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COFFEE/MOORE COUNTY'S FUN FAMILY NEWSPAPER

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Dear Kids, Happy July! Independence Day is one of my favorite celebrations of the year. Do you know why? Fireworks! It’s also a great time to grill out and have one of my favorite foods — hot dogs. Yum, yum! The birthday of our country is a very special day. I thought it would be a good idea to talk to one of our armed service members who represents our country. The Golden Knight that I interviewed is a parachutist that represents the U.S. in parachuting competitions. Really cool job! You’ll also find a recipe for a fun new way to experience hot dogs at your next backyard cookout. In the Come Out & Play section, read about a fun backyard sport to try with your family! I hope your summer is off to a great start. For more fun, visit my Web site at www.kidsvillenews.com! You’ll find more articles, worksheets and fun, interactive games. Have a great July! Your friend,

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Firefly

Have you ever spent a summer evening chasing tiny glowing lights, trying to catch fireflies in a jar? The firefly, or lightning bug, is a type of insect in the beetle order. So even though they are called fire “flies” and they do fly, they are beetles, not flies. It’s no wonder that this family of beetle, called Lampyridae, has the Kingdom: Animalia word “lamp” in it! The little firefly emits light from its Phylum: Arthropoda lower abdomen. The light can be yellow, green or even Class: Insecta pale red. They use this special bioluminescent power to Order: Coleoptera attract mates and prey. The light is made by a special chemical reaction in the light-producing organs of their Suborder: Polyphaga abdomen. Family: Lampyridae More than 2,000 species of firefly are found around the world. They mostly live in temperate and tropical environments. Marshes and wet, wooded areas are great habitats for the firefly. Most fireflies are nocturnal, so you only see them at night. The firefly is a soft-bodied beetle that ranges from five to 25 mm, very tiny or up to one inch long. Its body is flat and brown or black. Sometimes it has yellow or orange markings. In most species, both males and females have wings and produce light. Sometimes, the females do not have wings. And sometimes, the male produces only a small amount of light. The larvae of the firefly also produce light and are often called glowworms. Sources: Encyclopaedia Brittanica Online; Wikipedia. Photographer: Emmanuelm, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Firefly_composite.jpg Go Online and

This firefly was caught in Canada. The top photo was taken with a flash.

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g n i k n i r D water Why

is the way to Go! What do you, the trees, and a hamster have in common? Give up? You all need water. All living things must have water to survive, whether they get it from a water fountain, a rain cloud, or a little bottle attached to the side of a hamster cage. Without water, your body would stop working properly. Water makes up more than half of your body weight and a person can't survive for more than a few days without it. Why? Your body has lots of important jobs and it needs water to do many of them. For instance, your blood, which contains a lot of water, carries oxygen to all the cells of your body. Without oxygen, those tiny cells would die and your body would stop working. Water is also in lymph (say: limf), a fluid that is part of your immune system, which helps you fight off illness. You need water to digest your food and get rid of waste, too. Water is needed for digestive juices, urine (pee), and poop. And you can bet that water is the main ingredient in perspiration, also called sweat. In addition to being an important part of the fluids in your body, each cell depends on water to function normally. Your body doesn't get water only from drinking water. Any fluid you drink will contain water, but water and milk are the best choices. Lots of foods contain water, too. Fruit contains quite a bit of water, which you could probably tell if you've ever bitten into a peach or plum and felt the juices dripping down your chin! Vegetables, too, contain a lot of water — think of slicing into a fat tomato from the garden or crunching into a crisp stalk of celery.

How Much Is Enough? Since water is so important, you might wonder if you're drinking enough. There is no magic amount of water that kids need to drink every day. Usually, kids like to drink something with meals and should definitely drink when they are thirsty. But when it's warm out or you're exercising, you'll need more. Be sure to drink some extra water when you're out in warm weather, especially while playing sports or exercising. When you drink is also important. If you're going to sports practice, a game, or just working out or playing hard, drink water before, during, and after playing. Don't forget your water bottle. When your body doesn't have enough water, that's called being dehydrated. Dehydration also can keep you from being as fast and as sharp as you'd like to be. A bad case of dehydration can make you sick. So keep that water bottle handy when the weather warms up! Your body can help you stay properly hydrated by regulating the amount of water in your system. The body can hold on to water when you don't have enough or get rid of it if you have too much. If your pee has ever been very light yellow, your body might have been getting rid of excess water. When your pee is very dark yellow, it's holding on to water, so it's probably time to drink up . You can help your body by drinking when you're thirsty and drinking extra water when it's warm out. Your body will be able to do all of its wonderful, waterful jobs and you'll feel great!

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WHAT’S IT LIKE TO BE... A GOLDEN KNIGHT? As we celebrate the birthday of the United States on July 4, there will be celebrations all over the country. Some of those celebrations might include a demonstration by The United States Army Parachute Team, known as the Golden Knights. The demonstration and competition parachutist teams of the Golden Knights are made up of U.S. Army Paratroopers who have excellent parachuting skills. Dannielle Woosley is on the Golden Knights’ competition team at Fort Bragg, NC. Two teams participate in national and international parachute competitions. They have won an impressive array of medals from national and international competitions each year and hold the current Military World Record in both male and female four-way freefall formation. Dannielle spoke with Kidsville News! to tell us more about her job representing the U.S. Army.

TRUMAN: What does it take to become a Golden Knight?

DANNIELLE: I’m not scared to jump from the airplane; the Army provides us with the best equipment there is, and I have all the trust in my equipment to work.

DANNIELLE: In order to become a Golden Knight, you have to possess personal qualities such as professionalism, dedication, loyalty and selfless service and be a good soldier and team member. You also have to have at least 150 freefall parachute jumps and go through a rigorous eight-week assessment and selection program.

TRUMAN: What’s the hardest part of your job? DANNIELLE: That is a really hard question. If I had to pick one, I would say that it would be keeping up the tradition and standards of all the soldiers and Golden Knights before me.

TRUMAN: When, and why, did you first become interested in becoming a Golden Knight parachutist?

TRUMAN: What’s the best part of your job?

DANNIELLE: I remember seeing the Golden Knights at an air show and thought how wonderful and professional they were. I never imagined that I would be lucky enough to join them.

DANNIELLE: The best part of our job would be to represent the Army and the soldiers around the world. TRUMAN: What advice would you give to kids who are interested in this profession?

TRUMAN: What do you do? What’s a typical day on the job? DANNIELLE: We start our day pretty early in the morning. We meet at our team headquarters on Fort Bragg around 6:00 a.m., and then we drive about 45 minutes to our drop zone and training area at Laurinburg Maxton airport in Laurinburg, NC. We then set up the drop zone, stretch and get ready to jump. We make our first jump around 7:30 am. We normally make 10 to 12 jumps a day and then end the day with some type of physical fitness, either a run or weight training.

Dannielle Woosley is on the U.S. Army Parachute Team’s Golden Knights Competition Team.

DANNIELLE: Stay in school, work hard and remember, you can do anything you put your mind to. TRUMAN: Thanks for talking to me! It sounds like you have a very exciting job

representing our military!

TRUMAN: From how high do you jump? DANNIELLE: We jump from different altitudes, depending on what we are working on, so basically we can get out of the airplane anywhere from 2,000 feet to 13,500 feet. TRUMAN: Do you do different formations in the air, or are you just trying to hit a certain spot on the ground, or what? DANNIELLE: We work on all different aspects of skydiving, from formations to hitting a two-centimeter dot. TRUMAN: Are you ever afraid when you are jumping?

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6 Road Trip Games for Kids

*The Leader Game: Everyone in the car gets to be the leader for an hour “in charge of choosing the travel games, the radio station, the DVD, and, if you’d like, the seating arrangements,” says Bergen. *I Spy: For kids, run through the alphabet, such as “I spy something that begins with the letter A.” For adults, up the challenge with a line like “I spy something German.” *Who Are They?: Choose another group on the road and make up stories about where they’re from and where they’re going. *License-Plate Game: Print out a map of the United States. Each time someone spots a license plate from a different state, mark the map. *Vehicle Count: Have kids practice their counting skills with goals like “Find 25 green cars.” Older children can guess how many pickup trucks or police cars will pass in 10 minutes. The winner chooses the music. * Destination Education: Print out some fun facts about the areas you’ll drive through and have children read them and find the relevant places on a map.

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! n o ti a in b io m at o n c bi at re co g a e ar + n u f er at fu summertime and w What You Need Splashing, wading, and paddling — it must mean a great day in the water. Playing at the beach, at a water park, by a lake, or in a pool can be a real treat on a hot day. Swimming is a lot of fun, but drowning is a real danger. Let's find out how to stay safe in the water.

Why Is It Important to Be Safe in the Water? Fish are able to live and breathe under water, but people need air to breathe. People drown when too much water gets into their lungs. When that happens, the lungs can't carry enough oxygen to the brain and the rest of the body. Drowning is the second most common cause of death from injuries among kids under the age of 14. Drowning can happen so fast — sometimes in less than 2 minutes after a person's head goes under the water. That leaves very little time for someone to help. Many drownings and near-drownings occur when a kid accidentally falls into a swimming pool. But accidents can happen anywhere — at someone's home or even at your own house, and that's why you need to know how to be safe around water. Swimming Pools Pools are awesome! What could be better than a dip in the pool and fun in the sun? But remember a pool's sides and bottom are usually made of concrete, a rock-hard material. A slip or fall could be painful and dangerous. Have you seen those big numbers painted on the side of the pool? Those are called depth markers — they tell you how deep the water is at that point. You should always look before you jump into a pool. Here's some other good advice for the pool: * Always have an adult watch you when you are in the pool — even in your own backyard. Never go in the pool if there is no adult around. * Gates are around pools for a reason — to keep kids away from the water when there isn't a lifeguard or adult around to watch them. Never go through any pool gates when they are closed. Stay safe and stay out! * Always obey pool rules. * Swim with a buddy. * If you're learning to swim, ask your mom or dad to make sure your flotation devices are Coast Guard approved. * Walk slowly in the pool area. Don't run. * Swim at a depth that is safe for you. If you're just learning to swim, stay in the shallow end. * Don't push or jump on others. You could accidentally hurt someone or yourself. * Don't chew gum or eat while you swim — you could choke. But I Know How to Swim! It's important to know your limits when it comes to playing in the water. You could develop a cramp (where a muscle in your body suddenly tenses up and causes pain) or other physical problem that makes it hard to swim. If you get a cramp, get out of the water for a while and give your muscles a rest. Here are some other good water safety tips: * Learn to swim. Ask your parents to contact your local American Red Cross or community center for information on boating or water safety courses. * Always put on plenty of sun screen before you go outside. It's also a good idea to wear sunglasses and a hat to protect your skin. * Stop swimming or boating as soon as you see or hear a storm. Remember, lightning is electricity — electricity and water are a dangerous combination.

What You Need To Know!!!

In 2004, 55 percent of children ages 14 and under who drowned in reported boating accidents were not wearing life jackets. It is estimated that 85 percent of boatingrelated drownings could have been prevented if the victim had been wearing a life jacket.

MAKEYOUR YOUR CHILDREN MAKE CHILDREN WEAR JACKET…… WEARAA LIFE LIFE JACKET IT THELAW! LAW! ITMAY MAY BE BE THE Forty-five states have enacted laws that require children to wear life jackets while participating in recreational boating. These laws vary in age requirements, exemptions and enforcement procedures. Recreational boats must carry one appropriately sized life jacket approved by the U.S. Coast Guard for each person onboard, and the jackets must be kept accessible and in good condition. Children need to wear child-sized life jackets; make sure they are available. Nearly two-thirds (61 percent) of parents report that their children ages 14 and under have ridden on boats, and 32 percent report that their child participates in water sports.

What You Can Do? Protect your children while on the water – follow these safety tips. Remember active supervision is the best way to keep your kids safe!

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COME OUT AND PLAY! Croquet — A Popular Sport for Over 600 Years! Believed to have originated in France during the 1300s, Croquet or Paille-Maille (ball-mallet) became very popular in England in the mid 1800s. An association was created at Wimbledon (famous for its tennis) with special fields and rules, and the game quickly made its way to America where backyard croquet, as well as competitive croquet, is still popular today — around 200 croquet clubs in the US belong to the United States Croquet Association! Croquet is played on an area at least 35 x 28 yards in size, with a color-striped peg or stake 18 inches high at each end of the playing field. Players use a three-foot-long mallet — a longhandled hammer made primarily of wood — to hit a colored ball that weighs about a pound through nine (for backyard croquet) or six metal hoops or wickets. The wickets are placed in formation on the field, and the object of the game is to hit the ball through all the wickets in order and into the stakes both up and down the field before your opponent does. Croquet is usually played as a team, making it a great family-fun game, and each player takes a turn in order

JULY 2009

according to color of the mallet and ball — blue, red, black, yellow (and green and orange for six balls). When croquet is played as a team, blue, black and green compete against red, yellow and orange. A player takes one shot per turn and earns extra shots by scoring a wicket — hitting the ball through the hoop — for one bonus shot or by striking another ball, known as a roquet, for two extra shots. A player can earn a new extra shot on the final bonus shot for a maximum of two at one time. If they like, players can use the “deadness” rule in a game: A ball that has been roquetted cannot be hit again for an extra shot unless the player hitting it has scored another wicket first. A ball that ends up out of bounds is placed inside the playing field boundary directly in line from its out-of-bounds position. Variations of croquet include the fastest-growing version of the game, golf croquet, where a wicket is won by the first ball to go through each hoop. The winner is the player or team that wins the most hoops. Like horseshoes, badminton, and bocce ball, croquet is a great backyard game for the entire family to enjoy together. Sources: www.croquet.com; “Croquet,” Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Croquet.

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Hi, Truman.

cCarthy, Dear Pat M , so I can’t wait ory I love hist ok, ur new bo h the to read yo st: Life wit e W g in d a He Pioneers. ome inter c e b u o y How did istory? ested in h Your friend, Truman

When I was a kid, I th was boring. I had a grought history teacher in high schooleat history out how interesting hi and found in my books, I try to mstory is. Now, ake it interesting for kids. Many history books lis are important, of cour t a lot of dates. Dates is all about people. I trse, but–for me–history teresting little things y to learn all the inand pass them on to thabout people in history e kids who read my books. Another good way to lea DO things people did ba rn history is to why I included activiti ck then. That’s es in the book like churning butter, dip ping candles and tracking animals . This book has lots of th kids wrote about their ings pioneer journals and in letters lives in their home. Hope you enjoy to people back it! Your friend,

PatMcCarthy

Compiled by Kim Norman, author of Crocodaddy. Illustrations © 2009 by David Walker http://patmccarthysauth Used with permission from Sterling orblog.blogspot.com/ Publishing Co., Inc. May 2009. Author visit info: www.kimnorman.com

A biography is a book that tells about the life of a famous person. Pat McCarthy has written many biographies. Here are a few, (published by Enslow Publishers), that you may find in your local library:

HEADING WEST: Life with the Pioneers Chicago Review Press Aug. 1, 2009, ages 9-12

Conservation o r n e r Conserve Water!

Less than 3% of the Earth’s water is fresh water. This means that we need to take every step possible to conserve and take care of it. Little things, like whether you take a bath or shower, can influence how much water your family uses. There are small, easy changes you and your family can make to help conserve water. • One thing you and your family can do is instead of taking baths, take showers, and try to confine them to five minutes or less. • When you brush your teeth, turn off the faucet. • Ask your parents to buy a low-flow showerhead. Lowflow showerheads and faucet caps are inexpensive and available online. • Take unwanted household chemicals to hazardous waste collection centers. Do not pour them down the drain! • Use dishwashers and clothes washers only when fully loaded. • For outdoor water conservation, convince your parents to buy a water barrel. These are great for watering the garden and outdoor flowers. Small changes in our daily lives can bring us one step closer to being “green.” The fresh water available on our planet is limited. As more people are born, more people will have to share this resource. It’s very important to take care of our natural resources so that we will always have them to enjoy.

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Art Gallery Edgar Degas: A Real Impressionist Edgar Degas was a 19th-century French artist. Italian paintings. Known as one of the founders of the Impressionist Moving back to France after three years, Edgar toyed with more movement, he preferred to call himself a “realist” contemporary artistic techniques. After serving in the National Guard because he drew inspiration for during the Franco-Prussian war, he joined up his art from the world around with a group of young artists looking to crehim. ate a new style. Their first collective exhibit Edgar Degas was born was in 1874, and art critics began calling them Helaire-Germaine-Edgar De “the Impressionists.” Unlike earlier styles, Gas on July 19, 1834, in Paris, Impressionism focused on bright, bold colors France, the oldest of five without a lot of details. Edgar and his friends children. His father was a French painted as if they had taken just a quick peek banker, and his mother was at the subject of their work. Although Edgar American. Edgar liked painting never felt he was an Impressionist, like the as a child. By the time he was a Impressionists, he made his artwork look as if it teenager, he had set up his own shimmered in the sun. Gaining a reputation as a art studio in his family’s house. talented artist, his work was exhibited in France, At 18, Edgar was given permisLondon and New York. His most famous works sion to copy at the Louvre. At were of ballet dancers and horses. the time, young artists copied Edgar died on September 27, 1917. While paintings at the museum to study the techniques of he was known as a painter, more than 150 the master artists before them. Edgar showed artistic sculptures were found in his studio after his talent, but his father wanted him to be a lawyer. So in death. The Dance Class (La Classe de Danse),1873– Written by Tamar Burris, a former elementary 1853, after graduating from high school, he enrolled 1876, by Edgar Degas school teacher who now works as a freelance writer and in law school. Unhappy in law school, Edgar met two curriculum developer for PBS, the Discovery Channel prominent artists who inspired him to pursue his art. He transferred to and other education-related companies. Sources: Edgar Degas Paintings Gallery a school of fine arts in Paris and later decided to move to Italy to study www.edgar-degas.org/biography.html; Metropolitan Museum of Art: Degas, Chronology of the Artist’s Life, www.metmuseum.org/explore/Degas. the Italian masters. By 1860, he had made hundreds of copies of famous

WHERE IN THE WORLD IS... KIRIBATI? It’s time to get out your globe! You need to know about the imaginary lines on globes and maps. These lines are called lines of latitude and longitude, and they tell a pilot or ship’s captain exactly where in the world a certain place is located. Basically, latitude lines (also called parallels) are the horizontal lines on your map. Lines of longitude (also called meridians) are the vertical lines that run from the North Pole to the South Pole. This mapping system is written in degrees and uses the symbol °. Get ready to travel the world! Like the United States, another country celebrates its national independence day in July! Get out your globe, and find longitude 173º E and latitude 1º N to locate the archipelago of Kiribati, the easternmost country in the world. Kiribati is a group of 33 coral atolls – islands of coral that partly or completely surround a lagoon. Formerly known as the Gilbert Islands, Kiribati is located in the Pacific Ocean along the Equator and was first sighted by British and American ships in the late 1700s and early 1800s. Kiribati is actually composed of three island groups: the Gilbert Islands, the Phoenix Islands and the Line Islands. British settlers arrived in 1837, and in 1892, the Gilbert Islands became a British protectorate, and then a colony in 1915. On July 12, 1979, the Gilbert Islands gained independence from Britain and chose the name Kiribati, an adaptation of “Gilberts” in the Gilbertese language, though English is the official language. Kiribati is about four times the size of Washington, D.C., and 21 of its 33 islands are inhabited. The capital and largest city of Kiribati is South Tarawa, halfway between Hawaii and Australia. The climate is tropical – very hot and humid, and the atolls are at most seven feet above sea level. Because it is composed of coral reef material and sand, the country’s land is not very good for agriculture. Kiribati was once a source of commercially mined phosphate on Banaba Island, but copra, the dried flesh of the coconut, and fish are now the largest exports, and tourism makes up about a quarter of the economy. Kiribati’s July 12th National Independence Day celebration is a big event. The president of Kiribati opens the celebration at the capital in Bairiki, South Tarawa, which includes a colorful parade and sporting events, such as tennis, boxing, ping-pong, fishing, soccer, basketball, volleyball and canoeing, as well as local dance contests. The celebration on Tarawa lasts three days, but on the outer islands, it may go on for a week! Sources: “Kiribati,” The World Factbook, Central Intelligence Agency, www.cia.gov/library/publications/theworld-factbook/geos/KR.html; “Kiribati,” Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiribati; Kiribati National Tourism Office, www.visit-kiribati.com/kiribati/cms/about/events.html.

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At the Movies Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs (In Theaters: July 1) The third installment in the animated “Ice Age” series finds that little saber-toothed squirrel Scrat coming back for more funny attempts at getting away with a giant acorn, but this time he may be too blinded by his love for a cute little squirrel named Scratte to keep the acorn for himself. Queen Latifah’s Ellie, a giant mammoth, and her friendly mate Manny (Ray Romano) are due to become parents when they go on an adventure to a warmer environment to rescue their friend Sid the sloth (voiced by John Leguizamo). It seems Sid has been kidnapped by a dinosaur mother whose eggs Sid unwisely tried to take care of. Diego, the saber-toothed tiger, also returns along with a newcomer named Buck – a sly one-eyed weasel. Rated PG (20th Century Fox)

G-Force (In Theaters: July 24) Summer live-action 3-D movie fun comes with a team of specially trained guinea pigs working on a government mission to stop an evil rich genius from taking over the world using everyday household appliances. Our gang of elite guinea pig spies includes squad leader Darwin (voiced by Sam Rockwell), weapons expert Blaster (voiced by Tracy Morgan) and martial arts master Juarez (voiced by Penelope Cruz). Added to the group is a snoopy little fly named Mooch and a goofy computer specialist mole called Speckles (voiced by Nicolas Cage). Look for lots of silly jokes, fancy gadgets and super action chases in a movie where a bunch of smart little animals get to have all the fun. Rated PG for some mild action and rude humor. (Walt Disney Pictures) Movies on DVD

Peanuts: 1960’s Collection (DVD Release: July 7) All of your mom and dad’s favorite Peanuts cartoons from the ‘60s are here in an ageless collection of the classic cartoon series that touches on every season of the year. Starting with the award-winning 1965 classic A Charlie Brown Christmas, the set also includes Charlie Brown’s All-Stars (1966), It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown (1966), You’re in Love Charlie Brown (1967), He’s Your Dog, Charlie Brown (1968), and It Was a Short Summer Charlie Brown (1969). Snoopy, Linus, Lucy, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (In Theaters: July 15) Peppermint Patty, Pigpen and the rest of the gang are here in great little Daniel Radcliffe and the gang return to get ready for Harry’s biggest stories from the master of 20th-century cartoons, Charles M. Schultz. battle yet during his sixth year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Also included in the set is a cool documentary, The Maestro of Menlo Wizardry. The very powerful Voldemort is up to no good in the Muggle Park - Profiling Composer Vince Gauraldi, about the musician who wrote world when Hogwarts gains a new teacher named Horace Slughorn, and the famous “Linus and Lucy” theme, as well as other music for the Harry gets an ancient book of potions that once belonged to the Halfseries. (Warner Home Video) Blood Prince. Now, captain of the Quidditch team, Harry sees hearts and arrows in the eyes of his best friend’s sister Ginny Weasley, even Cole Smithey, also known as “the smartest film critic in the world,” has been a film critic for 11 years and writes for over 50 publications, in print though she may already be spoken for by Dean Thomas. Romance and and on-line. Truman loves to watch movies and has the highest appreciajealousy come with the territory as Harry tries to get to the bottom of tion for great popcorn. exactly what kind of trouble that creepy Draco Malfoy is up to at Hogwarts. Rated PG for scary images, some violence, language and mild sensuality. (Warner Brothers Pictures)

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WWW.KIDSVILLENEWSTN.COM

JULY 2009


NASA Cartoon Interviews a “GOES-O” Weather Satellite Engineer NASA’s Space Place is a Web site that helps kids learn about Earth and space science and technology. The latest interview on the Web site’s animated “television show,” called Space Place Live! features a scientist from the weather satellite that NASA is launching in 2009, called “GOES-O.” In the latest episode of the Space Place Live!, animated young hosts Kate and Kyo interview a cartoon version of the GOES satellite Deputy Project Manager, Andre Dress. Andre works at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. He talked with Kate and Kyo about the new GOES-O weather satellite as it is being prepared for launch. There have been 13 GOES satellites launched already. Before they launch, they are named with a letter, once they’re in orbit, the name changes to a number, so GOES-O would become GOES-14. “GOES means Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite,” Dress said during his interview. That means the satellite stays in a fixed position above the Earth as it rotates in orbit so it can keep an eye on the weather in a fixed area over the U.S. NASA manages the development and launch of the satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, also called NOAA. Once in orbit and after check out, NOAA takes over the satellite’s daily operations. During the 10-minute cartoon interview, Andre explains what the GOES satellite will do, where it is located in orbit and how the satellite is launched. He also explains why it’s so important that scientists rehearse what they’re going to say during and after the launch. Because Andre Dress will be in that group of engineers that will be practicing, it will really be a “dress rehearsal.” The actual launch will happen during the summertime in 2009. The Space Place is produced by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). JPL is managed for NASA by the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif. New episodes of Space Place Live! with hosts Kate and Kyo are always being made. The Web site is geared toward elementary school students and teachers. It is updated daily, with events, games, projects, animations, cool subjects, amazing facts and a section for friends to share news from their communities, so kids should bookmark it on their computer and check it daily. It’s both fun and a great learning experience. This article was provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

JULY 2009

KIDSVILLE KITCHEN Together Time — Ask an adult for help with projects!

Enjoy National Hot Dog Month! July is National Hot Dog Month! Sure, you can add cheese, or chili, ketchup and mustard, but there’s more than one way to enjoy a hot dog! Try this recipe for a new twist on this American classic.

GRILLED HOT DOG AND FRUIT KABOBS

WHAT YOU NEED: • 1 medium tart crisp apple (such as Gala), quartered and cored • 1 medium crisp pear, quartered and cored • 1 (8-ounce) can pineapple chunks in natural juices • 1/2 cup sweet honey mustard, DIVIDED • 1 (16-ounce) package hot dogs, cut in 1-½ -inch pieces • 8 (12-inch) metal or wooden skewers (if using wooden, soak in cold water for 30 minutes) • 1 tablespoon honey HOW TO MAKE IT (makes 6 to 8 kabobs): • Cut apple and pear quarters into thick wedges. Then cut each wedge in half. • Measure 2 tablespoons pineapple juice and reserve in a small bowl. • Pour pineapple chunks and remaining juice into a 9 X 12-inch pan. • Add apples and pears to juice and toss to coat all surfaces. (This will prevent the fruit from turning brown.) Add 1/4 cup mustard and hot dog pieces. Stir to coat all surfaces. • Alternately thread hot dogs, apples, pears and pineapple on skewers. • Liberally brush assembled kabobs with mustard mixture. • Mix remaining 1/4 cup mustard with honey and reserved 2 tablespoons pineapple juice. Save for a dipping sauce. • On a preheated grill or broiler, cook kabobs using the direct heat method. Cook, using medium-high heat, about 5 inches from heat. Turn a quarter of a turn every 2 to 2 ½ minutes. Cook until hot dogs reach an internal temperature of 165 degrees F, about 8 to 10 minutes. • Serve kabobs with mustard dipping sauce. ONE-ALARM MUSTARD DIP ½ cup yellow mustard 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 2 teaspoons catsup 1 teaspoon hot sauce* (see Note) 1/2 teaspoon ground cayenne* (see Note) Directions: 1. Combine ingredients and cover. Chill at least 30 minutes before serving. 2. NOTE: For hotter flavor, double portions of hot sauce and cayenne. For more recipes like these kabobs and Haute “Hogs” in a Blanket, pictured, visit www.hot-dog.org. © National Hot Dog & Sausage Council

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KIDSVILLE NEWS - PAGE 19


TM

A SECTION ESPECIALLY FOR PARENTS

BOOKSHELF The Declaration of Independence in Translation: What It Really Means

Americana Advernture

Author/Illustrator: Amie Jane Leavitt Publisher: Coughlan Publishing Age Range: 8 to 12 Are unalienable rights from outer space? How long is four score and seven years? This book helps translate The Declaration of Independence into a language that kids can understand. Find out what Thomas Jefferson meant when he wrote the Declaration of Independence. From the Kids’ Translations series, the book includes primary source photographs, a table of contents, glossary and index. It also features a time line showing the primary events leading up to the creation of the document, as well as a “top five” list of why you should care about the Declaration of Independence. Number one on the list: The Declaration of Independence helped establish the freedoms that Americans enjoy today. —JK

The Games Book: How To Play the Games of Yesterday Author: Huw Davies, Lisa Jackson (Illustrator) Publisher: Scholastic, Inc. Publication Date: August 2009 Age Range: 8 and up This book will take you back to the days before children’s TV shows were available every minute of the day, when computer games and video games didn’t exist, and the world was a simpler place. It features instructions for traditional indoor and outdoor games that have been enjoyed by generations of children — and they’re still fun! Learn (or remember) how to play classic games like jacks, marbles, and hopscotch. There are outdoor games, like Capture the Flag and Hide-and-Seek and card games such as Rummy and Solitaire. An excellent choice to take along on a family vacation! — JK

Author/Illustrator: Michael Garland Publisher: Penguin Group Age Range: 6 to 12 From the Publisher: Celebrate the Fourth of July in a vibrant seek-and-find adventure. This fun-filled ode to America brims with patriotic spirit and more than 200 hidden objects to find. Tommy, star of the bestselling Look Again series, awakes on July Fourth to find a note from his eccentric Aunt Jeanne, promising a spectacular surprise if he unravels clues she has hidden for him. Tommy’s clues lead him on a magical cross-country trip through America’s great places and iconic traditions. From Times Square to Mount Rushmore, from a Mississippi riverboat to the Golden Gate Bridge, spectacular scenery and colorful details are sure to delight eagle-eyed young readers.

The Very Lonely Firefly Author/Illustrator: Eric Carle Publisher: Penguin Group Age Range: Infants, Preschool From the Publisher: One night, a very lonely firefly goes off in search of friends. Each time he sees a flicker of light, he flies off toward it, but none of them turn out to be fireflies. He sees a lantern, an owl’s eyes, even headlights shining in the darkness. Will the lonely firefly ever find creatures like himself? A classic in its own time, The Very Lonely Firefly is finally available in a LAP-SIZED board-book format, perfect for the youngest readers and the smallest hands. And just as in the hardcover edition, the fireflies’ lights actually light up, delighting children of all ages.

P ARENTOWN

PAGE 20 - KIDSVILLE NEWS

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JULY 2009


P ARENTOWN’S K ID S MART How Money Is Earned: Setting an Allowance I am often asked, “Keva, how do I determine how much allowance to give my child?” I always advise them to set a dollar amount for a specific chore and let their child decide how much he earns each week based on the chores he selects. But there is a caveat! Parents need to decide, based on family values, what chores should not be on that list. For example, I was raised by my grandmother and making the bed each morning was something I HAD to do. Think about it, as adults, are we rewarded for making our beds each day before heading to work? In my grandmother’s house, having me make the bed I slept in each night was her way of instilling discipline and neatness, values that guide me to this day. Now keep in mind I didn’t say cleaning their room, just making the bed. As grandmother always said, “Making your bed each morning before you leave the house sets the tone for the day.” Now back to the money lesson: Tip: Teaching your child self discipline when it comes to money matters is something that will guide his future financial success. Activity: Type a list of chores your child can do around the house, such as loading/unloading the dishwasher, taking out the trash, helping to put away groceries. Next, assign a dollar amount that can be earned for doing each chore. Be sure to have several chores listed, and of course assign higher dollar amounts to the chores you want them to do the most. Every household is different, so your list will be different. Here’s another piece of wisdom from my Grandma Helen that I realized after she was gone: she only allowed me to do chores on a Saturday. She did not want chores to get in the way of “school lessons.” On Saturday morning, I sorted clothes in the laundry room, did dishes, vacuumed and dusted the living room tables. I am not saying no chores during the week, but assign the lesser dollar amounts to chores that can be done during the week so there is less emphasis on earning money and more time available for your child’s homework or “school lessons.” Also, do not forget to set a limit on the amount they can earn or to limit the number of chores they can perform. Sample List: Cleaning Room $5.00 Vacuuming $3.00 Loading Dishwasher $2.00 Take Out Trash $1.00 Dusting $2.00 Benefit/Key Takeaways: Your child will begin to associate the time and energy spent doing a particular job with financial rewards. Keep in mind he probably already has in his head how much he wants to earn because he already knows what they want to spend it on. Mom and Dad go to work every day to earn a paycheck. • Children need to learn where money comes from and how it is earned. Chores allow a good framework for teaching kids the difference between various denominations of bills. • Activity: The next time you’re at the register to pay for an item, pay with cash and let your child count the change. Keva Sturdevant is the founder of Born To Save, a nonprofit based in Washington, D.C., with the mission of teaching kids of all ages the importance of saving and investing. Our goal is to begin conversations about money in households across America between parents and their kids. In an effort to foster those conversations, we grant actual shares of stock to kids. To register your child to win a share of stock in our monthly stock giveaway, please visit our Web site at www.BornToSave.org.

JULY 2009

Cómo se gana dinero: Estableciendo una propina mensual A menudo me preguntan, “Keva, ¿cómo determino cuánto dinero doy a mi hijo? Siempre aconsejo establecer una cantidad determinada según la tarea concreta y dejar que los hijos decidan cuánto quieren ganar cada semana basándose en las tareas que ellos eligen. ¡Pero hay una advertencia! Los padres necesitan decidir las tareas que no deberían estar en esa lista basándose en los valores familiares. Por ejemplo, yo fui criada por mi abuela y el hacer la cama cada mañana era algo que YO DEBÍA hacer. Pensando en ello, cuando somos adultos, ¿se nos recompensa por hacer nuestra cama cada día antes de ir a trabajar? En la casa de mi abuela, el que yo hiciera la cama en la que dormía cada noche era su manera de enseñarme disciplina y orden, valores que me guían hasta hoy en día. Ahora bien, tengan en cuenta que no dije limpiar su cuarto, sino solo hacer la cama. Como mi abuela solía decir “el hacer la cama cada mañana antes de salir de casa establece el tono para el resto del día.” Ahora volviendo a la lección sobre dinero: Consejo: El enseñarle a su hijo autodisciplina en asuntos de dinero es algo que le guiará hacia su éxito financiero en el futuro. Actividad: haga una lista de tareas que su hijo/a pueden hacer en la casa tales como cargar/descargar el lavaplatos, sacar la basura, ayudar a colocar las compras. Después, asigne una cantidad de dinero que se puede ganar por hacer cada tarea. Asegúrese de que hay tareas diferentes en la lista y de que asigna más dinero a las tareas que usted quiere que hagan primero. Cada familia es diferente, así que su lista será diferente. Aquí está otro consejo sabio de mi abuela Helen del que me di cuenta cuando ya se había ido: solo me dejaba hacer tareas los sábados. Ella no quería que las tareas se entrometieran con mis ‘lecciones escolares’. Los sábados por la mañana, yo colocaba ropas en el cuarto de la colada, hacía los platos, pasaba la aspiradora, y limpiaba el polvo en las mesas del salón. No estoy diciendo que no se deban hacer tareas durante la semana, pero asigne menos dinero a estas tareas que se pueden hacer durante la semana para que haya menos énfasis en ganar dinero y más tiempo libre para que su hijo haga las tareas o las lecciones escolares. También no olvide establecer un límite en la cantidad que pueden aprender o límite en el número de tareas que pueden hacer. Ejemplo de una lista: Limpiar su cuarto $5.00 Pasar la aspiradora $3.00 Cargar el lavaplatos $2.00 Sacar la basura $1.00 Limpiar el polvo $2.00 Beneficio/cosas claves que puede quitarles: su hijo comenzará a asociar el tiempo y energía que gasta haciendo una tarea en particular con recompensas financieras. Recuerde que ellos probablemente ya tienen en su mente cuánto quieren ganar porque ya saben en lo que se lo quieren gastar. Mamá y papá van a trabajar cada día para ganar un cheque. • Los niños necesitan aprender de dónde viene el dinero y cómo se gana. Las tareas hacen posibles diferentes escenarios donde puede enseñar a los niños la diferencia entre varios tipos de billetes y dinero. • Actividad: la próxima vez que esté en la caja registradora para pagar por un artículo, pague con dinero y deje que su hijo cuente el cambio. Keva Sturdevant es la fundadora de Born To Save, una organización benéfica basada en Washington, DC con la misión de enseñar a los niños de todas las edades la importancia de ahorrar e invertir. Nuestra meta es comenzar conversaciones sobre el dinero en los hogares a través de América entre los padres y sus niños. En un esfuerzo por fortalecer estas conversaciones, concedemos acciones de mercado reales a los niños. Para registrar a su hijo para que gane acciones de mercado en nuestro concurso mensual, por favor visite nuestra página web www.BornToSave.org.

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KIDSVILLE NEWS - PAGE 21


P ARENTOWN’S K ID S HAPE

Fun Ideas to Keep Kids Learning Throughout the Summer Educators and parents agree that a solid elementary school education is the cornerstone for subsequent development and achievement. Classroom learning, however, is not enough to ensure academic success, given the fact that children spend much time outside of the classroom — especially during the summer months. According to the National Center for Summer Learning (NCSL), all young people experience learning losses when not engaged in educational activities for extended periods of time. Commonly referred to as summer slide, this overall decline in learning leaves many parents wondering how they can keep their children’s minds actively engaged outside of the classroom. Drawing on research that shows that exposure to the arts increases classroom performance and prevents learning losses, the Arts Education Partnership, a national coalition of arts, education, business, philanthropic and government organizations, encourages parents to incorporate the arts into their families’ everyday lives. Fun ways to do so include attending neighborhood film festivals and taking the entire family to the theater for a family-friendly performance. By fostering an appreciation of the arts and introducing children to a variety of artistic viewpoints at a young age, parents will be able to increase their child’s academic and social development while also creating long-lasting memories that the entire family can enjoy. Below are great ways for parents to increase their family’s exposure to the arts this summer. * Plan Family Field Trips - Take advantage of free days and reduced-priced admission to museums, theaters, film festivals and other cultural programs, such as those sponsored by Target. This summer, and throughout the entire year, there are more than 2,100 free days that Target sponsors at more than 120 museums and theaters nationwide, including the Chicago Children’s Museum, The Studio Museum in Harlem, Dallas Children’s Theater and the California African American Museum.

PAGE 22 - KIDSVILLE NEWS

* Organize a Family Summer Book Club - Encourage reading at home by starting a family summer book club. Each summer month, families can go to the library together and choose the next book that they will read. As an added benefit, small rewards can be given throughout the summer to mark milestones. To encourage comprehension, ask questions about the story, having the child summarize the story and in general, make reading a more interactive family experience. * Coordinate Scavenger Hunts - Why not make learning fun for the entire neighborhood with a scavenger hunt at a local museum? Invite your child’s friends from the neighborhood to a special day filled with learning and fun surprises. Keep costs low by planning the hunts in conjunction with a Target free or reduced admission price day. By making learning fun and taking advantage of free days at local museums and theaters, parents can reduce the effects of summer slide and create a memorable summer for the entire family. Information courtesy of Family Features.

WWW.KIDSVILLENEWSTN.COM

JULY 2009


What is a space maintainer? A space maintainer can be a vital part of your child’s dental health. If your child loses a baby tooth early through decay or injury, the child’s other teeth could shift and begin to fill the vacant space. When your child’s permanent teeth emerge, there is not enough room for them. The result is crooked or crowded teeth and difficulties with chewing or speaking. To prevent that, your dentist inserts a space maintainer to hold the spot left by the lost tooth until the permanent tooth emerges. The space maintainer might be a band or a temporary crown attached to one side of the vacant space. Later, as the permanent tooth emerges, your dentist removes the device. And presto! Your child is ready for a lifetime of smiles!

H.MichaelLong,D.D.S. JanetteG.Gardner,D.D.S. 211EastLincolnStreet Tullahoma,Tennessee

931-455-2595-www.drmikelong.com JULY 2009

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KIDSVILLE NEWS - PAGE 23


r e t n e C e c n e i c S n Hands o Happenings hosc@charter.net

931-455-8387

101 Mitcheelll Blvd. TN 37388 a, TN TTuullllahoma,

Museum Hours MONDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CLOSED TUESDAY - SATURDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-5 PM SUNDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 5 PM OPEN THE "FOURTH OF JULY"

ies Biirrthday Partie the HOSC... t a Are fun for the kids and easy on the

PreSchool Story Time

July 3rd - Camping Spree with Mr. Magee July 10th - Fast Food July 17th - Chicka Chicka 1-2-3 July 24th - The Skin I'm In July 31st - Gummy Bear Counting Book Members Free • Non-members Regular Admission

HandsMEMBERS On Science Center Club FREE • NON-MEMBERS - REGULAR ADMISSION

parents! Includes the party room for 1.5 hours & admission for 15 children.

WIZ KIDS

For More details, visit www.hosc.org or call 931-455-8387

SAVE THE DATE! FOR THE HANDS ON SCIENCE CENTER

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15TH - 4 PM Chromatography

HOME SCHOOL

AUGUST 29TH

PROGRAMS WILL RESUME IN AUGUST

14TH ANNIVERSARY & ANNUAL FREE DAY FREE ADMISSION, DISCOUNTED MEMBERSHIPS, EXCITING SHOWS, LOADS OF FUN!

REMEMBER OUR FACILITIES ARE GREAT FOR... REUNIONS - TEAM PARTIES - SHOWERS CORPORATE MEETING/GATHERINGS

NATURE TIME

First Friday of the Month at 4:00 PM

July 3rd Campfire Safety

n o t h t a e n E n e K This page proudly sponsored by:

FORD-MERCURY

PAGE 24 - KIDSVILLE NEWS

Friday at 10:30 AM

AUGUST - Dental Hygiene SEPTEMBER - Geology

ADMISSION

Members - $50 per year.

Membership includes free admission to HOSC and other science centers, 10% OFF in the gift shop, discounts on birthday parties, programs and special events!

Adults - $5.00 - Seniors - $4.00 Children $5.00

Children 2 years & under are free

Astronomy July 11th - 8-9 PM Night

Watch a video in the Cubic Theater, then go outside to view stars and possibly planets from the Goethert Observatory, which has been newly restored by Goodrich Landing Gear. Weather Permitted • FREE to the Public

HOSC is a COOL place on a HOT day! Come visit us this summer and let the kids cool down and have fun learning about science *HOSC is a non-profit organization with all proceeds going to up keep of the center.

800-787-7008 1106 New Manchester Highway Tullahoma, Tennessee

931-455-4564

WWW.KIDSVILLENEWSTN.COM

JULY 2009

Kidsville News - July 2009  

We are excited to bring KidsvilleNews to Middle Tennessee. KIDSVILLE NEWS IS THE NATION'S FAVORITE AND FASTEST-GROWING CHILDREN’S NEWSPAPER....

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