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S C I E N C E , A R T, & DESIGN RESEARCH & C O L L A B O R AT I V E PRACTICE IN RHODE ISLAND RI NSF EPSCOR 2009–2010

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visible

INSIGHT


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E P S C O R C O L L A B O R AT I O N I N R H O D E I S L A N D 2009–2010

VISIBLE INSIGHT


Editor and Art Director

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L I N D S AY K I N K A D E

Photographer (unless otherwise noted)

Designer

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SARA RAFFO

L I N D S AY K I N K A D E

Copyright 2010 Published by Rhode Island School of Design Printed by Brown University Graphic Services ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF SUPPORT AND DISCLAIMER This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 0554548. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation. Colophon: Body text typeset in Miller 8.5 pt. Display type and captions set in Gotham.

Phyllorhiza punctata jellyfish image from J.H. Costello's Medusan Design Principles presentation at the fall Making Science Visible symposium.


INTRODUCTION The Rhode Island nsf epscor project provides

In these pages, we have documented initial

a unique opportunity for collaborative research at the interface between science, art, and design as well as for project-based inquiries into the public purposes of science and science education.

sustainable research collaborations between

work done during 2009-2010 at risd. Our core interest is in building meaningful, artists, designers, scientists, and educators in the State of Rhode Island. This will involve developing both an organizational and an intellectual platform for this work, both at risd and in the larger research and educational communities of the State. risd brings to ri nsf epscor unique resources for the visualization and communication of science. risd-based artists and designers already collaborate successfully with scientists on a range of innovative projects.

The vision driving our proposal to the National Science foundation is that Rhode Island will

The primary goal for the 2009-2010 year was

be a leader in understanding and predicting

to begin assembling the appropriate networks

the response of marine organisms to climate

through the hosting of two events around the

change. According to the State Technology

theme Making Science Visible. In the fall, we

Advisory Council (stac), “[Design thinking] is

hosted a symposium called Making Science

an approach to problem solving that could be

Visible: Collaborative Research on Climate

a powerful driver for successful collaboration

Change. We hosted a follow-up symposium

and should be a major priority.”

in the spring. By presenting ongoing research in a variety of contexts, the potential for and benefits of collaboration were highlighted and a fruitful conversation was begun. We are developing collaborations on campus in a series of nine studios over the next five years. Collaborative discovery is in our shared future. Please write to EPSCoR@risd.edu if you would like to participate.


RESEARCH THEMES

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FOR RI NSF EPSCOR

Together, we will answer three primary questions about climate change. We will work

in the lab, in the studio, in the field. ‘What is the response of marine life to climate change? How will climate change alter the structure and function of coastal marine food webs? Will increased ocean temperatures result in greater rates of infection and disease among host populations?


RESEARCH IN E X P E R I M E N TA L S PA C E S


Scientists, artists, and designers gathered in April 2010 at the second Making Science Visible symposium to continue the conversation about collaboration begun in the fall.

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+ Participants were encouraged to write their thoughts, notes, ideas in these custom notebooks. These are noted throughout this book.


D AV I D B O G E N

N OT E S C O L L A B O R AT I V E P R AC T I C E

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ON

a stairwell. Involved in this task are complex appreciations of spatial relations, leverage, weight, and balance. The object (the couch)

‘Collaboration’ is a word that has become freighted with any number of cultural aspirations well beyond its rather humble meaning as ‘the condition or state of working together’ (co-laboring).

and the space (the stairwell) framed by the task-at-hand (moving the couch through the stairwell) provide a field of play for the exercise of the shared expertise of the movers. Their expertise is, in turn, available as a set of specific, coordinated activities: the stepping-up and balancing of the object, the contours of speech, and the moment-to-moment reorientation of one’s own actions to the actions of the other. It is in this sense that moving furniture — when you get it right — represents a rather deep form of collaboration.

Our desire for collaboration…for more of

Successful collaborations are made out of

it…and for creating forms of organization

such things as shared orientations to objects,

and community that will allow collaborative

spaces, and common tasks-at-hand to which

activity to flourish, arises out of a deep sense

participants are, or become, committed. These

that we have somehow been “working apart,”

commitments are built around the experience

and that the conditions of separation under

of co-constituting these objects, environments,

which our intellectual and creative work has

and purposes over time in the context of

been organized for much of our recent history

specific projects and activities. In this sense, it

are now getting in the way of our capacity to

is not the conditions of collaboration in general,

expand our knowledge and to understand and

but rather the details of collaboration in

solve problems on many fronts.

practice that shape our proper focus.

Successful collaborations are full of nuance

David Bogen is the Associate Provost for Academic Affairs at risd where he leads the development and integration of Rhode Island nsf epscor work into the research being done at risd.

and complexity that we mostly take for granted, especially when “working together” is working well. Consider, for instance, the example of two skilled furniture movers, moving a couch up

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JENNIFER SPECKER

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BENEFITS C O L L A B O R AT I O N IN S C I E N C E There are few private moments as a scientist when brand new knowledge lies there. These moments do not last long for me because I cannot wait to share an unseen observation.

OF

cannot have two interpretations. The sentences I wrote in the first paragraph are not precisely understandable. Collaboration in science is essential for precise communication. In my career as a scientist I have found other scientists to be indispensable for two

The unseen observations at the edge are

reasons. One reason is that elders often

such an acquired taste that it takes a

report that our new ideas have been tested

close collaborator to know quickly why

before, usually by them. This has one of two

the excitement. The challenge I relish is

consequences — either we save time and avoid

broadening the scope of appreciation for the

the replication or we find we cannot replicate

heretofore unseen now seen knowledge.

them and change the course of thought. The

I use writing clubs with scientists who are

ask fearless questions, throwing the whole

second reason is that student scientists within range of what I do but who do not do

structure of a laboratory into chaos resulting

the same thing. We aim to be understood by

in the queerest discoveries. My laboratory’s

each other in our writing. In science, a sentence

finding of flounder without intestines comes to mind. I would like to add a third indispensable reason for collaborating with other scientists. They know so many things, it is intoxicating. Is happiness indispensable?

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I believe there is a complex set of potential outcomes as we engage scientists, artists, and designers in collaboration. The outcomes in our Rhode Island nsf epscor experiment are

Graduate students from Brown and RISD met weekly during the summer of 2010 to find and discuss shared interests and to initiate research projects for the coming year.

intriguing because we began the collaboration at an early stage in the process of idea creation and planning. The Making Science Visible events held this last year were captivating. They created space. My hope for us this next year is that we explore the space and take hold, assemble, learn unfamiliar processes, and try them on. Jennifer Specker is the Associate Project Director of Rhode Island nsf epscor and Co-director of the Center for Marine Life Science.

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CHRISTOPHER ROSE

WHAT IS EMBODIED COGNITION? The human body has nothing more than its various surfaces and other sensibilities, more or less well understood, with which to comprehend, to act, to relate to and to project, to imagine and live within this environment. Embodied Mind theory holds that even our most abstract or grand concepts are in some ways founded upon the biological and electromagnetic phenomena underpinning the sensory procedures upon which we so completely depend. The roots of our expressions of experience and ‘knowledge’ have certain common ground in this embodiment of process, however different their ultimate expression may become within differing types of work. This concept can be useful in exploring endeavours that are effectively interdisciplinary.


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D AV I D G E R S T E N

‘Each discipline affords us distinct modes of thinking and acting, they provide structures of: perception, representation, comprehension and engagement. The mental and physical instruments of each discipline situate us within a spectrum of embodied experiences, from a violin, to a table saw, a canvas, a foundry, a camera, each situation creates unique experiences and modes of developing embodied knowledge.

The Loeb model collection at RISD is a rich campus resource for the study of shapes and dynamic geometric systems found in nature.

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P E T E R WA L K E R

‘Weather forecasting has developed to the point where hourly predictions are available for locations all over the globe at any specific time of the day indicating swell periods, swell heights, swell direction, wind direction and strength, tidal information etc. The surfer’s familiarity with local microclimates and coastal typography in conjunction with ‘observed’

natural indicators provide an additional layer of climatic and environmental awareness. At right, surfboards designed and made by Peter Walker. PHOTO | GRANT HANCOCK

At far right, mapping is an abstracted way of seeing what happens in the water. PHOTO | STATE OF NEW SOUTH WALES, THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND TRAINING AND CHARLES STURT UNIVERSITY

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CASEY DUNN

‘Science stories are often constructed so that the narrative serves as a vehicle for a particular series of facts. Putting the story first better reflects the process and goals of science, and is more compelling to a broader audience.

Art can help science by simplifying and clarifying these narratives, and science can serve art by developing new narratives that are beyond the range of human experience. Casey Dunn's laboratory shares its findings with the public through its Creature Cast series, which includes animation and videos to visualize the science at work. ANIMATION | SOPHIA TINTORI

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PETER HOCKING

‘Artists and designers, while not purely makers in the sense of those in manufacturing or the trades, spend a lot of time making meaning with their hands. At the same time, their process, while not purely intellectual like scientists and other knowledge workers, is often rigorously engaged with the life of the mind, and also allows them — or can require them — 

to develop agility in comprehending and relating complex ideas to a range of audiences.


PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT


PETER HOCKING

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K N OW I N G A N D T R A N S L AT I N G BETWEEN

CONSTITUENCIES It’s quickly become a cliche to claim an exceptional role for artists and designers in the new economy. Perhaps because we sense something unusual in the way that creative minds navigate the world; perhaps, even more, from what we can understand observing creative practitioners at work, they seem to embody ways of being that we intuit as potentially vital to the world we sense is ahead, but cannot yet bring into focus.

The It's in the Bag project transformed plastic shopping bags into new material and new products.

Artists and designers, while not purely makers in the sense of those in manufacturing or the trades, spend a lot of time making meaning with their hands. At the same time, their process, while not purely intellectual like scientists and other knowledge workers, is often rigorously engaged with the life of the mind. This dual nature allows artists and designers to navigate an unusual array of terrains and also allows them — or can require them — to develop agility in comprehending and relating complex ideas to a range of audiences. It’s this ability to translate ideas —  among and between constituencies, as well as ways of knowing — that make risd’s participation in Rhode Island’s nsf epscor project such an intriguing opportunity for Rhode Island. As our gatherings this year have shown, this promises a renewed opportunity for enlivening research and translating research outcomes into new economic and educational opportunities.

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The speed with which knowledge is being produced and new research enables us to consider new paths confounds the precepts of and exposes the limitations of our current educational systems. ri nsf epscor provides an opportunity to connect the current research — and research that has gravitas because it’s grounded in place — with the worldview of a range of Rhode Islanders. Through the development of exhibitions, interactive public encounters, information visualization, publications, and symposia —  all collaboratively developed with researchers —  risd’s role in this project enables a new kind of public engagement with current science. Whether aimed toward young learners who are just beginning to develop a sense of their vocational identity, leaders in commerce, or Rhode Islanders considering public policy directions in their neighborhoods and communities, engagement with the process and outcomes of ri nsf epscor research holds the promise of sparking a new kind of public classroom — on the street, in schools, and through a variety of existing (and yet to be fully known) media. Peter Hocking is Interim Director of risd’s Office of Public Engagement where he works to develop innovative university-community partnerships. He is leading risd’s ri nsf epscor’s public engagement initiatives.

Exhibit posters for research underway at RISD, the host for the Making Science Visible events. At left is Mark Nystrom's wind drawing project made with custom equipment on a rooftop in New York. Sara Raffo's survey of visual systems compared the methods of biology, storytelling, art, and language. Nystrom's carbon balloon project was presented by Lucinda Hitchcock in the first Making Science Visible symposium.


CHRISTOPHER ROSE

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THE

DESIGN

MAKING SCIENCE VISIBLE OF

During the preparation work carried out prior to devising the Making Science Visible program, I spoke individually with many potential participants… about what exactly? Everyone wanted to know.

What emerged from the conversations influenced our thinking about how to run a preparatory event that would assist the bigger picture of cross-disciplinary potentials in research in Rhode Island in the epscor framework as we move ahead. These are some examples of key challenges, either implied or specific, that appear to be permanent features of rapidly developing research in different specialist fields;

There are ‘Good theorists’ and ‘Good experimenters’ (differing practices, different skills, differing characteristics)

A common frustration is that of ‘Not being able to see the big picture’

The work of another person or group being ‘Within reach’

Difficulties and needs of communication between specialist disciplines

Public engagement with science, and its challenges.

Taking a notion such as the big picture and thinking how that translates into practical arrangements, there is a useful analogy with telescope design. Beyond a certain size a

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single device is either unworkable or unbuildable in present conditions. The biggest telescope we can make and use right away is achieved by networking together many small telescopes while paying attention to exactly how the details of each relate to one another. For ourselves and our bodies the analogy holds true for the co-relationships set up among the different senses; sound, vision, touch, movement, balance etc., and their combined

In thinking about language itself, we can

capacities to enable us to function in the world.

disentangle ourselves from some of its

In our case, it is this capacity to intelligently

problems by considering that it has at least

and selectively co-construct meaning out of the

these two paths; the formally and syntactically

electromagnetic storm washing over us that

correct written or codified form through which

produces any clarity. Unfortunately we take

power and hierarchy is established from above;

this largely for granted.

and in contrast the spoken, personal, form in

If we can learn from current insights into such

voices can convey their character and where

and of the moment, through which individual embodied cognition and apply such insights

poetry becomes the laboratory of language

to the effective networking, sharing, and

itself, in other words, a kind of grassroots

understanding of the many specialist fields of

quest. The fact that we can consider these

research in the sciences, then it is my belief that

two different branches implies the existence

we will be enhancing the conditions for mutual

of a larger unexplored domain of meaning

advances in understanding, for what we refer to

between them — one which we need a strategy

as the ‘happy accident’ that characterizes many

to explore.

of the great advances in science, and above all beginning to address our needs of a shared

Art school can be thought of as an experimental

language and effective communication.

domain of the ‘multiple intelligences’ described

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by Howard Gardner, and as such has the

of Design and in its many partnerships and

potential to be a key partner in addressing,

collaborations.

and in assisting others to address, some of the

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challenges set out above. Specialized skills in

Making Science Visible’ at risd in 2009–10 was

visual thinking, in virtual and physical media,

devised and brought together to lay down some

and the critical engagement with cognitive and

foundations for the intellectual, organizational and

associative languages and their connections

creative practices in support of the Rhode Island

with all forms of human experience are found

epscor scheme looking ahead. risd held two

in concentrated form within the many arts

events in the year, the most recent of which brought

and design disciplines at Rhode Island School

together in a setting amongst the tree canopy and


sunlight surrounding the Woods-Gerry building on Providence’s East Side, many succinct examples of cross-discipline enquiry, critique, awareness and emerging possibilities that the sixty participants can continue to refer to in planning and inventing

David Farmer gave two presentations on solitons — one for a highly technical science audience and the second presentation for a general public audience. He changed his language, visuals, and his storytelling style between the two presentations.

new curricular spaces and research partnerships in the next few years. Chris Rose is a critic at risd, where he creates spaces and events that promote knowledge negotiation between disciplines. He was Interim pi for risd in 2009–10 and produced the spring event, Making Science Visible.

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D AV I D FA R M E R

‘How can we capture essential scientific concepts and

translate them to an educated but non-technical public?

Viewing a soliton on the Scott Russell Aqueduct on the Union Canal near Heriot-Watt University in July 1995. David Farmer showed this image during his presentation. By seeing the wave in a human context, the scientific idea is made accessible. PHOTO | MATHEMATICS, HERIOT-WATT UNIVERSITY, EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND

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C O U R T N E Y M AT T I S O N

‘My work includes analysis of qualitative interview data from biologists and artists discussing

how art might promote coral reef stewardship and policy change.

Courtney Mattison's work includes ceramic sculptures depicting the state of coral reefs–with natural and manmade materials intertwined in the ocean. PHOTO | COURTNEY MATTISON

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D AV I D G E R S T E N

‘Like many complex structures such as language or molecular structures,

disciplines are polymorphic. Which is to say they can exist in more than one form, they can take on different meanings and organizations depending on their context and environment. Recognizing the links between embodied experience and embodied knowledge as well as the polymorphic characteristics of disciplines helps us understand and navigate the particular disciplinary geography of a given time and place. This navigation is essential to creating coherence between our lives and the broader geographies of our given epoch.


PA R T I C I PA N T S


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Presenter at Making Science Visible symposia RISD Rhode Island School of Design URI University of Rhode Island GSO Graduate School of Oceanography CCRI Community College of Rhode Island RWU Roger Williams University PC Providence College STAC State Technology Advisory Council RI NSF EPSCoR Leadership

Peter Alfonso RI NSF EPSCoR Director and Vice President for Research and Economic Development | URI peteralfonso@uri.edu

David Bogen RI NSF EPSCoR Co-Director and Associate Provost, Academic Affairs | RISD dbogen@risd.edu

Charlie Cannon

Brad Moran

Dawn Barrett

Denise Campbell

RI NSF EPSCoR Co-Director and Professor, GSO | URI moran@gso.uri.edu

Dean, Architecture+Design RISD dbarrett@risd.edu

Department Coordinator, Landscape Architecture | RISD dcampbel@risd.edu

Tim Pelletier

Mary Bergstein

Bongsup Cho

RI NSF EPSCoR Biotechnology Outreach Coordinator, Biology CCRI tepelletier@ccri.edu

Department Head, History of Art and Visual Culture | RISD mbergste@risd.edu

Professor, Pharmacy | URI bcho@uri.edu

Rachel Berwick

Christopher Rose

Department Head, Glass | RISD rberwick@risd.edu

Graduate Student, Architecture RISD jcombs@risd.edu

Jean Blackburn

Dennis Congdon

Department Head, Illustration RISD jblackbu@risd.edu

Department Head, Painting | RISD dcongdon@risd.edu

Diane Blair

Program Coordinator | STAC kcoogan@riedc.com

Interim PI (spring 2010), Consulting faculty, Graduates Studies and Furniture Design | RISD crose@risd.edu

Jennifer Specker Associate Project Director and Professor GSO RI NSF EPSCoR jspecker@riepscor.org Participants

Wendy Abelson

Co-PI RI NSF EPSCoR and Associate Professor, Industrial Design | RISD ccannon@risd.edu

Department Coordinator, Interior Architecture | RISD wabelson@risd.edu

John Dunnigan

Director, Government Relations RISD ballina@risd.edu

Co-PI RI NSF EPSCoR and Professor, Furniture Design | RISD jdunniga@risd.edu

Edward Hawrot RI NSF EPSCoR Co-Director and Professor, Medical Science, Bio Med Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology & Biotechnology Brown Edward_Hawrot@Brown.edu

Jim Lemire RI NSF EPSCoR Undergraduate Research Center Coordinator RWU jlemire@rwu.edu

Sara MacSorley Project Administrator, RI NSF EPSCoR smacsorley@riepscor.org

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Babette Allina

Barbara Andrade Department Coordinator, Teaching and Learning in Art and Design RISD bandrade@risd.edu

Edythe Anthony

Administrator Assistant, Foundation Studies | RISD dblair@risd.edu

Joe Combs

Kristen Coogan

Jack Costello+

Deborah Bright

Professor, Biology | PC costello@providence.edu

Acting Dean, Fine Arts | RISD dbright@risd.edu

Stephanie Darling

Shelley Brown

Department Coordinator, Printmaking | RISD sdarling@risd.edu

Graduate student, Biological Sciences | URI smbrown@my.uri.edu

R. John Davenport

Department Head, Ceramics RISD lbush@risd.edu

Associate Director Institute for Brain Science; Adjunct Assistant Professor, Neuroscience | Brown John_Davenport@brown.edu

Maureen Buttenheim

John Donoghue

Department Coordinator, Industrial Design | RISD mbuttenh@risd.edu

Director, Brown Institute for Brain Science, Bio-Med Institute for Brian Science | Brown John_Donoghue@Brown.edu

Lawrence Bush

Mairead Byrne

Ellen Driscoll

Professor, Biology | RIC eanthony@ric.edu

Associate Professor, English | RISD mbyrne@risd.edu

Elisabeth Arevalo

Celia Cackowski

Department Head, Sculpture RISD edriscol@risd.edu

GSO | URI celia@gso.uri.edu

Casey Dunn+

Associate Professor and Department Chair, Biology PC earevalo@providence.edu

Ed Baker GSO | URI ebaker@gso.uri.edu

Liz Camara Executive Assistant, Institutional Engagement | RISD lcamara@risd.edu

Assistant Professor, Biology Bio Med Ecology & Evolutionary Biology | Brown Casey_Dunn@brown.edu


Pat Ewanchuk

Marilyn Grear

Taehee Kim

Anais Missakian

Assistant Professor, Biology | PC ewanchuk@providence.edu

Department Coordinator, Furniture Design | RISD mgrear@risd.edu

Graduate Student, Digital+Media RISD tkim03@g.risd.edu

Department Head, Textile Design RISD amissaki@risd.edu

Lonnie Guralnick

Lindsay Kinkade

Jan Mun

Assistant Dean, Math and Natural Sciences; Professor, Biology RWU lguralnick@rwu.edu

Graduate Student, MSV Research Assistant, Graphic Design | RISD lkinkade@risd.edu

Graduate Student, Digital+Media RISD jmun@g.risd.edu

Jonathan Knowles

David Nelson

Donna Gustavsen

Assistant Professor, Architecture RISD jknowles@risd.edu

Professor, Cell and Molecular Biology | URI dnelson@uri.edu

David Laidlaw

Greg Nemes

Professor, Computer Science Brown David_Laidlaw@Brown.edu

Graduate Student, Architecture RISD gnemes@g.risd.edu

Chris Lane

Bill Newkirk Department Head, Graphic Design RISD bnewkirk@risd.edu

David Farmer + Dean, GSO | URI thedean@gso.uri.edu

Gabriel Feld Professor, Architecture | RISD gfeld@risd.edu

Henry Ferreira Department Head, Printmaking RISD hferreir@risd.edu

Ann Fessler

Department Head, Apparel Design RISD dgustavs@risd.edu

Sara Hickox

Professor, Photography | RISD afessler@risd.edu

Director, Office of Marine Programs, GSO | URI sara@gso.uri.edu

Richard Fishman

Jonathan Highfield

Professor, Visual Arts | Brown Richard_Fishman@brown.edu

Department Head, English | RISD jhighfie@risd.edu

Professor, Department of Biological Sciences | URI clane@mail.uri.edu

Leslie Fontana

Jonathan Hills

Andrew LeClair

Celia Olson

Department Head, Industrial Design | RISD lfontana@risd.edu

Undergraduate Student | Brown Jonathan_Hills@brown.edu

Graduate Student, MSV Research Assistant, Graphic Design | RISD aleclair@g.risd.edu

Undergraduate Student, Industrial and Exhibit Design | RISD colsen@g.risd.edu

Kyna Leski

Rebecca Page

Department Head, Architecture RISD kleski@risd.edu

Assistant Professor, Biology Bio Med Ecology & Evolutionary Biology | Brown Rebecca_Page@brown.edu

Claudia Ford Director, International Programs RISD cford@risd.edu

Kai Franz+ Graduate Student, Digital+Media RISD kfranz@g.risd.edu

Lindsay French Department Head, History of Art and Visual Culture | RISD lfrench@risd.edu

Lucinda Hitchcock+ Professor, Graphic Design | RISD lhitchco@risd.edu

Dennis Hlynsky Department Head, Film Animation and Video | RISD dhlynsky@risd.edu

Peter Hocking Director, Office of Public Engagement | RISD phocking@g.risd.edu

Elizabeth Leuthner Web Editor, Media + Partners RISD eleuthner@risd.edu

Courtney Mattison+

Gail Hughes

Graduate Student, Environmental Studies | Brown Courtney_Mattison@brown.edu

David Gersten+

Coordinator, Liberal Arts | RISD ghughes@risd.edu

Dan McNally

Critic, Architecture | RISD dgersten@risd.edu

Bethany Jenkins

Jason Graff Graduate student, GSO | URI jrgraff@gso.uri.edu

David Grand Assistant Professor, Diagnostic Imaging, Bio Med Diagnostic Imaging | Brown David_Grand@Brown.edu

Rebecca Paiva Department Coordinator, Film/ Animation/Video | RISD rpaiva@risd.edu

Michael Paradiso Professor, Neuroscience Bio Med Neuroscience | Brown Michael_Paradiso@brown.edu

Amy Patenaude

Professor, Cell and Molecular Biology | URI bjenkins@uri.edu

Associate Professor, Environmental Science, Department of Science and Technology | Bryant dlm1@bryant.edu

Yasmine Khan

Susanne Menden-Deuer

Graduate Student, Teaching and Learning in Art and Design | RISD ykhan@g.risd.edu

Professor, GSO | URI smenden@gso.uri.edu

Department Head, Digital+Media RISD dpeltz@gmail.com

Administrator Assistant, Graduate Studies | RISD apatenau@risd.edu

Daniel Peltz

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Wolfgang Peti

Laura Shirreff

Elizabeth Stubblefield Loucks

David Warner

Associate Professor, Medical Science, Bio Med Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology & Biotechnology | Brown Wolfgang_Peti@brown.edu

Technical Assistant, Textiles | RISD lshirref@risd.edu

Research Alliance Manager | STAC bloucks@riedc.com

Brian Smith

Eva Sutton

Professor, History, Philosophy + Social Sciences | RISD dwarner@risd.edu

Dean, Continuing Education | RISD bsmith@risd.edu

Department Head, Photography RISD esutton@risd.edu

Patricia Phillips Dean, Graduate Studies | RISD pphillip02@risd.edu

Jeff Poland Lecturer, History, Philosophy + Social Sciences | RISD jpoland@risd.edu

Jocelyne Prince Assistant Professor, Glass | RISD jprince@risd.edu

Sara Raffo Graduate Student, MSV Research Assistant, Graphic Design | RISD sraffo@g.risd.edu

Vellachi Ramanathan Graduate Student, Textiles | RISD vramanat@g.risd.edu

David Rowley Professor, College of Pharmacy URI drowley@uri.edu

Christine M. B. Smith Executive Director | STAC csmith@riedc.com

David C. Smith Associate Dean, Professor of Oceanography, GSO | URI assoc_dean@gso.uri.edu

Alexandra Snook Graduate Student, Furniture RISD asnook@g.risd.edu

Dean Snyder Professor, Sculpture | RISD dsnyder@risd.edu

Rosanne Somerson Department Head, Furniture Design | RISD rsomerso@risd.edu

Paul Sproll

Tatiana Rynearson

Department Head, Teaching and Learning in Art and Design | RISD psproll@risd.edu

Professor, GSO | URI rynearson@gso.uri.edu

Tracy Steepy

Colgate Searle

Department Head, Jewelry and Metalsmithing | RISD tsteepy@risd.edu

Department Head, Landscape Architecture | RISD csearle@risd.edu

Jessie Shefrin Provost, Academic Affairs | RISD jshefrin@g.risd.edu

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Kathy Takayama+ Director of the Sheridan Center, Dean of the Faculty | Brown Kathy_Takayama@brown.edu

David Targan Associate Dean of the College for Science Education Dean of the College Brown David_Targan@Brown.edu

Carol Terry

Thompson Webb Professor Emeritus, Geological Sciences | Brown Thompson_Webb_lll@Brown.edu

Jackie Webb Coordinator, Marine Biology Program; Professor, Biological Sciences | URI jacqueline_webb@mail.uri.edu

Kerry Whittaker Graduate student, GSO | URI kawhitta@gmail.com

John Williams

Director, Library | RISD cterry@risd.edu

Professor, Chemistry, Physical Sciences Department | RIC jcwilliam@ric.edu

Dan Udwary

Liliane Wong

Pharmacy | URI danudwary@gmail.com

Department Head, Interior Architecture | RISD lwong@risd.edu

Clement Valla Digital Technician, RISD EPSCoR; Critic, Digital+Media and Foundation Studies | RISD cvalla@risd.edu

Peter Woodberry

Philip Veillette

Sara Wylie

Web design, GSO | URI pveillette@gso.uri.edu

Research Assistant, Science, Technology, and Society | MIT sawylie@mit.edu

Barbara Von Eckardt

Joanne Stryker

Dean, Liberal Arts | RISD bvonecka@risd.edu

Dean, Foundation Studies | RISD jstryker@risd.edu

Peter Walker+ Assistant Professor, Furniture Design | RISD pwalker@risd.edu

Business Science and Technology | CCRI pwoodberry@ccri.edu

Lisa Zuccarelli Chair, Biology, Biomedical Sciences, Chemistry | Salve Regina lisa.zuccarelli@salve.edu


With Special Thanks to

PAMELA HARRINGTON & ELIZABETH ITHURBURU RISD CORPORATE + FOUNDATION RELATIONS

without whom Making Science Visible would not have been possible

SARA RAFFO & ANDREW LECLAIR & LINDSAY KINKADE GRADUATE RESEARCH ASSISTANTS

+


AAAS REPORT ON THE C O L L A B O R AT I V E W O R K DONE IN 2009–2010

+

‘The excitement was palpable during the last two panel visits. If the same excitement can be further developed and communicated, RI could obtain national or international visibility in the field of visualization and interpretation/translation.

EXPspace.risd.edu

Visible Insight  

Edited and Art Directed by Lindsay Kinkade. Designed by Sara Raffo. NSF EPSCoR at RISD is a research project at the Rhode Island School o...

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