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Monthly Report

June 2020

Limbe Wildlife Centre: June 2020

Published in July 2020 Limbe Wildlife Centre, P.O. Box 878, Limbe, Republic of Cameroon

Limbe Wildlife Centre is a collaborative effort between the Pandrillus Foundation and the Republic of Cameroon, Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife, MINFOF Pandrillus Foundation is a non-profit making NGO specialized in the protection, rehabilitation and reintroduction of primates, as well as management and sustainable financing of conservation projects in Africa Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife is in charge of implementing the national forest policy for ensuring sustainable management and conservation of wildlife and biodiversity over the national territory as enacted by forestry law No. 01/94 of 20 June which regulates all forestry, wildlife and fisheries activities

guillaume@limbewildlife.org limbewildlifecentre

+237 681 991 590 limbewildlife

ALL OUR REPORTS ARE AVAILABLE

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limbewildlife.org limbewildlife


Monthly Report

June 2020

Accreditations & Awards

In December 2018, the Limbe Wildlife Centre has had its accreditation with the Pan African Sanctuary Alliance (PASA) renewed for another five years. PASA is the largest association of wildlife centres and sanctuaries in Africa, founded by the Limbe Wildlife Centre, along with 6 other primate sanctuaries. Today, PASA includes 23 organizations in 13 countries which demonstrate exceptional commitment and the highest standards of animal welfare and conservation practices, to securing a future for Africa’s primates and their habitat.

In June 2018, the Limbe Wildlife Centre was voted Best Volunteer Abroad Project and chosen to feature in the Tutorful’s Wildlife Conservation editorial along with other prestigious organisations making a notable difference in wildlife conservation worldwide. The LWC gives people the chance to volunteer and assist experienced caregivers with the daily caregiving activities, offering the opportunity for volunteers to the experience of making a meaningful contribution to primate conservation (and all the satisfaction this provides).

In August 2019, the Limbe Wildlife Centre received a 2019 Clark R. Bavin Wildlife Law Enforcement Award at the Conference of the Parties of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) in Geneva, Switzerland, in recognition of the remarkable efforts the LWC has made to help combat wildlife crime.

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Monthly Report

June 2020

Content

ACCREDITATIONS & AWARDS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | PROJECT MANAGER OUR PRIORITY FINANCIAL NEEDS JUNE 2020 HIGHLIGHTS EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN VS. COVID-19 ACHIEVEMENTS JUNE 2020 & OBJECTIVES JULY 2020 1. Pandrillus-GoC Partnership & Public Relations 2. Population management & Animal welfare 3. Wildlife rescue, rehabilitation and release programme 4. Infrastructures and development| Material & Equipment 5. Community Conservation, Environmental education & Ecotourism 6. Wildlife conservation research & Health monitoring 7. Capacity building & staff empowerment 8. Communication & Visibility 9. Revenues generated

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Monthly Report

June 2020

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | PROJECT MANAGER Preparing to release the first flock of 25 endangered African grey parrots Dear Friends and Supporters, The rainy season has arrived a little earlier than expected, but we are pleased with our progress this month despite this disturbance. We are very happy that Cameroon’s first-ever soft release aviary, designed for releasing the endangered African grey parrots, is under construction (p. 14 & 16). A fruitful partnership with the Limbe Botanical Garden has born, and they will jointly lead an essential component of the conservation of the species. Next month, when we transfer the first flock of 25 parrots, we will celebrate the establishment of the national rescue, rehabilitation and release program for the species (enforcing CITES recommendations in Cameroon). Thus, we will further assist the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife by providing the best care to the

victims of poaching and trafficking. With this pilot phase, we aim to release at least two flocks of 25 parrots. Further releases will subsequently be completed in protected areas across the country to restore dwindling wild populations. Through this project, Pandrillus, the government of Cameroon and other partners are bridging a little more of the gap existing between animal welfare and biodiversity conservation to better protect Cameroonian wildlife. This month also saw the rescue of two new individuals, the completion of several health checks and the successful transferal of a few of our parrots from quarantine to the rehabilitation aviary. Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, greater efforts have been made to maintain and increase the level of biosecurity in the centre (p. 9, 14 & 17-

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Monthly Report

June 2020

18. Thanks to the Human Society International for providing emergency support. Access to clean water is an essential part of this. Water supply shortages are not an uncommon occurrence, which has proved problematic for our stringent cleaning protocols requiring more clean water. In response, we have had do increase our water storage capacity in each section. This will also help in implementing our biannual pressure-washing and disinfection, which will be completed as soon as we have raised the necessary funds to purchase 2 new water pressure machines. Despite the rain (bringing some challenges and delays), some much-needed maintenance works were done at the Chimp Mainland, Mandrill and Drill enclosures (p. 14-18). Our vet team has also been very busy dealing with 3 serious cases of resistant bacteria abscessation in our Island population, requiring weekly anaesthesia. The team has been working very hard to treat Lolo, Koto and Ntui, and the first two are recovering very well. Ntui, on the other hand, was more seriously affected and the healing is taking longer. His condition is, however, stable and we will continue to put in all our energy to restore his health (p. 11). Thanks to the Wagmore Foundation for supporting our veterinary care.

Throughout this month, other important projects have also been in the pipeline. These include: □ The Emergency Action Plan to respond to the threat of the Covid-19 pandemic (p.7 & 9) □ Developing and promoting organic farming as a sustainable alternative to slash-and-burn agriculture in the local community to increase food security, reduce deforestation, preserve the quality of soil and water of the Mount Cameroon and mitigate climate change (p. 19). □ Art-4-Nature: using Art for protecting Nature and support talented Cameroonian artistactivists in their journey to educate, inspire and change people's attitude towards wildlife (p. 7). Your continuing support, for which we are endlessly grateful, is essential for the continued development of these projects. Our four billboards (4x2 sq. m) designed by Toh Bright1,2,3 are ready to be displayed in two locations in Limbe. These amazing and unique artworks still need sponsorship and we welcome all donations. For any donation above $500, the name of the generous philanthropist will be incorporated into the completed work (p. 7)! Stay safe and healthy, Thank you for your unfailing support

1

2 https://www.tohbright.com

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2019/may/10/ifyou-sleep-your-life-sleeps-friday-night-in-cameroonnonstop-city-a-cartoon-douala-toh-bright

3 https://www.instagram.com/tohbright_art/

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Our priority financial needs 1. Help us protect our rescued animals during COVID-19! We must boost the immunity of 15 critically endangered gorillas, 43 endangered chimps, and 75 endangered Drills and upgrade biosecurity measures vs. COVID-19. COVID-19 updates in Cameroon The number of confirmed cases exceeds 13,000, with more than 2,000 occurring within the past 2 weeks. We need your help to resist the first wave that will fall on Limbe. Any amount leads us a step forward! Donate on Paypal or on our GoFundMe Fundraising campaigns

Confimed cases of COVID-19 in Cameroon (source: MINSANTE)

16000 14000 12000 10000 8000 6000 4000 2000 0 Mar-20

Apr-20

May-20

Jun-20

2. Help us free 100 parrots back to the wild! We are leading the rehabilitation and release programme for the endangered African grey parrot.

3. Sponsor 1 of the 4 large-sized artistic creations! Art-4-Nature is a concept developed by Toh Bright and the LWC to inspire people to protect nature.

Contact info@limbewildlife.org to know more

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June 2020

Monthly Report

June 2020 Highlights

□ Initiated the collaboration with the Limbe Botanical Garden for the pilot soft-release of rehabilitated endangered African grey parrots □ Putty-nosed monkey: Completed the integration Bamenda, Eboti, and Tanyi to Zulu’s group □ Completed maintenance of the Chimp mainland night den □ Planted 50 trees in the LWC’s farm to increase food security, reduce soil erosion on the river bank and start promoting organic farming □ Media coverage: French national television France 2 highlighted our efforts to safeguard our 455 animals amid COVID-19 pandemic in evening news

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June 2020

Monthly Report

Emergency Action Plan vs. COVID-19 EACH MONTH, WE SELECT A FEW KEY MEASURES IMPLEMENTED TO SAFEGUARD THE LWC AND PURSUE OUR CONSERVATION EFFORTS

# A.1.3

ACTIONS PROTECTION & SANITATION

A.1.7

A.2.1

SECURING ANIMAL CARE STANDARDS

OBJECTIVES Upgrade all sanitary protocols

MEASURES Compost all organic waste in the farm and control access

Strengthen the immunity and body condition of the animals

Provide nutritional supplement (soya cake)

Maintain daily operations and animal care standards

Maintain diet and enrichments

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June 2020

Monthly Report

Achievements June 2020 & Objectives July 2020 1. Pandrillus-GoC Partnership & Public Relations Funders

□ Initiated the collaboration with the Limbe Botanical Garden for the pilot soft-release programme of the rescued endangered African grey parrots rehabilitated at the Limbe Wildlife Centre

July 2020 objectives: □ Validate internal rules and regulations (pending) □ Review the proposal of the national strategy to rehabilitate and release the African grey parrots

2. Population management & Animal welfare Funders

Ongoing activities □ Maintained frequency and diversity of enrichments in each section (Image 1)

Specific activities □ Putty-nosed monkey: Completed the integration Bamenda, Eboti, and Tanyi to Zulu’s group (Image 2)

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June 2020

Monthly Report

□ Vet cares (June 2020): ◌ 71 Primate individuals treated; 13 anaesthesia performed; 38 individual sampled (14 blood samples for haematology analysis, 36 faecal samples for coprology analysis); 2 contraceptions; 1 identification with a microchip; 1 laceration repairs; 1 minor surgery; 96 drug therapies (of which 30% to treat 4 individuals with resistant bacteria abscessation): 64% dietary supplements, 25% antibiotics, 9% painkillers and anti-inflammatories, 1% arthritis supplements, 1% others; 0 health checks; 0 death. ◌ African grey parrots: 12 health checks; 6 transferrals to the rehabilitation aviary; 1 individual received intensive care treatment with 3rd generation antibiotic treatment and special diet; 2 deaths

Image 1. Wood shaving was scattered in the Red-eared monkey enclosure before the rains to provide enrichment, litter and reduce parasite production.

Image 2. Three individuals (Bamenda, Eboti, and Tanyi) have successfully been integrated into Zulu’s group. Motumba (dominant female, lying) and Zulu (dominant male, grooming her) have accepted them and this change in the group contributed to strengthening their link.

July 2020 objectives: □ Continue with the ongoing activities □ African grey parrots: Continue to provide special care for the last individuals with difficulties improving their body conditions □ Vet cares: 3rd quarantine health check: Drill (Mbigou, juvenile male); General health checks: African grey parrots (3-4); Contraception: Drills (5) and Guenons (3)

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June 2020

Monthly Report

3. Wildlife rescue, rehabilitation and release programme Funders

Arrival & quarantine □ Rescued 2 endangered African grey parrots (Images 3) □ African grey parrot: Arranged a recovery area for injured and most fragile individuals in quarantine (Image 4)

Behavioural rehabilitation □ None

Social rehabilitation □ African grey parrot: Continued to maintain the care and enrichment to the 210 African grey parrots in the large aviary before releasing them back to the wild □ African grey parrot: Continued the socialisation of one humanized African grey parrot (Image 5) □ Drill: Continued the social rehabilitation of the juvenile male Drill Mbigou with adult female Jafita

Release (ecological & environmental rehabilitation) □ None

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June 2020

Monthly Report

Image 3. One of the 2 newly rescued African grey parrots seized by the authorities from a man, who was hiding the birds in his car, wanting to transport them to Douala. Unfortunately, no arrest was made and the culprits are free. Failure to implement legal procedures impedes deterring wildlife crimes and contributes to impunity and corruption and hence must be combatted. Based on the drawing around the eye (Ace of Spade shape) and light grey colour of the head, we believe this adult (yellow iris) is a female. Sexing endangered African grey parrot based on physical criteria is not well described nor validated, but we will investigate with our rescued individuals to generate data and cross-cut with genetical sexing.

Image 4. Killi Matute, Head of quarantine and in charge of the African grey parrot rehabilitation, arranges a cage to limit the risk of injuries in already fragilized individuals and facilitate the recovery process (Le Monde Afrique article highlighting Killi)

Image 5. Tchakou (bottom left), who lived alone almost all its life with humans, has gone through a progressive and effective social integration with wild conspecifics. Although he is still a little bit “wild�, he is now much more comfortable with the other individuals and has been transferred to satellite room of the large rehabilitation aviary where he will be able to train to fly.

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June 2020

Monthly Report

July 2020 objectives: □ African Grey Parrots: Continue the rehabilitation process of the rescued individuals; continue Tchakou socialisation □ African Grey Parrots: Start the pilot soft-release with the first flock of 25 individuals in the Limbe Botanical Garden □ Drill: Transfer juvenile Mbigou and his surrogate female Jafita in a satellite cage of the Drill enclosure (delayed)

4. Infrastructures and development| Material & Equipment Funders

□ Completed maintenance of the Chimp mainland night den (Images 6-13) □ Started to install the first soft release aviary for the African grey parrots in the Limbe Botanical Garden (Images 14-15) □ Started to maintain the Drill enclosure fence (Images 16-17) □ Started to maintain the Mandrill satellite cage (Images 18-21) □ Installed water drum to increase storage and wooden table to store material (Images 22-25) □ Maintained several feeding platforms for the African grey parrot rehabilitation aviary (Images 26-27)

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June 2020

Monthly Report

Image 6. Food basket installation in the Image 7. Last part of the top foundation Chimp mainland night den. concreting in the Chimp mainland night den.

Image 8. Installation of the new sliding door that is linking the big hall and the small room leading to the Chimp Mainland outdoor enclosure.

Image 9. Concreting of some area of the floor to facilitate cleaning and disinfection in the Chimp mainland night den.

Image 10. View of some damage zinc Image 11. Replacing the damage zinc sheet in the roof of the Chimp mainland sheets. night den.

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June 2020

Monthly Report

Image 12. Final view of the maintained Image 13. Final view of the maintained Chimp mainland night den. Chimp mainland night den.

Image 14. Framing the soft-release aviary Image 15. Framing the soft-release aviary inside the Limbe Botanical Garden. inside the Limbe Botanical Garden.

Image 16. Installation of the overhang Image 17. Wire mesh installation for pipe that will carry the overhang electric added protection to prevent Drill fence line of the Drill enclosure. escapes.

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June 2020

Monthly Report

Image 18. Part view of damage metal Image 19. Part view of damage metal and concrete in the Mandrill satellite and concrete in the Mandrill satellite cages requiring maintenance. cages requiring maintenance.

Image 20. Part view of the damaged Image 21. Replacing damaged metal area requiring maintenance in the pipe in the Mandrill satellite cages. Mandrill satellite cages.

Image 22. Crafting of wooden table and Image 23. View of finish table. cover with bamboo sticks.

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June 2020

Monthly Report

Image 24. Preparation of the water drum. Image 25. This cost-efficient system increases our water storage capacity in each section to implement our cleaning and disinfection procedures efficiently.

Image 26. Damage feeding platform Image 27. Crafting of a new feeding eaten by the African grey parrots. platform for the African grey parrot rehabilitation aviary.

July 2020 objectives: □ Complete the first soft release aviary for the African grey parrots □ Complete the maintenance of the Chimp mainland night den □ Start the maintenance of the Mandrill satellite cages □ Start building a roof over the composting area within the farm

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June 2020

Monthly Report

5. Community Conservation, Environmental education & Ecotourism Funders

DUE TO THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC, ALL EDUCATION ACTIVITIES WITH CHILDREN HAVE BEEN SUSPENDED □ School outreach programme: Suspended the 2019-2020 programme □ Saturday Nature Club: Suspended the 2019-2020 Nature Club □ Tree planting: Planted 50 trees in the LWC’s farm to increase food security, reduce soil erosion on the river bank and start promoting organic farming (Image 28) □ Community-based Green Economy: 15 ex-hunter members sustainably harvesting wild herbaceous plants: 799.5 kg of Aframomum stems and 254 kg of Costus stems; 44 women members harvesting crop by-product: 937 kg of cassava leaves, 2.579 kg of papaya leaves, 3,134 kg of potato leaves, 239 kg of invasive Trumpet wood shoots, corresponding to 54 trees hand-cut; 869,775 FCFA (€1,328) paid directly to the local community association this month; 5,285,860 FCFA (€8,070) contributed to alleviate local poverty in 2020. Image 28. Our team planted several Corossol trees (Annona muricata) aka the Soursop, and Cashew trees (Anacardium occidentale), which are both native to Cameroon. These trees will serve as a food source for the animals and helps us increase our food safety, help avoid soil erosion on the river beds, and lastly, they add value to our newly made compost. In the future, we plan on scaling up the project to encourage tree nursery and reforestation and promote organic agriculture in local communities to improve farming practices, reduce deforestation and mitigate climate change. July 2020 objectives: □ Continue with ongoing programs

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June 2020

Monthly Report

6. Wildlife conservation research & Health monitoring Ongoing activities □ Behavioural monitoring of the endangered Chimpanzees: assess the Mainland group cohesion and individual welfare before, during and after social integration of Chinoise (subadult female) □ Recovery monitoring of the rescued endangered African grey parrots: Continued to collect data during health checks and through direct observation □ Establishing Haematological Reference Values for the endangered Drill: Continued to build the dataset of haematological data extracted from 18 years of analysis (2002-2019), corresponding to 199 samples, and including a total of 21 haematological parameters.

Activity achievement □ Resumed the behavioural data collection on the Mainland chimpanzee group.

Data analysis □ None

July 2020 objectives: □ Continue with the above ongoing activities

7. Capacity building & staff empowerment □ Behavioural study: Trained an MSc student from Dschang University to collect, organise and analyse behavioural data on Chimpanzees for assessing the success of social integration (see also above: 6. Wildlife conservation research & Health monitoring; Image 29)

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June 2020

Monthly Report

Image 29. Isabel Misori is an MSc student from the University of Dschang. She will observe (under the rain!) the Chimp Mainland group within the framework of the assessment of Chinoise’s social integration after 4 months. The Limbe Wildlife centre plays an important role in training and inspiring student to embrace a scientific career and learn about behaviour study standard methodologies. July 2020 objectives: □ Continue with the above ongoing activities

8. Communication & Visibility □ Digital communication (Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and Twitter): The month of June was a bit of a slower month compared to the last one but our platforms are all still on a steady growth (+5%) reaching a total of close to 22,500 across all platforms. Our Twitter (+18% this month) has benefited from a very large increase in followers thanks to the recognition and support of English actor Mr Peter Egan! □ Media coverage: 1 international report made o Television: COVID-19, peur sur les grands singes, 20h, France 2, 20 May

2020

(National

French

television); available here at 48:00

July 2020 objectives: □ Continue advocating the missions of the LWC within the Central African Conservation Landscape in Cameroon

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June 2020

Monthly Report

9. Revenues generated â–Ą Entrance fees (June 2020): FCFA 0 (0 visitors; 0% children, 0% Cameroonians) due to the closure of the Limbe Wildlife Centre to visitors 4500 4000 3500 3000 2500 2000 1500 1000 500 0 Jun-19 Jul-19 Aug-19 Sep-19 Oct-19 Nov-19 Dec-19 Jan-20 Feb-20 Mar-20 Apr-20 May-20 Jun-20 Adult Nationals

Children Nationals

Adult Foreigners

Children Foreigners

Figure 1. Visitor statistics June 2019- June 2020

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June 2020

Monthly Report

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Profile for limbewildlife

Limbe Wildlife Centre: June 2020  

Limbe Wildlife Centre: June 2020  

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