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LINER

THE WOMEN IN CHARGE ISSUE


VOLUME FOUR


LINER


TEAM. KELLY SEARLE EDITOR IN CHIEF JESSICA PORTILLO PHOTOGRAPHER DAVID WANG ASSISTANT SET DESIGNER WENDY PORTILLO ASSISTANT SET DESIGNER EDDIE PORTILLO ASSISTANT SET DESIGNER EZEKIEL WILLIAMS PHOTO ASSISTANT KATIE QIAN STYLIST DANIELLE ROTELLA HAIRSTYLIST AND MAKEUP ARTIST GIAVANNA WHITED MODEL AT PHOTOGENICS LAYNE EILER ENTREPRENEUR MIHAE JUNG MODEL ELENA CHRISTOPOULOS ENVIRONMENTAL/POLITICAL ADVISOR


ALEXANDRIA BASSO MODEL COURTNEY COLEMAN MODEL ANGELA GULNER MODEL KARINA PALAMARCHUK PHOTOGRAPHER MEG OLSEN MUSICIAN KRISTINE CLAGHORN MODEL JESSICA CALDWELL DESIGNER EMMA HERDENER MODEL SACHA SIMMONS MODEL JAMIE CRUSH MODEL DESTINEE ALBARRAN MODEL HOLLYANN FINCH OWNER AT ACCESSORY APPEAL DANIELLE SPIRES PHOTOGRAPHER ALEX DAVALOS MODEL


WELCOME Welcome to the Women in Charge Issue. In this winter issue we’ll explore women of all walks shaping the world and the lives of others around them. You’ll see profiles of women like Elena Christopoulos, who was the first person to put an urban wind turbine in North America, and Karina Palamarchuk, who’s gained a following for taking heartbreakingly beautiful photos of untouched wilderness. The women in my life have shaped me, changed me, encouraged me, scolded me, molded me, and made me who I am today. I can’t start this issue without paying tribute to them. My mom teaches me endless optimism, my grandma Maxine taught me individualism, my Aunt Diane gave me my first camera, my sister-in-law Katie teaches me compassion, my mothers-in-law teach me love. The list of gratitude is endless. My best friend of 14 years, Tiffany, taught me so much, and it’s her I dedicate this issue to. I almost gave up on

this issue when she passed this winter but I know she would want me to finish, would want these people’s stories to be seen. I love you TT. Best friends forever. This one’s for you. This issue celebrates female talent and empowerment in myriad forms. You’ll only see photos and stories spearheaded by women (you’ll see some male assistants in the credits, who contributed greatly to this issue, but no male photographers, writers, shoot producers, etc.). This kind of female power in a magazine is pretty rare. This issue also celebrates winter, a time when things hibernate, and the slate is wiped clean with snow. Fresh starts are brewing. Volume Four is broken up into three parts: The Pioneer, The Visionary, and The Heroine. I hope you enjoy reading these stories, and that they inspire you to create something amazing! Kelly Searle, Editor in Chief


DEDICATED

TIFFANY


TO

THOMAS


VOLUME FOUR Frozen lakes, ice-tipped pines, the world covered in a fresh blanket of white. What’s beneath is hidden, for a time. What’s old will hibernate. Above the ice, a crunch of a boot breaking ground, a bird screeching south, a vacuum of silence pierced by new things, brave things. Things that can weather the storm, weather the conditions, weather the bleakness. These things use the fresh start, yell into the abyss, bring life and newness into an untouched world. They aren’t afraid to mar the perfection. They will move forward, change the landscape, carefully and bravely trek above the old world burried below.


Let’s forge ahead.


part one.

THE PIONEER


STARK BEAUTY PHOTOGRAPHER JESSICA PORTILLO HAIR & MAKEUP DANIELLE ROTELLA STYLIST KATIE QIAN MODEL GIAVANNA WHITED @ PHOTGENICS

PHOTO ASSISTANT EZEKIEL WILLIAMS ASSISTANT SET DESIGNERS DAVID WANG, WENDY PORTILLO & EDDIE PORTILLO


TOP/SOCKS NASTYGAL DRESS/GLOVES STYLISTS’S OWN


COAT H&M SKIRT NASTYGAL SOCKS AMERICAN APPAREL NECKLACE THE HOT PURSUIT


MAKEUP: MAKEUP FOREVER LIMECRIME LAURA MERCIER NYX


COAT/SWEATER H&M BUTTON-UP ARMANI SOCKS/NECKLACE/HAIR ACCESSORIES STYLIST’S OWN SHOES (THROUGHOUT) JEFFREY CAMPBELL


HAIR: LANZA REDKEN TIGI


COAT/NECKLACE H&M PETTICOAT AMERICAN APPAREL GARTER BELT STYLIST’S OWN


CANDIED GINGER

PHOTOGRAPHY, HAIR & MAKEUP KELLY SEARLE MODELING & STYLING ALEXANDRIA BASSO, COURTNEY COLEMAN & ANGELA GULNER


DRESS HOWL NECKLACE KATE MISS


ELENA CHRISTOPOULOS In 2002, she implemented the first urban wind turbine in North America in Toronto, and has since brought one to Southern California. She is a powerhourse, traveling around the world speaking about sustainability and is an advisor for New York energy think tank E3NYC. The energy and political consultant wanders around LA with us for a day, sharing insight into business, life, community and empowerment. WORDS ELENA PHOTOS KELLY SEARLE

__________

How did you accomplish the wind turbine goals? I was in University in the late 90’s, and people always said to me that Toronto was a green city. I grew up in Europe and Toronto was a green city but there’s always room for improvement. I loved, being European, wind turbines, and I thought they were such a beacon of environmentalism and sustainability. So, what happened was that I knew the winds off of Lake Ontario, which are blustering in the winter, could capture wind energy. This began in 1997. Most people thought I was crazy. I’ve learned over the years that when enough people say it’s a crazy idea, it’s probably the best idea you have. It was a dream of mine, and what happened was it became a reality. I got the Premier, which is the equivalent of a Senator in the US, the mayor at the time and the head of the Utilities, all together in a room and we talked about strategy. I went to community groups and long story later, in 2002, the first urban wind turbine was implemented in downtown Toronto. It took 256 homes off the grid. So then came the first Feed and Tarriff program. The whole

idea was community power for everyone. At that time, if you bought into it, in 20 years you would be off the grid. So that sold people. It’s 90 meters tall. It was a tough go but one of the most wonderful things I’ve done in my life. It’s amazing that back in the late 90’s in North America, that was the first. To think about that all over on a global level, the landscape has changed. I get asked as an energy consultant to work on all types of renewable energy but wind turbines are the toughest because you can see them. The NIMBY’s (‘Not in my backyard’ folks) are always around, and so that’s been a challenge. The hardest thing to do in my experience is for one person to actually change. Change one’s mind. Through politics and through facts...it’s amazing, I get a thrill out of changing a NIMBY into a YIMBY, which is ‘yes in my backyard’. I’ve always cared for the planet. Growing up in a large Greek family in Greece, we lived a sustainable life, but it wasn’t called that, and not at the pricetag that lifestyle is here. That idea of talking and communicating, I always thought, why can’t that be done elsewhere? Through energy, advocacy, and transparency, we’re changing things.


“I’ve learned over the years that when enough people say it’s a crazy idea, it’s probably the best idea you have.”


I can imagine at times, in your field, being a woman has been something other people point out to you. Yes. Especially being a woman in science. So in my field, there’s less than a third of us women. What I really do is try to promote and speak to girls, and tell them it’s exciting to be in science and math. Some people have said that there is no glass ceiling. Well, yes, there is, in my experience. But, it’s forging ahead with facts, putting my head down and continuing. If I said to you all the names men have called me on construction sites, and others, we’d be here all day. What a friend of mine once said to me is, ‘a woman’s strength is in her softness’. I was 22 at the time. I had no idea what that meant until I think it was my 30th birthday, and suddenly I stopped trying to be a man in the workplace. I was just myself. That friend said to me, ‘How comfortable do you feel now that you’re not carrying anyone else, you’re just carrying you?’, and I felt, and feel, the weight is literally off my shoulders. I think that as women we can do a lot to promote each other and help each other. I think through mentorship and women bonding together, that really is the most amazing strength we have. I still go to conferences and the diversity is...lacking. I do call conference directors and say there needs to be a woman here. There are women doing great things. And it’s not to promote myself, but there needs to be one woman in a sea of hundreds of men. There needs to be diversity, diversity of opinions. That’s still an ongoing effort. A woman’s strength is in her vulnerability, her caring for others. If I’m not a fit for a conference, who else do I know who can come in? What other woman can I promote and push up in the field? It’s our responsibility and strength to help each other. We are our best advocates and sometimes our toughest critics. So my hope is that we as women really bond

together. Some people say to me, ‘you’re the female scientist’. I believe there will be a day where I’m just a scientist. Let’s take the ‘just’ out of there too. I am a scientist. I don’t listen to labels or names. I do the work that needs to get done. If I let men and society define the rules for me, I never would have gotten to where I am. I have to thank the women in my life for that stength. In my world, there are no rules, and if there are, I tend to break them. That knowledge comes from my mother. What’s your advice for someone struggling to find who they want to be? I knew in high school I could make a difference. For me, body image was a barrier to my goal. I was a heavy high school girl. I was very lucky to have parents who were wonderful role models. That’s such a pivotal time. I was a geek and a nerd and wasn’t really into boys. I wore skirts and dresses because they were easy to put on, but I think deeper I thought I looked fat in those jeans. It’s such a difficult time, and if there’s not someone there to guide girls in their lives, they need to seek out guidance and mentors. It helps so much. For me, I looked to my parents. My dream did become a reality. Dreams do come true. It’s our responsibility to give back and mentor in return. I love to help other girls. What is Elena’s Utopia? I was recently involved in a documentary called Brave Miss World. It was nominated for an Emmy and it talks about one woman’s story of sexual assault. My utopia is that every girl goes through her life safe, protected and nurtured. If that’s the case, she can really do anything she wants to do. My utopia is that bullying will not exist and women will be able to go to school and not worry about anything but their studies and passions. That we will be off of fossil fuels by 2030. It’s adventurous, but so was getting a wind turbine up. I think kindness to each other, animals, and the environment is our future. Learn more about Elena at elenachristopoulos.com.


Katy assessing a model’s skin type before a shoot. Photo cred: Kelly Searle


DAYDREAMING WITH MIHAE

We walk along the cracked roads of LA with Mihae, a Prevention Education Program Manager at Koreatown Youth and Community Center. Here’s a cat with 9 lives.


“People inspire me. Their resiliency, grind, and stories motivate me to elevate myself every day. We are all in it together.�

photography kelly searle hair, makeup and styling kelly searle modeling and words mihae jung


“As a Korean woman growing up, I was always searching for a glimpse of what my identity should be. I battled between pragmatism and idealism. I loved art but I am also an immigrant, so needed to pursue a stable career.�


“I have been married, divorced, found a kick-ass career, gotten laid off all before 24. I know now that if i’m making an important decision, I look inward. I am interested in community empowerment and social justice. I love making an impact in my community.�


HOLIDAY FINERY BEAUTY PICKS FOR WINTER PHOTOS KELLY SEARLE


Essie nail polish in For the Twill of It has shades of purple, green and blue running through it, giving an irridescent finish.

Maybelline Color Tattoo Leather in Vintage Plum

Too Faced Lipstick in Believe


In terms of a cream lip and cheek color that suits everyone, you can’t beat Stila Convertible Color in Lillium.

Smith & Cult’s beautiful packaging gives way to the shiniest polish we’ve ever tried. We love the Nailed Laquer in Cut the Mullet.


part two.

THE VISIONARY


PHOTOS KELLY SEARLE WORDS, STYLING, & MODELING SARAH SVETLANA


EDGE OF EVERYTHING

PHOTOS & WORDS KARINA PALAMARCHUK


“Every year my family drives through the North Cascades to stay in winthrop, WA. For me it’s always been less about the destination and all about that drive.”


“Memories of dimmed kitchen lights.�


“The view from Lake Serene is one for the books. Definitely worth the 8.2-mile trek through thick Washingtonian forests.�


“Our way up to Mt. St. Helens.”


“I think watching the clouds will always be my favorite activity. It’s the only place where dragons can turn into teacups and you’re there to witness it.”


MEG OLSEN Meg has a haunting voice akin to the country greats. She just released Charade, her noir-meets-western album. Her music is poetic and chill-inducing, our favorite track being Corners of Bars. Give her a read and a listen with us. _______________ INTERVIEW, MAKEUP, HAIR AND PHOTOS KELLY SEARLE

Have you always been into music? Music has definitely been an ever-present entity in my life. I preferred movies and TV shows that had musical elements, and used to put on ‘stage shows’ in front of the fireplace for my parents. I started writing lyrics and makeing up melodies when I was eight or nine. Despite a few failed attempts in my teens, however, I didn’t really learn to play an instrument until much later on. What inspires you, musically or otherwise? I look for inspiration in as many places as I can get it, honestly. The internet is particularly useful when you are looking to rattle your cage a bit. It is so incredibly easy to be jaded by the day-to-day, but there are so many people out there--my own circle of friends included--who are doing these amazingly creative things. I’m inspired by music, fashion, art, film and the written word. I feel lucky to be around at this moment in time for that reason because it’s all there at our fingertips. I also love to hear other people’s stories, especially biographies and documentaries. Seeing someone’s struggles and achievements laid out in a plain narrative form can really help put your own life into perspective, I think. You have a very feminine, 60’s sort of vibe to your style...where did that influence come from? I am a bit of a ‘false nostalgia’ junkie so that is probably part of it. I love vintage clothing and not just for the aesthetic reasons. I love the history that comes along with it. My style is contantly evolving but I think there will always be a throwback aspect to my look. I’ve also learned to embrace the feminine in my 20’s, which has been pretty empowering. That said, dresses

and skirts happen to be more comfortable for me than jeans and t-shirts ever were! When you’re writing lyrics, where do you write? When I sit down specifically to work on lyrics I’ll usually be at my piano or kitchen table in my house in Laurel Canyon. That said, fragments and ideas can and usually do come to me at the most inopportune moments. I’m usually out and about somewhere so I try to keep a pen and paper handy wherever I am. What’s your favorite part of playing live? I love so much about playing for a live audience. I love the pre-show ritual too because it’s all part of the performance. Unfortunately, I still get horribly anxious before a show. It’s silly because once I am up there and the wheels are in motion, that anxiety just melts into the background. I feel like I am exactly where I am supposed to be. What’s one of the major challenges you’ve faced in life, and did it effect your music? I struggled for years with nerves about sharing my songs. I was always thinking that what I was creating was perhaps not good enough. But, knowing it was such a big part of who I am as a person I just couldn’t keep it a secret. Finally, with some encouragement from my close friends and people I trusted creatively, I felt like I was in a plce to commit to making music for public consumption. Once I got through that self-doubt barrier, there was this incredible relief and everything fell into place pretty quickly. It was a long time coming! Check out Meg’s music at megolsenmusic.com.


“I struggled for years with nerves about sharing my songs. I just couldn’t keep it a secret.”


“I love so much about playing for a live audience. I feel like I am exactly where I’m supposed to be.”


SHE’S A MACHINE

PHOTOGRAPHY KELLY SEARLE WORDS JESSICA CALDWELL OF MACHINE HAIR & MAKEUP KELLY SEARLE MODELING EMMA HERDENER STYLING JESSICA CALDWELL ALL WARDROBE BY MACHINE APPAREL


“The hardest part of running an independent creative venture is knowing at the end of the day, the success of a project rests solely on your shoulders. The best parts are the freedom and opportunity to experiment. To be truly creative.�


“You can play devil’s advocate and say the fashion world objectifies women, while others say it empowers them. I like to think of fashion as a tool to help us discover, cultivate, and express to the world who we are and how we feel from day to day.”


“I want women to feel strong, confident, and comfortable in their own skin. My designs are for bold women who are edgy and tough, but want to still feel feminine and sexy.�


“One of the biggest shifts in my life was back in 2008 when the recession hit. I was working as a web developer and they had to lay off half the company. I’d never been fired before, so it was a pretty big blow. I was wiping the slate clean and literally starting over from scratch. It ended up being the best thing that ever happened to me. I found new independence both creatively and personally.�


WINTER SOLSTACE PHOTOGRAHY, MAKEUP & HAIR kelly searle MODELING & STYLING kristine claghorn


part three.

THE HEROINE


ice queen photography KELLY SEARLE hair and makeup KELLY SEARLE modeling and wardrobe ALEXANDRIA BASSO


HEADPIECE JESSLABELLE AVELAR TUNIC VINTAGE PANTS VINTAGE


HEADPIECE model’s own

SWEATER paradox EARRINGS catbird


SWEATER M.Frederic


MOTEL NIGHTS PHOTOGRAPHY, STYLING AND WORDS DANIELLE SPIRES MODELING ALEX DAVALOS


“Photography is like free therapy. I get to work through all my problems with the click of a button.”


“I started shooting portraits of my friends at 16 years old and never looked back.�


LAYNE EILER

Layne owns the successful Sweet Clementine’s Popsicles in Los Angeles. Throughout her business journey, she’s proved that pretense is trash and joy is the treasure. Here she shares her lessons with us. INTERVIEW & PHOTOS KELLY SEARLE _______________ How did your business start? I was working at Intelligentsia when I moved to Los Angeles from Nashville. Year-round it’s warm here, we’ve got frozen yogurt, we’ve got ice cream sandwiches...but not really popsicles, other than the ice cream trucks you see in the neighborhood. I thought, how can you get that ice cream truck feel without the added dyes? That’s kind of where the idea was formed and I started doing tons of research.

you know? Having that bright part in someone’s day. Whatever may be going on, they come to the cart, and for a moment they have a happy, sweet experience.

I just started bringing popsicles into work and experimenting. Our clients started picking up on it and then small orders started coming in. It’s been a little over two years and it’s been this slow and steady evolution of small stages of growth. I detailed a cart with a friend, started to do tons of pop-ups around town. I started doing coffee flavors, and then branched out to a wide variety of pairings. Now I work full time on Clementine’s.

Sometimes as a businesswoman, I find you have to fight a little bit harder than maybe a man would in the same situation. Do you come across that? There is this component about being a woman where people tend to be very cheeky or flirtatious. They wouldn’t do that with a man in an interview or a business setting. That would be completely unprofessional. There’s a side of me that’s very driven and business-minded, and then there’s my business that’s very vibrant and cute. I think they blur the lines because of those opposing things. I really get taken seriously now because I just stand my ground and don’t allow myself to be belittled. Men are intimidated by a driven woman, or enthralled by that.

Has food always been part of your career or is this a recent development? No, actually. I was actually in the fashion industry for a long while. I did wardrobe styling and merchandising, and management. And so you can see the fashion element in Sweet Clementine’s. It really is about an experience. Not just the quality of the popsicle, but also that wonder, excitement, joy and delight. That comes down to things being very stylized and I love that handson creative process. It brings me so much joy,

What’s your outlook on your business and its future? The key to everything for me is to not risk everything, but if you do have a plan set in place, you should fully dedicate yourself. Not paying attention so much to whether it fails or not, but more just seeing your vision through to completion. That’s my mindset. I don’t want to abort something prematurely; I’d rather follow this out to the end. If it fails or not, either way I loved it and it was a learning experience. I love my job.


IN THE WOOD PHOTOGRAPHY KELLY SEARLE HAIR & MAKEUP KELLY SEARLE MODELING DESTINEE ALBARRAN WARDROBE HOLLYANN FINCH AT ACCESSORY APPEAL


LIFE ON TOP

PHOTOGRAPHY, MAKEUP & HAIR KELLY SEARLE MODELING AND WORDS SACHA SIMMONS


“Overall, I am more present to the power of being a woman rather than obstacles or discriminations.�


“For years I worked in the corporate environment. While it was an extremely valuable and educational experience, I stopped loving it. I moved to Los Angeles and now work as a business consultant/yoga instructor/model/actress.�


“Since I’ve shifted my motivation to serving others first, I am much more fulfilled. How I do one little thing is how I do everything. If I show up as if everything is an opportunity, it’s the difference between I have to and I get to. Gratitude runs through my work.”


CONTRIBUTORS Kelly Searle | Editor in Chief | kellysearle.com Jessica Portillo | Photographer | jessica-portillo.com Layne Eiler | Sweet Clementine’s | sweetclementinespops.com Mihae Jung | Model | @mihaejung Kristine Claghorn | Model | claggie.com Elena Christopoulos | Visionary | elenachristopoulos.com Courtney Coleman | Model | @courtlynnecole Alexandria Basso | Model | @AliMarie_B Angela Gulner | Model | angelagulner.com Karina Palamarchuk | Photographer | instagram.com/karinapal Destinee Albarran | Model | facebook.com/destinee.albarran.5 Hollyann Finch | Accessory Appeal | accessoryappeal.com Meg Olsen | Musician | megolsenmusic.com Danielle Spires | Photographer | daniellespires.com Jessica Caldwell | Machine Apparel | machine-apparel.com Emma Herdener | Model | modelmayhem.com/3262060 Sacha Simmons | Model | modelmayhem.com/2979232 Giavanna Whited | Model at PhotoGenics | photogenicsmedia.com


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LINER MAGAZINE / VOLUME IV  

A quarterly magazine dedicated to personal style.

LINER MAGAZINE / VOLUME IV  

A quarterly magazine dedicated to personal style.

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