranch.com info@springcoveranch.com

Find us on Facebook www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

James & Dawn Anderson 208-280-1505 Bev Bryan 208-934-5378 1998 S 1500 E Gooding, Idaho 83330 jbbalherefords@hotmail.com

Selling progeny of /S THOR 2809Z

CED+3.1 BW+1.5 WW+50 YW+88 Milk & Growth +43 SC+2.2 Rib +.84 MARB+.19 CHB+$30

For Sale Catalogs call: 208-352-4332

Find us on Facebook

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

53


MEAT STILL ON THE MENU A WIN FOR U.S. BEEF PRODUCERS

The 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, released Jan. 7, by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, reaffirm the role of lean beef in a healthy diet and confirm that Americans are, on average, consuming lean meat in daily amounts that are consistent with the recommendations for protein foods. National Cattlemen’s Beef Association President Philip Ellis commended HHS Secretary Sylvia Burwell and USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack for ensuring the final recommendations were based on the latest nutrition evidence available. Dr. Richard Thorpe, a physician and Texas cattle producer, agreed, saying he is pleased the guidelines recognize all the strong science that supports the many Americans who are looking to build a healthful diet with lean beef. “As a physician, I appreciate the Secretaries making sure the dietary guidelines are based on the latest nutrition science,” said Thorpe.

“Numerous studies have shown positive benefits of lean beef in the diet, and I commonly encourage my patients to include beef in their diet to help them maintain a healthy weight and get the nutrients they need to be physically active. Lean beef is a wholesome, nutrient-rich food that helps us get back to the basics of healthy eating, providing many essential nutrients such as zinc, iron, protein and B vitamins, with fewer calories than many plantbased sources of protein.” Updated every five years, this report serves as the foundation for federal nutrition policy and shapes the recommendations found on USDA’s MyPlate. While there is no one-sizefits-all diet, Dr. Thorpe said consumers can feel confident about putting lean beef on their plate knowing the Dietary Guidelines recommend Americans choose lean meat. Thirty-eight cuts of beef now meet government guidelines for lean, including some of America’s favorite cuts like sirloin steak and 95 percent lean ground beef. “Over the last decade or so, a

significant amount of research shows that many people can lose and maintain a healthy weight, support a healthy metabolism and age more vibrantly when they consume more highquality protein, within calorie goals,” said Thorpe. “As a physician, I see an opportunity to improve the health of Americans in all age categories by choosing nutrient rich protein foods, like lean beef, more often and by pairing them with more vegetables, fruits and whole grains.” Ellis, a Wyoming rancher, noted the changes in today’s retail meat case and said cattlemen and women provide a healthful product consumers demand. “U.S. cattle producers work each and every day to provide safe, wholesome and nutritious beef for consumers around the world,” said Ellis. “Since the first Dietary Guidelines were released in 1980, external fat on beef has decreased 81 percent and 65 percent of the most popular beef cuts sold at retail are lean, a prime example of beef producers responding to consumers’ nutritional preferences.”

THE BEEF CHECKOFF’S ROLE IN THE DIETARY GUIDELINES PROCESS Leading up to the release of the guidelines, the Beef Checkoff submitted published scientific evidence on the role of beef in human health, for the participating agencies involved in approving the guidelines to consider as they developed the DGA. The Checkoff submitted 12 sets of comments as part of the public comment process and oral testimony to provide the DGAC with the latest peer-reviewed research on beef ’s role in health. Throughout the process, the Beef Checkoff also reached out to numerous leading nutrition experts to keep them informed about the science that supports beef ’s role in a healthy diet and provide them with resources to help people build healthy diets with beef and meet the goals of the current DGA. 54

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


Mark Holt AHA Western Region Manager 2300 Bishop Rd. Emmett, ID 83617 208-369-7425 mholt@hereford.org

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

55


SNAKE RIVER BULL TEST LLC

ALL BREEDS BULL TEST SALE FOR FALL AND SPRING BULLS

Testing for Growth, Maternal and Carcass Plus a Select Group of Replacement Heifers

3rd Annual Sale

Friday, March 4, 2016 Jerome Co. Fairgrounds • Jerome, Idaho 1 p.m. MST

Selling 120 Bulls

Jason Anderson

208-420-7352 jason@snakeriverbulltest.com 56

Ben Eborn

208-399-2350 ben@snakeriverbulltest.com

www.snakeriverbulltest.com

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


T HE H EREFORD

U TAH A SSOCIATION

4 5 TH A N N UA L BULL SALE 3 0 B ULLS • 15 F EMALES M ARCH 5 • 1

PM

• P RODUCER’ S L IVESTOCK • S ALINA, U T

Selling 45 Head from these Progressive Hereford Breeders L OWELL

P HILL A LLEN AND S ON, A NTIMONY • D ICK J ONES, O RANGEVILLE P ETERSON, E DEN • L AMOND S MITH, F ERRON • D AN T AYLOR, G ENOLA SIRED BY THESE BULLS

NJW 73S W 1 8 H O M ETO W N 1 0 Y E T

NJ W 7 3 S M 3 2 6 T R U ST 100W ET

CRR 719 CATA P U LT 109

TH 122 71I V ICTOR 71 9 T

PLUS MORE BREED-LEADING SIRES!

Come enjoy a great afternoon hosted by the Utah Hereford Association! Call Shannon Allen at 435-624-3285

F OR M ORE I NFORMATION , C ONTACT :

U TAH H EREFORD A SSOCIATION

P RESIDENT • S HANNON A LLEN - 435-624-3285


MAKING THE MOST OF MINERAL IN 2016

C

from Purina Animal Nutrition

attle nutrient requirements can vary by season and stage of production – and now is a great time to evaluate your mineral program and map out a plan to maximize impact in the new year. “Minerals are a relatively small portion of the diet, but they control many vital functions in cattle,” says Kent Tjardes, Ph.D., cattle consultant for Purina Animal Nutrition. “They impact everything from cattle reproductive and nervous systems, to feed efficiency and overall herd health. That’s why it’s so important to make sure the mineral needs of your cattle are being met year-round.” Producers should consider these three steps to develop a solid mineral strategy for the new year. ANALYZE ANNUAL MINERAL NEEDS Mineral needs throughout the year can be impacted by a variety of factors, including cattle production stage and ration nutrient composition. Start your 2016 plan by considering how these factors change in your herd during the year. Production stages such as gestation, calving, weaning and breeding are especially important. “During gestation and calving it’s critical to have a good mineral to get cattle through that stress period,” says Tjardes. “Cows that are mineral deficient can create a calf that is deficient at birth, which can result in ‘weak calf syndrome,’ loss of vigor or scours.” At weaning, calves need an onboard reserve of minerals in their system as stress is often elevated and feed consumption may decrease temporarily. Bulls have special needs during breeding season – zinc, manganese and Vitamin E help to ensure sperm quality and vitality.Producers should also consider the overall nutrient composition and seasonality of their feedstuffs. For instance, areas with high growth, cool season grasses commonly have a need for higher magnesium in the spring to prevent milk fever or grass tetany. CHOOSE AN OPTIMAL MINERAL SOURCE “Don’t let the mineral label completely drive your decision making,” says Tjardes. “More is not necessarily better, and it’s important to identify the source of the mineral, not just the concentration.” Tjardes recommends producers work with a nutrition consultant or Extension personnel to identify the levels of macro and micro nutrients needed in their herd and compare those nutrients to the amounts available in their rations or forage. Mineral product labels will list concentrations of each nutrient, so calculate anticipated intake and choose a mineral

58

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

that sufficiently supplies lacking nutrients. Not all sources of minerals are utilized equally. “Oxides are virtually unavailable to the animal – forms like chlorides and sulfates are better, and organics or chelates are usually the best,” says Tjardes. “Most oxide formulations are less expensive for manufacturers to include in a product, but they simply aren’t going to have the impact.” Finally, consider expected seasonality when choosing a mineral source. During snowy or rainy seasons, water-resistant and weatherized products can provide protection from mineral caking or from wind blowing it away. MAKE THE MOST OF MINERAL CONSUMPTION While planning and choosing a quality mineral source are key, it takes proper management to have

an effective mineral program. First and foremost, producers should be tracking mineral consumption to make sure the cattle are getting the minerals that have been put out. To calculate consumption, producers should follow this simple formula: (Pounds of mineral distributed ÷ Number of cows) / Number of days mineral was available Producers can encourage or discourage consumption by placing mineral feeders near or away from water sources, and in areas with ample room for access and rotation. “Cows can’t tell if they do or don’t need mineral,” says Tjardes. “But, they do seek out phosphorus and salt, which can offer management tactics.” Salt can be used as a limiting factor, or if the cows are salt deficient, as a driver of intake. “Overconsumption of mineral should be regulated,” says Tjardes. “Although it is likely not dangerous, it can be costly.” A well-planned mineral program means considering a variety of factors from cattle needs and nutrients, to mineral sources and management strategies -- that planning can pay off in the long-run, says Tjardes. “You might not see changes overnight, but the return on this investment can be long-term,” says Tjardes. “More cows bred back, less calf health challenges and any number of factors could result from a well thought out mineral strategy. Planning a strategy now can pay-off later on.” For information on Purina Cattle Products in Utah or general cattle nutrition questions, please contact Yvette Connely at (435) 640-8827 or yconnely@landolakes.com. VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


10,00 0 F EE T! We raise our cattle like commercial cattle! We expect our cattle to survive the rigid conditions year-round with minimal inputs. As soon as our permit is ready, the pairs are taken to 10,000 feet to summer! If they can’t survive there, we don’t expect them to survive anywhere! Call today for more information! SE L L I NG 50 LOVE L E S S B U L L S ALO NG W I TH BU L L S FR OM SO RE NSE N ANG U S A N D CI RCL E 4 SI M M E N TA L S ! M ARCH 11, 2016 • 6 : 0 0 P M SPANI SH F O RK FAI RGR OU N D S SPANI SH F O RK, UTA H

KC F BENN E TT Y6 BA LA N C E R

KCF BE NNE TT ABSO LU TE AN GUS

D LW I ND U STRY 3 0 1 X BAL AN CE R

PLUS CT R G OO D N I GH T 7 1 5 T ( B A L A N C E R) • W T R L AZ Y T V WATCH MAN W021 ( BAL AN CE R) E G L LO C K A N D LOA D 4 1 5 X ( B A LAN CE R) • CT R S AN D H IL L S 0065X ( BAL AN CE R)

Jeff a n d Ta m a ra Lo v e le ss 8 7 8 8 Sou th D i xo n Rd S p a n i sh Fo rk, U T 84660 Jeff • 8 01.623.8308 Ta ma ra • 801.623.8309 OLRa n ch @a o l.co m Fi n d u s on Fa cebook • Lo v e le ss G e lb v i e h

59


BOEHRINGER INGELHEIM & SANOFI’S MERIAL MAKE BUSINES SWAP Sanofi and Boehringer Ingelheim announced in mid-December that the companies have entered into exclusive negotiations to swap businesses. The proposed transaction would consist of an exchange of Sanofi animal health business (“Merial”) with Boehringer Ingelheim consumer healthcare (CHC). Boehringer Ingelheim CHC business in China would be excluded from the transaction. The transaction would also include a gross cash payment from Boehringer Ingelheim to Sanofi. The transaction would allow Sanofi to become the No. 1-ranked player in CHC and a global market share close to 4.6 percent. Sales of Boehringer Ingelheim CHC business (excluding China) is highly complementary with that of Sanofi CHC, both in terms of products and geographies. Boehringer Ingelheim CHC would improve the position of Sanofi in Germany and Japan where Sanofi CHC presence is limited, and expand Sanofi presence in its Priority Categories. Sanofi

would gain access to iconic brands in Antispasmodics, Gastrointestinal, VMS and Analgesics, and attain critical mass in Cough & Cold. Sanofi CHC business in the U.S., Europe, Latin America and Eurasia would also expand significantly, giving it multiple leadership postions in key countries and/or on key product categories. The animal health industry is a very attractive industry in terms of innovation, growth potential and profitability. Combining Merial’s and Boehringer Ingelheim’s complementary strengths would create the second largest player in the global animal health market with the ability to compete for global market leadership. The combined portfolios and technology platforms in anti-parasitics, vaccines and pharmaceutical specialities would place the combined company in the key growth segments of the industry. The species portfolios are highly complementary building on Merial’s expertise in companion animals and

get serious with accuration ® block PART OF PURINA’S SUSTAINED® NUTRITION PROGRAM

poultry and BI’s expertise in swine. “In entering into exclusive negotiations with Boehringer Ingelheim, we have acted swiftly to meet one of the key strategic objectives of our roadmap 2020, namely to build competitive positions in areas where we can achieve leadership,” said Sanofit Chief Executive Officer Oliver Brandicourt, MD. While the exchange would benefit the human health portfolios of both companies, the animal health implications are also significant, according to Boehringer Ingelheim Board Chairman Andreas Barner, Ph.D. The execution of definitive agreements is expected in the coming months following consultations with the relevant social bodies. Boehringer Ingelheim and Sanofi’s goal currently is to close the potential transaction in the fourth quarter of 2016, subject to appropriate regulatory approvals.

New Accuration® Block from Purina Animal Nutrition takes the games and guess-work out of beef cow nutrition supplementation. Accuration® Block includes Purina’s Intake Modifying Technology®, allowing cows to consume the nutrients they require, when they need them, while providing a balanced supplement. A part of the Sustained® Nutrition program, the Accuration® Block helps keep cows at an optimal BCS all year-round, for their best performance.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________ ACCURATION® BLOCK IS AVAILABLE IN 200LB BLOCK, 500LB BLOCK AND 200LB TUB FORM.

Contact your local Purina Animal Nutrition representative to learn more about incorporating Accuration® Block into your feeding program.

CATTLENUTRITION.COM | (800) 227-8941

Accuration, Building Better Cattle, Sustained Nutrition, IM Technology and Intake Modifying Technology are registered trademarks of Purina Animal Nutrition LLC.

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


Bar T Bar Ranches

Annual Bull Sale

Live Auction Crater Ranch Headquarters

A PRIL 9 , 2016 TH

Winslow Arizona

Guaranteed Sight-Unseen Purchases PAP Testing Available upon request Bull Warranty Program Free Delivery

Genetics that Matter!

By selecting for Feed Efficientcy, Maternal Efficiency, and Fertility; These bulls will sire calves that will eat less, produce more live calves, and more pounds of calves off the same resource.

175 Bulls Average EPDs: • Top 10% for Residual Feed Intake

• Top 15% for Dry Matter Intake and Marbling • Top 20% for Pregnancy after 1st Calf • Top 20% Efficiency Profit Index

Growsafe System at Crater Ranch, W Winslow, AZ.

• Top 30% for Average Daily Gain & $ Cow Efficiency • Bo and Judy Prosser Bob P.PO O. Box 190 P.O. W in Winslow, AZ 86047 9928-289-2619 28 C el 928-380-5149 Cell: EE-Mail: -M info@bartbar.com www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

70 Bulls are extreme calving ease bulls.

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

61

100 1 00 B Balancer allancer B Bulls ulls • 40 Southern Balancer Bulls • and 35 Angus Bulls


PRESIDENT VETOES WOTUS DECISION DESPITE PASSAGE BY BOTH HOUSES OF CONGRESS On Jan. 20, despite bi-partisan passage in both chambers of Congress, President Obama vetoed Senate Joint Resolution 22, disapproval of the EPA’s “waters of the United States” rule. National Cattlemen’s Beef Association President Philip Ellis said this is a clear indication the president does not understand the role America’s cattle producers, land owners and state governments play in preserving our natural resources. “We are extremely disappointed the president chose to side with the EPA, which has pulled out all the stops and shown an appalling disregard for the law throughout this rulemaking process,” said Ellis. “In siding with the EPA, the president has ignored the will of Congress, including members of his own party. Moreover, he has taken side against the 32 states, and countless stakeholders who have challenged the WOTUS rule. With Congress clearly showing their disapproval of this rule, the consequences of WOTUS implementation now rest solely with President Obama.” The Senate voted 53-44 on Nov. 4, 2015 and the House voted 253-166 on Jan. 6, in support of the joint resolution. Public Lands Council President Brenda Richards said that while the outcome remains certain, the path is now much longer. “Rather than ditch the rule, the president ignored the tidal wave of opposition to appease the EPA’s radical agenda,” said Richards. “Due to the President’s veto cattle producers, stakeholders, states and ultimately taxpayers are now going to have to spend millions of dollars on litigation to ultimately determine what we already know; the WOTUS rule extends beyond Congressional intent under the Clean Water Act and violates Supreme Court precedent. Once again the regulatory train wreck has landed squarely on America’s rural economy.” NCBA and PLC filed a lawsuit in the Southern District Court in Texas on July 2, 2015. That litigation will continue. While the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals considers jurisdiction, a temporary nationwide stay on implementation of the WOTUS rule remains in effect. “Cattle producers need regulatory certainty,” said Ellis. “While the WOTUS rule remains at the EPA, we will continue to pursue litigation and legislation to bring about that certainty. This is a top priority for our members and today’s action shows that we have only begun our fight.” 62

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

M i ra M a r a

n

g

o g d e n ,

u

u t

s

Offering For Sale

A select group of Females O p e n , B r e d , a n d Pa i r s Many are AI Sired aar TEN X 7008 SA

C a l l To d a y !

(ced) +8 (bw) +.3 (ww) +68 (yw) +129 (m) +22 (mb) +1.29 (re) +.77 ($b) +192.49 Ten X has made his mark on the breed and on our program. We have a powerful set of sons and daughters for sale right now at the ranch!

Striving to produce a superior Angus

• Bulls and Females Currently Available at the Ranch •

• Call Today to Scehdule a Visit • Justin Hogge (801) 450-7747

Karl Oelke (801) 731-5473

Pow e r f u l A n g us

Breeding Angus with power, structure, and doability. Offering PAP tested bulls!

MF Net Return 8197 Traveler 004 x Bando 5175

Look for Lazy A Genetics at: Color Country Bull Sale Cedar City, UT March 5, 2016

Utah Angus Sale Ogden, U T April 2, 2016

Rocky Mtn. Angus Sale Duff Hobart 8302

Duff New Edition x OCC Freestyle

Soo Line Motive 9016 HF Kodiak x Rainmaker

V i s i t o rs A l w a y s W e l c o m e ! C a ll T o d a y !

Ogden, U T November 12, 2016

A

LA Z Y ANGUS

The Aiken Family Rusty, Kim, Jason and Duke Daniel and Lucy PO Box 1684 Cedar City, UT 84721 (435) 463-9344

VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


th 44 ual Ann

Utah Beef I mprovement Association

Performance Bull Test

e l a S

View the Bull Videos t wo weeks prior to sale at

liveauctions.tv Also at

ubiabulls.com Enjoy

Free Lunch Sponsored by

March 19, 2016 - 1:00 p.m. Producers Livestock Market - Salina, UT Sale Preview at 10:00 a.m.

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Bid online at liveauctions.tv www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Free Delivery up to 300 miles Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

63


THE AI SIRES

C ONNEALY C OMBINATION 0188

C ONNEALY C OUNSELOR

AAR T EN X 7008 SA

KCF B ENNETT A BSOLUTE

EXAR U PSHOT 0562B

S ITZ U PWARD 307R

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g SNAKE S NA KE RIVER llin ls e l S Bu 15 BULL TEST

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PM

g llin Se ulls B 20

LLC

• J EROME , ID

M ARCH 19 • 1

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• S ALINA , UT

Br o th e r s t o t he 2 0 15 S n ak e Ri v e r B ul l Te st H i g h I nde x i ng L ow B W A ngus b u l l s el l ! The

2

• Our Program •

nd Largest Angus Seedstock Herd in Utah

By using the top AI sires, we actively breed the best Angus cattle we can. We take a balanced approach with EPDs coupled with a strong phenotype. We strictly cull, always trying to improve our herd. We run our cattle at high elevations and PAP a majority of the cattle. By doing all this, we know we can back our cattle with a 100% satisfaction guarantee. - Paul McPherson

64

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

P AUL M C P H E R SO N F A M I LY 885 W 200 S • Ne phi, UT 84648 ce ll (801) 362-7150 McPhe rs on Farms @ ms n . com VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


The Best Bulls are Backed with Solid Genetics! Building the best Source for Hereford and Angus Genetics in Utah.

Bulls available by these breed-leading donors and sires!

TC Barbara 6045 • Several powerful flushmate sons by Connealy Earnan 076E are available! We are expecting several calves by Barstow Cash!

Barstow Cash

NJW 73S W18 Hometown 10Y et

Selling Bulls At

ML 122L Investor Gal A11 • We are very excited to have two matings by this very powerful and broody girl by Remitall Online mated to Hometown and Professor!

KCL 122L Bonissa 65K 66P • Longevity at its finest, we have sons and daughters available. Sired by Thriller and KCL The Professor!

HAVE METICULOUSLY LOOKED FOR

DONORS THAT HAVE EVERYTHING A CATTLEMAN NEEDS .

KCL WPF The Professor 7110 et

Star KKH Okaboji 151U • One of the most gorgeous Hereford cows in the breed. Perfect uddered! Sons and daughters by Hometown 10Y available now!

(dam of A11)

WE

Connealy Earnan 076E

D ONORS

Genetic Alliance Bull Sale MARCH 5 • NEPHI, UT Utah Beef Improvement Ass’n MARCH 19 • SALINA, UT Private Treaty at the Ranch CALL 435- 823-7752 • ROOSEVELT, UT

NOT

ONLY HAVE TO BE GOOD ON PAPER , BUT THEY HAVE TO ACCOMPLISH

A PROVEN PRODUCTIVE REPRO DUCTION RECORD .

WE

AREN ’ T

CHASING NUMBERS , WE ARE

CHASING THE MOST POWERFUL ,

PRODUCTIVE , EFFICIENT , AND

FERTILE COWS WE CAN .

WE

FEEL THAT IF WE HAVE THE

RIGHT COWS , THE FOUNDATION TO BUILD THE BEST RANGE BULLS FOR OUR ARID ENVIRONMENT AND FOR OUR CUSTOMERS IS ALREADY IN PLACE .

C ALL

TODAY !

The only way to Raise Cattle is the Right Way.

Raise Em’ R ni g ch th R a

*TC Barbara 6045 grazing fall feed at 6,800 ft.

Kelly and Sue Crozier • PO Box 1151 • Roosevelt, UT 84066 (c) 435-823-7752 • kellycrozier@hotmail.com


P O L L E D H E R E F O R D B U L L S WI T H POWER • MATERNAL TRAIT S

OUR BULL SALE CALENDAR!

PERFORMANCE

F ALLON ALL B REEDS B ULL S ALE FA L L O N L I V E S T O C K E XC H A N G E F E B R UA RY 2 0 • FA L L O N , N V

U TA H H E R E F O R D A S S O C I AT I O N B U L L S A L E P R O D U C E R’ S L I V E S T O C K M A R K E T MARCH 5 • SALINA, UT

U TA H B E E F I M P R O V E M E N T A S S O C I AT I O N P R O D U C E R’ S L I V E S T O C K M A R K E T MARCH 19 • SALINA, UT

BASIN ALL-BREEDS B ULL SALE BASIN LIVESTOCK MARKET M A R C H 2 6 • R O O S E V E L T, U T

P R I VA T E T R E A T Y

AT THE

A N T I M O N Y, U T

RANCH

FEATURING THE INFLUENCE OF THESE GREAT SIRES!

NJW

O UR C OMMITMENT

TO

73S W18 HOMETOWN 10Y

Q UALI T Y

We a r e a f a m i l y o p e r a t i o n d e d i c a t e d t o r a i s i n g t o p t i e r P o l l e d H e r e f o r d c a t t l e . We s t r i c t l y c u l l a n d s e l e c t o n l y t o p c a t t l e t o u s e i n o u r p r o g r a m . We a r e c o n fi d e n t t h e s e c a t t l e will work for you. Call us anytime, and we will work our best to help you.

THM

DURANGO 4037

STAR

P HIL ALLEN POLLED

MARKET INDEX 70X ET

AND

S ON

HEREFORDS

P O B o x 1 2 0 0 7 4 | A n t i m o n y, U T 8 4 7 1 2 Phil 435-624-3236 | Shannon 435-624-3285 s j a l l e n @ c o l o r - c o u n t r y. n e t

Steve Smith Angus and Gelbvieh Sel l i ng c urv e - ben di ng b ul l s t h i s sp r i ng with the influence of

C o n n e a l y Consensus 7 2 2 9

Connealy Consensus x Woodhill Admiral 77K (bw) +1.8 (ww) +60 (yw) +103 (m) +24 (sc) +.97 (cw) +36 (mb) +1.05 (re) +.58 ($w) +86.60 ($b) +126.36 The $210,000 Connealy high seller who’s popularity continues to soar! He will make an impact with easy calving, high performing, and easy-keeping progeny!

Look for us at these sales

Fallon All Breeds Bull Sale Fallon Livestock Exchange • Fallon, NV February 20

Perform ance testing b u l l s at a l l t h e m a j o r bull test centers for over t wo decades,

w e ’ v e b ui lt a br eed i n g

WBCIA Bull Test Sale

p r o g r a m a i m e d at

Pingetzer’s Bull and Hfr Center • Shoshoni, WY March 11

higher weaning with

Snyder Livestock Bulls for the 21st Century

let our bulls go to

Synder Livestock Facilities • Yerington, NV March 13

Midland Bull Test Midland Bull Test Center • Columbus, MT April 8

Private Treaty at the Ranch

66

strong conversion. work for you!

S TEVE S MITH

A

NGUS &

GELBVIE

H

9200 W 8570 N • Lehi, U T 84043 (h) 801-768-8388 • (c) 801-368-4510 stevenkaysmith@gmail.com

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

Featuring the influence of

Connealy

Black Granite CONNEALY CONSENSUS 7229

X

SAV BISMARCK 5682

(ced) +13 (bw) +.2 (ww) +62 (yw) +109 (m) +30 (mb) +.60 (rea) +1.17 ($w) +76.03 ($b) +140.04

Selling bulls this spring in the Buchanan Angus Ranch Sale Feb 28 • Klamath Falls, OR & Private Treaty at the Ranch!

WHO WE ARE Our family has deep roots in Southeastern Idaho and we are building that legacy back to its original form! We are taking a systemmatic approach with sound judgement, balanced eye appeal, and functional cattle that will thrive in our rigid conditions. We plan to build a model angus cow backed with performance and maternal traits so we can sell bulls that the commercial man needs. Getting back to basics of good-footed, hearty cows producing soggy calves every year! CALL TODAY • 818-400-4513 JOHN CANNON AND FAMILY 2214 E 800 S PRESTON, ID 83263 818-400-4513 JOHN@CANNONANGUS.COM

VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


lis onbee

A ngus

Watching over genetic selection - F O R YO U Bulls carrying these genetics are available!!

Dam

Dam

PF 7008 Henriette Pride 4528

(ced) +9 (bw) +.9 (ww) +68 (yw) +128 (m) +26 (mb) +.89 (rea) +1.13 ($w) +74.55 ($b) +192.88 A direct daughter of Ten X and the $390,000 full sister to Upward 307R, 643T! She’s got style, balance, and length all in a powerful skeleton!

GAR Bextor 558

Dam

(ced) +10 (bw) -.5 (ww) +50 (yw) +99 (m) +32 (mb) +.82 (rea) +.52 ($w) +57.97 ($b) +178.32 A full sister to GAR Prophet and out of the most powerful daughter of the $370,000 GAR Objective 1885! Progeny are exciting and powerful!

VAR Blackbird 3348

(ced) +1 (bw) +3.4 (ww) +69 (yw) +114 (m) +35 (mb) +1.11 (rea) +.86 ($w) +77.34 ($b) +149.13 Our $70,000 selection of the 2015 Boyd Beef Sale, KY. She’s powerful, easy doing, and out of Blackbird 8809, the multi-million dollar producer for Vintage Angus, CA!

Riverbend Blackcap W1579

Dam

(ced) +7 (bw) +.6 (ww) +50 (yw) +84 (m) +27 (mb) +.61 (rea) +.75 ($w) +61.03 ($b) +105.95 A direct daughter of the breed matron Rita 2811 who’s been the cornerstone of the Riverbend program in Idaho. She’s moderate, stout, and functional!

- E MBRYOS A RE A VAILABLE - C ALL T ODAY F OR O UR M OST C URRENT I NVENTORY ! -

Upcoming Sales

U TAH B EEF I MPROVEMENT A SS ’ N M ARCH 19 • S ALINA , UT C ONSIGNING 10 B ULLS !

P RIVATE T REATY A T T HE R ANCH A VAILABLE A FTER F EBRUARY 1

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

- SIRE LINEUP AAR Ten X 7008 SA • Basin Payweight 1682 VAR Generation 2100 • VAR Discovery 2240 Quaker Hill Rampage • Connealy Capitalist 028 EXAR Denver 2002B • GAR Prophet

L ISONBEE A NGUS J L

2 1 2 S 1 9 3 0 W • Ro o s e ve l t , U T 8 4 0 6 6 (h) 435.722.0668 • (c) 435.724.2318 LisonbeeAngus@yahoo.com Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 67


THE FULL VALUE OF A TRUE PARTNERSHIP

Full Value Beef ™ starts with you and a thorough understanding of why you do what you do and how ® the2013 industry’s challenges affect Program your operation and Your Rumensin Winter Rewards your livelihood. Whether it’s using our data and analytic capabilities to discover insights that are meaningful to your business or delivering solutions through both our innovative new products and the trusted brands producers have depended on for years, it’s all about showing you the full value of a true partnership.

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Contact your local Financial Center or Zions Bank AG GROUP 190 N. Main Street | Spanish Fork, UT 801-798-0684

Elanco, Full Value Beef, Titanium®, Nuplura®, Vira Shield® and the diagonal bar are trademarks owned or licensed by Eli Lilly and Company, its subsidiaries or affiliates. | © 2015 Elanco Animal Health. NCH 34619-1 USBBUMUL01131

GELBVIEH AND BALANCER BULLS FOR SALE

MCCA 524C CORNHUSKER MCCA 516C CAPITOL HILL

100 Gelbvieh and Balancer Bulls Sell

FEBRUARY 26, 2016 JIM’S AUCTION BARN MONTROSE, CO Watch & Bid Online

PUREBRED CED BW WW YW MK TM FPI 11 0.1 69 98 30 68 71.63 HOMO POLLED, DILUTER FREE SIRE: RWG TRACTION 7412

SEMEN AVAILABLE ON THESE EXCITING YOUNG SIRES!

68

25% BALANCER CED BW WW YW MK TM FPI 17 -2.4 64 99 33 63 77.55 HOMO BLACK, HOMO POLLED SIRE: SAV BRILLIANCE 8077

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

DAN & MORGAN McCARTY, DVM PARACHUTE, COLORADO 970-481-5217 www.mccartycattle.com mccartycattle@hotmail.com VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


Sons of These Bulls Sell!

6 T H A N N UA L

BULL AND HEIFER SALE Cole Creek Cedar Ridge

S AT U R DAY , M A RC H 2 6 , 2 016 B OX E L D E R C O U N T Y F A I RG RO U N D S T REMONTON, U T • 1 PM 6 0 B ULLS • 2 0 H EIFERS S I M M E N TA L • A N G U S • S I M A N G U S ®

Bid Live Online at PA P T E S T E D • S E M E N A N D T R I C H T E S T E D F U L LY G UA R A N T E E D

Vin-Mar O’Reilly Factor

FOR A CATALOG OF MORE INFORMATION, CALL OR EMAIL KASEY ROWSER 435-757-4093 • KASEYROWSER@YAHOO.COM

Come be a part of our family and enjoy a free lunch on us! Our sale is a highlight of our year and we’re excited to share it with you! FBF1 Combustible

GCC Lincoln

R&R Genetics consists of three families running cattle operations in Northern Utah. Our cattle run on US Forest permits where they range at elevations reaching 9,500+ feet. Water is scarce and trips of 2-3 miles are common from one watering hole to the next. This is why we have chosen to run Angus and Simmental cattle. Both breeds offer a strong maternal instinct, solid milk flow and reproductive efficiency. This is coupled with great dispositions, strong carcass traits and good feet and legs. Our high elevation cattle bred in the west offer top end genetics at affordable prices. We implement a strong ET program and vast AI protocol. If you are looking for strong Angus, Simmental, and SimAngus® genetics, be sure to look us up March 26, 2016!

R & R

ROWSER & RINDERKNECHT

GENETICS MCM Top Grade 018X www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Double JR Simmentals Rowser Angus & Simmental Rinderknecht Ranch (435) 512-8455 (435) 757-4093 (435) 279-7372 Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

69


IN THE DRIVER’S SEAT Getting to know the men leading the seedstock industy

Being at the helm of the nation’s top beef breed associations is a large responsibility. From working with various boards of directors and allied industry groups to managing a staff and understanding complex genetic science, the spectrum of abilities that must be possessed by chief executive officers and executive vice presidents is never-ending. In the past year, there have been many changes in these leadership roles. As such, cattlemen and women - both commercial and purebred producers alike - may be interested it learning more about the men who are leading a valuable section of the beef business. On page 70 and 72 are biographies and information about just a few of these association executives.

ALLEN MOCZYGEMBA AMERICAN ANGUS ASSOCIATION

Allen Moczygemba, a native of San Antonio, Texas, became the new chief executive officer of the American Angus Association, effective Dec. 1, 2015. Moczygemba serves as the chief executive officer for the American Angus Association and for each of the Association’s subsidiaries: Angus Productions Inc., Certified Angus Beef LLC, Angus Genetics Inc. and the Angus Foundation. He is also responsible for implementing the Association’s long-term strategic objectives and leading a team of more than 200 employees. “Allen not only brings a fresh, strategic vision to our organization, but also a detail-oriented, hands-on approach to leadership that will ensure our resources are focused on continuing to grow demand for Angus genetics and the Certified Angus Beef brand,” said Steve Olson, Association president. Moczygemba possesses nearly three decades of experience in the cattle business, managing business units, overseeing brands and building strategic relationships. He most recently served as vice president of marketing for Advanced Animal Diagnostics, a tech company developing on-farm animal health diagnostic platforms. While serving as beef segment marketing director for Zoetis Animal Health and Pfizer Animal Health, he developed partnerships with organizations such as the American Quarter Horse Association, CattleFax, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association. He managed Progressive Beef, a program of standard operating procedures for the fed cattle sector that includes an independent third-party audit. Moczygemba also was senior vice president for Farm Journal Database Strategies and vice president for Farm Journal Livestock Group, where he was publisher of Beef Today and Dairy Today magazines. “AAA enjoys a long and successful history in developing innovative ways to advance the Angus breed,” Moczygemba said. “I am excited about helping to write the next chapter for the breed and blazing new trails of opportunity for our members.” Moczygemba received his degree in 1987 in agriculture communications from Southwest Texas State University. He and his wife, Venetta, have two sons, Lane and Ross.

70

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

TOM BRINK

RED ANGUS ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA Tom Brink, Brighton, Colo., has been named CEO of the Red Angus Association of America. President Kim Ford made the announcement today at the Association headquarters in Denton. She noted the extensive selection process, the approval of the Board of Directors and is looking forward to the future of the breed and the organization. “This is an invigorating time for the Red Angus breed. Tom brings incredible industry knowledge and experience to our organization, and he also possesses the skills and character, along with innovative and synergistic thinking to propel our breed into a new era,” said Ford. Brink brings a wealth of beef industry experience to the RAAA, previously serving several top organizations including Cattle-Fax, American Gelbvieh Association, J & F Oklahoma Holdings, Inc., (JBS Five Rivers Feeding, LLC) and most recently as the founder and president of Top Dollar Angus. “I am looking forward to the opportunity and the challenge to bring the Red Angus breed to the forefront of the beef industry in this country and beyond,” said Brink. “Red Angus and Red Angus-influenced cattle have much to offer ranchers and cattle feeders in terms of profit-driven traits which result in high-quality, nutritious and wholesome beef for today’s demanding consumer.” The Red Angus breed has the genetics to successfully contribute and excel in all segments of the beef industry, from cow-calf and stocker operations to feedlot and finishing phases of the business. Brink holds three degrees from Kansas State University; a Bachelor’s of animal sciences and industry (1983) and Master’s of Science in animal science and industries (1985), and a Master’s in agricultural economics (1987). He and his wife Mindy have four grown children; Erin (26), Austin (24), and twins Dylan and Coltin (20). VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


GILLESPIE ANGUS S E L L I N G 7 0 B U L L S A N N U A L LY P E R F OR MAN C E | Q U ALITY | CA RCA SS | HIGH M ATE RNA L S T R U C TU R AL C O R R EC TNE SS | V IGOROUS | E FFICIE NT T E S TED FO R PER FO R M A NCE , SE M E N, TRICH, A ND PA P

Bulls Available from these Sires

CONNEALY FINAL PRODUCT

CONNEALY CONFIDENCE 0100

HOOVER DAM

EXAR UPSHOT 0562B

CONNEALY CONSENSUS 7229

CONNEALY COUNSELOR

PLUS

VDAR WIND BREAK 7062 | SITZ NEW DESIGN 458N | HA IMAGE MAKER 0415 | HARB ICON

BY P RI VAT E T REAT Y Conservatively Priced Slowly Developed for Structural Integrity Fully Guaranteed

6 0 BRED HEI F ERS F OR S A L E

We invite you to come take a look! Visitors ALWAYS welcome!

GILLESPIE ANGUS

Celebrating 48 Years!

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

P O Bo x 6 | F ai rvi e w, U T 8 4 6 2 9 | 4 3 5 . 4 6 9 . 1025 Dave Hanse n M i ke C o x Ji m G i l l espie He rdsm an R anc h M anage r Ow ner 435.469.1024 435.469.1025 2 0 8 . 3 7 5 .6229 Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

71


JACK WARD

AMERICAN HEREFORD ASSOCIATION In the summer of 2015, Jack Ward was named Executive Vice President (EVP) of the American Hereford Association (AHA). He has served as AHA’s chief operating officer and director of breed improvement since he joined the AHA team in 2003. In his new role, Jack will lead, direct, manage or support all functions of the Association, including serving as the Association secretary. Reporting directly to the AHA Board, he will develop and recommend policies, plans and programs to effectively meet the needs and challenges of the membership and to enhance the growth and reputation of the Hereford breed and the American Hereford Association. With deep roots in the beef cattle industry, Jack has been involved in the seedstock industry since birth. While growing up in Indiana, he was active in 4-H and FFA showing cattle, sheep and pigs. He earned his associate of science degree from Black Hawk East, Kewanee, Ill., and bachelor’s degree in agriculture economics from Purdue University. Jack’s leadership has created increased interest and participation in the Association’s National Reference Sire Program (NRSP) and testing Hereford genetics in real-world commercial settings. During his tenure AHA has increased the number of commercial cows used in testing young sires from 700 to 2,000. He was also instrumental in AHA’s development of genomicenhanced expected progeny differences (GE-EPDs) and other breed improvement strategies such as the newly released udder EPDs. “As Executive Vice President, I strive to encourage a culture that enhances the skills and expertise of our competent and qualified staff with the direction and guidance of the AHA Board while continually monitoring the needs and interests of our diverse membership,” Jack says. “It is both humbling and an honor to lead an organization that has been such a major part of my life and my life’s work.” Along with his solid background in Association work, he also has real world seedstock experience spending 16 years managing several predominant seedstock operations and most recently was managing partner of Maple Lane Angus. He is recognized throughout the industry for his ability to effectively communicate and educate. He has traveled across the U.S. and overseas to lead educational forums. Jack serves on the Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) board of directors — serving from 2006 to 2010 and was re-elected to the board in 2014. In 2013, BIF honored Jack with its Continuing Service Award for his contributions to BIF past, present and future. He currently serves on the Ultrasound Guidelines Council (UGC), the Scientific Advisory Board for the Feed Efficiency Project and on the beef species advisory board for the National Animal Germplasm Program. A proponent of performance data coupled with phenotypically correct cattle, Jack has judged livestock shows for more than 30 years in the U.S and six foreign countries. Family is also a very important part of his life as well. Jack and his wife, Mary Ann, reside in Plattsburg, Mo., and have two sons — Cameron and Carter. Cameron is a senior at the University of Southern Indiana and Carter is a sophomore at Black Hawk East. Jack and Mary Ann raised both boys involved in agriculture and both have a passion for showing and raising livestock.

72

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

MYRON EDELMAN

AMERICAN GELBVIEH ASSOCIATION Myron Edelman is a native of Kansas and grew up in the agriculture industry. Upon graduating from Kansas State University. He continued down an agriculture path as a high school agriculture education teacher and FFA advisor. Myron’s beef industry career became full-time upon accepting the responsibility as livestock manager of Wagonhound Land & Livestock Co. in Wyoming. That commercial cow-calf and feedyard background directly led to an opportunity to serve on the marketing team at the Red Angus Association of America (RAAA) as the director of value added programs. Myron believes the experience of operating a large commercial ranch that included feedlots combined with providing marketing assistance to ranchers in a breed association setting is the foundation needed to direct the American Gelbvieh Association (AGA) in providing accurate genetic tools and marketing service to the beef industry. “Serving a membership organization is definitely a challenge. The geographical diversity of the cattle operations represented in the AGA coupled with variation of size and scope of operations throughout the country is the premise behind the need for extensive member service and customer programs. However, the AGA has a collective goal of connectivity to the beef industry and providing information and services beneficial to seedstock suppliers, cow/calf operations, feeders and packers.” says Edelman who has been the Executive Director of the AGA since 2014.

WADE SHAFER

AMERICAN SIMMENTAL ASSOCIATION Wade Shafer grew up in Detroit Lakes, Minn., on Shoestring Ranch, a small seedstock operation. Shafer completed his bachelor’s degree in Animal Science at North Dakota State University, followed by a master’s and doctorate in Animal Breeding and Genetics from Colorado State University. While at Colorado State, Shafer did extensive work in the area of bio-economic simulation modeling. Following his formal education, he expanded Shoestring Ranch to over 500 cows, with cooperator herds representing another 500-plus cows. The ranch sold up to 200 bulls annually. After selling his cow herd, Shafer joined the Simmental team as the director of breed improvement for the American Simmental Association (ASA) in 2003; in 2011, he accepted the position of ASA’s chief operations officer. After Dr. Lipsey’s retirement in 2013, Shafer now serves as executive vice president of ASA. Founded in 1968, the American Simmental Association (ASA) is headquartered in Bozeman, Montana. ASA is committed to leveraging technology, education and collaboration to accelerate genetic profitability for the beef industry. In keeping with its commitment, ASA, along with its partners, formed International Genetic Solutions--the world’s largest genetic evaluation of beef cattle. VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


Lund Ranch

h

23nd Annual Bull Sale

New Location At The Ranch• 1 PM MST

Friday, March 4, 2016

100 Black & Red Angus Bulls

All Bulls Pap, Trich and Fertility Tested

Contact us for your catalog today! Scott & Suzette Lund Cell (435) 851-0099

Kim & Julie Lund Office (435) 528-3748

PO Box 730 • Gunnison, Utah 84634 • Email: Lundranchangus@gmail.com www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

73


CATTLEMEN TESTIFY TO THE IMPORTANCE OF THE TRANS-PACIFIC PARTNERSHIP

In mid-January, the United States International Trade Commission hosted a hearing entitled Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement: Likely Impact on the U.S. Economy and on Specific Industry Sectors. Kevin Kester, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Policy Division chair, testified before the ITC, stressing the importance of TPP for the cattle industry. “We have a very mature market in the United States, but 96 percent of the world’s population lives outside U.S. borders,” said Kester, a cattle producer from California. “With a growing middle class overseas demanding a higher quality diet, we need strong trade agreements like TPP in place to level the playing field and allow us access to those consumers who are asking for our product.” The TPP is multi-lateral trade agreement negotiated by the United States, Australia,

74

Brunei Darussalam, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, Vietnam, Japan, Canada and Mexico. The biggest advantage for cattle producers is the increased access to the Japanese market. In 2014, the U.S. exported beef worth $1.6 billion into Japan at a 38.5 percent tariff. Once TPP is implemented that tariff rate will phase down to 9 percent over 15 years, with a significant cut in the first year. The U.S. is already one of the most open markets in the world and the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association urges Congress to pass TPP swiftly. Of the more than 260 preferential trade agreements in force worldwide, only 14 include the United States. If the U.S. does not act to expand new market opportunities in these growing economies, cattle producers will be severely disadvantaged the global market place.

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


HOT SHOE RED ANGUS

OPENING DAY

PRIVATE TREATY SALE MARCH 19, STERLING, UT PREVIEW 11 A.M. • LUNCH AT NOON PERFORMANCE-TESTED • SOLID • SOUND

NOW UTAH’S LARGEST SOURCE OF HIGH ALTITUDE RED ANGUS! We have recently acquired the entire Red Angus herd from Lund Ranch, Gunnison, Utah. Now with more than 400 head of quality, registered Red Angus cattle, we have plans to expand to become the Intermountain West’s largest supplier of Red Angus genetics with genetics from foundation operations like Beckton, Buffalo Creek, Glacier, Larson Red Angus, Ludvigson, Bootjack and Redlands Red Angus and outcross lines from Sitz Angus as well!

• BIGGER CONTEMPORARY GROUPS • •HIGH ALTITUDE, PAP-TESTED BULLS • AFTER PAP-TESTING FOR 9 YEARS - WITH AN AVERAGE SCORE OF 32 (HIGH OF 37) - THESE BULLS WILL WORK AT ALTITUDE!

A.I. Sires Include:

BECKTON EPIC R397 K

FINE LINE MULBERRY 26P

5L SOLITAIRE 3769-33Y

BUF CRK LANCER R017

BECKTON EPIC R397 K BUF CRK LANCER R017 LARSON BANJO 902 LUDVIGSON EXPECTATION 5L SOLITAIRE 3769-33Y 5L ADVOCATE BRYLOR DEWBERRY FINE LINE MULBERRY 26P ...ALSO, TOP-END SIRES RAISED HERE AT HOT SHOE RED ANGUS

AT HOT SHOE, IT’S ALL ABOUT THE COWHERD - YOURS & OURS! PRODUCING THE BEST GENETICS AND BACKING THEM

HOT SHOE RED ANGUS Ron Christensen • Sterling, Utah • (435)851-9594 www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

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ROOTS helping urban youth spread their wings by Samantha Arehart for the Utah Cattlemen’s Association

Nestled in the heart of West Valley, Utah, there is a then were able to take the concepts to the farm and see how high school that is attracting quite a bit of attention, not they are applicable to agriculture. This method of learning because they just won the state football game, or have a carries through all the teachings at Roots, from fine arts to marching band that will play in a bowl game this year. No, English, students are always given a pathway as to which this school is attracting attention because it is unique and they apply their knowledge. the concept surrounding its evolution is ground-breaking. Along with encompassing a new method of learning, Roots Charter School, the very first farm-based high the students are also inadvertently gaining a much broader school in the state of Utah is where education is literally and in-depth knowledge base of the agricultural industry as grown and harvested. The school operates a five-acre well as an appreciation for the agriculturalist that manage it. farm on which students help grow and harvest fruits and “When our students come to Roots most of them have vegetables, as well as tend to a variety of animals. All of the absolutely no knowledge of agriculture,” Bastian stated. curriculum, centered around the farm and its practices, “About 90 percent of our students have never had any emphasizes the school’s motto, which is to teach the association with agriculture and most of them have never students to “Reap What You Sow.” even seen a cow before.” Interestingly enough, however, students don’t enroll However surprising this statement may be to some, it with the intentions of becoming is a very real fact. According to studies members of the agricultural industry. by the National Ag Day campaign, one “You see the light bulb In fact, most of the students have in three students in the United States are little knowledge of where their food come on in the students. not agriculturally literate. But what does comes from or how it’s raised before be agriculturally literate? Their thought processes turn it meanBytodefinition, they enroll. being “A majority of our students agriculturally literate means, “Having from one of consuming didn’t come and attend Roots to understanding of Agriculture’s to one of producing, they an learn how to be farmers,” Tyler history and current economic, social start to understand that and environmental significance to all Bastian, Root’s director stated. “They came to Roots seeking an education This understanding includes there is more to agriculture Americans. that was both active and applicable.” some knowledge of food and fiber than buying bacon in a production, processing, and domestic And that is exactly what Roots is giving them, an active and applicable and international marketing.” supermarket.” education. Within the curriculum at In a nutshell, being agriculturally Roots, there is an emphasis placed literate means understanding what –Tyler Bastian on being able to take the skills and agriculture is and how it affects each and Roots Director every knowledge learned in the classroom one of us. and apply them to an area of life, in While attending Roots, the this case a farm. students are given various opportunities to bridge that For example, in the math classes this past fall, the gap of understanding. The students witness the processes students were tasked with planting basil seeds. In doing this and management needed in order to run an agricultural they were required to figure the area needed for each plant, establishment first hand, and are tasked with doing many of depth of soil, how to measure and graph the rate of growth the processes themselves. of the plants and many more practices. All of these formulas At Roots there are many opportunities for the students and concepts the students learned in the classroom, and to not only learn about agriculture, but also to be involved VOLUME 3 • FEBRUARY 2016 Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 76


in it. The school owns a variety of animals that some students have the privilege of caring for during the school year. There are projects such as gecko breeding, swine production, beef production, a breeding heifer project and even a young student with special needs training goats to be companion animals. “You see the light bulb come on in the students,” Bastian reflected, “Their thought processes turn from one of consuming to one of producing, they start to understand that there is more to agriculture than buying bacon in a supermarket.” In addition to experiencing the practices of the agriculture industry firsthand, the students at Roots are also gaining an appreciation for the industry and its subsectors that are the cornerstone of our society. They are beginning to understand that everything we do is affected by agriculture. “Students are asking more questions,” Bastian noted. “Curiosity is overtaking them about different processes in agriculture and why we do things the way we do. They are gaining an appreciation for the men and woman that provide our food source, an appreciation most of them never would have had.” Hard work is an ethic that many of the students are also experiencing first hand. There are many students that are able to raise and care for steers at the schools farm while they may live in an apartment complex, where otherwise they would never have this type of opportunity to learn about hard work and responsibility for animals. The farm-based nature of Roots also reinforces to students the importance of attending school. If they are tasked with watering the seeds of their basil plants and they miss a day of school, the plant could shrivel up and die. Giving the students this perspective and added incentive has in turn helped the students learn about responsibility to something beyond themselves. In the Root’s motto there is a section of text that reads as follows: “…teaching students that they are stewards to everything in life and community. The skills that the students gain and experience here will be taken with them throughout the course of their lives, agriculturally related or not, and give them the knowledge to become active members of their community.” A major milestone Roots and its students have accomplished this year includes been being granted an official FFA charter by the Utah FFA State Association. They join the ranks of 80 other high schools throughout the state of Utah that are being proactive in agricultural education. Nicole Hopkins, the Utah FFA State President for the

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

current year, visited Roots in order to teach the students the importance of leadership and activeness in agriculture and community. “They were so willing to learn,” Hopkins reflected. “I was amazed by how interested the students were in FFA and the things it had to offer.” Bill Carpenter is the advisor for the Roots FFA charter and is planning to take students to the Utah FFA State Career Development Events contest in April to compete in horse judging. While there are 170 students enrolled at Roots for the 2015-2016 school year, the school’s capacity is around 300 students. Roots founders and instructors are optimistic that as years go on, the popularity and awareness of the school will only grow. This school is truly something special and ground-breaking. Roots is not only giving students an opportunity to learn in an active environment, but they are also giving students skills and values that they will be able to carry on throughout the course of their lives. About the Author: Samantha Arehart, Lewiston, Utah, is a student at Utah State University, majoring in Agricultural Business. A strong advocate for agriculture education, Samantha represented Utah on the State FFA Officer Team in 2014-2015 and continues to stress the importance of agricultural literacy in her community and beyond.

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37TH ANNUAL BULL SALE

CAT TLE CHO MAN’S ICE!

BW +2.8 WW +47 YW +74 M +35

LOT 16 • UCC DOMINO 427

BW -4.5 WW:59 YW:90 M:26

LOT 47 • UCC CONQUEST 531U

144 Bulls and 64 Heifers

Hereford, Red Angus, Black Angus two year olds and yearling bulls. RED ANGUS SIRES HXC CONQUEST 4405P LSF PROSPECT 2035Z

HEREFORD SIRES CL 1 DOMINO 105Y TH 122 71I VICTOR 719T

BLACK ANGUS SIRES CONNEALY BLACK GRANITE R B ACTIVE DUTY 010

BW +.6 WW +63 YW +113 M +29

LOT 93 • UCC RIGHT ANSWER 4128


DEDICATED SERVICE. PROVEN SUCCESS.

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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FEBRUARY 2016


Angus

SimAngus

TM

March 26, 2016 • 1:00 p.m. at the ranch in Bancroft, Idaho

Offering over

100 Head Angus & SimAngus TM

Cole Creek Cedar Ridge IV Angus reg. 16134394 Sons Sell

50

BBB VE TEN MILE 169Y SimAngusTM reg. 2623195 Homozygous Black/Polled PAP 41 • Sons Sell

Registered Bulls Yearling & Coming Two’s Negative BVD-PI Tested, Performance Tested, Fertility Tested and

PAP TESTED

Duff Carry On 252

Angus reg. 17542203 F0203 x O C C Emblazon Sons Sell

60 Commercial SimAngus & Angus Yearling Heifers 5 Registered SimAngus Heifers

OCC JetFleck 133N

SimAngusTM reg. 2288462 Sons Sell

3 AQHA Ranch Broke Horses JCS ABRAM Z121

O C C Zamir 412Z

Fleckvieh reg. 2756492 PAP 39 • SimAngusTM Sons Sell

Angus reg. 17771569 O C C Jet Stream x D D A Fahren 21X Sons Sell

Dirk & Marnie Johnson 2055 Ivins Road • Bancroft, ID 83217 Cell: (208)390-6619 • Home: (208)425-9169 simroot57@yahoo.com

www.verticaledgegenetics.com

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Call or email to join our mailing list.

UStay tah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 81 tuned to website for pictures & videos.


ZOETIS EXPANDS BVD PROTECTION OPTIONS FOR PREGNANT CATTLE Providing the highest level of year,” Voris added. “I recommend protection against infectious bovine producers work with their veterinarian rhinotracheitis (IBR) and bovine to identify the right vaccine for viral diarrhea (BVD) viruses is the challenges on their operation. critical, especially for pregnant cattle. Selecting vaccines with the strongest Unprotected cows exposed to BVD label claims can help protect the Types 1 and 2 viruses may experience herd from diseases that can harm the pregnancy loss or the delivery of weak bottom line.” or BVD persistently-infected (PI) Zoetis also offers a Fetal calves.1 To help producers further Protection Guarantee when protect the cow herd, BOVI-SHIELD BOVI-SHIELD GOLD FP 5, GOLD FP® 5 and BOVI-SHIELD BOVI-SHIELD GOLD FP 5 HB, GOLD FP 5 HB products, recently CATTLEMASTER GOLD FP® earned an additional label claim from the U.S. Department of Agriculture against fetal infection caused by (BVD) Types 1 and 2 viruses. “With the value of calves in today’s market, helping protect every pregnancy has become even more important for cattle producers. The additional label claim against BVD fetal infection assures producers that our BOVI-SHIELD product can help protect the pregnancy through the critical stages of gestation, which is a benefit for cattle producers,” said Nathan Voris, DVM, Senior Marketing Manager, Cattle Vaccines with Zoetis. “Continued innovations in Zoetis reproductive vaccines help keep the cow herd healthier. Healthy pregnancies lead to healthy calves and ultimately, an improved bottom line for producers.” Combined with the current label claims to prevent PI calves caused by BVD Types 1 and 2 viruses, and to aid in the prevention of abortion caused by IBR virus, the BOVI-SHIELD GOLD FP® 5 and BOVI-SHIELD GOLD FP 5 HB product lines have the highest level of fetal protection of any reproductive vaccine available to cow-calf producers. “This level of fetal protection helps maximize the reproductive potential of your cows, helping to ensure a healthy productive calf every Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 82

and PREGGUARD GOLD FP® 10 vaccines are used in herds according to label directions. It guarantees 100 percent of calves are born free from BVD persistent infection and the herd is protected against IBR abortion. To learn more about the BOVI-SHIELD GOLD FP 5 and BOVI-SHIELD GOLD FP 5 HB product lines. For more inforamtion, contact your veterinarian, Zoetis representative, or simply visit www. CattleReproVaccines.com.

VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016


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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

83


serving Your needs From the heart of the west

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Sale starts at 1:00 pm • Bulls ready for inspection by 11:00 am All Bulls Semen & Trich Tested • Several Bulls PAP Tested

Breeds: Angus • Simmental • SimAngus • Gelbvieh • Balancer • ChiMaine • LimFlex INFORMATION AND CATALOG: RUSTY AIKEN 435-463-9344

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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FEBRUARY 2016


PREGCHECKantage ™

dv The Genex Fertility A

1AN01224 COLE CREEK

CEDAR RIDGE 1V

PREGCHECK™ CED BW

WW

YW

SCR HPG CEM

13 -0.8 44 78 1.09 10.3 11 .88 .94 .91 .87 .85 .22 .60

10% 15%

20%

MILK

34 .70

3%

$EN

CW MARB

RE

FAT

$W

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102

81% Reliability $B

16.16 26 0.26 0.60 0.051 92.53 22.35 20.76 78.81 .37 .49 .43 .41 10%

1%

COle Creek Black Cedar 46P x HBR Encore 0544

1SM00126 MCM

The A .I. industr y's only data-driven sire fer tility ranking

Reg. No. 16134394 (ANGUS)

TOP GRADE 018X

Within our bred heifer program, PregCheck rankings are a very important tool to increase conception rates. When we select prospective sires, they must be highly proven calving ease bulls, with a high PregCheck ranking, in order to be considered. – JUSTIN JACOBS, RIVERSIDE RANCH, PRAIRIE CITY, OREGON

PREGCHECK™ CED

BW

WW

YW

MCE

MM

10%

1%

MWW DOC

CW

YG

MB

3%

15%

10.5 -1.2 57.2 96.5 12.1 38.0 66.6 11.8 26.2 -0.40 0.60 .78 .92 .89 .86 .43 .44 .54 .80 .60 .46 .59 25%

2%

BF

-0.064 .53 15%

MR NLC Upgrade U8676 x MCM Marbler 307N

1SM00121 MR NLC

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SHR

105

89% Reliability API

TI

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0.94 -0.23 149.3 78.9 .53 .38 10%

Reg. No. 2540315 (3/4 SIMMENTAL )

UPGRADE U8676

Increase conception rates now. Ask Genex how. Kolby Romrell Montpelier, ID 208-847-0183

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SHR

106

Lane Miles Altamont, UT 435-454-3278

Mathew Gray Pine Valley, UT 208-490-0241

Klynt Heaton Alton, UT 435-691-1681

96% Reliability API

TI

3%

1%

7.8 2.1 82.9 125.3 7.8 24.5 65.9 21.4 11.6 47.2 -0.61 0.50 -0.116 1.46 -0.14 151.9 89.5 .94 .96 .95 .95 .92 .92 .93 .39 .86 .61 .47 .58 .56 .54 .51 2%

20%

Ellingson Legacy M229 x GLS Mojo M38

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Reg. No. 2474338 (SIMMENTAL)

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition©2016 CRI

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A-11425-16


Index of Advertisers 2W Livestock Equipment...................... 32 ABS........................................................... 17 AL Silencer.............................................. 18 All West/Select Sires............................... 80 Allflex, USA............................................. 24 American Angus Association............... 51 American Hereford Association........... 55 Anderson Angus..................................... 41 Bar T Bar Ranches.................................. 61 Barker Cattle Company......................... 27 BioZyme/VitaFerm................................. 16 Blackett Angus........................................ 41 Boehringer Ingelheim............................ 42 Cannon Angus Ranch............................ 66 Circle Four Simmentals 87.................... 87 Color Country Bull Sale........................ 84 Colyer Herefords & Angus.................... 26 Crystalyx.................................................. 33 DBC Angus............................................. 47 Ekker Herefords...................................... 88 Elanco Animal Health..................... 47, 68 Fullmer Crescent Moon......................... 52 Genex Cooperative, Inc......................... 85 Gillespie Angus....................................... 71 Harrison Tire Tanks............................... 74 Hoffman AI Breeders............................. 82 Hot Shoe Red Angus.............................. 75 Intermountain Farmers Assn.......... 32, 33

Intermountain Genetic Alliance........... 41 Ipsen Cattle Co....................................... 49 James Bessler Insurance......................... 29 JBB/AL Herfords.................................... 53 Johansen Herefords................................ 31 Keller Cattle Corp. 9.................................... Lazy A Angus.......................................... 62 Lazy JB Angus......................................... 74 Lisonbee Angus...................................... 67 Loveless Gelvbieh............................. 59, 87 Lund Ranch............................................. 73 Lyman Livestock..................................... 45 Lynn Angus............................................. 41 McCarty Cattle Company..................... 68 McPherson Farms.................................. 64 Miles High Angus................................... 41 Mira Mar Angus..................................... 62 Newport Laboratories............................ 78 ORIgen..................................................... 30 Phil Allen and Son Herefords............... 66 Purina Animal Nutrition....................... 60 Quest of the West Bull Sale................... 87 R & R Bull Sale........................................ 69 Raise Em’ Right Ranch........................... 65 Redd Ranches............................................ 2 Riverbend Ranch.................................... 44 Robins Nest Angus Ranch..................... 29 Rocky Mountain Ultrasound................ 84

RV Bar Angus......................................... 25 Shandar Angus Ranch........................... 23 Shaw Cattle Co........................................ 19 Sitz Angus.................................................. 7 Snake River Bull Test.............................. 56 Sorensen Angus Ranch...................... 6, 87 Spring Cove Ranch................................. 53 Steve Smith Angus & Gelbvieh............. 66 T-Heart Ranch........................................ 48 The Adams Connection......................... 11 The Cattlemen’s Connection................. 53 Top Hat Simmentals............................... 40 Udy Cattle Company.............................. 79 Utah Angus Association........................ 13 Utah Beef Improvement Association... 63 Utah Hereford Association................... 57 Vertical Edge Genetics........................... 81 Ward Angus Ranch................................ 15 Western Livestock Journal.................... 36 Western Video Market........................... 12 Wine Bar Ranch...................................... 37 Winnemucca Ranch Hand Rodeo........ 43 Yardley Cattle Company.......................... 3 Zions Bank.............................................. 68 Zoetis i50K.............................................. 83 Zoetis Synovex........................................ 35

Thank you to all our advertisers for their support of the Utah Cattlemen’s Association!

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O U R F E AT U R E H E R D S I R E S

Bulls built for the Commercial Cowman!

Churchill Outcross 1217Y ET • 43237197 (bw)+4.9 (ww)+56 (yw)+98 (m)+26 (mg)+54 (sc)+1.3 (re)+.79 1217Y is our cornerstone herd sire with an abundance of eye appeal and performance all while starting with a 78 lb bw.! He was a class winner at the ‘13 NWSS! Sons available now!

H5 408 Domino 151 • 43207105 (bw)+2.1 (ww)+58 (yw)+98 (m)+30 (mg)+59 (sc)+1.3 (re)+.36 151 was our selection out of Harrell Herefords’ sale in Baker City, OR. He’s moderate in frame, but powerful, easy doing, fully pigmented. We have big expectations for him! Sons available now!

J IM E KKER 435-839-3454

The Next Generation at Ekker Here fords...

A t Ek k e r He r e f or d s, w e st r iv e to b r e e d t he be st Ho r ne d ge ne t ics a vail abl e. We sel ect o n l y top he r d sir e s a nd b r e e d t he m to pr o v e n c o ws with t h e i n te n t to c on t inu a l l y mo v e o u r ge ne t ic ba se f o r w a r d. We w el c ome v isito r s a nyt ime !

EKKER H EREFORD S 88

J I M A N D L I N DA E K K E R PO BOX 37 • VERNON, UT 84080 U(tah C)attleman 435 8 4 0 - 2S6eedstock 99 • E ( dition 435) 839-3454

O FFERING

A SELECT GROUP OF

Y EARLING B ULLS

PLUS A SELECT GROUP OF

O PEN AND B RED F EMALES ! C ALL T ODAY TO R ESERVE Y OUR E KKER H EREFORD ! VOLUME 3

FEBRUARY 2016

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 2016_Online  
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