Page 1

December 2010

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

1


2

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010


LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

3


PAGE

18

The Perry Home

Where Packwood Creek Meets the Mediterranean

LITERARY ARTS Christmas Memories Land Irene Morse in Chicken Soup

PAGE

28 CULINARY

8. 10. 12. 14. 38. 48. 54. 56. 58.

Letter from the Executive Editor Business Cents Word Play Charity: Hands in the Community Business Profile: Visalia Eye Center Holiday Cocktails Fashion Performances Happenings

Holiday Hors d’oeuvres

From Opening Act to Main Event

PAGE

32 S EASONAL Christmas Around the World

PAGE

42 4

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

ON THE COVER: Brian and Karla Perry’s recently completed Mediterraneaninfluenced home abuts Packwood Creek, one of the four main waterways that branch off the Kaweah River Delta near Visalia.


DECEMBER 2010 PUBLISHED BY DMI Agency 801 W. Main St. Visalia, CA 93291 BUSINESS MANAGEMENT MALKASIAN ACCOUNTANCY LLP GARY MALKASIAN CPA JEFFREY MALKASIAN EA Bookkeeper MARILYN HARRIS Office Administrator MARIA GASTON EDITORIAL Executive Editor KAREN TELLALIAN Assistant Editor TAYLOR VAUGHN Copy Editor KATIE DESROCHERS Calendar KATIE DESROCHERS CONTRIBUTING WRITERS AARON COLLINS DIANE SLOCUM SHARON MOSLEY CHERYL DIETER CAROLE FIRSTMAN KATIE DESROCHERS IRENE MORSE MARSHA PELTZER JIM WOHLFORD ART & PRODUCTION Creative Director DAVID JONES Senior Graphic Designer KURT BAKER ADVERTISING SALES Advertising Director BRIDGET ELMORE DARLENE MAYFIELD 559.739.1747

RACK LOCATIONS

Borders Books Music & Cafè DMI Agency Evolutions Fitness Center, Tulare Party City Tazzaria Coffee & Tea The Lifestyle Center Visalia Chamber of Commerce Visalia Coffee Company Visalia Convention Center COUNTERTOP LOCATIONS

210 Cafe Advanced Laser Clinics Bravo Farms Cheese Factory Creekside Day Spa & Wellness Center Downtown Visalians Exeter Chamber of Commerce Exeter Golf Course Holiday Inn Kaplan Financial Services Kaweah Delta Hospital Red Carpet Car Wash Richard Rumery, Attorney at Law Sequoia Laser Aesthetics Smiles by Sullivan Tiffany’s Luxury Medispa Tulare Chamber of Commerce Tulare County Library V Medical Spa Visalia Community Bank-Downtown Visalia Convention Center Visalia Eye Center Visalia Imaging & Open MRI Visalia Marriott Visalia Medical Clinic Wildflower Cafe-Exeter Dr. Keith Williams Williams, Jordan, Brodersen & Pritchett, Attorneys at Law Windows Plus, Inc.

SALES OFFICE 801 W. Main St. Visalia, CA 93291 559.739.1747 • Fax 559.738.0909 E-mail: lifestyle@dmiagency.com See us online at VisaliaLifestyle.com

Facebook.com/LifestyleMag Visalia Lifestyle Magazine is published monthly and is distributed via direct mail to nearly 13,000 homes in the upper-middle and high-income neighborhoods in Visalia and Exeter. An additional 2,000 copies are distributed at various distribution points around both communities. Views expressed in columns are those of the columnist and not necessarily those of Direct Media, Inc. or its advertisers.

Circulation of this issue: 15,000 © 2010 DMI Agency

6

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

LEFT: It’s Christmas time at the recently completed Perry home, located where the suburbs meet oak-dotted farmland south of Visalia.


ENSURING THAT YOUR FAMILY HAS A LIFETIME OF HEALTHY SMILES. The Williams family Dental Comprehensive Dental Plan is designed to provide affordability and greater access to quality dental care. sNo Deductibles sNo Pre-existing Condition Limitations sImmediate Eligibility sANDMANYMOre features... This Family Plan includes children who are enrolled full-time in college until age 23, or children who are not enrolled full-time in college until age 18. This plan is only honored at Williams Family Dental. This dental plan is not an insurance plan that can be used at any other dental office. Visit VisaliaSmiles.com for savings on comprehensive coverage.

Family Dental Practice Keith E. Williams DDS Inc.

2744 West Main, Visalia, CA 93291

559-667-4304

Visaliasmiles.com

LIFEST YLE | OCTOBER 2010

7


EDITOR NOTE

A

s we go to print this month it’s almost Christmas and I’m so easily reminded of holidays past – years of dreading the entire season because of the pressure I felt to get everything done “Martha style”: to have found the absolute perfect gifts, wrapped to match with nothing less than spectacular handmade bows. Add to that a more than full-time job, coupled with a few holiday parties, and it was enough to make me want to hide out until January 2. Thankfully, all of that changed for me a couple of years ago as I began a deliberate attitude transformation. After what was certainly a moment of panic for our children (as they considered the possibility of a no gift Christmas) everyone realized that as soon as the dread and pressure lessened for mom, the more enjoyable the entire season became – for everyone in my circle. This year, the reminder of what is truly wonderful and glorious started with a gift – the gift of sight. Earlier this week as I was leaving the office, our mountains were lit up in a way I’ve never seen. The sun was shining on the snow-capped tops and the color was a beautiful shade of pink. The image was so spectacular that I called the office and told them to run outside before they missed one of the most amazing views of the year, maybe the decade. Oh how I wish I could have wrapped that up and shared it with everyone I know. The next reminder is the gift of hearing, and I’ve heard plenty this year. The words of encouragement, the sounds of praise, the terms of endearment – from family, our friends and my pastor – all falling on human ears but precious to me, every one. Those sounds, those words are gifts to me throughout the year and I am thankful to be able to hear them, even when you thought I wasn’t listening. My most cherished gift this year is the gift of hope – the hope I’ve been given for the future. For most, hope is what keeps us going, and we never know when we might be able to share that hope with others. So, as we go to print with our last issue of 2010, we celebrate all of the gifts we’ve received this year, and look forward with hope to 2011. Most of all, we wish to share that hope with you and wish everyone a very Merry Christmas and joyous Holiday Season.

Photo by Becca Chavez | Hair and Make-up provided by Velvet Sky

8

KAREN TELLALIAN, EXECUTIVE EDITOR For more information or to submit a story idea email Karen@dmiagency.com or call (559) 739-1747 or fax (559) 738-0909. LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010


Take the Danger out of shopping.

Stop by and pick an ornament off the tree for Extra Savings and Discounts.

Celebrate Customer Appreciation Month with a Tiffany Gift Card receive 10% OFF through December 24th

Other Services Available: Pearl Fractional ® | High-end Skincare Products Nine Treatment Rooms | Couples Massage Room Waterfall Hydro Therapy Tub (Women Only) Elegant Locker Rooms and Showers (Men’s and Women’s) Infared Saunas (Men’s and Women’s) | SmartLipo ® Body Sculpting Beeming White Teeth Whitener | Hair Salon

The spa and salon are open Tuesday-Friday 9 a.m. – 8 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. LIFEST YLE | OCTOBER 2010

9


B BUSINESS CENTS

Text Jim Wohlford Stifel, Nicolaus & Company, Inc.

I

t’s hard to believe that another year will soon be coming to an end. It’s likely you’re busy preparing for the holidays and winter months ahead. But despite the hectic pace this time of year, it’s important to take time to make an assessment of your financial situation and look into implementing strategies before the end of the year that could potentially benefit you during tax season. The end of the year is a great time to schedule a meeting with your financial advisor and your tax professional to talk about your current financial situation, and help ensure that the plans you have in place are suitable to help you meet your goals. Recent market volatility may have significantly impacted your target asset allocations. Revisit your original objectives and analyze your portfolio with your financial advisor to see if any changes need to be made. You’ll also want to determine whether now would be a good time to sell underperforming investments or capitalize on assets that have performed well for you. Either scenario will have tax implications that you will want to discuss with your tax professional. If you plan on purchasing or selling mutual fund shares, you may want to find out when the fund makes its year-end capital gains distributions and plan your transaction accordingly so as to avoid the tax consequences. If you’re buying, it may make sense to make your purchase after capital gains distributions are made; the opposite applies when you are selling. If you’re looking to reduce the taxable value of your estate, you can give up to the annual exclusion amount – $13,000 in 2010 – to any number of people without having to pay gift taxes and without the recipient owing income tax on the gifts. If both you and your spouse make gifts, you can give up to $26,000 to each recipient without triggering the gift tax. 10

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

The end of the year is also a good time to make charitable donations for a tax write-off. If you have a stock that has appreciated in value, it may make sense to donate the appreciated stock, since you will receive a tax deduction for the market value of the stock while avoiding having to pay capital gains on the sale of the stock. Before taking further action, you should discuss any year-end strategies w ith bo th your t ax a nd i nvestment p rofessionals. All electronic messages sent and received by Stifel Nicolaus Associates are subject to review by Stifel Nicolaus. Stifel Nicolaus may retain and reproduce electronic messages for state, federal, or other regulatory agencies as required by applicable law. IMPORTANT: Please do not use e-mail to request or authorize the purchase or sale of any security or commodity, send fund transfer instructions, or otherwise conduct any securities transactions. Any requests, orders, instructions, or time-sensitive messages sent by e-mail cannot be accepted or processed by Stifel Nicolaus. The accuracy of any information sent by Stifel Nicolaus through e-mail cannot be warranted or guaranteed by Stifel Nicolaus or its affiliates.


:OPUPUN:VS\[PVUZ By Alex Lechtman, M.D., F.A.C.S. Board-Certified Plastic & Reconstructive Surgeon

A glowing new you for the holiday season... • Browlift/Facelift • Eyelid Surgery ALSO ASK ABOUT… • Breast Augmentation • Breast Lift • Breast Reduction • Tummy Tuck • Ultrasonic Liposuction • Laser Resurfacing • Lip Enhancement • Complete Skin Care Line • Botox, Radiesse, Juvederm and Sculptra

Be Well

Visalia Medical Clinic The Aesthetic Center alechtman@vmchealth.com 738-7572 | 5530 Avenida De Los Robles (West of Applebee’s), Visalia

All follow-ups are performed personally by Dr. Lechtman at The Aesthetic Center. ASPS CareCredit Financing

L I F E S T Y Laccepted. E | DECEMBER 2010

11


WORD PLAY

NEWS ON WRITING, BOOKS AND THE WORLD OF PUBLISHING Text by Diane Slocum

A

This year’s must-have or must-give Christmas book for Visalia residents is Chicken Soup for the Soul Christmas Magic: 101 Holiday Tales of Inspiration, Love, and Wonder. Our own Irene Morse is featured as the author of the second story in the book. (See Literary Arts) For children ages four to eight, the icy characters from Snowmen at Night are off on a new, holiday adventure. Written by Caralyn Buehner and illustrated by Mark Buehner, Snowmen at Christmas follows the snow people as they come alive at night to celebrate Christmas while humans sleep. For older children (and adults as well), The Christmas Gift by R. William Bennett introduces readers to school bully Ben, and newcomer Scott who has the courage to stand up to him. Though Scott begins as Ben’s daily torment target, they gradually demonstrate tolerance, forgiveness and love. Read the book Will the real Richard Castle please stand up? Fans of the television series Castle are having fun with a real-life plot twist, as novels by the show’s title character – mystery writer, Richard Castle – surface in bookstores. It’s a double mystery, as fans read the novels that tie into the show’s current storyline, and search for clues as to the identity of the real author. Some guesses are Tom Straw, Stephen Cannell, Stephen King, Andrew Marlowe with his wife Terri Miller, James Patterson and Nora Roberts. Awards This year there are two winners of the Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award. Retired American Diplomat Patricia McArdle won for her novel Farishta, about a diplomat in Afghanistan who provides refuge for women in a volatile outpost and endangers herself in the process. Publication is scheduled for June, 2011. Amy Ackley won for her young adult novel, Sign Language, which tells the story of how a 12-year-old’s life changes when her father contracts cancer. The book is due out in August 2011. Previous winners of this award include Bill Loehfelm’s Fresh Kills and James King’s Bill Warrington’s Last Chance. The latter books are now available. Indy Quillen won the Southern California Writers’ Conference Award for Outstanding Fiction with Ceremony. Only a month after the award, agent Paul Fedorko of N.S. Bienstock signed to represent her novel. Raul Ramos y Sanchez won first place in the Books into Movies Awards from Latino Literacy for his debut novel America Libre. The sequel, House Divided, will be out in January.

12

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

The Library The Socrates Café meets the second Tuesday of each month in the Visalia Branch Blue Room to discuss philosophical topics. A recent question was “What is Democracy?” The next meeting is scheduled for January 11 at 6:30 p.m. The January 20 independent film presentation will feature Alamar; in which a Mexican boy learns his fisherman father’s way of life before going to live with his mother in Italy. The library recently spotlighted the topics of Manifest Destiny, migration and immigration through such works as The Devil’s Highway: A True Story by Luis Alberto Urrea, The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson, and The Closing of the American Border: Terrorism. Immigration, and Security Since 9/11 by Edward Alden. The library’s recent Community Picks included Against Medical Advice: A True Story by James Patterson, The Great Arizona Orphan Abduction by Linda Gordon and Thieves of Darkness by Richard Doetsch. The next event will be on January 27 at 6:30 p.m. Each person who attends brings a book of their choosing. Conferences and Workshops The 2011 Writers Digest Conference will be held on Jan. 21 – 23 in New York City. Topics include “Getting Published in the Digital Age,” “The Future of Publishing,” and “Perfecting Your Pitch at the Pitch Slam.” Details at: http://www.writersdigest.com/conferencesevents. The Writers Studio San Francisco Workshop begins Jan. 24. This is a 10-week course designed for students at all levels who have not studied the workshops methods. Lorraine Babb is the instructor. Details at http://www.writerstudio.com/cart/show_course. php?cno=SF1Worksho. Contests Glimmer Train Press, Inc. offers monthly contests. Each contest is open from the first day of the month to the last. The January contest is for Very Short Fiction, not to exceed 3,000 words. Details: http:// www.glimmertrain.com/writguid1.html. The Last Word “I like to compare the holiday season with the way a child listens to a favorite story. The pleasure is in the familiar way the story begins, the anticipation of familiar turns it takes, the familiar moments of suspense, and the familiar climax and ending.” Fred Rogers (1928-2003)


%JTKUVOCU /GTT[ 8KUCNKC'[G%GPVGT from

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

13


C CHARITY

Text by Donna Leach

O

n October 12, Pam Scott addressed over 200 supporters at the Hands in the Community dinner and auction. She shared a testimony about her life, and the tragedy that struck her family in 1995 when her husband was caught in the crossfire between two rival gangs and killed – leaving her a widow with two young children to raise alone. To compound her difficulties, a recent battle with kidney failure had placed Pam on a waiting list for a matching donor. With limited income and major health issues, everyday chores like yard work had become a major challenge. However, through the efforts of Hands in the Community, Pam was helped by volunteers who removed weed growth to clear the way for a much-needed irrigation system on her property. Hands in the Community (HNC) is a Christian-based, nonprofit organization governed by a board of directors including several local businessmen and church members that connects available resources in the community with families in crisis, or 14

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

who are in need of short-term care. On October 12, friends and volunteers of Hands in the Community gathered at the Visalia Country Club for a dinner and auction to promote awareness for the organization, raise funds, and to allow people like Pam Scott to share their gratefulness for the work of the organization. “I appreciate the support and services received through HNC more than you can imagine,” Scott said. Belinda Boylan became involved with Hands in the Community in order to fulfill volunteer hours for college credits. But her intentions shifted as she saw what a difference the organization could make, “The level of care and support offered by this organization amazed me.” Boylan was especially amazed by an HNC program recently launched in our community: Gangs to Jobs – a newly developed project that includes providing job training through a mentoring program for individuals transitioning out of gang involvement. The program was shaped to mimic one in Fresno County which has proven to be successful.


L ILFI EF SE TS YT LY EL E| |D O E CC ET M OBER 2010

15


C CHARITY

Sharon and Kevin Fikkert, supporters of HNC, were in attendance that evening. Sharon said they became involved by visiting the organization’s website to choose a project that their Bible study group could work on together. They were given the opportunity to fulfill a request from a disabled family needing assistance to prepare for a move out of state. The group volunteered together and helped pack the family’s belongings. During a Lyons Club presentation by HNC founder Lester Moon, Valley Business Bank’s Terry Culotta was impressed with Moon’s initiative to start such an organization from scratch during this economically challenging time. “The calls for assistance are real and the time to help is now,” Terry added. Lester Moon is the founder and Executive Director of Hands in the Community. But more than that, he is the true driving force behind the organization. His level of dedication is evident in his willingness to sacrifice his own personal finances to ensure HNC’s success during its infancy. “I support the concept that people need to know about the Lord by the deeds of believers,” Moon said. The official launch date for Hands in the Community was January 2009. During its first year in operation, the fledgling organization managed to raise nearly $500,000 worth of goods and services that were distributed to and directly benefited members of our community. “For every $100 donated, HNC is able to generate $2500 worth of goods and services,” Moon explained. The dinner and auction raised around $15,000. “Our gospel is a social one. Anyone in the community can contact us with a need. For example, we don’t just feed someone who is hungry today. We find resources that will feed them for the next month, and then we help them get back on their feet so they can feed themselves. Sometimes that means preparing them for a job interview by providing proper clothing or a haircut,” Moon said. “HNC advocates on behalf of the most vulnerable members of our society who are the elderly and low-income families with children. And most importantly, we provide hope and encouragement to those calling us for help.” Dennis Smethers is a staff volunteer who has been with the organization since nearly the beginning. “The reward of seeing firsthand the difference this organization makes in the lives of people facing a crisis makes it all worthwhile,” Smethers said as he summed up his reasons for his continuing work with Hands in the Community. A pool of approximately 1,300 people have volunteered their time, but Hands in the Community still needs the support of local business leaders and individuals for donations. As with any non-profit group, there are numerous expenses that must be met to stay in operation. “Of course, needs increase during the holidays and winter months,” Moon added. Hands in the Community provides access to resources which include: medical care, parenting aids, financial, legal or paralegal, teenage mother support, help with filling out forms, food, home repairs, tutoring, short-term housing, shopping help, transportation to appointments, and prayer. To become involved, or make a tax deductible monetary donation, contact Hands in the Community at (559) 625-3822 or visit their website at www.hnconline@yahoo.org. Photos by Becca Chavez

16

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010


Show the World 9OUR 3MILE. At the dental office of Mariya Grigoryan, your smile is our priority. We provide expert dentistry without lavish prices, and timely, attentive care, so you leave happy every time. We offer comprehensive care for the whole family: sPERIODONTALCARE sRESTORATIVEWORK sLATESTINADVANCEDTEETHWHITENING sLASERTREATMENTMETHODS sORTHODONTICS BRACESANDINVISALIGN sIMPLANTS Our office features state-of-the-art technology and a highly trained staff to provide the very best in service for your smile.

-ARIYA'RIGORYAN $-$ 2634 W. Walnut Ave. Visalia CA 93277 p 559.732.7224


H HOME TOUR

Text By Aaron Collins | Photos by Forrest C avale of Third Element Studios

18

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010


HOME TOUR H

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

19


H HOME TOUR

A ON THE SPREAD: The great room of the Brian and Karla Perry home in Visalia takes full advantage of views of Valley Oaks on the property, one of the region’s most beloved defining features. The homesite is located along Packwood Creek, once the lifeblood of the area’s Native California Yokuts. TOP: A grand staircase near the Tuscan-themed Perry home entrance features wrought iron detailing, Cantera stone columns, and a fireplace that anchors the adjacent formal dining room.

20

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

long the southern edge of Visalia runs Packwood Creek, where commercial and suburban residential developments give way to fertile farmland dotted by towering valley oaks. Like the Kaweah Oaks Preserve, Mooney Grove stands nearby, perhaps a less pristine remnant of the not-so-distant past, reminding us how very wooded the area once appeared during a time when cougars and grizzly bears could still make their living on the forested Big Valley floor. Packwood Creek – one of the four main waterways in the Visalia area that branch from the Kaweah River Delta – once attracted the Central California Yokuts to make their lives here. But it has become more synonymous in recent years with commercial big box retail development via the nearby Packwood Creek Shopping Center. Real estate marketing has a way of quickly supplanting geographical features in the mind with commercial images via the blunt force of advertising repetition, while calling to mind only a scant memory of the thing itself. In short, it is easy to forget the creek in Packwood Creek, now with its sprawling asphalt parking lots and Chinese-made bargains. Not so for Brian and Karla Perry. They think of Packwood Creek because it runs just outside their windows along the property where they built their Tuscan-inspired residence. While some of us may forget the extent to which our survival depends on snowmelt from the Sierra Nevada, here the residents can experience a reminder, a literal connection to the figurative lifeblood of the region along its descent from the high country.


LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

21


H HOME TOUR

ABOVE: The master bath of the Perry home is flanked by imported Cantera stone columns that frame a view of the property’s ample grounds. TOP RIGHT: Christmas finds lots of decorating action at the Brian and Karla Perry’s new Visalia home, in addition to the interior design that was a collaboration between Karla and an interior decor firm.

22

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

The setting is one aspect of the home the Perrys like best. “We like the open floor plan with the view of the valley oak trees from the great room. And the way it is tucked back away from other homes makes it nice and safe for the kids to play and enjoy,” Karla says. Their home’s general Mediterranean stylistic heritage may be suggestive of Northern Italy, but it also could more broadly conjure Karla’s Portuguese heritage and the tile roofs of her family’s native Portugal. Symbolic of that family history within her home is a stained glass pantry door featuring a rendition of the Galo de Barcelos (“the rooster of Barcelos”), a beloved bit of Portuguese lore about a supposed lucky rooster in the city of Barcelos. The fable that inspired the piece has become an icon of a hard-won fight for justice. (Story has it that the guest at a rich man’s party was wrongly accused of stealing the host’s sterling cutlery and was exonerated in a desperate moment of fleecing: As the judge was about to eat a roasted rooster, the accused man said, “If I am innocent, let this rooster crow three times.” Just before his scheduled lynching, the rooster did, getting him off the hook, according to the tale.) In addition to the stained glass, other handcrafted touches contribute to the home’s intended “rustic castle” look via extensive faux painting treatments. Unique tile designs further the effects, reflecting an ongoing effort to underscore the castle theme, according to Karla, who is a registered dental hygienist originally from El Centro and San Diego. “Our niece asked us if she could have her princess-themed birthday party at our house because it looked like a castle,” Karla says, indicating that the decor persuaded at least one discriminating aficionado in the typical demographic interested in the theme. Brian, who serves not only as current king of the rustic Perry castle, also served as its owner/builder, while Karla’s ongoing role is that of court decorator, with input from Lisa Standlee at Modern Renaissance, an interior decorating company based in Porterville. The team applied her home’s overarching castle motif as liberally as possible, even reflecting it in a cabinet-style bathroom sink that got the faux royal treatment when Karla was unable to locate the perfect old one that she wanted.


H HOME TOUR

ABOVE: The master suite at the recently completed Perry home. “We are both very blessed to be able to finally have the home that we have always dreamed of,” Brian says.

“Brian became the owner/builder and spent many hours researching, dreaming, and planning the details of the house. A great number of ideas were generated from visiting model homes in Calabasas and the surrounding area, along with books of European home designs,” Karla says. Additionally, the Perrys say that Steve Sparshot was a great aid in putting all the ideas together as one on paper. Tim Chaney, a family friend, provided additional expertise and advice with various construction aspects. One decorative feature that has appeared in all three residences that the Perrys have owned since their marriage a decade ago is a plaque depicting the Last Supper, which is now embedded in the backsplash of the home’s butler’s pantry. The piece, a gift from Brian to Karla, has been plucked from its base repeatedly – and may be yet again, should the Perrys undertake the possibility of starting a new custom home. For now, this one still has a bit more work before completion; two in-the-works rooms upstairs include a game room and a home theatre room. “We have been collecting old movie pictures to hang in the theatre room,” Karla says of the rare off-theme excursion away from their castle home. 24

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

Another distinctive feature is the dining room fireplace. “At first I didn’t know what she was talking about and disagreed with her idea. But she got her way and it turned out beautifully and is now one of my favorite things in the house,” Brian says. So far, the couple say, Karla has gotten her way in keeping Brian’s mounted trophies from a South African safari in 2009, refusing to allow them in the great room. Negotiations are under way for their installation in the game room, although none of the five species have yet appeared there or anywhere visible in the Perry home. Karla moved to Visalia to attend San Joaquin Valley College where she met then SJVC employee Brian, a lifelong Visalian and graduate of Golden West High School and College of the Sequoias who has owned California Cartridge for the past 10 years. “I am very proud of Brian for starting his business on his own out of his home when he was a single young man of 25. He now has five employees and a new office with a lot more space to grow. Brian is a very driven and a person with great integrity and I am proud to be married to him. I think Brian would be successful at whatever he sets his mind to,” says Karla, who is quite possibly Brian’s biggest fan. And the feeling is mutual.


MUSIC SCENE M

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

25


H HOME TOUR

“I was very impressed and motivated when I met Karla,” Brian says. “She was a single mother putting herself through college. She showed me that I could do anything that I set my mind to and that is what made me take the risk of giving up my position at SJVC to start my own business. I saw how she had struggled but kept on following her dreams.” Together the couple now have two children, Bryson and Briannah, plus Karla’s son Nick, currently a student at California State University Monterey Bay. An additional castle resident is high school senior Barbara, an exchange student from Argentina. So a castle theme might seem fanciful to some, but it signifies a successful union as the two have established their humble empire together. “We are both very blessed to be able to finally have the home that we have always dreamed of,” Brian says. “What made the planning of our home easy was that we both have the same taste in style.”

ABOVE: A bas relief depiction of The Last Supper has been a feature of all three homes owned by the Perrys during their marriage. A gift from Brian to Karla, the object has been plucked and reinstalled with each move, shown here mounted within a tile backsplash. RIGHT: The kitchen for the Perry residence features two kinds of granite, pendant lighting and custom cabinetry that reflects a Tuscan castle theme, while concealing the modern appliances beneath.

26

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010


HOME TOUR H

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

27


L LITERARY ARTS

W

hen Irene Morse retired from her job as a CPA in 2004, she hated retirement. “There was nothing about it that I liked,” Morse said. Now, as a regular contributor to Lifestyle Magazine with a story in the latest edition of the Chicken Soup series, her sentiment has changed. While back in 2004 Morse could brag that she had the cleanest closets around, reorganizing shelves and cleaning drawers was not satisfying to her. However, she did enjoy keeping a travel journal and writing letters. She had also been writing articles about the Visalia Community Players for a local newspaper for about a dozen years. “I’ve been writing all my life,” Morse said. “I love words. In my youth I satisfied the urge by writing 12 to 14 page letters.” But in retirement, not even letter writing was enough. Morse was rolling around, not knowing where she was drifting when she attended a women’s networking luncheon in Visalia. At that luncheon, she met Karen Tellalian (currently Lifestyle Magazine’s executive editor) and told her she had always wanted to be a writer. Morse was bold enough to ask if Tellalian would take a look at her travel writing. Tellalian described her first thought about this request as “Oh, geesh, retired accountant thinks she’s a writer now.” Not one to 28

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

Text by Diane Slocum

overlook possibilities, however, Tellalian quickly reconsidered and agreed to look at Morse’s writing. “I gave her excerpts from my travel journal,” Morse said, “and walked out with a new career.” Morse’s route to this career was a long one. She grew up in Las Vegas and moved to Visalia in 1962. She had several careers along the way as she worked as a single mom to earn a living and support her children. She had never been to college except for taking what she described as “fun” classes at College of the Sequoias, until she became a return student at age 41. Morse was 45 years old when she graduated from California State University, Fresno, and passed her CPA certification within the week. She worked for a few years for various firms before going into business on her own. During this time, Morse’s prime creative outlet was her participation in the Visalia Community Players. She has been involved since 1970 as an actor, director, and business manager, as well as helping with wardrobe and other jobs. This year, Morse won the Elizabeth Dobson (Lizzie) Award for best director for Seven. Her husband Gary Benjamin, also won an award for his role in A Perfect Prayer. Morse will be directing Lonely Planet, to be performed in February.


LASER SERVICES Laser Vein Treatment IPL - Photorejuvenation Acne Treatment Laser Hair Removal Wrinkle Treatment - Matrix IR Skin Tightening Skin Resurfacing - Matrix RF Revage 670™

SKIN CARE Botox Juvederm™ Perlane Radiesse Hydrafacial™ Acid Peel Vi Peel VISIA

OUR PRODUCTS OBAGI™ ClariSonic MD™ GloMinerals™ Clinique Medical Vivite Skin Ceuticals (Phloretin CF - strongest topical antioxidant)

(Skin Analysis)

(Laser Hair Restoration)

BODY CONDITIONING VelaShape™

LASH EXPANDERS Latisse™ RevitaLash Elastilash by OBAGI™

LIFEST YLE | OCTOBER 2010

29


L LITERARY ARTS

The launch of Morse’s writing career came with her first published article in Direct Magazine, another of Tellalian’s publications. This magazine also published her story “Winter Cabin: A new family tradition for the Holidays” in December 2006. It was this story that just brought Morse’s career to a new level. The article began with an anecdote about her young grandson’s memory of a little excursion they made when he was five. The fact that he remembered this enjoyable but minor event changed the way the family celebrated Christmas. Morse and her husband put creating warm memories at the top of their Christmas wish list for their entire large family. Their plan included renting a cabin at Shaver Lake for a week, and inviting everyone to come and go as their schedules permitted. Morse is hard-pressed to say whether getting published for the very first time in Direct Magazine or appearing in Chicken Soup is more exciting. “The depth of emotion wasn’t much different between the two,” she said. When Morse opened Direct Magazine and saw her name on the page of the magazine as an author for the very first time, she was thrilled. But she learned that satisfaction for a writer isn’t always so immediate; the drawn-out process of getting into the Chicken Soup book took away some of that success’ excitement: Morse submitted her story in June or July of 2009, hoping to have it accepted for the 2009 Christmas book. But when she finally received a response from the publishers, she learned that they were not rejecting it, but they were not accepting it for their 2009 publication either. With that kind of ambiguity, Morse said she had to put the process out of her mind. After two more months, Morse learned at last that her work would be featured in the 2010 book Chicken Soup for the Soul: Christmas Magic: 101 Holiday Tales of Inspiration, Love, and Wonder. “My first thought was that this is big,” she said. “This is national.” Morse thought about people all over the country thumbing through the book and coming across her story. When they do, they won’t have to thumb very far. Hers is the second story in the book, in a section titled “It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas.” Morse is sharing the pages with some heady company. Other contributors include Ferida Wolff, author of 17 children’s 30

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

books such as The Story Blanket; Stefanie Wass whose essays have been published in the LA Times, Seattle Times and Christian Science Monitor; and Bruce Robinson, an award-winning, internationally published cartoonist who has appeared in the National Enquirer, Saturday Evening Post, Woman’s World and The Sun. “This recognition showed that I could have another career,” said Morse. “And if it never goes further, that is okay, because the process is so joyful. If nothing else happens, my family gets joy out of reading the stories.” And the stories do keep coming. Together with her husband who is blind, Morse is writing a series of articles on traveling with someone with a handicap. They each write a segment on the same topic from their own point of view. “It’s interesting to hear what Gary gets out of it,” laughs Morse.“He likes the food.” Morse is also compiling stories concerning her experiences with her 92-year-old mother in hopes that they might turn into a book. Since she first recognized that her mother was aging, Morse says that every visit is another story. “Some are funny, some poignant,” she said. “It helps me get through the emotions.” Morse continues to write compelling pieces for Lifestyle Magazine, such as her articles about a woman who escaped from Rwandan violence at age 13, and another who was a prisoner in Auschwitz. She also hopes to write fiction, and is studying short stories to learn how the masters can say so much in so few words.

PREVIOUS PAGE TOP LEFT: Irene Morse and her husband, Gary, alighting from a balloon tour in Cappadocia, Turkey. PREVIOUS PAGE TOP RIGHT: Irene Morse (far right) with friends and husband, Gary (far left), in Trogir, Croatia. ABOVE LEFT: Irene with her son, Bill, at the top of the theater in Pamukkale, Turkey. ABOVE RIGHT: Irene with a little Turkish girl and her grandfather.


DID YOU KNOW?

Dr. Didya Know-December Tip *magazine.org/handbook

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

31


C CULINARY ARTS

From Opening Act to Main Event

I

Photos by Kelley Frese of Studio 317 | Recipes by Elaine Dekassian

32

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

n today’s realm of entertaining, modern hors d’oeuvres move from opening act to main event as dining styles like aperitif and tapas gain in popularity. After all, finger foods and casual mingling are the centerpiece of most fêtes, but there’s nothing quite like a holiday party to bring out the classic celebration combination of little black dresses, flutes of champagne, and trays of treats. Quintessential bite-size crowd pleasers are perfect before a dinner, or to simply have on hand for when an afternoon with friends and family snowballs into something a little more festive. So this year, let finger-food classics and conversation take center stage as your guests gather to toast to a new year of health, wealth, and happiness.


CULINARY ARTS C

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

33


C CULINARY ARTS

Chilled Jumbo Prawns Ingredients: 24 jumbo prawns (use U-16 or larger – that is how many prawns are in a pound) Crab Boil (found in spice aisle of market) 1 lemon, quartered Preparation: Fill a large bowl with ice and water. Set aside for now (will be used after the shrimp are boiled). Boil 12 quarts of water in large pasta pot. Add crab boil packet. Add the quartered lemon to the water, and bring to a rolling boil. Add the shrimp in their shells and let boil for 2 minutes. Turn heat off and let sit in water one minute more (use a timer). Use a strainer and take the shrimp from the boiling water right to the water bath (bowl of ice and water). Remove from bath and peel, leaving the tails intact. Bloody Mary Cocktail Sauce Ingredients: 1 C ketchup 1 lemon, juiced 2 tsp Worchestershire sauce Splash Tabasco or to taste 1 tbsp horseradish ¼ C vodka Preparation: Add all the ingredients in a bowl and serve with the shrimp. Use extra lemons for squeezing over the prawns if desired. Salmon Mousse in flute Cucumber Cups Ingredients: 5oz smoked salmon 4oz cream cheese, softened ½ tsp grated lemon peel 1 tbsp lemon juice 1 Armenian cucumber Dill to garnish Cayenne pepper to taste Essential equipment: 1-3/8 inch fluted pastry cutter Melon baller Preparation: Cut cucumber into 2-inch thick slices using the pastry cutter. With the melon baller, scoop out the center to make a slight indentation as a base for the mousse. Place smoked salmon, cream cheese, lemon peel and lemon juice in a food processor or blender; and pulse to a smooth paste. Fill piping bag with mousse and pipe into cucumber cups. Top with dill sprig and lemon peel using a zester. 34

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010


C CULINARY ARTS

Ham, Gruyere and Dijon Palmiers Yield: 24 Ingredients: 1 sheet puff pastry (about 9 ounces) thawed and covered with dish towel to keep from drying out 4 tbsp Dijon mustard 3oz grated aged Gruyere cheese Âź C freshly and finely grated parmesan cheese 4oz very thinly sliced black forest ham Parchment or wax paper

Mini Holiday Brie wrapped in Puff Pastry Ingredients: 1 Brie wheel 2 tbsp cherry preserves 2 tbsp dried cherries 2 tbsp chopped walnuts 1 small red delicious apple, cored and thinly sliced 1 tbsp brown sugar 1 sheet puff pastry (found in freezer section) 1 egg 1 tablespoon milk or cold water Cookie cutter – holiday holly leaves are what I use Small dish with water to seal the Brie Pastry brush Preparation: Preheat oven to 400 degrees Thaw puff pastry in the refrigerator overnight. Lay out, covered with a dish towel until ready for use. Take a knife or pizza cutter and remove 2 inches from one narrow side to save for decoration. Cut brie in half horizontally to create two halves, like a sandwich. Spoon the preserves onto one half. Lay the sliced apples in a fan-like pattern atop the preserves. Follow with the dried cherries, walnuts and then the brown sugar. Place the top half of brie wheel back on top. Place brie in the center of the pastry. Using your fingers, wet all the edges. Begin folding pastry up over the brie and wrap as a package. Turn over and place on a baking sheet covered with parchment paper. (It will slide right off after baking and that is a lovely thing.) Whip the egg and the tablespoon of milk or water with a fork or whisk until it is smooth. Using the pastry brush, liberally brush the wrapped pastry all over. Cut out the leaf patterns (from the 2 inch piece of pastry cut off earlier) with your cookie cutter and place decoratively on top. Brush with more of the egg wash. Bake in the 400 degree oven for approximately 15 to 20 minutes or until golden brown (be sure to watch it from time to time). Serve on a cake plate or stand with crackers, dried fruit and nuts. 36

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

Preparation: Position the sheet of pastry on a lightly floured counter so that the short side is closest to you. Roll the pastry out into a 10 x 14 inch rectangle. Trimming the edges is necessary to make the pastry neat. Using a spatula, spread the Dijon over the pastry. Distribute the Gruyere and parmesan evenly over the surface. Arrange the ham in a single even layer. Lay a piece of parchment or wax paper on top, and gently compress the layers with a rolling pin. Peel off the paper carefully. Cut the rectangle in half widthwise to make two 10 x 7 inch pieces. With your fingers, gently roll the short edge of one of the bands into the center, and then roll the opposite edge in so the two rolls meet in the middle and resemble a double scroll. Press lightly so the rolls stick together (spread a few drops of water where the two rolls meet to help them stick). Repeat with the second piece. Wrap the rolls in plastic wrap and chill until they are firm, at least an hour in the refrigerator, or 30 minutes in the freezer. Preheat oven to 425 degrees, and line two baking sheets with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat. With a sharp knife, slice each roll into 12 pieces; and arrange them on the sheet at least 1 inch apart and bake until the pastry is nicely browned and flaky and the cheese is melted but not burned (10 to 12 minutes). Serve warm, or within the hour if possible.


CULINARY ARTS C

TUVEJP

QIPUPHSBQIZEFTJHO

Bring Your Garden Into The Party The Perfect Holiday Gift! Unique, Elegant and Functional

A handcrafted wrought iron table that easily attaches to pots, urns and even wine barrels. It’s Time to Turn Your Patio Into a Wine Tasters Paradise. For information on how to order, contact info@ilovetheledge.com or call 559-294-3344

www.ilovetheledge.com

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

37


B BUSINESS PROFILE

Text by K atie Desrochers | Photos by Taylor Vaughn

I

n the words of Henry David Thoreau, “The eye is the jewel of the body”. This seems a fair assessment of what is perhaps our most essential sense; because more than hearing or taste, touch or smell, our eyes and their sense of sight are what most effectively connects us to our surroundings. We often believe our eyes above anything else, and equate sight with true perception. So great is the significance of sight, that in the English language, “I see” effectively means the same thing as “I understand”. But what happens when eyes need help? There are many things that can interfere with healthy vision, from astigmatisms and cataracts, to ocular injury and disease. Eyes are fragile, and their care specialized. That’s why it’s important to choose the right professionals to care for your vision. Fortunately, sophisticated eye care combines with a family-owned philosophy at Visalia Eye Center. “We’re unique in the fact that this is more of a family-run business,” explained Office Manager Cherie Cozine. “We want to provide very personable, professional care. For instance, we do satisfaction surveys, and I look at every single one of them and take their comments into careful consideration.” 38

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

Once upon a time, losing all or part of one’s vision to injury, disease, or the ravages of time was an inevitability, and glasses were the only corrective option available for any and all vision complaints. But thanks to the advances of modern medical technology, the treatment of declining vision has come a long way. Now, ocular irregularities, injuries and degenerative diseases can be assuaged by a number of procedures and surgeries that can reduce or completely eliminate a patient’s dependence on glasses and contacts. Visalia Eye Center offers a variety of professional and ethical treatment options. “We do complete eye care with both optometrists and ophthalmologists on site. Dr. David Feil has been practicing for more than 30 years, Dr. Stan Fiel is also a cornea specialist, and Doctors Michael Baumann and Matthew Oblad are our Optometrists with many combined years of experience behind them,” said Cozine. “We also have a glaucoma specialist starting in August of 2011. We do everything from refractive needs (contacts and glasses) that can be chosen in our optical shop, all the way to surgery that can be done in our fullyequipped AAAHC certified surgical center.”


BUSINESS PROFILE B

Visalia Eye Center first developed as an expansion of Dr. David Feil’s ophthalmology practice. The Center opened in 1983 to offer more comprehensive diagnostic and treatment services to his patients, and was the first office-based ambulatory eye surgery center in the South Valley. In 2005, the practice and surgery center moved to its current location, and brought the Courtyard Surgery Pavilion and Courtyard Aesthetics under its umbrella of all-encompassing eye care. Today, Visalia Eye Center offers several surgical options for vision correction, including: modern, no-stitch/no-shot cataract and lens implant surgery, laser vision correction (Lasik), glaucoma surgery, laser retina surgery, and cornea transplant and other corneal surgery, including DSEK (descemets stripping endothelial keratoplasty). It’s incredible to think how significantly the face of eye care has changed in just a few short decades. Corrective surgery options such as Lasik are particularly revolutionary, as they enable individuals whose vision is blighted by astigmatism and other such tissue irregularities to improve their sight at a relatively young age. Lasik – which stands for Laser in-Situ-Keratomileusis, and is also known as Laser Vision Correction – is a procedure by which the cornea is reshaped with lasers to achieve a form of vision correction which is near-immediate, and long-lasting. Patients who elect to undergo Lasik are often under the age of 45, and therefore stand to benefit from many years of clear vision. “Personally, I’m not a Lasik candidate myself,” said Cozine, “but I understand why the possibility of going from waking up in the morning and not being able to see, to waking up and being able to see everything is truly amazing.” Visalia Eye Center has a long tradition of Lasik surgery success – both Doctors David and Stan Feil have been performing the procedure since it was first FDA approved in 1996.

PREVIOUS PAGE: (Front Row) Dr. Michael Baumann, Dr. Stan Feil, Dr. David Feil, and Dr. Matthew Oblad.

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

39


B BUSINESS PROFILE

The advantage of Lasik surgery is its ability to grant improved vision to younger eyes who would have otherwise relied on glasses for a lifetime. But as eyes grow older, even the healthiest are sometimes beset with vision problems, and many mature patients are afflicted with cornea issues and cataracts. Fortunately, Visalia Eye Center offers excellent solutions to combat the trouble of aging eyes. The advent of cataract and cornea transplants are a revolution in restoring sight, and a miracle for today’s patients. “Our patients who have cataracts and other debilitating conditions, it can really limit their ability to do things, like drive,” explained Cozine, “but they still want that freedom, and so it’s very rewarding to be able to offer it to them.” The level of medical expertise and ethical treatment at Visalia Eye Center is something at which its professionals strive to succeed in and improve upon daily. The specialization of the Doctors Feil and all their professionals is a wonderful example of how rewarding the latest advancements in medical technology can be. “In some cases, we are bringing back people from nearly the brink of blindness,” reflected Cozine.“To be able to provide healthy eyes and the opportunity for people to continue to have sight is very rewarding. The freedom that good vision brings is amazing.” 40

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

Indeed, there is something extra-special about the ability to restore sight. The solutions of medicine often seem miraculous, but just one advantage of modern eye surgeries is that they deliver some of the fastest results of any procedure. Says Corzine, “Working here is one of the most rewarding things I have ever done, because we are able to provide such immediate results.” For more information on your local solution to worldclass eye care, call (559) 733-4372 or visit http://www. visaliaeye.com/.


BUSINESS PROFILE B

8JTIJOH :PV:PVS'BNJMZ

B 3FMBYFE )PMJEBZ4FBTPO

Diabetic Wound Care Complete Surgical Reconstruction Heel Pain | Sports Medicine General Podiatric Care for Elders Ingrown Townails

2914 W. Main Street, Visalia, CA | 559.627.2849 | 559.627.9772 fax | www.flahertyfootcare.com

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

41


S SEASONAL

42

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010


A

SEASONAL S

ll over the world, Christmas celebrations reflect local culture and traditions. Our beloved winter holiday is both a sacred religious day, and a global cultural and commercial phenomenon. For two thousand years, people around the world have been observing Christmas with traditions that are both religious and secular in nature. Let’s take a look at the history behind what is arguably America’s favorite holiday, and how Christmas is celebrated around the world today. A Brief History of an Ancient Holiday Long before the arrival of Christianity, the middle of winter was a time of celebration. December 21 – the longest day of the year – was a day to celebrate the end of winter’s darkness. Early Europeans rejoiced during the winter solstice when the worst, shortest of winter’s gloomy days were behind them and they could look forward to more hours of sunlight. The end of December was a prime time for feasts throughout Europe. Many cattle were slaughtered that time of year, so they would not have to be fed during the winter when food supplies were scarce. For many, this was the only time of year fresh meat was plentiful. Beer and wine that had been fermenting for months was also ready for drinking, so this season was a natural time for large festivities. Easter was the main holiday in the earliest years of Christianity, but the birth of Jesus was not celebrated until the fourth century. As the Bible does not mention an actual date of Jesus’ birth, Pope Julius I is said to have designated December 25. Many historians believe that this date was chosen in an effort to absorb pre-existing pagan traditions. By holding Christmas at the same time of year as traditional winter solstice festivals, church leaders increased the chances that the holiday would be popularly embraced. Originally called the Feast of the Nativity, the custom quickly spread to Egypt, then to England by the end of the sixth century, and through Scandinavia by the eighth century. A wave of religious reform during the 17th century changed the way Christmas was celebrated in Europe. History reports that when Oliver Cromwell and his Puritan forces took over England in 1645, they vowed to rid England of decadence, and thus cancelled Christmas. Charles II was eventually returned to the throne, and along with him Christmas was revived. But even more orthodox in their beliefs were the pilgrims who left England for America in 1620. Christmas was not an official holiday in America’s early history, and it was actually outlawed for a time in Boston. English customs fell further out of favor following the American Revolution. The first Christmas under America’s new constitution was a day like any other for many – Congress was even in session on December 25, 1789. Christmas was finally declared a federal holiday in 1870. As Americans began to embrace Christmas as time of good will, peace and family closeness, old customs were Tex t by C arole Firstman unearthed. Over the next century, Americans built a tradition all their own, which today includes sending holiday cards, gift-giving, and decorating trees. Construction workers are reported to have initiated the Christmas tree tradition in 1931 in Rockefeller Center.

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

43


S SEASONAL

Celebrations Around the World Christmas is a time for getting together – spending time with loved ones, cooking and sharing food, and the exchanging of gifts. The festivities can be strikingly different from country to country. Let’s take a look at the Christmas traditions of our friends around the world. Australia: December 25 falls during hot summer vacation, so it’s not surprising that many of the country’s celebrations take place outdoors. Instead of the traditional winter scene, Christmas here is often celebrated in the gardens and beaches. An event called Carols by Candlelight is perhaps the most popular activity. This is held every year on Christmas Eve, where tens of thousands of people gather in the city of Melbourne to sing their favorite songs. Ethiopia: Ethiopia follows the ancient Julian calendar, so Ethiopians celebrate Christmas on January 7. The Ethiopian Orthodox Church’s celebration of Christ’s birth is called Ganna. On this day, families attend church and everyone dresses in white. Most Ethiopians don a traditional shamma, which is a thin, white cotton wrap with brightly colored stripes across the ends. Religious observances, feasting, and games are the focus of the season. France: Here Christmas is called Noel. Celebrations begin on December 5, which is St. Nicholas Eve, but Christmas Eve is the highlight, with church bells ringing throughout the cities and children singing carols in chorus. In cathedral squares, the story of Christ’s birth is re-enacted by players and puppets. After church on Christmas Day, families settle in for an abundant feast, including buche de Nol, a rich, buttercreamfilled cake shaped and frosted to look like a Yule log. 44

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010


SEASONAL S

More Than A Trusted Advisor

Front L-to-R: Monica Peterson, Amy Gunn, Penney Sick, Jim Wohlford Back L-to-R: Sherri Rigney, David Sharp, Lupe Sanchez

Jim Wohlford – Branch Manager & Senior Vice President/Investments Lupe Sanchez – Vice President/Investments David Sharp – Vice President/Investments Penney Sick – Vice President/Investments Amy Gunn – Client Service Associate Monica Peterson – Office Coordinator Sherri Rigney – Wire Operator

 t   &BTU$BMEXFMMt7JTBMJB $BMJGPSOJB Stifel, Nicolaus & Company, Incorporated | Member SIPC and NYSE

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

45


SEASONAL

Germany: Four Sundays before Christmas, German families make an Advent wreath of fir or pine branches and four colored candles. A candle is lit on the wreath each Sunday. During the weeks leading up to Christmas, homes are filled with the delightful smells of baking loaves of sweet bread, spicy cookies called lebkuchen, and cakes filled with candied fruit. Children leave letters on their windowsills for Christkind, a winged figure dressed in white robes and a golden crown who distributes gifts. Sometimes the letters are decorated with glue and sprinkled with sugar to make them sparkle. Holland: Dutch children eagerly await the arrival of Sinterklaas on St. Nicholas Day early in December. Sinterklaas – or St. Nicholas – can be found wearing traditional bishop’s robes and carrying a huge sack full of gifts as he rides into towns across Holland on a white horse. In each city he is typically greeted with a parade. Each year Dutch television broadcasts the official arrival of St. Nicholas live to the nation. Families celebrate St. Nicholas Eve at home with hot chocolate and a letterbanket, a “letter cake” made in the shape of the first letter of the family’s last name. Italy: The season begins on the first Sunday of Advent, which is four Sundays before Christmas. During this period, children go from house to house reciting Christmas poems and singing. Markets are filled with shoppers looking for gifts and new figures for the family’s manger scene. In Rome, cannons are fired from Castel St. Angelo on Christmas Eve to announce the beginning of the holiday season. A 24-hour fast ends with an elaborate Christmas feast. 46

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

Mexico: The weather is warm and mild throughout the season. Families shop for gifts, ornaments, and tasty treats in the market stalls. Many decorate their homes with lilies and evergreens. Family members cut intricate designs in brown paper bags to make lanterns called farolitos. Sand and candles are carefully placed inside these luminarias and set along sidewalks, windowsills, rooftops and outdoor walls to illuminate the neighborhood with the spirit of Christmas. It’s a Small World, After All From country to country, region to region, Christmas traditions are varied and unique. We each have our special ways of celebrating life, family and peace, but no matter the language, culture or customs of each land, the spirit of Christmas is about love and goodwill. It’s a small world, after all.


SEASONAL S

Order your Holiday Poinsettias TODAY! Wrapped and ready to go.. Delivered to your Holiday Door $72 per six plants

Broker/Owner NMLS #252789

559.734.4920

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

47


H HOLIDAY COCKTAILS

N

othing completes the holidays quite like the perfect drink. Whether you’re clinking glasses with friends, wrapping gifts, or cozying up to a roaring fire, a sip of something festive is just the thing to make you feel merry. Warm up after window shopping, or light up your holiday fête with one of these jolly libations. This season’s drinks evoke the most indulgent flavors of the holidays, and are the perfect way to spice up classics like hot cocoa and candy canes. This year, make it a joyous holiday with one of these delicious celebrations in a cup.

48

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010


HOLIDAY COCKTAILS H

Mrs. Claus’ Mint Chocolate Ingredients: 5 oz. Hot Chocolate 1 oz. DeKuyper® Peppermint Schnapps Whipped Cream Chocolate Shavings Optional: Candy Cane Preparation: Pour peppermint schnapps into heatproof mug or glass. Fill with hot chocolate and stir. Top with whipped cream and chocolate shavings. Garnish with candy cane.

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

49


H HOLIDAY COCKTAILS

Santa’s Little Green Helper Ingredients: 1 oz. Vodka 1 oz. DeKuyper® Sour Apple Schnapps 1 oz. Peach Schnapps 1 oz. Coconut Rum 1 oz. Sweet & Sour Mix Preparation: Pour ingredients into a shaker with ice. Shake and strain into a cocktail glass.

White Christmas Dream Ingredients: 1 oz. Vodka 1 oz. Amaretto Almond Liqueur 1 oz. Heavy Cream Optional: Nutmeg Preparation: Pour ingredients into a shaker with ice. Shake and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with nutmeg. 50

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010


HOLIDAY COCKTAILS H

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

51


H HOLIDAY COCKTAILS

Christmas Cosmo Ingredients: 1 oz. Cranberry Juice 1 oz. Cointreau® 2 oz. Vodka 1 tsp Lime Juice, fresh Optional: Frozen Cranberries Preparation: Pour ingredients into a shaker with ice. Shake and strain into a chilled martini glass. Garnish with frozen cranberries.

Blitzen-52 Shot Ingredients: 1/3 shot Kalua® Coffee Liqueur 1/3 shot Amaretto Almond Liqueur 1/3 shot Bailey’s® Irish Cream Preparation: Carefully layer ingredients by pouring each one, in order, over a spoon into shot glass; Kahlua, Amaretto, Bailey’s. 52

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010


HOLIDAY COCKTAILS H

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

53


FASHION

54

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010


Text Sharon Mosley

THE LONG AND THE SHORT OF IT

FASHION F

W

ith holiday parties fast approaching, panic can set in when thinking about what to wear. The dress code for the social scene is no longer “one dress fits all” – but that perfect party ensemble is easy to put together if you follow a few guidelines. “However rarely you’re required to dress up, it pays to be prepared,” says Lisa Armstrong, editor of Harper’s Bazaar magazine. “A specific event provides an excellent, bona fide excuse to buy something new, but there’s nothing like an imminent deadline to muddle the brain and miraculously empty the stores of anything remotely suitable.” Instead, Armstrong suggests shopping early and sticking to a “tightly edited festive repertoire” that prevents impulse purchases. “Trends tend to come and go,” she says, “but for parties, they tend to sit tight.” Here are some of Armstrong’s tips on navigating the special-occasion dress wardrobe: • Classics are classics for a reason. A choice among the little black dress, little navy-blue dress or little gray dress is your passport to most formal events. For daytime, just take the color intensity down a few shades. • Even if you choose a little black dress, don’t select a silhouette that is humdrum. Instead, look for a dress with subtle details, such as lace trim, panels, embroidery or pleating. • Wearing intense color in a flattering shade can last for years, even though it might not go under the radar as easily as a neutral frock that bears frequent wearings. • Shine casts a flattering glow on the face, but it also draws the eye to lumps and bumps. It’s better to use pearls, diamonds, diamante, or a jeweled neck plate to light up your skin. • While brocades and patterns have instant appeal, they can become all too familiar after a few outings. • Showing off gleaming skin is important. “To a degree, the rule seems to be the skimpier the dress, the more festive,” says Armstrong. But even though necklines have continued to plunge since the 16th century, that’s no excuse for vulgarity. “Bare arms, legs and backs (within reason) always look classier than cleavage as deep as the Grand Canyon.” • Strapless gowns can be a supremely elegant statement, but not if they don’t fit and look as if they’re going to slip off. Visit a tailor beforehand to avoid that regrettable fate. • A beautiful gown or dress doesn’t need much help, but you can make a truly winning finish with a dazzling pair of shoes and one beautiful piece of jewelry. LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

55


PERFORMANCES

Text By Marsha Peltzer

A

fter weeks of practice and much anticipation, the participants in the Symphony League’s signature fundraising event “Dancing with the VIPs” came together on November 6 with more than 300 guests in attendance. Tension mounted when the judges asked for more time to deliberate, and featured professional entertainers continued to delight the crowd as the votes were tallied. Community celebrity Kathleen Remillard and her “smooth dancer” partner Dr. Dean Levitan were proclaimed the winners. It was agreed that much fun was had by all – both those onstage and off. Kathleen has been the Director of the Creative Center Foundation for six years. She is a graduate of Cal Poly, where she majored in Business. She is married to Rick Remillard, and is the proud mother of three children: Lorraine, Luke and Rocky. Kathleen says she has a new understanding of the frustration and drama that the “Dancing with the Stars” television series participants face during their practices. “I knew in my mind that the foot should turn right but it wanted to go left,” she said, though the judges agreed that she certainly got it right on the day of the competition! On Saturday, January 22, the Tulare County Symphony will ring in the new year with a concert devoted to “Classical Delights” and will feature one of the Valley’s musical treasures, Svetlana Harris, who will play one of Mozart’s most popular piano concertos. Following on the heels of the Symphony’s 50th anniversary, Music Director Bruce Kiesling is pleased to present a new season that celebrates many of the best known and loved orchestral classics. Stravinsky’s Pulcinella Suite will begin the program. Pulcinella is a ballet by Igor Stravinsky based on an 18th century play; Pulcinella is a character originating from Commedia dell’arte. It is unclear exactly who composed the original ballet, but Stravinsky rewrote the older music in a more modern way by borrowing specific themes and textures, and interjecting modern rhythms, cadences and harmonies. It is often considered to be the first piece of Stravinsky’s neoclassical period. The Suite is derived from the Ballet, and consists of eight movements. Bruce Kiesling is a master at explaining the intricacies of the pieces he conducts, so plan to be on hand for his pre-concert discussion. The orchestra celebrates Mozart’s 250th birthday with the very popular Piano Concerto #23 K.244. Guest pianist Svetlana Rudikova-Harris is both a master teacher and concert performer 56

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

whose accomplishments have given her a place in the world of music which few have attained. She is an international recording artist, a concert soloist, and a decorated teacher who holds three masters degrees in performance, and an additional special certification for children’s education. Her private studio is a part of the Wyndfall Conservatory, and her studio members come from all corners of the Central Valley. At five years old, Rudikova-Harris gave her own piano recital; and performing works – including her own compositions – won her the Russian State Piano Competition at age nine. Her recording credits are too numerous to mention, and her awards include Gold Medalist for the Russian National Young Performance Competition, winner of the Russian Choral Conducting Competition, winner of the National Piano Prize, Russian Piano Competition, and accompanist to some of the great performers of our time. The final selection of this concert is Mendelssohn’s Symphony #4 in A Major, commonly known as the “Italian” Symphony. The work has its origins in a tour of Europe which occupied Mendelssohn from 1829 to 1931. Its inspiration is the color and atmosphere of Italy, where the composer made sketches but left the work incomplete. In a letter to his parents when he was just 20 years old he wrote, “This is Italy! And now has begun what I have always thought to be the supreme joy in life. And I am loving it. Today was so rich that now, in the evening, I must collect myself a little.” The symphony was finished in Berlin in March 1833, and Mendelssohn conducted the first performance himself in London on May 13, 1933, at a London Philharmonic Society concert. The symphony’s success and Mendelssohn’s popularity would continue to influence the course of British music for the rest of the century. However, Mendelssohn never published the symphony, even after revisions in 1837. It only appeared in print in 1851, after his death. Tickets are available at the Symphony Office (559) 723-28600.


PERFORMANCES P

Visalia Medical Clinic Sleep well … be well Sleep disorders can cause: ‡6QRULQJ ‡:HLJKWJDLQ ‡,UULWDELOLW\ ‡+HDGDFKHV ‡'HSUHVVLRQ ‡'LI¿FXOW\FRQFHQWUDWLQJ ‡+LJKEORRGSUHVVXUH ‡0HPRU\LPSDLUPHQW 7KH6OHHS'LVRUGHU&HQWHUFDQKHOS\RXVOHHSEHWWHU DWQLJKWDQGIXQFWLRQEHWWHUGXULQJWKHGD\

Call today for a consultation. 74-SLEEP (747-5337)

vmchealth.com 5400 W. Hillsdale

739-2000

208 W. Main St. | Suite 8 | Visalia | 93291 | Call for an appointment: 635.7590

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

57


The dancers of Central California Ballet preset The Nutcracker. This iconic performance tells the enchanting fairy tale of a Christmas come to life with traditional ballet, and the music of Tchaikovsky. A holiday dream for all ages! Reserved seating, ticket prices $20-$50. When: Saturday, December 18, 2p and 7:30p Where: William Saroyan Theatre, 700 M Street, Fresno Contact: 877-608-5883 THEATERPERFORMANCESMUSIC D E C .“Meet me at the Manger” – A Christmas Musical Visalia Christian School presents their Elementary School Musical “Meet Me at the Manager”. A delightful, energetic musical that teaches us about the gifts of the wise men, and what God really wants from each of us. Admission is free. When: Thursday December 16, 7:00p Where: Visalia First Assembly Worship Center – 3737 South Akers, Visalia Contact: VCS Office 733-9073 or www.visaliachristianschools.org

16

D E C . Sons of the San Joaquin – Annual Christmas Concert Known for their lifetime of family singing and true love of cowboy music, The Sons of the San Joaquin return to the Fox Theater for their annual holiday concert. Tickets: $19, $21, $23. When: Saturday, December 18. Doors @ 1p and 6:30p, Shows @ 2p and 7:30p Where: Fox Theater, 300 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: 625-1369 or visit www.foxvisalia.com

18

58

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

J A N. Music at the Main – Wyndfall Trio Local musicians bring their celebrated, world-class sound to the Main Street Theater. Flautist Tracy Harris, Pianist Svetlana RudikovaHarris, and Harpist Wendy LeBlanc serve up a distinctive mix of classical suites and traditional Irish tunes. When: Friday, January 7, 7p Where: Main Street Theater, 307 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: 635-1761

7

CLASSES & WORKSHOPS CASA Volunteer Orientations When: Mondays - 5:30p & Thursdays, 12p-1p Where: CASA office, 1146 N. Chinowth, Visalia Contact: Sid Loveless at 625-4007 Visalia Toastmasters Toastmasters is a nonprofit organization that helps people with public speaking and leadership skills. Club meetings are held weekly. When: Tuesdays, 6:30p-8p Where: Visalia United Methodist Church, 5200 W. Caldwell, Visalia Contact: 713-0138 or www. visaliatoastmasters.org


dIVERSIoNS & EXCURSIONS D E C . Fox Film Series: December Enjoy viewings of a selection of classic holiday films. This month: “A Christmas Story” (1983), and “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” (1989) provide the perfect dose of family-friendly festive antics for your December evenings. Tickets: $5 When: “A Christmas Story” – Tuesday, December 14, “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” – Tuesday, December 21. Organ prelude @ 7p. Film @ 7:30p Where: Fox Theater, 300 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: 625-1369 or www.foxvisalia.com

14

D E C. Downtown Visalia Holiday Open House This month, enjoy festive Thursdays in downtown Visalia! Local merchants will be open late for you to enjoy the music of carolers and local high school bands, horse-drawn carriage rides, photos with santa, and gift wrapping. No charge for admission. When: Thursday, December 16 and 23, 5p-8p Where: Downtown Visalia – Main Street Contact: 732-7737 or visit www.DowntownVisalia.com

16

D E C. Exeter Holiday Open House Come celebrate the holidays in downtown Exeter. Local merchants will be open late for you to enjoy food, festivities, and a visit from Santa! No charge for admission. When: Thursday, December 16 and 23, 5p-9p Where: Downtown Exeter – Pine Street Contact: Exeter Chamber of Commerce, 592-2919

16

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

59


Arts Visalia 3rd Annual Holiday Show and Sale December 1–24

Find the perfect gift as you enjoy browsing the wide selection of paintings, prints, unique gift cards, hand-blown glassware, and ornaments from local and regional artists. When: December 1 – 24, Wednesday – Saturday, 12p-5:30p Where: Arts Visalia, 214 East Oak Avenue, Visalia Contact: 739-0905 or visit www.artsvisalia.org

CHILdHood DISTRACTIONS D E C. Art Exhibit: Sew Eclectic -An Exhibition of Quilt Art Ten Central Valley-based quilt artists comprise the group known as the Sew Eclectics. Come and view their array of traditional and contemporary approaches to the quilt form. When: December 1-24, WednesdaySaturday 12-5:30p Where: Arts Visalia, 214 East Oak Avenue, Visalia Contact: 739-0905 or visit www.artsvisalia.org

4

Art Exhibit: Where Different Paths Meet Artists Bob Goetting, Don Eric Butler, and John Griesbach are three local men, whose lives have taken various career paths. They come together to exhibit the works that connect them. When: Every Saturday-Sunday through December 29, 10a-4p Where: Courthouse Gallery, 125 N. B Street, Exeter Contact: Marty Weekly, 592-1143 or Anna Nelson, 592-3882

60

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

Visalia Swim Club – Year-Round Program A member of USA Swimming and a 501(c)3 organization, dedicated to guiding youth (6-18) to learn, love and succeed at life through swimming. Cost: $55/month plus $62 annual USA Swimming membership. When: Monday-Friday, 5:30p-7p Where: College of the Sequoias - Pool, Woodland St. & College Ct., Visalia (north of tennis courts) Contact: Head Coach Kyler, 737-2080 or www.visaliaswimclub.com

D E C . The Boys & Girls Club of Tulare County The Boys & Girls Club of Tulare County offers a variety of youth development activities and classes for children of all ages. Annual Fee $10 When: Monday-Friday, 12p-8p Where: 215 W. Tulare Ave., Visalia Contact: 625-4422 or www.bgclubtc. org

6

The Boys & Girls Clubs of the Sequoias Offering children ages 6-18 development and training in computer technology, life skills, sports, art, music and homework assistance. Annual fee $15. When: Monday-Friday, 2p-6p Where: Exeter – Farmersville – Porterville Contact: 592-2711 or www. bgcsequoias.org

D E C. Winter Holiday Day Camp Tulare Recreation and Parks Department is offering a winter holiday day camp to children in kindergarten through sixth grade. Fee: $64 for Dec. 20-23; $64 for Dec. 27-30; and $80 for Jan. 3-7. When: 7:30a – 5:30p, December 20 January 7 Where: Cecil Berkeley Activity Center, 830 S. Blackstone St., Tulare Contact: 684-4310.

20


FACES & PLACES Bumble and bumble available here

D E C. Mystery Readers Book Exchange The Mystery Readers group will have a book exchange. Buy a paperback mystery, and bring it to exchange with other whodunit enthusiasts. When: Wednesday, December 15, 6:30p Where: Tulare County Library, 200 W. Oak Ave., Visalia Contact: Judith Wood, 559-713-2706

15

Tulare County Library Children’s Storytime Baby/Toddler Time (Tues. 10a), Preschool Storytime (Wed. 10a). When: Call or visit website to confirm times. Where: Tulare County Library, 200 W. Oak Ave., Visalia Contact: Children’s desk at 733-6954 ext. 209 or www.tularecountylibrary.org

california’s 2010 stylist of the year

s a l o n ó s c a r

WRITERS & READERS

If you would like to have your event considered for a free listing in our “Happenings” section, please email your submission to lifestyle@dmiagency.com or fax to 738-0909, Attention Happenings. Please note, we do not guarantee listing of any submission. Submissions are due 6 weeks prior to publication.

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

61


62

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010


LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

63


64

LIFESTYLE | DECEMBER 2010

December 2010  

Style, Art, Culture and Events of the South Valley.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you