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Annual Report

2018

Limbe Wildlife Centre: Annual Report 2018 by Guillaume LE FLOHIC, Manager (Limbe Wildlife Centre) & Country Director (Pandrillus Cameroon)

Published in April 2019 Limbe Wildlife Centre, P.O. Box 878, Limbe, Republic of Cameroon

Limbe Wildlife Centre is a collaborative effort between Pandrillus Foundation and the Republic of Cameroon, Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife, MINFOF Pandrillus Foundation is a non-profit making NGO specialized in the protection, rehabilitation and reintroduction of primates, as well as management and sustainable financing of conservation projects in Africa. Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife is in charge of implementing the national forest policy for ensuring sustainable management and conservation of wildlife and biodiversity over the national territory as enacted by forestry law No. 01/94 of 20 January which regulates all forestry, wildlife and fisheries activities

guillaume@limbewildlife.org limbewildlifecentre

+237 681 991 590 limbewildlife

LINK TO OUR REPORTS

limbewildlife.org limbewildlife


Annual Report

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Content FOR THE PAST 3 YEARS… 2018 IN REVIEW CHARACTERISTICS OF THE INDIVIDUALS WHERE WE WORKED IN 2018 FOREWORD ACCREDITATIONS OUR INSTITUTIONAL DONORS ACHIEVEMENTS 2019 OBJECTIVES FINANCE DONORS VOLUNTEERS

5 6 7 8 9 13 14 15 50 51 56 59


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The Limbe Wildlife Centre (LWC) is a wildlife rehabilitation and education centre operating in the Limbe Zoological Garden of the South-West Region of Cameroon since 1993. LWC was created in response to the rapid decline of animal populations in Cameroon resulting from habitat degradation, poaching, and the illegal wildlife trade. LWC is managed in partnership by the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife (MINFOF) and the Pandrillus Foundation, a US non-profit that is also registered in Nigeria and Cameroon. For more than 25 years, LWC has provided emergency care, treatment, safety and rehabilitation for animals rescued from illegal wildlife trafficking while aiding Cameroonian authorities in their efforts to combat wildlife crime. In support of these efforts, LWC has also developed partnerships within our local community to sustain a green economy and provide an alternative to hunting, and conducts environmental education outreach programmes. With 40,000 to 50,000 visitors each year (the large majority of which are Cameroonians), LWC is one of the most visited protected areas in Western and Central Africa, with an unmatched opportunity to educate the public. As both the demand for wildlife protection and our ability to support animal populations in critical need has continued to grow, we aim to expand our rehabilitation efforts in the coming years by transferring rehabilitated animals to semi-free, naturally forested enclosures in their original range of distribution. Our expanded efforts in this area will further the rehabilitation and well-being of the animals in our care so they may eventually be reintroduced to the wild. It will also improve our ability to rescue new animals in dire need, reinforce our support to wildlife law enforcement, and protect wild populations.

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For the past 3 years…

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2018 in review

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Where we worked in 2018

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Foreword

Dear Friends and Supporters, In 2018, we elevated the project to the next level to increase our conservation impact. There is still much progress to be made and work to do, but our team continues to exhibit a great enthusiasm and work ethic. This is despite an increasingly complex political situation due to the socio-political and economic crisis and the elections held in October 2018. During this period, the crisis in Cameroon reached an unprecedented level. The situation has affected our activities, and we have responded by directing an even greater focus and dedication towards the welfare and safety of our wildlife in rehabilitation. Even though the climate was very tense, the LWC team pulled together to ensure the daily procedures were prioritised. This is what it takes and what the LWC stands

for: to be here for the animals no matter the situation, as far as it is possible, and beyond! We have completed several major projects aimed at consolidating and professionalizing our activities within the Limbe Wildlife Centre. We are now in a position to diversify and expand our efforts. Animal Welfare Firstly, we successfully integrated most of the quarantined individuals into our existing groups. As a result, most of our quarantine cages became free. We could, therefore, provide additional special care to individuals in need and planned some maintenance and development work in our vet clinic/ quarantine complex.


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Secondly, major enrichment and animal infrastructure projects were achieved. These include: 1) the completion of the new savannah-dwelling guenon enclosure and three-in-one metal enrichment in the Chimpanzee Island 2) the complete maintenance of the big Quarantine cage 3) the complete maintenance of the Agile and Red-capped mangabey enclosures, and 4) the renovation of the two-levels climbing structure. 5) We also re-adjusted the prototype of a metal tree and full reenrichment of the Drill enclosure. Finally, three adult Chimpanzees (Jackie, Utah and Mungo) confiscated by the law enforcement authorities in recent months and rescued by the Limbe Wildlife Centre. These Chimpanzees were transferred to other high standard sanctuaries: Ape Action Africa (AAA) and Sanaga Yong Chimpanzee Rescue Center (SYCRC). There, they will be provided with lifetime care in a forested enclosure. Gorilla Rescue & Rehabilitation Similarly, we rescued an infant gorilla, Bobga, from the East region, who will be transferred in 2019 to Ape Action Africa. Given the limited capacity of Cameroon to providing a high quality of life care to primates, especially gorillas and chimpanzees, saved from poaching and trafficking, support is given by the three high-standard sanctuary partners (LWC, AAA and SYCRC). This united front advises the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife (MINFOF) on how to better manage the

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captive population of rescued individuals at a national scale. It is critical that each rescued individual is placed where the best conditions will be, as quickly as possible; in order to provide him with the necessary care. This is not only to ensure the best standard for each individual’s personal well-being but also to ensure the optimal functioning of each structure. In this context, Limbe Wildlife Centre, the smallest of the three structures, has been supporting wildlife law enforcement. Together with the MINFOF and partners, especially LAGA, we assisted with confiscation, implemented quarantine procedures, performed health checks and aided the first steps of rehabilitation. During this critical period, a team of specialized animal carers consistently work on reducing the stress resulting from the act of poaching, transport and abuse. They also work on building the trust in humans, on stimulating natural skills, and on preparing the individual to later integrate a social group. This achievement was only made possible because of the excellent collaboration between all stakeholders. This enables us to develop the best plan to manage the population of rescued primates at the national scale: this unique configuration among all African countries has proved a great opportunity for Cameroon. Strategic orientation We also worked on enlarging our area of intervention. Our main goal is to prospect


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forest sites in protected areas for the potential transfer of part of the population taken care at the Limbe Wildlife Centre. This would increase our capacity to rescue more individuals and enable more confiscations to occur. On the other hand, the natural enclosure that will serve to complete the primates’ socio-ecological rehabilitation will also contribute to sustaining the strategic plan of the chosen protected area, by engaging the community through new livelihoods activities and education. This will also contribute to the development of eco-touristic activities. In our long-term vision, the Limbe Wildlife Centre serves as a national rescue and rehabilitation centre for immediate intervention through to mid-term care. We always have the goal for stabilized individuals and groups to be transferred back to their area of origin in protected areas, under strong management, close monitoring and protection. While this programme will serve national conservation strategies, it will also greatly help make the LWC more functional and financially sustainable. GoC-Pandrillus partnerships To materialise our goals, I met with the Minister of Forestry and Wildlife (MINFOF), Mr Ndongo Jules Doret, the Secretary of State to the MINFOF, Ms Koulsoumi Alhadji Boukar, the Director of Wildlife and Protected Areas, Mr Joseph Lekealem and Sub-directors. Here, I presented Pandrillus vision for the next 10

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years. This included our support to the GoC to ensure the best standard of animal welfare; to develop prospection and reintroduction projects, all while upgrading education and communitybased programmes. I also met with several key stakeholders from the private sector, governmental institutions, and civil society organisations in Campo Ma’an National Park (South Region). In Faro National Park (North Region), I also met with the Conservator of the Garoua Zoo and the Directorate of the Garoua Wildlife School in order to start making new connections and share ideas. The years to come should provide more concrete elements on the feasibility of reintroduction programmes. Pandrillus will sponsor fieldwork in the Mount Cameroon National Park and Campo Ma’an National Park in collaboration with the MINFOF and their local partners. Outreach programmes For more than 10 years, the LWC has built strong relationships with the neighbouring communities and community leaders of Batoke, located in the Southern part of the Mount Cameroun National Park. Through the Green project (reports available: 201718 and 2018-19), we have supported them to maintain (or offer) their livelihoods. In 2018, we strengthened our relationship and started the Batoke Family Nature Club. The two first sessions (out of 8) were organised. Each month, different themes pertaining to environmental protection are


Annual Report

studied and debated. This enables each community member to appreciate the value of nature, to be aware of the threats and to possess the basics skills to better understand nature, thus acting to protect it on a daily basis. In Yaoundé, we co-organized and participated in a debate on the theme of Conservation and Protection of Primates in Cameroon, at the Institut Francais du Cameroun. This debate involved various stakeholders, including Sekakoh (environmental organisation monitoring and protect wildlife), LAGA (wildlife law enforcement NGO) and the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife. Our skills were also exported, as the LWC, through Pandrillus, helped another member of the Pan African Sanctuary Alliance in Guinea (Chimpanzee Conservation Centre) to build an escapeproof chimp enclosure. Overall, we believe it is critical that further ties are built, at all possible geographic

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scales, between the actors engaged to protect wildlife and nature as a whole. All these activities led by Pandrillus, in partnership with the MINFOF and other partners, follow this philosophy. Goals for next year In 2019, we will invest more time on prospecting site and assess their suitability for transferring wildlife rehabilitated at the Limbe Wildlife Centre. In the meantime, we will professionalize our education department, upgrade content, and redouble our efforts to instigate a change of behaviour in the community. This crucially hinges on increased engagement: our engagement with the community, and the community’s engagement in their local ecology. On behalf of the Limbe Wildlife Centre, we thank you sincerely for your unfailing support.

With very best wishes, Limbe, 30 August 2019

Guillaume LE FLOHIC Country Director, Pandrillus Foundation


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Insk,

Accreditations In December, the Limbe Wildlife Centre has had its accreditation with the Pan African Sanctuary Alliance (PASA) renewed for another five years. PASA is the largest association of wildlife centres and sanctuaries in Africa, founded by the Limbe Wildlife Centre, along with 6 other primate sanctuaries. Today, PASA includes 23 organizations in 13 countries which demonstrate exceptional commitment and the highest standards of animal welfare and conservation practices, to securing a future for Africa’s primates and their habitat.

In April, the Limbe Wildlife Centre was elected Best Volunteer Abroad Project and chosen to feature in the Tutorful’s Wildlife Conservation editorial along with other prestigious organisations making a notable difference in wildlife conservation worldwide. The LWC gives people the chance to volunteer and assist experienced caregivers with the daily caregiving activities, offering the opportunity to volunteers will find themselves in the hub of primate conservation and contribute to primate conservation.


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Our Institutional Donors

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Achievements

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Pandrillus-GoC Partnership | Public Relations Jan 18

□ Individual performance review letters were distributed to all Pandrillus and GoC staff members □ MINFOF- Pandrillus joint field operation to seize 1 infant male western lowland gorilla in Batouri, Eastern Region □ MINFOF-Sanaga-Yong Chimpanzee Rescue Center-Pandrillus joint operation to transfer chimpanzees Utah & Mungo from LWC quarantine facilities to Sanaga-Yong Chimpanzee Rescue Center in the Mbargue Forest, Central Region

Feb 18

□ A mission to initiate contact in the North Region was organized: visit of the Garoua Zoological Garden, the Garoua Wildlife School, and Faro National Park □ Meeting with stakeholders of Campo Ma’an National Park, South Region

Jun 18

□ Audited 2017 Pandrillus administration and financial accounts □ MINFOF -Ape Action Africa-Pandrillus joint operation to transfer chimpanzee Jackie from LWC quarantine facilities to Ape Action Africa, Mefou Park, Central Region

Aug 18

□ Published the 6-month report of the Limbe Wildlife Centre (available online here)

Sep 18

□ Published report for Community-based Green project 2017-2018 (available online here) □ Pandrillus country Director / Manager of the Limbe Wildlife Centre held two meetings with the Minister of Forestry and Wildlife and the Director of Wildlife and Protected Areas, on 14th in Buea and on 17th in Yaounde: discussed future of the LWC, the reintroduction of our rehabilitated wildlife and improving visibility during the upcoming African Cup of Nations

Oct 18

□ MINFOF-Pandrillus joint field operation to rescue 1 Mona monkey in Douala, with the support of the Programme for Sustainable Management of Natural Resources (PSMNR-SWR)

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Wildlife rehabilitation, Population management & Animal welfare Jan 18

□ Western lowland gorilla: Started behavioural rehabilitation of the infant male Bobga □ Chimpanzee: Transferred Utah & Mungo (adult females) to Sanaga-Yong Chimpanzee Rescue Center, Mbargue Forest, Central Region Mefou Park, where she will be integrated into her new group in a large enclosure

Apr 18

□ Drill: Eyole integrated back into the Drill group □ Savannah-dwelling guenon: Lydia introduced into Boyo's group □ Mandrill: Opened access to the densely grassed strip left fallow and rotated

May 18

□ Chimpanzee: Achieved the social integration of Lolo, Madame & Mayos into the Chimp Island group

Jun 18

□ Savannah-dwelling guenons: released the newly composed group to their new enriched enclosure

Jul 18

□ Chimpanzee: Transferred Jackie (adult female) to Ape Action Africa, Mefou Park, Central Region, where she will be integrated into her new group in a large enclosure

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Aug 18

□ Released 4 Vulnerable Home's hinged tortoises and 11 Black-hinged terrapins back into the wild, in partnership with traditional rulers of Bimbia village

Sep 18

□ Mandrill: Opened access to the densely grassed strip left fallow and rotated

Nov 18

□ Western lowland gorilla: introduced Bobga into a forested area of the Limbe Botanical Garden to stimulate foraging and locomotive behaviours as part of his socio-ecological rehabilitation Dermatologic disorders 2% Others 6%

Endocrine and Metabolic disorders 5% Gastrointestinal disorders 3% Infectious diseases 21%

Subcutaneous disorders 24% Pulmonary disorders Poor body 8% conditions 17%

Musculoskeletal disorders Old age 5% 12%

Graphe 1. Proportion of the conditions and disorders treated.

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Tantalus monkey Red-eared monkey Putty-nosed monkey Preuss's monkey Patas monkey Moustached monkey Mona monkey Crowned monkey Red-capped mangabey Agile Mangabey Olive baboon Mandrill Drill Western lowland gorilla Chimpanzee

90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Graphe 2. Density of the veterinary procedures conducted through the year per species. Health checks were done in February and May 2019, explaining the two picks at those months. January was marked by two cases of Drill who required long treatments, while in May we provided intensive care to Chimpanzee Bankim, who unfortunately eventually did not survive. In August, in the second half of the rainy season, we treated several individuals for gastro-intestinal parasites and started provided dietary supplements to our primates until the end of the year as the Government of Cameroon was unable to cover all food requirements for the primates due to financial difficulties.

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Classification Species PRIMATES Great ape Central African Chimpanzee Nigeria-Cameroon Chimpanzee Western Lowland Gorilla Papionid Drill Mandrill Olive baboon Mangabey Agile mangabey Red-capped Mangabey Guenon Crowned monkey Mona monkey Moustached monkey Patas monkey Preuss's monkey Putty-nosed monkey Red-eared monkey Red-rumped Putty-nosed monkey Tantalus monkey UNGULATES Bay Duiker Blue Duiker Bush Buck OTHER MAMMALS African civet Large-spotted genet BIRDS African grey parrot Lizard Buzzard REPTILES Black-hinged terrapin Dwarf crocodile Home's hinged tortoise Nile crocodile Radiated tortoise Total

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Scientific names

[UICN]1 | Class2

Pan troglodytes troglodytes Pan troglodytes ellioti Gorilla gorilla gorilla

[EN] | A [EN] | A [CR] | A

Mandrillus leucophaeus Mandrillus sphinx Papio anubis

[EN] | A [VU] | A [LC] | C

Cercocebus agilis Cercocebus torquatus

[LC] | A [VU] | A

Cercopithecus pogonias Cercopithecus mona Cercopithecus cephus cephus Erythrocebus patas Cercopithecus preussi Cercopithecus nictitans nictitans Cercopithecus erythrotis Cercopithecus nictitans ludio Chlorocebus tantalus

[LC] | C [LC] | C [LC] | C [LC] | C [EN] | A [LC] | C [VU] | A [LC] | C [LC] | C

Cephalophus dorsalis Philantomba monticola Tragelaphus scriptus

[NT] | B [LC] | C [LC] | B

Civettictis civetta Genetta maculata

[LC] | B [LC] | B

Psittacus erithacus Kaupifalco mongrammicus

[EN] | A [LC] | B

Pelusios niger Osteolaemus tetraspis Kinixys homeana Crocodylus niloticus Astrochelys radiata

[LC] | C [VU] | A [VU] | A [LC] | A [CR] | A

1

check conservation status at iucnredlist.org: CR = critically endangered; EN = endangered; VU = vulnerable 2 classes of protection as defined by Cameroonian wildlife laws: A, B and C. Class A species benefit from the highest degree of protection

Table 1. Animal population cared for at the Limbe Wildlife on 31st December 2018

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Nbr 215 60 11 33 16 104 82 13 9 11 4 7 40 0 13 1 3 1 2 3 8 9 3 1 1 1 2 1 1 6 6 0 7 3 2 0 1 1 233


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Classification Species

2018

Scientific names

[UICN]1 | Class2

Arrivals 2018

PRIMATES Great ape Western Lowland Gorilla

Gorilla gorilla gorilla

[CR] | A

Drill

Mandrillus leucophaeus

[EN] | A

Cercopithecus mona

[LC] | C

Genetta maculata

[LC] | B

Psittacus erithacus Kaupifalco mongrammicus

[EN] | A [LC] | B

Pelusios niger

[LC] | C

2 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 3 3 8

1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

[UICN]1 | Class2

Nbr 4 3 1 13 8 5 17

Papionid Guenon Mona monkey OTHER MAMMALS Large-spotted genet BIRDS African grey parrot Lizard Buzzard REPTILES Black-hinged terrapin Total

Births 2018

Table 2. Individuals rescued and born in 2018

Classification Species BIRDS African grey parrot Lizard Buzzard REPTILES Black-hinged terrapin Home's hinged tortoise Total

Scientific names Psittacus erithacus Kaupifalco mongrammicus

[EN] | A [LC] | B

Pelusios niger Kinixys homeana

[LC] | C [VU] | A

Table 3. Individuals released in 2018

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Infrastructures and development | Material & Equipment Feb 18 Apr 18

□ Transferred and mounted the prototype of the Drill metal tree in the Drill enclosure □ Completed the construction of new savannah-dwelling guenon enclosure and satellite cages □ Completed the construction of three-in-one metal enrichment structures in the Chimpanzee Island

May 18 Jun 18

□ Completed the structural enrichments of the new savannah-dwelling guenon enclosure and satellite cages □ Performed the complete maintenance and renovation of the big Quarantine cage

Aug 18

□ Completed the renovation of the Agile and Red-capped mangabey enclosure and satellite cages

Sep 18

□ Completed the re-enrichment of the Agile mangabey enclosure

Oct 18

□ Completed the maintenance of Quarantine cages and chimp Nursery

Nov 18

□ Prepared, improved and remounted the Drill metal tree □ Maintained and redesigned the two-levels climbing structure in the Drill enclosure

Dec 18

□ Continued the enrichment of the Drill enclosure: positioned wooden poles prepared and mounted a network of bamboos and ropes, installed one experimental visual obstacle

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Community conservation, Environmental education & Ecotourism Feb 18

□ Organized a debate on the theme of Conservation and Protection of Primates in Cameroon, Institut Français du Cameroun, Yaoundé, 27 February

Mar 18

□ School Outreach Final Event: organized a visit to the Limbe Wildlife Centre and reward ceremony for all schoolchildren, 21-23 March 2018 □ Organized the Saturday Nature Club Final Event □ Organized a Community Workshop in Batoke with the members involved in the Green project

Jun 18

□ Housed the Divisional World Environment Day at the Limbe Wildlife Centre

Jul-Aug 18 □ Special event: Organized a 4-weeks Art Summer Camp in partnership with local art and culture group Da Nzimbistic Cultural Centre: teaching children a variety of environmentally friendly creative art activities at the LWC Nov 18

□ Batoke’s Family Nature Club: Organised the 1st session on the 3rd November to present the programme: 66 families, 240 participants (64% females, 157 children between 4 and 17 years old (46%), 65% of community members not involved in the Green Project)

Dec 18

□ Batoke’s Family Nature Club: Organised the 2nd session on the 15 and 29th December on flora and fauna: 61 families, 221 participants (64% females, 110 children between 4 and 17 years old (50%), 74% of community members not involved in the Green Project) □ Nature Club Christmas: 126 children participated in the guided tour of the LWC, watch and discussed a wildlife documentary and enjoyed entertainments □ Christmas in the Village at the Limbe Wildlife Centre, 2nd Edition: installed a traditional African village and organised various artistic, cultural nature-oriented activities such as live music, storytelling and wildlife documentary projection for all ages

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Year 2018 □ Community-based Green Economy: 28 ex-hunter members sustainably harvesting wild herbaceous plants: 9,640 kg of Aframomum stems and 8,012 kg of Costus stems; 148 women members harvesting crop byproduct: 10,396 kg of cassava leaves, 26,080 kg of papaya leaves, 37,822 kg of potato leaves, 7,377 kg of invasive Trumpet wood shoots, corresponding to 1,640 trees hand-cut; 10,465,715 XAF (€15,978) paid directly to the local community association and contributed to alleviate poverty in 2019 □ Nature Club: 296 kids registered; annual effort: 1,460 children.days □ School outreach programme: Annual effort: 360.0 men.hrs, covering 11 schools, 28 classes and 1,101 students (end 2017-18) and 10 schools, 21 classes and 1,023 students (beginning 2018-19)

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Capacity building & Mentoring May 18 Jul 18

□ Trained our vet nurse in the preparation of Nyango’s skeleton (Cross river gorilla) □ Pan African Sanctuary Alliance: our team sent to the Centre de Conservation des Chimpanzésin Guinea completed the construction of their new chimpanzee enclosure □ Mentorship: Dr John Kiyang, Head Vet of the Limbe Wildlife Centre, provided emergency care to a chimpanzee cared for at Association Papaye International, and started to provide counselling to the new management team to meet with Primate sanctuary minimum standards

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Sep 18

2018

□ Media coverage on Bobga's story: Online report: Adorable orphaned gorilla baby cuddles up to keeper after losing mother to illegal wildlife trade, StoryTrender, 27 August 2018 (available here) Online report: Orphaned gorilla demands to be snuggled — And gets exactly what he wants: Bobga will never have to be alone again, The Dodo, 6 September 2018 (available here) Online report: Orphaned baby gorilla cuddles up with carer after his mother was killed in bushmeat trade, Pickle, 10 September 2018 (available here)

Dec 18

□ Media coverage TV report: Limbe Wildlife Centre was one of the two conservation projects in Cameroon highlighted in the Green Cops season to be broadcast on Planete + channel. The documentary describes the challenges of the wildlife conservation in Cameroon and the efforts made by the Government and partner NGOs

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Sep 18

2018

□ Giving Day for Apes: $4,040 raised thanks to 48 generous donors for providing long-life care to our disabled chimpanzee Ghaa and gorilla Twiggs

Year 2018 □ Limbe Wildlife Centre generated 12,046,997 FCFA of revenues through the entrance fees (25,2010 visitors; 31% children, 95% Cameroonians) (see Financial analysis); 25,210

7500

5000 9,261 2500

10,895

13,004

14,608

16,348

17,571

20,667 19,066 19,551 20,001

28,000 24,000 20,000 16,000 12,000

5,399

8,000 4,000

0

-

Adult Nationals

Children Nationals

Children Foreigners

Cumulated

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Adult Foreigners


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2019 Objectives □ Maintain the Chimp Island night dens: hammocks for enrichment, new foot baths and pathway maintenance □ Improve the Drill enclosure escape-proofing □ Restructure the vet clinic/quarantine complex □ Build the new quarantine cages □ Re-structure the chimpanzee Special Care and Rehabilitation Section □ Build the new bridge over the second arm of the Limbe river to access the farmland and develop organic farming in the next year □ Build the first African grey parrot rehabilitation aviary in Cameroon □ Install bamboo fence along the visitor path to enhance wildlife privacy and welfare □ Run the first edition of the Family Nature Club □ Design and run a #ProtectWildlife campaign □ Transfer gorilla Bobga to Ape Action Africa □ Assess space use and enrichment preference, as well as group cohesion and individual wellbeing in gorilla groups in view of studying the feasibility to split the large enclosure and re-enrich it □ Organise field trips to set the data collection protocol and to conduct the first feasibility study in Mount Cameroon and Campo Ma’an National Park to release drills and gorillas back into the wild

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Finance

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EXPENDITURES (1/2) Pandrillus (XAF)

ACTIVITIES ITEMS WILDLIFE REHABILITATION, POPULATION MANAGEMENT & ANIMAL WELFARE ANIMAL CARE STAFF ANIMAL FOOD CROP BY-PRODUCTS & WILD PLANTS ENCLOSURES & ENRICHMENT, GROUNDS MAINTENANCE STAFF MATERIAL & EQUIPMENT RESCUE VET PERSONNEL VETERINARY / MEDICAL Subtotal WILDLIFE REHABILITATION, POPULATION MANAGEMENT & ANIMAL WELFARE

GoC (XAF)

TOTAL (XAF)

16,434,216 11,405,250 3,171,130 28,630,500 10,273,540 7,913,907 2,000,000 4,026,822 1,267,250 64,200 727,350 8,794,159 2,534,500 1,041,175 52,446,499 45,837,500

TOTAL (EUR)

TOTAL (USD)

27,839,466 42,441 50,617 31,801,630 48,481 57,821 10,273,540 15,662 18,679 9,913,907 15,114 18,025 5,294,072 8,071 9,626 64,200 98 117 727,350 1,109 1,322 11,328,659 17,270 20,598 1,041,175 1,587 1,893 98,283,999 149,833 178,698

NEW INFRASTRUCTURES PROJECTS CONSTRUCTION STAFF DRILL TREE & ENCLSOURE ENRICHMENT SAVANNAH-DWELLING GUENON ENCLOSURE Subtotal NEW INFRASTRUCTURES PROJECTS

4,454,449 1,641,805 1,343,295 7,439,549

-

4,454,449 1,641,805 1,343,295 7,439,549

6,791 2,503 2,048 15,892

8,099 2,985 2,442 18,954

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION CHILD EDUCATION SPONSORSHIP EDUCATION PERSONNEL MATERIAL, DISPLAY, BOOKS NATURE CLUB OUTREACH PROGRAMMES Subtotal ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION

3,232,000 4,169,364 987,150 408,550 8,797,064

2,534,500 2,534,500

3,232,000 6,703,864 987,150 408,550 11,331,564

4,927 10,220 1,505 623 17,275

5,876 12,189 1,795 743 20,603

5,912,075 355,000 807,950 7,075,025

520,000 520,000

6,432,075 355,000 807,950 7,595,025

9,806 541 1,232 11,579

11,695 645 1,469 13,809

4,444,288 513,400 8,011,688 1,504,548 4,500,000 2,913,802 2,534,500 578,666 8,000,000 1,311,550 7,000,000 11,266,254 30,046,188

4,444,288 8,525,088 6,004,548 5,448,302 8,578,666 8,311,550 41,312,442

6,775 12,996 9,154 8,306 13,078 12,671 62,980

8,081 15,500 10,917 9,906 15,598 15,112 75,114

STAFF NON-WAGE EXPENDITURE PANDRILLUS ADVISOR STAFF MEDICAL Subtotal STAFF OPERATIONS ACCOMODATION FUEL, WATER & ENERGY MISSION & RECEPTION OPERATION STAFF TRANSPORT & TRAVELS VEHICLE FUEL & MAINTENANCE Subtotal OPERATIONS

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EXPENDITURES (2/2) Pandrillus (XAF)

ACTIVITIES ITEMS ADMINISTRATION & COMMUNICATION LEGAL COSTS, BANK FEES, MISC. MARKETING & FUNDRAISING OFFICE SUPPLY, EQUIP. & COMMUNICATIONS P.R. / MERCHANDISING PANDRILLUS PROJECT MANAGEMENT Subtotal ADMINISTRATION & COMMUNICATION

GoC (XAF)

TOTAL (XAF)

TOTAL (EUR)

TOTAL (USD)

1,454,818 804,700 1,370,922 126,495 13,649,439 17,406,375

3,250,000 2,439,037 5,689,037

1,454,818 804,700 4,620,922 2,565,532 13,649,439 23,095,412

2,218 1,227 7,045 3,911 20,808 35,209

2,645 1,463 8,402 4,665 24,817 41,992

744,150 744,150

-

744,150 744,150

1,134 1,134

1,353 1,353

GIFT SHOP GIFT SHOP PURCHASES Subtotal GIFT SHOP TOTAL EXPENDITURES

105,174,915 84,627,225 189,802,140 289,351 345,095

ADMI NISTRATION & COMMUNICATION 12%

GIFT SHOP 0%

OPERATIONS 22% WILDLIFE REHABILITATION, POPULATION MANAGEMENT & ANIMAL WELFARE 52%

STAFF 4% ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION 6% NEW INFRASTRUCTURES PROJECTS 4%

Figure 1. Expenditures by activities

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Annual Report

2018

INCOMES Pandrillus (XAF)

CATEGORIES ITEMS

GoC (XAF)

Total (XAF)

Total (EUR)

Total (USD)

REVENUES FINANCIAL DONATION GENERATED INCOMES GoC SUBVENTIONS GRANTS OTHER INCOMES VOLUNTEER PROGRAMME Subtotal REVENUES

18,566,146 1,880,6461 150,000 83,026,992 9,770,703 113,394,487

11,839,5372 44,500,000 28,287,688 84,627,225

18,566,146 13,720,183 44,650,000 83,026,992 28,287,688 9,770,703 198,021,712

28,304 20,916 68,068 126,574 43,124 14,895 301,882

33,757 24,946 81,182 150,958 51,432 17,765 360,039

14,029,029 14,029,029

-

14,029,029 14,029,029

21,387 21,387

25,507 25,507

127,423,516

84,627,225

212,050,741

323,269

385,547

22,248,601

-

22,248,601

33,918

40,452

5,516,540 11,737,039 17,253,578

-

5,516,540 11,737,039 17,253,578

8,410 17,893 26,303

10,030 21,340 31,370

CAPITAL N-1 BROUGHT FROM 2017 Subtotal CAPITAL N-1 TOTAL INCOMES BALANCE END OF PERIOD (INC. - EXP.) VOLUNTARY CONTRIBUTION IN-KIND DONATIONS VOLUNTARY WORK Subtotal VOLUNTARY CONTRIBUTION 1 includes

sales from the gift shop fees

2 entrance

BROUGHT FROM 2017 V OLUNTEER 7% PROGRA MME 5%

FINANCIAL DONATION 9% GENERATED INCOMES 6%

OTHER INCOMES 13% GoC SUBV ENTIONS 21%

GRA NTS 39%

Figure 2. Incomes by sources

54


Annual Report

2018

Financial analysis Pandrillus brought 60.1% of the 2018 incomes of the Limbe Wildlife Centre while the Government of Cameroon contributed to 39.9%. The decrease in GoC support to the LWC is mainly due to the decrease of visits and hence of the funds generated through the entrance fees. In 2016, the fees generated 25,033,050 FCFA (for 48,544 visitors), while the civil unrest in the region brought the revenues down to 20,595,400 FCFA in 2017 (-24%; 36,976 visitors) and to 12,046,997 FCFA in 2018 (-42%; 25,210 visitors). Between the 3 years, incomes generated by the gate were reduced by 51.9% and the attendance decreased by 48.1%! 50,000 40,000 GoC 39,9 %

30,000 PAN 60,1 %

20,000 10,000 0 2015

Figure 3. Contributions to LWC’s incomes.

2016

2017

2018

Figure 4. Variation of visitor attendance (-48% in 3 years)

Similarly, expenditures for the LWC were covered at 55.4% by Pandrillus and 44.6% by the GoC. The stability of Pandrillus accounts has improved for the past 3 years, increasing each year the reserve of funds for the next year (+167.9%), but also raising more funds each year for the LWC and other projects (+11.9) thanks to the longlasting sponsors. However, the decrease in incomes generated through the volunteer programme (because of the socio-political crisis) has created tensions in the financial resources available and limited the extent to which educational programmes and insitu conservation programme could be developed. Pandrillus financial stability has been pivotal in helping the Government of Cameroon maintaining the level standard of care provided to the animals. For ensuring a higher level of sustainability, it is essential that the Government of Cameroon maintains its contribution and improves its cost-efficiency. Meanwhile, Pandrillus should at least maintain the support to the LWC and develop further conservation projects in-situ to increase the conservation impact and help the GoC protect wildlife and their natural habitats.


Annual Report

2018

Donors

We are deeply grateful to all our funders for supporting our work in 2018. We cannot fulfil our mission and continue our efforts without the generous support we receive from the Government of Cameroon, institutional donors, foundations, companies, and of course individuals. Your continued support ensures wildlife in critical need receive the immediate treatment and on-going care they need to survive, and that we can continue our efforts to protect and sustain biodiversity conservation in Cameroon and Central Africa. We wish to thank:

INSTITUTIONAL DONORS 10,000 EUR and more

From 100 to 5,000 EUR

Save the Drill (incl. Hellabrun & Erlebnis Zoo) Columbus Zoo & Aquarium Stichting Weesaapjes Pro Wildlife e.V. Fondation Brigitte Bardot Born Free Foundation UK

The Marchig Animal Welfare Trust International Primate Protection League World of Wildlife Proyecto Gran Simio Abraham Foundation Givskud Zootopia Los Angeles Zoo & Botanical Gardens North Carolina American Association of Zookeeper John Ball Zoo Worldwide Veterinary Services International Vet Care Warsaw Zoo Camtel Pipedrive Zapier

From 5,000 to 10,000 EUR World Association of Zoos and Aquariums Children of Conservation

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Annual Report

2018

INDIVIDUAL DONORS From 2,500 to 5,000 EUR Sara Thrall

From 1000 to 2,500 EUR Gladys And Logan Coffin

From 250 to 1,000 EUR Matthew Callahan Pamela Lunny Patricia Gleason Judd Osullivan Veronica Rivadeneira Vasconez Leah Knowlton Ann Johnson Ami Van Oppenraay Ariana Tuggle

From 100 to 250 EUR Beate Klauß-Perschke Rebecca Snyder Gaetano Chionchio Selma Forotti Victor Skloff Annelies Begas Elaine Henley Nigel Miller Jutta Philipp Natasha Lefkowitz Sarah Hospodar Ralph Cioffi Sandra Purins Tania Prebble Eliot Kaplan Ex Animo Natalia Ronkina Shirley Richardson Bridget Macedonski

From 50 to 100 EUR Cedric Berthod Dr Pat Latas Ellen Mcnally Emma Kaiser Jennifer Williams

Kim Bonnaud Lauren Van Breugel Maria Spataro Martha Falkenberg Nancy Jonas Patrick De Labie Rhonda Johnson Sam Winemiller Sebastien Robidoux Sharon Braun Wendy Morgan Jeremy Barrett Uwe Zündorf Nicole Gianni Angela Ortiz Megan Wood Ericka A Novotny Gigi Thorakos Monique Fox Anita Bunting Chun-Wei Yi Miroslava Pešková Theresa Strunk Joanne Hill Lauriane Cacheux

From 3 to 50 EUR Rod Stewart Alexey Kotlyarov Angela Clark Caroline Hero Charise Mixa Gayla Hagans Irene Ruiz Jayne L Roepke Joshua Schleman Julie Krajewski Kate Hrabcova Kelly Boekee Livia Wittiger Louis Carrio Michelle Hayward Pamela Hokanson Sandra Purins Shirley Mcgreal Silvia Ferrer Sousa VPD Visscher


Annual Report

2018

Nina Blackwood Ingrid Molander Mary Pratt Miika Norro Diane L Koosed Kat Werner Adriana Aquino Alma Poli Anchi Ko Cathy Granholm Gail Melavas Irene Stewart Isabel Martin Almirante Jessa Mccauley Joan Joffe Sandra Greenblatt Ted Spencer Teresa Hall Berit Larsen Caroline Stovall Charlotte Collins Diane Hall Doug Krom Elizabeth Mostov Eva Dvorakova Eva Manzano Helene Gobert Irene Magarzodelgado J Joustra Jan Brown Joanne Tanner John Bour Lauren Zurchin Studios Lloyd Jones Ma Montserrat Torres Mari Nyyssola Marjorie Davis Marylue Thomas Nanita Samuels Roslin Talbot Scott Thomson Thaïs Lenkiewicz

Allen Kaylee Lynn Brien Watts Carine Boekee Christine Arenella Frances M Boland Jared Brenner Lynne Venant Micaela Owen Mildred Sturdy Tina Broida Eileen Adams Alana Esq. Emilie Marsaudon Sallyann Rose Amanda Ziobro Arlene Zuckerman Barbara Litton Cynthia Evans Edit Karacsony Flavia Zaca Gwyneth Fraser Jennifer Byrne Joyce H Dixon Kaylee Allen Kim Free Linda Disney Ludmila Sigal Mary Ruth Miranda Prince Petra Hulleman Sally Wise Sheila Robertson Tara Capel Wanda Harris William Alecander Yc Brienen-Van Kerchove Deborah Fischer Eva Rupp Joshua Lam Nikesha Doughty John Mascarenhas Valeria D'Arace

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Annual Report

2018

Volunteers

We are immensely grateful to everyone who volunteered this year to help our staff to provide the best care to our animals. It would be almost impossible for our under-resourced project to carry on maintaining our standards without their contributions, hard work and enthusiasm. Thank you to the women, men, youngsters and seniors, Cameroonians and foreigners from many different countries, who decided to give their time and support to our project! We hope that the Limbe Wildlife Centre will always be in their hearts and that they had fun and learnt a lot!

VOLUNTEERS Cameroonians Ngambo Keguep Estelle Gwankem Brown Hilda Mwambo Anita

Nkwelle Kaven Mbuve George

59

Netherlands Petra Janssen Deborah Martin Marell Nijkamp


Annual Report

Marianne Meijer Rowena Facee Schaeffer Martina van der Biezen Anouk Villeumier Remco Boerema Ana de Boon Jesse ten Hove Corinne Zeevat Annemiek van Elteren Amber Hereijgers

2018

Véronica Rivadeneira Léopold Fried Nicole Gianni Gabrielle Innocenti Floriane Vagner

Spain Irene Ruiz Martín Marina Lopez Tapias

Belgium Tine Buyse

Czech Republic Martina Hodkova Kate Hrabcova

Rosalie Edmonds

USA

UK France

Germany

Laura Cradock

Cedric Berthod Julia Dauthuile

Natalia Ronkin

Benjamin Alyoshkin

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Annual Report

2018

61

Profile for limbewildlife

Limbe Wildlife Centre: Annual Report 2018  

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