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Annual Report

2019

Content WHO WE ARE EXECUTIVE SUMMARY CO-MANAGER’S MESSAGE ACCREDITATIONS & AWARDS 4-YEAR IMPACT 2019 IMPACT WHERE WE WORKED IN 2019 2019 HIGHLIGHTS ACHIEVEMENTS 1. PANDRILLUS-GOC PARTNERSHIP & PUBLIC RELATIONS 2. POPULATION MANAGEMENT & ANIMAL WELFARE OUR RESCUES AT A GLANCE 3. WILDLIFE RESCUE, REHABILITATION AND RELEASE PROGRAMME 4. INFRASTRUCTURES AND DEVELOPMENT 5. COMMUNITY CONSERVATION & ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION 6. WILDLIFE CONSERVATION RESEARCH & HEALTH MONITORING 7. CAPACITY BUILDING, MENTORING & STAFF EMPOWERMENT 8. COMMUNICATION & VISIBILITY 9. REVENUES GENERATED 2020 OBJECTIVES FINANCE DONORS VOLUNTEERS

3 4 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 19 25 27 30 34 44 49 51 54 55 56 61 65


Annual Report

Who we are

CORE MISSION The Limbe Wildlife Centre ensures the survival of Cameroonian wildlife through the rehabilitation and release of wild animal victims of illegal trafficking, education, community outreach, applied conservation science and by supporting wildlife law enforcement.

2019

WHO IS LIMBE WILDLIFE CENTRE The Limbe Wildlife Centre was created in 1993 as a result of the rapid decline of animal populations in Cameroon due to habitat degradation, poaching, and the illegal wildlife trade. Our team is composed of local and international wildlife ecologists and veterinarians, and a highly experienced and qualified local animal care staff. Run in partnership between the non-profit organisation Pandrillus and the Government of Cameroon, our project is unique in Central Africa.

VISION Limbe Wildlife Centre envisions a Cameroon where animal welfare and wildlife conservation merge and are included in the development of Cameroonian society to substantially benefit local communities and improve human wellbeing.


Annual Report

2019

Amazing things can still happen

PANDRILLUS COUNTRY DIRECTOR’S EXECUTIVE SUMMARY | GUILLAUME LE FLOHIC

Dear Friends and Supporters, 2019 marked a major turn in our efforts to protect wildlife in Cameroon. Although our primary goal remains the welfare of the rescued animals at the Limbe Wildlife Centre, we are proud of our progress developing a wider conservation strategy to increase our local and national impact. We were honoured to receive the prestigious 2019 Clark R. Bavin Wildlife Law Enforcement Award at the Conference of the Parties to the CITES in Geneva, Switzerland. This award was in recognition of our consistent dedication to the welfare of rescued animals. We also hosted our partners, community members, school children and government officials to celebrate LWC’s 25th anniversary working with Cameroon’s Ministry of Forestry and

Wildlife to rescue and protect Cameroon’s important wildlife heritage. In addition to our substantial daily operations caring for over 500 rescued animals, we focused on four additional priorities throughout 2019: education; rescue, rehabilitation and release ‘3R’; applied science; and community engagement. Education: We proudly inaugurated the #ProtectWildlife Campaign on Endangered Species Day, which became the common thread of our Nature Club, School outreach and Batoke Family Nature Club throughout 2019. We designed this new intergenerational programme to educate, engage and inspire communities to protect their wildlife heritage.


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Wildlife Rehab & Release: The LWC has become the leading national rescue and rehabilitation centre for endangered African grey parrots with 380 individuals in our care throughout 2019. We completed a brand-new rehabilitation facility to better rehabilitate the birds in our care for wild release and developed comprehensive standard operating procedures for other rescues to replicate. In 2020, we will further strengthen our support to the national rehabilitation and release programme and continue our role as conservation leader of this emblematic species. We continue to strive towards full rehabilitation and release of every rescued individual in our care, however, it requires significant financial, technical and scientific resources to do so. Applied Science: In 2019, Our Research and Monitoring Unit conducted several field trips in National Parks to further plan the semi-wild release of Drills and Western lowland gorillas under our care. Additionally, we started four research projects in 2019 ranging from behavioural to haematological studies on wildlife rehabilitation, enclosure enrichment, social integration and medical procedures. We will continue to implement evidence-based practices to continuously evolve and improve our rescue, rehabilitation and release efforts.

2019

Support to Communities: Beyond wildlife protection, we play an important socioeconomic role in our community providing conservation education and important alternative livelihood programmes. In 2019, our support to the community-based green economy increased by 10 per cent, for almost €18,000 in incomes paid directly to women farmers and ex-hunters. By alleviating poverty, empowering women, and conducting educational programmes, we can curtail further encroachment into Mount Cameroon National Park, and provide sustainable alternatives to hunting and the wildlife trade. Visibility: Our most significant achievements of the year were covered widely by national and international media, continuing to increase our visibility as a leading wildlife rescue in the world. Expanding our public profile and media visibility is an essential piece of our efforts to further in-situ projects that increase in our efficacy on nature conservation by addressing the root causes of the mass species extinction in Cameroon. Finance: In 2019, our funding increased by 52% (+97% in 5 years), due to a combination of stricter financial controls and improved fundraising strategies. Our target is to reach half a million euros per year in reliable funding by 2021 to successfully implement all our broader conservation, release, education and


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alternative livelihood objects. To date in 2020, COVID-19 has posed a significant challenge both to the health, safety and welfare of our staff and animals, and also to our overall financial health as we rely upon significant income from our volunteer programme, which is currently at a full stop. We are grateful for the continuous support of so many donors now more than ever to help us weather this difficult period.

2019

individual donors (+33% this year), trusting institutional donors, dedicated experts and committed volunteers. I also cannot thank enough the entire LWC staff for their unfailing dedication to our daily operations, constant efforts to advance our practices, and without whom we would not be able to achieve any of our great work. On behalf of the Limbe Wildlife Centre, we thank you sincerely for your unfailing support.

I am happy to share with you our full 2019 report. Sincere thank you to all our loyal With very best wishes,

Guillaume LE FLOHIC Country Director Pandrillus Foundation


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2019

Paving the way for the national rehabilitation and release programme

CO-MANAGER’S MESSAGE | PEGGY MOTSCH

The Limbe Wildlife Centre is the only project in Cameroon dedicated to the survival of the endangered African grey parrot. In 2019, we completed significant renovations to our aviary facilities and upgraded all our medical, nutritional and rehabilitation procedures to maximize the survival for the rescued birds we receive. In late 2019, we saved 380 parrots from illegal trafficking with almost 90% survival rates after one month. With all our improvements, we are now able to provide life-saving care for up to 200 African grey parrots at a time and rehabilitate 400-500 individuals per year. On average, a 6-9 months rehabilitation period is required before the birds can be released back into the wild and require a minimal budget of EUR 45,000 per year. The African grey parrot is our 2020 flagship species. In close partnership with

the Government of Cameroon, we are working to establish and run the national programme for the rehabilitation and release of African grey parrot victims of poaching and illegal trafficking. To fill the existing gaps, we will design and implement a standard high-quality softrelease methodology. The standard procedures will then be replicated nationwide to release all African grey parrots rescued, cared for, and rehabilitated at the Limbe Wildlife Centre. This national programme will support the fight against parrot poaching and trafficking, help restore dwindling wild populations, catalyze to improve the human perception of animal welfare, increase collaborative efforts between civil society organisations, local communities and the government of Cameroon, and will advance conservation actions in and around protected areas.

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Accreditations & Awards

In December, the Limbe Wildlife Centre’s accreditation with the Pan African Sanctuary Alliance (PASA) was renewed for another five years. PASA is the largest association of wildlife centres and sanctuaries in Africa, founded by the Limbe Wildlife Centre, along with six other primate sanctuaries. Today, PASA includes 23 organizations in 13 countries which demonstrate exceptional commitment and the highest standards of animal welfare and conservation practices, to securing a future for Africa’s primates and their habitat. In April, the Limbe Wildlife Centre was elected Best Volunteer Abroad Project and chosen to feature in the Tutorful’s Wildlife Conservation editorial along with other prestigious organisations making a notable difference in wildlife conservation worldwide. The LWC gives people the chance to volunteer and assist experienced caregivers with their daily activities. Volunteers will find themselves at the heart of primate rescue and contribute to primate conservation. In August 2019, the Limbe Wildlife Centre received a 2019 Clark R. Bavin Wildlife Law Enforcement Award at the Conference of the Parties of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) in Geneva, Switzerland, in recognition of the remarkable efforts the LWC has made to help combat wildlife crime.


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4-year impact

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Where We worked in 2019

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2019 Highlights □ Received a 2019 Clark R. Bavin Wildlife Law Enforcement Award at

the Conference of the Parties (CoP) to the CITES in Geneva, Switzerland □ Celebrated the 25th year Anniversary of the Limbe Wildlife Centre □ Launched the #ProtectWildlife Campaign in Limbe

□ Rescued 380 endangered African grey parrots through 3 operations □ Built the first African grey parrot rehabilitation aviary in Cameroon □ Renovated and restructured the medical complex □ Presented the strategy to protect the endangered African grey parrots in Cameroon at the EAZA conference in Spain

□ Restored Adjibolo’s health after a long history of poor body condition □ Integrated adult female Emma to silverback Batek and adult female Pitchou, and completed the 4th step of the gorilla population management plan □ Conducted the first two feasibility studies to release drills into Mount Cameron National Park and gorillas into Campo Ma’an National

Park □ Media coverage: 31 international and local reports made

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Achievements

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1. Pandrillus-GoC Partnership & Public Relations Mar-19

□ The Pandrillus Country Director held a series of meetings in Yaoundé to outline Pandrillus’ upcoming plans to advance sustainable development in Cameroon through educational programmes, awareness campaigns, and capacity building of public services

Apr-19

□ Pandrillus Cameroon, Ape Action Africa & the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife worked together to successfully transfer three individuals between the two high standard rehabilitation centres □ The Pandrillus Country Director held another series of meetings in Yaoundé

May-19 Jun-19

□ The Senior Divisional Officer bestowed his patronage to support the Protect Wildlife Campaign launched on 17th May 2019 in Limbe □ The Pandrillus Country Director held a series of meetings in Munich, Germany and several zoological parks in France to advocate for Pandrillus long-term vision for the Limbe Wildlife Centre and Wildlife Protection in Cameroon □ MINFOF-LAGA-Pandrillus joined in a field operation to confiscate and rescue 19 endangered African grey parrots at Kribi seaport, en route to Nigeria

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□ The Research and Monitoring Unit met with Campo Ma'an National Park authorities and partners to discuss the educational and ecotouristic potential of developing semi-free enclosure for wildlife rehabilitated at the Limbe Wildlife Centre Jul-19

□ The Pandrillus Country Director and LWC’s co-manager held another series of meetings in France to advocate for Pandrillus long-term vision for the Limbe Wildlife Centre and Wildlife Protection in Cameroon

Aug-19

□ The Limbe Wildlife Centre received a 2019 Clark R. Bavin Wildlife Law Enforcement Award at the Conference of the Parties (CoP) to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) in Geneva, Switzerland, 20 August 2019 □ Mr MBELLEN A RIM Serge was appointed new Conservator to the Limbe Wildlife Centre / Limbe Zoological Garden

Sep-19

25 years of efforts to protect wildlife Our internationally renowned efforts were rewarded at the Conference of the Parties (CoP) to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) in Geneva, Switzerland. The Limbe Wildlife is the sole recipient of the prestigious 2019 Clark R. Bavin Wildlife Law Enforcement Award. There was no better occasion to celebrate our 25 years of work in Cameroon. The ceremony, postponed from 2018 due to the civil conflict in the Anglophone regions where Limbe is located, was a great opportunity to celebrate our community partners, our dedicated staff and former managing teams. Some honoured guests were invited, including national and local government representatives and traditional rulers. As a special invitee, the UNESCO, our partner of the #ProtectWildlife Campaign launched in May 2019, reminded community members and schoolchildren present this day of the value of Cameroon’s biodiversity as part of the World Natural Heritage and national richness.

□ The 2019 Clark R. Bavin Wildlife Law Enforcement Award was officially bestowed on the Limbe Wildlife Centre during a ceremony organised at the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife, Yaounde □ Celebrated the 25th Anniversary of the Limbe Wildlife Centre, in presence of local authorities and the special representative of the Minister of Forestry and Wildlife □ The Pandrillus Country Director hold a series of meetings at the European Association of Zoo and Aquariums Conference in Valencia, Spain □ The Pandrillus Country Director made a presentation for the Parrot Taxon Advisory Group (TAG) and explained Pandrillus strategy to enhance the rehabilitation of the African grey parrot during the EAZA Conference 15


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□ The Pandrillus Country Director made a presentation for the Old World Monkey Taxon Advisory Group (TAG) and explained Pandrillus strategy to improve the Drill rehabilitation, during the EAZA Conference Nov-19

□ Rapid Intervention Battalion, MINFOF, Pandrillus joint efforts to confiscate and rescue 84 endangered African grey parrots □ The new Divisional Officer for Limbe made an official visit to the Limbe Wildlife Centre

Dec-19

□ Customs-MINFOF-Pandrillus joint efforts to confiscate and rescue 275 endangered African grey parrots

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2. Population management & Animal welfare Feb-19 May-19

Jul-19

□ Mandrill: Opened access to the densely grassed strip left fallow and rotated □ Western Lowland Gorilla: Completed the 4th step of the long-term population management plan to rebalance the group sizes and increase cohesion: Integrated adult female Emma from silverback Chella’s group to silverback Batek and adult female Pitchou □ Mandrill: Opened access to the densely grassed strip left fallow and rotated □ Western lowland gorilla: Adjibolo’s (adult female) physical and psychological health is finally restored and stable after a long history of poor body condition

Nov-19

□ Tantalus monkey: Transferred adult male Malende into his new enclosure

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Animal welfare Thanks to our new on-site animal behaviour expert, we have made significant improvements in our


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Year 2019 □ Vet cares: ◌ 302 Primate individuals treated; 84 anaesthesia performed; 113 individuals sampled (48 blood samples for haematology analysis, 152 faecal

samples

for coprology

analysis);

44

contraceptions;

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microchips; 12 laceration repairs; 3 minor surgeries; 2 major surgeries; 263 drug therapies: 24% dietary supplements, 19% arthritis supplements, 18% antibiotics, 17% anti-inflammatories, 12% antiparasitic; 3% fluid therapies; 7% others; 36 health checks: Chimpanzee (6), Western lowland gorilla (4); Drill (20), Mandrill (2), Olive baboon (2), Mona monkey (2); 1 birth: Drill (1); 16 deaths: Chimpanzee (1), Drill (8), Mandrill (2), Olive baboon (1), Preuss’s monkey (1), Patas monkey (1), Mona monkey (2), incl. 3 euthanasia ◌ African grey parrots: 108 health checks performed; 297 individuals received intensive care treatment with 3rd generation antibiotic treatment and special diet; 75 deaths Preuss's monkey 3% Patas monkey Mona 7% monkey

Putty-nosed monkey 4%

Tantalus monkey 2%

Dermatolo gic disorders 7% Respiratory disorders 8%

Chimpanzee 23%

Musculoske letal disorders 12%Superficial wound 12%

7%

Red-capped mangabey Olive 1% baboon 4%

Mandrill 16%

Drill 23%

Others 11%

Western lowland gorilla 10%

Figure 1. Distribution of the vet procedures among the primate species (N=302 procedures).

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Poor body conditions 6% Infectious diseases 16% Severe wound 15% Gastrointes tinal disorders 13%

Figure 2. The proportion of the sickness treated (213/302; 70.5% of the procedures).


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90

Tantalus monkey

80

Red-eared monkey Putty-nosed monkey

70

Preuss's monkey Patas monkey

60

Moustached monkey

50

Mona monkey

40

Red-capped mangabey Agile Mangabey

30

Olive baboon

20

Mandrill

10

Drill

0 Jan-19 Feb-19 Mar-19 Apr-19 May-19 Jun-19

Western lowland gorilla Jul-19 Aug-19 Sep-19 Oct-19 Nov-19 Dec-19

Chimpanzee

Figure 3. Density of the veterinary procedures conducted throughout 2019 per species. In April, after a tree broke his fence, gorilla Arno escaped and fought with Batek. His calf was injured as a result. Arno was anaesthetized several times to treat his wound and received treatments this month. We also completed numerous health checks on our drill population, including TB tests and microchip identification. Several female drills and one female chimpanzee also received contraceptive implants in September and October. In October and through November, our group of Mona monkeys became unstable after the dominant male Sonara started fights, was injured and had to be isolated for a few days. As the

hierarchy of the group was disturbed, several subsequent fights and injuries occurred, which all required treatment. In November, Mandrill Nko suffered low intestinal motility. Nko underwent major surgery to remove fecalomas. We worked tirelessly to administer specialized treatment and care but unfortunately, our veterinary team was not able to save her and she passed away. In December, four adult females received health checks. Batek also escaped two more times again trying to fight with Arno, and needed to be immobilized.


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Our Rescues at a Glance

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Table 1. Animal population cared for at the Limbe Wildlife Centre as of December 31, 2019 Classification PRIMATES Great ape

Species

Scientific names

[UICN]1 | Class2

Central African Chimpanzee Nigeria-Cameroon Chimpanzee Western Lowland Gorilla

Pan troglodytes t roglodyt es Pan troglodytes ellioti Gorilla gorilla gorilla

[EN] | A [EN] | A [CR] | A

Drill Mandrill Olive baboon

Mandrillus leucophaeus Mandrillus sphinx Papio anubis

[EN] | A [VU] | A [LC] | C

Agile mangabey Red-capped Mangabey

Cercocebus agilis Cercocebus t orquat us

[LC] | A [VU] | A

Crowned monkey Mona monkey Moustached monkey Patas monkey Preuss's monkey Putty-nosed monkey Red-eared monkey Red-rumped Putty-nosed monkey Tantalus monkey

Cercopithecus pogonias Cercopithecus mona Cercopithecus cephus cephus Eryt hrocebus pat as Cercopithecus preussi Cercopithecus nictit ans nictitans Cercopithecus eryt hrotis Cercopithecus nictit ans ludio Chlorocebus t ant alus

[LC] | C [LC] | C [LC] | C [LC] | C [EN] | A [LC] | C [VU] | A [LC] | C [LC] | C

Bay Duiker Blue Duiker Bush Buck

Cephalophus dorsalis Philantomba mont icola Tragelaphus script us

[NT] | B [LC] | C [LC] | B

African civet

Civettictis civetta

[LC] | B

African grey parrot

Psitt acus erit hacus

[EN] | A

Black-hinged terrapin Dwarf crocodile Home's hinged tortoise Nile crocodile Radiated tortoise

Pelusios niger Osteolaemus tet raspis Kinixys homeana Crocodylus niloticus Ast rochelys radiat a

[LC] | C [VU] | A [VU] | A [LC] | A [CR] | A

Papionid

Mangabey

Guenon

UNGULATES

OTHER MAMMALS BIRDS REPTILES

Total check conservation status at iucnredlist.org: CR = critically endangered; EN = endangered; V U = vulnerable classes of protection as defined by Cameroonian wildlife laws: A, B and C. Class A species benefit from the highest degree of protection. 1 2

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Nbr 200 58 11 32 15 93 75 10 8 11 4 7 38 0 12 1 4 0 2 3 8 8 3 1 1 1 1 1 301 301 7 2 2 1 1 1 512


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3. Wildlife rescue, rehabilitation and release programme Apr-19

□ Western Lowland Gorilla: Juvenile Bobga was transferred to Ape Action Africa to join a group of gorillas and is being released into a large forested enclosure □ Patas monkey: 2 females (Leonie and Coco) were transferred from Ape Action Africa to integrate into our group in the savannah-dwelling guenon enclosure

Jun-19

□ African grey parrot: Rescued 19 individuals

Nov-19

□ African grey parrot: Rescued 84 individuals □ Mona monkey: Completed J.K. (juvenile male) social rehabilitation □ Patas monkey: Completed the social integration of Leonie and Coco (2 subadult females) to the savannah-dwelling guenon group

Dec-19

□ African grey parrot: Rescued 275 individuals

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Saving the endangered African grey parrot Although LWC primarily focuses on rescuing and rehabilitating primates, we have a long history as the leading rescue of African grey parrots. Between 2003 and 2018, we have rescued 3,372 individuals. Over 15 years of rescuing trafficked parrots, we have continued to advance our infrastructure and protocols to maximize survival and release rates. In 2019 we made significant investments in our rescue practices and are proud to have built the first large rehabilitation aviary in Cameroon specifically designed for the species. We also restructured all our medical facilities, quarantine centre, vet clinic, and we upgraded all our medical, nutritional and rehabilitation procedures to maximize the chances of survival. With close to two decades of dedication and experience Limbe Wildlife Centre has become the de facto national standard for rescue and rehabilitation for the species. Building upon these successes, in 2020 we will establish a soft-release procedure that can be replicated by other rescues for rehabilitated birds to be relocated to release sites across the country to reinforce wild populations.


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Table 2. Individuals rescued and born in 2019 Classification PRIMATES Papionid

Species

Scientific names

Drill

Mandrillus leucophaeus

Mona monkey Patas monkey

Cercopithecus mona Eryt hrocebus pat as

Bosman’s potto

Perodicticus potto

African grey parrot African goshawk African wood owl Barn owl Black goshawk Black kite Northwest White-faced owl

Psitt acus erit hacus Accipiter t achiro St rix woodfordii Tyt o alba Accipiter melanoleucus Milvus migrans Ptilopsis leucotis

Black-hinged terrapin Home's hinged tortoise

Pelusios niger Kinixys homeana

Guenon

Prosimian BIRDS

REPTILES

Total

[UICN]1 | Class2 Arrivals 4 0 [EN] | A 0 3 [LC] | C 1 [LC] | C 2 1 [LC] | A 1 386 [EN] | A 380 N/A | C 1 [LC] | B 1 [LC] | B 1 [LC] | B 1 [LC] | C 1 [LC] | B 1 3 [LC] | C 1 [VU] | A 2 393

Table 3. Individuals released in 2019 Classification PRIMATES Prosimian

Species

Scientific names

[UICN]1 | Class2

Bosman’s potto

Perodicticus potto

[LC] | A

Large-spotted genet

Genett a maculat a

[LC] | B

African grey parrot Black kite Black goshawk

Psitt acus erit hacus Milvus migrans Accipiter melanoleucus

[EN] | A [LC] | C [LC] | B

OTHER MAMMALS BIRDS

REPTILES Black-hinged terrapin Pelusios niger Home's hinged tortoise Kinixys homeana Total

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[LC] | C [VU] | A

Nbr 1 1 1 1 1 14 12 1 1 4 3 1 20

Births 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1


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4. Infrastructures and development Mar-19

□ Completed maintenance of the Chimp Island night cages: Sitting upswing rope and hammock, new foot baths and pathway maintenance □ Completed renovations and enrichments for the Drill enclosure: Visual obstacles and bamboo screens

May-19 Jun-19

□ Built 10 two-sided education billboards for the #ProtectWildlife campaign □ Completed the re-enrichment for Red-capped mangabey enclosures □ Built male Tantalus monkey Malende’s new enclosure within the large savannah-dwelling guenon enclosure

Aug-19

□ Completed building new structural enrichment in the Chimp Mainland enclosure □ Completed improvements of the Drill enclosure escape-proofing: setting up wire mesh and build new overhangs through the easy-to-escape route

Oct-19

□ Completed construction of the first African grey parrot rehabilitation aviary in Cameroon

Nov-19

□ Completed renovation of the medical complex □ Completed renovation of the Olive baboon upper satellite cage and full maintenance of the lower satellite

Dec-19

□ Completed construction of the new bridge □ Installed a bamboo fence along the visitor path to serve as a visual barrier to increase wildlife privacy and welfare, while enhancing the LWC’s aesthetic appeal for visitors

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5. Community conservation & Environmental education Jan-19

□ Batoke Family Nature Club: Organised the 3rd session on the 26 January on Plastic pollution & recycling: 38 families, 61 participants (62% women, 24 children between 4 and 17 years old (39%), 70% of community members not involved in the Green Project)

Feb-19

□ Batoke Family Nature Club: Organised a programme evaluation meeting at the Limbe Wildlife Centre between LWC management and community representatives to discuss and share ideas on how to make it more efficient and successful.

Mar-19

□ Batoke Family Nature Club: Organised the 4th session on the 9 March on water pollution: 16 families, 80 participants (70% women, 18 children between 4 and 17 years old (23%), 68% of community members not involved in the Green Project)

Apr-19

□ Batoke Family Nature Club: Organised the 5th session on the 9 April on the positive and negative impacts of human activity on ecosystem health, in partnership with Da Zimbistic Cultural Centre: 25 families, 93 participants (74% women, 23 children between 4 and 17 years old (25%), 67% of community members not involved in the Green Project)

May-19

□ Behaviour Change: Launched the #Protect Wildlife Campaign in Limbe on Endangered species day, 17th of May

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Jun-19

2019

□ Batoke Family Nature Club: Organised the 6th session on the 8 June on the forest ecosystem: 40 families, 97 participants (46% women, 40 children between 4 and 17 years old (41%), 100% of adults are members of the Green Project □ Launched an exhibition on the critically endangered Preuss's Red Colobus in Nyango’s Exhibition Hall, in partnership with Partners for Red Colobus (including our partners from the Korup Rainforest Conservation Society (www.korup-conservation.org), the University of North Carolina Wilmington) and the Programme for Sustainable Management of Natural Resources, SWR

Jul-19

□ Batoke Family Nature Club: Organised the 7th session on the 13 July 2019 on Ecosystem Education in Mount Cameroon National Park: 38 families, 83 participants (31% women, 42 children between 4 and 17 years old (51%), 52% of adults are members of the Green Project

Sep-19

□ Special event: Conducted an environmental education programme with 120 schoolchildren from the local community focusing on the Sustainable Management of Natural Resources, in partnership with the UNESCO’s Central Africa World Heritage Forest Initiative (CAWHFI)

The #ProtectWildlife Campaign Under the patronage of the Senior Divisional Officer for Fako, and in collaboration with the regional delegation for the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife and several civil society organisations, we inaugurated the campaign by unveiling 10 large doublesided billboards, to raise awareness, educate and engage the local community, and instil a sense of ownership around protecting wildlife. The theme “From the mountain to the Sea: Let’s protect wildlife”, highlighted 8 emblematic terrestrial and marine species of the SouthWest region’s biodiversity. A few months after, we launched our T-shirts campaign, which served to reward every participant of the Batoke Family Nature Club and to raise fund to sponsor our rescue and rehabilitation programme for the African grey parrots.

□ Batoke Family Nature Club: Organised the 8th and last session on 14th of September: feedbacks on the programme, certificate award ceremony and launching of our #ProtectWildlife T-shirt campaign: 40 families, 89 participants (67% women, 39 children between 4 and 17 years old (44%), 78% of community members not involved in the Green Project)

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2019

□ School outreach programme: Started the 2019-2020 programme: 10 schools, 24 classes and 1,488 school children will attend our 16 lessons curriculum

Year 2019 □ Nature Club Summary: 759 children registered; 1,637 total attendance □ School outreach programme: 335.3 hours of teaching, covering 10 schools, 45 classes and 2,511 students “Cheetahs, wild dogs and rhinos disappeared from Cameroon. Elephants are threatened for their tusks, pangolin for their scales, and chimpanzees and gorillas by habitat destruction and the bushmeat trade. Nature is our cultural inheritance: the killing of animals must stop and we must protect wildlife.”” Ngwese Nzimbi Koge President of Da Nzimbistic Cultural Centre #ProtectWildlife Campaign partner

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Environmental education In addition to our daily operations at Limbe Wildlife Centre, we devoted more time and resources to our educational programmes in 2019. Throughout the year, we ran three educational programmes to teach our community about the importance of preserving their wildlife heritage: Saturday Nature Club for Kids, Batoke Family Nature Club, and general school outreach., For the first time, 385 rural community members from 145 families learned about a range of conservation topics (including water pollution, plastic pollution, damage to the local ecosystem, etc.), and how these issues impact their daily lives, the land, freshwater and the marine ecosystems. The best participants of this intergenerational education programme were rewarded with a certificate during our 25th-anniversary ceremony and received a T-shirt as part of our #ProtectWildlife Campaign. Five of them have been identified as potential conservation leaders for future educational initiatives. Finally, after months of interruption due to the civil conflict, school resumed and we began teaching children about nature again. With the help of our Education coordinator, we also made a number of updates to our Nature Club to make it more appealing and entertaining. We now use more media, address more topics, and conduct more diverse activities. In 2019 that doubled our attendance doubled and the number of children receiving our environmental lessons each week in school increased by 31% for a total of 24 primary and secondary school classes. Our total outreach for 2019 was 2,511 kids in school weekly and 1,637 kids in our Nature Club for the year. 38

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Year 2019

2019

□ Community-based Green Economy: ◌ 113 women members sold crop by-products, increased their land value, and contributed to reducing encroachment into the Mount Cameroon National Park: 11,467 kg of cassava leaves, 39,602 kg of papaya leaves, 36,735 kg of potato leaves (∑= 87.8 t); ◌ 15 ex-hunter members sustainably harvested wild herbaceous plants: 9,640 kg of Aframomum stems and 7,788 kg of Costus stems (∑= 17.4 t); ◌ Combatted the spread of the invasive Trumpet wood in South-West Region: 525 trees hand-cut representing 6,861 kg of shoots; ◌ Income generated: 11,533,515 FCFA (€17,608; +10.2% YoY growth) directly benefiting the local community association and helping to alleviate poverty in 2019 For 15 years, we have sustained an environment-friendly economy and provided alternative livelihood to the hunting and wildlife trading community of Batoke. In the past 3 years alone, €46,100 contributed to alleviate poverty for more than 500 community members, of which a vast majority are women farmers. Our project has 3 components: 1/ Increasing land value by purchasing crop by-products to women farmers as a way to reduce encroachment into the Mount Cameroon National Park; 2/ Sustainable harvesting of wild herbaceous forest products by ex-hunters; and 3/ Combatting the spread of the invasive Trumpet wood in South-West Region.

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Annual Report

2019

Community livelihood projects Last year, we purchased 17.4 tons of wild herbaceous plants, 87.8 tons of fresh crop byproduct leaves and 6.9 tons of invasive Trumpet wood shoots for a total of €17,610 (+10.2% YoY growth) directly paid to 128 Batoke community members. As the women farmer’s workload remains stable, the financial benefit of selling crop byproducts is high. Ultimately, these incomes encourage the community to reduce the pressure on the surrounding wildlife and allow them to enhance both education and health care to their children.

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Annual Report

2019

6. Wildlife conservation research & Health monitoring Feb-19

□ Started a behavioural study of space use and social relationships in our gorilla’s groups, in partnership with AKONGO | Wildlife connection (www.akongo.fr). The behavioural study will guide the steps we take to split our main enclosure into two groups to maximize access to the outdoor space. It will also inform our future decisions on how and when to transfer our wildlife into more natural enclosures. □ Conducted the first field prospecting work in Mount Cameron National Park: fieldwork included habitat assessments & establishing research protocol to study the feasibility of transferring rehabilitated wildlife from Limbe Wildlife Centre to semi-wild enclosures for a future release, in partnership with AKONGO and the MINFOF Programme for Sustainable Management of Natural Resources, South-West Region (PSMNR-SWR) 44

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Annual Report

Jun-19

□ Completed data collection for our behavioural study of space use and social relationships in our gorilla groups (hereinafter referred as to the gorilla behavioural study) aimed at enhancing the design of our gorilla enclosures, in partnership with AKONGO □ Conducted the first field prospection work in the Campo Ma'an National Park (South Region) to study the feasibility of transferring rehabilitated wildlife from Limbe Wildlife Centre to semi-wild enclosures: habitats assessment & team training on the research protocol were conducted in partnership with AKONGO

Sep-19

□ Dr Amélie Romain, the founder of AKONGO | Wildlife connection, presented the results of the first phase of the gorilla behavioural study at the EAZA conference in Valencia, Spain

Oct-19

□ Presented the first results of the gorilla behavioural study to the Société Francophone de Primatologie in France

2019

Boosting applied conservation research Our research and monitoring unit conducted the two first feasibility studies in the Mount Cameroon and Campo Ma’an National Parks to release drills and gorillas, respectively. The results obtained were encouraging and we will focus on identifying a release site for the gorillas in the Campo Ma’an National Park in 2020. If successful, we will be able to transfer one or two of our four groups. Meanwhile, our team studied the possibility of splitting the largest of the two gorilla enclosures into two parts, which will allow 3 groups out of 4 to go out every day. The results will serve to begin the separation and re-enrichment of this enclosure. Throughout the study, we also transferred female Emma to another silverback Batek (the fourth transfer of a female to a new male in 4 years) to better balance the size of the group. Applied research is essential to help us better manage our animal population and make the best decisions based on facts and not assumptions. Thus, we can foresee and mitigate any potential risk incurred when managing wildlife and plan accordingly to maximise welfare and improve each species and individuals’ rehabilitation process. Three other research projects have started and will continue through 2020: 1/ Assessment of the health and welfare of rescued African Grey Parrot during rehabilitation based on stress and body conditions indexes; 2/ Assessment of the cohesion of the chimp Mainland group and individual welfare before, during and after social integration of female Chinoise; 3/ Establishment of the standard haematological value for the endangered Drill. This ongoing research aimed at improving the day-to-day management of our animal population and enhance welfare. 45


Annual Report

Dec-19

2019

□ Completed the enclosure design plan to divide and re-enrich the large gorilla enclosure based on the gorilla behavioural study □ Completed the analysis of the data collected on our gorilla groups, in partnership with AKONGO Selfdirected 2%

Stereotypie Not visible s 1% 1%

Feeding 26% Resting 55%

Handling 1% Locomotio n 9% Social behaviours 5%

Figure 4. Space use analysis resulting Figure 5. Distribution of the behaviour from the 5-month behavioural study categories (time budget): the proportion of on the groups of gorillas abnormal behaviour in Benito’s group significantly decreased after we allow the group to go outdoors more often.

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Annual Report

2019

47


Annual Report

2019

48


Annual Report

2019

7. Capacity building, Mentoring & Staff empowerment Jan-19

□ Workshop: Built a positive reinforcement training plan to improve behavioural and social skills of unskilled humanised chimpanzees, by Candace Sclimenti (Los Angeles Zoo) and Lee Ann Rottman (Tampa Zoo) □ Mentorship: Conducted chimpanzee health checks, and provided assistance and counselling to Association Papaye International management team to help them meet Primate sanctuary minimum standards

May-19

□ Dart training programme, led by Dr John Kiyang, Head Vet

Aug-19

□ A team composed of the acting Conservator, Head veterinarian, and the Head of Education made a presentation at the National Forestry School (ENEF), Mbalmayo

Nov-19

□ Pan African Sanctuary Alliance (PASA) Community Engagement Workshop: Wilson ATEH, Head of Education, attended the workshop in South Africa

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Annual Report

2019

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Annual Report

2019

8. Communication & Visibility Apr-19 May-19

Jun-19

□ Limbe Wildlife Centre participated in the 6th edition of the Festival of Arts and Culture (FESTAC), Limbe □ Conference: How to make the best of limited available resources? Example of re-designing gorilla enclosure at the Limbe Wildlife Centre, Cameroon, by Dr Amélie Romain, Founder of Akongo, presenting our gorilla behavioural research project, started in February 2019, at the International Zoo Design Conference in Wrocław, Poland □ Event: Organised the Protect Wildlife Charity Night at the Lynk Garden Café, Douala, in partnership with the Central African World Heritage Forest Initiative (CAWHFI) of the UNESCO and Da Nzimbistic Cultural Centre, 7th of June 2019

Aug-19

□ Digital communication: surpassed 10,000 Facebook likes in August.

Oct-19

□ Website: Launched our new website!

□ Media coverage: 1. TV report: The Limbe Wildlife Center, A Hub For Wildlife, Planet Rise, Canal 2 English, presented by Environmental Journalist, Regina Leke Tandag 2. TV report: Limbe Protect Wildlife Campaign Launched, Canal 2 International, presented by Environmental Journalist, Regina Leke Tandag 3. Newspaper: Pandrillus, Da Nzimbistic Cultural Center launch Protect Wildlife Campaign in Limbe, The Star Newspaper, 20th of May 2019, by Solomon Agboren 4. Online report: Cameroun – Environnement. Une nouvelle ere pour la protection de la faune est-elle a l’horizon au Cameroun ? Le cas de Limbe, Cameroun24.net, 27th M ay 2019 5. Newspaper: Nzimbistic Cultural Center Launches Change Behavior Campaign To Conserve Nature, The Sun Cameroon, 28th M ay 2019, by Simon Ndive Kalla 6. Newspaper: Anglophone crisis a treat to endangered animal species, The Star Newspaper, 27th of M ay 2019, by Solomon Agboren 7. Online report: What is magic without ape parts? Inside the illicit trade devastating Nigeria’s apes, M ongabay, 29th May 2019 8. Online report: Face to Face with Victor Veseke, Assistant Head Keeper at the Limbe Wildlife Centre, Wildlife Times Summer 2019, Born Free, page 10

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Annual Report

2019

9. Online report: Rescuing African Grey Parrots, Guest Blog, Born Free 10. Online report: Cameroun: une nouvelle vie pour des primates rescapés du braconnage, Agence France-Presse 11. Online report: Ground-Breaking New Campaign Encourages Wildlife Protection In Cameroon, News, Born Free 12. Radio: Protecting Wildlife in Cameroon: A major Hotspot for biodiversity, BBC World Service Newsday, 9th of June 2019, by Randy Joe Sa'ah - BBC Correspondent 13. TV report: A Hospital for the African grey parrot, Eco Africa, Deutsche Welle, 21st of June 2019, by Blaise Eyong & M ichael Hartlep 14. TV report: Limbe Wildlife Centre protège notre biodiversité, Publi Infos, Canal 2 Internation, 7th of June 2019, by Junior Haussin & M arius Kuossu 15. Online report: LWC Organises Fund Raising at Lynk Cave Bonapriso for Wildlife Protection & Sensitisation, Fabafriq Magazine, 12th of June 2019, by Karen Ayungwa 16. Online report: Cameroon conservationists heal endangered African grey parrots, Reuters, 19th of July 2019, by Blaise Eyong 17. TV report: Au Cameroun, un centre sauve les perroquets gris, une espèce menacée, France 24, 22nd of July 2019 18. TV report: Cameroonian doctor saves endangered Grey parrots, Africanews, 24th of July 2019 19. Online report: Wildlife law enforcement leaders honored at CITES, Animal Welfare Institute, 20th of August 2019 20. Online report: Limbe Wildlife Centre wins prestigious award in Geneva, The Post, 26th of August 2019 21. Newspaper: Limbe Wildlife Centre wins Clark R. Bavin Wildlife Law Enforcement Award in Switzerland, The Star, 2nd of September 2019 22. Newspaper: Limbe Wildlife Centre celebrates 25th anniversary, calls for species conservation, The Sun, 15th September 2019 23. Newspaper: MINFOF, Pandrillus Foundation celebrate 25 years of fruitful partnership in wildlife conservation, The Star, 23rd September 2019 24. Newspaper: Limbe Wildlife Centre wins an international award, celebrates 25th anniversary, The Guardian Post, 17th September 2019 25. TV & Radio: Un quart de siècle de partenariat entre la Fondation Pandrillus et MINFOF pour la protection des espèces fauniques menacées d’extinction, CRTV News, 14th September 2019 26. Interviews: The Pandrillus Country Director was invited to speak about the #ProtectWildlife campaign in South-West Region and the Bavin award received by the Limbe Wildlife Centre in the morning programme Cameroun Feeling, CRTV, 9th September 2019 27. TV News: News extracted from Limbe Wildlife Center and Pandrillus Foundation Celebrate Silver Jubilee, Canal 2 International, 18th September 2019

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Annual Report

2019

28. Newspaper: Limbe Wildlife Centre cements role in rescue, rehabilitation of endangered African grey parrots, The Star, 11th November 2019 29. Newspaper: Traffic of endangered animal species on the rise in Bakassi, The Guardian Post, 28th November 2019 30. Newspaper: Limbe Wildlife Centre rescues 84 endangered African grey parrots, The Sun, 30th November 2019 31. Newspaper: Limbe Wildlife Centre: Last hope for endangered African grey parrots, The Star, 9th December 2019

53

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Annual Report

2019

9. Revenues generated Oct 19

□ Giving Day for Apes: $4,657 raised thanks to 57 generous donors for building the chimp Island overhang

Year 2019 □ Limbe Wildlife Centre generated 7,577,000 FCFA through entrance fees in 2019 (18,018 visitors; 36% children, 98% Cameroonians) (see Financial analysis); 18,018

5000

20,000 16,000

11,535 2500 3,286

3,853

4,653

5,638

6,566

7,942

9,469

12,297

13,048

13,846

12,000

8,000 4,000

0

-

Adult Nationals

Children Nationals

Children Foreigners

Cumulated

Adult Foreigners

60,000 50,000

40,000 30,000

18,018

20,000 10,000 0 2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Figure 1. Variation of visitor attendance (-61% in 5 years as a result of the ongoing civil conflict that has continued to escalated since 2016)

54


Annual Report

2019

2020 Objectives □ Ensure preparedness to face the COVID-19 pandemic and increase biosecurity and boost primate immunity □ Run necessary social integration and special care programme □ Complete new special care and rehabilitation section for disabled adult chimps □ Complete renovation of the medical complex □ Complete improvement of the Drill enclosure escape-proofing □ Complete the first phase of the Chimp Island overhang to prevent escapes □ Divide and re-enrich the large gorilla enclosure following the design plan □ Perform annual maintenance programme of several animal infrastructures: mandrill and drill satellite cages, chimp mainland night den □ Upgrade medical, nutritional, care and enrichment protocols to rehabilitate rescued African grey parrots and develop the SOPs □ Advise and assist the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife to develop and implement the national rehabilitation and release strategy to conserve the endangered Africa grey parrot □ Continue field trip to study the feasibility for transferring gorillas, drills and guenons in protected areas □ Develop and implement on-site organic agriculture to increase food security, reduce soil erosion and promote tree nursing and planting □ Promote organic agriculture as an alternative to slash-and-burn agriculture to reduce deforestation, increase community resilience to climate change, improve soil quality and prevent erosion to the local communities □ Art-4-Nature: develop the art-based concept to public engagement aimed at showing the link between nature protection and human wellbeing

55


Annual Report

2019

Finance

2019 TOTAL INCOME ($493,164) BROUGHT FROM 2018 VOLUNTEER 8% PROGRAMME 4% OTHER INCOMES 10%

2019 TOTAL EXPENSES ($445,722)

FINANCIAL DONATION 16%

GENERATED INCOME 3% GoC SUBVENTIONS 16%

GRANTS 43%

ADMINISTRATION & COMMUNICATION 11% OPERATIONS 22% STAFF 3% WILDLIFE CONSERVATION RESEARCH & HEALTH MONITORING ENVIRONMENTAL 1% EDUCATION 10%

GIFT SHOP 0%

WILDLIFE REHABILITATION, POPULATION MANAGEMENT & ANIMAL WELFARE 46%

NEW INFRASTRUCTURES PROJECTS 7%


Annual Report

2019 EXPENSES (1/2)

ACTIVITIES

ITEMS

Pandrillus (FCFA)

GoC* (FCFA)

TOTAL (FCFA)

TOTAL (EUR)

TOTAL (USD)

WILDLIFE REHABILITATION, POPULATION MANAGEMENT & ANIMAL WELFARE ANIMAL CARE STAFF ANIMAL FOOD CROP BY -PRODUCTS & WILD PLANTS ENCLOSURES & ENRICHMENT, GROUNDS MAINTENANCE STAFF MATERIAL & EQUIPMENT RESCUE VET PERSONNEL VETERINARY / MEDICAL Subtotal WILDLIFE REHABILITATION, POPULATION MANAGEMENT & ANIMAL WELFARE

23,399,346 3,899,230 11,717,300 12,001,692 5,050,826 5,080,926 821,700 10,496,198 1,935,547 71,785,887

11,405,250 23,833,463 2,000,000 1,267,250 1,267,250 2,534,500 41,040,463

34,804,596 27,732,693 11,717,300 14,001,692 6,318,076 6,348,176 821,700 13,030,698 1,935,547 112,826,350

52,069 42,088 17,863 21,345 9,632 9,678 1,253 19,865 2,951 171,013

62,100 50,196 21,304 25,458 11,487 11,542 1,494 23,692 3,519 203,958

NEW INFRASTRUCTURES PROJECTS CONSTRUCTION STAFF NEW AFRICAN GREY PARROT AVIARY NEW BRIDGE SAVANNAH-DWELLING ENCLOSURE Subtotal NEW INFRASTRUCTURES PROJECTS

5,587,196 7,287,250 4,384,700 23,500 17,282,646

-

5,587,196 7,287,250 4,384,700 23,500 17,282,646

8,518 11,109 6,684 36 26,347

10,159 13,250 7,972 43 31,423

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION CHILD EDUCATION SPONSORSHIP EDUCATION PERSONNEL NATURE CLUB OUTREACH PROGRAMMES WORKSHOPS & STAFF TRAINING Subtotal ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION

6,894,000 5,269,616 7,350 9,376,568 795,479 22,343,012

2,534,500 2,534,500

6,894,000 7,804,116 7,350 9,376,568 795,479 24,877,512

10,510 11,897 11 14,294 1,213 37,926

12,535 14,189 13 17,048 1,446 45,232

1,829,661 570,000 2,399,661

-

1,829,661 570,000 2,399,661

2,789 869 3,658

3,327 1,036 4,363

WILDLIFE CONSERVATION RESEARCH & HEALTH MONITORING RESEARCH EQUIPMENT & MATERIAL SCIENTIFIC CONSULTANCY Subtotal WILDLIFE CONSERVATION RESEARCH & HEALTH MONITORING

57


Annual Report

2019 EXPENSES (2/2)

ACTIVITIES

ITEMS

Pandrillus (FCFA)

GoC* (FCFA)

TOTAL (FCFA)

TOTAL (EUR)

TOTAL (USD)

STAFF NON-WAGE EXPENDITURE STAFF MEDICAL Subtotal STAFF

4,907,125 1,431,900 6,339,025

520,000 520,000

5,427,125 1,431,900 6,859,025

8,274 2,183 10,457

9,868 2,603 12,471

5,820,150 125,800 3,308,700 4,439,959 24,500 7,592,200 1,837,050 110,000 23,258,359

8,011,688 4,500,000 2,534,500 8,000,000 7,000,000 30,046,188

5,820,150 8,137,488 7,808,700 6,974,459 8,024,500 7,592,200 8,837,050 110,000 53,304,547

8,873 12,406 11,904 10,632 12,233 11,574 13,472 168 81,262

10,582 14,795 14,198 12,681 14,590 13,804 16,067 200 96,917

891,504 1,368,014 3,627,057 2,109,481 1,601,500 14,048,712 23,646,269

3,250,000 439,037 3,689,037

891,504 1,368,014 3,627,057 5,359,481 2,040,537 14,048,712 27,335,306

1,359 2,086 5,529 8,170 3,111 21,417 41,672

1,621 2,487 6,595 9,745 3,710 25,543 49,701

262,150 262,150

-

262,150 262,150

400 400

477 477

167,317,009

77,830,188

245,147,197

373,724

445,722

OPERATIONS ACCOMODATION FUEL, WATER & ENERGY MISSION & RECEPTION OPERATION STAFF TRANSPORT TRAVEL VEHICLE FUEL & MAINTENANCE WATER & ELECTRICITY Subtotal OPERATIONS ADMINISTRATION & COMMUNICATION ADVERTISING & PUBLICATIONS LEGAL COSTS, BANK FEES, MISC. MARKETING & FUNDRAISING OFFICE SUPPLY, EQUIP. & COMMUNICATIONS P.R. / MERCHANDISING PANDRILLUS PROJECT MANAGEMENT Subtotal ADMINISTRATION & COMMUNICATION GIFT SHOP GIFT SHOP PURCHASES Subtotal GIFT SHOP TOTAL EXPENDITURES *GoC: Government of Cameroon

58


Annual Report

2019 INCOME TOTA (EUR)

TOTAL (USD)

42,440,901 8,852,500 44,600,000 115,577,643 25,753,188 11,767,303 248,991,535

64,701 13,496 67,992 176,197 39,260 17,939 379,585

77,165 16,095 81,091 210,141 46,824 21,395 452,712

-

22,248,601 22,248,601

33,918 33,918

40,452 40,452

193,409,948

77,830,188

271,240,136

413,503

493,164

EXPECTED BALANCE END OF PERIOD

26,092,939

-

26,092,939

39,778

47,442

VOLUNTARY CONTRIBUTION IN-KIND DONATIONS VOLUNTARY WORK Subtotal VOLUNTARY CONTRIBUTION

6,383,446 57,094,490 63,477,936

-

6,383,446 57,094,490 63,477,936

9,732 87,040 96,771

11,606 103,808 115,414

ACTIVITIES

ITEMS

Pandrillus (FCFA)

GoC (FCFA)

TOTAL (FCFA)

FINANCIAL DONATION GENERATED INCOMES GoC SUBVENTIONS GRANTS OTHER INCOMES VOLUNTEER PROGRAMME Subtotal REVENUES

42,440,901 1,275,500 100,000 115,577,643 11,767,303 171,161,347

7,577,000 44,500,000 25,753,188 77,830,188

22,248,601 22,248,601

TOTAL INCOMES (incl. CAPITAL N-1)

REVENUES

CAPITAL N-1

BROUGHT FROM 2018 Subtotal CAPITAL N-1

1 includes

sales from the gift shop fees

2 entrance

59


Annual Report

2019

Financial analysis INCOMES

EXPENDITURES

Pandrillus Foundation generated 71.3% of the 2019 revenue for the Limbe Wildlife Centre while the Government of Cameroon (GoC) contributed 28.7%. The decrease in GoC funding is a result of the increase of funds raised by Pandrillus compared to last year (+52%). At the same time, total funding GoC also dropped by 8% as we had a significant reduction in visitors (-36% drop in revenue with a 29% drop in visitors. The decrease in visits is the result of over three years of civil conflict in the English-speaking regions of Cameroon where Limbe is located and that has caused a major ongoing humanitarian crisis (more than 3,000 deaths, 600,000 internally displaced people).

Similarly, expenditures for the LWC were covered at 68.3% by Pandrillus and 31.7% by the GoC. However, the decrease in incomes generated through the volunteer programme (because of the socio-political crisis) has created tensions in the financial resources available and limited the extent to which educational programmes and in-situ conservation programme could be developed.

Millions

This crisis also significantly impacted our self-financing through our volunteer programme. Pandrillus has worked to counter this decline with an increased in individual donations as well as grants from institutional donors. This was critical for enabling the ongoing care of hundreds of animals in our facility, plus our national rescue, rehabilitation and release programme for the endangered African grey parrots, our 2020 flag species. Some funds were also raised locally with support provided by PSMNR-SWR and UNSECO as a sponsor to our #ProtectWildlife campaign. 200

Pandrillus 167

160

FINANCIAL HEALTH Pandrillus financial health has improved overall. Pandrillus yearly balance increased by 17% and tripled over the last five years, (+218%), while Pandrillus incomes almost doubled (+97%). Going forward, we are concerned with the continued decrease in GoC funding for the Limbe Wildlife Centre as we will continue to need to make up the loss through outside fundraising. To ensure our ongoing rescue, conservation and educational efforts, it is essential that the Government of Cameroon maintains its contribution, provides the staple food and a safe environment to the animals and improves its costefficiency. Especially, the GoC must increase its contribution, by employing more staff (73% of the local staff cost is supported by Pandrillus), investing in infrastructures and maintenance (+90% was covered by Pandrillus) and education (+90% was covered by Pandrillus).

71%

120 80 GoC 78

40 0

2015

CONCLUSION

29%

2016

2017

2018

2019

We remain heavily reliant on continued GOC funding for the ongoing LWC operations, and we are also reliant on Pandrillus Foundations continued support to ensure the best standards of animal care and welfare. However, Pandrillus should also continue to invest more in developing further in-sit u conservation projects, to increase the conservation impact and help the GoC 2020 better protect wildlife and their natural habitats.

Figure 2. Evolution of the incomes (in Millions FCFA) brought in the LWC by Pandrillus (orange) and the Government of Cameroon (blue) since 2015; 100M FCFA = 152,450 EUR = 182,000 USD


Annual Report

2019

Donors

We are deeply grateful to all our funders for supporting our work in 2019. We cannot fulfil our mission and continue our efforts without the generous support we receive from the Government of Cameroon, institutional donors, foundations, companies, and of course individuals. Your continued support ensures wildlife in critical need receive the immediate treatment and on-going care they need to survive, and that we can continue our efforts to protect and sustain biodiversity conservation in Cameroon and Central Africa. We wish to thank:

INSTITUTIONAL DONORS $20,000 and more From $5,000 to $9,999

Stichting Weesaapjes Columbus Zoo & Aquarium Save the Drill Chessington Zoo Pro Wildlife e.V.

World Association of Zoos and Aquariums Vogelpark Marlow New England Biolabs Foundation Lush UK Los Angeles Zoo& Botanical Gardens UNESCO International Primate Protection League

$10,000 to $19,999 Born Free Foundation UK Fondation Brigitte Bardot Givskud Zootopia PSMNR-SWR Children of Conservation

From $2,500 to $4,999 Proyecto Gran Simio Parrot Wildlife Foundation

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Annual Report

2019

Akongo Zapier Pipedrive Jouets Sans Frontière World Parrot Trust Partners for Red Colobus

Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium World of Wildlife

Less than $2,500 World Wide Animal Rescue Parc de Branféré Pan African Sanctuary Alliance John Ball Zoological Society

THANK YOU TO OUR DONORS

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Annual Report

2019

INDIVIDUAL DONORS Platinium donors $5,000 and more Sara Thrall Gregory Shrimpton

Gold donors From $2,500 to $4,999 None

Silver donors From $1000 to $2,499 Gladys and Logan Coffin Mark Kovac Matthew Callahan Annelies Begas

Bronze donors From $500 to $999 Pamela Lunny Ami van Oppenraay Anne-M arie Serre Veronica Rivadeneira

From $250 to $499 Rowena Facee Schaeffer Victor Skloff Ahtziri Gonzalez Jane T Rasmussen-Dewar Gaetano Chionchio Ann Johnson Nigel M iller Selma Forotti Beate Klauß-Perschke Erica Farrell Leslie Robinson Mark Swiadas Patricia Gleason Rebecca Rose

From $100 to $249 Anita Bunting Amanda Swift Natalia Ronkina Judd O'Sullivan

Matthew Weiss Rene Gonzalez Eliot Kaplan Beate Mitzlaff Candace Sclimenti Charise M ixa Erica Sandoval Matthew Smith Tomas Horacek Warren Burton Bridget Macedonski Marieke de Bruijn Marcia Kwarsick Mrs J Collins Kelly Boekee Joanne Hill Mary Pratt Tania Prebble Uwe Zündorf Wanda Harris Bryan Kramer Cedric Berthod Dr Pat Latas Emma Kaiser Gigi Thorakos Jeremy Barrett Joshua Schleman Kerstin Sellars Kim Bonnaud Lauren Van Breugel Martha Falkenberg Michelle Quiles Miroslava Pešková Nancy Jonas Natasha Lefkowitz Patricia J Latas Peggy Sears Sam Winemiller Sandra Purins Sharon Braun Valerie Crow Valerie Hernandez Veronicka Jourde Wendy Morgan

From $50 to $99

Eva-Maria Dittgen Adriana Aquino Angela Ortiz Cathy Granholm Anna Coffaro Mary Ruth Angela Clark Teresa Hall Alexey Kotlyarov Bogdan Yavorsky Ingrid van Tiggelen Caroline Stovall Ted Spencer Charlotte Collins Cynthia Hern Blorian Yang Eugene Tinelli Ken Stallcup Lee Ann Rottman Linda Goldman Maria Susana Pataro Michelle Hayward Paul Kuchenbuch Rachel Kimber Sebastien Robidoux Shannon Winsted Virginie Nierat

From $3 to $49

Emma M itchell Angelique Corthals Cheryl Rutherford Gabriele Hupp Gwyneth Fraser Hanneke Joustra Jill Punter Miika Norro Nicole Gianni Wendy O'M alley Alma Poli Diana Higgins Eldridge Wisely Gail M elavas


Annual Report

Irene Stewart Jessa M cCauley Joan Joffe Lauréline Nierat Sandra Greenblatt Brien Watts Christopher Whittier Claire Downer David Eakin Diane Hall Doug Krom Elizabeth M ostov Irene Ruiz Jacob Harrington Jan Brown Jana Icke Janes Francis Jared Brenner Jayne Roepke John Bour Kacie D. Noonan Karen Smith Lauren Zurchin Studios Ma Montserrat Torres Mari Nyyssola MaryLue Thomas Monika Kostrzewa Nanita Samuels Nina Blackwood Oscar Perdomo Paula Feldman Sarah hospodar Shirley Casallas Silvia Ferrer Sousa Pia Sif Andersen

2019

Christina Balogh-Nunes Anthony De Leon Chris Brodie Christine Arenella Corinne Zeevat Elaine Jorgensen Hsin Ying Chou Julie Krajewski K Kelly Karen Wible Laila Osterkloft Micaela Owen Mildred Sturdy Rosemary Jenkins Sarah Bokaie Sylvia Dienel Tina Broida Tricia Sicilia Venessa Johnson Violaine Meuchin Rosina Blom Anna Lucia Dennis Savanna Rullens Eileen Adams Adriana Plukkel Alana Esq. Arva Roland Courtney Berne Reebecca M aher Robert Hoffman Sallyann Rose Carole Evans Manon Berguig Anni-Ruffina Ström Arlene Zuckerman

64

Barbara Litton Barry Malkin C.J. Borowiec Eileen Hennessy Emilie Marsaudon Eva Teruel Gabrielle Fewell Llisa Goodheartz Joseph Odom Joyce H Dixon Laura Gonzalez Lauriane Cacheux Ludmila Sigal Mandy Sheldrake Maria Fotopoulos Marion Degois Marsha Thalin Patricia Johnson Sally Wise Scott Schlueter Terri L Scantling Vincent Billy Deborah Fischer Judith Newmark Justine Thevenon Romain Vallas Stephanie M orais Teri Barribeau Michael Marychurch Sarah M cGrath Jesse Farrington Femke M unnichs


Annual Report

2019

Volunteers

We are immensely grateful to everyone who volunteered this year to help our staff to provide the best care to our animals. It would be almost impossible for our under-resourced project to carry on maintaining our standards without their contributions, hard work and enthusiasm. Thank you to the women, men, youngsters and seniors, Cameroonians and foreigners from many countries, who decided to give their time and support to our project! We hope that the Limbe Wildlife Centre will always be in your heart and that you had fun and learnt a lot!

VOLUNTEERS Cameroon

Ajongafac Kelly Nkemazeh Anthony Duxell Male Chokeh Irene Chutame Cyrille Tazem Dione Ntongue Sandra Doumtsop M. Landry

Faith Ayone Njeuge Forbah Sandra Gam Reveal Bi-Nain Kouphe Tumbu Brian Magomo Eveline Dominique Momo Mbassa Lizette Ndam Alma

65

Nzalie Isaas Eyong Sokoudjou Yvette Sunday Etienne Teba Kemba Raissa Yohmbo Sandra


Annual Report

2019

Australia

Liberia

Spain

Jayme Reddacliff

Tyrese Shaffa Thomas

Ainhoa Arriero Castaño

Belgium

Netherlands

Switzerland

Steven Janssen

France

Amelie Romain Aurore Balaran Delfosse Cyril Fiona La M endola Noe Campagne Véronica Rivadeneira

Germany

Konstanze Uhlig

Anja Herben Elin Besters Jiske M ölenberg Kor Sikkens Melissa Bleumink Rosina Blom Rowena Facee Schaeffer Savanna Rullens Tesse van der Pasch Truus van Dooren

Slovakia

Bea Jakubcova

Italy Andrea Laudisio

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Virginia Gomes De Figueiredo

UK

Anna Ciezarek Anna Lucia Denniss Laura Craddock

USA

Candace Sclimenti Jaclyn Lorge Jessica Farrington Kristen Marshall Lee Ann Rottman Payton Kaar


Annual Report

2019

Limbe Wildlife Centre: Annual Report 2019 by Guillaume LE FLOHIC, Manager (Limbe Wildlife Centre) & Country Director (Pandrillus Cameroon) Published in April 2020 Limbe Wildlife Centre, P.O. Box 878, Limbe, Republic of Cameroon

Limbe Wildlife Centre is a collaborative effort between Pandrillus Foundation and the Republic of Cameroon, Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife, MINFOF Pandrillus Foundation is a non-profit making NGO specialized in the protection, rehabilitation and reintroduction of primates, as well as management and sustainable financing of conservation projects in Africa. Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife is in charge of implementing the national forest policy for ensuring sustainable management and conservation of wildlife and biodiversity over the national territory as enacted by forestry law No. 01/94 of 20 January which regulates all forestry, wildlife and fisheries activities

guillaume@limbewildlife.org limbewildlifecentre

+237 681 991 590 limbewildlife

LINK TO OUR REPORTS

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limbewildlife.org limbewildlife


Annual Report

2019

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Profile for limbewildlife

Limbe Wildlife Centre: Annual Report 2019  

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