Page 1

STYLE, ART, CULTURE, + EVENTS OF THE SOUTH VALLEY MARCH 2019

EPICURE

LIGHT AND BRIGHT Page 20 TRAVELER’S TREK

ST. CHARLES, MO Page 32

Home Tour

THE LAMBERT HOME

Page 40

ECRWSS LOCAL POSTAL PATRON

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID DENVER CO PERMIT NO 5377


IS YOUR BACKYARD READY FOR

SUMMER?

WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR?

CALL US TODAY!

• In House Designers • Residential & Commercial Installation • Free Installation Estimates

• Displaying Over 30 Tile Suppliers in our Showroom • Proud Supplier of Cambria Quartz • Solid Surface Counters – Granite/Quartz/Marble

917 N. American St. Visalia, CA 93291 (559) 651-2925 www.vctile.com map not to scale


S

pring forward... with a fresh face! Let CreekSide help you put your best face forward for Spring! We offer a variety of skin treatments to help you regain that beautiful skin you’re looking for. Visit our website to see our variety of microdermabrasion treatments, facials, chemical peels & more!

GET BIKINI READY just in time for summer! Through March, receive $100 off any bikini laser hair removal package.

CREEKSIDE LASER CENTER 559.625.2737 2826 W. Main Street CREEKSIDE DAY SPA & SKIN CENTER 559.625.3480 2824 W. Main Street

www.creeksidedayspa.com

Connect with us on social media: /CreekSideDaySpaSkinLaserCenter

E S TA B L I S H E D 1 9 9 8

/CreekSideDaySpa /CreekSideDaySpa


40 HOME TOUR

THE LAMBERT HOME A three-bedroom, two-bath bungalow built in 1921 on Visalia’s Kaweah Avenue provides a window into the past and a chance to reflect on everyday living nearly a century ago.

8

Letter from the Executive Editor

12

REFLECTIONS OF VISALIA

20

10

Word Play Community

VISALIA'S FIRST NEIGHBORHOOD

LIGHT AND BRIGHT

16 50

Downtown Scene

52

Fitness Challenge

54

Kudos

58

Happenings

26

32

BEYOND THE HARVEST

ST. CHARLES, MO

WHAT'S INSIDE

ADVENTURES IN AG

4 LIFEST YLE | MARCH 2019

EPICURE

TRAVELER'S TREK


FUELING FOR THE GREATER GOOD.

559-651-1760 | 8601 W. RO OSEVELT AVE., VISALIA CA 932 91


Published By

DMI Agency 200 E. Center St., Suite A Visalia, CA 93291

Karen Tellalian

Executive Editor

Creative Director Art Director Senior Designer Web Designer/Designer Assistant Editor Text Editor

Greg Bitney Marcie Vagnino Frank Miramontes Kaci Hansen Sue Burns Melinda Brown

Contributing Writers Operations Manager

Cheryl Dieter David Vartanian Diane Slocum Lisa McEwen Major Rogers Sharon Mosley Sue Burns Terry L. Ommen

Sales@DMIAgency.com

Advertising Sales

Sales Office

Maria Gaston

200 E. Center St., Suite A Visalia, CA 93291 559.739.1747 • Fax 559.738.0909

E-Mail Lifestyle@DMIAgency.com WEBSITE www.VisaliaLifestyle.com View The Mag Online Issuu.com/LifestyleMagazine Facebook.com/LifestyleMag Instagram: visalialifestyle

RACK LOCATIONS DMI Agency Evolutions Fitness Center, Tulare

Exeter Chamber of Commerce Tazzaria Coffee & Tea The Lifestyle Center

Visalia Chamber of Commerce Visalia Convention Center

COUNTERTOP LOCATIONS 210 Cafe AMCC Ashoori & Co. Jewelers Blend WIne Room California Fitness Academy Chad Clark Hair Salon Citizen's Bank Comfort Suites Downtown CreekSide Day Spa Skin & Laser Center Downtown Visalia Alliance Ed Dena Auto Center, Visalia Exeter Chamber of Commerce Exeter Library Franey's Design Center

Glick's and Co. Holvik Family Health Center ImagineU Children’s Museum International Agri-Center Janeen’s Furniture Gallery Kaweah Delta Hospital Keller Williams Reality Max's Cookies Michael's Custom Jewelry Monét’s, Exeter Pacific Treasures Premier Medical Clinic PRO-PT Salon 525 Sherman & Associates

Sunmed Health & Weight Management The Aesthetic Center The Smoke House, Visalia Tulare County Library Visalia Ceramic Tile Visalia First Assembly Visalia Marriott Visalia Medical Clinic Watson's Wildflower Café, Exeter Williams, Brodersen & Pritchett, Attorneys at Law Windows Plus, Inc. Wyndham Hotel

Visalia Lifestyle Magazine is published monthly and is distributed via direct mail to nearly 13,600 homes in the upper-middle and high-income neighborhoods in Visalia. An additional 2,000 copies are distributed at various distribution points around Visalia, Tulare, and Exeter. Views expressed in columns are those of the columnist and not necessarily those of DMI Agency or its advertisers. Circulation of this issue: 15,600 © 2019 DMI Agency

6 LIFEST YLE | MARCH 2019


ARMSTRONG

ARMSTRONG Property Management

Property Management

Professional Property Management Services: Residential • Commercial • Shopping Centers • Industrial (Maintenance Division with Shop)

Jim Armstrong

President/CEO CPM, Institute of Real Estate Management

Chris Zulik

President, Rental Division CCRM, California Apartment Association

7046 W. Pershing Court, Visalia, CA 93291 | (559) 733-1321 | www.armstrong-property.com HOA/Common Interest Development Management at 116 N. Bridge Street, Visalia, CA 93291


FROM THE

EDITOR On a more personal note, by the time this issue hits the streets, the Lifestyle and DMI Agency staff will be found in our new location at 200 E. Center St. FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO SUBMIT A STORY IDEA, CONTACT ME AT KAREN@DMIAGENCY.COM

W

hat an absolutely gorgeous winter we have had. This morning as I drove to work, the mountains were just as they should be – white-capped and covered with snow, and nothing short of spectacular. Personally, I cannot remember a winter with this many days where the mountains were as clear as could be and appearing close enough to reach out and touch. With all this rain and snow, one might easily forget the continued need for water conservation. Reducing our use of water is as important as ever, and if we have not yet adopted the idea that conservation in the Central Valley is a way of life, we should. While we pay careful attention to leaky faucets and other water-wasting occurrences, it is also time to start turning our thoughts to spring. Spring always brings with it a variety of fun things to do. But the best news of all is that it signals the start of baseball season. The San Francisco Giants are in Arizona for spring training and our own local professional baseball team, the Rawhide, gets ready for its opening day on April 4. Hopefully, many of you caught Visalia on the Cities Tour Program, which aired on C-SPAN on Feb. 2 and 3. During the nearly weeklong stay in Visalia, C-SPAN producers interviewed local historians such as Lifestyle’s own Terry Ommen. It was very exciting to see Terry and Visalia on the national stage, so if you missed the first airing, you should be able to view it at a later date.

Like you, we appreciate Terry and the historical events he recounts for us every month. “Fort Visalia – Visalia’s First Neighborhood,” found on page 12, is no exception. One only has to read a few paragraphs to understand that Visalia really was the Wild West. Not long after, and very near the original Fort Visalia, in 1921, a beautiful bungalow was built on Kaweah Avenue. To give the time some perspective, Visalia’s population was less than 6,000 people, and the Fox Theatre was yet to be built. Fast forward to the early 1980s as then-newlywed Peggy and Joe Lambert happened to fall in love with the Craftsman-style home and the neighborhood now known as Beverly Glen. When the couple found the home for sale, they decided to purchase it and restore it to its natural glory. For the complete story and photos, please turn to page 40. On a more personal note, by the time this issue hits the streets, the Lifestyle and DMI Agency staff will be found in our new location at 200 E. Center St. We are very excited about our cool new space, into a building with a lot of its own history as the original municipal courthouse. Stay tuned for more information about the building in an upcoming history feature. Thank you for reading, and please remember that this beautiful winter is a true blessing – be careful with it.

KAREN TELLALIAN EXECUTIVE EDITOR

8 LIFEST YLE | MARCH 2019


WO R D PLAY

T E X T

B Y

D I A N E

S L O C U M

News on writing, books + the world of publishing

T

he UNESCO date for World Poetry Day is March 21. The idea is to support linguistic diversity, including endangered languages. Poets.org has a World Poetry Day page to find poets from around the world. The site also offers poem-aday with unpublished poems by today’s poets. How about writing a poem yourself, especially if you’ve never had any leanings toward poetic expression? That would be one way to create diversity. Among the California poets listed are the Central Valley’s Burlee Vang (“The Dead I Know: Incantation for Rebirth”), Soul Vang (“Song of the Cluster Bomblet”), Andre Yang (in “Beltway Poetry Quarterly”), Mai Der Vang (“Afterland”), David St. John (“The Last Troubadour”) and Gary Soto (“The Elements of San Joaquin”). VALLEY WRITERS Former Fresno poet laureate (2015-17) Lee Herrick’s new book of poetry, “Scar and Flower,” was released in January by Word Poetry Press. Juan Felipe Herrera, former U.S. poet laureate and Valley poet himself, calls the book “rare and gifted, a timely arrival.” Brynn Saito, another Fresno poet, describes it as “a mighty, tender, and fearless book from a poet at the height of his powers.” Herrick’s other books are “Gardening Secrets of the Dead” (WordTech Editions, 2012) and “This Many Miles from Desire” (WordTech 2007). His work has also appeared in the anthologies “One for the Money: The Sentence as Poetic Form” and “Highway 99: A Literary Journey Through California’s Great Central Valley.” Herrick founded the Fresno LitHop in 2016, during his laureate. Last year’s event featured about 140 writers at 40 events. It encourages diversity with writers of all ages, genres, levels of publication and subject matter. After three years,

10 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

LitHop is taking a hiatus this year, but plans are for it to resume in 2020.

READ THE BOOK James Baldwin’s novel, “If Beale Street Could Talk” (The Dial Press, 1974, and many other editions), tells the story of Tish and Fonny, the man she loves. Fonny is falsely accused of a terrible crime and sent to prison, while Tish is pregnant with their baby. As their families try to get Fonny released, the young couple go through a gamut of emotions dealing with their situation. Baldwin wrote more than 20 books, and some say this is his best. Other awardwinning works include “Giovanni’s Room” and “The Fire Next Time.” The Beale Street movie of the same name stars Kiki Layne and Stephan James. POETRY WORKSHOP The Squaw Valley Community of Writers Poetry Workshop will be held June 22-29. The application deadline is March 28. The idea of the conference is that when poets gather to write, they will find new ways to write and overcome some of their bad habits, and their work

will advance to a higher plane. The application fee is $35; tuition is $1,250. Evening meals are included, but housing is not. Details: Communityofwriters.org. WRITING CLASSES Writer’s Digest offers online classes covering broad aspects of writing. Classes beginning March 25 give an idea of the scope. They are Advanced Novel Writing, Breaking Into Copywriting, Fundamentals of Fiction, Getting Started in Writing, Professional Copyediting Tools of the Trade, Writing the Mystery Novel and Writing the Picture Book. Examples of classes offered at other times include 12 Weeks to a First Draft, Fitting Writing Into Your Life and Advanced Poetry. Fees are in the range of about $220 to $800. WRITING CONTEST The Writer’s Digest 27th annual Self-Published Book Awards deadline is April 1. The grand prize is $8,000, a feature article in Writer’s Digest and a trip to the magazine’s annual conference. All entrants receive a brief commentary from a judge. Categories include literary and genre fiction, nonfiction, inspirational, memoir, children and young adult. First prize in each category is $1,000. All entries must be a printed and bound book. Details at: www.writersdigest.com. AWARDS The Pura Belpré Award for 2019 went to Elizabeth Acevedo for “The Poet X,” the story of Xiomara, a young Dominican girl who finds that writing poetry is the most freeing experience of her challenging life. The PEN America 2018 Los Angeles Literary Award for Poetry went to Vickie Vertiz for “Palm Frond With Its Throat Cut.” THE LAST WORD “Poetry is an echo, asking a shadow to dance.” Carl Sandburg (1878-1967) L


25OR52?

Keep Everyone Guessing!

BODY AND FACE CONTOURING

Nonsurgical Fat Reduction • Cellulite Reduction Skin Tightening • Painless • No Downtime • Safe and Reliable 20 Minute Body Changer • For Men and Women • Free Consultation

559.205.2585 • Body and Facial Contouring Say

to staying healthy

www.SunMedHealth.com

5510 Avenida de los Robles Suite A, Visalia, CA 93291

• Primary Care Services • Physician-Supervised Weight Loss • Men’s Health

Gilbert Sunio, MD Medical Director


Existing plaque on the Fort Visalia block placed in 1981.

FORT VISALIA – VISALIA'S FIRST NEIGHBORHOOD T E X T

A N D

Recently, Fort Visalia has been in the news. The experts have finished their report and basically confirmed what many have believed for a long time. The block bounded by Garden, Bridge, Oak and School streets is the site of Fort Visalia – the town’s earliest neighborhood. It is an exciting announcement and, in light of the publicity, it seems appropriate to review some of what we know about the fort and a little background related to it. The structure probably began because of an incident that happened nearby a few years before it was built. In December 1850, John Wood and a dozen or so members of his work crew were camped along the Kaweah River about seven miles east of what is now Visalia. The local Native Americans visited them and, for reasons not totally clear, they

P H O T O S

S U B M I T T E D

B Y

T E R R Y

O M M E N

ordered the men to leave, giving them 10 days to do so. The men ignored the demand and a violent confrontation ensued. Wood and almost all of his entourage were killed, and some say that Wood was skinned alive and his skin nailed to a nearby tree. Word of the Wood party “massacre” spread throughout California and beyond. The horror and mental images of the fight lingered for some time and likely dampened some settler interest in the area, but the lure of fertile farmland was strong and tugged hard on those looking for a better life. So still they came. One of the immigrant groups was led by three brothers – Osee, Warren and Reuben Matthews. They gathered up their families, some relatives and a few others, loaded them into seven wagons and, on April 18, 1852, the small wagon

Top left: No actual photos exist of Fort Visalia. Here is a “block cut” artist’s conception by Alice G. Rouleau as it appears in Annie Mitchell’s book “King of the Tulares.” Bottom Right: This is a pen-and-ink drawing by artist Adele Bradley as it appears in Annie Mitchell’s book “Land of the Tules.” 12 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9


Left: Fort Visalia was built on this block. Photo was taken looking east from the intersection of Garden and Oak streets. Right: Edgar Reynolds and his wife, Electa, as they appeared in 1916. Edgar, an early Visalia settler, and journal writer, died at age 85 in 1919 in Tecumseh, Neb.

train left Red Rock, Iowa, bound for California. Edgar Reynolds, the brothers’ 19-year old nephew, was chosen as hunter for the group and fortunately kept a journal of their travels. After a mostly uneventful crosscountry trip, the group arrived in Stockton in September 1852, and soon the brothers began looking for a place to settle. Their family had come from a long line of millers and “community builders,” so it was not surprising that the brothers had carried the family millstone with them on their trip. New communities needed a good flour mill to thrive. While pondering a place to call home, the group saw Four Creeks Country as promising. The land, mostly unsettled, was in the heart of recently formed Tulare County, having fertile soil and lots of water. So before leaving Stockton, they stocked up on farming tools, seed and other supplies, and hired an interpreter to help communicate with the native people. In October 1852, the party headed south. They arrived in the Four Creeks area and, probably while stopping in Woodsville, they met Nathaniel Vise. He lived in the midst of a large oak forest in a little cabin about seven miles west on land that became Visalia. He persuaded the land seekers to explore the area near him. They did and liked what they saw. So to protect themselves from the potentially hostile native people, they 14 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

quickly went to work building a log fortress on land within the block now bounded by Garden, Bridge, Oak and School streets. They cut down oak trees in 15-foot lengths and split them in half. They then placed them side by side vertically in a 3-foot-deep trench with rounded sides facing out. The grouping formed the exterior walls of the fortification. On each corner of the enclosure, a 4-foot extension structure was built for improved visibility. The fort walls stood about 12 feet high, and the overall structure footprint was about 60 feet square. A tunnel was dug under one wall, and it became the entrance and exit point. During construction, the native people watched as the structure took shape. According to Reynolds, the settlers’ interpreter had put the “fear of God into the Indians” and, as a result, they created no problems. However, Reynolds added that after the fort was finished, the locals paraded around the structure making “threatening gestures.” Some claim that the interior of the fortress was large enough for cabins to be built inside and, according to others, it was large enough to accommodate wagons. The inside also provided opportunities for entertainment. Rough-cut boards were laid on the ground, creating a dance floor, and fiddle music filled the air each evening. The settlers would spend nights inside and, during the day, they would leave the

compound to work the land, but Reynolds noted that they were always armed with shotguns and pistols. The journal writer also shared that at the end of November, he had plowed a furrow in Tulare County soil, the first man ever to do so. He added that he was the first to plant a “patch of turnips.” The safety of the fort gave the settlers peace of mind, but after a time, they decided that the enclosure was not necessary and vacated it. Exactly how long the fort stood or was occupied is not known, however local historian Joe Doctor provided a clue when he wrote that “during the Indian war on the Tule River in 1856, David Bice James rounded up some Indians and put them inside the stockade [fort] at Visalia to keep them from being harmed by vengeful whites.” Applied Earth Works Inc. concluded in its report that the block is “the most likely location of the fort,” but its exact footprint remains a mystery. The company added that “Fort Visalia represents a significant event in the history of the city.…” In 2010, the city of Visalia purchased the Fort Visalia block and it is very likely that the property will soon be going up for sale. Before that happens, the city has an opportunity to learn more about the earliest Visalians. As a city, let’s take reasonable steps to make sure that we don’t miss an opportunity. I encourage further study of the site. L


presented by

2019

SUPPORTING THE VISALIA COUNT Y CENTER ROTARY COMMUNIT Y SUPPORT ASSOCIATION

A FUNDRAISING EVENT A T T H E VISALIA COUNTRY CLUB 625 N. Ranch Street | April 27, 2019 @ 5:30PM

Come join us for this popular, top-notch food and wine tasting experience. Spread over Visalia Country Club’s spacious Club House and lawns, guests socialize and wander among the delicious food and over 15 wineries. Enjoy views of the lush golf course, stately oak trees, water fountains, and swans effortlessly drifting in the pond that fronts the 16th green while bidding on exciting auction items. For more information or to get your tickets, please visit:

www.vccrwineauction.com sponsored by

Lagomarsino Group Visalia Country Club Martin Enterprises

Houk & Hornburg | ServiceMaster by Benevento | Law Office of Afreen A. Kaelble | Visalia Montessori School | Farm Credit West | Bourdette & Partners | El Rosal Restaurant | Kaweah Delta Health Care District Tri Counties Bank | American Ambulance | Dick Toriggino | DeJonge Financial | Total Property Management | Fortune Property Management | Jo & Hollis Bloom Group | Scott, Mainord, Langley & Simmons, Inc. Larry & Erlene Benevento | Wyndham Hotels | Tulare County Federal Credit Union | Central California Cartage Company | The Auto Shop | Bragg Law Firm | Collins & Schoettler | Sam Logan-Merrill Lynch Dr. Steven and Karen Koobatian/Vocational Designs Inc. | Ruth Golombek | Sequoia Construction | Zeeb Commercial | DMI Agency | TK Firearms | Maria Lanteri | David & Paige Loverin | First Capital Group

County Center Rotary Community Support Association, Inc. is Charitable 501 (c) 3 entity and the funds raised fund local and International projects.


C O M M U N I T Y

‘LOOK AT THAT FACE!’ ARTIST WHO LOST PIECES ' 225 FIRE SUMMONS IN CAFE COURAGE TO EXHIBIT AGAIN T E X T

B Y

L I S A

M C E W E N

T

hree female artists who share a love of painting the human face have come together for an impressive exhibit at the Courthouse Gallery in Exeter. “Look at That Face! – An Exhibit of Portraiture” will be on display through March 31 and offers viewers an opportunity to interpret how three mediums — pastel, charcoal and oil — and three points of view can be used to create 30 drastically different pieces of art with a common theme. The show also marks the first time that portrait and figure painter Lynn Hock Napoli of Fowler will showcase her art since a devastating fire at Café 225 destroyed nine paintings and several examples of her best work. “Look at That Face!” also features the works of Visalia artists Ellen Milinich and LaVone Sterling. “When the artists dropped off their paintings at the gallery, I knew I had made a good choice,” said Joanie Constable, a new board member who along with Peg Collins is charged with curating the gallery’s bimonthly shows. The well-known artists are sure to be 16 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

a good draw for the gallery, Constable said, bringing collectors and large followings with them. Her goal as a board member is to increase attendance at the gallery by hosting exhibits more often and spreading the word about the gallery in downtown Exeter. A specific aim with this show is to also attract paying work for the artists. “I am hopeful with this show that all three will get commission work,” she said. Hock Napoli, in particular, is rebuilding her body of work following the fire. (She expects to be covered in owner Karl Merten’s insurance claim. Merten is a staunch advocate of local artists, and his restaurant was a veritable gallery for those enjoying a meal. Artist Glenn Hill also lost a significant portion of his collection in the fire.) “It’s been a traumatic experience,” Hock Napoli said of the fire. “It was heartbreaking, as those pieces I lost were some of my best. I lost one that I had painted of my grandmother when she was 8 years old.” This image is shown on the back of Hock Napoli’s artist brochure, available at the gallery. She has soldiered on, pulling older

work for the Exeter show and mixing it with some newer pieces. “I was committed to this show, so I had to make it work,” she said. Not only does Hock Napoli’s work shine, Sterling and Milinich’s pieces complement each other through their similar theme yet original styles. A well-attended opening reception in early February filled the gallery space and the artists conversed with friends, made new connections and received many compliments on their work. Portraits are equally enjoyable for Sterling, 81, known primarily for her plein aire landscape work. “I enjoy the challenge,” she said. “I try to capture the individual essence of the model. What makes this person unique? Capturing the light in a painting is so important, but quite different in a landscape as opposed to a portrait. In a landscape, the light is part of the subject. In a portrait, the light shines on the subject.” Sterling’s portraits are painted in oil and pastel. “They are very similar in technique and application,” she said. “I have found


We’re Moving! After 9 exciting years at our Main Street office, DMI Agency is relocating. Beginning in March, you’ll find us at: 200 E. Center Street, Suite A. (Just north of Bank of America). Call us or drop by!

559.739.1747 • DMIAGENCY.COM WEBSITES

CORPORATE ID

ADVERTISEMENTS

CAMPAIGNS

SIGNAGE

SOCIAL MEDIA

The vacated DMI Agency office space will be available through:

Evans Property Management

Bruce Evans Property Management, Inc.

303 N. West Street Visalia, California 93291 559-732-0313 Bruce Evans 559-302-2900 Ed Evans

3300-square-foot office space coming available in March, 2019.

801 W. Main Street • One block east of Redwood High School. Inviting reception area, conference room, individual glass-partitioned offices, kitchenette, 3 restrooms, storage space, common area for copy center, and more.

For information on this and other properties.

Visit: www.home4rent.org or call 559-732-0313


C O M M U N I T Y

that painting with oil improves my skill with pastel and vice versa.” Sterling and Milinich were featured in a show at the same gallery in 2010 (along with Sterling’s daughter, Lezlie, a photo editor at The Sacramento Bee) and have been best friends ever since. Although there’s a 20-year age difference, they connect as artists and offer each other constant encouragement. While the exhibit features the human face, there are several equine and canine faces that take viewers by surprise. Two of Milinich’s charcoal drawings feature horses. “The Champion” and “Glory Days” greet guests as they enter the gallery space and immediately draw attention because of their incredible detail. Another notable piece by Milinich is a portrait of 104-year-old Marjorie Brandon of Visalia, an arts icon. It is on loan for this exhibit from the permanent collection of the Visalia Visual Chronicles, a privately funded and publicly owned art collection for the city of Visalia. Watching people’s expressions as they view her work is one of Milinich’s favorite aspects of being an artist. “It has been several years since I have had an exhibit, and it excites me to bring my pictures out publicly again,” she said. “I always enjoy people’s reactions to viewing the charcoal drawings. The life-like images always amaze them.” Using charcoal as her medium was an easy choice for Milinich. “When I first used it, I knew right off that this was my favorite. It was the way I could rub the charcoal on the paper to create shadows that seduced me,” she said. “Capturing how light lays on the curves of a face can be very complex but exciting to me.” She has been working as an artist for about a decade, encouraged by the message in the book “The Artist’s Way.” “I grew up in Monterey, where my father taught art at Monterey Peninsula College. He said I inherited my art ability but said it was up to me to develop it. So, 10 years ago, I had an “a-ha” moment that I was to develop my drawing. ‘The Artist’s Way’ helped me on my path. Artists have a journey.” All three women agree that portraiture is one of the best ways to capture the loved ones in your life, human or animal. Forget selfies or quick photos taken hastily with a cellphone. “Portraiture is a three-dimensional 18 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

rendering by the human hand,” Hock Napoli said. “No digital image can render what the human eye is capable of seeing.” She encourages all to take time to travel to Exeter to see “Look at That Face!” “Anyone who wants to experience something magical and special should make the trip and see the wonderful work by these gifted women, LaVone

and Ellen,” she said. “They have developed into incredible award-winning artists. This type of beauty in art is rare these days, and I am humbled and honored to hang my work with theirs.” A closing reception will be held from 2-4 p.m. Sunday, March 17, at the Exeter Courthouse Gallery. There will be light appetizers and refreshments available. The free event is open to the public. The artists will be available. L


Holvik Family Health Center Welcomes three new health care professionals to our team:

Nikki Gonzalez FNP-C and Women's Health

Michael Hultin FNP-C

Jennifer Pacheco FNP-C and Pediatric Specialist

Open House Don’t miss our

A Smarter Way to Sculpt

Non-invasive laser body contouring that helps you achieve a natural-looking, slimmer appearance.

Join Us for an Open House! April 9 from 6pm-8pm • Space is Limited RSVP 559 732-4726

Live Demos • Free Consultations • Light Refreshments Special Event Only Pricing • Raffle Prizes & More!

Providing a full spectrum of family practice

William C. Holvik, MD Noah Sarr, FNP-C

You have found a home!

Alisha Sandidge-Renteria, NP, Women’s Health

MON - FRI 8am-5pm | SAT 9am-2pm | MOST INSURANCE ACCEPTED | 221 E. CALDWELL AVE. | 559-73 2-4726 | FAX: 559-732-4747

AC C E P T I NG N E W PAT I EN T S

• U RGE N T C A R E/A PP OI N T M EN T S

Family Practice | Women’s Health | Pediatrics | Sports Injuries | Aesthetics | Dermatology | Vasectomy | Travel Medicine


E P I C U R E

Light and Bright

R E C I P E S B Y D A V I D V A R T A N I A N , T H E P H O T O S B Y F R A N K M I R A M O N T E S ,

I

V I N T A G E P R E S S D M I A G E N C Y

t's time to say welcome to spring, and Chef David Vartanian's menu will have you shouting it from the rooftops. A light Grilled Romaine and Radicchio Salad With Balsamic Vinaigrette will get you cooking outdoors and prepare your palate for Herb-Crusted Rack of Lamb and Salmon Wrapped in Phyllo With Spinach and Onion. For dessert, Lemon Curd With Fresh Berries offers a sweet-tart ending (and a second way to utilize your phyllo dough). Cheers to the season's first alfresco meal!

20 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9


E P I C U R E

SALMON WRAPPED IN PHYLLO WITH SPINACH AND ONION Serves 4 INGREDIENTS 1 onion, sliced 1 cup spinach, blanched 4 ounces unsalted butter 4 5-ounce salmon fillets Salt and freshly ground black pepper 8 sheets phyllo dough DIRECTIONS Preheat the oven to 350F. Heat 2 ounces of the butter in a heavy pan. Add the sliced onion and cook slowly over medium heat until the onion begins to caramelize; set aside to cool. Chop the blanched spinach and add it to the onions. Season with salt and pepper. Lay one sheet of phyllo dough on a clean work surface. Melt the remaining 2 ounces of butter. Lightly brush the dough with melted butter and place another sheet on top; brush with melted butter. Place a salmon fillet in the center of the dough about 3 inches from the end nearest you. Season with salt and pepper. Place one-fourth of the spinach mixture on the salmon and spread it out evenly. Repeat the process with the other three fillets. Fold the sides of the phyllo to the middle. Beginning with the end closest to you, roll it up until you have a little package. Place each roll in a baking dish seam side down and brush the tops with melted butter. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes until golden brown.

Did you make these tasty dishes? Share your photos with us on Facebook and Instagram. We look forward to seeing you online!

/LifestyleMag

@visalialifestyle

Use #LifestyleVisaliaEpicure MARCH 2019 | LIFEST YLE

21


E P I C U R E

GRILLED ROMAINE AND RADICCHIO SALAD WITH ROASTED HAZELNUTS BALSAMIC DRESSING 1 shallot, diced 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar 1/2 cup olive oil Salt and freshly ground pepper SALAD 2 romaine hearts, halved 1 radicchio head, quartered Olive oil Salt and freshly ground pepper Sourdough croutons 1/2 cup roasted hazelnuts PREPARE THE VINAIGRETTE: Combine the balsamic vinegar with the chopped shallot in a bowl. Slowly add the olive oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste. MAKE THE SALAD: Heat a gas or charcoal grill or stovetop grill pan. Brush the romaine and radicchio with olive oil and place on the grill cut side down. Cook for 2-3 minutes until the leaves are lightly charred. Arrange on plate, grilled side up. Drizzle with balsamic dressing; top with croutons and garnish with hazelnuts.

22 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9


Your Home. Your Look.

559.625.8884 220 W. Main St., Visalia www.janeensfurniture.com


E P I C U R E

HERB-CRUSTED RACK OF LAMB INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

1 1/2 cups plain bread crumbs 1/4 cup parsley, chopped 1 tablespoon mint, chopped 1 1/2 tablespoons rosemary, chopped 2 tablespoons fresh garlic, chopped 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper 3 1/2 tablespoons olive oil 1/2 cup olive oil 3 frenched lamb racks, 16 ounces each 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

Heat the oven to 375 degrees. Mix together the bread crumbs, parsley, mint, rosemary, garlic, salt and pepper in a bowl. Drizzle with 2 1/2 tablespoons olive oil and mix well. Season lamb with salt and pepper. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a heavy skillet. Brown the rack of lamb on all sides, then remove from pan and cool. Spread Dijon mustard on the rack of lamb, then roll in the bread-crumb mixture. Place the meat on a roasting pan and roast for 15-20 minutes. Allow the meat to rest for 10 minutes prior to slicing. Slice into chops and serve as is or with cabernet sauce.

24 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9


E P I C U R E

LEMON CURD WITH FRESH BERRIES IN A PHYLLO CUP Serves 6 LEMON CURD

DIRECTIONS

9 large egg yolks 3 large eggs 1 cup sugar 1 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice

In a stainless steel bowl, whisk the egg yolks and sugar together, then stir in the lemon juice. Put the bowl over a pot of simmering water and stir continuously with a rubber spatula. When the curd starts to thicken, switch to a whisk; cook the curd until thick, about 5 minutes. Strain the curd into a glass or plastic container and cover the surface directly with plastic wrap to prevent a skin from forming. Refrigerate the curd for several hours until cold.

PHYLLO CUPS

DIRECTIONS

INGREDIENTS

INGREDIENTS 6 sheets phyllo dough 2 ounces melted butter 1 tablespoons superfine sugar 2 pints fresh berries

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Cut each phyllo sheet lengthwise into thirds and then cut each third in half. Butter the phyllo sheets and then sprinkle with sugar. Layer six sheets crosswise on top of each other and press into a large muffin tin or other ovenproof mold. Bake for 10-12 minutes until golden, then cool. ASSEMBLY When ready to serve, divide the curd into the phyllo cups. Top with fresh berries and serve. L

MARCH 2019 | LIFEST YLE

25


A D V E N T U R E S

T E X T

I N

A G

BEYOND THE HARVEST: MORE THAN YOU CAN IMAGINE B Y

S U E

B U R N S

A

s a food blogger, I have been incredibly fortunate to tour several farms in California, and I have never been less than awed at every one. Meeting the families who have been farming for generations and spending time in their fields and orchards is a privilege for which I am grateful. It is there, listening to them talk about planting, harvesting, challenges and successes, that one can see, hear and feel their dedication to growing the best foods they can in the most efficient and sustainable way. And they do this not just for their own families and those who work for them, but for everyone who purchases and eats their products. As one said, “It’s a global impact; what we do brings families together.”

26 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

|

P H O T O S

B Y

S H A N N O N

A D A M S ,

Farm tours aren’t available on a wide scale, so sharing them through my writing is very important to me. I do my best to convey the true feeling of being there so that more people will learn about everything that goes into growing the foods they enjoy. Now there is a resource that takes us even closer - as close to a personal farm tour as we can get. Beyond the Harvest is a new television series that “explores the farm-to-table phenomenon, uncovering the stories behind the intertwined partnerships among the farmer, the farmworker, packers, shippers, marketing representatives and chefs who help deliver the freshest local products from the bread basket of the world, California’s Central Valley.”

N T D

M E D I A

F I L M S

We are accustomed to the beautiful views of orchards, fields and farms as we drive through the Central Valley. But how often do we think about — or do we really know — everything that happens beyond the harvest?


A D V E N T U R E S

I N

A G

Executive Producer and host Ray O’Canto, of the popular Dine Out Along the Road series, says the show “has a higher good to elevate the small farmer that has a global impact — we are focused on telling positive stories about these dedicated families.” You may already be familiar with Dine Out Along the Road. Entering its seventh season, the show focuses on specific cities in Central California, shining a spotlight on beloved local eateries and the people who bring them to life. O’Canto, born in Venezuela, was inspired to create Dine Out by his father, Jose, who played baseball on the

28 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

country’s national team and came to the U.S. when he was drafted into the major leagues. He ultimately landed in Visalia on the minor league Redlegs (the Cincinnati Reds’ feeder team). After retiring from baseball, he went to work at El Presidente Restaurant as a dishwasher. Intent on doing more, he traveled to the Oakland hills every weekend to train as a chef at his uncle’s restaurant. He quickly moved up in the Visalia restaurant, eventually owning and running it for 40 years. The show is O'Canto's ongoing homage to his dad, telling the stories of small restaurants doing great things.

Inspired by the success of Dine Out Along the Road, Executive Producer Stephen Paul (of the Paul family, which has a huge legacy of farming in the Central Valley for decades) - approached O’Canto to say he loved the way the series featured the restaurants in the area and suggested a similarly styled show focusing on family farms and the agricultural industry in the Central Valley. The pilot was shot at the Peterson Farm in Kingsburg. Following that, four more were produced to round out the first season. Season 2 planning is underway with six episodes, anticipated to feature blueberries, persimmons, dairy, wine grapes and almonds, and will be shooting in May to air in October. The creators look for Central Valley family farms with generational history that are growing commodities that have global impact. Keeping in mind the distribution and quantity, they also consider how those commodities are being used and repurposed.


A D V E N T U R E S

Episode 1 features peaches and nectarines grown at the Peterson Family Farm, but actually begins in the kitchen at ultra-hip Chow (organic) Market, Cafe and Bakery in Oakland. We see the chef assembling an artisan pizza with sliced peaches, burrata and arugula before the footage cuts to the farm. There, we meet Vernon Peterson and members of his team and learn about the family history, planting and cultivation, and the harvest. (As O’Canto says, “You can’t tell the story of California agriculture without telling the cultural and historical component.”) We visit the packinghouse and follow the fruit to the distributor and on to Chow in the Bay Area, coming full circle as we see

the pizza being pulled from the oven. The correlation between Dine Out Along the Road and Beyond the Harvest is seamless. Our area is commonly called “the breadbasket of the world” because of the high percentage of foods grown here and globally distributed. But do people really know what that means and how that happens? Every Beyond the Harvest episode pays tribute to the whole process and intricate connections that link produce grown on family farms to packing and quality control, marketing, and transport to the restaurants and stores. Currently, the series is shown in five markets: Fresno, Bakersfield, Chico,

I N

A G

Redding and Eureka. Once the episodes air, they are available online, and I found myself watching one after the other, drawn into the tales of each farm. Every episode is fascinating in its own way. Ramon at Peterson Family Farm explains how he determines how much fruit will be produced on each tree based on how it is trimmed and shaped, spacing between branches and how much fruit is pruned. Natalie Soghomonian-Chooljian of Three Sisters Organic in Fresno talks about how grapes vary in taste and sugar levels depending on each vine down to which side of the vine they’re on, and moisture levels. Tad Kozuki of Kozuki Brothers Farming in MARCH 2019 | LIFEST YLE

29


A D V E N T U R E S

I N

A G

Parlier shares how his father found Japanese pears in Lindsay and began farming them, which led to planting brown Asian pears in the late 1960s. No one wanted to buy them because of the color - until Sunset Magazine published an article on Asian pears, which immediately set the trend and increased demand. O’Canto is hard-pressed to narrow down his favored moments from the shows. The episodes on Kozi Farming, Three Sisters Organic and D&S Farm have all been nominated for California Emmy Awards. Some of the special times that come to his mind are talking with Augustin Cardenas of Cardenas Farms in Reedley, who started as a migrant farmer and is now one of the most prolific mandarin growers in the Central Valley. He recalls watching Augustin and his father, Andres, tasting fruit together in the orchards. 30 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

Andres talked about his pride in his son for fulfilling the American Dream. Sitting on a tractor amid the grapevines with Natalie Soghomonian, who started at the bottom of her family’s farm and worked her way up, brings O’Canto back to his own boyhood days of sitting on a tractor with his grandfather. O’Canto selects the episode on D&S Farm in Atwater as one of the most special. It showcases the ingenuity of all farmers as it tells the story of David Souza and his dad, David Souza Sr., creating a business using the sweet potatoes not pretty enough for market to make Corbin Cash sweet potato vodka, gin, liqueur and rye, and blended whiskeys. Beyond the Harvest is informational and inspirational. It’s also important. The producers hope that the series will educate consumers and inspire them to learn more and try the featured produce

and products. They want to encourage state and national legislators to be aware of the impact that their environmental policy decisions have. They aspire to get everyone involved in supporting farms and utilizing the products. And they want to give back. Eventually, when the show is profitable, they want to contribute to the Community Food Bank. We are accustomed to the beautiful views of orchards, fields and farms as we drive through the Central Valley. But how often do we think about — or do we really know — everything that happens beyond the harvest? Take my advice and watch an episode soon (http://bth-tv.com/episodes/). You just might find yourself binge-watching the entire first season, which will leave you eagerly anticipating this fall’s new episodes right along with me.

L


A legal team with a century of experience. Something your case deserves. EXPERIENCED, ACCESSIBLE AND TRUSTED Litigation • Estate Planning, Trusts and Probate • Business Formation/Operation Accidental and Personal Injury • Real Estate • Employment Law

A T T O R N E Y S A T L AW

559 635-9000 • VisaliaLawyers.com


T R A V E L E R ' S

T R E K

32 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9


T R A V E L E R ' S

T R E K

ST. CHARLES: SMALL-TOWN CHARM WITH A BIG-TOWN FEEL T E X T

A N D

P H O T O S

B Y

C H E R Y L

L .

D I E T E R

W

e came in fast and the landing was hard, but that is to be expected when you fly into Lambert International Airport in St. Louis. The town, like the airport, is gritty and has a hard-nosed edge to it. But outside of the vast city lie small picturesque towns full of charm, history and character. One of my favorites is St. Charles.

MARCH 2019 | LIFEST YLE

33


T R A V E L E R ' S

T R E K

Founded in 1769, St. Charles, originally known as Les Petites Cotes, was named by French Canadian fur trader Louis Blanchette. Once a distant outpost, St. Charles soon became a thriving trade center because of its Missouri riverfront location. Here, weary settlers visited the town to trade and purchase supplies before heading out West to the great unknown. And today, its frontier history beckons the traveler to come and experience life as several great Americans once knew it. Standing on the banks of the Missouri River, you can almost imagine life traveling with Meriwether Lewis and William Clark as they left St. Charles in search of the “all-water route� to the Pacific coast, a vast journey that began right here. To get an idea of the challenges that the pair faced, a visit to the Lewis & Clark Boat House and Museum is, above, in order. Inside this beautifully designed 34 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

building, reminiscent of a barn, you will find educational exhibits, exquisite views of the mighty Missouri and even a full-sized replica of the keelboat used by the explorers as they made their way west. Displays informing visitors about the river’s ecosystem and Native American life are also a highlight as you make your way throughout the building on this self-guided tour. The museum is a special place to visit, with many knowledgeable and enthusiastic volunteers who will make sure that you know so much about the adventures of Lewis and Clark that you could probably write a book. Heading outside, you might find yourself on the Katy Trail. This byway is a 237-mile foot/bike path that nearly stretches across the entire state of Missouri. With more than half the trail following the path Lewis and Clark took along the river, you are bound to see some bald eagles soaring and fishing

along the banks. This meandering hike crisscrosses in and out of small quaint towns along the way and is a refreshing approach to acquaint yourself with this vast Midwest state. Suggestion: Spring or fall is the time to venture down this path as the humidity of summer can quickly suck the life out of you with a prickly wet heat that blankets you from head to toe. Across from the museum are the brick and cobblestone streets of the historic district of St. Charles. Beautifully restored homes and businesses stretch as far as the eye can see. This is a place that is meant to be savored and strolled at a leisurely pace so you can take in the variety of experiences offered. Look for the First State Capitol of Missouri housed on the second floor belonging to merchants Peck and Shepard. The building is open for tours just about every day of the year except Mondays during winter.


T R A V E L E R ' S

T R E K

Yet, most likely it will be the sweet aroma of fresh-baked cookies drawing you farther down Main Street and into Grandma’s Cookie Store (401 S. Main). Warning: Be prepared to stand in line because locals from all over consider this renowned establishment the place to see and be seen. Another sweetsmelling place and a personal favorite of mine is the Bathhouse Soapery. It's full of handmade small-batch soaps, bath bombs and custom-blend perfumes, you surely won’t be able to leave this establishment empty-handed. Afterward, skip on over to Di Olivas Oil & Vinegar, also on Main Street, where you can sample such local favorites as bacon oil and golden pineapple white balsamic vinegar. And don’t forget to stop in at Bike Stop Café, where you can rent a bicycle, sip coffee and eat a monstrous quesadilla all at the same time. The cafe also offers a premier shuttle service for bike riders and kayakers alike. After indulging your sight and senses, it is time to grab some grub. Wherever you go on Main Street, it is doubtful that you will be disappointed. A local favorite is the Trailhead Brewing Company. From light fare to full-fledged meals, you are bound to find something on the menu that will complement many of the fine ales that are created there. I highly recommend the Brewhouse Onion Rings hugged by an ale batter that quickly warms you from the inside out. Near the Ameristar Casino is one of the best barbecue places on earth in a state where barbecue restaurants are a dime a dozen. Housed in the beautifully renovated St. Charles Municipal Water Works building, Hendricks BBQ is the place to be if you are a barbecue connoisseur. Its fame comes not just from its meat, but it is also appreciated for serving unique small batch whiskeys, bourbons and moonshines. I can personally vouch for the Bootlegger Bellini, a concoction of cranberry moonshine and champagne. Besides the melt-in-your-mouth juiciest smoked brisket I might just be willing to die and go to heaven for, the sturdy fried green tomatoes and shrimp and grits are also excellent choices to soothe both stomach and soul. If you happen to be lucky enough to be visiting the area during the Christmas holidays, you’ll find the town packed to the brim with things to do. When we were there, snowflakes shining like paper 36 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9


Storewide Sale! We’re making room for new inventory, take advantage of never seen before prices and give your home the look you’ve always wanted.

2 1 4

W .

1 3 9

W.

M A I N B R A N C H

S T R E E T , S T R E E T,

V I S A L I A , A R R OYO

C A

9 3 2 9 1

G R A N D E ,

C A

9 3 4 2 0

5 5 9 . 6 2 2 . 0 9 8 7 •

805.668.2424


T R A V E L E R ' S

T R E K

moons fell while we rode in a horse-drawn carriage, the clip-clop of the horses’ hooves almost lulling us to sleep as we pulled the blankets tightly around us. After bidding our trusty steeds farewell, we headed over to Santa’s Cottage and Train Land, which is housed in the Katy Depot. If the “ho-ho-ho” of Santa and the twinkling of thousands of lights doesn’t put you in the Christmas spirit, then I doubt there is much hope for you. Another memorable event of the season is St. Charles’ traditional Las Posadas celebration. Hundreds of the faithful carry white candles as they follow behind “Mary” and “Joseph” as they seek shelter at various businesses along the way. The journey ends when the group arrives at the live nativity scene on the riverfront. If you are still in the mood to broaden your historical perspectives, then the nearby town of Defiance makes a great day trip. Here, you will find the historic Daniel Boone home, which you can tour along with a village of more than a dozen 19th-century buildings, including the picturesque Old Peace Chapel, a historic white church where lovers of all ages tie the knot. Of course, if you are in the area, following the Augusta Wine Country Trail is an idyllic way to spend the day. In fact, this region is actually the first region in the United States to be designated an American viticultural area. Following the trail will give you a glimpse of smalltown America and the amazing vistas viewed from the rolling hills of the state. St. Charles County has numerous wineries, including my all-time favorite, Blumenhof Vineyards and Winery. For award-winning wines, you can’t beat Blumenhof, which has won more medals for its Missouri wines than any other producer and features such varietals as chambourcin and vignoles. If you want to experience a traditional big Sunday brunch, Chandler Hill Winery in Defiance tops the list with its carving, omelet and bagel stations. Most of the wineries in the area offer free weekend entertainment from big names to small, but whoever you see, the music often can be funky and fun-loving and the wine even better. And, as usual, small mom-and-pop art galleries seem to go hand-in-hand with a glass of vino, so finding the perfect one to indulge your artistic taste is as easy as strolling to the 38 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

Foundry Art Centre back in St. Charles or Augusta Gallery near Balducci Vineyards in Augusta. Of course, if you are looking for some high-rolling action, there is the Ameristar Casino along the waterfront. Here you will find the typical games of chance and the Ara Spa, a place to be pampered after a day spent hiking, biking and kayaking down the Missouri River. While St. Charles offers its guests small-town charm, it certainly has a big-town feel. Paired with a trip down to the state’s entertainment capital of Branson, you will find that Missouri offers the charm, excitement and history that is often lacking in other so-called destination vacations. So what are you waiting for? Pack your bags and head to the Midwest and discover for yourself all that is to experience in America’s Show-Me State. L


H O M E

T O U R

The Lambert Home T E X T

B Y

L I S A

40 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

M C E W E N

|

P H O T O S

B Y

D A N N Y

K L O R M A N

P H O T O G R A P H Y


H O M E

T O U R

MARCH 2019 | LIFEST YLE

41


H O M E

T O U R LOVINGLY RESTORED, CENTURY-OLD HOME OFFERS A GLIMPSE INTO VISALIA’S PAST

I

Visitors can climb onto an elevated, redpainted porch that leads to a handsome Craftsman front door, above. The backyard, below, gives visitors a chance to sit and relax. Mature citrus trees are part of the landscape.

42 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

n 1921, Visalia’s population hovered at less than 6,000 people. The Fox Theatre was not yet built, and Visalia Union High School was the only high school in town. A home built this same year on the aptly named Kaweah Avenue gives guests a window into the past and a chance to reflect on everyday living nearly a century ago, all because of its owners’ loving and painstaking restoration. Peggy and Joe Lambert, longtime Visalia residents, have invested more than time and resources into the three-bedroom, two-bath bungalow during a year-long restoration process. Because they can envision themselves living in this adorable structure in retirement, they have also invested their hearts. If it’s possible to be in love with a building, then the Lamberts are certainly smitten with this home. Extreme attention to detail and an effort to retain the home’s historical value gives this away. Not to mention Peggy’s enthusiasm about the challenging and lengthy process to turn a dilapidated rental into a shining example of how a couple has chosen to invest in one of Visalia’s oldest neighborhoods.


Celebrating 5 Years!

216 N WILLIS STREET • VISALIA RESERVATIONS: 559.733.3033 thevintagepress.com

“IN TEN SESSIONS YOU WILL FEEL THE DIFFERENCE, IN T WENT Y SESSIONS YOU WILL SEE THE DIFFERENCE, AND IN THIRT Y YOU WILL HAVE A WHOLE NEW BODY.” -JOSEPH PIL ATES

111 S. Court Street, Ste. 208 Downtown Visalia 559.904.3912 layne@flowstudios.net www.flowstudios.net

PI L ATE S BAR R E BO U TI Q U E

MARCH 2019 | LIFEST YLE

43


H O M E

T O U R

NEIGHBORHOOD LOVE More than 36 years ago, Peggy and Joe strolled Kaweah Avenue as newlyweds. “I am from the Bay Area and Joe is from San Diego, so we decided to live right in the middle of the state,” Peggy said. Peggy, a nurse, and Joe, a pharmacist at Kaweah Delta District Hospital (where he still works), could walk to work from their first rental home. “We rented a little bungalow a few blocks from here since we were both paying off student loans,” she said. “We used to take neighborhood walks through here and have just always loved this neighborhood.” The neighborhood is known officially as the Visalia Homebuilders Addition and is located squarely in Visalia’s historic district. It was one of the first tract housing

neighborhoods in the city. According to a document prepared by Jane Higgins Nash of the city of Visalia’s Historic Preservation Committee, a group of well-known businessmen recognized the need for affordable housing in Visalia and incorporated as the Visalia Homebuilders Association in 1919. “At the time, there were very few homes to rent or buy. A group of Visalia businessmen decided that by pooling their resources, they could buy some tracts of land and subdivide the land into lots,” the document states. Shares were priced at $1,000 each and prominent businessmen such as L.C. Hyde and J.E. Richardson served as president and secretary of the association, respectively. The boundaries of the first Homebuilders tract were Watson and Conyer streets and Myrtle and Mineral King avenues.

The houses built by the association sold for $4,500 for the lot and house. A second tract was bordered by Giddings and Mineral King avenues, Divisadero Street and Sierra Drive along the south side of Mill Creek. The Homebuilders Addition neighborhood represents a distinct range of architectural styles and character, and the Lamberts' Crafstman bungalow on Kaweah Avenue is certainly no different. About three years ago, they decided that they would want to downsize during retirement from their current home, which is just a few blocks away in the Beverly Glen neighborhood. The couple kept an eye on the neighborhood and when 705 W. Kaweah Ave. came on the market, they purchased it with a plan to restore, rent and then move in when the time came.

The living room and dining area with an antique table feature old-growth fir flooring found beneath carpeting and linoleum. The 88 panes of glass in the home’s windows, which operate on a pulley system, are original.

44 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9


H O M E

T O U R

An opening was added from the kitchen, above, to facilitate delivery of food to the dining room. It also provides a view from the front door in the living room to the back porch, right. At left is a refinished 1940s-era stove found in Los Angeles

PEELING BACK THE YEARS After owning the home for a few years, the Lamberts decided to begin the renovation process. A tenant living in the home with four dogs and a few cats moved out, leaving behind quite a mess. “The carpets were completely urine-soaked,” Peggy said. “The bathtub was used as a litter box. It was terrible. We thought to ourselves, ‘What have we done?’” However, as layers were peeled away, treasures began to emerge. Underneath the soiled carpet was pink linoleum, which happened to completely protect the original hardwood flooring, made of close-grain old-growth fir. Walking through the home, the tell-tale squeaks and thump-thump of footsteps remind visitors that the immaculate flooring is indeed a century old.

The couple hired Bothof Construction Inc. as general contractor, and Peggy said the owners’ expertise and patience was invaluable. As the renovation process continued, minor adjustments were made to the floor plan to allow for flow of traffic. For example, an opening was added to the dining room wall that allows plates of food and conversation from the kitchen to filter to guests seated at the antique dining table, and also gives visitors a view straight from the front door to the back porch. Peggy did a lot of restoration work herself, including tackling the original windows, some of which had been painted shut. She consulted the National Historic Trust to learn about window preservation. The 88 panes of glass in the home are all original, and Peggy had a hand in each of them. Peeling away layer after layer

of old paint and putty, Peggy began to appreciate what the home’s builders created. “This home is designed for passive energy use,” she said, demonstrating how the top window slides down while the bottom window slides up on a pulley system in the casing to allow cooling of the room in a matter of minutes. With the windows properly restored, they are air-tight, maintaining an ambient temperature and eliminating the possibility of mold, which is so often the case with older homes. “They are ready to go for another hundred years!” Peggy said. To increase the temperature stability of the home, low-E film was added to west-facing windows. And for further comfort, the Lamberts also added central heating and air. MARCH 2019 | LIFEST YLE

45


H O M E

T O U R

YEAR-LONG TREASURE HUNT With the major structural bones of the house solid, the fun began for Peggy, charged with finding the perfect period-appropriate accessories for the bungalow. From hunting around local thrift stores and antique shops to visiting home demolition sites in the Valley and on the coast, Peggy embarked on a yearlong treasure hunt for furniture, art, medicine cabinets, antique bed frames and more. It is ironic to note that modern technology is crucial to bringing an older home back to life. From Craigslist (where Peggy found a 1920s-era Art Deco sink for the Jack-and-Jill bathroom) to the ability to use the internet for hundreds of hours of research, the result is a flawless design that incorporates vintage items (plumbing and lighting fixtures, for example) from throughout the state and even the world. It is obvious that Peggy has a knack for combining elements from far and wide as the home emits a relaxing and inviting energy, always with an air to historical accuracy. Some of the most unique features to note are gorgeous, sparkling original doorknobs on interior doors and a 1940s-era stove that was refinished and found at Antique Stove Heaven in Los Angeles. Pull some freshly baked chocolate chip cookies out of one of its tiny ovens and one is sure to feel like this place is easily called home. Another trait that is rare to find in current construction standards is a picture rail, a fool-proof and plastersaving method for hanging art throughout the home. Fortunately, Peggy and Joe realized what a treasure this feature is and made sure to preserve it when renovating the home. Speaking of art, the home is wellappointed with original paintings from several area artists, including a scene of Mineral King painted by Mary Winey, a longtime Visalia oil and watercolor artist. Maintaining a sense of the home’s period extended to the exterior, as well. A handsome and sturdy Craftsman front door greets newcomers on an elevated porch that easily catches evening breezes. The design harkens back to a time when neighbors chatted often and easily. Peggy said their goal was to maintain the home’s original exterior paint colors, as well. That said, the stucco needed a 46 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

One of the home’s two bathrooms features a 1920s-era Art Deco sink bought on Craigslist. The Lamberts, who offer the house on airbnb, say many of their guests comment on its blend of vintage features and modern amenities.


COMMERCIAL CLEANING SERVICES

ROBYN ICENHOWER & ASSOCIATES LE ADING THE LUXURY MARKE T IN MOST HOM ES SOLD! W W W.3835W O O DS IDE .INF O

Janitorial Service For dependable commercial cleaning service ServiceMaster Clean can help. daily, weekly, or monthly janitorial service Medical & professional office cleaning Aggregate floor cleaning Tile & grout cleaning

Office system cleaning Window washing Nearly any other cleaning you want

Carpet cleaning using various processes

ROBYN GRAHAM ICENHOWER

ServiceMaster by Hellstern

Ron Hellstern owner 559.738.8927 Serving the Visalia area | Locally owned and operated for over 30 years

OUR : MOTTO

BRE Lic. #01810074

Workouts are better with others. Come join a positive group of people. We make working out fun, safe and effective.

Call 559-334-8990 to set up a strategy session with one of our awesome coaches. 6910 Pershing Ave. Visalia, CA 93291 MARCH 2019 | LIFEST YLE

47


H O M E

T O U R

In renovating the house, Peggy Lambert embarked on a year-long hunt for furniture, art, antique bed frames and more. The interior doors are fitted with sparkling original doorknobs.

lot of attention. Peggy said David Juarez expertly filled, repaired and colored the stucco to just the right hue of light green, the home’s original color, which offsets the red trim and red-painted porch perfectly. WELCOMING WORLDWIDE GUESTS Anyone who has embarked on a construction project knows that, generally speaking, they last twice as long and cost at least twice as much. The Lamberts’ bungalow restoration was no different. “Even through all the surprises, I didn’t realize a project like this would be so fun,” Peggy said. “There were times when we were overwhelmed and didn’t think we would ever be finished. But the house seems a lot happier now!” Anxious to share their love of Visalia with others, the next step in the couple’s plan has now come to fruition: renting the home on airbnb.com. In the last eight months, the couple has greeted guests from Switzerland to New Jersey, people who are often passing through Visalia on their way to Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. Another couple rented the home while visiting a brand-new grandchild born at Kaweah Delta. They were able to walk to the hospital to visit their new family member, which was incredibly convenient. Yet another couple began their honeymoon in the home before embarking on a trip. Many guests have commented on the delightful, quiet, tree-lined neighborhood, which is especially gorgeous in late fall. Others state that for those who love staying in historic structures while traveling, this home offers a perfect blend of vintage features with modern amenities. Acting as an ambassador of Visalia comes naturally to Peggy, who is quick to offer information on downtown restaurants and activities. She has prepared a binder full of pamphlets, menus and top area attractions for guests. In the backyard, the Lamberts acknowledge the area’s citrus history for their guests. They kept some existing mature citrus trees in the landscaping, including 48 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

“All of these houses deserve to be loved. I hope others come along and do the same thing. It is worth it, and we are very happy with the way it turned out.” — Peggy Lambert

orange and lemon, and planted a tangerine tree for good measure. Guests are encouraged to pick and eat the fresh fruit, which has been a highlight for many. Peggy cleans the home after every guest leaves, simply because she loves cleaning this house more than the home she currently lives in. “All of these houses deserve to be loved,” she said. “I hope others come along and do the same thing. It is worth it, and we are very happy with the way it turned out.” L


H O M E

T O U R

MARCH 2019 | LIFEST YLE

49


D O W N T O W N

S C E N E

2 NEW ADDITIONS B Y

W

e have yet again added a couple of quality-of-life businesses to our downtown over the past couple of months. One addition is found in the Green Apple Market, and the other the Poke House. Both offer something unique to downtown worthy of a visit. The Green Apple Market sits on Court Street between Main and Center streets a couple of doors down from Starbucks. It is reminiscent of the bodega-style market throughout the boroughs of New York, but a nonexistent convenience in our own downtown. Here you can find the typical city mart items like chips, cookies, beef jerky, dried fruits and nuts, among other on-the-go snacks. This is paired with a stocked cooler of nonalcoholic drinks such as Gatorade, sodas, energy drinks and bottled water. However, Green Apple goes on to add a twist to your average mart experience, this through various menu items offered. There is a smoothie and juice bar, with such drinks as the Bur-Berry made with almond milk, Greek yogurt, berries and dates. Or grab a Banana Nut smoothie 50 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

M A J O R

R O G E R S

made with oats, cinnamon, honey, walnuts, banana and almond meal. Other immune-system booster drinks are such juices as the Green Apple Detox, made with cucumber, lemon, parsley, kale, ginger and green apple. There is orange or carrot juice available, or the Mother Earth, made from parsley, kale, celery, cucumber, green apple, lemon, spinach and ginger. There is also a cooler of specialty bottled drinks such as coconut milk-based beverages or specialty cold tea drinks that contain immune-boosting agents, or with herbs and cultures to keep your body strong while on the move. There is another reason that you will find the market bustling with downtown shoppers and employees on weekday afternoons or evenings, and that's from the hardy food menu offered. On the lighter side is a salad selection that includes apple or strawberry salads with the option of chicken toppings. Or a selection of wraps such as the turkey sprout and hummus wrap. On the substantially filling end, you may order a Philly cheesesteak sandwich large enough to share. If you enjoy hamburgers, you

can order one with one to four patties, with such toppings as pastrami, bacon, avocado or peppers. For early risers, the Green Apple Market has fresh-brewed coffee, breakfast burritos or bagel-based sandwiches. When owner-operator Junior Muharram is asked “why the market, why downtown?” he simply says of the convenience store: “It’s the only thing missing in downtown.” The statement rings true for those in need of anything from pain relievers to pastrami sandwiches when on a quick break from work. The store is rapidly becoming a must stop for downtown professionals, but worth the drive from any part of town to experience. The other new attraction on Main Street is the Poke House. Okay, for starters, we are going to learn how to properly pronounce this trending food choice title: It’s Poh-kay. Now that we have that cleared up, lets get you educated on the rest. Poke, in a sense, is a Hawaiian-created style of sushi salad. At many poke restaurants, the customer can build their own bowl.


D O W N T O W N

Poke House operates this way as well, and it has simplified the process so that anyone can walk in for the first time and not be intimidated. Through a five-step process, you start by picking your base. Choices include brown or white rice, or mixed greens. Second, you choose your protein from more than a dozen items, from shrimp or scallops to spicy or Scottish salmon. Cooked chicken breast or tofu are offered for those not into fish or meat. The third step involves choosing your toppings. Here, you get up to five items such as mango salsa, edamame (soy bean), masago (fish roe), seaweed salad or sushi ginger, to name a few. Now onto the fourth step, picking your poke sauce. There are eight choices,

which allow you to change up the flavor of your bowl on return trips, such as the House Spicy Mayo, Yuzu Pepper or Soy and Sweet. To finish off the process, step five has you “adding some crunch� to the creation. Here you may do Crispy Garlic, Crushed Cashews or Tempura Crumbles. If you want to trust the professionals, you can do that, too, by ordering a House Bowl prepared one of three ways, featuring a multitude of flavor and healthy food with very little processing. For those who want to stay on the familiar side of tastes, Poke House also offers teriyaki bowls of beef, chicken or shrimp and traditional Japanese appetizers such as pot stickers and egg rolls.

S C E N E

There is something worth adding about both enterprises that makes them patron-worthy. Both are owned by people already operating within our city limits. Green Apple Market is run by the owner of the soon-to-relocate Doc's Drive-In on Main and Willis Steet, slated to open in the next year. Poke House is owned by Billy Sung, who has operated Gozen Japanese Restaurant. The Caldwell Avenue restaurant has been going Visalia strong for more than a decade. Both business owners believe in the power of patronage within our city, as they bring us yet another opportunity to experience something new and needed. L

MARCH 2019 | LIFEST YLE

51


F I T N E S S

C H A L L E N G E

AMY SHUKLIAN’S FITNESS JOURNEY CONTINUES ... T E X T

B Y

J U S T I N

L E V I N E

52 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

W

e began the new year with some tough circumstances. Life seems to do that to us, gets in the way of our goals. But we need to respond in times of despair and tough moments. We need to fight for the goals and the things that we desire to achieve. That has become our mantra. Stay persistent. Amy's short-term goal is to be active five days a week for 20 minutes a day.

We want her moving everyday, but five actual exercise sessions. These workouts will be focused on full body routines, moving as much as she can during each 50-minute session. She will move through mobility drills, strength exercises, power work and aerobic exercise. Consistency is the key. Let's send positive vibes to Amy. We’ve got your back! L


SHAVER LAKE & MORRO BAY VACATION RENTALS

Plan your next escape... Visit our website for more information: GregoryPropertiesRE.com

Interior and exterior plantscaping, along with some simple design elements, STAGING can make your home, place of business, or event more warm and inviting. DESIGN AND INSTALLATION CALL 559.734.4920 TO SEE HOW WE CAN BRING YOUR SPACE TO LIFE. LIVE PLANT RENTAL AND LEASING

MARCH 2019 | LIFEST YLE

53


K U D O S

EMPTY BOWLS

E

mpty Bowls is an international project to bring awareness to the fight against hunger, personalized on a community level. In our community, someone’s bowl is always empty, and this event serves as a reminder that we are all able to help. Visalia Rescue Mission not only wants to fill as many empty bowls as possible, but with the help of a warm meal, a conversation is started that may lead to a full soul. Guests who attended VRM’s 10th annual Empty Bowls were provided a beautiful, locally hand-crafted bowl that they were able to fill with hot soup, donated by the Vintage Press. The guests were guided to cross the street, where they stood in the same soup line where our most vulnerable community members wait for their dinner each night. Volunteers promptly served each guest their meal and, for a moment, guests were able to experience the warmth of the kitchen and joy of a full bowl. Each year, guests are able to witness the testimony of a graduate of the Visalia Rescue Mission's Life Change Academy. This year, Angela Phillips bravely stood and shared her story of how the mission provided her with the tools she needed 54 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

to find her place in the world. She told how she still notices traits and habits in herself that can lead to relapse, but now that she knows how to identify the familiar feelings, she is able to use her tools to work through them. She gives all thanks to God for mending the relationships with her family and her children. She ended her testimony by stating that not only has the Visalia Rescue Mission changed her life, but it has also changed for every person in her life. As the evening ended, guests took home their empty bowls. The bowls are placed on their shelves at home as a simple reminder, when they are seen, of all the empty bowls in our community and that everyone is able to help. The mission of the Visalia Rescue

Mission is partnering with Central California to serve the poor and those in need with the love and power of the gospel of Christ so that they may become God-dependent and contributing members of their community. There are many ways you may support Visalia Rescue Mission. You may give your time by volunteering with us, donate gently used personal and household items to our thrift stores, donate a vehicle to Mission Motors, give financially, leave a legacy by giving through your will, become a Cheerful Giver through a donor-advised fund, and you may pray for us. For more information, please contact Betsy at (559) 740-4178. We hope to see you at the 11th annual Empty Bowls event in 2020. L


Little patients, Big experience Visalia Medical Clinic’s caring and skilled team of 7 pediatricians will help you grow strong, healthy children.

Sherman & Associates specializes in upscale Visalia residential properties. With over 30 years experience, Nola Sherman is “the recommended realtor.”

Expertise and convenience with easy referrals to VMC’s specialists.

SOLD ON R EAL EXPER IENCE.

nola@nolasherman.com

Jason Mihalcin, DO

Be Well www.vmchealth.com Visalia 5400 W. Hillsdale Ave., Visalia • 559-739-2000 Medical Clinic

YOUR OWN PERSONAL PARADISE 559.635.9637 | www.paradisepool.com | Since 1978

MARCH 2019 | LIFEST YLE

55


K U D O S

CELEBRATE RECOVERY

C

elebrate Recovery (CR) at Visalia Community Church held its annual fundraiser dinner Feb. 9. This year’s dinner had an Italian theme. Upon entering, a free photo booth was hosted by Broken Chains, a national Christian biker association of members who are in recovery. The dinner consisted of spaghetti, salad and bread. There were VIP tables and general admission tables, dessert, silent and live auctions, worship time led by Praymore, raffles and door prizes. CR is a Christ-based 12-step recovery program for any hurt, habit or hang-up. CR is in all 50 states and many countries, and translated in multiple languages. CR was founded by John Baker in 1991 at Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, Calif., where Rick Warren is the lead pastor. The program has been changing lives every Friday night at Visalia Community

56 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

Church for five years. More than 200 people attended the event, including four CR state representatives and their spouses, and also Point of Contacts for Broken Chains. This event was a huge success and took many volunteers to make happen. Each volunteer who worked on this fundraiser has been through the 12 steps at Celebrate Recovery and believes in giving back in service through the 12th step. Many local businesses donated items for the event, including Javi’s Tacos, Ryan’s Place, Pita Kabob, Los Arbolitos, St. Anthony Retreat, Tahoe Joe’s, Roller Towne, Quantum Leap and more. For more information about Celebrate Recovery at Visalia Community Church or to make a donation, contact Kilo Cerda, ministry leader, at (559) 723-4777 or by email at cr@vccoc.org L


We know 10 minutes means a lot! 10 MINUTE LUBE OIL-N-FILTER 223 E. Tulare Ave., Visalia 1630 E. Main St., Visalia 3550 S. Demaree, Visalia 1542 Tulare Ave., Tulare www.AutoOilChangers.com

OPEN Mon.-Sat. 8-5 Now open Sundays 9-3 (at our Demaree Location only) No Appointment Needed All Work Guaranteed

TAKING CARE OF YOUR VEHICLE SINCE 1985

contractor lic. #990257

559.738.9900 | 481 W. Noble • Farmersville

windows • doors • mirrors • shower • hardware • cabinets

windowspluss.com

facebook.com/windowspluss

@windowsplusconstruction MARCH 2019 | LIFEST YLE

57


HAPPENINGS

MARCH Portraiture Exhibit The Exeter Courthouse Gallery is presenting “Look at That Face! – An Exhibit of Portraiture” by Valley artists LaVone Sterling, Ellen Milinich and Lynn Hock Napoli. A closing reception attended by the artists will be held from 2-4 p.m. March 17. When: Through March 31, Saturdays 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sundays noon-4 p.m. Where: Exeter Courthouse Gallery, 125 South B St., Exeter Contact: exeterarts@outlook.com or (559) 592-5900 Impact Leadership Conference The Visalia Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring a full-day Impact Leadership Conference featuring nationally recognized keynote speakers Justin Patton and David Carr, and breakout sessions facilitated by local industry experts and community leaders. When: March 21, registration 8 a.m., conference 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Where: Visalia Convention Center, 303 E. Acequia Ave., Visalia Contact: visaliachamber.org/impact; Jon Bueno at (559) 734-5876 or jon@visaliachamber.org ‘Honky Tonk Angels’ Country classics combine with a hilarious story about three good ol’ gals who follow their dreams to Nashville, presented by the Visalia Players. Tickets: adults $20, students $16. When: March 22, 23, 29, 30, April 5, 6, 12, 13, 7:30 p.m.; March 24, 31, April 7, 14, 2 p.m. Where: Ice House Theatre, 410 E. Race Ave., Visalia Contact: (559) 734-3900, visaliaplayers.org 58 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

Senior Games The Central Valley’s only Senior Games, an Olympic-style competition for adults ages 50 and “better,” is scheduled in Visalia over two weekends. Events include archery, basketball, bowling, cycling, disc golf, golf, horseshoes, pickle ball, road race, softball, swimming, table tennis, track and field, and trap shoot. Try your hand at such sports as corn hole, darts or billiards at two social events. $25. When: March 23-24, 30-31 Where: various locations Contact: (559) 713-4365; register in person at the Anthony Community Center, 345 N. Jacob St., Visalia or online at http://bit.ly/2S8fjFO ‘Black and White Gala’ The Tulare County Symphony League will hold its annual “Black and White Gala” fundraiser to benefit the Youth Music Education Program and Sequoia Symphony Orchestra. The event will include live entertainment and auction. When: March 23, 6 p.m. Where: Visalia Country Club, 625 N. Ranch Road, Visalia Contact: Angela Biscotti (559) 635-7675 or Faye Zeeb (559) 734-6501

Oldies Concert The Main St. Spring Fling will feature Lakeside, Steve Salas of Tierra, King James Brown, 2nd Chance and tribute to Mary Wells, and hosted by actor Noel G. Tickets $30-$40, or $51 for premium seating and VIP meet and greet. When: March 23, doors 5 p.m., show 6-9 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 308 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: foxvisalia.org or (559) 625-1369 ‘Batteries Not Included’ “Batteries Not Included” is a 1987 American comic science fiction film directed by Matthew Robbins about small extraterrestrial living spaceships that save an apartment block under threat of redevelopment. $5. When: March 28, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 308 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: (559) 625-1369, foxvisalia.org ‘Night at the Museum’ On the last Friday of the month, ImagineU Children’s Museum holds “Night at the Museum” for its imagineers. Children can be dropped off for a night of fun, crafts, games and imagination. Members $20, guests $25. When: March 29, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Where: ImagineU Children’s Museum, 210 N. Tipton St., Visalia Contact: (559) 733-5975, imagineumsueum.org


FROM OUR FAMILY TO YOURS BUSINESS SALES | COMMERCIAL | AGRICULTURE | INVESTMENT PROPERTY

What’s your exit plan? Graham and Associates has a proven strategy to selling businesses. Our business brokers can value, market and close your business transaction in a confidential and professional manner. Our large database of buyers are actively looking for businesses in many different industries. Every business is confidentially marketed. Shutters | Blinds | Verticals | Honeycombs | Woven Woods

Free In-Home Consultation and Professional Installation • Guaranteed Lowest Price • Lifetime Warranties Lic. #810617 blindsforlessvisalia.com

(559) 213-2424 Bradley Bickers

BRE #01997751 (559) 213-2424 1005 N. Demaree St Visalia, CA 93291

Business Sales | M&A Transactions Commercial | Agriculture Investment Properties

MARCH 2019 | LIFEST YLE

59


APRIL HAPPENINGS

Murder Mystery Dinner The Visalia Host Lions will present “Crime and Pun-ishment in the Roaring ’20s,” their second annual fundraising murder mystery dinner. Guests are encouraged to dress in their best 1920s attire. Tickets: $75 per person. When: March 30, 6 p.m. cocktails, 7 p.m. dinner Where: Visalia Convention Center, 303 E. Acequia Ave., Visalia Contact: visaliahostlions.org/; Lauri Aguilar, (559) 936-5712 or laguilar@thelockwoodagency.net

Wine Walk Downtown Visalians will hold their eighth annual Wine Walk featuring wines at more than 30 locations downtown. Your passport will get you a souvenir wine glass and entry into each location to taste a variety of wines, plus food pairings. There will also be live entertainment. Tickets are $45 and must be presented before receiving the glass and passport. Participants must be at least 21 years of age. When: April 2, 5:30-8:30 p.m.; check-in 4:30-6:30 p.m. Where: check-in at 225 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: (559) 732-7737 or www.downtownvisaliacom.ticketleap. com/winewalk

Comedy Night Edwin San Juan and Friends will perform at Comedy Night, featuring Kabir Singh and Anthony K. Tickets $25-$30. When: March 30, doors 7 p.m., show 8 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 308 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: foxvisalia.org or (559) 625-1369 Room to Spare Acoustic Tour Country music singer-songwriter Kip Moore's Room to Spare Acoustic Tour will perform at the Hanford Fox Theatre. Tickets at $55, $45, $30 plus fees. VIP tickets are available online. When: March 30, 8 p.m. Where: Hanford Fox Theatre, 326 N. Irwin St., Hanford Contact: (559) 584-7823, foxhanford.com South Valley Art Tour The nonprofit Arts Consortium is rebranding the South Valley Artists’ Studio Tour. This year’s event will feature more than 25 Tulare County artists with studios south of Highway 198. The tour features a range of artwork from painters and woodcarvers to basket weavers and sculptors. Tickets at $25 will admit two people. (Artists whose studios are north of Highway 198 will be featured in 2020.) When: March 30-31 Where: Artists’ studios south of Highway 198 Contact: (559) 802-3266 or hello@artsconsortium.org. Tickets at bit.ly/ACSVAT2019 60 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

‘Big’ “Big” is a 1988 American fantasy comedy film directed by Penny Marshall, and stars Tom Hanks as Josh Baskin, a young boy who makes a wish "to be big" and is then aged to adulthood overnight. $5. When: April 4, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 308 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: (559) 625-1369, foxvisalia.org Tattoo Exhibition Arts Visalia will present Tattoo, an exhibition featuring local talent. The artwork consists of tattoo sketches, photography of tattoos, three-dimensional artwork and other artwork made by the tattoo artists. The exhibition may contain some nudity to show the full range of tattoos on the body. When: April 3-26; opening reception, April 5, 6-8 p.m. Where: Arts Visalia, 214 E. Oak Ave., Visalia Contact: artsvisalia.org or (559) 739-0905

‘For the Love of Art’ The Visalia Education Foundation presents “For the Love of Art,” Visalia high schools’ art show, dinner and auction, including painting, pottery, sculpture, leatherwork, woodworking, jewelry, fashion and welding. Entries are limited to two per Visalia high school student; applications must be submitted by March 25. Auction proceeds will be divided between the student and foundation for grants, scholarships and projects to benefit students. Event and dinner tickets $20 per person. When: April 5, exhibit opens 6 p.m., buffet dinner 6:30-8 p.m. Where: Ridgeview Middle School, 3315 N. Akers St., Visalia Contact: visaliaedfoundation.org First Friday Arts Visalia showcases a monthly rotation of regionally, nationally and internationally recognized artists. Join us every First Friday during the Art Walk for an opening reception honoring each month’s artists. When: April 5, 6-8 p.m. Where: Arts Visalia, 214 E. Oak Ave., Visalia Contact: (559) 739-0905; artsvisalia.org


HAPPENINGS

Quilt, Cloth Doll Show The 24th annual Best of the Valley, a regional show of quilts and cloth dolls, will feature Carmen Friesen of Strathmore. The three-day event will include a judged and juried quilt show with more than $4,000 in cash awards, BOTV “Valley Agriculture” Challenge Quilts, vendor mall, quilt appraisals, big/ little quilt sale, 2017 Sacred Threads Traveling Exhibit, Viewer’s Choice Awards, food, and special categories for quilters 80 and older and under 18. General admission $10 a day, $15 for a three-day pass; group rates available. Children under 12 admitted free when accompanied by an adult. When: April 5-6, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; April 7, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Where: McDermont Field House, 365 N. Sweetbriar Ave., Lindsay Contact: botvquilts.com or call Suzanne Kistler at (559) 936-2204 Spring Fling The nonprofit Genesis House will present its Spring Fling With Boots & Bling, with proceeds benefiting efforts to help runaway and homeless youths in Tulare County. The event will include contests for blingiest boots, blingiest hat and blingiest outfit, tricky trays, country store, silent auction and special buy-in cake walk. Tickets: $50 each or $400 for a table of eight. When: April 6, 10 a.m. Where: Koetsier Ranch, 8230 Ave. 272, Visalia Contact: tickets at Genesis House, 841-A W. Walnut Ave., Visalia, or call (559) 280-4619 1st Saturday Artists, restaurants and merchants of Three Rivers invite the public to join in a town-wide celebration. Pick up a map at the Three Rivers Historical Museum, 42268 Sierra Drive, or Art Center, 41673 North Fork Drive. Cost to participate is $10, with deadline the 15th of the previous month. When: April 6, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Where: Three Rivers Contact: (559) 561-3463 or 1stsaturdaytr.com

Bakersfield Sound Tribute “The Okie From Muskogee: A Tribute to the Bakersfield Sound,” a sub-genre of country music, will honor some of the artists who helped Bakersfield become “The Country Music Capital of the West Coast” and “Nashville West.” The concert will include Kris Korsgaden. Tickets: $15-$30. When: April 6, doors 6:30 p.m., show 7:30 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 308 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: foxvisalia.org, (559) 625-1369)

‘Wonders of Europe’ The Sequoia Symphony Orchestra will present a concert featuring “Wonders of Europe,” including a quick trip through Italy and Spain, featuring Rodrigo’s guitar concerto and the debut of soloist Jiji. Tickets: $22-$45. When: April 13, doors 6:30 p.m., show 7:30 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 308 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: Tickets: (559) 632-8600, sequoiasymphonyorchestra.com ‘Chinatown’ “Chinatown” is a 1974 American neonoir mystery film directed by Roman Polanski from a screenplay by Robert Towne, starring Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway. The film was inspired by the California water wars. $5. When: April 17, 6:30-9 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 308 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: (559) 625-1369, foxvisalia.org

Diabetes Walk 2019 Visalia Medical Clinic will present the fifth annual Diabetes Walk in honor of the late Dr. James Mohs, an endocrinologist who worked with diabetic patients in Visalia. There will be blood sugar checks, blood pressure screenings and blood donations. Participants in the free-to-register 3k/5k and kids group walks will receive a free T-shirt while supplies last. When: April 13, 8 a.m.-noon (registration 8 a.m., walking 9 a.m.) rain or shine Where: Visalia Medical Clinic, 5400 W. Hillsdale Ave., Visalia Contact: (559) 739-2087; register at http://conta.cc/2V8Hvdx Book Festival The Tulare County Library will hold its 2019 Book Festival. Featured authors will include Christina Lynch, Kasie West and Isabel Quintero. Applications are available for sponsors, vendors, authors, illustrators and volunteers. When: April 13, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Where: Visalia Branch Library, 200 W. Oak Ave., Visalia Contact: (559) 713-2700, tularecountylibrary.org MARCH 2019 | LIFEST YLE

61


MAY Golf Classic The fifth annual Hopper Heritage Foundation Golf Classic is planned in conjunction with the annual Great Western Gospel Music Fan Festival. When: May 1, 11 a.m. Where: Valley Oaks Golf Course, 1800 S. Plaza Drive, Visalia Contact: Rich Trimmer, (602) 448-6995 Gospel Music Fan Fest The annual Great Western Gospel Music Fan Festival is scheduled, featuring the Booth Brothers, the Hoppers, Grammynominated Ernie Haase and Signature Sound, Triumphant Quartet, Liberty Quartet, Tribute Quartet, 2017-18 solo artist of the year Joseph Habedank, the Hall Sisters, comedian Taylor Mason and the Henrys, Rykert trio, Evidence Quartet, the Roberts and the Chordsmen. When: May 2-4 Where: Visalia Convention Center, 303 E. Acequia Ave., Visalia Contact: (800) 965-9324, iTickets.com or fanfestivals.com Youth Orchestras The Tulare County Youth Orchestras will perform at an event sponsored by the Tulare County Symphony League. Free admission. When: May 2, doors 6:45 p.m., show 7:30 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 308 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: foxvisalia.org or (559) 625-1369 Golf Tournament Hands in the Community, which provides volunteers and groups to assist with crisis and short-term services for the underserved in Tulare and Kings counties, will present its sixth annual Golf Tournament, which will include lunch, dinner and raffle. Cost is $600 for a team of four or $150 for individual players. The community can sponsor local first responder teams as a special thank you. First responders from police, fire and sheriff’s departments in Tulare and Kings counties, as well as CAL FIRE, are invited to take part. When: May 3, 1 p.m. shotgun start Where: Ridge Creek Golf Club, 3018 Ridge Creek Drive, Dinuba Contact: register at hnconline.org or call (559) 625-3822 62 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

HAPPENINGS May Flowers Marketplace The May Flowers Marketplace shopping event featuring more than 40 vendors will include collectibles, home decor, skin care, greeting cards, jewelry, crafts, fashion times, scented candles, food and nutrition, patio and garden health, kitchenware and more. There will be door prizes and raffle items. Free admission. Proceeds benefit the House of Hope. When: May 4, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; fashion previews noon, 1:30 and 3 p.m. Where: Visalia Veterans Memorial Building, 609 W. Center St., Visalia Contact: ksondra68@gmail.com or facebook.com/events may flowers marketplace visalia Orchid Sale Just in time for Mother’s Day, Arts Visalia’s annual Orchid Sale fundraiser will include a display of more than 800 orchids delivered to the gallery. The sale will continue until the orchids are sold out. When: May 4-11, noon-5:30 p.m. Where: Arts Visalia gallery, 214 E. Oak Ave., Visalia Contact: (559) 739-0905, artsvisalia.org Food Creativity A workshop for creativity in food styling and photography is planned by Lori Rice, food photographer and stylist. When: May 9, 8 a.m.-noon Where: Historic Seven Sycamores Ranch, 32988 Road 164, Ivanhoe Contact: loririce.com/workshops for registration information ‘The Goonies’ “The Goonies,” a 1985 Steven Spielberg film, part of Throwback Thursdays. $5 When: May 16, doors 5:30 p.m., show 6:30 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 308 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: foxvisalia.org or (559) 625-1369 ‘Miscast’ Join the Visalia Players for a night of music where there is no “right” age, type or gender, just talented folks with dream songs and blind casting. Tickets: adults $20, students $16. When: May 17-18, 7:30 p.m.; May 19, 4 p.m. Where: Ice House Theatre, 410 E. Race Ave., Visalia Contact: (559) 734-3900, visaliaplayers.org

‘The Wizard of Oz’ “The Wizard of Oz” is a 1939 American musical fantasy film produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and considered to be one of the greatest films in cinema history. Legendary for its use of Technicolor, fantasy storytelling, musical score and memorable characters, it has become an icon of American popular culture. $5. When: May 22, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 308 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: (559) 625-1369, foxvisalia.org ‘Night at the Museum’ On the last Friday of the month, ImagineU Children’s Museum holds “Night at the Museum” for its imagineers. Children can be dropped off for a night of fun, crafts, games and imagination. Members $20, guests $25. When: May 31, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Where: ImagineU Children’s Museum, 210 N. Tipton St., Visalia Contact: (559) 733-5975, imagineumsueum.org Night at the Races Happy Trails Riding Academy’s annual fundraiser, Night at the Races, is returning to the end of May. When: May 31, 6 p.m. Where: Visalia Convention Center, 303 E. Acequia Ave., Visalia Contact: (559) 688-8685 or www.wearehappytrails.com


KEEP THEM

GUESSING Why give away your age if you don’t have to? Eyelid surgery may be all it takes to keep them wondering just how long you’ve looked this young.

Call us today to schedule your own complimentary consultation. All surgeries are performed by Dr. Stevens, a BOARD-CERTIFIED PLASTIC SURGEON, in an ACCREDITED SURGICAL CENTER and with the support of a LICENSED, CERTIFIED ANESTHETIST.

model

Face + Neck Lifts | Liposuction | Tummy Tucks | Breast Lift | Nose | Eyelids MICHAEL B. STEVENS MD, PhD, FACS BOARD CERTIFIED PL ASTIC SURGEON P R I VAT E A C C R E D I T E D S U R G E R Y C E N T E R LOC ATIONS IN VISALIA + BE VERLY HILL S

5 5 9. 6 2 5 . 8 6 3 6 F ac ebook.c om / Mic h aelB S teven s MD

Know your surgeon, know your procedure. Dr. Stevens personally performs your entire surgical procedure.


DrLechtman.com

Question? Hi Dr. Lechtman, I’m thinking about…

THE Doctor is in Email me your questions about plastic surgery. I personally answer every email.

DrLechtman.com 5530 AVENIDA DE LOS ROBLES VISALIA

559. 738.7572

ALEX LECHTMAN,

MD, FACS Board-Certified Plastic & Reconstructive Surgeon

Profile for Lifestyle Magazine

Visalia Lifestyle Magazine – March 2019  

Visalia Lifestyle Magazine – March 2019