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LIONS DAILY NEWS FRIDAY / JUNE 23 / 2017 PUBLISHED BY BOUTIQUE EDITIONS

IN PRINT AND ONLINE

LIONSDAILYNEWS.COM

Katzenberg runs with premium mobile

A SELECTION OF TODAY’S SEMINARS 10.00 IPA AND ADAM&EVEDDB ‘CAN’T STOP THE FEELING’ – EMOTIONAL ADVERTISING, A MASTERCLASS 11.00 PUBLICIS GROUPE CAN CREATIVITY CHANGE THE WORLD? 12.00 THE CANNES DEBATE MARTIN SORRELL IN CONVERSATION WITH ROBERT KRAFT AND RON HOWARD 13.15 VENABLES BELL & PARTNERS WHY INDEPENDENCE IS THE KEY TO CREATIVITY

How famous five joined forces to change the face of Samsung Samsung’s Pio Schunker

Turner Duckworth’s David Turner

CANNES Lions delegates were introduced to the future of marketing yesterday in the form of a radical and unlikely partnership between five agencies designed to transform the fortunes of global brand Samsung. Pio Schunker, senior vicepresident, global head inte-

Leo Burnett’s Mark Tutssel

grated marketing, mobile communications, Samsung, told the Cannes Lions Daily News that the story began in 2015 when he was charged with turning a faceless technology brand into a human, lifestyle-centred brand. His response was to create a “team of rivals” consisting of

R/GA’s Nick Law

Leo Burnett, R/GA, Turner Duckworth, Ogilvy and Cheil. Each agency was handed a distinct brief, but required to work collaboratively: “We were trying to achieve a very different result with the brand, so we had to approach it in different way,” said Schunker. TURN TO P.03

14.15 BURGER KING HOW TO SUCK LESS AS A CLIENT 15.15 SAPIENTRAZORFISH IN PARTNERSHIP WITH SONAR CREATIVITY IN THE EXPERIENCE AGE

16.15 CANNES LIONS THE LION OF ST MARK INTERVIEW: DAVID DROGA WITH PHILIP THOMAS

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Madonna Badger

Tina Brown

Marc Pritchard

Equality is good for business

16.00 WGSN THE MEANING ECONOMY

INSIDE

Sheryl Sandberg

BRANDS that speak the language of gender equality score 8% to 10% more in terms of positive sentiment than those that don’t, said Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg at yesterday’s P&G seminar, which examined the actions that brands can

take to level the gender playing field. “Ads that market into gender equality and not into gender stereotypes are not only good for the world but good for business,” Sandberg said. “There’s no trade-off. It’s an

OLLYWOOD mogul Jeffrey Katzenberg gave detailed information for the first time about his new media-and-tech venture WndrCo in a live on-stage interview at Cannes Lions yesterday. Speaking to Michael Kassan, Medialink’s chairman and CEO, he announced ambitions for WndrCo to invest in original six- to eight-minute premium mobile-first content that will signal the advent of the “new TV” format. In addition to being advertising-funded, the snack-sized scripted and non-scripted series will have the production standard associated with event dramas on Netflix and HBO. Industry experts calculate their average budgets are more than 60 times the size of the amount spent on YouTube content. Additionally, his company is prepared to sign deals that give talent a share of the copyright and revenues. Katzenberg’s presence at the Lions comes shortly after The Wall Street Journal revealed his company had raised almost $600m in January. He is a co-founder of the Hollywood studio DreamWorks Animation, which was sold last year to NBCUniversal for a reported $3.8bn.

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easy decision.” Observing wryly that “men still run the world — and I’m not sure it’s going that well”, Sandberg said that a major barrier preventing women for achieving C-suite status was the global TURN TO P.03

NEWS LION OF ST MARK COMMERCIALS ON LOCATION TITANIUM AND INTEGRATED SHORTLIST FOCUS ON SOUTH AFRICA FOCUS ON THE NETHERLANDS FOCUS ON SPAIN FOCUS ON US HISPANIC SCREENINGS SCHEDULE

WndrCo’s Jeffrey Katzenberg

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HOW FAMOUS FIVE JOINED FORCES TO CHANGE THE FACE OF SAMSUNG, CONTINUED...

“We’re still in the process of humanising the brand but what we have seen is that this approach has enabled us to scale out so much faster compared to other brand journeys. We’ve reached a point in 18 months that might have taken us four years with a more traditional approach.” A possible response from agencies in this situation might be to try and poach work from each other or treat the brief as an attenuated beauty parade. But Leo Burnett Worldwide global chief creative officer Mark Tutssel told the Lumiere session entitled How Radical Collaboration Can Rapidly Reshape A Global Brand:

EQUALITY IS GOOD FOR BUSINESS, CONTINUED...

stereotype “that men should lead and women should be communal”. She then conducted a short experiment, asking the men in the auditorium to raise a hand if they’d been called bossy as a child. Not one hand went up. The same question directed at the women saw barely an arm kept down. “But little girls aren’t bossy — they’re showing executive leadership skills,” she said. “We have to acknowledge deeply engrained stereotypes exist and challenge them.” Madonna Badger, chief creative officer of Badger & Winters, who launched #WomenNotObjects campaign last year, said it was ironic that

NEWS

“It hasn’t been dog eat dog because all the agencies involved have been properly remunerated for their work. And there has been a lot of curation on Pio’s part. He’s been at the coalface with us, making decisions in real-time. What we actually found is that this raised the creative bar and motivated us to push harder.” R/GA’s core role in the mix has been to drive digital strategy. Vice-chairman and global chief creative officer Nick Law said the kind of “agile thinking” demonstrated by Samsung is in line with the new age of disrupted marketing communication. Of the process, he said it was “a true democracy of disciplines”. Turner Duckworth played a pivotal role in develop-

ing a design template for the agencies to work with. Co-founder David Turner said “the origin of the Samsung brand is about pushing against complacency, and what we have never had in this process is complacency. When you work with agencies like these you continually have to re-earn your place in the team.” Samsung’s creative work during the Rio 2016 Olympics was a key discussion point during the session. In the week McDonald’s withdrew from its partnership with the Games, Schunker said the Olympics remains core to Samsung’s strategic thinking “especially with our new brand position. From a cultural standpoint, it’s a massive opportunity to talk to the world.”

racism in advertising is completely unacceptable and yet sexism is still tolerated. “Women are used as props, parts and plastic without even a thought,” she added. “And it causes immense harm.” For those in doubt as to whether a piece of work is objectifying women, Badger recommended looking at it through a personal lens: “Ask yourself, would I be OK with this if that woman was my mother, my sister, my daughter or even me? If the answer is ‘no’, you’ll know.” Award-winning journalist Tina Brown, whose remarkable career included the decision to put the heavily pregnant actress Demi Moore on the front cover of Vanity Fair in 1991, said the news business is also bat-

tling sexism. She pointed to the Daily Mail’s coverage of a meeting between UK politicians Teresa May and Nicola Sturgeon, which sported the headline: ‘Never mind Brexit, who won Legs’it!’ Accused of being offensive and sexist, the Mail told its critics to “get a life”. “The trouble is, when you make a noise about it, you’re called humourless,” Brown said. “But I think we have to be willing to sound humourless and say this is not funny.” So what’s do be done, asked session moderate Marc Pritchard, P&G’s chief brand officer. “Make it uncool to treat women this way,” Brown suggested. “Change the culture,” Sandberg said. “Be a mentor and find a mentor,” Badger added.

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PUBLISHER RICHARD WOOLLEY EDITOR IN CHIEF JULIAN NEWBY MANAGING EDITOR DEBBIE LINCOLN SUB EDITOR NEIL CHURCHMAN REPORTERS ANDY FRY - JULIANA KORANTENG - GARY SMITH - JO STEPHENS LIONSDAIL­­­­YNEWS.COM/SOCIAL MEDIA SUNNIE/STUDIO A PHOTOGRAPHERS YANN COATSALIOU - MICHEL JOHNER LAYOUT DESIGN A NOIR - T: +33 (0)1 48 06 22 22 - AGENCE@ANOIR.FR ARNAUD PAIKINE - VALERIE MERSIER CHRISTIAN ZIVOJINOVIC SYSTEMS CO-ORDINATION EURODOC - SOPHIA ANTIPOLIS - T: +33 493 00 80 00 CANNES LIONS DAILY NEWS/EDITORIAL T: 04 92 59 00 30 ADVERTISING IN CANNES 04 92 59 00 30 JODLIN@BOUTIQUEEDITIONS.COM JERRY ODLIN +44 77 6886 0417 - LISA RAY +44 77 98 662 955 - NICKI WEBBER +1 912 308 6967 ADVERTISING PRODUCTION ROGER HALL PRINTER RICCOBONO OFFSET PRESSE, LE MUY GREEN PUBLISHING THE PAPER USED BY BOUTIQUE EDITIONS IS A NATURAL, RECYCLABLE PRODUCT MADE FROM WOOD GROWN IN SUSTAINABLE FORESTS. THE MANUFACTURING PROCESS CONFORMS TO THE ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS OF THE COUNTRY OF ORIGIN PUBLISHED BY BOUTIQUE EDITIONS LTD - 117 WATERLOO ROAD - LONDON SE1 8UL - T: +44 20 7902 1942 © 2017 CANNES LIONS

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Platon: legendary lensman with an eye for the authentic image TOMORROW’s Craft Of Authenticity seminar, sees TBWA’s global chief creative officer Chris Garbutt in conversation with renowned photographer Platon. Garbutt described working with Platon in the lead-up to the event as “the most inspiring process”. “He rightly considers himself to be a cultural provocateur with a camera, and he’s a genuine visionary who I am convinced will inspire the audience to use their talent to effect real change. He’ll also be showing some of his work and explaining how he gets the shots that show the real person. For example, with Putin he knew that the Russian President likes The Beatles, and mentioning

that allowed him access to a much more personal side of the man.” The erosion of trust in authority is at the heart of Garbutt’s seminar: “People are looking elsewhere for ways to navigate our uncertain and rapidly changing world, and I believe we can use authenticity and ethics and convert them into a valuable currency for our clients,” he said. “For example in the work we do for adidas Running we have teamed up with real people and the clubs that exist in every city. They are genuine influencers whose passion for the sport and the products is genuine. It is, at root, a form of brand journalism.”   

CHRIS GARBUTT

Creativity hurts. Get used to it. AFTER A WEEK of discussion about chasing the creativity muse, Steve Chapman is hosting a session tomorrow in which he will share the highs and lows of getting to know his inner critic and the creative ways in which he as learned to live with it, rather than fight it — This Talk Isn’t Very Good – Dancing With My Inner Critic. Chapman, who describes himself as ‘chief adventurer’ at Can Scorpions Smoke?, helps organisations and individuals nurture their own culture of creativity and works with everyone from airline pilots and academics to charities, councils and corporations. In all cases, he says a key question he asks at the outset is: “Are you serious about creativity? Are you ready for the pain involved in nurturing a culture of creativity — because risktaking inevitably creates disturbances?”

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Liberating creativity and encouraging spontaneity may be painful, said Chapman, but it’s a worthwhile

STEVE CHAPMAN

journey. “It enlivens people and helps them build relationships. Ultimately it can benefit everything from

brand health and market share to employee retention.” A lot of Chapman’s training and coaching uses unusual and counter-intuitive techniques — but he doesn’t like the phrase ‘out of the box’. “A lot of what I do with clients involves looking more deeply inside the box to find out what is inhibiting people. I’m looking to disturb the patterns that individuals, groups and organisations are stuck in.” Part of the problem, he argues, is that creativity has been presented as a superpower that some have and others simply don’t. This ties in with one of the key themes of his Cannes Lions talk — the ‘inner critic’. “This is the self-limiting voice within us that despises creativity because it is trying to keep us safe and secure,” he said.  

Seminars to motivate and inspire HE SATURDAY seminar schedule kicks off at 11.00 with mcgarrybowen’s US chief creative officer Ned Crowley recounting the story of his four-month sabbatical in A Bloody Mess. How Advertising Saved My Film and Sanity. Crowley will share the story of what it’s like trying to make a highend indie feature, with little money. “I plan to share how my 25 years in advertising allowed me to get through a challenging time, keep my sanity, and showed me the importance of doing something really terrifying in my life. I hope my story will inspire the audience to take a chance and do something really terrifying too.” I Fell In Love With An Asshole at 12.45 features The Martin Agency’s CCO Joe Alexander alongside David Fleming, Will Speck, Josh Gordon and Jenny Rooney, discussing how big ideas often die at the intersection of risk and persuasion. “This story scared us all to death,” said Alexander. “How to sell it, make it, and pay for it involved a lot of risk, but the reward was worth it.” Livity co-founder Michelle Morgan will round off the day with When Your Passion Burns Out Suddenly And Violently. Then What?

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MICHELLE MORGAN

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Be fearless, be meaningful, but above all be authentic AUTHENTICITY is a real thing, agreed the CMOs at yesterday’s Wake Up With The Economist debate. Discussing the overarching trends of the 65th Cannes Lions, Bank of America’s Meredith Verdone, said: “One thing I’ll be taking out of this week is the need to build an authentic connection with audiences and how brands can maintain that in an increasingly dispersed world.” Vivendi’s Lucien Boyer said authenticity was bred into the bone the French media giant. “For us, if it’s not fully authentic, it doesn’t exist,” he said. “If we didn’t stay true to content in a genuine way, people wouldn’t play our games or listen to our music or watch our movies. We don’t invent artists — we find them.” Like Vivendi, Burger King’s Axel Schwan said authentic-

ity was part of the fast-food restaurant chain’s brand positioning. “Authenticity is a nice

word and looks good on power point, but it doesn’t mean anything if you don’t

ANYBODY wanting to know how to boost their socialmedia followers should have attended yesterday’s The Audience-building Secrets Of YouTube Stars. The session, hosted by Swed-

ish online production-music specialist Epidemic Sound, focused on social-media superstars Pia Muehlenbeck, Carly Rowena and Kane Vato and their relationships with brands.

As long as YouTubers and their brand partners support each other, the more likely it is that their fans will stay loyal to the brand message. “Ad agencies know we can drive traffic they can’t get

VIVENDI’S LUCIEN BOYER: “IF IT’S NOT FULLY AUTHENTIC, IT DOESN’T EXIST”

execute it well,” Schwan said, quoting Sir John Hegarty’s famous advice that “advertising is 80% idea and 80% execution”. “At Burger King,” he added, “we’ve learned you have to be crazy about execution.” Creativity is, of course, the white noise of the Cannes Lions. But this year, the panel agreed, the work and ideas in contention have been notably bolder and braver, as brands and advertisers strive to cut through the clutter. Applauding the amount of “fearless, meaningful, innovative” work he has seen this week, Boyer said: “We all need to keep our eyes open because the future is taking shape in front of us. All the platforms that are now everywhere — we need to think carefully how to use their powers and not get lost in fragmentation.”  

Tapping YouTube star power

PIA MUEHLENBECK: BRANDS CAN ADD “A LOT OF VALUE”

organically,” said photographer blogger Vato, who has 51,000 Instagram followers. Meanwhile, his YouTube travel channel with Instagram star Muehlenbeck has attracted almost 200,000 subscribers. “It’s not about the money, because we would prefer some to be used for ads that help us,” Vato added. Fitness blogger Rowena said: “I want to reach as wide an audience as possible, so I want to work with brands that can help me grow, especially if it also helps me support the charities I work with.” Muehlenbeck recommended that brands independently create experiences related to bloggers’ content: “Brands can make something happen that we can integrate organically into our content. That can add a lot of value for our followers.”  

Plattar puts AR in reach of everyone NE OF THE MOST exciting dimensions of the Cannes Lions Festival is the array of startups and disruptors participating in the event. One attending this year is Australia-based augmented reality firm Plattar, here as part of R/GA’s startup support programme. Speaking to the Lions Daily News, Plattar co-founder Rupert Deans said his company’s USP is that it democratises AR: “We set out to be the first to create a platform that makes it possible for companies to build their own AR experience at an affordable price. Instead of paying $20,000-$50,000 for someone else to do the work for you, you’re looking around $249 per month to build your own.” Deans is convinced AR will have widespread applicability across a range of social and commercial scenarios — citing education, training, health and safety, and retail as examples. It’s possible, for example, to use VR to position virtual furniture/ furnishings in a room to see if they look good before purchasing them — or to overlay instructions on new tools or devices. “That’s what we call ‘instant expert’,” says Deans, “using AR to simplify tasks such as setting up a modem.” Proof that Plattar is on to something is that the company raised $1.1m in seed funding from News Corp Australia and is now engaged in a new funding round. It is also working with blue-chip brands like Air France. “Plattar allows anybody with any skill set to create their own AR experiences, bringing ideas to life in 3D,” says Deans.

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Plattar’s Ash Goldman (left) and Rupert Deans


pioneer.hu

FOR ALL TASTES Service producer of award winning TV commercials Budapest, Hungary

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Pussy Riot roar into the Lions with manifesto of misbehaviour JASON XENOPOULOS

Africa’s new age is here THE EMERGENCE of artists like Osborne Macharia, knitwear brand Laduma, and the neo-Afro folk of The Venus Bushfires are all helping to force the rest of the world to reassess Africa. “We have seen the end of coca-colonisation,” said Jason Xenopoulos, CEO and chief creative officer at VML. “And Africa is thriving. Three of the world’s top five fastest growing economies are African, there are now more people connected to the internet than in North America, the fight against white domination has only just begun, and in September the Zeitz MOCAA, a new museum of contemporary art, will open in Cape Town on the V&A Waterfront.” For VML’s Absolut campaign, Xenopoulos knew he had to reflect the creative brilliance surrounding him. “We did that by teaming up with rapper Khuli Chana as well as choreographers, videomakers, and artists, then we asked them to harmonise around the theme ‘one source’ because Absolut Vodka is made from one single source in Sweden, and of course Africa is the source of all life on earth, it is the only place that we can all truly call home. The campaign resulted in a number one album on iTunes and an 84% rise in sales.”

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PUSSY RIOT’S SACHA (LEFT) AND NADYA, WITH SACHA’S DAUGHTER GERA AT THE GREY MUSIC SEMINAR

THE ELEVENTH Grey Music Seminar featured what are considered to be one of the bravest and most radical bands in the world, Pussy Riot. A group, as Grey’s global creative chairman Per Pedersen said who are so committed to bringing about change, they spent 22 months in a Russian jail. “They’re going to turn you into activists because we all have a

duty to misbehave,” he added. Two members of the band then took to the stage and read out their manifesto: “We believe the revolution is upon us, that the world is our country because if closing your borders was a good idea, North Korea would be the best country in the world. Our religion is doing good, and even though we still didn’t get

rid of Putin, we will keep on trying. Same goes for that man in the White House whose name we don’t want to say because he loves to hear it too much.” They then went on to criticise capitalism. “The reason why that man is in the White House is because we think too much about profit, and not enough about people. We are

totally opposed to celebrity fascism, by that we mean the cult of people who believe that wealth and power allows them to say and do anything they want without being answerable to justice. Talking about fascism, Putin, the malicious KGB agent, said he thinks it’s right because it comes from healthy nationalist feelings.”   

R/GA gets driven by disruption R/GAISONE of the world’s most successful agencies — but staying on top isn’t easy in an era of disruption, said chairman, founder and CEO Bob Greenberg in a session entitled Disruption By Design. “You have to change to stay relevant. For us that means self-disruption is a driving force. When we are at our most successful, that is the time we abandon the existing model and change.” R/GA chief strategy officer Barry Wacksman picked up the story by describing the company’s efforts to disrupt the venture-capital sector by working with its clients to support startups. “Clients are operating with a new playbook that has six parts based around

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BOB GREENBERG

brand purpose, the use of innovation, connecting within ecosystems, designing interfaces and experiences, datadriven membership and living within culture. To be a relevant partner we also need a new model,” he said. Joining Greenberg and Wacksman on stage were R/GA senior vice-president consulting Saneel Radia and vice-chairman, global chief creative officer Nick Law, who stressed the importance of social media for brands that want to play a meaningful role in culture: “Sharing is the key currency. We have to tell stories that audiences also want to tell, which means building stories based around their behaviour.”  

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‘IT’S NOT WHAT DON DRAPER WOULD HAVE BEEN DOING’

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IR MARTIN Sorrell, CEO/founder of advertising behemoth WPP Group, has told Lions Daily News the global ad sector is currently going through a tough period as it transitions into a tech-driven business. “It is a difficult market exacerbated by low growth and low inflation,” he said. “But tech is the future; it accounts for 75% of what we do, which is not what Don Draper would have been doing in his day.” Sorrell, who is known for constantly addressing more efficient routes to helping clients reach consumers, will be examining the international marketing sector’s future at today’s Cannes Debate which sees him in conversation with two revered thought leaders in entertainment and sports. His on-stage exchange of ideas of how entertainment and sports will help boost the industry’s future will be with Robert Kraft, one of the biggest investors in professional American football and soccer, and Ron Howard, the Oscar-winning director, producer and co-chairman of Hollywood production powerhouse Imagine Entertainment. Speaking ahead of the event, Sorrell explained why the duo were were ideal for the debate.

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“Sport is a subset of entertainment and vice-versa,” he said. “Both are a key part of what we do in marketing and highly relevant to what we see and hear in Cannes. Sports and entertainment establish an emotional connection to the different products and services we serve consumers. And tech is increasingly becoming important to that.” That is also why Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Apple and Amazon, the tech sector’s “fearsome five” and the world’s most valuable companies, are involved in sports and entertainment, he pointed out. And he pointed to key examples of sports-entertainment-tech partnerships. E-commerce goliath Amazon is the exclusive streaming TV partner of the NFL’s Thursday Night

Football’s 2017 season. This means its Amazon Prime customers in more than 200 markets worldwide will be able to watch top-tier American football for free. Amazon snatched the NFL agreement from Twitter, which was the previous streaming partner. Rakuten, Japan’s biggest e-commerce conglomerate, is sponsoring Spanish soccer team FC Barcelona in a deal worth €220m. “Increasingly, digital media has made sports and entertainment more accessible and because of social media, live entertainment and sports are reaching more people than ever before,” he added. He said these developments have contributed to the growing business of esports, the professional competitive

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gaming tournaments whose popularity prompted Amazon to pay almost $1bn for Twitch, the world’s biggest streaming esports platform, in 2014. “Kraft also happens to be heavily involved in esports because competitive gaming is becoming more and more significant as both entertainment and sports,” he added. Sorrell acknowledged the rising competition and consolidation in the global ad-tech sector as Verizon, the US telecoms group, merges the digital-ad assets of Yahoo! and AOL. This will create Oath, a new platform set to be the third biggest ad-tech service provider after Google and Facebook. But the ever-pragmatic Sorrell advised that the industry should not ignore emerging players like Snap, owner of the new-generation social platform Snapchat, and a major Cannes Lions sponsor this year. Snapchat recently sealed deals to deliver content linked to the prestigious European football tournament UEFA Champions League to its 10 million-plus daily users. “I would argue that Snap is the most significant third force in digital advertising,” Sorrell said. He then referred to the ambitions of Vivendi, the French media, music and gaming conglomerate in talks to take over French advertising and communications conglomerate Havas Group. “Although it could create a possible conflict of interest, as you have media planners and buyers at Havas selling client content that it owns, it will definitely be creating a new business model,” he said.

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MEET THE WINNERS

WEDNESDAY NIGHTS’ AWARDS CEREMONY FEATURED WINNERS FROM THE ENTERTAINMENT, ENTERTAINMENT FOR MUSIC, MEDIA, DESIGN AND PRODUCT DESIGN CATEGORIES. ALSO DURING THE EVENING PHILIP THOMAS, CEO OF ASCENTIAL EVENTS, PRESENTED CHAIRMAN AND CEO OF UNIVERSAL MUSIC GROUP SIR LUCIEN GRAINGE WITH THE 2017 MEDIA PERSON OF THE YEAR AWARD 4

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1 Sir Lucien Grainge, chairman and CEO of Universal Music Group, was awarded the 2017 Media Person Of The Year by Ascential Events’ Philip Thomas 2 The team from DDB Group Germany celebrated a Design Gold Lion for Verein Fur Berliner Stadtmission with jury president Planeta Design’s Sandra Planeta (second left) 3 Leo Burnett Toronto picked up a Design Gold Lion for Ikea’s ‘Cook This Page’ 4 The Media Grand Prix went to R/GA New York for Jet.com’s ‘Innovating Saving’ 5 AP Thailand’s Saharath Sawadatikom and Chotika Tantipong accepted the Design Grand Prix for ‘The Unusual Football Field’ 6 Snap Los Angeles’ Kelly Nyland (left), pictured here with jury presiden Yes Architecture’s Ruth Berktold, accepted a Product Design Gold Lion for ‘Spectacles’ 7 VML Johannesburg won an Entertainment Gold Lion for Absolut’s ‘One Source: Campaign’ 8 J Walter Thompson London accepted an Entertainment Gold Lion for Glasgow School of Art’s ‘Ash to Art’ from jury president Pereira & O’Dell’s PJ Pereira (left) 9 Y&R Dubai took a Gold Lion in Design the Interreligious Council of Bosnia and Herzegovina’s ‘One Book for Peace’ 10 The Product Design Grand Prix was awarded to Grey Colombia for Tigo-Une’s ‘Payphone Bank’ 11 Ogilvy Paris, pictured here with jury chairman UMG’s Olivier Robert-Murphy (centre), picked up a Gold Entertainment Lion for Music for Sony Music’s ‘Black M’ 12 The team from Black Sheep London one an Entertainment Gold Lion for UNDP Kosovo’s ‘Home’ 13 The team from MRM/McCann Spain celebrated the Entertainment Grand Prix for Santander Bank’s ‘Beyond Money’ 14 FCB Moscow collected a Gold Media Lion for BMW Russia’s ‘Ultimate Giving Pleasure’ 15 The team from McCann New York, pictured here with jury president PHD Worldwide’s Mike Cooper (second right), won a Gold Media Lion for ‘Fearless Girl’ 16 The Grand Prix in Entertainment for Music went to Johannes Leonardo New York for Adidas Originals’ ‘Original is Never Finished’

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GRAMMY AWARD-winning superstar Wyclef Jean performed at the Music, Technology, And Creativity: The Exciting New Reality session, where industry bosses discussed how tech is reshaping the music business. The speakers were Shazam’s Gregory Glenday, FCB’s Susan Credle and Madline Nelson from label Heads Music

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20 years ago, an average media plan took around 50 decisions to make. Today, it is more like 50 0 0. Without ar tif icial intelligence you can no longer keep up. That ’s why we are a tech company amongst an industr y of media agencies .

Face the truth at blackwoodseven.com - The Media A .I.gency Copenhagen · Munich · Los Angeles · New York · London · Barcelona

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NEWS

Women campaign to close the chronic directorial gender gap

UNICEF’S CLAUDIA GONZALEZ ROMO (LEFT), SAATCHI & SAATCHI LONDON’S KATE STANNERS, PEARL & DEAN’S KATHRYN JACOBS OBE AND FILM DIRECTOR GILLIAN ARMSTRONG

ONLY 9% of commercials are directed by women. “That’s 9% of people telling the stories and shaping the cultural and social messages of half the world,” said Kate Stanners, global chairman and global chief creative officer of Saatchi & Saatchi London. Stanners was talking exclusively to the Lions Daily News after Monday’s SAWA (Global Cinema Advertising Association) session, Women And

Cinema, alongside fellow panelist Kathryn Jacobs OBE, CEO of Pearl & Dean; respected Australian film director Gillian Armstrong; and Claudia Gonzalez Romo, UNICEF special advisor and chief of global advocacy. As a follow-up to their onstage debate, which focused on the chronic under-representation of women in the creative industries, the panelists issued a call to action

to the global advertising community: to increase the number of female commercials directors by 10% by next year’s Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. The initiative, dubbed ‘Conscious Cannes’, will measure progress and report its findings during the 2018 Festival. “When I started directing commercials, I was the only woman director in Australia,” Armstrong said. “There are

now nine and it’s 38 years later. For many directors, commercials are the springboard into their careers, so it’s crucial we challenge the unconscious bias against young women filmmakers.” Gonzalez Romo added: “This is important for the world, not just advertising and entertainment. We cannot achieve our sustainable development goals without women and girls. Investing in women is

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not only the right thing, it’s the smart thing.” Jacobs observed that, while there is “an appetite for change and people are beginning to listen”, more needs to be done in practical terms. Among the remedial measures identified by the ‘Conscious Cannes’ instigators are encouraging young women to put themselves forward for directing roles, turning a gender lens on creative briefs and urging producers to actively seek female directors for commercial spots, rather than resorting to “the usual male suspects”. Educating clients to avoid gender stereotypes and showcasing and celebrating female success would also help level the male-skewed playing field, the women suggested. Cheryl Wannell, CEO of SAWA, concluded: “Cinema is not only the mother of all screens, but its audiences are 50% women. Its storytelling capability and capacity to drive change make it an incredibly powerful medium when it comes to winning hearts and minds. SAWA was a founding partner of Global Goals, and one of the most important of these — the one that will help achieve progress fastest and advance humanity furthest — is improving the lot of women and girls.”  

Being a Festival jury president: the verdict

COLLEEN DECOURCY of Wieden+Kennedy, who headed up the Cyber jury, and DDB’s Wendy Clark, who helmed the Glass category this year, both agree that being a jury president is one of the hardest things anyone in the industry is ever likely to be asked to do. “The first-time jurors tend not to trust the process, so you have to work on bridging that gap,” said Clark, who was named Ad Age’s

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executive of the year this year. “This year there were 10 of us, nine of whom were women with Gerry Graf [Barton F. Graf] the only male juror, which I think was a bit too female-slanted. That said, in general, I like the changes the Lions management are making, like smaller juries, regional inclusiveness and more gender diversity, but agencies and the broader industry need to work harder on the regional inclusiveness.”

For DeCourcy, who was working with 21 jurors, it was the number of entries and the size of the jury that made her role a challenge: “21 very senior people, all with their own points of view gives you a lot of variety, and the way that I dealt with that was by asking them to judge work by what it made them feel,” she said. “It was very important to go beyond judging the interface. But it was how we started the process, by ask-

COLLEEN DECOURCY

ing each person to introduce themselves, and also to justify their presence as a juror that enabled us to find some amazing work. Really we were looking for

WENDY CLARK

campaigns that went beyond the message and actually changed people’s behaviour. We have a shared compulsion to try to change the world for the better.”  

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T:12.99”

S:12.74”

Congratulations, David, from all of us at Droga5. What a wild ride it’s been oh my god that sweater.


LIONS DAILY NEWS FRIDAY / JUNE 23 / 2017

THE LION OF ST MARK

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David Droga, founder and creative chairman of Droga5, will be honoured with the Lion of St Mark at this year’s Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. Andy Fry looks at one of the most awarded creatives in the history of the Festival

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AVID Droga won his first Lion aged 19 and has achieved more than 70 Gold and 15 Grand Prix/ Titanium Lions in his career to date. Still only 48, it would be a surprise if he didn’t add to that total in the coming years. “The Lion of St Mark recognises an individual who has made a significant and outstanding contribution to creativity in our industry,” says Jose Papa, managing director of the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. “David’s drive, passion and unbounded creative skill has led him to deliver continual awardwinning results.” Australian by birth and upbringing, Droga started his career in Sydney before moving to Singapore to become executive creative director of Saatchi & Saatchi Singapore and regional creative director of Saatchi Asia in 1996. At the age of 29, he was promoted

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THE LION OF ST MARK

FRIDAY / JUNE 23 / 2017 LIONS DAILY NEWS

Gisele Bundchen’s ‘Under Armour’ campaign won the 2015 Cyber Grand Prix

to executive creative director of Saatchi & Saatchi London, after which it was awarded Agency Of The Year at the 2002 Cannes Lions. Next came a move to New York, where Droga became the first-ever worldwide chief creative officer of the Publicis Network. In 2006, he launched his own creative agency, New York-based Droga5 and the awards kept coming. The agency was selected as the Cannes Lions Independent Agency Of The Year in 2015 and 2016, confirming its status as one of the most influential agencies in the business. Droga believes his early years of globe-trotting have benefited him: “I’ve had more opportunities than most and learned a lot from different people and cultures. I think I really found my feet creatively in London, but the overall process of moving markets takes you out of your comfort zone and encourages you to be creative. You can’t assume that what works in one market will

work in another, so you need to be creative.” While London was an important milestone for Droga, the launch of his own agency was the fulfilment of “a very personal goal”. He adds: “I really believe in building my own thing and being master of my own destiny. I also really liked the idea of a creative-run agency. There aren’t enough agencies where the owners and leadership are creatives.” Droga5 hit the ground running, winning a Cannes Lions Grands Prix almost immediately. Looking back to the early days, Droga says he is proud of the agency’s work on the UNICEF Tap Project, which asked restaurant-goers to donate $1 for their free tap water to raise funds for clean drinking water. “The UNICEF work struck a chord in terms of what I believed in, and the positive impact creative, empathetic work can have. Even if Droga5 had folded after that, it would have been worth it.” Droga5 didn’t fold, of course, and

DAVID DROGA

“I’M NOT ONE FOR LOOKING IN THE REAR-VIEW MIRROR. I NEVER THINK I’VE CRACKED IT

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has gone on to deliver terrific work across a range of formats and media, including the ‘Under Armour’ campaign featuring Gisele Bundchen, Android’s ‘Friends Furever’, The New York Times’ ‘Truth’ campaign and the hilarious MailChimp campaign. Explaining his success, Droga says: “I love being a creative person, but I never take it for granted. I have a restless curiosity that’s really empowering and stops me being complacent. I’m not one for looking in the rearview mirror. I never think I’ve cracked it. I’m always on edge about how the agency proves the point of its existence.” There are other factors that explain Droga5’s success, Droga adds. One is its emphasis on creativity with a purpose: “We’re in business, so creativity can never be a ‘nice to have’ — it has to have a purpose. Our creativity is all about problem-solving strategies, seeing around corners, making lateral leaps.” He is also open to innovation in media usage: “I’d say 60%-70% of what we do is not traditional. If the right answer for the brief is billboard or film, that’s what we’ll do. But if the best idea is a product, event or experience, we’ll do that. Creativity can morph its

shape into anything. I don’t want us to be one note.” As head of Droga5, Droga also ensures that everyone who joins the agency wants to go on the journey with him. “You have to hire well — select people who share your beliefs and have sympathy with your core values,” he says. “If you can build the right environment, then creativity becomes contagious.” In terms of Lion of St Mark, he says the honour is “beyond my wildest ambitions”. He adds: “It’s incredible to be recognised when so many previous recipients are my heroes. But the truth is, I don’t go to the Lions for the awards. I go to see people from other stages of my career and to be inspired — like I did in my twenties. Each year, I see something I love, that I wish I’d done.” As for the future, he says: “I’m a simple person and can never get over how fortunate we are to be paid to use our ingenuity. I just want Droga5 to stay relevant and come up with ideas that make the world a better place and make people feel better.” David Droga will be presented with the Lion of St Mark during the awards ceremony tomorrow. Droga will also be speaking on the Cannes Lions stage today.

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THERE ARE CREATIVES. THEN THERE ARE TRUE ORIGINALS.

Congratulations to David Droga on winning the Lion of St. Mark. From the time you won your first Cannes Lion 30 years ago, you’ve kept raising the bar on what it really means to be creative.

©2017 JPMorgan Chase & Co. All rights reserved.

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FOCUS ON LOCATION

FRIDAY / JUNE 23 / 2017 LIONS DAILY NEWS

COMMERCIALS ON LOCATION A shooting location can be determined by the need for the correct scenery or environment, film-friendly regions, tax incentives, the expertise of affordable and inspired set-builders, the right mix of old and new architecture, or sometimes even the characteristics of a country’s local culture and its people

THIS LAND IS YOUR LOCATION

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HE US STATE of Montana is going out of its way to help agencies build their campaigns around its stunning locations. A case in point is ‘This Land is Our Land’, part of the ‘Keep Walking America’ campaign for Diageo’s top Scotch whisky brand Johnnie Walker, which first aired in November last year. The commercial took a prize for outstanding location at this year’s Location Managers Guild International awards. Diageo’s aim was to represent the progress of cultural diversity in the US and the spot aired in a time of fierce political upheaval. The film portrays Americans from all walks of life going about their daily activities while the voiceover is a spoken version of folk singer Woody Guthrie’s This Land is Your Land, a protest song from the 1940s urging Americans to be inclusive. The spot opens up with the little-known verse “As I went walking, I saw a sign. And on the sign it said, ‘No Trespassing’. But on the other side, it said nothing. That side was made for you and me.” The majestic scenery that opens — and closes — the commercial features the peaks around the city of Livingston, north of Yellowstone National Park. The Montana Film Office helped the agency, Anomaly New York, and production company, Anonymous Content, source local crew, find hotel deals and research potential locations in the Paradise Valley of Montana. Film commissioner Allison Whitmer said: “We offer specialised location assistance with our location database having categories such as performance roads, forests, dams, lakes and Western towns. It’s our goal to assist producers in finding locations that

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meet their needs and contribute to incredible visuals. We do preliminary scout trips, data gathering and permit facilitation for productions, which assists in a quick response to inquiries.” Many of the available locations — including Native-American reservations, and state and national parks — embody stereotypical Rocky Mountain or Western country vistas. Montana’s vast size and small population mean an endless selection of wide-open spaces and long road views — settings beloved by directors. Unsurprisingly, many vehicle shoots come to Montana for the isolated roads, off-road possibilities and agricultural locations. Recent examples include: the Dodge Ram Super Bowl commercial, ‘God Made a Farmer’; the Chevy Silverado ‘A Man and his Truck’ and ‘A Woman and her Truck”; and a range of spots for Toyota, Ford, Hyundai and Polaris off-road vehicles. But Whitmer was also keen to stress Montana’s film-friendly urban areas “Very few of our cities have a formal

permit process, and we work closely with our business and tourism partners on accommodating commercials,” she said. The small city of Chester in Liberty County, northern Montana got a lucky break when the Frito-Lay mascot for the Cheetos brand, Chester Cheetah, led the Orange Party in a spoof election campaign for city mayor in 2015, featured in the ad series ‘Chester for Chester’. His campaign included promising to paint the local playground slide orange, installing orange street-crossings, kissing babies and handing out a lot of cheesy snacks to the local population.

1 Montana provided a backdrop for the Johnnie Walker spot 2 The tunnel constructed for the Virgin Fibre shoot 3 Ramiro Rodriguez Cohen 4 Hero Production’s Bui Baldvinsson: “You become energised by being in these locations”

SURREAL APPEAL OF ARGENTINA

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RGENTINIAN agencies produce a

disproportionate number of international campaigns that often make use of a unique, surrealist

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LIONS DAILY NEWS FRIDAY / JUNE 23 / 2017

FOCUS ON LOCATION

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sense of humour and a specific view of the world. But where does that come from and why do so many nonArgentinians find it appealing? According to Ramiro Rodriguez Cohen, chief creative officer at BBDO Argentina, it’s partly down to the relationship ordinary people have with advertising: “The local audience enjoys advertising. It’s something that occurs in very few places in the world, people talk about advertising and it generates a pressure to do great work. They pay attention but are also ready to bring you down when they don’t like something.” Papon Ricciarelli, CEO of Don, points to a curious streak in the national character: “I suspect it has a lot to do with our curiosity, since being so far south we feel far from everything. That leads us to inform ourselves as much as possible, and to be more aware of what happens in the world. We have developed a fairly interesting typical humour that is very easy to understand internationally.” Rodriguez Cohen points to ‘Talk to the Artwork’ as one of BBDO’s best recent works: “Using Facebook Messenger, we created chatbots to enable various museum art pieces to answer, in the first person, any question visitors might want to ask. Each chatbot has a unique personality based on the work’s characteristics, its author, the art movement it belongs to, the period in which it was created and so on. This differentiation allowed the chats to be different not just because of the work’s characteristics and what it has to tell about itself, but also through a marked difference in personality and voice tone.”

BUDAPEST: A CAPITAL OF CREATIVITY 3

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RODUCER Milan Szabo of Budapest-based Pioneer Productions likes a serious challenge, and a recent job for Virgin Fibre by Rogue Films/BBH drew the best out of Pioneer’s art department: “Having built thousands of amazing sets, our construction departments are by now proved themselves on a wide range of jobs, treating the smallest local market jobs and major Hollywood pictures with the same skill and enthusiasm,” he said. “A tunnel 60 metres long was built in an exhibition hall because even the biggest sound

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stages couldn’t provide the necessary length from corner to corner for the vehicles and four horse-drawn stagecoaches to build up speed, go through the tunnel and slow down after exiting it. The set also featured 196 fluorescent tubes, 500 spotlights, and hundreds of LED spots. The biggest problem we had was building an enclosed tunnel with 1,000 large holes in it, that could cope with several vehicles preceded by a Russian arm weighing two and a half tons and travelling at 50 kph.” After the shoot the tunnel materials were donated to charity. Szabo explained that Budapest boasted hundreds of fantastic locations and could double for almost any city in the world. “The city has developed a lot in recent years, and now there are 15 sound stages as well as all the amazing locations.”

INCENTIVES MAKE ICELAND A HOT SPOT

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PECIAL legislation has been passed in Iceland that aims to enhance domestic culture and promote the country’s history and nature by supporting motion pictures and television programmes produced in Iceland. The reimbursement from the state treasury is 25% of the costs incurred in the production of films and television content in Iceland. Payments pertaining to employees and contractors are only to be included in production costs if they are verifiably taxable in Iceland. The reimbursement scheme does not cover the production of commercials or music videos. According to producer and director Bui Baldvinsson of Hero Production, naming Iceland’s most popular locations is hard. “Iceland has endless different landscapes with short distances between them,” he says. “But the south coast is the one easiest to access and thus the most popular place to shoot. The area around the village of Vik is currently the most common place to shoot, because it offers so many landscape options. Our favourite locations are the glaciers of Iceland and the glacier lagoon. The contrast and the extreme environment makes you feel so empowered, but also makes you feel tiny in the universe. But the crew of Hero Production really feels at home there. You become energised by being in these locations.”

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LIONS DAILY NEWS FRIDAY / JUNE 23 / 2017

SHORTLIST

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TITANIUM & INTEGRATED TITANIUM A01/005 ADIDAS ODDS • ADIDAS • ADIDAS SHOE • ENT./IDEA TAPROOT DENTSU, MUMBAI • PROD TAPROOT DENTSU MUMBAI • PR TAPROOT DENTSU, MUMBAI

INDIA

A01/006 BOOST YOUR VOICE • BOOST MOBILE • PROMOTE BOOST STORES AS POLLING STATIONS • ENT./IDEA 180LA, SANTA MONICA • PROD 180LA SANTA MONICA/THE CORNER SHOP, SANTA MONICA/THERAPY STUDIOS, LOS ANGELES/ ATOMICA MUSIC, TEXAS

USA

A01/011 THE REFUGEE NATION • AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL • AWARNESS AROUND THE REFUGEE CAUSE • ENT./IDEA OGILVY NEW YORK • PROD ASTEROIDE FILMS CURITIBA/CANJA AUDIO CULTURE, CURITIBA/SQUARE PIXEL, RIO DE JANEIRO A01/012 WE’RE THE SUPERHUMANS • CHANNEL 4 • THE PARALYMPICS • ENT./IDEA 4CREATIVE, LONDON • MEDIA 4CREATIVE, LONDON • PROD 4CREATIVE LONDON • PR 4CREATIVE, LONDON A01/039 IKEA RETAIL THERAPY • IKEA • FURNITURE & HOME ACCESSORIES • ENT./IDEA ÅKESTAM HOLST, STOCKHOLM • MEDIA MEC, STOCKHOLM • PROD ÅKESTAM HOLST STOCKHOLM • PR ÅKESTAM HOLST, STOCKHOLM A01/043 CARE COUNTS • WHIRLPOOL • HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCE • ENT./IDEA DIGITASLBI, CHICAGO • MEDIA DIGITASLBI, CHICAGO • PROD GOODSTORY FILMS NEW YORK/C41 MEDIA, NEW YORK/CUTTERS, CHICAGO • PR KETCHUM, CHICAGO

USA UNITED KINGDOM SWEDEN USA

A01/052 RESPONSIBLY THE BEER • UBREW • RESPONSIBLY • ENT./IDEA MCCANN WORLDGROUP, MILAN/MRM/MCCANN, MILAN/MCCANN MILAN • MEDIA RAPPORT ITALY, MILAN/UM, MILAN • PROD CRAFT WORLDWIDE LONDON/ THINK CATTLEYA, MILAN/DOCARTIST, MILAN • PR PERSUASION PR, GATESHEAD

ITALY

A01/057 NEW AND NOT IMPROVED • KRAFT HEINZ • KRAFT HEINZ COMPANY • ENT./IDEA CP+B, BOULDER • MEDIA STARCOM, CHICAGO • PR OLSON ENGAGE, CHICAGO

USA

A01/060 SCARIEST BK • BURGER KING • BURGER KING • ENT./IDEA DAVID, MIAMI • PROD CRANE.TV NEW YORK

USA

A01/069 IKEA: COOK THIS PAGE • IKEA CANADA • IKEA CANADA • ENT./IDEA LEO BURNETT TORONTO • PROD TRADE GRAPHICS BY DESIGN INC. CONCORD/PAPERTEC INC., GARFIELD/PRINTED BY SOMERSET, MISSISSAUGA/ GRAYSON MATTHEWS, TORONTO

CANADA

A01/071 BURGER CLAN • BURGER KING • ONLINE DELIVERY SERVICE • ENT./IDEA LOLA MULLENLOWE, MADRID • MEDIA WINK TTD, MADRID • PROD TRONCO MADRID • PR EVERCOM, MADRID

SPAIN

A01/075 MAGENTA UNLEASHED • DEUTSCHE TELEKOM • DEUTSCHE TELEKOM • ENT./IDEA SAATCHI & SAATCHI, LONDON • MEDIA MEDIACOM, DÜSSELDORF • PROD STRANGELOVE PRODUCTIONS LONDON/PASSION PICTURES, LONDON/ SPINDLE PRODUCTIONS, NORWICH/COFFEE AND TV, LONDON/SPEADE, LONDON • PR PROUD ROBINSON, BRIGHTON

UNITED KINGDOM

A01/078 HUNGERITHM • MARS CHOCOLATE AUSTRALIA • SNICKERS® • ENT./IDEA CLEMENGER BBDO MELBOURNE • MEDIA MEDIACOM AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE • PROD FINCH MELBOURNE/FLUTTER, MELBOURNE • PR CLEMENGER BBDO MELBOURNE

AUSTRALIA

A01/116 SCHOOL FOR JUSTICE • FREE A GIRL MOVEMENT • CHARITY • ENT./IDEA J. WALTER THOMPSON AMSTERDAM • MEDIA J. WALTER THOMPSON AMSTERDAM • PROD J. WALTER THOMPSON AMSTERDAM • PR J. WALTER THOMPSON AMSTERDAM A01/131

THE NETHERLANDS

UNLIMITED STADIUM • NIKE • NIKE LUNAR EPIC • ENT./IDEA BBH, SINGAPORE • PROD BBH SINGAPORE

SINGAPORE

A01/160 FEARLESS GIRL • STATE STREET GLOBAL ADVISORS • SHE ETF • ENT./IDEA MCCANN NEW YORK • PROD CRAFT WORLDWIDE NEW YORK/STUART WEISSMAN PRODUCTIONS, NEW YORK/COPILOT STRATEGIC MUSIC + SOUND, NEW YORK • PR STATE STREET GLOBAL ADVISORS COMMUNICATIONS, BOSTON

USA

A01/174 GOOGLE HOME OF THE WHOPPER • BURGER KING • WHOPPER • ENT./IDEA DAVID, MIAMI • PROD CAVIAR LOS ANGELES

USA

A01/193 THANKS 2016, IT’S BEEN WEIRD. • SPOTIFY • SPOTIFY • ENT./IDEA SPOTIFY, NEW YORK • MEDIA SPOTIFY, NEW YORK • PROD SPOTIFY NEW YORK

USA

A01/202 BRADSHAW STAIN • P&G • TIDE • ENT./IDEA SAATCHI & SAATCHI, NEW YORK • MEDIA HEARTS & SCIENCE, NEW YORK • PROD RATTLING STICK SANTA MONICA/THE MILL, LOS ANGELES/ARCADE EDIT, NEW YORK/ NYLON STUDIOS, NEW YORK/COMPANY 3, NEW YORK • PR TAYLOR, NEW YORK/MMK, NEW YORK

USA

A01/212 ANDES BAR 45 • AB INBEV • ANDES BEER • ENT./IDEA SAATCHI & SAATCHI, BUENOS AIRES • PROD PRIMO BUENOS AIRES/SAKE, BUENOS AIRES/LINDA TV, BUENOS AIRES A01/216 MY MUTANT BRAIN • KENZO • KENZO PARFUMS • ENT./IDEA MJZ, LOS ANGELES/BLACK FRAME, NEW YORK • PROD MJZ LOS ANGELES

ARGENTINA USA

INTEGRATED A01/003 BOOST YOUR VOICE • BOOST MOBILE • PROMOTE BOOST STORES AS POLLING STATIONS • ENT./IDEA 180LA, SANTA MONICA • PROD 180LA SANTA MONICA/THE CORNER SHOP, SANTA MONICA/ THERAPY STUDIOS, LOS ANGELES/ATOMICA MUSIC, TEXAS

USA

A01/018 MAKE YOUR NEXT MOVE - JOHN MALKOVICH • SQUARESPACE • DOMAINS/WEBSITES • ENT./IDEA SQUARESPACE, NEW YORK/JOHN X HANNES NEW YORK • MEDIA SQUARESPACE, NEW YORK • PROD SMUGGLER NEW YORK • PR SQUARESPACE, NEW YORK

USA

A01/037 BUSTER THE BOXER • JOHN LEWIS • JOHN LEWIS • ENT./IDEA ADAM&EVEDDB, LONDON • MEDIA MANNING GOTTLIEB OMD, LONDON • PROD BLINK PRODUCTIONS LONDON/MPC CREATIVE, LONDON/FINAL CUT, LONDON/MPC CREATIVE, LONDON

UNITED KINGDOM

A01/038 GIVE THE RAINBOW • MARS • SKITTLES • ENT./IDEA ADAM&EVEDDB, LONDON • MEDIA MEDIACOM, LONDON • PROD CAIN & ABEL LONDON

UNITED KINGDOM

A01/048 THE TRUTH IS • NEW YORK TIMES • NEWSPAPER • ENT./IDEA DROGA5, NEW YORK/THE NEW YORK TIMES, NEW YORK • PROD SECOND CHILD NEW YORK

USA

A01/051 MEET GRAHAM • TRANSPORT ACCIDENT COMMISSION VICTORIA • TRANSPORT ACCIDENT COMMISSION VICTORIA • ENT./IDEA CLEMENGER BBDO MELBOURNE • PROD FLARE PRODUCTIONS BBDO MELBOURNE/ AIRBAG PRODUCTIONS, MELBOURNE • PR CLEMENGER BBDO MELBOURNE

AUSTRALIA

A01/052 HUNGERITHM • MARS CHOCOLATE AUSTRALIA • SNICKERS® • ENT./IDEA CLEMENGER BBDO MELBOURNE • MEDIA MEDIACOM AUSTRALIA, MELBOURNE • PROD FINCH MELBOURNE/FLUTTER, MELBOURNE • PR CLEMENGER BBDO MELBOURNE

AUSTRALIA

A01/054 SICKKIDS VS • SICKKIDS FOUNDATION • SICKKIDS FOUNDATION • ENT./IDEA COSSETTE, TORONTO/SICKKIDS FOUNDATION, TORONTO • MEDIA OMD CANADA, TORONTO • PROD THE MILL NEW YORK/ SKIN & BONES, TORONTO/JAM3, TORONTO/WESTSIDE STUDIO, TORONTO/THE VANITY, TORONTO • PR COSSETTE, TORONTO A01/055 WHERE LIFE HAPPENS • IKEA • IKEA • ENT./IDEA ÅKESTAM HOLST, STOCKHOLM • PROD BACON COPENHAGEN • PR ÅKESTAM HOLST, STOCKHOLM

CANADA SWEDEN

A01/061 TIME IS PRECIOUS • NIKE • CLOTHING/FOOTWEAR/ACCESSORIES • ENT./IDEA WIEDEN+KENNEDY, PORTLAND • MEDIA WIEDEN+KENNEDY, PORTLAND/RAZORFISH, PORTLAND • PROD JOINT EDITORIAL PORTLAND

USA

A01/062 UNLIMITED • NIKE • CLOTHING/FOOTWEAR/ACCESSORIES • ENT./IDEA WIEDEN+KENNEDY, PORTLAND • MEDIA MINDSHARE, PORTLAND/RAZORFISH, SEATTLE • PROD PRETTYBIRD CULVER CITY

USA

A01/063 UNLIMITED GREATNESS: SERENA WILLIAMS • NIKE • CLOTHING/FOOTWEAR/ACCESSORIES • ENT./IDEA WIEDEN+KENNEDY, PORTLAND • MEDIA MACDONALD MEDIA, PORTLAND

USA

A01/064 JORDAN & CHELSEA’S BOOKING WEDDING • BOOKING.COM • BOOKING.COM • ENT./IDEA WIEDEN+KENNEDY, PORTLAND • MEDIA MINDSHARE USA, NEW YORK • PROD SMUGGLER LOS ANGELES/CARTEL, LOS ANGELES/ JOINT EDITORIAL, PORTLAND/LIME STUDIOS, SANTA MONICA/THE MILL, LOS ANGELES • PR HARRISON & SHRIFTMAN, NEW YORK

USA

A01/075 MADE BY GOOGLE • GOOGLE • GOOGLE PIXEL • ENT./IDEA DROGA5, NEW YORK/GOOGLE, MOUNTAIN VIEW • MEDIA PHD, NEW YORK • PROD SOMESUCH LONDON/EPOCH FILMS, NEW YORK/ THE DIRECTORS BUREAU, LOS ANGELES/NEXUS, NEW YORK/ROCK PAPER SCISSORS, NEW YORK

USA

A01/076 MADE THE JOHNSONVILLE WAY • JOHNSONVILLE • JOHNSONVILLE SAUSAGES • ENT./IDEA DROGA5, NEW YORK/JOHNSONVILLE SAUSAGE, SHEBOYGAN FALLS • PROD ARTS & SCIENCES LOS ANGELES

USA

A01/081 CHEETOS MUSEUM • CHEETOS • CHEETOS • ENT./IDEA GOODBY SILVERSTEIN & PARTNERS, SAN FRANCISCO • MEDIA OMD USA, NEW YORK • PROD CAVIAR LOS ANGELES/COMPANY 3, SANTA MONICA/ WHITEHOUSE POST, SANTA MONICA/ONE UNION RECORDING, SAN FRANCISCO • PR THE MARKETING ARM, LOS ANGELES/KETCHUM, SAN FRANCISCO A01/086 CHANNEL 4 PARALYMPICS • CHANNEL 4 • PARALYMPICS • ENT./IDEA OMD UK, LONDON/4CREATIVE, LONDON/CHANNEL 4, LONDON • MEDIA OMD UK, LONDON • PROD 4CREATIVE LONDON A01/106 2016 WRAPPED • SPOTIFY • SPOTIFY • ENT./IDEA SPOTIFY, NEW YORK • MEDIA SPOTIFY, NEW YORK • PROD SPOTIFY NEW YORK A01/115

GIVE REGISTRY • MYER • NA • ENT./IDEA CLEMENGER BBDO MELBOURNE • PROD FLARE PRODUCTIONS BBDO MELBOURNE • PR CLEMENGER BBDO MELBOURNE

USA UNITED KINGDOM USA AUSTRALIA

A01/116 T HE CHILD REPLACEMENT PROGRAMME • MARS NZ • PEDIGREE • ENT./IDEA COLENSO BBDO, AUCKLAND • MEDIA STARCOM NZ, AUCKLAND • PROD EXIT FILMS AUCKLAND/CREATURE, AUCKLAND/FRANKLIN RD, AUCKLAND • PR IMPACT PR, AUCKLAND

NEW ZEALAND

A01/126 BRADSHAW STAIN • P&G • TIDE • ENT./IDEA SAATCHI & SAATCHI, NEW YORK • MEDIA HEARTS & SCIENCE, NEW YORK • PROD RATTLING STICK SANTA MONICA/THE MILL, LOS ANGELES/ARCADE EDIT, NEW YORK/ NYLON STUDIOS, NEW YORK/COMPANY 3, NEW YORK • PR TAYLOR, NEW YORK/MMK, NEW YORK

USA

A01/140 P ITCHING FRENCH FILMS TO HOLLYWOOD • ALLIANCE FRANÇAISE DE SINGAPOUR • CINÉ CLUB • ENT./IDEA OGILVY & MATHER SINGAPORE • MEDIA OGILVY & MATHER SINGAPORE • PROD OGILVY & MATHER SINGAPORE • PR OGILVY & MATHER SINGAPORE

SINGAPORE

A01/146 THIS GIRL CAN - PHENOMENAL WOMEN • SPORT ENGLAND • SPORT ENGLAND • ENT./IDEA FCB INFERNO, LONDON • MEDIA CARAT, LONDON • PROD FRAMESTORE LONDON/SOUNDTREE MUSIC, LONDON • PR BLUE RUBICON, LONDON

UNITED KINGDOM

A01/154 NEW AND NOT IMPROVED • KRAFT HEINZ • KRAFT HEINZ COMPANY • ENT./IDEA CP+B, BOULDER • MEDIA STARCOM, CHICAGO • PR OLSON ENGAGE, CHICAGO

USA

A01/209 DID YOU MEAN MAILCHIMP? • MAILCHIMP • EMAIL MARKETING • ENT./IDEA DROGA5, NEW YORK/MAILCHIMP, ATLANTA • MEDIA PHD, NEW YORK • PROD RESN WELLINGTON/JUCO, LOS ANGELES/BROSMIND, BARCELONA • PR DROGA5, NEW YORK

USA

A01/214 PRICE ON THE JERSEY • WALMART • WALMART • ENT./IDEA DM9DDB, SÃO PAULO • MEDIA DM9DDB, SÃO PAULO • PR DM9DDB, SÃO PAULO

BRAZIL

ENT./IDEA : ENTRANT IDEA PROD : PRODUCTION

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‘THERE’S NO STOPPING US NOW’ Some 23 years after the fall of apartheid, South Africa has become one of the world’s leading filming destinations, pulling in top-notch creatives, producers and directors from across the globe. Marlene Edmunds reports

Molo Sana’s Brand South Africa campaign

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OUTH Africa has it all. The

country of 55 million people and 11 official languages not only offers skilled crews and production professionals, but any number of locations, from jungles and oceans to mountains and the grassy savannahs that are home to some of the world’s most magnificent animals. “Every year, we see the country grow in its capacity to facilitate international filmmaking,” says AFS Productions partner and executive producer Dale Kushner, whose company has been in the business for 21 years. “There’s no stopping us now.”

JASON XENOPOULOS “WE ARE SEEING THE BIRTH OF A NEW AESTHETIC... IT’S COLOURFUL, VIBRANT AND UNASHAMEDLY AFRICAN”

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On the creative front, there is also no stopping the promise of the new generation that has come of age in post-apartheid South Africa. “Young South Africans are beginning to assert their identity in bold new ways. We are seeing the birth of a new aesthetic — one that is defined by cultural re-appropriation and the eclectic and irreverent mash-up of western and African influences. It’s colourful, vibrant and unashamedly African,” says Jason Xenopoulos, CEO of Native VML and Y&R South Africa. Xenopoulos, who is a member of this year’s Lions Entertainment jury, adds: “This aesthetic has changed the face of art, fashion and music and is being reflected in the way brands are manifesting in the marketplace.” Among Y&R’s more recent projects is The Surfshack Outreach’s ‘True

Stories’, a campaign that aims to help combat drug addiction and gangsterism. It follows young adults whose lives have been transformed through surfing. Kevan Aspoas, CEO of The Jupiter Drawing Room (Cape Town), believes the first generation of post-apartheid South Africans brings a welcome and dynamic new viewpoint. “In addition to their opinions, they also bring the unshackled minds of a vibrant youth,” he says. He also believes South Africa’s new generation will play a more powerful role in global creativity in the future: “The world will look to us for a fresh African perspective instead of creating their own ‘Africa’ or ‘African’ inspiration.” There is criticism that creativity produced by the international market misses the mark in terms of reaching its intended

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audience in Africa. Director Mzi Kumalo, a former Velocity alum now with Darling, has worked across the African continent. He agrees that South African marketers have some homework to do: “Our multicultural society ties marketers stomachs in knots. We need to start reflecting society in our work, as well as the various social strata and all the subtleties within. In referencing real scenarios, we must stop resorting to stereotypes. We can certainly use them as a tool to help set the scene or context, but not as the punchline, or market or product differentiator.” Kumalo points out that research into understanding South African

MZI KUMALO: “WE MUST STOP RESORTING TO STEREOTYPES. WE CAN CERTAINLY USE THEM AS A TOOL TO HELP SET THE SCENE OR CONTEXT, BUT NOT AS THE PUNCHLINE, OR MARKET OR PRODUCT DIFFERENTIATOR”

Velocity’s Anton Visser and Zayd Halim

consumers is tainted with preconceived notions about what certain people want or need. “We need to reverse the process and study South African lifestyles within context,” he says. “This is how our messaging will hit home.” Black creatives working in agencies, he adds, need to speak up and not be afraid to share their stories and perspectives: “Their childhood is the majority of the market research they need.” On the production side, both veterans and new players are attempting to move away from the stereotypes. Giant Films director Sam Coleman used his expertise in digital when working with

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Ogilvy South Africa on the Audi Q2 ‘#untaggable’. Audi was running a series of digital films exploring the need to constantly hashtag everything. The brief was to show how the best and most beautiful things in life are impossible to define, the message being that the Q2 is ‘untaggable’. “You can’t call it an SUV, a sports car, a coupé or a luxury car,” Coleman says. “It’s all of these things and more. In an age where we instantly hashtag everything and our experiences, you can’t put it in a box.” Ogilvy decided the South African lawyer, model, actress and activist Thando Hopa was the perfect candidate for the ‘#untaggable’ campaign on the basis that “she is a rare, multifaceted and multi-layered individual”. Coleman adds: “My job was to bring her personality across in a visually arresting way. Thando is someone who challenges boxes and, as a black woman in this territory, she has had several to challenge, among them stereotypes surrounding albinism, with which she was born.” People with albinism have been persecuted and even killed in parts of Sub-Saharan Africa as a result of lack of education and superstition. Coleman continues: “What was so great about this project was having a famous brand like Audi focus on albinism and move it into the spotlight in Southern African countries, helping to normalise how people perceive this rare genetic disease.” Patriot is a new director/producer-led production company launched by former Velocity players Anton Visser and Zayd Halim. The boutique outfit

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SCHWHOPPING RESULT THE JUPITER Drawing Room (Cape Town) showcased its integrated talents in Burger King’s recent ‘#Schwhoppers’ campaign. “It was a great example of creative that was custommade for each platform, and nimble and tactical in execution,” says the agency’s executive creative director Lucas Van Vuuren. “The TV ad built on the insight that people get food envy and translated that into ‘Whopper envy’ — the feeling you get when you compare whatever you’re eating with a Whopper. Digitally, we offered people the opportunity to swap any not-so-great meal for a Whopper by sending us pics of the offending meal. In return, we sent them a voucher.” Jupiter Drawing Room used its social platforms to promote the campaign and a microsite as the tool for swapping. And the outcome? “’Schwhopper’ trended and sales were great,” Van Vuuren says.

CAPE TOWN CALLING MANY international shoots end up in Cape Town. “In general terms, Gauteng province and the Western Cape probably have a 50:50 share of commercials,” says Bobby Amm, executive officer of the Commercial Producers Association of South Africa. Local spots tend to predominate in Gauteng, which is home to Johannesburg, and international commercials in the Western Cape. “For international work, most of our business comes from the UK, the US, Germany, France and Scandinavia,” she adds. Monica Rorvik, head of film and media promotion at Wesgro, which owns a 10% stake in Cape Town Film Studios, notes that crews gain experience working on big international film and TV shoots, and that experience is then passed on and benefits the South African industry as a whole. Cape Town has recently hosted commercials for clients including Samsung, Adidas, Toyota, Nutella, Hugo Boss, H&M, IKEA, Nestlé, Citroen, Nivea, PlayStation, Johnson & Johnson, BMW, Volvo, Daimler, Nike, Colgate, Oreo, Jeep, Jägermeister, Opel, Audi, Hyundai, Renault, Mini, Speedo, Tommy Hilfiger and Marks & Spencer.

THREE MILLION YEARS AND COUNTING JOHANNESBURG is the capital of Gauteng, the smallest but wealthiest of South Africa’s nine provinces. The city offers a range of stunning locations, from major art deco buildings, the inner-city Maboneng Precinct, tree-lined suburbs, trendy streets with outdoor eateries and cafes, and neighbourhood markets. The industrial engine of South Africa, Gauteng is also home to the largest stadium in Africa, the 95,000-seater FNB Stadium; the 1.4 km Tswaing Meteorite Crater; and The Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site at Maropeng, which is home to the Sterkfontein cave system. It was here that a 2.1-million-year-old skull, nicknamed Mrs Ples, and a three-million-yearold Australopithecus fossil skeleton named Little Foot were discovered.

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aims to offer the quality and exacting standards for which Velocity was known, but with more flexibility. Visser says: “Zayd is a very solutions-driven guy, so it will allow us to plug into agencies earlier, as we did for Cape Town agency FoxP2’s campaign for the SPCA [Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals]. That campaign reflected some of the more collaborative ways we want to think and work. We were brought early into the process, we had input in the scripts and we also co-wrote the director’s treatment. The old divide between concept and treatment fell away and, instead, it was just a bunch of people with different skills sitting down to make some ads together.” Visser says that giving up the director’s chair has been incredibly liberating

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1 Director Mzi Kumalo, formerly with Velocity, now with Darling 2 AFS Productions’ Old Spice shoot

and stimulating: “It was only when we started to execute the work that our traditional roles [director, copywriter, producer, etc] really came back into play. It was a beautiful, constructive experience.” Patriot also plans to expand into the service side. “I think it is appealing for clients that we are a director-led service company, because they gain the benefit of our working knowledge of the best suppliers, casting director, locations, crews and DOPs,” Halim says.

ANTON VISSER: “THE OLD DIVIDE BETWEEN CONCEPT AND TREATMENT FELL AWAY AND, INSTEAD, IT WAS JUST A BUNCH OF PEOPLE WITH DIFFERENT SKILLS SITTING DOWN TO MAKE SOME ADS TOGETHER”

He adds that the service side will also offer more opportunities to mentor and train young talent — something both Visser and Halim consider a priority goal. Just after the collapse of apartheid, Halim went to Velocity right out of film school. “I was one of a handful of non-white production staff and I was young, so it took a while for people to get to know me and to look past my skin colour,” he says. “Now I’d say there’s a bit less of that kind of prejudice and the industry is a bit more transformed — but not nearly as much as it could and should be.” While Patriot uses crews from all walks of life, it has plans to help develop talented people of colour and to employ them. “The service side of the industry will offer an opportunity to mentor, train and expose new people coming into the industry to the world-class talent coming to South Africa to film,” Halim adds. There are a number of South Africans in the industry who, like Halim and Visser, started their careers in the post-apartheid era and they are now on a mission to change the industry. Founded by respected creative advertising producer Simoné Bosman and Darling co-founders Melina McDonald and Lorraine Smit, Molo Sana was launched in October as the first South African majority black female-

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www.afsproductions.com

2017/06/09 2:14 PM

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Your Vision Into Reality

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owned commercials production house in South Africa. The company, which consists of a collective of established film directors, photographers and content producers, aims to change the way stories about black South Africans and the African continent are told. Bosman’s CV includes stints at South Africa’s top advertising agencies, where she produced a raft of award-winning commercials. The Molo Sana motto, “we’ve got your black”, reflects the company’s mission to represent black talent that is not exposed to the advertising community but have African stories and insights to share. “All of Molo Sana’s talent comes from a rich background of storytelling in film directing and photography, having worked on leading TV dramas, films, music videos, etc. Our aim is to work with agency creatives to produce commercials work and content that is a true reflection of our society and of our people,” Bosman says. She adds: “With our pulse on the ground, we take all of these perspectives and insert them into the ad world, so that we don’t see an inaccurate view of what we know today.” Among Molo Sana’s latest projects is a web campaign for Brand South Africa. The campaign, ‘#InspiredByMyConstitution’, follows

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3 1 AFS Productions’ Brin and Dale Kushner

Navigator facilitated a Lexus spot for Dentsu 2

1 Behind the scenes on Navigator’s Neffos shoot

four celebrities as they talk about how they exercise their rights under the South African constitution. Among them is television personality Hulisani Ravele, who talks about her constitutional right to speak her native language, Tshivenda, which is one of South Africa’s 11 official languages. There is no question that the service sector is one of the leading drivers of the South African industry. During its

SIMONÉ BOSMAN: “OUR AIM IS TO WORK WITH AGENCY CREATIVES TO PRODUCE COMMERCIALS WORK AND CONTENT THAT IS A TRUE REFLECTION OF OUR SOCIETY AND OF OUR PEOPLE”

21-year history, family-run AFS Productions has not only survived but, under the direction of partner and executive producer Dale Kushner and director/executive producer Brin Kushner, thrived. The company is as renowned for mixing business with fun as it is for its locations savvy. While it films outside South Africa when the job calls for it, Brin Kushner says that, this year, AFS has been able to provide all the required locations within the country. A case in point is a recent campaign for Old Spice, which aired at the 2017 Super Bowl. In the spot, Old Spice’s ‘Legendary Man’ character is in the jungle, interacting with a silverback

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FOCUS ON SOUTH AFRICA

gorilla. “This particular TVC saw us testing our abilities to bring a script to life by shooting animatronic gorillas, creating a shower in the midst of sand dunes and even making a dog park look like a lush jungle,” Brin Kushner says. “The bulk of the jungle scenes were actually shot in a residential area of Cape Town and the gorilla team was headed up by Peter Elliot, who worked on Gorillas In The Mist. The guy in the actual suit never broke character.” AFS also helped out on the reboot of the new Dos Equis ‘Most Interesting Man in the World’ campaign. The spots were directed by Traktor out of Rattling Stick, with DOP Tim Maurice Jones. “It was one fun campaign,” says Dale Kushner, “from [shooting] on a game reserve at sunset, where we had to stop filming due to an inquisitive rhino, to Samurai sword battles in an abandoned factory to airboats racing over the Atlantis dunes outside Cape Town. Another veteran is Navigator Films, which is coming up to its 19th year in the business. In addition to a raft of European clients, Navigator executive producer Meike Laesch Schoeman says interest from Asia is picking up. “This is an area we expect to grow in the future,” she adds.

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She cites a recent job for Chinese cell phone manufacturer Neffos, with German advertising agency Saint Elmos, directed by Laurentius Emmelmann from e+p films. Clever money management and creative thinking turned a tight budget into full production values, Laesch Schoeman says: “We shot on various locations day and night all over Cape Town, with two creatives and two production crews from Germany.” The talent included German pop star Yvonne Catterfeld. Navigator also facilitated a Lexus spot for Japanese agency Dentsu, collaborating with production houses AOI Pro Tokyo and Hamlet Belgium. “It was the third time we’ve worked with the Japanese, and it’s always an amazing experience on all levels,” Laesch-Schoeman says. “Belgian director Ian Pons Jewell was on board for the shoot — as were all the toys, including Filmtech’s Russian Arm.” On the flashy technology front, Gatehouse Commercials manager Joel Wynne says two breakthroughs — the drone and the hand-held gimbal mount — are allowing the industry to be more creative, as well as more cost effective. “The legality issues with drones in South Africa are finally sorted and we

Hungry Man shooting a commercial for World of Tanks

now have experienced and licensed operators to help realise more creative and exotic shots,” Wynne adds. “Aerial shots are now several times cheaper than they were and, because the vehicle is unmanned, you can get closer to the action without risking safety. Hand-held camera-mount technology has now matured to the point where there are several brands creating three-axis stabilised hand-held mounts that allow filmmakers so much more leeway in terms of how they want to create shots.” Among the projects upon which Gatehouse has worked in the last year was a short for Drake and Apple Music, with Anthony Mandler as director. The shoot took place in and around Johannesburg, as well as in the Namibian desert. “We had car chases, dance scenes and dramatic views over Joburg from a beautiful house, as well as filming with cheetahs in the desert,” Wynne says. “At one stage, we were still bidding the project out, with the director already on a plane from LA to start recceing. It happened very fast and furious.” While commercials producers do not benefit directly, they are capitalising on the halo effect of several South African tax incentives. These breaks,

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along with the massive success of Cape Town Film Studios, have fuelled a major uptick in work coming into the territory. Cape Town Film Studios has been booked solid since it launched in 2010 and continues to expand. In addition to bringing in top international film and TV productions such as Black Sails and The Empty Man, servicing these productions has also that meant that local crew skills have been mentored by the best in the global industry. Cape Town Film Studios has also created some 40,000 jobs over the last seven years and it is hoped this success can be replicated in other South African cities, notably Durban and Johannesburg, where plans are under way to build more studio space. South African producer Anant Singh (Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom; Sarafina!) is involved in the development of Durban’s new eThekwini Film City. Singh’s company, Videovision Entertainment, holds a 50% stake in Cape Town Film Studios, and he expects Durban’s $500m complex to to bring in thousands of new jobs for both the city and the province of KwaZulu Natal. eThekwini Film City will start off with three sound stages. The backlot, which can be expanded as needed, will include workshops, post-production and technical facilities, and a film school. Toni Monty, head of the Durban Film Office, expects the new studio to have a spectacular effect on the growth of the local industry. Durban hosted some 50 commercials shoots in 2016, among them HogarthOgilvy for Nescafe, Darling for Pick n Pay and Egg Films for ABSA. “The great thing about shooting commercials in Durban is that, as a city, we understand the need for fast turnaround times, and the Durban Film

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Office team works hard to meet these requirements,” Monty says. She adds that a film-friendly policy and varied landscapes “make for an ideal location for commercials that need to wrap on a tight schedule without breaking the budget”. Durban’s locations go from palm trees and beach cafés through urban steel and glass to rolling hills and meandering countryside within 30 minutes from the city centre. Durban also has the largest Indian population outside of India, and its array of Indian architecture, markets and some 40 Hindu temples are an added attraction. Also in the works is Studio Joburg, a film hub based at the Johannesburg Expo Centre in Nasrec, where many movies, including District 9, and commercials have been shot. The complex, which will offer 50,000 sq m of indoor facilities and 100,000 sq m of outdoor space, will include themed precincts of major world cities, including New York, London and Paris. These initiatives have been greeted with enthusiasm by South Africa’s commercials production houses. Says Gatehouse’s Wynne: “There’s no bigger vote of confidence in our industry than to see entrepreneurs willing to sink funds into long-term projects like studios, backlots and other capitalintensive ventures. The nice thing about the Joburg hub is that it is taking over old exhibition space, so it’s immediately available for shoots. Durban is not online yet, but there should be useable space by 2022.” Wynne adds: “Our go-to destination in

JOEL WYNNE “THERE’S NO BIGGER VOTE OF CONFIDENCE IN OUR INDUSTRY THAN TO SEE ENTREPRENEURS WILLING TO SINK FUNDS INTO LONG-TERM PROJECTS LIKE STUDIOS, BACKLOTS AND OTHER CAPITAL-INTENSIVE VENTURES”

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South Africa is still Cape Town, but we would expect to move certain shoots to Joburg should studio space not be available in Cape Town. There is never enough space. Let me qualify that — there is never enough space when you need it.” Philip Key, CEO of Moonlighting, which runs both a commercials and a film business, agree: “For producers, the more studios the better. It’s difficult to sell a destination as having studios, only to find they are booked for months or years in advance and you cannot get access.” He adds that studio variety and location is also important: “When you need an SFX stage, you don’t want to be paying for a fully treated sound stage. If you want 500 sq m, you don’t want to be forced into a 2,000 sq m facility.” One of Moonlighting’s most interesting recent jobs was Hungry Man’s commercials for World of Tanks. The storyboards depicted various comic scenarios being interrupted by a tank suddenly crashing though the wall. The ads, which were played at the Superbowl, were directed by Dave Laden from Hungry Man for agency Mekanism. “It had all the elements,” Key says. “Great scripts, greats performance from local talent, big SFX, big set builds and a great director.” The campaign was filmed on Noordhoek Common, south of Cape Town. The common — normally populated by people walking their dogs and children playing — became home to four sets, each of which was then destroyed by the tank. Transported down from the Bloemfontein military museum on the back of a flatbed, the tank was driven throughout the filming by a tank regiment commander from Johannesburg.

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FRIDAY / JUNE 23 / 2017 LIONS DAILY NEWS

SMALL BUT PUNCHY

The Netherlands is small in size only. Commercially, culturally and creatively Europe’s most densely populated country punches well above its weight. Andy Fry reports

D

OWN the centuries, the

Netherlands has had a remarkable impact on the world. From the masterpieces of Rembrandt and Van Gogh to iconic exports such as Big Brother, The Voice, Total Football and Heineken, this small nation’s output has frequently captured the global imagination. Ask people why and they tend to cite two key factors. The first is the country’s size, which means it has always been driven in the direction of international trade. While early manifestations of this may have been morally dubious, the modern-day legacy is an entrepreneurial spirit and strong commercial acumen. The second is the country’s liberal and progressive culture, perhaps best exemplified by Amsterdam. The Dutch capital’s tolerance has engendered an open-mindedness that has given it a deserved reputation as an ideas and innovation laboratory. This combination of progressiveness, internationalism and entrepreneurship has also made the Netherlands one of the communications capitals of the world, with Amsterdam generally regarded as being on a creative par with London or New York. “You can look back to

landmark moments like Wieden+Kennedy launching its Amsterdam office in 1992 and 180 Amsterdam opening in 1998,” says Kerrie Finch, CEO of reputation-management firm FinchFactor. “But Dutch-based companies have continued to evolve ahead of changes in the market, so now we also have the likes of 72andSunny and producer MediaMonks doing great work.” An apt illustration of Dutch creativity in action was JWT Amsterdam’s 2016 campaign for ING, ‘The Next Rembrandt’ — a big winner at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity last year. Using a 3D printer, JWT collaborated with Microsoft, the Delft University of Technology and the Rembrandt House Museum to design a software programme that could replicate all aspects of the Dutch painter’s artistic techniques to create a new masterpiece. JWT Amsterdam’s executive creative director, Bas Korsten, says: “The campaign captured everyone’s imagination because it focused on the intersection of AI and creativity. It raised some key questions about what art and creativity really are, and the way in which

Part of Halal’s campaign for ASOS

humans will interact with new technology.” For the agency, the success of the Rembrandt campaign “taught us that we really enjoy working on projects that are more than just communications campaigns”, Korsten adds. “We also really liked the fact it involved partners. It’s good for creativity to involve different ideas and perspectives.” ‘The Next Rembrandt’ was also an example of an agency having the determination to see something through: “A lot of people were very sceptical at the start, but creativity is all about going where no one has gone before and attempting the impossible,” Korsten says. “Right now, for example, we’re talking to [client] BMW about developments in time travel and teleportation. It may seem far-fetched, but that’s how you uncover the great new ideas.” Another Amsterdam-based agency currently riding high is 72andSunny. Recent work to have captured global attention is its 2016 campaign for Unilever’s young men’s personal-care brand Axe. Dubbed ‘Find Your Magic’, the campaign urges men to celebrate what makes them real — their quirky nose, wheelchair dance moves or an affinity for wearing high heels. There has also been some outstanding work for Smirnoff, featuring albino DJ Jeffrey Jewell; and adidas, with the feisty ‘blah blah blah’ campaign. “Our agency has had a spirit of openness embedded in it from the start,” says managing director Nic Owen, “and I think that’s something that you see in Amsterdam. It’s one of the most open cities in the world and that encourages inclusiveness, playfulness and collaboration.” A side effect of this is that Amsterdam has become attractive to talent from other territories, adds executive creative director Stuart Harkness, whose career path pre-72andSunny took him via W+K in Portland and London. “It’s an exciting place to live and work,” Harkness adds, “because it has such a vibrant youth culture. Talent is drawn here and that gives it a global vibe.” Echoing JWT’s Korsten, Owen says there is a strong inter-disciplinary feel to Amsterdam’s agency scene that has helped it stand out from the international pack. “There’s a strong design heritage in the Netherlands, as well as a fast-growing

BAS KORSTEN “WE’RE TALKING TO BMW ABOUT DEVELOPMENTS IN TIME TRAVEL AND TELEPORTATION. IT MAY SEEM FAR-FETCHED, BUT THAT’S HOW YOU UNCOVER THE GREAT NEW IDEAS”


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IT industry. So it’s possible to put programme coders and makers together with the more traditional creative disciplines.” The weather-obsessed agency has even gone as far as getting into product creation, launching a stylish waterproof onesie called a Raynsie. “It’s been a useful learning process for us because it introduces us to the kind of challenges our clients face every day,” Owen says. “And it fits in well with the sense of self-expression and entrepreneurship you encounter here.” An interesting result of Amsterdam’s bold enterprise culture is that non-traditional companies are flourishing. A prime example is MediaMonks, a production firm that launched in Hilversum in 2001 and has grown to become a major player in the world of creative communications. At the last count, it had won 96 Cannes Lions, including two Grands Prix. “At the very beginning, the decision was taken to be a production company, not an agency,” says ‘main monk’ Victor Knaap. “The result is we have built a strong position for ourselves, producing in any format for Dutch and international clients. Because we were born and raised in a small market, we learned to be efficient, so we’ve also been able to transfer the model to markets around the world.” Knaap agrees that the Dutch market has many unique qualities, “but we have also benefited from a big growth in the number of startups and scale-ups in the last few years”, he adds. “That’s creating 1

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1 IMA’s Maddie Raedts and Emilie Tabor 2 ‘Main monk’ Victor Knaap

some interesting crossovers between technology and advertising.” High on the agenda for MediaMonks is to encourage a co-ordinated approach to branded production. “An agency will come up with an idea that then needs to be produced across all kinds of different touch points in different territories,” Knaap says. “But that process is rarely integrated. So you might get the brief for the TV commercial and then the digital brief a couple of weeks later. Brands would be better served if there were more effective producer supervision of this process.” In terms of the kind of ground-breaking work for which MediaMonks is known, recent examples include a campaign for Audi Norway that allowed consumers to test-drive the Audi Q5 in a virtual-reality sandbox. “The campaign helped the car become the bestselling model in Norway and it’s now being extended across trade shows and car shows and into other markets,” Knaap says. “I’m a big believer that we should follow the lead of Dutch format creators like Talpa and stretch a creative idea into new markets when it has proven to be successful.” In terms of the integrated approach referred to above, Knaap cites a recent cross-platform campaign for barbecue brand Weber. He also points to innovations in personalisation, such as Airforce.com, a platform built for the US Air Force (USAF): “The website features an intelligent interface that helps to inspire recruits to learn, explore and discover career opportunities with the 2

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USAF. Each piece of content and every career that makes up Airforce.com is analysed and adjusted to the profile and persona of each user. I don’t get why we aren’t seeing more of this yet. The technology for us to deliver personalised content is already there and should be used.” MediaMonks may be the most high profile, but it is not the only Dutch production company geared up to work across different formats and genres. “It’s a consequence of the market’s size that Dutch producers work across a range of areas,” says Gijs Determeijer, a partner/ owner at Amsterdam-based producer Halal: “Companies like Halal have learned to innovate on small budgets and have also developed an international mindset.” In the case of Halal, that means doing everything from feature films to photographic shoots, Determeijer says: “We recently completed a campaign for ASOS that involved a series of digital commercials, but we have also had a film showcased at the Berlinale [Prince]. And we recently made the feature-length documentary Genderbende, which is about five young people who have chosen to live without defining themselves as either male or female.” As an example of its pioneering brand work, Determeijer cites a campaign for agency Anomaly Amsterdam and T-Mobile that involved the first ever live-stream commercials shot in the Netherlands. The ads, directed by Johan Kramer, were shot on mobiles to test the


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quality of T-Mobile’s network and showed scenes from all over the Netherlands taking place in the course of one evening. Also making waves is IMA, an influencermarketing agency set up in 2010 by Emilie Tabor and Maddie Raedts, now strategic director and creative director respectively. Tabor and Raedts say their business is about taking a client’s brief and working with digital influencers to create a tailored communications strategy. The agency, which has a team of around 60, works with a global network of 15,000 influencers across the fashion, beauty, food, travel and technology sectors. IMA’s work is primarily about creating aspirational branded content that can be

A GREAT INCENTIVE THE NETHERLANDS has always offered a warm welcome to the international creative community. Many firms employ foreign talent, while events such as technology exhibition IBC and documentary festival IDFA are worldrenowned meeting points. In addition, the country is also making a concerted effort to attract film productions via an initiative called Take The Netherlands. “A big attraction for international firms is our 30% cash rebate for feature films,” says Netherlands film commissioner Bas van der Ree. “But there are several other factors that make the Netherlands a great place to base a movie production. We have a wide variety of locations, excellent professionals, a great infrastructure and the famous Dutch light. Dutch crews are also very reliable, so we have a reputation for always shooting according to the schedule.” Productions that have taken advantage of this package include Christopher Nolan’s feature film Dunkirk, which shot for four weeks in the Netherlands and received €1m from the incentive scheme. Other beneficiaries of the scheme include US production The Hitman’s Bodyguard and the French thriller Gangsterdam. “So far, the incentive has benefited 188 productions in its first three years, 60% of them international,” van der Ree says. “We’re also hoping to extend the incentive to scripted television in the near future.” The success of the 30% incentive is now encouraging some local firms to invest with a view to expansion. Leading audio post-production firm WarnierPosta, for example, is soon to open a state-of-theart Dolby Atmos studio. Chief operating officer Christan Muiser says: “We’re the market leader in the Netherlands for high-end audio in films, TV and gaming. But the incentive means we’re seeing more international co-productions coming into the country, so there’s an opportunity for us to expand the range of audio work we currently do.”

FOCUS ON THE NETHERLANDS

disseminated by influencers to their fans and followers on social media. This work is typically designed to dovetail with the work created by more traditional agencies, say Tabor and Raedts, who describe influencer marketing as a way for brands to make a personal connection with consumers that they might not otherwise make. IMA recently launched an online strategy called ‘#EyeLoveTommy’ for Tommy Hilfiger in France, Italy, Spain and Germany, which sits alongside the brand’s ad campaign. This follows IMA’s previous work for Hilfiger, called ‘Hilfiger Island’. Other brands to have benefited from the IMA approach include Esprit, Innocent, CK and Diesel. Tabor and Raedts say influencer marketing can work for a lot of different brands, “but the best results tend to be for lifestyle brands that people feel the need to talk about and recommend. There needs to be a level of authenticity Like their industry peers, Tabor and Raedts stress that part of the Netherlands’ strength is its internationalism — an asset that is likely to become even more valuable in an era of US and UK isolationism. It is also a theme that Finch emphasises: “I moved here 15 years ago from London and have found that the different attitudes and perspectives in Amsterdam generate a broader mindset and creative friction. Like a lot of companies in the city, FinchFactor has a diverse set of employees.” Finch stresses, however, that the Netherlands’ creative success story is not just about a single city: “There’s the Delft University of Technology, which is a world-class institution. And Utrecht is an important hub for the gaming industry. Then you have the cities of Eindhoven and Rotterdam, which are both known for design, technology and innovation. Creativity is something you’ll find right across this country,” she says. “Eindhoven and Rotterdam are both known for design, technology and innovation. Creativity is something you’ll find right across this country,” Finch says. Dinesh Sonak, managing director of Dutch art directors’ club ADCN says he wants the Netherlands to become “the silicon valley of advertising”. His organisation is playing its part in making this a reality by encouraging greater interaction among talent from different disciplines. “Since I arrived in 2014, the ADCN has reinvented itself as a multidisciplinary club where people from different fields can come together

and inspire each other,” he says. “We believe it’s at the intersection of the different disciplines that creativity really happens.” More emphasis has also been placed on reaching out to clients: “Sometimes there’s a lack of understanding about how ideas are sold inside companies. So we do a lot of coaching and workshops around the business application of creative ideas.” Sonak and the ADCN play an active role in the Embassy of Dutch Creativity, a popular event that takes place across four days during the Cannes Lions. “The Embassy is an example of Dutch entrepreneurship,” Sonak says. “It’s like a creative trade mission where around 30 to 40 Dutch companies showcase their talent to the international market. This isn’t only about promoting the use of creativity within communications — it’s also an accelerator that can stimulate innovation across all industries.” The Embassy is also a great opportunity to learn about the work on show in Cannes, Sonak adds, with Dutch jury members providing insights into their experience. And it’s also great fun — another thing the Dutch are good at: “We want it to have a festival feel, like the Holland Heineken House, which has become such an institution at the Olympics.” Halal 1(5th FridayV.pdf

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FOCUS ON SPAIN

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MORE THAN JUST BLOOD SPORTS

Bullfights, sangria and sunny beaches. They’re the clichés. But the country has an astonishing variety of locations, skilled film crews — and in the last six months has seen a surprising boom in demand for the country’s production services. Gary Smith asks what’s going on

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NE THEORY about the uptick in

the Spanish production services sector is that it is picking up new work on the back of Germany’s booming economy. “In the first three months of this year, we worked for 75 shooting days, which is already an incredible statistic,” says Toni Schulz, executive producer and managing director of Mamma Team. “But when you take into consideration the fact that we didn’t start back after the winter break until the third week of January, it’s even more impressive. Clearly some of that is being driven by Germany — but we also secured six French jobs recently, and that’s also unprecedented in the 14 years I’ve been working here.” From this avalanche of work, one of Schulz’s favourite jobs was a campaign for Range Rover featuring US chef

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Anthony Bourdain. “It was six episodes, each of six minutes, with Anthony exploring Spain’s regional cooking. So it wasn’t a traditional campaign but a very satisfying one, and Bourdain was a joy to work with. We also worked with David Munoz, Madrid’s only three Michelinstarred chef, on a campaign for the Mercedes GLC Coupé, which was also a great project.” Carlos Rosado, president of the Spain Film Commission, offers an overview that also contains some clues as to the surge in activity. “In the past 10 years, Spain has experienced a remarkable diversification in what were considered the traditional filming locations, with an increasing number of projects being shot in locations such as Andalucía, the Canary Islands, Aragon and Navarra,” he says. “Added to that, we recently signed an agreement

The ‘Blood Sport’ campaign for Banco de Sangre in Catalonia

with the Film & Television Producers Guild of India and have also established new contacts with Chinese producers. But behind all that, Spain is a very popular destination for national and international productions thanks to its climate, landscape and urban diversity. This country is a first-class filming destination, with movies and television drama constantly discovering new locations that were previously unknown. Recent examples include San Juan de Gaztelugatxe, which features in Game Of Thrones, and the stunning spectacle that is El Castillo de Almodovar del Rio.” Heading back in time, Spain has been a popular filming location for some of the biggest productions in the history of cinema. “Many people don’t know that the Tabernas Desert in Almería is the main setting for Sergio Leone’s dollars trilogy, standing in for the deserts of the

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American West,” Rosado adds. “The well-known scene when the train explodes in Lawrence Of Arabia was filmed in the dunes near Monsul beach in Almería. And Chimes At Midnight by Orson Welles was completely filmed in Spain, using locations in Castilla y León, Castilla la Mancha, Madrid, Catalonia, Navarra and the Basque country.” Also enjoying a sharp rise in business is goodgate productions, which booked 26 shooting days in June. “That’s absolutely unprecedented,” says goodgate executive producer Philip Bolus. “I haven’t a clue why it’s happening but we’re very glad that it is. Last year was relatively quiet but, since March, we’ve been working at maximum capacity, with the majority of the jobs coming from the US. The core of our business remains cars, banks, phones and pharma.” Bolus says goodgate’s biggest recent job was a 10-day shoot for Samsung, which entailed filming at several locations a day. “That in itself is a big undertaking,” he adds. “But on top of that, it was signed off very late, so we only had 12 working days to put it all together, which was a massive logistical headache. But we got it done and everything went smoothly.” Being based in Barcelona, Bolus is well aware that it is possible for there to be too much filming in certain neighbourhoods: “The El Born district was hugely popular, especially for car adverts, but the locals have had enough and now it’s very controlled, with only two shoots allowed there a week,” he says. “The inhabitants were sick of the disruption and I totally see their point of view. Producers need to be more aware of the effect they’re having on an urban environment and take responsibility for keeping disruption to the minimum.”

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FOCUS ON SPAIN

Another recent shoot in Spain also had repercussions for the local community — but positively rather than negatively. Michael Moffett, managing director and founder of Production Services Network (PSN) and executive producer of PSN Spain, takes up the story: “In Galicia, men routinely risk their lives and brave the deadly waves for one thing: barnacles. ‘The Percebeiros’ have an extremely dangerous profession, harvesting one of the world’s most coveted delicacies. But now, thanks to a ground-breaking new wearable created by Nissan and TBWA Spain, their lives are a bit safer.” The wearable in question is the Percebeiro Shield, a smart wetsuit inspired by Nissan’s intelligent mobility and safetyshield technology, which detects danger on the road. Juan Sánchez, vice-president of creativity and innovation at TBWA Spain, continues: “Technological innovation has to be at the service of communication, not the other way around. In this case, the development of the Percebeiro Shield and the campaign to launch it is our way of communicating that Nissan’s technological innovation is always geared towards a final objective: improving people’s lives.” TBWA Spain called on the team at Glassworks to develop the Percebeiro Shield, which uses laser technology and software to analyse the different types of waves to detect the most dangerous ones. The suit alerts the Percebeiros through audio, vibration and LED lights, allowing them to dodge out of the way of the most hazardous waves. If they are unfortunate enough to fall into the water, the system also detects this and sets off an alarm to alert the emergency services. TBWA Spain conceived the campaign to

O&M’s ‘Max Motor Dreams’ campaign for Ford

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improve Nissan’s market recognition across Galicia in the north-west of Spain. “Percebeiros are admired for their dedication to a risky livelihood, so putting Nissan technology at their service raised brand awareness in a genuinely useful way,” Sánchez adds. Another campaign featuring genuine social outreach was aimed at Spain’s video-gamers. Paloma Adrien, head of experience at Ogilvy & Mather (O&M) Madrid and a member of this year’s Product Design jury, explains: “The campaign is called ‘Blood Sport’ and it was for Banco de Sangre [the blood bank] in Catalonia. The challenge was to sensitise young people to the need to give blood, because only one in five people under 25 do so. So we developed a gaming cubicle, which we installed at the Games World congress in Barcelona, and players gave blood every time they lost a life while playing a one-person shooter game. The results were amazing, with huge queues of people waiting to play and a lot of blood donated.” Another O&M campaign with social impact was Ford’s ‘Max Motor Dreams’, which was based on the fact that one sure-fire way to get a baby to sleep is to take it for a drive. “We decided to build a crib that reproduces the sounds and sensations of being driven, so that babies sleep at home like they do in a car,” Adrien says. “Alongside that, we developed an app that records the drives you do, then reproduces them for the crib — right down to street lighting being recreated by LEDs around the edge of the crib. The result was a 200% increase in traffic to the Ford site, 2,000 test-drives requested and a 95% growth in the number of visits to Ford dealerships. It was nice to do something that really helps couples with small kids, plus the client was delighted and the people who took test-drives also have a chance of winning a car.” Barcelona-based We Produce is a production services company specialising in commercials. Ana Laura Solis, managing director and founding partner, has a theory that partly explains the current volume of business: “On one level, it’s the quality of the crews, the good weather, the great food and the low cost compared to the US and other countries. So I would say it’s partly the overall experience.” But she also points to the number of top football players in La Liga: “So when they have to shoot a

MICHAEL MOFFETT “IN GALICIA, MEN ROUTINELY RISK THEIR LIVES AND BRAVE THE DEADLY WAVES FOR ONE THING: BARNACLES”

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campaign featuring football players, they usually have to come here.” We Produce recently worked on an H&M campaign in which every shot featured a celebrity, actress, dancer or model from somewhere in the world. “Just co-ordinating the talent, their wardrobes and their expectations was pretty challenging,” Solis says. “Then as producers, we did a campaign for the 9GAG [millennial entertainment content platform] app with LOLA Mullen-Lowe Barcelona, which was seriously epic and had a major challenge in that we had to cut, carve and transport a huge stone weighing several tonnes, then dig a hole and bury it. And we had to do all of this on a very tight budget. Our production team were stars for being able to achieve that — and that’s also why people like to shoot in Spain.” For Sara Hernandez, executive producer at La Joya Producciones, the boom in business is unsurprising given Spain’s multiple charms: “It has the weather, the talent, the people, the history and the architecture, so you can shoot any commercial that you can imagine because no matter where you look the environment is perfect,” she says. “Two of my favourite campaigns of the last year were ‘Tregua’ [‘Truce’] for Servicios Financieros Carrefour and ‘El Instante’ [‘The Instant’] for Euromillones, because both were extremely challenging from an emotional point of view. Both stories are charged with feelings and, at that point, it doesn’t matter that your ultimate goal is selling a product, because all you are focused on is reaching people’s hearts. To achieve that, you have to have an amazing director who is able to identify actors who can give everything in just a few seconds. It’s jobs like those that really bring the best out of everyone.”

FOCUS ON SPAIN

Down in Andalucía, business is also buoyant, according to film commissioner Piluca Querol: “In 2016, the Andalucía Film Commission assisted with 1,336 audiovisual projects. This is a record in the 19 years we have been operating — we celebrate our 20th anniversary in 2018 — and it represents an increase of 10.4 % on the previous year. Out of that total, 239 of them were advert shoots covering all kind of products. And it’s a very global business: in 2016 and the first few months of 2017, we’ve worked with ad shoots from all over the world, including a lot of European countries such as the Netherlands, the UK, Italy and Germany, as well as countries from outside the EU, including India, Russia and Turkey. In addition, of course, we’ve

ANA LAURA SOLIS “WE HAD TO CUT, CARVE AND TRANSPORT A HUGE STONE WEIGHING SEVERAL TONNES, THEN DIG A HOLE AND BURY IT. OUR PRODUCTION TEAM WERE STARS — AND THAT’S ALSO WHY PEOPLE LIKE TO SHOOT IN SPAIN”

CANARY ISLANDS

“THE MOST commonly requested locations in the Canary Islands are the white sand beaches and the dramatic, volcanic Teide National Park [in Tenerife], which features the towering mass of the 3,700-metre high Mount Teide, as well as the surreal Roque Cinchado and its otherworldly surroundings,” says Alejandro Álamo Sanabria, executive producer at Volcano Films. “But I personally really like Los Gigantes in the very south-west of Tenerife. It’s a truly magical place, with good weather all year long and astonishing views. Punta de Teno at the other end of the cliffs is also fantastic.”

NORTHERN SPAIN

“FOR ME, the north of Spain is under-appreciated and under-used,” says Sara Hernandez, executive producer at La Joya Producciones. “Areas like Galicia and Asturias are not that well known and both places have very different looking cities. There are also amazing tracts of unspoilt forest and

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done quite a few national jobs.” Querol says the most common product categories are car, fashion and drink brand. “But also this year we’ve had several productions featuring products related to the internet and social networks, shipping companies — even an insurance company from Australia, which filmed in Antequera, Malaga with Macaulay Culkin,” she adds. As Querol observes, international producers choose Andalucía because of its broad variety of locations. “Here they can find snow-capped mountains, the largest desert in Europe, medieval and Arabic castles, modern buildings, many kilometres of varied coasts, from dramatic cliffs to extensive, unspoilt beaches — and all of it topped off with a spectacular

the sort of architecture that can provide a very different look for a production.”

FUERTE-VENTURA

JUAN CANO, executive producer at Sur-Film, is a fan of Fuerteventura, because of “the dunes that arrive right by the ocean, the oasis, the rocky mountains in several different colours and the canyons. Plus, of course, the endless sandy beaches and the local goat cheese, which is so delicious.” Cano also cites Picos de Europa in Asturias: “It’s the Alps in Spain, with snowy mountains, huge natural lakes and green valleys.”

ANDALUCÍA

NOBODY knows Spain’s southern-most territory better than Andalucía film commissioner Piluca Querol. She runs through a few of her favourite locations: “Let’s start with Almería, which features the Tabernas Desert, then the city of Cadiz, which looks like Havana in Cuba. I also love the Roman bridge in Córdoba, the snowy mountains of

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climate and wonderful light,” she says. “All these types of locations are constantly in use and they are all regularly requested by visiting producers.” Juan Cano, executive producer at Sur-Film, also reports a satisfying 12 months. “It’s difficult to have to select one of the many great jobs that we’ve serviced this year in Spain, because it has been such a very creative and challenging 2016/17,” he says. “But if I had to select just one, it would be Porsche. It was directed by Joern Heitmann, and produced by Katapult filmproducktion and agency KeKo. We shot at the Navarra race circuit last September, in temperatures of 40-degrees, both day and night. The concept was that the car comes alive. Right from the first second of the commercial, you can feel its emotions while it’s speeding around the deserted circuit. It was also very satisfying for us to be able to share our creative process with the official racing team from Porsche. To be honest, the whole experience was simply amazing.” For Cano, the Porsche shoot encapsulates the reasons why Spain gets so much repeat business. “First of all, our crews are highly qualified and experienced,” he says. “On top of that, we have an embarrassment of riches in terms of locations. In less than a two-hour drive, you can go from snowy mountains to beaches and dunes. You can find everything from great modern cities to the most isolated, lonely spaces. Then there’s our Mediterranean weather, of course. We typically get 300 days of sunshine per year. And then there are our islands, which feature the most amazing tropical and jungle landscapes. And finally, I guess the Spanish style of life is also very charming and provides a highly agreeable working environment.”

Granada, the spectacular Sierra Nevada, Huelva, Rio Tinto, the Renacentists monuments in Jaen, the magical stones of El Torcal in Málaga and the newly named ‘Treasure of European Film Culture’, which was awarded to the Plaza de España in Seville by the European Film Academy.”

IBERIAN PENINSULAR

STAFFAN Tranaeus, executive producer and owner of SouthWest Productions, works out of Lisbon in Portugal, but often shoots in Spain. “It depends what you’re looking for as to whether we’d propose a shoot in Portugal or Spain, but the fact is that the Iberian Peninsular has some fantastic coast,” he says. “If you’re doing a short shoot, why go all the way to Turkey or South Africa when you can get an equally good look at great rates in the south of Spain? As much as we work in Spain, the big Spanish companies come to Portugal regularly and we have a very good relationship with them. In terms of production and production services, Portugal these days is like another Spanish province. And it’s great value for money.”

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FOCUS ON HISPANIC AMERICA

FRIDAY / JUNE 23 / 2017 LIONS DAILY NEWS

MOVE OVER, ADMEN

Women leaders of Hispanic agencies insist that the more their gender is involved in advertising, the greater the talent on hand to create big ideas. Liz Unamo, editor of Hispanic and media advertising at Produ, reports 2

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DVERTISING continues to be an industry dominated by men. Women occupy only 30% of the leadership positions in the advertising world, according to data provided by the UK’s Institute of Practitioners in Advertising (IPA). Initiatives like The 3% Conference and SheSays have helped highlight and even partially remedy the problem, but there is no doubt that women are still underrepresented. In an effort to promote gender equality, this year’s Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity has structured juries that in total are 43.5% female, which means that, over the past five years, the proportion of women judges has doubled from the 21% in 2012. “These initiatives must continue, because respect for women and recognising the importance of their contributions is not only good for the industry but for the world in general,”

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3 Lopez Negrete Communications’ Olga Reyes 4 Dieste’s Carla Eboli

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says Monica Marulanda, senior creative director at Alma DDB. There’s a lot of work to do to attract a diversity of talented people and Verena Thompson, chief strategy officer at Conill, believes it all has to begin with a new attitude about what kind of action the ad industry must take to ensure a greater inclusion of women. “If diversity — including that of gender — becomes seen as a valued asset of the industry, that will attract talent,” she says. Multicultural agencies are leading the drive toward gender equality, thanks to the nature of the business. “But besides the corporate efforts, we must all act individually to create a richer, more diverse work environment,” says

Lapiz’s Luciana Cani 6

7 Casanova/ McCann’s Ingrid Otero-Smart

Dieste’s chief reputation officer, Carla Eboli. According to Flor Leibaschoff, creative director at Richards/Lerma, the industry is a monster that never takes a break — everything is for yesterday, so the hours and lack of routine don’t help if a creative also wants to be a mom and raise a family. “That’s what makes it so hard for many women to pursue a career in the industry,” she says. Ingrid Otero-Smart, CEO and president of Casanova/McCann, points to a recent study, which reached the conclusion

MONICA MARULANDA: “RESPECT FOR WOMEN AND RECOGNISING THE IMPORTANCE OF THEIR CONTRIBUTIONS IS NOT ONLY GOOD FOR THE INDUSTRY BUT FOR THE WORLD”

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that men are hired for their perceived potential while, for women, it’s their experience or what they have achieved that gets them the job. “As long as this double standard doesn’t change, nothing will change,” she adds. “And personally, I believe that if we women unite more and help each other more, we can change the world.” Cannes is an outstanding opportunity for women to show what they can do. And when they take home a prize, they are a great inspiration for other women who dream big, says Luciana Cani, senior vice-president and executive director of Lapiz. “It’s also a great chance to show how well women can lead, inspire and create the most powerful ideas of the year,” she adds. “What we must do is train and develop the next generation so young adwomen can go on to be rewarded with top positions in the industry.” Hispanic women creatives agree that

INGRID OTERO-SMART: “PERSONALLY, I BELIEVE THAT IF WE WOMEN UNITE MORE AND HELP EACH OTHER MORE, WE CAN CHANGE THE WORLD”

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FOCUS ON HISPANIC AMERICA

ideas have no gender and say the great thing about Cannes is that what wins are ideas, not people. The influence of the Hispanic market is evident at today’s international ad festivals, now that it has proved itself capable of taking the first three places in the awards rankings. “We have to stop asking for permission to sit at the table with the general market. We’ve already won that place. It’s important to be proud of what we have achieved as an industry and to continue to show our clients the tremendous boost our approach can give to their bottom line,” Otero-Smart says. Meanwhile Olga Reyes, executive creative director at Lopez Negrete Communications, describes the advantages of belonging to the Hispanic segment: “We’re able to understand and connect with our audience through the treasures of our language, our humour and our emotions in a way the general market could never do.” The Hispanic community will have a greater presence than ever, Lapiz’s Cani predicts. “The brands that target that market will have the responsibility of keeping up to date with the changes in

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the community while avoiding stereotypes. I believe this is our great contribution.” The leading multicultural agencies have a built-in advantage over their general market counterparts in terms of strategy, creativity and execution for the Hispanic market. “Staying within the limits of the culture and adapting to its changes will ensure our continued success,” Conill’s Thompson concludes.

THE BIG QUESTION “OVER the past few years women have made themselves heard and are opening the eyes of the world to their potential. Traditionally, the advertising industry has been a man’s world, but now regards the gender-equality movement with the importance it deserves. The point for today’s adwomen to debate, therefore, is not how good or bad they are likely to be, but rather the enduring question: how far are women from attaining equality in this industry?” MARA Fernandez, associate publisher/ senior director for US Hispanic/Latin America, PRODU

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THE WORK & AWARDS HUB SCREENING SCHEDULE

FILM LIONS SCREENING ROOM 3

FILM & FILM CRAFT LIONS SCREENING ROOM 4

FRIDAY 23 A01 A02 A03 A04 A08 A09 A10 A11 A12

Direction Script Casting Production Design / Art Direction Use of Licensed / Adapted Music Sound Design Animation Visual Effects Achievement in Production

FRIDAY 23 09:00 - 11:30 11:30 - 14:00 14:00 - 16:00 16:00 - 18:00 18:00 - 19:00

SATURDAY 24 B07 B08 B09 B10 B11 B12 B13 B14 C01 D01 D02 D03 D04 D05 E01 E02 E03 E04 E05 E06 E07 F01 F02 A01 A02 A03 A04 A05 A06 A07 A08 A09 A10 A11 A12 A13 A14 A15 A16 A17 A18 A19 A20 A21 A22 A23 B01 B02 B03 B04 B05 B06

Media & Publications Financial Products & Services B2B Products & Services Commercial Public Services Corporate Image & Sponsorship Corporate Social Responsibility Public Sector Charities & Non-profit Viral Film Public Screens & Events Private Screens & Events Personal Screens Micro-Film 360° & VR Film Short Non-Fiction Film (under 10 minutes) Long Non-Fiction Film (over 10 minutes) Non-Fiction Series Short Fiction Film (under 10 minutes) Long Fiction Film (over 10 minutes) Fiction Film Series Music Video Use of TV/Cinema Film Use of Online Film Savoury Foods Sweet Foods & Snacks Alcoholic Drinks Non-Alcoholic Drinks Cosmetics & Toiletries Healthcare & Pharmacy Miscellaneous Clothing, Footwear & Accessories Household Goods, Home Appliances & Furnishings Consumer Electronics & Technology Cars & Automotive Products & Services Retail & e-Commerce Restaurants & Fast Food Chains Travel & Transport Entertainment & Leisure Media & Publications Financial Products & Services B2B Products & Services Commercial Public Services Corporate Image & Sponsorship Corporate Social Responsibility Public Sector Charities & Non-profit Food & Drinks Fast Moving Consumer Goods Durable Consumer Goods Cars & Automotive Products & Services Retail, e-Commerce, Restaurants & Fast Food Chains Travel, Transport & Leisure

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09:00 - 11:00

11:00 - 12:30

12:30 - 15:00

15:00 - 17:00

A19 A20 A21 A22 A23 B01 B02 B03 B04 B05 B06 B07 B08 B09 B10 B11 B12 B13 B14 C01 D01 D02 D03 D04 D05 E01 E02 E03 E04 E05 E06 E07 F01 F02 A01 A02 A03 A04 A05 A06 A07 A08 A09 A10 A11 A12 A13 A14 A15 A16 A17 A18

Commercial Public Services Corporate Image & Sponsorship Corporate Social Responsibility Public Sector Charities & Non-profit Food & Drinks Fast Moving Consumer Goods Durable Consumer Goods Cars & Automotive Products & Services Retail, e-Commerce, Restaurants & Fast Food Chains Travel, Transport & Leisure Media & Publications Financial Products & Services B2B Products & Services Commercial Public Services Corporate Image & Sponsorship Corporate Social Responsibility Public Sector Charities & Non-profit Viral Film Public Screens & Events Private Screens & Events Personal Screens Micro-Film 360° & VR Film Short Non-Fiction Film (under 10 minutes) Long Non-Fiction Film (over 10 minutes) Non-Fiction Series Short Fiction Film (under 10 minutes) Long Fiction Film (over 10 minutes) Fiction Film Series Music Video Use of TV/Cinema Film Use of Online Film Savoury Foods Sweet Foods & Snacks Alcoholic Drinks Non-Alcoholic Drinks Cosmetics & Toiletries Healthcare & Pharmacy Miscellaneous Clothing, Footwear & Accessories Household Goods, Home Appliances & Furnishings Consumer Electronics & Technology Cars & Automotive Products & Services Retail & e-Commerce Restaurants & Fast Food Chains Travel & Transport Entertainment & Leisure Media & Publications Financial Products & Services B2B Products & Services

09:00 - 11:00

11:00 - 13:00

13:00 - 15:30

15:30 - 17:00

17:00 - 19:00

SATURDAY 24

17:00 - 19:00

A08 A09 A10 A03 A04 A05 A06

Use of Licensed / Adapted Music Sound Design Animation Casting Production Design / Art Direction Cinematography Editing

09:00 - 11:00 11:00 - 13:00 13:00 - 15:00 15:00 - 16:30 16:30 - 18:45

To find out when your work is screening come and talk to us at the Welcome Desk in the Awards Hub.

22/06/2017 21:31


INNOCEAN WORLDWIDE SPONSORS THE OPENING

© INNOCEAN WORLDWIDE INC. All rights reserved.

AND CLOSING CEREMONIES OF CANNES. ENJOY IRRESPONSIBLY.

22/06/2017 19:07

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22/06/2017 20:55


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22/06/2017 20:54

Lions Daily News Issue 7 - June 23  
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