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TRUMAN’S LETTER Hi, Kids! Do you have a favorite animal? The world is such a big and wonderf ul place that it can some t ime s be hard to choose just one favorite. This issue of Kidsv ille Ne ws! is all abou t animals. From the Broadway product ion of The Lion King to the wild horse s that roam the prairie s and the coast, animals play an important role in the circle of life. They impact our world so much that humans e ven play game s that mimic animals. Crab soccer is just one e xample of how people imitate cre at ure s and have f un doing it. Some t ime s what we do impacts an animal’s abilit y to sur v i ve. Animals who lose their habitat or the place they li ve some t ime s become endangered. Check ou t what animals are endangered and make a Connect ion. Be sure to check ou t the “What’s It Like to Be…” sect ion. I talked to a zookeeper and le arned some intere st ing facts abou t what it’s like to care for the animals at a zoo. You might be surprised by some of the things a zookeeper doe s! Do you think you would like being a zookeeper? Re ad on and f ind ou t !

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Connections Putting a Spotlight on Endangered Animals For many people, there is no greater friend than our pet dog or cat. But many in the world do not hold animals in high regard. When an animals habitat is destroyed, their water source polluted and their hunting grounds taken away, animals are in danger of becoming extinct. Today there are more than 5,000 species of officially endangered or threatened animals and birds on our planet. Below is a list of some of the animals that are on the Endangered Species List:

woods bison exist in conservation herds Status: Near-Endangered Species. Note: Bison kept in commercial herds are not included in these numbers. Trends: The bison was hunted to near-extinction in the 19th century before conservation measures were put into place. It’s NearEndangered status is based on the fact that the species’ survival requires management of bison (aka buffalo) herds.

Bears : Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) Population: 20,000 to 25,000 Status: Threatened Species Trends: Very likely declining due to habitat loss brought on by climate-change-induced melting of Arctic sea ice and shelf ice.

American Bison Bison Population: 19,000 plains bison and 11,000

Chimpanzees Common Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) Population: Between 150,000 and 250,000. Status: Endangered Species Trends: Declining Rapidly due to habitat loss and illegal hunting. Chimps are used for food in Africa. An estimated 1 million to 2 million chimps lived in African forests a century ago. Bonobo (Pan paniscus) Population: Between 30,000 and 50,000. Status: Endangered Species. Trends: Declining due to habitat loss and illegal hunting. Condors California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus) Population: 130 Status: Critically Endangered Species Trend: Increasing due to captive breeding programs

Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Population: 1,000 to 2,000 in the wild Status: Endangered Species Trends: Still decreasing due to habitat loss

Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) Population: More than 500 in the U.S. Lower 48, most in the greater Yellowstone National Park region Status: Threatened Species under the U.S. Endangered Species Act Trends: Increasing. At its low point several decades ago, the grizzly population was down to 140. ESA protections were removed from grizzlies in 2008, but restored in 2009 following a lawsuit by conservation organizations.

Status: Vulnerable Species Trends: Decreasing due to habitat loss

Camels Wild Bactrian (two-humped) Camel (Camelus ferus) Population: 600 in China; 350 in Mongolia Status: Critically Endangered Species Trends: Declining due to illegal hunting for food. In the mid-1980s, the Mongolian population was above 600. Cheetah Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) Population: Between 7,000 and 10,000

Elephants Asian Elephant (Elephus maximus) Population: 40,000 to 50,000 Status: Endangered Species Trends: Decreasing due to habitat loss and illegal hunting

African Elephant (Loxodonta africanus) Population: Between 470,000 and 690,000 Status: Near-Threatened Species Trends: A recent upsurge in poaching has threatened the population. African elephants are also threatened by habitat loss.

. Information taken from the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species

In America, shamrocks, or four-leaf clovers, are thought to be lucky, but many people look at shamrocks in different ways. In the late 1700s, the shamrock symbol was used by Irish soldiers who rebelled against England. The symbol was then associated with rebellion, and to avoid being tagged a rebel, many Irish people wore a red and green cross instead. The word shamrock originated from the Irish word “seamrog,” which means “summer plant.” In ancient times, the Druids thought of the shamrock, which lived in the highest altitudes, as a sign of life. They considered shamrocks a symbol of motherhood and joy and often used them in their rituals.

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AR O UND THE W O RLD St. Patrick’s Day The Gathering Worldwide On March 17, people all over the United States will celebrate a traditional Irish holiday, St. Patrick’s Day. In places like Boston, New York City and Savannah, Ga., people turn out in huge numbers to enjoy this special day that has come to be a celebration of their Irish heritage. Events include parades, marathons, parties and much more. Most people dress in green, and just about everyone wears a shamrock. In Savannah, they dye the river green to pay tribute to the Irish families who settled the city. There’s an old saying that “everybody is Irish on St. Patrick’s Day,” which indicates the hospitality for which the Irish are known. Céad Míle Fáilte! or in English, “A hundred thousand welcomes!”

Kingdom: Phylum: Class: Order: Family: Genus: Subgenus: Species:

Animalia Chordata Mammalia Perissodactyla Equidae Equus Equus E. Ferus

While in America we will celebrate St. Patrick’s Day on one day, in Ireland they are pulling out all of the stops, as the Irish host the biggest St. Patrick’s Day party in the world. “The Gathering Ireland 2013” will be held March 14-18, and will include the People’s Parade, dancing and more. The parade will pass by some of Ireland’s most historic landmarks including Trinity College and Dublin Castle. What’s special about this year’s event is they are asking more than 8,000 people from around the world to come to Ireland to participate in the parade!

Each year on March 22, people all over the world celebrate World Water Day. International World Water Day focuses the world’s attention on the importance of fresh water and asks that people do all they can to keep our water resources clean. The first World Water Day was celebrated on March 22, 1993, and was designated by the United Nations. Water is important for people, plants and animals. While people have invented ways to clean water, animals can’t, so it is very important to keep our waterways clean for the animals who depend on it and those who call it home.

Wild Horses of Corolla

Hundreds of years ago, before America was even a country, the great powers of the world — England and Spain — were in a race to see who could claim this new continent. Both countries left a major mark on the culture and development of America, and in particular on the wildlife that calls our country home. If you ever visit the State of North Carolina, you should take the time to visit the Outer Banks. The Outer Banks are a series of islands that run along the northern coast of the state. If you want to see the legacy of the Spanish explorers, the perfect place to visit is the little town of Corolla. Corolla is home to an amazing breed of horses called Banker Horses. These horses are not native to the island. Instead, they are descendants of horses that were brought to the islands by Spanish explorers and some are survivors of shipwrecks on the sandbars of the islands. The wild horses that inhabit Corolla have been traced by the Spanish Mustang Registry following a visit by the organization in 1982. In June, 1982, members of the Spanish Mustang Registry came to the Outer Banks to take a look at the horses that are much beloved along the coast and in the state. During their visit to the beaches and marshes of Corolla, they were able to observe the last known remaining bands of Banker Horses still existing in their natural state — as they have for the past 500 years — in Currituck County on the Outer Banks. History tells us that Spanish explorers attempted to colonize the area in the 1500s, bringing with them Spanish Barb and Arabian horses. One colony, d’Allyon’s, is believed to be on the Outer Banks. Troubles with the native Indians and with getting supplies to the colony caused it to fail. The Spanish sailed off to their thriving colonies in Florida, leaving behind all of their livestock, including horses that survived the wreckage of ship that was bringing supplies to the colony. Left on their own, the horses adapted to their new environment and produced a band of wild horses that roamed the barrier islands. Today, the wild horses that live on Ocracoke and Corolla carry the distinguishing features of Spanish-type horses. One striking similarity to the Arabian ancestry is the number of vertebra (one less than most breeds) which occurs in the Banker Horse Breed. Their even temperament, endurance, size, and the startling beauty prove that they are descendants of the once numerous herds of Spanish stock which ran free along the sandy islands of the North Carolina coast. The Spanish Mustang Registry is satisfied that the Banker Horses, in particular the Corolla strain, have a direct line to the 16th century horses imported by the Spanish. Another unique trait of these horses is that they can live on the sandy islands, which is not a normal habitat for horses. The horses in the Outer Banks survive on sea grass for their food and water. Sometimes they also drink from little streams when it rains, but the majority of their water is obtained from sea grass. History reports that when the horses were moved from the island, they often died quickly because they could not survive on what other horses eat. The beautiful horses of Corolla are now protected, and while you can walk the beach and see them, it is illegal to try and feed them or pet them. For more information, visit www.corollawildhorses.com/facts-and-history.

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What’s It Like to Be... a Zookeeper I really love animals. I think working with animals would be one of the best jobs in the world! This month, I visited the N.C. Zoo in Asheboro, N.C., and met a zookeeper. Sara Monson has been at the zoo for six years and works with polar bears, sea lions, seals and the arctic fox. Did you know that polar bears in the wild fill up on food whenever it is around and then fast (don’t eat) for a while when food is not so plentiful? At the zoo, Aquila (a 1,000-pound polar bear) eats about 20 pounds of food a day! Keep reading to learn all about Sara’s fascinating job. Truman: What does it take to become a zookeeper? Monson: For most zoos, it takes a four-year college degree in biology, zoology, psychology, marine biology or animal behavior. Some zoos will take a two-year associate degree. I have a bachelor of science in biology and psychology. And most times, you have to do internships. Depending on the species you want to work with, you may have to do multiple internships — like to work with marine animals, which is a very sought-after job. Any animal experience is helpful — volunteering at an animal shelter, working in pet store, working at an animal rehab center. A lot of times you have to start out as a temporary keeper and work your way up. There are also special skills that you need to have, depending on what area of the zoo in which you work. For instance, in the Rocky Coast Mammals section of the zoo where I work, we have to be scuba certified because we have to clean all the pools regularly. Truman: When, and why, did you first become interested in this profession? Monson: Always as a child I was interested in animals, but I never thought it was a career you could actually do. I was really interested in marine mammals. My first year of college, I was going for teaching. But then I decided to find out more about working with marine mammals. I figured out what I needed to do, talked to my advisor at Central Michigan University, talked to different zookeepers and decided to pursue it as a career. Truman: What do you do every day? Describe a typical day on the job. Monson: A typical day starts out with food preparation for the animals, especially for the seals; we have a lot of fish that we sort through. We weigh it out, make sure that the fish are perfect. We do a lot of cleaning — the back areas that the animals are in at night, the inside areas for polar bears — and we have to clean the exhibit area. There’s a lot of scooping poop and putting out toys for the day. Toys are called “enrichment.” And enrichment is a big part of the day — it includes not just

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toys, but music playing, scents around the exhibit and playing with the animals at the viewing windows. We do lots of different things to stimulate them and give them the opportunity to interact. Since they are not in the wild, we have to keep their brains stimulated. We train at least three times a day, so that’s a big part of our day as well. We train for a variety of reasons. A lot is for medical care. We want to do as much as possible with the animal voluntarily doing it — like getting their teeth brushed, eye drops, getting vaccinations, etc. We have to train them to get on a scale, to move from one area to the next area, and we also train just for fun, especially for the seals. We teach them behaviors that are good mental stimulation, to demonstrate to the public the abilities the seals have, and it can be exercise for them, too. We have the most freedom to train seals, and they enjoy the most variety of training. We also do a lot of paperwork. We have to track everything, from diets to what they do during the day, and also things like their weight and how they interact with the enrichment. Every time we are feeding the seals, we will answer questions from the public. We are the voices for the animals, so it’s important

for us to talk to the public and educate the public on their natural behavior and any conservation issues. A lot of people who go into zoo keeping say they are not “a people person,” but that’s a huge part of the job. In this section, we do a lot of special events for climate-change awareness. Polar bears are the biggest species where a visual outcome is obvious with climate change. Truman: What’s the hardest part of your job? Monson: The hardest part is when an animal dies, or gets sick or hurt. We are their primary caregivers, so we have to be very aware of those things. You get attached to the animals because you are with them more than your own pets.

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Truman: What’s the best part of your job? Monson: My favorite part is training the animals. It’s always a challenge, and it keeps you on your toes. Every animal is different, so that adds to the challenge. We are constantly training new behaviors. It is really cool when an animal gets it and you see that light bulb go off in its head, especially when you’ve been working on a behavior for a long time and they finally get it. My second favorite part is interacting with the public. I enjoy talking with the public about these animals. Truman: What is one accomplishment in your career of which you are most proud? Monson: I was selected to go to Polar Bears International Leadership Camp in Churchill, Manitoba. This past October, I got to go with a group of other zookeepers and educators to observe polar bears in the wild and learn about climate change and the effects on the polar bears. Truman: What is your favorite hobby or thing to do when you are not working? Monson: I have a 2.5-year-old that takes up a lot of my time, but I love to read. I also have my own pets, two cats and a dog, at home. Truman: What is your favorite animal? Monson: The dolphin is my favorite animal, but don’t tell the polar bears and seals. Here at the zoo, I have a lot of fun with Ronan and Paco, 5-and-a-half-year-old harbor seals. They are unique individuals. Ronan is pretty laid back, and he’s easy to train. Paco is the dominant one, but he’s also more sensitive. Truman: What advice would you give to kids who are interested in this profession? Monson: Start early. As soon as you can start volunteering with animals, do that. Don’t give up. It’s a difficult field to get into, but if you do the schooling and internships and work hard at it, it will pay off. Truman: Wow! Thank you so much for showing me the zoo and telling me all about your job. It sounds awesome! Editor’s Note: You can learn more about the N.C. Zoo at www.N.C.zoo.org. The Zoo’s polar bears are on vacation right now while the polar bear exhibit undergoes a $7.8 million renovation and expansion. The exhibit renovations are expected to be complete in late 2013 and will provide the N.C. Zoo with some of the best polar bear facilities in American zoos.

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PUZZLEVILLE! What’s The Difference? There are four things different between Picture A and Picture B. Can you find them all?

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By Jan Buckner Walker

The Original Crossword Puzzle for Kids and Their Favorite Adults

The across clues are for kids and the down clues are for grown-ups!

Kids Across 1. When this beautiful bird spreads its feathers, you can see spots on its plumes that are shaped like eyes 6. A semicolon is a comma with a dot _____ it 7. A tall jungle animal with large brown spots 10. Your belly button's place 12. Sharpen your mind (and your pencil): What state's name causes you to have to dot the most "I"s when you write it? 15. A spring holiday event when some find speckled eggs for their baskets: Easter egg ___ 17. A cheetah is a spotted one 18. A little dot on your skin that has been there since

Lots and Lots of Spots and Dots you were born 19. If you use Morse code to send spy messages to your friends, you know that the letter A is a dot followed by a ____ 20. Spotted animals in the wild that sometimes sound like they are laughing

Parents Down 1. Vintage video fun: Atari's groundbreaking 2-D, single-player table tennis game 2. Dry ________ take their best shot at removing spots 3. Flurry of falling bits of paper over a celebration 4. Nickname of the Kennedy brother who

had a dog named Freckles 5. Brits enjoy a spot of it now and then 8. Decorative dot: Location of a bindi on a Hindu woman 9. Dotted tiles in a matching game 11. Early office workers known for their dot matrix technology 13. Seeing red and smiling: Event for which red dots typically signal further markdowns 14. Wocka, wocka: '80s arcade lover's dotgobbling obsession 16. Freckled and famous: Ms. Watson, who was Hermione in the "Harry Potter" series

This Week’s Solution

kris@kapd.com

KAPD ebooks now available on www.kapd.com

1/20/13

© 2013 KAPD, LLC

Where In the World Is... Corolla, North Carolina It’s time to get out your globe! You need to know about the imaginary lines on globes and maps. These lines are called lines of latitude and longitude, and they tell a pilot or ship’s captain exactly where in the world a certain place is located. Basically, latitude lines (also called parallels) are the horizontal lines on your map. Lines of longitude (also called meridians) are the vertical lines that run from the North Pole to the South Pole. This mapping system is written in degrees and uses the symbol °. Get ready to travel the world! On your globe, locate longitude of 75°49’59”W and latitude of 36°22’53”N, and you’ll find the coastal town of Corolla, North Carolina. While “Where in the World” usually features a country each month, you will find many interesting places in the United States as well, and Corolla, situated along North Carolina’s Atlantic coast, is home to a rich history and some very interesting residents. Corolla is located in the Outer Banks, a 200-mile string of narrow barrier islands and peninsulas that stretches from southern Virginia south along the North Carolina coast. The first English colony, Roanoke Colony, was established in the Outer Banks and mysteriously disappeared in 1587. Edward Teach, also known as Blackbeard the Pirate, made his home base here, and the Wright brothers took their first flight in the Outer Banks. The Outer Banks area is known for its beautiful beaches and mild climate. Its location, however, also places it in the path of hurricanes and storms called Nor’easters. Recent storms have actually cut new paths in the islands, temporarily making travel possible between the islands by boat only. The rough seas have also been responsible for many shipwrecks, resulting in the nickname, the Graveyard of the Atlantic. Some of the descendants of survivors from shipwrecks hundreds of years ago — wild Spanish mustangs — live on Corova Beach near Corolla, located on the Currituck Peninsula in the northern Outer Banks. The wild horses of Corolla are thought to have come ashore to the North Carolina coast at least 400 years ago, when Spanish galleons wrecked in the treacherous seas. As late as 1926, more than 6,000 wild horses were estimated to live along the Outer Banks. The North Carolina Outer Banks are a great place to go on vacation. While there, you can spend some time on the beautiful beaches, fly kites in the blue skies or visit the marshes with their unique plant and animal life. If you get a chance to go to the far end of the islands where Corolla is located, you can spend some time looking at the magnificent horses who call the island home.

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Cultural Connections: “The Lion King” For 15 years, Disney has been bringing the wild and beautiful world of the African Serengeti to the stage with The Lion King. During performances, lions roam, elephants lumber and hyenas laugh across the stage, so close that they can nearly be touched. The story of The Lion King is a classic story about a youngster becoming an adult and accepting his destiny. The main character is a young lion cub named Simba. His father is named Mufasa, and he is the king of the land. Mufasa teaches Simba all about being king and the delicate balance of life and death in nature called “the circle of life.” Not everything is happy on Pride Rock, which is like the castle where the lions live. Mufasa has an evil brother named Scar who wants to be king. Scar and the evil hyenas work together to make Scar the king of Pride Rock by killing Mufasa and blaming it on Simba. Simba feels so badly that he runs away into the jungle. In the jungle, Simba becomes friends with Timon, a meerkat, and Pumbaa, a warthog. Simba grows up with this funny couple and decides not to worry about anything anymore. Years later, Simba meets a beautiful lioness named Nala. She is an old friend from his

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childhood at Pride Rock. Nala tells Simba about the terrible things happening at Pride Rock, and Simba has to return home and fight Scar so that he can take his place as the true king. It is hard for Simba to realize that he has to be king, but he knows that his father lives on within him, and being king is his destiny. The human actors are able to portray such huge and life-like animals through their costumes. The costumes have giant masks and bright colors and also act as puppets that the actors can control while they dance and sing. The puppet costumes are important because they make it look as though all the different animals are really dancing and singing and are not just painted people. The stilts and large masks that the dancers and actors use also make them closer to the actual size of the animals they are pretending to be. This is different from so many other Broadway productions because usually actors just wear clothes and makeup to look like the animals they are pretending to be. A classic and inspiring story as well as amazing costumes and actors make The Lion King an amazing play to watch.

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Come Out and Play... Crab Soccer Soccer is a popular game all over the world. That’s why it comes as no surprise to find games that are similar to soccer. It is fun to play, and it is easy to make variations that suit different purposes. One game that many kids play in gym at school that is a lot like soccer is crab soccer. Crab soccer is a game that people of all ages can play, inside or outside. The best place to play crab soccer is in a gymnasium or in a large grassy area outside, like a soccer field. Most of the rules of the game are similar to those of soccer, but there are a few differences, and they are what make it interesting. Like soccer, there should be two teams. Each team should have one goalie and a goal marked on opposite sides of the field. For this version of the game there is no set number of how many people should be on a team, but it should be more than two people and less than 10. The point of the game is for players to kick the ball into the other team’s goal. It is best to use a large soft ball for this game, but a regular soccer ball would work. The first team to score 15 goals wins. The most important thing about this game is the way the players move around. Players should lie on their backs and then lift themselves off the ground using their hands and feet so they crawl like a crab with their bellies to the sky. Players still use their feet to kick the ball, but only the goalie is allowed to stand up, and as in regular soccer, only the goalies can touch the ball with their hands. Sometimes, especially at school, instead of crawling with only their hands and feet, players can sit on a little scooter and use their hands and feet to push themselves around the field. Just as in regular soccer, at least two players, called defenders, guard the goal, and a few people should work hard to score goals. These players are called strikers. Teams should also have players who stay in the middle and work both as defenders and strikers. These players are called mid-fielders. There is no set number for how many players should be in each position, but more people should be playing as mid-fielders and strikers than as defenders, and each team should have only one goalie. Crab soccer is a great way to exercise all parts of the body in a fun and competitive way. Moving around like a crab works both the arms and the legs because both are used to support the player’s entire body. It is also a great way to have a fun with friends and play outside. People of all ages can play crab soccer, and it is an easy way to do something healthy. Not much equipment is needed to play this game either. All the players need is a ball, a field and something to mark the two goals.

Conservation o Tips Just for Kids r n e r

Taking care of our environment is a very important job. Here are some tips about how you can make a difference. •Make a map of your neighborhood or school and use it to identify areas where litter is a problem. Where are the areas? Are they near busy roads, businesses or places where people gather? •Make a list of things that could be done to stop litter. It can include things like placing more trash cans and recycling bins around the school or neighborhood or making posters or flyers to educate people about how harmful littering can be to the environment and community. •Look around your community and check with organizations like a forest service or conservation district office. Ask if they offer free tree seedlings and/or plants to plant in parks or other public areas. Perhaps they come to schools and community centers to talk with people about protecting forests. •Ask your teacher if your school can make a small model of a sanitary landfill. Your class can fill it with items from home. Use the model to predict what will happen to each item before it is buried. Before the school year ends, dig up the site and see what actually happened. Check with the city’s public works department or a local landfill to see if they will help you with the model and talk with your class about how landfills impact your community. From www.keepamericabeautiful.org

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In Theaters

Oz The Great and Powerful March 8 Have you ever wondered how the Wizard of Oz became, well you know, a wizard? I’ll give you a hint; he had to defeat a wicked witch. In this Disney fantasy, Oscar Diggs (James Franco) is a small-time circus magician who gets swept up in a tornado that takes him out of Kansas and drops him off in the Land of Oz. Oscar thinks he has hit the jackpot. But there are hurdles to the fame and fortune that Oscar fantasizes about. Three witches — Theodora (Mila Kunis), Evanora (Rachel Weisz) and Glinda (Michelle Williams) — see through Oscar’s wizard disguise. The Land of Oz is in trouble. Does Oscar have what it takes to live up to his promise as a wizard, when in fact he is really just a lowly magician? The same director who made the first three Spider-Man movies directs this exciting fantasy adventure. Rated PG for sequences of action and scary images and brief mild language. 127 mins. (Walt Disney Pictures)

From Up on Poppy Hill March 15 Winner of the Japan Academy Prize for Animation, From Up on Poppy Hill is a romantic hand-drawn animated movie from the same Japanese studio that created such children’s classics as Ponyo and The Secret World of Arrietty. The story is set on the coast of Yokohama in 1963. Umi (voiced by Sarah Bolger) and Shun (voiced by Anton Yelchin) team up to help save their high school’s clubhouse from being destroyed. Meanwhile, the country is preparing to host the 1964 Olympics. If you’ve never seen an animated movie from the gifted artists at Japan’s famous Studio Ghibli production company, you’re in for a real treat. If you have already seen a movie like Spirited Away, then you have a pretty good idea about the kind of experience you’re in for. Kids that like to draw will be inspired by the great artwork they’ll see in From Up on Poppy Hill. Rated PG for mild thematic elements and some incidental smoking images. 91 mins. (GKIDS)

Children’s DVDs Life of Pi Available March 12 Life of Pi follows a survival story about an Indian boy named Pi. Born into a Hindu family, the teenaged Pi experiments with different religions — Hinduism, Christianity and Islam. Pi’s life changes when his dad decides to move the family zoo to Canada. A big storm turns over the Japanese ship containing Pi’s family and their zoo animals in the middle of the ocean. Pi miraculously escapes on a lifeboat where a wounded zebra, a hyena, an orangutan, and a Bengal tiger vie for precious space. Soon the boat’s only passengers are Pi and the tiger — named Richard Parker. For 227 days, Pi manages to stay alive in the remote conditions with the ferocious tiger as his only friend. Life of Pi is a wild adventure movie for the whole family. It is full of thrills and chills. Rated PG for emotional thematic content throughout and some scary action. 127 mins. (20th Century Fox)

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Rise of the Guardians Available March 12 Based on William Joyce’s book series for children, Rise of the Guardians is an animated movie full of fantastic creatures on a mission to bring joy to kids. The Sandman, the Easter Bunny, the Tooth Fairy and even Santa Claus himself are all part of the team whose mission is to protect the children of the world. Naturally, there is a bad guy who wants to spread darkness and fear — they call him Boogeyman “Pitch” Black. Pitch wants to take over the world. The Man in the Moon sends Jack Frost (voiced by Chris Pine) to join the Guardians, but the rest of the team don’t see how he can help them defeat Pitch. One thing’s for certain: The Guardians can protect the kids of the world only if kids believe in them. As if children needed any more reason to believe in their favorite sleepy-time heroes, Rise of the Guardians is a super-fun reminder. Rated PG for thematic elements and some mildly scary action. 97 mins. (DreamWorks Animation)

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Exploring Nature!

Butterfly Life Cycle Number the stages in the life cycle of the swallowtail ���������

4IFSJ"NTFMtXXXFYQMPSJOHOBUVSFPSH Find the 10 things hidden in the mouse life cycle.

Life Cycle Hidden Picture

Math-A-Muse

by Evelyn B. Christensen, Ed.D.

Coin Caper

Life Cycle Order: 2, 5 4, 1, 3, 6, 5 4,

1

What 5 U.S. coins are worth 81¢? Find 2 Solutions. bullfrog

Name the Baby Animal and %SBXB-JOFUP*UT"EVMU'PSN

2 monarch butterfly

1 ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ 2 ____ ____ ____ ____

mouse

3 ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____

3

4 ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ 4

bald eagle

5 ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ SLQNLHPRXVHIDZQGHHUFDWHUSLOODUEXWWHUĂ \WDGSROHEXOOIURJHDJOHWHDJOH

5

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More puzzles are available at deer

www.evelynchristensen.com. Exploringnature.org is an award-winning resource that inspires learning about science, conservation and the ���������������������������������������������������������� books and online resources. Explore outside today!

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MARCH 2013


PUZZLEVILLE!

Math-A-Muse ANSWERS DIVISION SUDOKU

What’s the Difference?

The Science of Space Art By Diane K. Fisher You may have seen colorful, eye-popping space images in books or on NASA websites. There are beautiful spiral galaxies that shine in pinks and blues, glowing green and yellow clouds with great white-tipped columns or the radiant leftovers of exploded stars that may look like an eye or a spider. Many of these images were made by capturing light that is not even visible to humans. We see only a very tiny portion of the huge range of light that is all around us. There are far more “colors” we cannot see than colors we can see. Some telescopes can sense infrared light. The Spitzer Space Telescope is one of these. Infrared light has too little energy for your eyes to notice it. But very cool material, like space gas, glows in infrared light. Another kind of telescope senses ultraviolet light. This kind of light has too much energy for your eyes to respond. Hot objects like newly forming stars glow in ultraviolet light. So, if these telescopes see “invisible” light, how can our eyes even see the images they make? Where do those beautiful pinks and blues and yellows come from? Do scientists “colorize” them or give them fake colors? No! If someone speaks to you in a language you do not understand, you need someone else to translate the message into your language. In the same way, you need to have the colors of the space images translated into something you can see. Scientists process these “invisible” space images so we can see them. The new colors also help the scientists tease out all sorts of information the light can reveal. For example, a good job of translating colors can reveal the temperature differences between stars, dust and gas in the images. The colors can also be made to show fine details that would otherwise be hard to see. Download a new Spitzer poster of the center of the Milky Way. On the back is a more complete and colorfully illustrated explanation of the “art of space imagery.” Go to http://spaceplace.nasa. gov/posters/#milky-way.

Get the Picture

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COIN CAPER ANSWERS QQQNP, HDDDP

People Fact

ADDITION SQUARE ANSWER 5, 9, 6, 0, 0, 6, 9 ROAD RIDDLE ANSWER +6

This article was provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

MARCH 2013

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KIDSVILLE NEWS - PAGE 19


KIDSVILLE KITCHEN

Together Time — Ask an adult for help with projects!

Kid-Friendly Snacks the Whole Family Will Love Whether it’s kids hanging out with friends after school or you watching the game with neighbors, there are plenty of reasons to have kid-friendly snacks that grown-ups will enjoy, too. One way to keep everybody happy is to bring cheese into the mix. Cheese is versatile and nutritious and can add zest to snacks and family-friendly dishes. And with a broad array of appetizing flavors, such as Gouda, Provolone and Pepper Jack available from Borden® Cheese, the options are boundless. Here are a few cheesy snack ideas that you and the kids will enjoy making as much as you enjoy eating. * Walking tacos – Layer taco meat, tomatoes, lettuce and shredded cheese in individual serving-sized bags of corn chips. Top them off with sour cream, guacamole or salsa, and then eat them with a fork, right out of the bag. * Baked mac and cheese bites – Spoon your favorite baked macaroni and cheese recipe into mini-muffin tins and bake. * Kebabs – Alternate chunks of ham, grapes and cheese cut into shapes with a small cookie cutter. * String cheese dippers – Roll string cheese in breadcrumbs and bake. Serve warm with marinara sauce for dipping. * Mini quesadillas – Sandwich cheese, shredded chicken and salsa in between two tortillas. Bake until cheese has melted. Slice into triangles with a pizza cutter, and serve with salsa and sour cream. You can also try the Pizza Bagel Snacks. They use Borden Cheese, which is made by a cooperative that is 100 percent farmer-owned. This means that for every product purchased, 100 percent of its proceeds go back to hard-working American dairy farmers and their families. Source: www.FriendsOfElsie.com.

Pizza Bagel Snacks 2 1/3 1

bagels, halved cup pasta sauce cup Borden Mozzarella Part-Skim Regular Shredded Cheese Toppings of your choice

Preheat oven to 350˚F. Halve two bagels and top them with the pasta sauce, cheese and toppings of your choice. Bake 8 to 10 minutes until the cheese is bubbly and melted. Suggestions for toppings are thin slices of hot dogs, sliced ham or any lunch meat, pepperoni, browned hamburger, mushrooms, diced green peppers, chopped onions and black olive slices. Be creative with toppings that your family likes.

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MARCH 2013


MARCH 2013

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KIDSVILLE NEWS - PAGE 21


P ARENTOWN’S K ID S MAR T

How to Do Your Taxes for Free

Going to college, getting your first job, moving into your own place. To these rites of passage add one more: doing your own taxes. And, it’s not as scary as you might think. It’s not scary because there’s help available. It’s called Free File, and it’s offered exclusively from the IRS in partnership with nearly 15 leading tax software companies. About 3 million people use it every year. Free File lets you choose brand-name software that does the hard work for you — all for free. And, it offers a fast, safe and free option for everyone. Brand-name tax software is available to those who made $57,000 or less in 2012 — which is about 70 percent of us. Earned more? Try Free File’s online fillable forms, the electronic alternative to IRS paper forms. Three simple steps to getting started Step 1: Gather Your Tax Information —Collect your tax information and log on to Free File through the IRS website: www.IRS.gov/freefile. Step 2: Choose an Option —The “Help Me Choose a Company” option helps you pick the brandname software that will guide you through the tax process. —Free File Fillable Forms, the electronic documents, perform basic math calculations and are for people who are comfortable preparing their own paper tax returns. Step 3: Prepare and e-file Your Return —E-file your return for free. No matter what option you choose, IRS and brand-name software providers use the most current technology to ensure tax information is encrypted, so it’s safe and secure when it’s transmitted. Free File is also available online 24/7, giving you the freedom to choose when and how you do your taxes. Checklist of materials to do your taxes Keep this list as a checklist of the items you will need to do your taxes. The IRS recommends keeping all tax-related documents for three years, in case of an audit. Tracking income-related documents can help you take full advantage of deductions available to you. —A copy of last year’s tax return —Valid Social Security numbers for yourself, spouse and children —All income statements, i.e., W-2 forms, from all employers —Interest/dividend statements, i.e., 1099 forms —Form 1099-G showing any state refunds —Unemployment compensation amount —Social Security benefits —Expense receipts for deductions —Daycare provider’s identifying number Did you know? —Most refunds are issued in less than 21 days. —Combining e-file with direct deposit is still the fastest way to get your refund. —Use “Where’s My Refund?” to get personalized refund information based on the processing of your tax return. —You can also use the IRS app, IRS2Go, to check the status of your refund. —Can’t meet April 15 deadline? Use Free File for a free extension; then use Free File to do your taxes by October 15. Volunteer Income Tax Assistance There are thousands of Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) sites nationwide that offer free help to those earning around $51,000 or less. To locate the nearest VITA site, search for “VITA” on www.IRS.gov. Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE), which is supported by AARP, offers free tax help to people who are age 60 and older. Locate the nearest AARP Tax-Aide site at AARP.org or call 1-888-227-7669. Some VITA/TCE sites even offer Free File. You can do it yourself on their computers.

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Ir a la universidad, obtener su primer empleo, vivir solo... A estos rituales de cambios, deberá agregar uno más: liquidar sus propios impuestos. Y no es tan terrible como usted cree, porque hay ayuda disponible. El servicio se denomina Free File y se ofrece exclusivamente a través del IRS en asociación con casi 15 empresas líderes de software para impuestos. Aproximadamente 3 millones de personas utilizan este servicio todos los años. Free File le permite elegir un software de marca que hace el trabajo difícil por usted, y gratis. Ofrece una opción rápida, segura y gratuita para todos. Este software impositivo está disponible para quienes ganaron USD 57.000 o menos en 2012 (el 70 % de la población de los Estados Unidos). ¿Ganó más dinero? Conozca los formularios de Free File que se pueden completar en línea. Son la alternativa electrónica a los formularios de papel del IRS. Comience en tres simples pasos Paso 1: recopile la información impositiva —Recopile la información impositiva e inicie sesión en Free File en www.IRS.gov/ freefile. Paso 2: elija una opción —La opción Help Me Choose A Company (Elegir una empresa) le ayuda a elegir el software que lo guiará por el proceso impositivo. —Los formularios en línea de Free File son documentos electrónicos que realizan cálculos matemáticos básicos y han sido diseñados para personas que prefieren preparar sus propias declaraciones juradas impositivas. Paso 3: prepare y presente su declaración jurada de manera electrónica —Presente su declaración jurada de manera electrónica sin cargo alguno. Independientemente de la opción que elija, los proveedores del software y el IRS utilizan la tecnología más actualizada para que la información fiscal esté encriptada. Por lo tanto, estará segura y protegida al momento de la transmisión. Además Free File está disponible en línea las 24 horas, los 7 días de la semana y le brinda la libertad de elegir el momento y la manera de calcular sus impuestos. Lista de los documentos necesarios para calcular sus impuestos Guarde esta lista para controlar los documentos que necesitará para calcular sus impuestos. El IRS recomienda guardar todos los documentos impositivos durante tres años, en caso de auditoría. El seguimiento de los documentos relacionados con los ingresos puede ayudarle a aprovechar plenamente las deducciones. —Copia de la declaración impositiva del año anterior —Números válidos del Seguro Social suyo, de su cónyuge e hijos —Todas las declaraciones de ingresos (formularios W-2) de sus empleadores —Declaraciones de intereses/dividendos (formularios 1099) —Formulario 1099-G de devoluciones del estado —Importe de indemnización por desempleo —Beneficios de Seguridad Social —Recibos de gastos para deducciones —Número de identificación de la niñera ¿Sabía usted esto? —La mayoría de las devoluciones se realizan en menos de 21 días. —La combinación de presentaciones electrónicas y depósito directo sigue siendo la manera más rápida de recibir un reembolso. —Utilice el servicio Where’s My Refund? (¿Dónde está mi reembolso?) para obtener información personalizada sobre reembolsos basada en declaraciones impositivas. —Además puede utilizar la aplicación de IRS denominada IRS2Go, para verificar el estado de su reembolso. —¿No llega a la fecha de vencimiento del 15 de abril? Utilice el servicio Free File para obtener una prórroga gratuita. Luego vuelva a utilizar este servicio para calcular sus impuestos antes del 15 de octubre. Asistencia voluntaria para el impuesto sobre la renta Existen miles de sitios de Asistencia Voluntaria para el Impuesto sobre la Renta (VITA, por sus siglas en inglés) que ofrecen ayuda gratuita a quienes ganan hasta USD 51.000. Para encontrar la oficina VITA más cercana, busque “VITA” en www.IRS.gov. El Programa de Asesoramiento Impositivo para Personas Mayores (TCE, por sus siglas en inglés), respaldado por AARP, ofrece ayuda impositiva gratuita para personas mayores de 60 años. Para encontrar la oficina AARP más cercana, ingrese al sitio: AARP.org o llame al 1-888-227-7669. Algunas oficinas de VITA/TCE incluso ofrecen el servicio Free File. Puede liquidar impuestos usted mismo en sus computadoras.

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MARCH 2013


P ARENTOWN’S K ID S HAPE

Affordable Summer Camp Options When most people think of summer, the classic idea of camp comes up. For years, kids have been spending their summers away from home in the great outdoors learning about nature and how to survive without their parents, and many adults remember camps as some of the best times of their lives. Today’s summer camps are not strictly outdoorsy, rough and tumble camps that many adults remember. Academic camps, art and music camps, and sports camps are just a few of the choices family’s have for summer fun. Summer is quickly approaching, and with it comes the long days that are perfect for exploring. Unfortunately, these camps can get pricey, but that does not mean that there’s no way to give the kids a great summer camp experience. There are affordable alternatives to traditional summer camps that are just as much fun. Day camp is a popular alternative to away camps. For day camps, parents drop off kids and pick them back up later in the day, usually before dinner time. Depending on the camp, some may even provide transportation and some meals during the day. At day camps, the campers can experience all the outdoor and nature fun that overnight campers experience –– with the added bonus of the comfort of their own beds at night. Day camps are also usually cheaper than away camps because the camp does not watch the children overnight. School camps are another great option for affordable summertime fun and learning experiences. Though it may sound suspicious, school camps are nothing like traditional summer camps or regular school. Community colleges often offer classes for kids of all ages that are aimed at sparking curiosity and enriching their minds. Classes are geared toward appropriate age groups, and during the summer,

MARCH 2013

depending on the college offering the classes, a greater variety of topics are usually available for children to pick from and learn about. Children may not be exploring the great outdoors, but they will explore their innate curiosity, develop critical thinking skills, develop social skills, improve self-confidence and foster the growth of unique interests and talents. Art and museum camps are also a great way to keep a child interested and engaged during the summer. Most galleries and museums are focused on bringing culture and knowledge to the community. They achieve this outreach through different programs, and during the summer, camps, lessons and classes are very common. Local theatres may also offer acting classes for kids interested in preforming, so it is important to research the different educational and cultural opportunities that are available in the community. The recreational center in most communities is also a place to look for summer opportunities. Many rec centers offer more than just sports year round. Depending on the community, it is common to find varied activities such as gymnastics camps, art lessons and cooking classes offered through the local rec center. These activities may not last all day, but they are a great way to keep kids active and engaged during the long and hot summer days. Summers should never be boring, but they don’t have to be expensive either. Plenty of opportunities exist in every community for kids of all interests to have fun, explore and learn without costing a fortune. All it takes is a little searching to find the right program for the right child. Source: Singleparents.about.com

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KIDSVILLE NEWS - PAGE 23


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