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Dear Kids, Happy Valentine’s Day! I hope your February is off to a great start. As for great starts, I like to start off every school day by saying “I Love You” to my mom and dad. Valentine’s Day is a great time to let the people you love know it, but I like to do it year round! I do love Valentine’s Day though — I get nice cards from my friends and sweets! Speaking of sweets, Jordan Pruitt has a sweet voice. Learn more about her in this month’s “What It’s Like to Be...” There’s a lot going on in February. There is Valentine’s Day, Presidents’ Day, Groundhog Day and National African American History Month. Wow, that’s a lot to learn about! History is one of my favorite subjects. Learning history helps you understand how countries of the world came to be and what the people of those countries accomplished. And, we learn history so we don’t repeat the mistakes of the past! Have a fabulous February! Be sure to visit my Web site at www.kidsvillenews.com for more fun and games. Your friend,

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February has been proclaimed National African American History Month, also known as Black History Month. This month is set aside to recognize the achievements and contributions by African Americans. The observance of this special period dates from February 1926, when it was established as Negro History Week by Dr. Carter G. Woodson, a noted African American author and scholar. Dr. Woodson founded the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) in 1915. He established the week during the period of February, which contains the birthdays of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. In 1976, the month of February was established as Black History Month. You learned about Martin Luther King, Jr., last month when we celebrated his birthday. This month, make it a point to learn about other African Americans who have made great contributions to the world. A few famous African Americans and their accomplishments are mentioned below. Frederick Douglass was one of the leaders of the abolitionist movement, which sought to end slavery in the United States decades before the Civil War. During the Civil War, Douglass served as an adviser to President Abraham Lincoln. He fought for the adoption of constitutional amendments that would guarantee voting rights and other civil liberties for African Americans. George Washington Carver was born a slave, but later earned his college degree and became a chemist. He discovered uses for the peanut, the sweet

potato and the soybean. Astronaut Mae Jemison became the first African American woman to enter space in September of 1992. She served on the crew of the Space Shuttle Endeavor. Lewis Howard Latimer invented an electric lamp and a carbon filament for light bulbs and had them patented in 1881 and 1882. He was also the only African American member of Thomas Edison’s engineering laboratory. Benjamin Banneker was a self-taught mathematician, astronomer and surveyor. He predicted a solar eclipse in 1789 and published the first scientific book published by an African American. He was appointed by President George Washington to work on the commission which surveyed the city of Washington, D.C. Charles Richard Drew was an African American physician, surgeon and a professor at Howard University. He developed a way to preserve blood plasma for transfusion. He was the director of the first American Red Cross Blood Bank.

WHERE IN THE WORLD IS... CHILE?

It’s time to get out your globe! You need to know about the imaginary lines on globes and maps. These lines are called lines of latitude and longitude, and they tell a pilot or ship’s captain exactly where in the world a certain place is located. Basically, latitude lines (also called parallels) are the horizontal lines on your map. Lines of longitude (also called meridians) are the vertical lines that run from the North Pole to the South Pole. This mapping system is written in degrees and uses the symbol °. Get ready to travel the world! Did you know that there is a country called Chile? It is in South America and borders the South Pacific Ocean. To find Chile, get out your globe, and find longitude 71º W and latitude 30º S. Chile is a long and narrow strip of land, about twice the size of the U.S. state of Montana. It is bordered by Argentina, Bolivia and Peru. Because the country is so long, it has a wide range of climates. It has desert areas in the north and a Mediterranean climate in the central region, and the southern region is cold and damp. The country has the Andes Mountains in the east and lower coastal mountains to the west. These beautiful mountain ranges make Chile a popular tourist destination. It has active volcanos and can have serious earthquakes. The warm waters and beaches in the northern region make it a nice place to vacation. The world's driest desert, lagoons, geysers and other natural attractions are beautiful and unique areas. Easter Island is also a special territory of Chile. The Moai, huge sculpted statues, attract visitors from all over the world. Chile declared its independence from Spain in 1810. The Spanish came to Chile in the 16th century looking for gold and silver. Before the Spanish came, northern Chile was under the rule of the Incas. The Araucanian Where in the Indians (also known as Mapuches) lived in central and World Word southern Chile. Spanish is the official language. territory [ter-i-tawr-ee] Sources: The World Factbook prepared by the Central the land and waters Intelligence Agency; "Chile," Encyclopædia Britannica; under the jurisdiction www.visitchile.com. of a government.

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WHAT’S IT LIKE TO BE... SINGER/SONGWRITER? Oakridge Elementary School in Tallahassee, Florida, was the winner of the Samsung Hope for Education Annual Essay Competition. They were awarded over $200,000 worth of electronics from Samsung, software from Microsoft, a lifetime subscription for Directv and a $5,000 cash grant. In addition to having representatives from the participating organizations, there was a very special guest performance by 17-year-old teen superstar Jordan Pruitt. Through Samsung’s partnership with her label, Hollywood Records, the teen sensation is the National Spokesperson for the 2008 Samsung Hope for Education Program. I was fortunate enough to have the opportunity to interview her, to find out what it’s like to be a singer/ songwriter.

TRUMAN: What does it take to be a singer/songwriter? JORDAN: To become a singer/ songwriter, it takes lots of hard work, dedication and practice. I began when I was only four years old and have been doing this ever since. The first song that I sang was “Jesus Loves Me.” TRUMAN: When and why did you first become interested in becoming a singer/songwriter? JORDAN: I became really interested in the profession when I was nine and wrote my first song. My dad was a worship and song leader at my church in Loganville outside of Atlanta, GA. He helped me make my first rough demo, getting me to where I am today.

TRUMAN: What’s the best part of your job? JORDAN: I get to make really cool music, and the fans make it fun. I really love to perform. However, even though I’ve been doing this for a long time now, I still get nervous before I go on stage. TRUMAN: Why is education important to you? JORDAN: While I’m currently a senior in high school, receiving the best education possible has definitely helped me achieve what I have in my career. Furthering education and reading is an important initiative for me. That’s one reason I’m so excited to work with Samsung’s Hope for Education Program. I appreciate the opportunity to work with Samsung, Microsoft and Directv to spread the message about how important technology and education are in our day-to-day lives.

TRUMAN: What’s your typical day like? JORDAN: I don’t know that I have a typical day because it varies so much. It depends on where I am and my schedule. My day can vary from working from 12 to 12, having 25 interviews in one day, five hours of sleep or performing a show, to meeting and greeting fans.

TRUMAN: What advice would you give to kids who are interested in this profession? JORDAN: I would tell them to be yourself and follow your dreams.

TRUMAN: What’s the hardest part of your job? JORDAN: The hardest part of my job is being away from home so

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much. I get homesick sometimes and really miss my dad and little brother Jared.

TRUMAN: While you strive to make the world a better place, you are a true inspiration to kids. It appears that you’re just like your album says, No Ordinary Girl. Thank you so much for talking with me about your career as a singer/ songwriter. I’ll make sure to listen out for you on Radio Disney.

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Amazing Hearts

Presidential Word Find

Truman wants to send Valentine’s cards to his friends. Can you help him get to the mailbox?

Find the names of the first 12 Presidents of the United States. Why are there only 11 names shown? Both the second and the sixth Presidents were named Adams! ADAMS HARRISON JACKSON JEFFERSON

Knock, knock! Who’s there? Who. Who who? Hey, is there an owl around here?

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NUTTY KNOCK KNOCK JOKES! ! Knock, knock Who’s there? Ya. Ya who? ou’re excited y s s e u g I , e e G to see me!

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TYLER VAN BUREN WASHINGTON

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Knock, knock ! Who’s there? Kent. Kent who? Kent you tell who it is? I’m standing r ight here.

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Coloring Corner In February, we celebrate Presidents’ Day. Do you have a favorite President? Write a sentence about him and color the picture.

Visit www.kidsvillenews.com for more fun and games! Truman

Truman’s Tricky Picture Find these items!

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COME OUT AND PLAY! Table Tennis Table tennis, also known as Ping-PongTM, is popular all over the world. The game is similar to the regular game of tennis, except it is played indoors on a flat table. The table is divided into two courts by a net across the middle. Equipment You Need The equipment for table tennis is pretty simple. In addition to the table, you need a racket, also called a bat. This paddle-like racket is usually made of wood and is flat and thin. The ball used for table tennis is a small lightweight plastic ball and can be white, yellow or orange. How It’s Done The object of table tennis is to hit the ball so it goes over the net and bounces on the opponent’s side of the table. One player serves the ball by tossing it up in the air and then hitting the ball so that it bounces on the server’s side of the net and then goes over the

net and bounces on the opponent’s side. The server changes after every two points. The ball is hit back and forth across the net by the two players. But you hope that your opponent misses and doesn’t hit it back so you get a point! The player to reach 11 points first wins the game. A match is made up of more than two games, in odd numbers. The player who wins the most games wins the match. Table tennis was invented in England in the early 20th century. The first world championships were held in 1927. It became an Olympic sport in 1988. Sources: Encyclopaedia Britannica Online. Photo: courtesy of the ITTF. Wang Hao, the winner of the 2008 Tournament of Champions.

ART GALLERY Franz Marc and Expressionist Painting Franz Marc was a German artist. A painter and which artists try to express feelings or emotions through their work. printmaker, he usually used bright colors and Expressionist artists are more interested in the feelings presented in art painted pictures of animals. than in making sure a painting looks exactly like what it is supposed to Franz Marc was born on February 8, 1880, in be. With the Blue Rider, Franz had a group of friends who understood Munich, Germany. His father was him as an artist. Together, they had an art show in 1911. also a professional painter and People loved Franz’ paintings of animals, and he was an art teacher, so Franz was offered a one-person art show in 1913. He was fast encouraged to study art. But, as a becoming a very well-known artist. child, Franz wanted to be a priest! Sadly, World War I broke out in 1914. Franz joined It was not until he was 20 that the Germany Army, even though his name was on a list Franz decided to concentrate of important artists who were not supposed to fight in on art. In 1900, he started the war. On March 4, 1916, Franz was killed in battle. taking painting classes at the He was just 36. Munich Academy of Fine Arts, Franz left behind some 60 prints and numerous where his father taught. Once he paintings. In October 1999, one of his paintings, got started, he couldn’t stop! Der Wasserfall (The Waterfall) sold for more than $5 Like many young artists, million! It set the record for the most expensive German Franz wanted to spend time in painting sold in the 20th century. Written by Tamar Burris, a former elementary school France, which was a major center teacher who now works as a freelance writer and for important modern artists like Vincent Van Gogh curriculum developer for PBS, the Discovery Channel and and others. In 1903, Franz went to Paris to study these other education-related companies. Sources: Franz Marc great artists. Greatly impressed by what he saw in Paris, Deer in the Woods II, 1912. Biography on Artelino, www.artelino.com/articles/franz_ Franz returned twice, once in 1907 and again in 1912. marc.asp; Franz Marc Biography on Art in the Picture, Franz also decided to form a new art group in Germany. www.artinthepicture.com/artists/Franz_Marc/biography. Together with his friends from the Munich Academy of Art, he created html; Franz Marc on Wikipedia, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franz_Marc. Der Blaue Reiter, or the Blue Rider. This group of artists painted in the Expressionist style, a style in

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Back to the Moon — or Bust! It was 36 years ago, in 1972, when Apollo astronauts left their last boot prints in the lunar dust. Now NASA is working on new technologies to get us back to the Moon and, maybe someday, on to Mars. Why do we need new technologies when we’ve already done it before? Well, much has changed. Today’s technologies and materials are smarter, stronger, lighter and cheaper than ever before. In a few years, we will be able to go to the Moon more safely and with far more capability than during the Apollo Program. And this time, the astronauts will get to stay a while. The Moon is a lousy vacation spot, though. For one thing, there is no air. None. If the astronauts want any to breathe, they will have to bring their own. Also, with no air, they will always have to be in a pressurized spacesuit or habitat. Otherwise the vacuum of space will mean instant death.

During the lunar day, the temperature gets hot enough to roast a turkey. And at night, it’s cold enough to freeze the oxygen right out of the atmosphere — if there were any! And with no atmosphere, there is nothing to protect the astronauts from the Sun’s killer radiation or the constant rain of tiny space rocks hitting the Moon. But, thanks to NASA’s Exploration Technology Development Program, the new lunar astronauts will have all they need to survive in comfort for months. They will have tools and materials to build a whole lunar outpost. They will have a comfortable, inflatable home. They will have a vehicle to drive around and explore the lunar surface. They will have light, protective and comfortable spacesuits for their “extra-vehicular activities.” Make believe you are a new Moon explorer and build your own lunar habitat from newspaper logs. Check it out at spaceplace.nasa. gov/en/kids/exploration/habitat. This article was written by Diane K. Fisher. It was provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

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KIDSVILLE KITCHEN Together Time — Ask an adult for help with projects!

Baking from the Heart Here’s a saying that I just love: “There’s nothing better than a good friend — except a good friend with chocolate.” What better way to be a good friend on Valentine’s Day than by baking up some chocolate treats? Make some gorgeous Red Velvet Cupidcakes for an extra special Valentine. The color may be red, but the flavor is all yummy chocolate!

RED VELVET CUPIDCAKES WHAT YOU NEED: Cupcakes • 4 ounces Nestlé Toll House Chocolatier 62% Cacao Bittersweet Chocolate Baking Bar, broken into small pieces • 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda • 1/2 teaspoon salt • 3/4 cup milk • 1 tablespoon white vinegar • 1 cup granulated sugar • 1/2 cup vegetable oil • 3 large eggs • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract • 1 tablespoon red food coloring Cream Cheese Frosting • 1 package (3 ounces) cream cheese, at room temperature • 2 tablespoons butter, softened • 2 tablespoons milk • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract • 3 cups powdered sugar Assorted sprinkles (optional) HOW TO MAKE IT (makes 18 cupcakes): For Cupcakes: PREHEAT oven to 350º F. Paper-line 18 muffin cups. MICROWAVE chocolate in small, uncovered microwave-safe bowl on HIGH (100 percent) power for 45 seconds; STIR. If pieces retain some of their original shape, microwave at additional 10- to 15-second intervals, stirring just until melted. Cool to room temperature. COMBINE flour, baking soda and salt in small bowl. Combine milk and vinegar in small glass measure. Beat sugar, oil, eggs and vanilla extract in large mixer bowl on high for 2 minutes. Carefully beat in melted chocolate and red food coloring. Gradually beat in flour mixture alternately with milk mixture. Spoon into prepared muffin cups, filling 2/3 full. BAKE for 22 to 27 minutes or until wooden pick inserted in centers comes out clean. Cool in pan for 10 minutes; remove to wire racks to cool completely. Frost with Cream Cheese Frosting. Top with sprinkles, if desired. For Cream Cheese Frosting: BEAT cream cheese, butter, milk and vanilla extract in medium mixer bowl until light and fluffy, scraping bowl occasionally. Gradually beat in powdered sugar until light and fluffy. Makes about 1 3/4 cups. Nutrition Facts per Cupcake: 280 calories, 13 g total fat (4.5 g saturated fat), 45 mg cholesterol, 140 mg sodium, 42 g carbohydrate, .5 g fiber, 34 g sugars, 3 g protein Courtesy of Family Features and Nestlé.

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Presidential Word Find (Over, Down, Direction) ADAMS (1, 15, NE) HARRISON (14, 1, S) JACKSON (11, 15, W) JEFFERSON (6, 8, E) MADISON (8, 1, SW) MONROE (6, 10, NW) POLK (9, 1, SE) TAYLOR (15, 8, N) TYLER (1, 1, E) VAN BUREN (7, 1, SE) WASHINGTON (3, 10, NE)

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Amazing Hearts

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At the Movies The Pink Panther 2 (In Theaters: February 6) Steve Martin tries to improve in his second effort at stepping into the “Pink Panther” franchise that Peter Sellers made popular in the ‘60s and ‘70s. Against the better judgment of the long-suffering Chief Inspector Dreyfus (John Cleese), bumbling French police inspector Jacques Clouseau (Steve Martin) is assigned to a case regarding the theft of art treasures that include the legendary “Pink Panther Diamond.” Paris and Rome are the locations upon which Inspector Clouseau will leave his mark of destruction and slapstick pratfalls. The gifted Emily Mortimer plays Nicole, the unlucky target of Clouseau’s romantic attraction. Lily Tomlin, Jean Reno and Alfred Molina also star. Rated PG for some suggestive humor, brief mild language and action. (Columbia Pictures/Sony/MGM) The Velveteen Rabbit (In Theaters: February 20) Director Michael Landon Jr. adapts the classic children’s story about a lonely little boy named Bobby whose tears bring to life a poor little velveteen stuffed rabbit. After being sent to live with his stern grandmother in her rural European home, little Bobby steps into an attic fantasy world where a talking toy horse (voiced by Tom Skeritt) and a swan (voiced by Ellen Burstyn) take him on a fantastic journey. With a velveteen rabbit that dreams of becoming real someday, Bobby learns about the mystery of Nursery Magic and discovers that “love makes us real.” Rated PG for some mild language and thematic elements. (Touchstone Pictures/Disney)

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Jonas Brothers: The 3D Concert Experience (In Theaters: February 27) The latest boy-band sensation The Jonas Brothers (Kevin, Joe, and Nick) soak up their 15 minutes of popular fame with an all-things Jonas-familyrelated before the band takes their act on stage with 3-D cameras to make the movie audience feel like you’re onstage with the band. Director Bruce Hendricks (Hannah Montana/Miley Cyrus: Best of Both Worlds Concert) captures the Jonas Brothers “Burning Up” concert tour with all of its screaming fans and special performances by the likes of Demi Lovato and Taylor Swift. Rated G. (Walt Disney Pictures) Movies on DVD Back to the Future II (DVD Release: February 10) While not as great as the first Back to the Future (1985), this passable sequel is made into a cult classic due to fun performances by Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd and Elisabeth Shue. Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) and his mentor/scientist/friend Dr. Emmett Brown take the time-skipping DeLorean for a ride to the year 2015 in order to rescue Marty’s children. Back to the Future II received a 1989 Oscar nomination for Best Visual Effects. Rated PG. (Universal Studios) High School Musical 3: Senior Year (DVD Release: February 17) HSM3 is one of those harmless unavoidable kids’ movie phenomenon that exists only to be gobbled up like pop culture cotton candy by every squealing pre-teen around. The High School Musical movies are like a modern condensed version of the old Mickey Mouse Club in their ability to churn out teen stars like Zac Efron and Ashley Tisdale. It’s the last year in high school, and Troy Bolton (Zac Efron) has many basketball games to win and plenty of romantic nothings to say to his girlfriend Vanessa (Gabriella Montez) in between ecstatic song-and-dance numbers that prove the musical genre is alive and well among kids today. Rated G.

(ABC Video) Cole Smithey, also known as “the smartest film critic in the world,” has been a film critic for 11 years and writes for over 50 publications, in print and on-line. Truman loves to watch movies and has the highest appreciation for great popcorn.

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Manners Matter

be the one to respond, after she has reviewed the family’s schedule and you and she decide together whether or not she can attend. If you respond for her, seeing as she is only 8, that will be fine, too. We have all overlooked responses, especially when we have too much going on in our lives, and there’s no getting around the fact that occasionally we will make the mistake of being a “no show.” That doesn’t change the fact that it is very disheartening when someone who has been invited either does not respond at all, or waits until the last possible second. Failing to respond to an invitation is very poor form. I know how disappointed I have felt before waiting for those responses, and personally, I think it is ok to call folks to ask them if they plan to attend your party, if we are talking about close friends whom you see or speak to on a regular basis. Invitation Rules: • Simple invitations issued not too far in advance don’t have to be written, but they should still contain the relative information and be issued in the same polite way that a written one would. For example, you might say, “We are having a swim party this Saturday afternoon. My mom is ordering pizza for lunch. Can you come?” Response: “Yes, that sounds great! What time should I be there?” or “I’m sorry, we already have plans Saturday, but thanks for inviting me.” • Do not ever ask if someone is busy on the day you are inviting him or her! For example, you would not say, “Are you doing anything Saturday?” It really isn’t any of your business what someone’s plans are.

with Truman and Mrs. F

Q.

Dear Truman and Mrs. F, My kids received many invitations to various holiday events, and now they are getting invitations to a few birthday parties. Do I have to respond to all these invitations? If it is addressed to my 8-year-old, should she be the one to respond? Also, my daughter is having a birthday party next week, and so far, no one has called to say they can or can’t come. Is it ok to call them to ask if they are going to come? Can you give us some guidelines for invitation etiquette? Thank you, Laurie W.

A.

Dear Laurie, You should respond to each and every one of the invitations you have received if so requested. Some invitations are RSVP, which is asking you to respond as to whether or not you are coming. Other kinds will ask for “regrets only,” in which case you should respond only if you cannot attend. If you don’t respond to that kind of invitation, the sender will assume you are coming and will plan accordingly. If an invitation is sent from your daughter’s friend, addressed to your daughter, then she could

• Engraved or hand-written white or creamcolored invitations should be sent for formal events four to six weeks ahead of the date. • Colorful or computer-generated invitations are good for less formal events and can be sent about two weeks before the event. • You should respond to any kind of invitation within one week of receiving it. • If you are sending regrets, you do not have to give an explanation as to why you can’t come. • After you accept an invitation, you must attend. You can’t drop an acceptance if something “better” comes along in the meantime. Sometimes exceptions can be made if an unexpected relative from out of town pops in or you are going to meet the Queen. • An RSVP must be made in writing if there is no phone number or e-mail address. Send the response to the address on the return label. If there is a response card, just fill it in and reply by the date indicated — it should have an addressed return envelope included. • If the RSVP has a telephone number or e-mail address, you may respond that way; however, if you are not able to speak to the person directly, you will have to leave a message. E-mail is more reliable. • Unless the invitation says you may bring someone extra or siblings, then don’t! Truman and Mrs. Susan Fleming will be glad to answer your questions on manners and etiquette. Mrs. F is a home economist, editor and lifestyle writer, specializing in entertaining and children’s etiquette. E-mail your question to manners@ kidsvillenews.com. If we use your question in the paper, you will receive a Kidsville News! t-shirt!

Visit boomerandhalley.com for the answer! Series by Mary Jane McKittrick Illustrations by Bob Ostrom

Paws for a lesson in Y RESPECTING PROPERTY Boomer and Halley have fun playing in their parents’ bedroom and bath. Halley hears something fall. Boomer has knocked over a jar of make-up brushes. “What are these?” he asks. “Better put that brush down,” warnss Halley. Halley lley. Boomer looks at her. “Why can’t I play with ith it?”

Why shouldn’t Boomer playy with the make-up brush? a) It belongs to someone else. b) He doesn’t need make-up. c) It doesn’t taste good.

For the answer and a chance at a prize, go to the FUN STUFF page at boomerandhalley.com! FEBRUARY 2009 WWW.KIDSVILLENEWSTN.COM

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TM

A SECTION ESPECIALLY FOR PARENTS

BOOKSHELF Stuttering Stan Takes a Stand Author/Illustrator: Artie Knapp, Barbara L. Gibson (Illustrator) Publisher: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital

Barbara McClintock’s charming 19th century-styled drawings depict children in a school play, acting out Lincoln’s life. With art reminiscent of Maurice Sendak, and as a three-time New York Times Best Illustrator, McClintock is sure to garner awards and recognition. And Jim Aylesworth’s ear for rhythms and rhymes will have everyone singing OUT LOUD!

Age Range: 6 to 10 Author Artie Knapp worked with the Division of Speech Pathology at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center to create a series of books about pediatric communication disorders. Knapp has created a wonderful story about Stuttering Stan, a squirrel with a stuttering problem. He suffers teasing from other animals in the forest and doesn’t stand up to them. Instead, he runs away from his problem but makes a new friend along the way. She teaches him a valuable lesson about friendship, confidence and self respect. Courage and forgiveness are the end result that leads to a happy ending for Stuttering Stan and the others in the forest. — JK

Our Abe Lincoln Author/Illustrator: Jim Aylesworth, Barbara McClintock (Illustrator) Publisher: Scholastic, Inc. Age Range: 4 to 8 From the publisher: Wise Abe Lincoln said, “No More!” to slavery, “No More!” to slavery, “No More!” to slavery, Wise Abe Lincoln said, “No More!” to slavery, Many brave days ago. This simple song, sung to the tune of “The Old Grey Mare,” was adapted from an actual campaign song for Lincoln during his run for the presidency. Beginning with “Babe Abe Lincoln was born in the wilderness” to “Strong Abe Lincoln fell oaks with a mighty ax” to “Great Abe Lincoln died hard for his noble deeds” — here is a perfect book for Lincoln’s birthday that tells the story of Lincoln to the very youngest audience.

Still I Rise: A Graphic History of Arfican Americans Author/Illustrator: Roland Laird, Taneshia Nash laird, Elihu “Adofo” Bey (Illustrator) Publisher: Sterling Publishing Age Range: 10-12 From the publisher: Still I Rise is a critically acclaimed work with an impressive scope: the entire history of Black America, told in an accessible graphicnovel form. Updated from its original version — which ended with the Million Man March — it now extends from the early days of colonial slavery right through to Barack Obama’s groundbreaking presidential campaign. Compared by many to Art Spiegelman’s Maus, Still I Rise is a breathtaking achievement that celebrates the collective African American memory, imagination and spirit.

Happy Valentine’s Day, Dolores Authors/Illustrator: Barbara Samuels Publisher: Feiwel & Friends Age Range: 4 to 8 From the publisher: The one thing Dolores is absolutely NOT supposed to do is touch her big sister Faye’s things. But when Faye hides a mysterious heartshaped box, Dolores can’t stop herself from peeking inside. What she discovers is irresistible — a singing froggie Valentine’s Day necklace! What would happen if she just “borrows” it for a day? Trouble! For when the necklace disappears, Dolores must go to hilarious extremes to make things right with Faye, even enlisting the help of her long suffering cat, Duncan.

P ARENTOWN

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FEBRUARY 2009


P ARENTOWN’S K ID S HAPE February Is Children’s Dental Health Month! The American Dental Association (ADA) advises parents to teach children the importance of oral hygiene at an early age so when they grow up, they will continue good habits that will contribute to their overall health. Oral hygiene, just like diet and exercise, should be factored together when teaching children how to keep themselves healthy. The American Dental Association offers these age-by-age tips: Babies, Toddlers and Pre-Schoolers • After each feeding, clean the baby’s gums with a clean wet gauze pad or washcloth. • When teeth start to appear, brush them with a child’s-size toothbrush and plain water. At the direction of your dentist, some children under two may benefit from the use of fluoride toothpaste. Look for toothbrushes that carry the ADA Seal of Acceptance. They have been evaluated by the ADA for safety and effectiveness. • Begin flossing when at least two teeth begin to touch. • Start dental visits by the child’s first birthday. Make visits regularly. If you think your child has dental problems, take the child to the dentist as soon as possible. • Brush teeth of children over age two with a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste and make sure to floss daily. Look for toothpastes that carry the ADA Seal of Acceptance. They have been evaluated by the ADA for safety and effectiveness. • Children should be supervised while brushing to keep them from

KIDSVILLE NEWS - PAGE 22

swallowing the toothpaste. School-Age Children and Adolescents • Until they are six or seven years old, continue to brush your children’s teeth twice a day with a child’s-size toothbrush and a peasized amount of fluoride toothpaste. Continue to assist with flossing as needed. Look for dental products that carry the ADA Seal of Acceptance. They have been evaluated by the ADA for safety and effectiveness. • By age six or seven, children should be able to brush their own teeth twice a day but often require supervision until about age 10 or 11 to make sure they are doing a thorough job. Since each child is different, your dentist can help you determine whether your child is brushing and flossing properly. • Visit your dentist regularly. • Ask the dentist about dental sealants, a protective plastic coating that can be applied to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth where decay often starts. • Adolescents may need reminders about practicing good oral hygiene, the importance of regular dental checkups and making nutritious food and beverage choices, the benefit of using mouthguards and the risks of oral piercings and of tobacco use. Information courtesy of the ADA, www.ada.org. Photo: metrocreativegraphics.com.

WWW.KIDSVILLENEWSTN.COM

FEBRUARY 2009


FEBRUARY 2009

WWW.KIDSVILLENEWSTN.COM

KIDSVILLE NEWS - PAGE 23


Kidsville News - Feb. 2009  

We are excited to bring KidsvilleNews to Middle Tennessee. KIDSVILLE NEWS IS THE NATION'S FAVORITE AND FASTEST-GROWING CHILDREN’S NEWSPAPER....

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