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STYLE, ART, CULTURE, + EVENTS OF THE SOUTH VALLEY FEBRUARY 2017

HOME TOUR

EPICURE

TRAVEL

JORDAN HOME

KICKIN' IT WITH CREOLE

EXPLORING TASMANIA

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CREATE A FEATURE WALL IN YOUR HOME RECYCLED WOOD WALL TILE:Rustic Elegance Modern Living


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LIVELY ARTS

HOME TOUR

TULARE COUNTY SYMPHONY

THE JORDAN HOME A World of Color

Tuning in to a Millennial Generation

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The Tulare County Symphony Orchestra seeks a new generation of listeners and supporters. Photo by Ryan Krauter.

10 Wordplay

EPICURE

KICKIN’ IT WITH CREOLE The Vintage Press

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8 Letter from the Executive Editor

Chef David Vartanian presents four Creole dishes, perfect for your Mardi Gras celebrations.

12 Refl ections of Visalia: The Santa Fe – A Vanishing Visalia Railroad 38 Traveler’s Trek: Tasmania – A ‘Devil’ to Get To, But Well Worth The Trip 48 Charity: Open Arms House – A Place for Comfort 54 Happenings

SIP

CRAFT BEER A Local’s Guide to Beer in the Central Valley

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Local food blogger, Lori Rice, explores the craft beer scene in and around the Central Valley. Photo by Chris Vaughn.

COVER: The exterior of the home shows off a Mediterranean flare with smooth white stucco, a curved front door, and a variety of palm trees. ABOVE: Sitting on a corner lot, the home’s many palm trees and Mediterranean style give it a unique tropical look.


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DMI Agency 801 W. Main St. Visalia, CA 93291 Karen Tellalian Kelly Lapadula Malynda Parsons Chris Bly Kaci Hansen Aaron Collins Cheryl Levitan David Vartanian Diane Slocum Lisa McEwen Terry L. Ommen Malkasian Accountancy LLP Gary Malkasian CPA Jeffrey Malkasian EA Maria Gaston Melissa Olson Melissa@DMIAgency.com 801 W. Main St. Visalia, CA 93291 559.739.1747 • Fax 559.738.0909 Lifestyle@DMIAgency.com www.VisaliaLifestyle.com Issuu.com/LifestyleMagazine Facebook.com/LifestyleMag Instagram: visalialifestyle

RACK LOCATIONS DMI Agency Evolutions Fitness Center, Tulare

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Visalia Lifestyle Magazine is published monthly and is distributed via direct mail to nearly 13,000 homes in the upper-middle and high-income neighborhoods in Visalia and Exeter. An additional 2,500 copies are distributed at various distribution points around both communities. Views expressed in columns are those of the columnist and not necessarily those of DMI Agency or its advertisers. Circulation of this issue: 15,500 © 2016 DMI Agency

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FR O M TH E

EDITOR

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f there has ever been a come back story like the one written by the New England Patriots during Super Bowl 51, I don’t remember it. Regardless of your team, one is hard pressed not to notice how momentum changes everything. Sometimes you just need one thing to go your way, one change of direction, followed by an incredible amount of hard work and a never-giveup-attitude, and before you know it, they are handing you a trophy and throwing

examples in our community than the Tulare County Symphony Orchestra. Since the first performance in 1960, the nonprofit has seen its share of changes in attitude toward classical music and the arts in general. As supporters age, administrators face tough questions about how to stay true to core values, while appealing to a younger demographic that will help sustain another decade, or two, or three. On page 16, frequent Lifestyle contributor

For most of us, there are no rings or trophies or parades, but there are days of incredible satisfaction and depth of relationships we would have never thought possible. E X E C U T I V E

E D I T O R

K A R E N

T E L L A L I A N

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO SUBMIT A STORY IDEA, CONTACT ME AT KAREN@DMIAGENCY.COM

you a parade. I just love stories like these, and although in business we most likely won’t get a trophy, we are rewarded in so many other ways. This month’s Home Tour feature, “A World of Color,” is an excellent example of how attitude, hard work, and perseverance can be a winning combination for success. Almost 30 years ago, then single mom of two, Christi Jordan, decided to relocate from San Jose to Visalia without even a prospect for a job. To learn how that turned out for Christi and to see photos of the Jordan’s beautiful and colorful home, turn to page 22. While we’re on the topic of never giving up, there are few greater

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Aaron Collins gives us insight into what to expect from the Symphony this year. We feel so fortunate to be able to bring the best of Visalia and the surrounding communities to our pages every month. Like many of you, our friends and peers, there have been times when we’ve been on one side, or the other, of a change in momentum. For most of us, there are no rings or trophies or parades, but there are days of incredible satisfaction and depth of relationships we would have never thought possible. What Super Bowl 2017 reminded us is… no matter if you’re ahead or behind, don’t ever stop fighting. In business and in health, we are cheering for all of you.


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WO R D PLAY News on writing, books + the world of publishing

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ebruary is Black History Month. A recent book, published in November, shares the story of the slave, James Armistead and the Marquis de Lafayette during the American Revolutionary War. Filthy Rich + Dirt Poor: How the Richest Kid in France and a Teenage Slave Teamed Up to Win America’s Revolutionary War by Lee Smyth, is listed as a book for children, but gives readers of all ages a look at how an educated slave who could read, speak French, and do math, helped win the war by spying on Lord Cornwallis and Benedict Arnold. Cornwallis trusted him so much, he sent him to spy on the rebels, or so he thought. Just out this month is a new edition of W.E.B. DuBois’ The Souls of Black Folk, originally published in 1903. Using historical and sociological essays, songs, and poetry, personal recollections and fiction, DuBois’ ideas were radical at the time, but proved prophetic. DuBois points out that being African American is “always looking at one’s self through the eyes of others” and that there is a duality to their existence. Also out in a new edition this month is Double Victory: How African American Women Broke Race and Gender Barriers to Help Win World War II, a book in the Women of Action series by Cheryl Mullenbach. Profiled are war workers, political activists, military women, volunteers, and entertainers. Some are well-known, others’ stories, such as overseas war correspondent Betty Murphy Phillips, have not received the publicity they deserve. Other significant books include Laurence Leamer’s The Lynching: The Epic Courtroom Battle That Brought Down the Klan. READ THE BOOK For a more in-depth look at the 10 L I F E S T Y L E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 7

women of the movie, Hidden Figures, read Margot Lee Shetterly’s book of the same name. The book follows the careers and lives of four of the black women mathematicians as they used their extraordinary calculating abilities to advance aerospace developments from World War II through the Cold War, Civil Rights, and the Space Race. While these women performed their computational magic at Langley Field in Virginia, another book chronicles the

printing press. The first Pulitzer Prizes were awarded in June with the first Pulitzer for journalism going to Herbert B. Swope. The Nobel prize for literature was shared by Danes Henrik Pontoppidan and Karl Gjellerup. TOP 500 POEMS The list of top 500 famous poems on All Poetry starts with “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” by Maya Angelou. This is followed by “Invictus” by William Ernest Henley, “The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost, “All the World’s a Stage” by William Shakespeare, and “If You Forget Me” by Pablo Neruda. WRITING CONTESTS

women mathematicians who served in the same capacity at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. The Rise of the Rocket Girls by Nathalia Holt gives another perspective on the roles women have played as human computers and the advancement of science. 100 YEARS AGO IN LITERATURE J.R.R. Tolkien began his Middle-earth stories with “Fall of Gondolin” while on medical leave from the British Army after being wounded in World War I. Another English writer, Hugh Kingsmill, was taken prisoner while fighting in France. Leonard and Virginia Woolf began Hogarth Press in their home with a hand

Glimmer Train welcomes Very Short Fiction (from 300 to 3,000 words) in March and April and in July and August. The first place submission will receive $2,000. Entries for the Fiction Open are also accepted in those four months. These stories may run from 3,000 to 20,000 words and can be on any subject and theme. First place is $3,000. The Gimmer Train rules are significantly more relaxed than most contests. Details at: glimmertrainpressinc.submittable.com/ submit. WRITING CONFERENCE The Idyllwild Arts Spring Poetry Retreat will take place March 12-15 at the Creekstone Inn. The workshops will be led by Suzanne Lummis. Students will be encouraged to push boundaries and surprise themselves. Details at: idyllwildarts.org/page.cfm?p=1059. THE LAST WORD “There is nothing more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity” – Martin Luther King Jr. (1929-1968).


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The Santa Fe train and depot at Main and Santa Fe streets, circa 1906.

THE SANTA FE

A VANISHING VISALIA RAILROAD

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rain service began in Visalia in 1874, and from that early beginning, the town had a love-hate relationship with the iron horse. The arrival of a railroad to a town meant a good chance for prosperity as people and freight could move quickly and conveniently. But joy oftentimes turned to resentment when the train’s arrival and departure times were not convenient or the freight rates and ticket prices were seen as excessive. Communities soon discovered that the problems were not necessarily related to the train or its management, but instead were connected to the lack of railroad competition. More trains servicing a community could help keep prices down,

so communities lobbied not just for a railroad, but for multiple railroads. In the 1890s, the Southern Pacific was the only main line railroad operating in Visalia and it was subjected to the normal monopoly criticism. So in 1890, when rumors of an additional railroad coming to Visalia began to circulate, excitement started to build. By 1895, a group of San Francisco businessmen, including entrepreneur Claus Spreckels, organized the San Francisco and San Joaquin Valley Railroad Company (S.F. & S.J.V.), oftentimes called the Valley Railroad. Construction began on the San Francisco to Bakersfield line, and in 1895 a delegation from Visalia paid T EXT

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a visit to the railroad officials with an offer. In exchange for putting Visalia on the route, the city would provide free right-of-way through town, and would also secure right-of-way through the county from the Fresno County line to Kern County. The generous offer was accepted by the company, and the people of Visalia were overjoyed. Alonzo Melville Doty, the poetic publisher of the Visalia Daily Morning Delta, captured the excitement when he penned the following in his paper: O won’t this be a lively town, And won’t the people shout, And won’t prosperity rain down, When that railroad’s round about. By 1897, the Valley Railroad crew arrived


in Visalia on its 391-mile track laying journey that began at Point Richmond in the bay area. Sept. 9, 1897 was the date set for the inaugural S.F. & S.J.V. train’s arrival in Visalia. Not only was it California Admission Day, but according to the media, it represented the day “that Visalia was admitted into extended communication with the world at large.” At about 11 a.m. on the big day, the southbound 26-car train pulled into Visalia on East Street (now Santa Fe Street) and stopped at a boxcar, which served as a temporary depot for the new line at North Street (now Murray Avenue). The town was obviously in a party mood as bells, whistles, and anvil salutes blasted in the background of a cheering crowd. An estimated 12,000 people filled the town, all anxious to celebrate the occasion with sporting events, parades, and a big BBQ feast. Valley Railroad officials were also on hand and that evening a formal program was held in front of the county courthouse with railroad and city officials exchanging compliments and congratulations. The following year, the S.F. & S.J.V. sold their line to the Santa Fe Railroad and new owners began planning an extension of the tracks to Chicago. On July 1, 1900, Visalia welcomed yet another inaugural train. This time it was the first Santa Fe “through-train” from Chicago to San Francisco. As it pulled into the Santa Fe Depot, now at Main and East Street, about 1,000 people were there to greet its arrival. Even before the train wheels stopped rolling, representatives from the Visalia Board of Trade entered the cars and presented

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each passenger with a gift basket of Tulare County grown fruit. Passengers were surprised and bewildered by all the attention. One young female passenger commented, “Why these are the nicest people I ever saw.” Another passenger overwhelmed by the generosity said, “What have we done to deserve such special treatment? I shall never, never, never forget Visalia.” As the train left heading north, the Visalia crowd cheered.

Not only were the passengers and crew pleased with their Visalia reception, the San Francisco Examiner took notice as well reporting, “Residents of the town [Visalia] forsook their homes and callings and crowded at the depot… and the Overland Express moved out of the depot amid cheers and hat and handkerchief waving…” The Fresno Democrat was also impressed with Visalia’s response to

this historic occasion reporting, “It was not until Visalia was reached that the passengers realized the importance of the event. The people of that city left no chance for doubt as to their feelings and the train was given a royal reception.” However, it didn’t take long for feelings to change. On July 9, 1901, the Visalia Daily Times commented in an editorial headlined “Mighty Poor Railroading.” The Santa Fe had upset Visalians with an unreliable time schedule. According to A. H. Brandt, freight and passenger agent for the Santa Fe Railroad and Santa Fe employee for 42 years, the S.F. line had six passenger trains running through Visalia daily up until 1921. After that he said a new era had arrived; one that saw a steady decline in train travel as the use of automobiles took over. By about 1949, passenger service on the Santa Fe line in Visalia ended, however, a few freight trains continued to run. By about 1958, even freight trains stopped and Visalia’s depot sat vacant. Arnold Wiebe owned the building in 1969, and that year it was demolished to expand his automobile dealership. Now the Santa Fe trains, tracks, and depot are gone. The only historical remnant reminding us of the glory days of the transportation giant is the name of the street.

TOP: The Santa Fe depot at the corner of Main and Santa Fe streets as it appeared in about 1937. [Courtesy Bruce Geiger]. INSET: The souvenir pendant commemorating the arrival of the Valley Railroad.


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that make some people more susceptible to gum inflammation. We know that it takes about 3-6 months for the inflammation-causing biofilm to reform underneath the gum line. Thus, if you have gum disease risk factors it is even more important for you to partner with us on a regular basis to determine if any gum inflammation has developed and then to do what is necessary to eliminate it.

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The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise. Children are now tyrants, not the servants of their households. They no longer rise when elders enter the room. They contradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up dainties at the table, cross their legs, and tyrannize their teachers. S O C R A T E S ,

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rotchety old Socrates might have huffed, “And the little punks don’t go to the Symphony, either! – had symphonies yet been a thing. He philosophized about uncultured, feckless youth fully two millennia before Western Classical would hit the Top 40 equivalent of the 18th Century. Instead of Socrates’ vinegar, today’s Symphony marketers have figured out it’s more effective to lure young concert audiences with honey. The waning Baby Boomers and Silent Generation members comprise most symphony audiences, and as a result, arts organizations are being bombarded with headlines that scream in unison: Symphonies Must Adapt. Symphonies Have Two Decades Till Curtains. Classical Audience Crescendo Long Past. It’s enough to rattle your pacemaker. Most Classical aficionados and symphony administrators are wellattuned to these existential issues, although the questions about enduring solutions and structural change await full resolution: How is this art form going to make the jump to new generations, those who will then, in turn, be responsible for its reach into new and devoted audiences beyond them who will continue symphonic music’s core and hopefully, stewardship through volunteerism, donation, and board service? Without audience revenues, or without much governmental support, such as European arts institutions used to perpetuate themselves, American symphonies are guaranteed little if no one remains to carry the torch. Who will carry it forward, if not our millennial youth? That uncertainty has motivated the Tulare County Symphony Orchestra (TCSO) to improvise one way forward for its March movie score-themed concert. The Symphony’s executive director, Juliette de Campos, approached the Visalia Chamber of 18 L I F E S T Y L E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 7

Commerce’s Young Professionals Network (YPN) to ask how the Symphony could reach out to the young networking group members and encourage them to begin attending and supporting the Symphony. “After brainstorming what a networking mixer with the Symphony could look like, we decided on a red carpet event,” said YPN Coordinator Nicola Wissler, who also serves as the Chamber’s education & workforce development manager. Hence was born, “Join Us on the Red Carpet,” slated for

March 11 at the Visalia Fox, the TCSO’s longtime home venue. “The Tulare County Symphony faces many of the same obstacles as other local nonprofits. Older generations who have always supported the arts and nonprofits are getting older and are not able to be as involved as they have in the past. Many nonprofits are trying to find new ways to engage a younger demographic and that is not always easy to do,” said Nicola. “Events like the Red Carpet Concert are a great way to help

introduce young professionals to the Symphony.” Sara Kabot, who is a strategic planner at Stanford University’s Cantor Arts Center, is helping the Symphony meet that goal of cultivating younger audiences. “I'm consulting with the TCSO to understand the barriers to attendance and the opportunities to deepen engagement within this age group. Once we thoroughly understand the problem, there are opportunities for developing solutions and, crucially, ways to test those solutions.” Sara says TCSO leadership is on the right track. “The most important thing that the TCSO is doing right is not assuming that they know what this demographic wants. It may be that this age group sees symphonic music as stuffy or it may be that Saturday night is their only opportunity to be together with their family.” The solution to one of these problems would look very different from the solution to the other, she said, so it's imperative to be sure TCSO has identified the right problems to solve and LIVELY barriers to remove. ARTS Those barriers to entry for younger generations include matters as simple as wondering what to wear, uncertainty how to behave, and which of high society’s mores they’ll need to affect, to more complex factors such as which concerts to prioritize, given lack of music awareness and limited finances for season tickets. Internet Age device addiction, uncertainties over value, captive time and audience requirements, lack of music education, and social motives are all potential factors as well. Demographic shifts mean that the younger Joneses are still keeping up; just with different things these days. Millennials crave and value experiences over material stuff. But therein lies the Symphony’s opening. “Recently I have talked to multiple young professionals who mentioned


that they have always wanted to attend a symphony or learn more about the symphony, but they just had not had the time, money, or a purposeful reason to do so,” said Nicola. “This event is focused on getting young professionals to attend the symphony and making them feel welcome. Young professionals know that if they come to this event, there will be other young professionals in attendance, and they will not only get to watch the Symphony, but they will be able to learn about the history and the important role it plays in the community from Music Director Bruce Kiesling himself.”

seems to have struck a chord with young audiences as the program enters its third year. Classical music as pop culture is well more than a century past its prime. Scott Joplin and Ragtime, the Roaring ‘20s and all that jazz, and Big Band music sent Classical into mothballs in rapid succession. Rock ‘n’ Roll was merely the more recent nail in symphonic music’s musty old coffin. In places like Tulare County, Hip Hop, Country, and Contemporary Christian music now squeeze Classical to a mere sliver on the FM dial, usually saved from oblivion by public radio’s funding model.

things newcomers hate, are turned off by, or are just uninformed about. We decided if we at the California Symphony are serious about cultivating new audiences, we better stop talking about how much we care about this elusive group like so many organizations do and actually take an interest in what this group has to say.” In addition to youthful indolence around old school culture, other threats loom on the horizon: The proposed demise of the National Endowment for the Arts; continued cuts to music education in schools; and

And yet, Classical is still there. And the Tulare County Symphony is, too, having weathered the major economic downturn of 2008 and a number of generational shifts since its inception in 1959 in Pat Hillman’s back yard. Somewhat surprisingly, a report by the East Bay Area-based California Symphony indicates that clever programming may not be what new generations want. New symphony goers love Mozart – once they get their butts into the seats. Getting them there in the first place appears to be the big hitch, especially when the homebound interactivity of the Internet, computer games, and immersive virtual reality offer instant gratification. Classical can be an acquired taste that may unfold more slowly over time. According to the report, “A new [California Symphony] program called Orchestra X with the idea that arts organizations must change the way we think about new audiences, and specifically, must change our willingness to have hard conversations about the

the notoriously not-philanthropically inclined rumored end to tax breaks for charitable nonprofit contributions. An average 40 percent of annual revenues come from donations to symphonies. And that tax break is a huge motivator, in addition to love of classical music, community boosterism, and basic altruism, an enduring trait that seems to have made the leap to Millennials. Sara believes that future success for the Symphony will lay in adaptability. “All arts organizations are trying to tackle these [audience building] issues, but the strategy needs to be individualized to the unique circumstances and community – neither of which remain static over a 10- or even five-year period. Success will be driven by flexibility, an open dialogue with the audiences we're trying to reach, and a willingness to experiment and learn.” Even those like old Socrates could learn a few things from the Millennials, if they’re similarly receptive and willing to think anew.

LIVELY ARTS

While TCSO’s current concept attempts to make newcomers comfortable with the existing ways of Symphony culture, the San Francisco Symphony (SFS) has taken the honey lure concept even further into Trojan horse territory by meeting young audiences where they live with its SoundBox. The noted SFS conductor Michael Tilson Thomas and his troupe have carved a nightclub-like setting out of its vast rehearsal warehouse where typical rows of concert hall seats have been eschewed in favor of couches casually draped with lounging concert goers who sip cocktails and nosh locallysourced treats. Furthermore, attendees are not scolded for device addiction or admonished against Instagramming or Snapchatting the show’s happenings in real time, but are rather encouraged to ‘selfie’ away. Classical, both old guard and contemporary, mixes with more modern offerings for a wideranging curatorial approach to music programming at SoundBox, which 20 L I F E S T Y L E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 7


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THE JORDAN HOME

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HOME TOUR

The Jordans have collected a variety of exotic masks from their travels around the world, which now hang on their dining room wall.

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olor. That’s what Christi Jordan wanted more of in her home when she and her husband, Richard, decided to give it a facelift this past year. “I like things that are bright and happy, and I wanted that reflected in our home,” said Christi. As a local hair stylist and owner of CA Looks salon in Visalia, Christi’s world seems to revolve around color – blending, mixing, dying, highlighting, tinting; you name it, she’s done it. So when it came to their living space, Christi and Richard felt it was time for a cheerful change. The Couple collaborated with local interior decorator Annie Gilles to bring some sizzle to their space. For Annie, it all started with a painting she came across that she thought epitomized Christi. The rare serigraph by Itzchak Tarkay depicts a tall, dark-haired woman dressed in vibrant clothes from head-totoe, surrounded by a burst of bright and warm colors. “Christi told me that if I ever found something that had some color, to get

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it,” said Annie. “I saw this, and there was just something about it that reminded me of her; she has great attitude.” Along with the painting, Christi had a set of orange armchairs that she wanted to fit in with the rest of the

family room décor. Christi and Annie then selected several colors from the painting that they thought would work well throughout the room. A mix of teal and red throw pillows, an orange throw blanket, and vibrant curtains tie together the look expressed in Tarkay’s art piece, which now hangs above the couch. The

addition of several large potted palms also bring out the tropical feel reflected in the painting. Annie made sure that same theme flowed effortlessly into the kitchen as bold colors are purposefully scattered throughout; the kitchen table chairs were painted lime green, the stool pads were reupholstered with vibrant orange fabric, and a variety of colorful ceramics sit happily on the counter tops and shelves. “The space was all very heavy before,” said Annie. “I didn’t feel it reflected her personality. Like she said, it just needed a facelift.” Much of Christi and Richard’s love for bold, tropical colors comes from their travels visiting exotic countries around the world; places like Cambodia, Thailand, Bali, Australia, Belize, Singapore, China, Hawaii, and the Caribbean are just a few of the destinations they’ve traveled to. And with Richard’s sister living near Rosarito, they try to visit Mexico at least once a year. While the Jordans aren’t big

INSET: The Tarkay painting that inspired the colors and décor in the Jordan’s living room.


YOUR

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Living to see her next birthday At 86, Dona was walking over a mile a day. But one day, chest pain that felt like “someone sitting on my chest” hit. She was hospitalized and diagnosed

with four severely blocked arteries and a malfunctioning valve. When she asked what would happen without surgery, she learned she likely wouldn’t live to see her next birthday. She wasn’t ready to give up. Today, thanks to Drs. Araim and Caminha, Dona is back to walking a mile a day and enjoying being 87.

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HOME TOUR

TOP LEFT: The kitchen stools were reupholstered with orange fabric to tie in the bold colors throughout the living space. TOP RIGHT: The custom made throw pillows bring out the colors in the painting. PICTURED: Interior decorator Annie Gilles painted the kitchen chairs green to liven up the room. INSET: The guest bathroom features a beautiful fish from Christi and Richard’s travels.

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collectors, they have established the tradition of purchasing a mask from every country they visit. Over the years, these masks have been incorporated into their décor as they sit on the dining room wall, overlooking a custom-made, travertine table. “You know when you go on a trip, you always feel like you have to buy something to bring back home,” said Christi. “Well, I don’t really like nic nacs, but we started collecting the masks and we needed to put something in the dining room anyways. We think it looks cool, and they’re kind of like pieces of art.” This year, Christi and Richard plan to add several more masks to their collection, as they are currently on a three-week trip

In fact, they met for the first time while in Mexico, thanks to Richard’s sister. “When I was moving my salon from Mooney to Main Street, Richard’s sister was the opposing realtor,” said Christi. “She and I became good friends, and I was single at the time, so she was always trying to set me up. He lived in San Diego, but we met in Mexico while his sister was building a house down there.” After many months of sitting in traffic while traveling between San Diego and Visalia to see each other, Richard made the decision to retire and move to Visalia for Christi. The same perks of smaller town living that originally brought Christi to

exploring Vietnam, Dubai, China, Thailand, and Singapore. Richard’s daughter, who travels all over the world, told them that Vietnam has one of the most beautiful coastlines she’s ever seen. As lovers of tropical destinations, architecture, and history, they decided to make the trip a reality. “I’ve always loved geography and history, and I just enjoy checking things off my bucket list,” said Richard. Richard and Christi have been checking destinations off their bucket lists together for more than a decade, and plan to continue well into the future.

Visalia proved to be a good fit for Richard as well. Almost 28 years ago, long before they met, Christi decided to make the move from San Jose to Visalia with two young children in tow, despite having no job and no family members nearby. When she first arrived, she rented a single room from her friends and lived there with her son and daughter, who were one and four years old at the time. “I had two small children and I just wanted to raise them in a smaller town; I knew Visalia was a growing community,” said Christi. “I had one close friend L I F E S T Y L E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 7

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HOME TOUR

While simply decorated, the Master Bedroom’s animal print decor leaves hints of Christi’s fun personality.

from high school who lived here and we used to come visit. I always thought it was a cute town, so I thought we’d try it.” Though difficult, the move would prove to be one of the best things for Christi and her children. She came to Visalia in May of 1989 and by November opened up CA Looks salon, which has since grown into a thriving business. “I looked around for a job when I got here, but most of the salons were booth rental,” said Christi. “Because I managed a salon for so many years and I didn’t know anybody here, I thought, I’ve got to do something myself. So I got a shop on the corner of town and did $8 haircuts, and I just went from there.” But success didn’t come to Christi over night; she dedicated years of hard work and sacrifice to keep the salon afloat. For the first several years she worked very long hours, went to every local Chamber of Commerce meeting, brought her kids to work with her, and did a lot of coupon shopping to pay the bills. “The first few years were very hard,” said Christi. “I was a single mother of two kids with no family here. I just had my friends that would help me, but a lot of the times the kids came to work with me. There were some months when I thought ‘this is it,’ but with hard work 28 L I F E S T Y L E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 7

and determination, I just did whatever I had to do.” Now, nearly 30 years later, Christi has a large staff working at her salon with some of the most talented hairstylists in the region. She instills in them the same values of hard work, dedication, and professionalism that got her to where she is today. Many of her staff members have even moved on to open their own salons around California.

“I’ve watched a lot of people become very successful,” said Christi. “Some people will leave mad at me, but a lot of people will call back later thanking me for teaching them the business side – being responsible, showing up for work before your client gets there, keeping your station clean, and looking professional. It makes me feel very

proud.” When Christi first moved to Visalia, she knew that it would be a steppingstone to greater things, but she never quite imagined she’d be where she’s at now with a beautiful home and such a successful business. Unlike in San Jose, here Christi was able to establish roots, raise a family in a safe and clean neighborhood, own her own business, and have a beautiful house to come home to at night. “I knew I would be ok,” said Christi. “I mean, I could never own a home like this in San Jose. That’s one reason why I wanted to move to Visalia; I could own a home, have roots here, and make something of myself.” When Richard and Christi were looking for a home they could call their own, they spent a long time seeking out just the right fit for them. They even purchased a lot in The Lakes, but decided to search for a home in a more private setting. While Richard was still living in San Diego, Christi came across a Mediterranean oasis in the Cobblestone neighborhood and knew right away it was the one. After seeing the home’s large doors, open floor plan, spacious patio, four-car garage, and smooth white stucco exterior, Richard was on board. Because the home was just 45 days away from being complete, Christi and

INSET: The Master Bathroom carries on the bedroom’s subtle animal print theme.


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HOME TOUR

Richard didn’t get to pick out the materials used inside the home. But, they added their own touch to the back yard, which Richard designed himself. He even brought up 18 different species of palm trees from San Diego. “We put more than 100 yards of dirt in the backyard; it was totally flat before,” said Richard. “We put in the ‘spool’ too – we both hate cold weather and we’re not swimmers, so we can heat that thing up pretty quick.” When Christi and Richard planned to have their wedding in the backyard of their new home, they purchased a bar at the Visalia Home Show, which added to the tropical atmosphere. The orange 30 L I F E S T Y L E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 7

base of the bar and colorful chair cushions complement the outdoor bed that overlooks the “spool.” With a trickling waterfall, countless palm trees, a fire pit, and plenty of outdoor seating, the backyard is a true island oasis. While the couple designed the outdoor look themselves, it flows perfectly with the interior colors and creates a succinct look, bringing the outdoors in. “The exterior patio is very tropical, so it seemed like bringing the outdoors inside was just kind of a good idea,” said Annie. “There is continuity there, and I like that.” Christi and Richard had a vision for


PICTURED: The backyard was designed by Richard, who planted 18 species of palm trees throughout the yard.

HOME TOUR

LEFT: The Jordan's dog, George, enjoys the outdoor bed. RIGHT: Christi and Richard purchased the bar for their wedding ceremony and reception, which took place in their backyard.

creating a brighter space, but they needed Annie’s help to make it happen in a way that worked with their home’s existing materials while complementing their personalities and interests. “I have a hard time putting stuff together as far as decorating,” said Christi. “I told Annie I wanted something different and colorful, so she came in with some new ideas, and now it looks clean and put together.” Annie added, “It was a lot of fun to work with bold colors, which I don’t get to do too often. I feel, as an interior designer, it’s our job to make people think outside of their box. I call the look of their home ‘happy.’” L I F E S T Y L E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 7

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KICK IT WITH CREOLE

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CRAB AND SAUSAGE GUMBO

SHRIMP REMOULADE INGREDIENTS 12 large Shrimp, de-veined (but not shelled) 2 C shredded lettuce ½ C chopped red onion, for garnish ¼ C capers, for garnish Boiling salted water

REMOULADE SAUCE 2 egg yolks ¼ C vegetable oil ½ C celery, chopped ½ C Gr. onion, chopped ¼ C parsley, chopped ¼ C horseradish Juice of one lemon 1 T Tabasco sauce 2 T catsup 1 T white vinegar 2 T Dijon mustard 2 T Worcestershire sauce 1 T minced garlic 2 tsp paprika 1 tsp salt DIRECTIONS In a blender or food processor, beat egg yolks for two minutes, with the machine running, slowly stream in the oil. Blend in the remaining sauce ingredients one at a time until well mixed. Chill well. Place the shrimp in the boiling water and cook for three to four minutes until done. Remove and let cool. Peel the shrimp and chill. Place ½ cup of shredded lettuce on each of four chilled plates. Spoon a generous amount of remoulade sauce onto the shredded lettuce. Place three shrimp on top. Garnish with the capers and red onion. 34 L I F E S T Y L E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 7

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

2 C chopped onions 1 ½ C chopped green bell peppers 1 C chopped celery ¾ C vegetable oil ¾ C all–purpose flour 1 T garlic, minced 1 lb Andouille smoked sausage 1 lb medium shrimp, peeled 1 dozen medium to large oysters in their liquor ¾ lb crabmeat (picked over) 2 ½ C Creole style cooked rice (recipe on visalialifestyle.com) 5 ½ C seafood stock

Combine the onions, bell peppers, and celery in a medium-size bowl and set aside. In a small bowl combine the seasoning mix ingredients; mix well and set aside.

SEASONING MIX 2 whole bay leaves 2 tsp salt ½ tsp white pepper ½ tsp ground cayenne red pepper ½ tsp black pepper ½ tsp dried thyme leaves ¼ tsp dried oregano leaves

Heat the oil in a large skillet over high heat until it begins to smoke, about five minutes. Gradually add flour, whisking constantly with a metal whisk. Continue cooking, whisking constantly, until roux is dark red-brown to black, about two to four minutes, being careful not to let it scorch or splash on your skin. Immediately add half the vegetable mix and stir well (switch to a spoon if necessary). Continue stirring and cooking about one minute. Add the remaining vegetables and cook and stir about two minutes. Stir in the seasoning mix and continue cooking about two minutes, stirring frequently. Add the garlic; stir well, then cook and stir about one minute more. Remove from heat. Meanwhile, place the stock in a 5 ½-quart saucepan or large Dutch oven. Bring to a boil. Add roux mixture by spoonfuls to the boiling stock, stirring until dissolved between each addition. Bring mixture to a boil. Add the Andouille sausage and return to a boil; continue boiling 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Reduce heat and simmer 10 minutes more. Add the shrimp, undrained oysters, and crabmeat. Return to a boil over high heat, stirring occasionally. Remove from the heat and skim any oil from the surface. Serve immediately by scooping one cup of gumbo over a ¼ cup of rice (go to visalialifestyle.com for the Creole rice recipe).


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BANANAS FOSTER INGREDIENTS ¼ C butter (½ sick) 1 C brown sugar ½ tsp cinnamon ¼ C banana liqueur 4 bananas, cut in half lengthwise, then halved ¼ C dark rum 4 scoops vanilla ice cream DIRECTIONS Combine the butter, sugar, and cinnamon in a flambé pan or skillet. Place the pan over a low heat either on an alcohol burner or on top of the stove, and cook, stirring until the sugar dissolves. Stir in the banana liqueur, then place the bananas in the pan. When the banana sections soften and begin to brown, carefully add the rum. Continue to cook the sauce until the rum is hot, then tip the pan slightly to ignite the rum. When the flames subside, lift the bananas out of the pan and place four pieces over each portion of ice cream and serve immediately.

JAMBALAYA

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INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

4 T unsalted butter 1 lb. Andouille sausage 1 ½ C onion, chopped 1 C celery, chopped 3/4 C bell pepper, chopped 1 C chicken, diced 16 medium shrimp, peeled 1 ½ tsp salt 1 ½ tsp granulated garlic 1 ½ tsp cayenne pepper 1 tsp black pepper 1 ½ tsp white pepper 1 ½ tsp pregano 4 tomatoes, diced 2 C rice, uncooked 2 C chicken stock Dash Tabasco

In a saucepan melt the butter, add the Andouille sausage, and sauté about five to eight minutes. Add the onion, celery, and bell pepper and sauté until just tender, add the chicken, shrimp, and all of the spices, add the tomatoes and cook another 10 minutes, add the chicken stock, and bring to a boil. Then add the rice, the dash of Tabasco, and stir well. Cover the saucepan and place in a 350° F oven for 20 to 30 minutes or until rice is tender. Plate and serve. For the Creole sauce recipe shown in the picture, please visit our website at visalialifestyle.com.


TRAVELER'S

TREK

TASMANIA

A ‘devil’ to get to, but well worth the trip!

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ocated 150 miles south of the Australian mainland, this island state is surrounded by erratic seas and weather to match. In fact, Tassies often say you can experience four seasons there in one day. Just last month during Tasmania’s summertime, a sizable snowstorm blew through after a string of 80-degree days. Despite its unpredictable weather, this formerly sleepy outpost has now become a popular weekend getaway for mainland Aussie’s and a destination for international travelers. With more than 40 percent of its land composed of unspoiled reserves, national parks, and 38 L I F E S T Y L E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 7

world heritage sites, it has much to offer visitors. But it sure is a devil to get to! With the Bass Strait dividing it from the mainland and the Tasman Sea surrounding the rest of the island, Tasmania is located in the “Roaring Forties” (40 to 50 degree south longitude). Here, tropical trade winds and prevailing westerlies meet to become fickle gusts which blow at any strength or direction they choose. With both Melbourne and Sydney less than an hour-and-a-half flight from Tasmania’s southern capital of Hobart, those winds can make it a bumpy flight. But that’s nothing compared to the sea routes.

Visitors can opt for the 11-hour ferry ride from Melbourne through the Bass Strait into the northern city of Devonport. The combination of winds, currents, and tidal flow in this shallow sea strait create conflicting waves and swells. With nothing to see except the “chop,” many choose passage overnight in small berth cabins or seated in premium “ocean recliner” seats. For international visitors, Tasmania’s southern capital of Hobart is increasingly a port stop on cruises around Australia and New Zealand. As white knuckling as a flight or ferry in the strait can sometimes be, the

The sandstone block buildings in Salamanca Place were built originally as warehouses by the waterfront by prisoners.


Tasman Sea has the reputation as one of the roughest stretches of water in the world. Large cruise ship stabilizers can make those sea days acceptable (even pleasant when Neptune obliges), but the Tasman Sea didn’t get its moniker, “The Ditch” without good reason. After two days of sailing through it, my pictures just didn’t do it justice. Despite angry 20-foot swells roiling and crashing against the ship and 70 mph winds creating a very steep tilt, my photographs managed to show only mildly rough seas. And to think, our voyage was considered a relatively calm crossing! Despite the difficulty in getting there, a trip to Tasmania is well worth every unsettled stomach and moment of schizophrenic weather. With 500,000 residents overall, about half live in Hobart, making it an excellent place to begin touring. With Constitution Dock at the center of nautical activity, Hobart’s waterfront P H O T O S

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is where residents and visitors alike congregate. Boating is central to the Tassie way of life as Tasmania’s capital is situated along the River Derwent. The annual end-of-year Sydney-to-Hobart Yacht Race and the Australian Wooden Boat Festival are just two of the largest

The historic Richmond Arms Hotel

celebrations bringing visitors to the docks. For a quick meal, a number of excellent floating restaurants (basically houseboats serving fresh seafood) line the dock. Close by visitors will find the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, C H E R Y L

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featuring the area’s history and art that displayed in 19th century waterfront buildings, and the Maritime Museum, which offers history of the area’s rich heritage of seafaring. A short walk south brings visitors to Salamanca Place, a scenic row of four-story sandstone warehouses built by prisoners. Dating from the 1800 whaling era, they now house an array of restaurants, bars, galleries, and boutiques. The large open area in front is home to Salamanca Market each Saturday. For the past 45 years, this street market has been Tasmania’s most visited venue. Signs mark where the well-worn Kelly’s Steps, built in 1839 by Captain James Kelly, allow visitors to climb up to Battery Point. Once home to sailors and sea captains, these narrow lanes are full of picturesque maritime cottages and stately mansions, as well as cafés and restaurants. Nearby, Mount Wellington towers over the port of Hobart. Offering 360-degree L I F E S T Y L E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 7

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views from an alpine mountain overlooking a temperate weather city, its 4,167-foot summit is visited by 300,000 people annually. Although you won’t need a sherpa to climb this peak, fickle weather means the clear view offered at the start of your hike may be long gone when you actually reach the top. Driving up the asphalt road is much faster and allows tours to sandwich the summit visit between other sites in order to maximize the view. Some excursions include nearby Tahune Airwalk, a raised pathway in the trees more than 65-feet in the air. Lazy bikers can schedule a Mount Wellington descent tour, riding up by van and coasting down by bicycle.

Tasmania’s convict history are Richmond Historic Village and Port Arthur. While America was gaining its independence, the British practice of sending repeat criminal offenders to the American colonies ended, and Australia became the alternative. From the late 1700s to mid-1800s, more than 160,000 convicts entered Australia. Most of the inmates’ offenses were trivial (stealing small items or livestock), but British punishment of minor crimes, even by women and children, was harsh, especially for repeat offenders. When faced with hanging versus transportation to a penal colony for a set number of years, most offenders chose the latter. The British believed

Author Cheryl with a Wallaby at Bonorang Animal Sanctuary.

With more than 40 percent of its land composed of unspoiled reserves, national parks, and world heritage sites, it has much to offer visitors. But it sure is a devil to get to! Picturesque Richmond Bridge and church in the background were both built by prisoners.

Finally, when the weather is totally uncooperative, visitors can drown their sorrows while touring the Cascade Brewery in the foothills of the mountain. The Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) is a short ferry ride upriver. Unlike any other Australian museum, MONA’s humorous and rather odd art was the brainchild of a local philanthropist. Carved out of sandstone and looking more like a bunker than museum, the catamaran ferry transporting visitors there offers a “posh pit” with champagne and canapés. All Aussies (Tassies included) love their food and drinks! Sites that speak to 40 L I F E S T Y L E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 7

prisoners could be reformed through a combination of backbreaking work, religion, education, and trade-training, which guaranteed employment once freed. Wherever prisoners went, industry and manufacturing grew as penal colonies strove to be selfsustaining and profitable. Many convicts’ skills and labor created what would become the infrastructure of Australian society. Port Arthur – Located on a peninsula attached to Tasmania by a narrow isthmus, Port Arthur is just a 25-mile straight-shot from Hobart, but 62 miles by road. That isolation and formidable

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A two-year-old koala with a ranger now ready to return to the wild after treatment at Bonorong Animal Sanctuary.

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Floating houseboat restaurants along Constitution Dock, during a rainstorm.

The infamous Tasmanian Devil is an endangered species.

Salamanca Square fountain.

A small gap in the buildings in Salamanca Place is the entrance to Kelly Steps which take visitors up to Battery Point.

Despite angry 20-foot swells roiling and crashing against the ship and 70 mph winds creating a very steep tilt, my photographs managed to show only mildly rough seas. And to think, our voyage was considered a relatively calm crossing! C H E R Y L

geography gave it a feared reputation. Considered Tasmania’s most popular tourist attraction, visiting Australia’s best-preserved prison site is well worth the drive. Begun as a penal colony timber camp, it soon grew into a center for brick making and shipbuilding. To sustain the needs of the prison population, as well as support staff and their families, inmates took on shoemaking, blacksmithing, farming, and domestic service. By 1853, Britain ceased transporting prisoners, but the colony remained afloat economically by housing the infirm and mentally ill. Port Arthur eventually fell into decline and was closed after it was no longer profitable. Because if its surreal beauty and horror, as well as a need to memorialize the country’s convict heritage, Australia’s government decided to preserve Port Arthur. It is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. 42 L I F E S T Y L E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 7

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Richmond Gaol – Located just 20 minutes north of Hobart, Richmond Gaol is the oldest intact jail in Australia, predating Port Arthur by five years. More of a British colonial administrative site to oversee convicts, Richmond was the location where prisoners received punishment for offenses and remission of sentences for good behavior and “moral reform.” The picturesque arches of Richmond Bridge as well as the courthouse, church, and other structures (now filled with cafes and boutiques) stand as lasting reminders of this forced migration and labor. Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary - Due to its relative isolation, Tasmania is home to many animals, which are extinct everywhere except this island refuge. In fact, the only reason many of us recognize the word “Tasmania” is thanks to one of this island’s smaller marsupials, the Tasmanian Devil.

Known only as an ill-tempered Looney Tunes character by many, at Bonorong visitors can see this and other animals up close. As a 24-hour rescue service and sanctuary for the injured, a breeding facility for the endangered, and an educational center for visitors, it’s also home to a wonderful array of creatures. Friendly wallabies and kangaroos, echidnas (ant-eater-like mammals), koalas, bettongs (mouse-like kangaroos), quolls (a cat-like marsupial), and wombats (sweet, shy little bearlike marsupials) abound. Staffed by passionate rangers eager to introduce these animals, mend, and then return them to the wild, this was my favorite memory of Tasmania. With a welcoming atmosphere, warm residents, and sites easy to access, jump if you have a chance to visit Tasmania. Just pack some Dramamine for the journey!


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he Central Valley is brimming with quality craft beers and ciders that beg for a visit to the source. Whether you choose to stay close to home or venture away for the weekend, you can fill your time with everything from tours and tastings to a good meal. There are plenty of options for beer and cider lovers that are less than two hour’s drive from Visalia. Some of these spots are known to only a few, while others are nationally renowned. Some made their mark years ago, while others opened their doors within the past few months. Regardless of which direction you go, this list will get you started on a beer and cider adventure to experience the best the Central Valley has to offer.

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Dust Bowl’s downtown Turlock taproom. Photo provided by Dust Bowl Brewing Co


STAYING CLOSE TO HOME Brewbakers Brewing Company, Visalia Celebrating their 18th anniversary in February, Brewbakers has been serving craft beer and food to the Visalia community since 1999. Along with their flagship Sequoia Red, you will find traditional German styles such as Doppel Bock, Dunkel Weisen, and Hefewiezen. BarrelHouse Brewing Co., Visalia With a large tasting room set to open this spring in downtown Visalia, Paso Robles-based BarrelHouse Brewing is sure to draw beer lovers to downtown. Along with their easy drinking brews

Brewbakers Brewing Co. in downtown Visalia. Photo by Danny Klorman Photography.

like Sunny Daze Citrus Blonde Ale, don’t pass up their barrel aged options. Also keep an eye out for their limited-release Central Coast Wild Ales. Sequoia Brewing Company, Visalia An extension of the Fresno-based brewery, Sequoia Brewing Company serves craft beer and food in downtown Visalia. In addition to year-round beers, you can find a variety of seasonal options on rotation including the hefty Buzzsaw Imperial IPA with 11 percent ABV and the Maibock, a traditional German spring beer. Kaweah Brewing Company, Tulare Brewing great craft beer since 2013, Kaweah Brewing Company recently opened its tasting room in Tulare. Local beer fans are flocking there on Fridays

and Saturdays to enjoy offerings like the Fe Bourbon Barrel Aged Russian Imperial Stout. Local food trucks also make a regular appearance on Saturdays for those who go hungry. SET YOUR SIGHTS TO THE NORTH Tioga-Sequoia Brewing Company, Fresno A beloved spot for beer fans in downtown Fresno, Tioga-Sequoia turns out well-crafted brews that draw visitors from around the area. Their regulars such as the pleasantly hoppy General Sherman IPA shouldn’t be missed, but be sure to check out their events page for special release days, like Rush Day in

attention from beer lovers in the Valley. You can stop in for a pint or a growler fill of their regular favorites like the Cluster Fuggle Cream Ale. Stay tuned as their beer offerings are expected to expand even more this year. Tactical Ops Brewing, Fresno From homebrew to a small brewery now open to the public in Fresno, Tactical Ops Brewing will soon be opening a larger space in Clovis in a few months. New to the Central Valley craft beer family, the brewery is producing a variety of beers such as the Valor IPA with notes of tropical citrus and Blonde Bomber that uses local orange blossom honey, with many more styles to come.

BarrelHouse Brewing Co. Beer Garden in Paso Robles. Photo by Chris Vaughn.

December when they release Rush Hour Breakfast Stout brewed in partnership with local coffee roasters. Pine and Palm Brewing, Fresno Making its mark on the Central Valley beer scene, Pine and Palm is becoming a local favorite. Not only are they serving high-quality craft, they will get your attention with catchy names like the Fresno Fog IPA with fresh oranges. They are also one of the few breweries in the area selling crowlers, a quick canning method that may soon be taking over the popularity of the traditional growler for beer to-go. Full Circle Brewing Co., Fresno Under new ownership as of late 2016, Full Circle Brewing Co. is gaining

House of Pendragon Brewing Co., Clovis and Sanger Whether you swing by the tasting room in Clovis or make your way out for a tasting flight at the brewery in Sanger on a Saturday, House of Pendragon will quickly become a favorite. Known for well-crafted West Coast IPAs, like their Lancelot IPA, you can also find plenty of innovative beers on the rotating tap list, such as Dragon Juice, a saison brewed with smoked malt and jalapeños. Riley’s Brewing Company, Clovis This Madera brewery recently opened Riley’s Brew Pub in Clovis, making their beer more accessible to the Central Valley. Along with creative beers like their Cowlifornia Milk Stout, Riley’s also brews a variety of hard sodas like

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A flight from Dust Bowl Brewing Co.

root beer and orange cream that might make it easier to convince non-beer loving friends to come along on your adventure.

Earth and Fire Brewing Company,

Tin City Cider Co., Paso Robles

Paso Robles

South Gate Brewing Company, Oakhurst

Brewing Company was founded in 2015.

A perfect stopping point on your way back from Yosemite, South Gate offers American pub food alongside their craft beers. The brewery has just about any beer you are thirsty for, from Gold Diggin’ Blonde to Glacier Point Pale Ale, that all pair well with their grass-fed beef burgers and brick oven pizzas. They also serve a large selection of seasonal beers like their 1864 Ale, an Oktoberfest beer brewed with wild hops from the Yosemite Valley.

beer, it’s a nice weekend spot to enjoy

Located next door to BarrelHouse Brewing Co., the new Tin City Cider is serving and bottling creative hard ciders. You will find varieties that are dry hopped and aged in bourbon barrels such as the Templetucky, and those using wort from the neighboring brewery such as the Sour Blonde.

A cozy, family friendly taproom in downtown Paso Robles, Earth and Fire With self-described rustic, unfiltered an IPA or Chocolate Stout. Firestone Walker Brewing Company, Paso Robles shopping at the Brewery Emporium, and dining at the Taproom Restaurant, you can spend most of the day at Firestone Walker Brewing Company.

Dust Bowl Brewing Co., Turlock Boasting a new 30,000 sq.ft. brewery with a restaurant and tasting room located just off Highway 99, Dust Bowl Brewing Company is attracting visitors from all over the state. With an inviting indoor and outdoor dining space with plenty of room for large groups and families to roam, you can try any of their beers served on 18 taps at this location. Their original downtown Turlock location remains open with this expansion, so you have plenty of options to enjoy their food and well-crafted beers.

A QUICK TRIP TO THE SOUTH

Between taking a brewery tour,

SIP

Choose a beer from their Lion & Bear series like the Pivo Hoppy Pils, or seek out a rarer selection like a sour from their Barrelworks Wild Ales program. If you aren’t hungry, there are taps in the Emporium for trying a few beers while you shop.

BarrelHouse Brewing Co., Paso Robles

Bristols Cider House, Atascadero

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This brewery is the spot for inventive craft brews. From dry hopped and barrel-aged gose to imperial stout with vanilla, coffee, and cinnamon, you will find a beer that satisfies your creative curiosity. You will also want to check out their Olympus Barrel Society for special bottles and growler fills. Lengthwise Brewing Company, Bakersfield

WHEN YOU ARE HEADED WEST

Even though BarrelHouse Brewing will be open in Visalia soon, don’t pass up the opportunity to visit the beer garden in Paso Robles. With plenty of outdoor seating, enjoying their craft beers is a lovely way to take advantage of a beautiful afternoon. Also check out their special events and outdoor concerts as well as their food truck list.

Dionysus Brewing, Bakersfield

Temblor Brewing Company, Bakersfield

The Central Coast is the place to be for craft cider lovers and a stop should include Bristols Cider House. Their artisan ciders are crafted from local apples and include innovative varieties like the seasonal Merry Hell aged with gin botanicals. Tastings, pints, bottles, and growlers are all available in the tap room.

Located just down the street from the original brewing facility, visitors to Lengthwise Brewing Company’s brand new brewery and outdoor beer garden can sip beer, eat, and watch some of the brewing process when it is in operation. Well known for the Zeus Imperial Ale, an unfiltered imperial IPA, you can also find a variety of classic styles from stouts and porters, to cream ale and wheat beer.

Temblor Brewing Company offers an inviting space for craft beer lovers. In addition to their beers like the Six Six One Golden Kölsch Style Ale and special projects like the Diamond Dogs Barleywine, there are also a variety of foods on the pub menu and numerous events in the Temblor Concert Hall, from comedy shows to special beer release parties.

INSET: Brewbakers Brewing Co. Photo by Danny Klorman Photography.


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OPEN ARMS HOUSE A

A

PLACE

new hospice home in Visalia wants to help families cherish their remaining days with a loved one just as they would celebrate a newborn’s first weeks of life. The Open Arms House is set to open its doors in early summer, with the goal of providing a compassionate, holistic approach to end-of-life care, attending to the needs of the patient’s body, mind, and spirit in a home setting. This type of care is referred to as a Social Hospice Model, and the Open Arms House will be the first of its kind in the Central Valley, and the fourth such home in the state of California. The social hospice model is a community-based, end-of-life care home, and is part of a growing trend

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COMFORT

in the United States. The nearly 4,000 sq. ft. home, at 3234 W. Iris St. in Visalia, will accommodate six residents ages 19 and older for stays ranging on average from two to four weeks. “Families will be able to spend time with their loved one without the burden of caregiving,” said Carol Nickel, board president of the nonprofit organization that is bringing this new model of care to the Central Valley. “They will also get muchneeded emotional support from staff and volunteers.” According to an article from the Center to Advance Palliative Care, despite patients’ and families’ wishes, the United States health care system funnels the dying into a frustrating T E X T

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cycle of repeated hospitalization and institutionalization at the end of life. But for those who have articulated a desire to die at home, hospice care has provided the avenue and services needed to die at home. Unfortunately, dying at home is not always possible — expensive modifications may need to be made to the home or perhaps the patient does not have adequate caregivers or resources. This is where the social model hospice care home steps in as an option for both patient and family, and has the ability to revolutionize end-of-life care in the United States. As the Baby Boomer generation ages, the need for hospice care will increase. And like its earlier predecessors, the Open Arms House

M C E W E N

The Ruth Wood Open Arms House in Visalia.


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CHARITY

will be designed for patients who have expressed a desire to spend their final days in a home-like setting. It is also a way for families to provide their loved one with a gentle environment for their final days, away from the beeping monitors, tubes, and sterile environment associated with a medical hospice model. It’s even a respite for caregivers, too, who often want to be at their loved one’s side until their last breath. This “home-away-from-home” will provide patient care with a combination of paid caregivers, family members, and volunteers, in partnership with the patient’s medical hospice service provider. In this area, the Open Arms House will work equally with Kaweah Delta Hospice, Optimal Hospice, Gentiva Hospice, Adventist Hospice, and Sojourn Hospice. A DREAM BECOMES REALITY For Carol, a Visalia native who found her calling as a hospice nurse, retirement doesn’t mean slowing down. In fact, with near full-time zeal, Carol, along with the guidance of a dynamic board of directors, took the

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Open Arms House from concept to reality in less than two years. “This should have taken years to accomplish, but I give credit to a higher power. I can’t explain it any other way,” said Carol. “The momentum has taken on a life of its own.” In the summer of 2015, board members toured two other social model hospice homes in Southern California, Our Community House of Hope in Thousand Oaks and the Sarah House in Santa Barbara. Afterward, they were convinced that Tulare and Kings counties families needed this option. Six months later, they set about drafting bylaws, opening a bank account with their first donation, and establishing their nonprofit status (received in January 2016 from the IRS in a record 10 days). Using their contacts in the health care, private, and civic communities, the board of directors secured financial support from a wide range of benefactors. The Kaweah Delta Hospice Foundation Board approved a $300,000 no-interest loan for the purchase of the home on Iris

Street, which had a speedy 30-day escrow. Architectural changes were drawn by Larry Lewis, Mountain Vista Construction was hired, and remodeling began soon afterward. With the generous support of community members and a matching donation from the Lyles-Porter Family, the three-bedroom home was enlarged to six bedrooms, with the three-car garage converted to a conference room, office space, storage, and laundry. Remodel costs and landscaping are expected to top $250,000. When the home is complete, it will open with a full year’s budget in the bank. The amount of community support the project has received touches Carol and fellow board member Clare Whitlatch, who sat down with Lifestyle Magazine to discuss the project following a tour of the construction site. “It gives me goosebumps to think about,” said Carol. Clare added that many of the donors have taken ownership of the project, checking on the remodeling process and getting regular updates on progress. “It’s a reality check for all of us,”

A ribbon-cutting celebrates the official ground breaking of the Open Arms House.


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she said. “We will all need this type of care.” “The end of life should be as beautiful as the beginning,” said Carol. “We’re all going to die, so we might as well do it well.” The home will operate with a Residential Care Facility for the Elderly (RCFE) license, overseen by the Department of Social Services rather than the Department of Health, thus placing it outside the current health care regulatory environment. It will not receive reimbursement from Medicare, MediCal, or private insurance, except for long-term care insurance a resident may have. The cost of care is expected to be about $250 a day for each resident. While the Open Arms House board of directors would like to provide care at no cost to families, residents will be asked to pay a daily rate based on their ability to do so. Community support and grants will sustain the operation of the home, which is anticipated to be about $400,000 a year. Nickel said a consultant has been hired to assist with the licensure process, and two administrators and an executive director will be hired in the spring, thus keeping that momentum rolling toward a summer grand opening. UPON OPENING, A SPECIAL RENAMING Visalian Ruth Wood was an early

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supporter of bringing hospice care to the area in the 1980s and was a founder of Hospice of Tulare County. Upon her passing on March 30, 2016, her dear friend Marybeth Lyles-Porter Seay pulled Ruth’s family aside to discuss a new hospice home that

Ruth would be delighted to know that this has happened. She was a very kind woman and she would love to be associated with such a kind project. R E V .

H A R R Y

W O O D

would be built in Visalia. Husband Rev. Harry Wood, beloved former pastor of Visalia United Methodist Church, shared a touching scene: Ruth had endured a fifth and final stroke and would not survive. She was moved from Fresno

Community Hospital to Delta Nursing and Rehabilitation Hospital in Visalia to spend her final days. Her care was overseen by hospice nurses who not only tended to Ruth’s needs, but also counseled and comforted her family during their intense grief and 24-hour vigils spread over 10 days. “They made it as easy as it could be,” said Harry. “When Marybeth came to bid a tearful goodbye to Ruth, we prayed and sang and cried,” said Harry. “When it was over, we walked outside and Marybeth said her family would be offering its financial support to the Open Arms House, and that she would like it to be known as the Ruth Wood Open Arms Home. We all started crying again.” The Wood and the Lyles-Porter families will memorialize Ruth’s memory not only through a new name for the home, but through its mission. “The motivation clearly comes from our faith, but it’s not sectarian in any way,” said Harry. “Ruth would be delighted to know that this has happened. She was a very kind woman and she would love to be associated with such a kind project.” The Open Arms House Mission Statement: “To provide a home for end-of-life care where every life matters to the last breath and no one dies alone.” For more information, go to www.openarmshouse.org

During construction, three additional bedrooms were added to the back of the house.


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HAPPENINGS

T H E AT R E & A R T S

FRANCISCO ALONZO AT ARTS VISALIA

DULCE BY NATURE ART SHOW

In March, Francisco Alonzo will be showing new works in a show entitled "Iconografíca": an investigation of the role of capitalism on contemporary culture. He explores how important iconographic images are reduced to everyday knick-knacks and the interweaving of other images into contemporary culture.

Local artist Crystal Galindo is coming back to Visalia to present an art exhibit at Arts Visalia. Originally from Tulare County, Crystal eventually moved to San Francisco, where her art began to take off. Since graduating from Sonoma State, her Chicana style art has been in numerous galleries across California. Through Feb. 24, her vibrant and colorful work will be on display at Arts Visalia. When: Now – Feb. 24 Where: Arts Visalia, 214 E Oak Ave., Visalia Contact: artsvisalia.org

FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK Every month, the Arts Consortium presents First Fridays to explore the Visalia Art District. During the walk, you’ll experience a diverse range of local art in the downtown Visalia area. The guest artist for March will be Michael Frank, whose show “Vespertine” is a visual feast for the eyes. Working in 3D software and Photoshop, Michael creates otherworldly images; familiar, but not. Michael will give an artist talk at 7 p.m. during First Friday. This event is free to the public. When: March 3, 5–8 p.m. Where: Arts Consortium, 400 N. Church St., Visalia Contact: artsconsortium.org

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When: The month of March Where: Arts Visalia, 214 E. Oak Ave., Visalia Contact: artsvisalia.org


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SECOND SATURDAY CRAFT FAIR AT THE LOOKING GLASS From now through October, The Looking Glass in Visalia will be hosting a “Second Saturday” artisan and crafters fair. Come out and enjoy a day of shopping from local crafters. When: March 11, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Where: The Looking Glass, Court and Caldwell in Visalia Contact: thelookingglassvisalia.com

TULARE COUNTY SYMPHONY’S “NIGHT ON THE RED CARPET” Join the Visalia Young Professionals Network at TCSO for a VIP reception in the Fox Theatre Lobby, complete with hors d’ oeuvres and wine, prior to Tulare County Symphony’s most popular show of the season: “Great Movies, Great Music: Oscar Winners.” This show features music from your favorite Oscarwinning films. After the show, head to the after party at The Vintage Press.

DIVERSIONS & EXCU R S I O N S DARLENE LOVE IN CONCERT It’s no wonder the New York Times raves: “Darlene Love’s thunderbolt voice is as embedded in the history of rock and roll as Eric Clapton’s guitar or Bob Dylan’s lyrics.” Through the years, Darlene Love continues to captivate audiences worldwide with her warm, gracious stage presence and sensational performances. See her live at the Visalia Fox Theatre. When: Feb. 17, 7:30 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 308 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: foxvisalia.org

When: March 11, 5:30 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 308 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: tularecountysymphony.com/ events

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Come to the Visalia Fox Theatre to celebrate generations of incredible local talent! The evening begins with music and dance performances by rising stars at all the local high schools, while Act II features some of Visalia's most beloved entertainers, including Jaimie Hitchcock, Herb Mallory, Rosalinda Verde, Charlotte Garcia, Lim Forgey, Sylvia Garoian, and Amy Shuklian. This community fundraiser event is presented by Mr. Visalia himself – Stan Simpson – with Tony Caseras as the Master of Ceremonies. Proceeds benefit the Visalia Fox Theatre and Visalia Unified Performing Arts Programs. When: Feb. 24, 7:30 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 308 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: foxvisalia.org

HAPPENINGS

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SPOTLIGHT VISALIA


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HAPPENINGS BARBARA & FRANK: THE CONCERT THAT NEVER WAS Streisand and Sinatra never shared the same stage…until now! Barbara & Frank, The Concert That Never Was, comes to us live from Las Vegas starring Sharon Owens and Sebastian Anzaldo. Whether fans are reliving memories through the songs they’ve loved for years, or are experiencing their music for the first time, this “must see” show captures the imagination and brings to life the spirit of two of the most beloved legends ever to grace a stage. When: Feb. 25, 7 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 308 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: foxvisalia.org

ST. PATRICK’S PARADE & IRISH FEST The Visalia Breakfast Lions invites you to join them for the annual Irish Fest and St. Patrick’s Day Parade. First, head downtown at 10 a.m. for the parade, and then stop at the Rawhide ballpark from 1 to 5 p.m. for the Irish Fest. Guests will be able to sample beer, listen to music, and enjoy food. When: March 11, 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Where: Parade, downtown Visalia; Irish Fest, Rawhide Ballpark Contact: visaliabreakfastlions.org

KELLIE PICKLER IN CONCERT The talented country singer and American Idol contestant will be coming to the Visalia Fox Theatre to perform her latest country hits. This event will also benefit Hands in the Community, a local nonprofit that provides referral services to those in crisis in Tulare County. Seats for the Kellie Pickler concert can be reserved at foxvisalia.org. Sponsorships for this exciting event are still available (deadline is March 1). When: March 18, 8 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 308 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: hncvisalia@gmail.com or visaliafox.org

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VISALIA SENIOR GAMES The City of Visalia Parks & Recreation Department proudly announces Visalia Senior Games 2017. This Olympic-style competition is for adults ages 50 and better promotes healthy living and the benefits of staying active. When: March 16-19 Where: Locations vary throughout Visalia Contact: visaliaseniorgames.com or 713-365

THIRD ANNUAL LAWN-FREE GARDEN TOUR The Sequoia Garden Club is again sponsoring a garden tour focusing on drought tolerant plantings to help homeowners see that it is possible to conserve water, save money, and have a beautiful yard. When: March 25, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Where: Homes throughout Visalia Contact: dmekeel@att.net

HAPPENINGS

MENOPAUSE: THE MUSICAL Turnaround Artists presents Menopause: The Musical – Four women at a lingerie sale with nothing in common but a black lace bra and memory loss, hot flashes, night sweats, not enough sex, too much sex, and more! This hilarious musical parody set to classic tunes from the ‘60s, ‘70s, and ‘80s will have you cheering and dancing in the aisles. See what millions of women worldwide have been laughing about for over 10 years. When: March 25, 4 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 308 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: foxvisalia.org

C H A R I TA B L E EVENTS SPRING WINE & DINE FOR HABITAT FOR HUMANITY Raise a glass in order to help raise a wall! Join Habitat for Humanity at Café 225 in downtown Visalia to raise funds for future building projects. Tickets are $75 per person, and you must be 21 years or older to attend. When: Feb. 19, 5 p.m. Where: Café 225, 225 W. Main. St., Visalia Contact: 734-4040 ext 106

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HAPPENINGS

VISALIA SOUP: COMMUNITYBASED CROWDFUNDING DINNER Four pre-selected projects have four minutes to share their ideas and answer four questions about their projects, which can be about anything! We just ask that the idea is about Visalia. Submit a proposal or come and enjoy soup and vote for your favorite idea. The winner goes home with the money raised. We will hear from the winner and their progress at the next SOUP. When: March 14, 5 p.m. Where: Visalia Convention Center, 303 E. Acequia Ave., Visalia Contact: visaliachamber.org/soup

VISALIA CHAMBER’S 9TH ANNUAL GOLF TOURNAMENT Join the Visalia Chamber of Commerce for their 9th Annual Leadership Visalia Golf Tournament. Secure your spot early and enjoy a great morning of golf and networking while supporting leadership education in Visalia. When: March 24, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Where: Valley Oaks Golf Course, 1800 S. Plaza St., Visalia Contact: visaliachamber.org

BIRDHOUSE AUCTION FOR HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

IMAGINEU DREAMBUILDER’S BASH

Join Habitat for Humanity this spring for their 12th Annual Birdhouse Auction as they raise funds to help build, renovate, or repair homes with low-income families in Tulare-Kings Counties. There will be wine tasting, hors d’oeuvres, custom made birdhouses, and this year’s theme will be “Tropical Fiesta.”

Step right up to the biggest event of the year – the fifth annual ImagineU Children’s Museum Dreambuilder’s Bash. A vintage circus comes to town for one night only under the big top at ImagineU in Visalia. Bring your friends to enjoy cocktails, dinner by The Vintage Press, and exciting auctions, all to benefit the museum’s expansion projects.

When: March 31, 6:30-10:30 p.m. Where: Wyndham, 9000 W. Airport Dr., Visalia Contact: info@hfhtkc.org

When: April 22, 6 p.m. Where: ImagineU Children’s Museum, 210 N. Tipton St., Visalia Contact: Imagineumuseum.org

VACATION RENTALS

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HANDS IN THE COMMUNITY PRESENTS

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SATURDAY MARCH 18 8:00PM VISALIA FOX THEATRE

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WHEN IT COMES TO BEAUTY,

THE EYES HAVE IT. If your eyes make you look older or more tired than you are, then eyelid surgery may be the solution for you. Call us today to schedule your own complimentary consultation. All surgeries are performed by a BOARD-CERTIFIED PLASTIC SURGEON, in an ACCREDITED SURGICAL CENTER and with the support of a LICENSED, BOARD-CERTIFIED ANESTHESIOLOGIST

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Face + Neck Lifts | Liposuction | Tummy Tucks | Breast Lift | Nose | Eyelids MICHAEL B. STEVENS MD, PhD, FACS BOARD CERTIFIED PL ASTIC SURGEON P R I VAT E A C C R E D I T E D S U R G E R Y C E N T E R LOC ATIONS IN VISALIA + BE VERLY HILL S

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Know your surgeon, know your procedure. Dr. Stevens personally performs your entire surgical procedure.

Lifestyle Magazine - February 2017  

Style, art, culture, and events of the South Valley.

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