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FOR YOUNG EXECUTIVES ON THEIR WAY UP. . . . .

. . . th e trend is to go form al, and th e trend is exp en 足 sive . . . obviously it would cost a m illio n quid . . . but wait'. Does a few pounds sound so m uch? You see the trick is not to buy this handsom e form al a ttire but to h ire it. Let Form al Wear dress you for your next socie form al occasion (co c k tail parties, evenings a t Chevron, M enzies e t c . ) . . . pop in to Formal Wear and save.

M en's Evening Wear includes tuxedoes, D inner, M orning, Dress and Lounge suits with c o m p lete accessories'. (A ll fittings, la test sty le s .) Ladies' Evening Wear includes D ebutante, Party, Ball, Wedding and Brides足 m aid s' Gowns; M other o f th e Bride Gowns, Furs and T iaras.

147a KING STREET, SYDNEY ( at rear of lift ) F

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near Castlereagh St. PHONE 28-0537


YOU NEED ATHEISM “WE’ve got plenty o f nothing * Be your own boss * N o dues * Shock mum and dad You don't have to be intelligent to be an Atheist. Send in for a few simple, easy to learn, refutations of g o d ’s existence. Be the life of the party with our special m agic ingredient: Skepticism!

Convert today gjf \CATHOLICISM

JEWS

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Pray now, fly later.

O ne o f the oldest and m ost re s ­ pected firms has vacancies fornew staff. W e * ♦ + * * * * + * *

promise

an

eternal

superannuation scheme and travel opportunities after retirem ent. *M ass productions (bread & w ine on th e house)

J♦ Yes, folks, we were first.*"tz

*Limbo (exclusive)

j Come, be in the R ace*

*V atican (expensive)

♦ plenty of travelling and: * * * j * *

* Inquisitions (seasonal)

be 21 when you’re ju st 13

+ * *

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j * be circumsised J

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avoid the Christmas rushes.

*Confessions (optional) i S 'l / J IS ^

M

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Ot her historic features include Nuns, celibate clergy, miracles.

ia B I g la la ls I s S la ls lS lf lS S S S iS E I S S S S S E lS I S S

Be in the swim... be a Baptist

K n o ck on a n y door...be­ com e a Jehova’s W itness

— BE A PROTESTANT More flavours... . Less fervour.... | We take the irk out of worship, the wear out of prayer. There’s so many flavours you’ll find one to suit your taste: Presbyterianism for that Scottish tang, Sevn Day Adventism for happy little vegemites...there’s Methodism in our madness too!

Only English Spoken

No kneeling, no obligation

* Up service a speciality

OPTIONAL EXTRA: Church. oz

F e b ru a ry * i% 5

Page 3"


JUST ANOTHER UNHAPPY JOKE In a c i t y e a c h d a y w e r e c e i v e t h o u s a n d s o f v i s u a l i m p r e s s io n s : se e the f a c e s o f h u n ­ d r e d s of p eo p le; se e a s t r e e t o r a building o r an a c tiv ity th a t we have-not se e n b e f o re . It is lik e ly th a t a d ulling o c c u r s f r o m th is so t h a t a f t e r a t i m e i t i s o n l y t h e s t a r t l i n g w h i c h w i l l r e g i s t e r i n m e m o r y o r c a u s e an itc h of c u r i o s i t y . T h i s p r o b a b l y e x p l a i n s h o w a w o r d li k e new b eco m es a key, basic ad v e rtisin g w ord a n d w h y w i n d o w d i s p l a y s j u m p u p a n d do w n d e s p e r a t e l y to a t t r a c t o u r a tte n tio n . W o rd s lik e big, n e w , g iant, and m o d e r n b e c o m e th e a t t r a c t i o n a d j e c tiv e s (as a g a i n s t f a m i li l i a r , n o r m a l , and o ld ) . W hen th e y t i r e they a r e w o r k e d in h a r n e s s - big new a n d g iant m odern. Of c o u r s e th ey a r e fash io n ab ly a c c e p ta b le w o rd s b e c a u s e th ey a r e a s s o c ia te d w ith p ro g r e s s - e v e n t h o u g h it h a s n ' t a l w a y s m e a n t i m p r o v e m e n t - and w ith i n c r e a s e d m a t e r i a l w e a lth - ev e n though it h a s n 't a lw a y s m e a n t q u ality . B ut I w o n d er how m u c h an a t m o s ­ p h e r e of n e w n e s s , b ig n e s s , and g ia n tn e s s c o n t r i b u te s to, o r on th e o t h e r h a n d r e f l e c t s , a n o m ie . A n o m ie w a s f i r s t u s e d by the s o c ­ i o lo g is t E . D u r k h e im a n d e l a b o r a t e d on by h im in a b o o k S u i c i d e . He u s e d it to d e s c r i b e th e c o n d itio n w h ich a r i s e s in m o d e r n s o c ­ iety w hen people lo se th e ir b e lie fs o r a r e b e w i l d e r e d by c o m p e tin g b e l i e f s . T o q uote D u r k h e im , th e i n d i v i d u a l finds so c ie ty

m e a n i n g l e s s an d follow s " a r e s t l e s s m o v e ­ m en t, a planless self-developm ent, an aim of living w h ich h a s no c r i t e r i o n of v a lu e and i n w h i c h h a p p i n e s s l i e s a l w a y s in t h e f u t u r e . " W ith a n o m i e a p e r s o n f e e ls i n c r e a s i n g l y " a lo n e , i s o la te d , in a h o s tile , u n m a n a g e a b le en vironm ent. " A n o m ie is a s e r i o u s s o c ia l co n d itio n n o t only b e c a u s e of its a c tu a l d e s t r u c t i v e n e s s a n o m ic s u i c i d e - - b u t a ls o b e c a u s e of the eq u ally f e a r s o m e u r g e s it c an ignite when a s o c ie ty a t t e m p t s to f r e e i t s e l f of it. A n ­ om ie m ak es to ta lita ria n is m a n d h e a v y au th ­ o rita ria n is m attractiv e. T o ta litarian ism a n d a u t h o r i t a r i a n i s m c a n c r e a t e a f e e l i n g of o n e n e s s , give a f e e lin g of id e n tif ic a tio n a n d m e an in g w hich f r e e s p eople of a n o m ie . A n o m ie is low , f o r i n s t a n c e , d u r in g w a r t i m e w hen a co m m o n d a n g e r and highly o r g a n is e d life give m o r e p e o p le a s e n s e of b e lo n g in g and com radeship. C h r i s t i a n B a y in h is book T he S tru c tu r e o f F r e e d o m d e s c r i b e s th e r e la tio n b e tw e e n t h e g r o w t h o f f r e e d o m a n d t h e g r o w t h of a n o m ie. A n o m i e is h i g h i n s o c i e t i e s w h e r e t h e i n ­ d iv id u a l h a s th e r e s p o n s i b i li t y of d e c id in g w h a t i s r i g h t a n d w h a t i s w r o n g , of p l a n n i n g h is own life , a n d w h e r e t h e r e is no one c h u r c h to g uide h i m m o r a l l y and no one s u ­ p r e m e p o litic a l p a r t y to o r d e r his e x i s te n c e , o r no c o m m o n b e l i e f o r c o m m o n s e t o f v a l ­

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u e s . B a y a r g u e s t h a t p e o p l e w i l l h a v e to a c c e p t a d e g r e e of a n o m ie if th e y w a n t wide freedom . I t is i n t e r e s t i n g t h e n t o s p e c u l a t e on t h e r e c e n t i n c r e a s i n g u s e in a d v e r t i s i n g of a n ­ o th e r w o rd - villag e. We have a v illage at K ings C r o s s , la u n d ry v illa g e s , shopping v i l l a g e s , and e v e n B e a tle v illa g e s . Is the a p p e a l o f t h i s w o r d r e l a t e d to o u r f e e l i n g s o f a n o m ie and is o la tio n ? I s it a s w itc h aw ay f r o m w o rd s like big, new , and g ia n t b e c a u s e th ey a r e in so m e w ay s p sy c h o lo g ic a lly cold an d r e p e l l a n t ? V illag e h a s th e n o n -a n o m ic a s s o c ia tio n s such as s m a ll, quiet, t r a d i t ­ io n al, and n eig h b o u rly . A v illa g e can be p i c tu r e d a s a p la c e w h e r e e v e r y o n e is known and w h e re c e r ta in n o r m s of b e h av io u r a r e acce p te d . C o m m e r c i a l v il l a g e s in a big c ity a r e th en p e r h a p s j u s t a n o th e r of the sa d illu s io n s , o ne of th e in c o n g r u itie s of o u r c ity life. But p e r h a p s w e a r e now a d ju s te d to living a p a r a d o x i c a l life a n d th e id e a of a "c ity of v i l l a g e s " w ill s in k into o u r s u b c o n s c io u s m in d w ith th e o th e r c o n tr a d ic tio n s , i l l u ­ s i o n s , a n d i n s a n it i e s to b e , p a r a d o x i c a l l y , ju s t an o th e r unhappy joke our so c iety h as h a d on u s .

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T he m a t e r ia ] (drawn from revues as far back as 1956) h as worn well, and is perform ed by a cast of n in e w ith bright, sem iprofessional skill.

i S£eat, dea^ of nonsensitia , for anyone weary ;er ot satire or overfed m* ^usUrd pies. ’ A c

SOUR CREAM

Professional revues might well have a sketch as effi­ ciently devastating as Mungo M acCallum’s account o f a layman-lecturing scientific populariser (though it would be unlikely to be more neatly written, or to be more persuasively presented than it was by Stefan Gryff); but they would hardly know how to accommodate the ballooning verbal surrealism o f the Royal visit comment­ ary delivered by John Gaden. Andrew Fisher’s fantasy about a council street-clean­ ing machine was as swift and pointed as Clive James’ patchwork parody o f liter­ ary styles was richly sus-

tainei i y r a i K


“Can you imagine 1 I thing like this happening I between a man in public I [ life and a woman he prac­ tically doesn’t know, in | his own office?” he said.

i7,r Smyth: Did she ever

I■rdirty f f e y? at any sta^ . old> man?

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| atl^ r , Maher: At no stage y j^ h ^ o u ld j^ w a n ^

liss Shepherd: I said, I “You're a dirty old man” la n d pulled away from Ihim . Miss Shepherd said Mr. I Maher walked up to her la n d pressed his body (against hers. , Mr Skinner: My opi-. i nion was she was an| Iimmoral person. In answer to Mr. Kerr, I Miss Shepherd said she thought Mr. Maher made a remark about she and he I having “something” one I night. Mr. Kerr: Are you hav­ ing difficulty with the | word? Miss Shepherd: Yes. Miss Shepherd was then I handed a sheet of paper | and wrote something on it. Mr. Kerr: What did you I say to that?

. “How can it be ol assistI ance that her boyfriend I knew Rachmaninoff, or I whether she had an illegiti| mate child,” Mr Kerr asked.

. ^ ^ e ^ ^ b ^ ^ M ^ ^ S m y th l I whether she then proposed! J to get out of the room asl I quickly as possible. M issl I Shepherd said she didn’t! I make a “run and a dive out! ■ . -l'l r M a h e ^ a i c f f l ^ w m n a I I of the door.” Alter further legal argu-1 I give drinks to other girls I ment Mr. Stonham said. f I j A,sked A ether she stroll-. ■and this practice was prac-l ■ tically always in thej “There have been so le d leisurely, she said she 1 |aftern o o iv ^ many surprises in this case I I ■walkedsjo-1- ” that I am getting to the I He said: “You’re sm iling! stage where I cannot be f vhy?” ,, s h e said M r M a h e ^ a l ■ wearing a lace collar and™ surprised any more.” Miss Shepherd: I know I:!ack^^’ and he told her:! I "Don’t be worried or n er-l ■ m i s s ' c s t i e p h e r c H i a c ^ a i ^ h ^ Iwhat sort of a comeback J Ivous. Underneath all these I ■place was like a brothel. I lyou’re going to make. 1 1 I frills Im just an ordinary! ■“Anybody could say that, Iwon the case, Mr. Smyth. | man.’’ I T l,nd it could mean any° ne one occasion, after! ^ M ^ S to n h a m s a id J ■ I an argument with her boyMrs Iesu added, “EveryI friend, she told her I thing she said changed. She “I .think that as she was Maurice realises I am a I did not exactly say so in, |going she thanked me II beautiful and attractive I Is o manxwords that she wasi again. I w?man, and I could get I I a virgin, but sfie gave TUan “I think I said then, ‘It I impression ” ■ lis minor kindnesses likt this Ifrt » F men jf 1 wanted to do Ithat will get me a ticket to [Heaven.’ It was a very Stonham also tni?n Mr. Kerr: Was there any Ifriendly discussion.’’ reference .made to vir­ |cTuseSmHyth t0, sit “ own, be? ginity? [m atter 6 C0Uld handIe it c , -^err: Y ou an d M iss Miss Shepherd: Yes, he | S h e p h e rd tell e n tire ly differdid make a remark to me. Mr Evatt said he Wa* I I e nt s to n e s a b o u t w h at h a p It was early in the piece. Iready to proceed in three I pen ed on N o v e m b e r 17. She said Mr. Maher [days, but Mr Stonham I J o ‘^ r M a h e r: M y w ord, w e said: “Don’t tell me a ! said he could not see ho\f [ lovely, sexy thing like you I he could go on. is still a virgin.” Several times, Miss he told Mr. Kerr she Shepherd said, Mr. Maher had wriggled away from had said to her: “You and Mr. Maher and was walk­ I can have a lot of fun. ing towards the door. “He attracted my atten­ Mr Evatt: When youl tion in some way, by a | ddr' ,s the Bench. I cough or a call,” she said. |o Mr Smyth: That's rfdfcuj J “I automatically turned laround.” Miss Shepherd said he Ithen exposed himself and Mr Maher said he had] Imade an indecent sugges­ worn zippers on his trousers! tio n . for the last 10 years.

I

I I I

He had said it was caused by worry and the respon­ sibilities of his office.

Miss Shepherd said she asked if treatment by She said she saw several nassage would help his people who told her “it was gout. She said he had made an I too hot to handle because |_he_is the Speaker.” [im proper suggestion.

/Hf Smyth: “You. were! smiling.”— It’s a nervous re-| atcion. You could never forget it coming from a man in the Speaker’s position?—Oh, 1 wouldn’t say 1 could never I forget it, Mr Smyth. That | might be untrue.

Miss Shepherd and Mr. iM aher sat at extreme ends Mr. Maher said: “I sakH | of a stool between four * Clive Evatt, QC.I ‘The Premier will [ | legal representatives. Miss Shepherd’s counsel, II jokingly asked “What about my I be happy to hear about it.’ I • r^ ^ E vatt said: “In the I case?” 1 interests of .justice—” then I . Mr Evatt: Why should h e| his words were lost. ■control the position?

1

I M r S to n h a m : H e is n 't! M iss S h e p h e rd : I have I c o n tro llin g th e p o sitio n . 11 I h eard the w ord b efo re lam in c o n tro l.

All had zip fastener*

[—being selected extracts fron^h^M ahe^ase| 'Sydney Magistrates* Court, January 25 - 28)


Gaolbreaker Sentenced Judge Hidden yesterday told a prisoner who escaped from Long Bay gaol, “It is only natural for a man to try to escape if he can,” — then he sentenced him to an additional three months’ gaol. Joseph Y eadon B a rre tt, 1 34 - year - old la b o u re r, ■ pleaded guilty a t Sydney I Q uarter Sessions to h aving ■ escaped from law ful cusIto d y on O c to b e r 19 last I year. The sentence was added

to the 18 m onths’ sentence I for breaking and e n te rin g ! which he started to serve | six weeks before escaping. Sergeant Sharpe said that J when Barrett was arrested I in a house at G u ild fo rd ! four days after his escap e,! he said. “I went mad i n i these. I'd sooner be d e a d | than in gaol."

(Sydney Morning H erald.

Sat.

Feb 6,

1965)

Dr. O. R. S chm alzbach. a M acquarie Street psychiatrist, testified th a t Barrett showed signs of a form o f epilepsy. S ev­ eral apparent suicide attem pts and report­ ed depressive states were probably co n n ­ ected with this ep ilep tic condition. The prisoner also had a serious speech defect which would add to his problem s. He was not legally insane. Following is a non-interview w ith two court observers: 0 : If it is only natural for a m an to a t­ tem pt e s c a p e , is n 't it an inju stice to punish him for it? Thursby : It seem s to m e th a t you are trying to draw a psuedo-distinction b e ­ tween 'ju stic e ' and 'la w '. The law is very clear on this offence. Q: Psychiatrists go to Long Bay quite re g ­ ularly, though, d o n 't they? Thursby Sort of. Q: Is the prisoner receiv in g tre a tm e n t to alleviate his speech defect? Thursby : W hat, a t Long Bay! Q: Why d id n 't th e Court order psychiatric attention for th e prisoner. Thursby: The Court has full confidence in the ability and good intentions o f the gaol authorities. I am sure he w ill be placed at once in the O bservation Wing. Q: What happens there? Thursby: He is observed. If h e is found to be totally bonkers, he is then moved to a m ental hospital. Q: What if he is disturbed but not c e rtif­ iable? Thursby; W ell, it isn 't a h o te l, you know. But here's M 'friend . Now he had a very interesting case in m ind where the man was disturbed buc not c e rtifia b le .

T j n ^ d o w r ^ a n d he just Iwanted to relieve tension. “I didn’t want to kill anybody. I iust wanted to smash something,” he said. Ju d g e Stephen had de­ ferred his sen ten ce on condition that he placed h im se lf under the care of Dr N. T. Y eom ans, of A 2 1 -y ear-o ld m an R yd e P sy ch ia tric Centre. c h a rg e d w ith a rso n a n d But about two w eeks | p lac in g railw ay sle e p e rs on before he w a s due to railw a y lin e w as sencom e up for sentence, Ferrari had placed the j ten c e d to six y e a rs’ gaol sle e p e r s on the line. j by Ju d g e S tep h en in S y d ­ A train hit them but no ney Q u a rte r Sessions yesone w a s hurt, the court I terd a v . w a s told. H e pleaded guilty to Ju d g e Stephen said it these charges and asked w a s obvious the youth that 12 other m atters of needed p sy ch ia tric treat­ arson be taken into account. m en t but unfortunately there w a s no halfw ay £ 1 3 1 ,0 0 0 house. Damage “ D octors w on’t certify Detective-Sergeant T. A. | you as insane and the only Chaseling o f the C.I.B. said I thing I can do is to put the total dam age to the | you out of circulation to shops was about £131.000. p rotect the p u b lic,” he Ferrari told Judge j said . I Stephen that he put the ■ sleepers on the lines beIc a u s e things were getting [

IArsonist Gets ISix Years

S.M .H . and Australian, N ovem ber. 1964 M ’friend: “ Y ou mean poor old Ferrari? A fine example. report first.

But read the cou rt (see above).

Q: And w hat's going to happen to this man w hile h e 's in prison,M 'friend? M 'friendt I am q u ite sure h e w ill be p laced at once in the O bservation Wing where he w ill be - Thursby: Yes, w ell w e'v e been through th a t. M 'frie n d : And after th a t, h e 'll re c e iv e the best p sychiatric ca re th a t th e Prisons Dept, can provide. But seriously, his best bet is to go rig h t o ff and g et transferred to a m e n ta l hosp ital. T he psychiatrists who visit Long Bay w ill ex am in e h im , I sup­ pose __ Q: Of course, Mr. Locke S. M. out at Paddington ordered a p sychiatric ex a m ­ ination for a m an and h e d id n 't g et o n e .. (together): Yes, w ell, these things happen . . . long w eekend . . . no on e's p e r f e c t __ e tc . Q: A pparently you g en tlem en can do no­ thing but send these people to prison. But does prison rea lly help th e m , are they lik ely to g et a tte n tio n in th ere or are you just 'p u ttin g th em o ut of circ u la tio n ' so they can com e out in the sam e condition and m aybe do it again? Both: We adm inister the law . T h at's the way it crum bles. Q: So should we pray th a t they a ll go mad just as soon as possible?

Law Attacked by Judge Judge H idden said in D arlingh urst Q uarter S ession s yesterday th at legislation had not kept up w ith modern th ou gh t on the treat­ m ent o f hom osexuality. J u d g e H id d e n sa id th a t h o m o se x u a lity w as "a s m uch a d ise a se a s a c rim e .” How ever, the law m ade it a crim e and h e had to treat it as such, he said. “I a m convinced, after m any years in this court, that putting these people in gaol is no rem edy,” he said. “N o r has the legislature provided m e with any insti­ tu tio n to which I can send them .

Judge H idden was sen- I tencing two 20-year-old I m en, who pleaded guilty to having indecently assaulted one a n o th e r at Paddington in Ja n u ary this year. They w ere Lloyd Russell L am b, salesm an, o f no fixed I address and W olfgang M an- I fred O rlauski, labourer, o f I W ollongong. Judge H idden bound both 11 n en o v er to be o f good i behaviour for three years) | on bonds o f £100.

After lunch, Thursby was non­ interview ed a second tim e about this la ter case. Q: But stone walls do not a modern prison m ak e. Surely, if we are dead keen to change these m en th e prisons can provide psychiatrict treatm en t? Thursby: A ctually, stone walls are just about all our prisons do provide. Long Bay has two psychologists and a co u p le o f psychiatrists who drop in once in a w hile to ex am in e the new clients. But th ere is alm ost no tim e for therapy. Q: So we have a flawless record of w hat's wrong with them and no tim e to do anything about it? Thursby: Q uite so, but everyone is kept very busy and the H ealth D epart­ m en t feels virtuous. Q: But if you order psychiatric tre a t­ m ent? Thursby: They g et a rea l bang-up in ­ terview and no trea tm e n t. Q: W hat if the prisoners dem and tre a tm ent? Thursby: No in te rv iew and a real

“P lease, kids— I’m trying to g et the place known as a hom osexual hangout.”


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w h ic h a l l m e m b e r s a r e p le d g e d to ob serve. In c lu d e d in th e c o d e a r e th e follo w in g p r o v i s io n s : To re p o rt and i n t e r p r e t th e n e w s w ith sc ru p u lo u s h o n not t o su p p re s s e s s e n tia l facts a n d n o t to d i s t o r t th e t r u t h b v o m i s s i o n o r w r o n g o r i m p r o p e r e m p h a s i s ; to r e s p e c t a ll c o n f id e n c e s in a ll c i r c u m ­ s ta n c e s ; n e v e r to a c c ep t a n y f o r m of b r i b e , n o r to p e r m i t p e r s o n a l i n t e r e s t to in f lu e n c e a s e n s e j u s t i c e : to u s e only h o n e s t m e th o d s to o b ta in n e w s , p i c t u r e s a n d d o c u m e n t s ; to o b s e r v e a t a ll ti m e s the f r a t e r n i t y o f th e p r o f e s s i o n ; a n d a lw a y s to m a in ta in , th ro u g h p e r so n a l c o n d u c t, fu ll p u b lic co n fid e n c e in th e i n ­ te g r ity and d i g n i t y of th e jo u r n a lis t's ^ allin fl.

EDITORS: Richard Richard Walsh. ASSISTAN T EDITOR: Dean Letcher. SECRETARY: Marsha Rowe.

ART DIRECTOR: M a r t i n Sharp. ARTISTS: Gary Shead, Peter Kingston. Mike Glasheen. • OZ is an independent magazine. It is publish ed by OZ Publications Ink L im ited, 16 H u n ter Street, Sydney. B W 4197, X M 1448 (after hours).

• OZ should appear on the first of every m onth, but is usually late. Collins Book D epot dis­ tributes OZ in M elbourne; Cheshire's sells OZ in Canberra. In Adelaide, OZ available from Mary Martin’s Bookshop or from John Waters, St. M ark’s College. Jack's Central Newsagency, T h e Record Market and larger newsagents handle OZ in Brisbane. • Send m anuscripts or artwork to the above address. Back copies are still available for //-. Nos. 1,4,5,6,8, and 9 have sold out.


From Publican to

PARUMENTARIAN

S o m e c o u n t r i e s h a v e t h e q u a i n t h a b i t of tak in g D efence s e r io u s ly . N ot so A u s tr a l i a . R e c e n tly faced w ith im p o rta n t new d e v e l ­ o p m e n ts in the I n d o n e s i a - M a la y s i a v i s - a - v i s the P r i m e M i n i s t e r a n d th e L e a d e r of the O p p o sitio n q u ietly slip p ed aw ay fo r s h o r t ho lid ay s, th e A u s tr a l i a n A m b a s s a d o r in D j a ­ k a r t a sa w no r e a s o n fo r c u ttin g s h o r t h is s u m m e r v a c a tio n and the M i n i s t e r f o r E x ­ t e r n a l A f f a i r s w a s s o m e w h e r e in th e W es t. A s a s o p to p u b lic i n t e r e s t in w h a t w a s g o i n g o n t h e A c t i n g P r i m e M i n i s t e r M r. M cE w an announced th a t S enator P a l t r i d g e w o u l d g o E a s t to r e v i e w t h e s i t u a t i o n . S en . P a l t r i d g e w a s r e c e n t l y r e s h u f f l e d into the D efe n c e p o r tfo lio a f t e r y e a r s of w o r k in g f o r R eg A n s e tt a s M in is te r fo r C iv il A v iatio n . W e h a v e no d o u b t t h e G o v e r n m e n t t h i n k s D e ­ fe n ce is i m p o r t a n t y e t Sen. P a l t r i d g e ' s u n ­ ique q u a lific a tio n s fo r th is p o rtfo lio e lu d e u s . C o m p a r i s o n s a r e odious b u t . . . R o b e r t S. M c N a m a r a (48), t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s D e f e n c e S e c r e t a r y , i s a B. A . f r o m C a l i f ­ o r n i a U n i v e r s i t y . He is a M a s t e r in B u s i n -

Aids To Purity

'MOY ^luuMMttUh The Solitary Sin. Other names for this sin are, self-; masturbation, pollution. Wilfully indulged in, it is a serious offense against God and is grievously contrary to nature. “The mas­ turbator,” says Dr. Gottlieb Vogel, "gradu­ ally loses his moral faculties; he acquires a dull, silly, lisdess, embarrassed, sad, effem­ inate exterior. He becomes indolent, averse to and incapable of all intellectual exer­ tion; all presence of mind deserts him; he is discontented, troubled, resdess in com­ pany, he is taken by surprise, and even alarmed if required simply to reply to a child’s question; his feeble soul succumbs to the lightest task; his memory and mind are weakened; fear and even despair over­ take him.” Such the results if the habit is frequent and endures for months and years. Even if practiced only occasionally, its vic­ tim suffers from 'loss of self-respect, re­ morse, fear of serious results, and a sense of defeat in being unable to conquer the habit.” (Paper issued by U. S. Public Health Service.) “There is not a vice more fatal to the conservation of man than mas­ turbation,” says Dr. Fournier, Paris. It de­ prives him of his life-energy and brings on bodily exhaustion, which makes him easy mark for disease, for consumption nervous and muscular troubles,

e s s A d m in istratio n fro m H a rv a rd and w as a p p o in te d A s s i s t a n t P r o f e s s o r in t h a t f a c u lty i n 1940. H e b e c a m e a L i e u t e n a n t - C o l o n e l i n the A m e r i c a n A ir F o r c e , a w a rd e d th e L eg io n of M e rit. A f te r th e w a r h e jo in e d th e F o r d M otor C om pany and su c ceed ed H en ry F o rd II to t h e p r e s i d e n c y o f t h a t c o m p a n y . A m o n t h l a t e r , i n D e c e m b e r 19&0, h e a c c e p t e d t h e D efen ce S e c r e t a r y s h i p in the inco m in g K e n ­ nedy ad m in istra tio n . D e n n i s W. H e a l y (4 7 ), h a s j u s t b e e n a p p o i n ­ te d D e fe n c e M i n i s t e r in th e B r i t i s h C a b in e t. H e o b t a i n e d h i s B. A . a n d M. A, a t B a l l i o l C o l l e g e , O x f o r d . H e i s a f o r m e r m a j o r in th e B r i t i s h A r m y , m e n t i o n e d in d e s p a t c h e s . H e i s a f o r m e r C o u n c il l o r o f the R o y a l I n ­ stitu te of S t r a t e g i c S tu d ies, a f re q u e n t b r o a d c a s t e r a n d a u t h o r o f a l a r g e n u m b e r of p u b lic a tio n s on d e f e n c e a n d g e n e r a l p o litic a l to p ics. R e c r e a t io n s : tr a v e l, ph otography, m u s ic, pa in tin g. S e n a t o r S h a n e D u n n e P a l t r i d g e (54) i s t h e o l d e s t o f t h e t h r e e a n d D e f e n c e M i n i s t e r in v i r il e , fo rw ard -lo o k in g A u s tra lia . By in ­ t e r n a tio n a l s ta n d a r d s h is tr a in in g f o r th is im p o rta n t p o st is so m e w h a t unusual. He l e f t S y d n e y 's F o r t S t. H i g h S c h o o l t o j o i n t h e b a n k i n 1929. In 1936 h e l e f t t h e b a n k t o r u n h is own pub in V i c t o r i a , a s u b u r b of P e r t h . H e s e r v e d as a g u n n e r w i t h t h e A. I. F . a n d h a s b een S en ato r fo r W estern A u s tr a lia since 1951. T h e c u r r e n t " W h o ' s W h o " a c c r e d i t s h im w ith no p u b lic a tio n s ; he is an i n e f fe c ­ t u a l d e b a t e r . In i n t e r v i e w h e d i s p l a y s m o n u ­ m e n t a l d i s i n t e r e s t a n d h a s a h a b i t of m u m b lin g a lm o s t in co h eren tly . R e c r e a ti o n s : su rfin g , w alking.

I don’t know much about Art butT h i s y e a r th e j u d g e s h a v e d e c id e d t h a t t h e r e w i l l b e n o a w a r d m a d e in th e a n n u a l A r c h ib a ld P r iz e . M any c r i t i c s f e l t th a t in s o d o in g th e y h a d o v e r l o o k e d s o m e w o r t h w h ile p a in tin g s in t h e m o d e r n g e n r e . W ho a r e th e j u d g e s o f t h e A r c h ib a ld P r iz e ? T h e T r u s t e e s o f th e A r t G a ll­ e r y o f N . S . W ., a p p o in t e d b y th e M in ­ i s t e r o f E d u c a t io n v i r t u a l l y f o r l i f e . In a n a r t i c l e p u b lis h e d in " T h e A r t y W ild O a t" s o m e y e a r s a g o a r t c r i t i c B o b H u g h e s c l a i m e d th a t o n ly tw o o f th e t r u s t e e s w e r e s y m p a t h e t ic to m o ­ d e r n a r t. H e s a id th a t th e y w e r e n o t g e n u i n e l y i n t e r e s t e d in a r t a n d a t t h a t tim e t h r e e o f th e m h ad n e v e r s e t fo o t i n s i d e o n e o f S y d n e y ' s l e a d in g p r i v a t e

g a lle r ie s . T h e T r u s t e e s m a y b e d i v id e d in to th ree grou p s: T h e A l l R ig h t s W a lt e r B u n n in g , a r c h i t e c t M r s . H . Y . E v a t t , w i f e o f D r . E v a tt and an a r t c o lle c to r R u s s e l l D r y s d a l e , p a in te r ( v e r y f a ­ m ou s)

T h e A g e in g R e a c t i o n a r i e s E r i k L a n g k e r ( 6 6 ) , a n a c t io n p a in te r o f th e g u m t r e e s s c h o o l D o u g la s D u n d a s (6 4 ) , f o r m e r h e a d o f E a s t S yd n ey T e c h n ic a l C o lle g e H a r o ld W y n d h a m (61), N . S . W. D i r e c ­ t o r o f E d u c a t io n T h e U n q u a lif ie d H. F. H e a th , m e m b e r o f th e P u b lic S e r v ic e B o a r d H o n . P. N . R y a n , N .S .W . M i n i s t e r fo r P u b lic W o rk s J .D . B a t e s , D e p u ty C h a ir m a n o f P& O A . H. V a r c o e , in d u s tr ia lis t J. H. M y r tle , in d u s t r ia lis t M r. J u s tic e N a g le , P u is n e Ju d ge o f N . S . W . S u p r e m e C o u r t.

Printed by Tru- Tracts Pty. Ltd. Sydney Telephone: 92-7805


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d ip lo m atic pouch. O r th ro u g h R ed C r o s s . W i t h a f ew g e n u i n e U N E S C O s t i c k e r s o n it the P M G w ill p o s t f r e e to H a n o i, Q u e b e c , A n g o la , o r to th o s e p l a c e s w h e r e th e y s till h a v e m i s s i o n a r i e s a n d the b lo o d b a th p o t e n t i a l i s t h e r e f o r e h i g h . B e on t h e s i d e of a n t i - c o l o n ia l is m . I t 's a ll th e r a g e .t h e s e d a y s . W i t h q u o t a s on p o k e r m a c h i n e s a n d b e c h e - d e - m e r , y o u c a n f lo g t h e n a t i o n ' s flagging e x p o r t t r a d e . T h is is p a tr io tic . Copper T h e r e c e n t r i s e in w o r ld p r i c e s m a k e s c o p p e r hunting a paying p ro p o sitio n . No e x ­ p en siv e e x tra c tio n plant is needed. S urface c o p p e r i s b e s t fo u n d a l r e a d y p r o c e s s e d on

th e f l o o r s of b u s e s a n d t r a m s . A llu v ia l c o p ­ p e r i s fo u n d in w i s h i n g w e l l s , p o o l s o f r e m ­ e m b r a n c e , c o m m e m o r a tiv e fountains. A p r e l i m i n a r y c h e c k on th e d ep th of the w a te r i s a d v i s e d b e f o r e w a d i n g in. T a k e t h e t r e a ­ s u r e in h a n d y t o n - l o a d s to t h e b a n k o f y o u r ow n f a i t h . O r hold it b ack until d e c im a l ch angeover. Look a f te r th e c o p p e r s and K itty ta k e s c a r e of h e r s e l f . T h is is n u m i s ­ m atic . O il T h e r e 's p le n ty of good oil lying about. F o r the c o n v e n ie n c e of c o l l e c t o r s , t a n k e r s fro m o v e r s e a s o ften o b lig e by d is c h a r g in g t h e i r M o s l e m c r u d e d i r e c t in t o t h e h a r b o u r . It h a s ex c e lle n t ad h e siv e q u a litie s when b le n ­ d ed w ith s a l t a n d e a n sa fe ly be u s e d w h e r e ­ v e r h e a v y - d u t y w o r k i s c a l l e d f o r - in e c c le s ia s tic a l l a m p s for ex am p le o r for lu b ric a tin g the e s s e n t i a l p a r t s . T elltale s ig n s of its p r e s e n c e a r e the n u m b e r of s e a b i r d s th a t hav e difficu lty g e ttin g alo ft. K e r o -

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ff s e n e a n d high o c ta n e fuel is often d u m p e d a t s e a t o o . No n e e d t o pu t u p a d e r r i c k . S c a r e t h e m w i t h t h a t b i t a b o u t a b o m b b e i n g on b o a r d . T h o u s a n d s of g a llo n s of it a r e t h e r e f o r a g o - a h e a d t y p e on a p u n t w i t h a p l a s t i c m a c a n d a c o u p l e of c o c o a t i n s . T h i s is aquatic. A m b erg ris T h i s i s a m o r b i d p r o d u c t of t h e t o o t h e d w h a le . W h e r e v e r you find m o r b i d w h a le s w i t h t e e t h y o u f i n d a m b e r g r i s . If i t h a s a fatty ta s te , is lig h te r th an w a t e r , m e lts at 140°F and d is s o lv e s re a d ily in a b s o lu te a l ­ cohol o r e t h e r , it is w h at y o u 'v e b e e n lo o k ­ in g f o r . Go o v e r t h e b e a c h c a r e f u l l y . T h o s e s u n b a k e r s *m ight b e l y i n g o n s o m e . L o o k u n d e r t h e i r t o w e l s . A t n i g h t i t c a n o f t e n be lo c a te d by the m u s k y , s lig h tly n a u s e a tin g o d o u r . G i v e t h e s a n d h i l l s a p r o w l . T h i s is n eu ro tic. „ . , ... - ~ ..

In t h e n e x t f ew m o n t h s i t i s e x p e c t e d t h a t S ir R o b e rt M e n zies w ill re t i r e . A s a hum ble t r i b u t e O Z t h i s m o n t h p r i n t s a few e x e r p t s f ro m h is f o rth c o m in g p u b licatio n "T he Bob M enzies Joke Book". S ir R o b e rt is acknow ledged a s a h u m o r is t, p a r t i c u l a r l y , if n o t e x c lu s iv e ly , am o n g L i b ­ erals. " T h e re is an old F r e n c h P r o v e r b w hich sa y s th a t n o ise is no su b stitu te fo r in tellig en ce, (laughter)

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B O B : C a b in e t h a s a r r i v e d a t the i r r e s i s t i b l e c o n c l u s i o n t h a t t h e p o s i t i o n o f A u s t r a l i a in the w o rld h as d e te r io ra te d . V o ice: W hose fault w as th a t? BOB: W ell, of c o u r s e , m in e. I a m acting in d is g u is e . I a m S u k a rn o . I a m the fellow w h o i s m a k i n g a l l t h e s e a t t a c k s on M a l a y s i a . A n d in m y s p a r e t i m e I a m H o C h i - M i n h . ( la u g h te r v e r g in g on h y s te ria )

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Iron T h e a b o r i g i n a l r e s e r v e s in t h e t r o p i c s h a v e t h e f i n e s t d e p o s i t s b u t y o u h a v e to b e a f o r e i g n c o m p a n y to b e a l l o w e d in. F o r t h e a m a t e u r J e r v i s B a y a f t e r a g o o d s t o r m is s till p r o m is i n g . A lso th e H u m e and P r i n c e s H ig h w ay s f o r th o s e b u r n t out s e m i t r a i l e r s . T h e NRM A know s the b e s t sp o ts . N e a r e r h o m e is th e p a rk . C heck it o v e r. W hat about the c e m e te r y ? Q ueen V i c to r ia and A l ­ b e r t the Good a r e old c r e m a t i o n f a v o u rite s down a t th e s m e ltin g w o r k s . D o n 't fo rg e t

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"My d e a r c h ap , you fellow s a r e a ll th e s a m e . T h e m o m e n t y o u a r e le f t w i t h o u t a f e a t h e r t o fly w i t h , y o u t r y to p o s e a s s o m e o t h e r a n im a l, (laughter)

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( T o in te r je c tio n about child endow m ent) "Why g e t a n g r y ? I s i t b e c a u s e y o u a r e n o t th e f i r s t c h ild in y o u r f a m ily ? (laughter) P e r h a p s y o u a r e n o t in a f a m i l y a t a l l . (lau g h ter and u p ro a r).

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"G o o d h e a v e n s , m y f r i e n d w i t h t h e m e g a ­ phone v o ice is h e r e again, (audience c o l l ­ a p s e s in u n c o n tr o lla b le co n v u lsio n s)

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WAIKIKI th e tow n c o u n c il is putting b itu m e n o v e r u n ­ sightly t r a m lines. S ince it d o e s n 't w ant t h e m y o u m a y a s w e l l do t h e c o u n c i l a s e r ­ v ic e a n d dig t h e m up. T h is is c iv ic . DOUGLAS T E R R Y

OZ FEBRUARY 1965

Page 9,

HONOLULU u r n 11

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THE SUNSHINE STATE OF AUSTRALIA

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GO N O R T H YOUNG MAN

E v e r w is h y o u 'd b e e n to C h ic a g o in t h e 3 0 's ? A r e y o u e n ­ v io u s w h en m u m n 'd a d t e l l t a l e s of s p e a k e a s i e s , b o o t l e g g e r s , A1 C a p o n e a n d th e m a s s a c r e on St. V a le n ti n e s D a y ? W ell, i t s n o t to o l a t e to e n jo y y o u r ow n s l i c e of v i c e - c o m e to Q u e e n s la n d . D e s p i t e o u r S t a t e - w i d e P r o h i b i t i o n of e v e r y ­ th in g f r o m b r o t h e l s to b o o k s (we e v e n h a v e o u r ow n v i c io u s c e n s o r s h i p b o a r d ) , w e ' r e so d i r t y a n d c o r r u p t th a t e v e n th e l o c a l p r e s s h a s b e e n s tu n n e d in to r e c o n c i l i a t i o n . R e a d b e lo w to w e t y o u r a p p e ti te , t h e n p a c k y o u r b a g s f o r th e h o lid a y y o u 'll n e v e r com e back fro m . . . If y ou’re a worker, y o u 'll strike it rich in sunny Q ueensland. So m uch so, that th e indigenous labourers are loathe to share th e spoils and therefore discourage th e 'p ic k 'n shovel' tourists. Last D ecem ber, for instan ce, the pow­ erful Q ueensland Trades and L a b o u r C ouncil launched an intensive p u blicity cam p aign in Britain to try to stop skilled workers m igrating to Q ueensland. (See T he A ustralian, 9 /12/64). T hey sent a circu lar to a ll m e ta l and building trade unions in England. The c i r c u l a r said that intending m igrants should not be m isled by glow ing reports from G overnm ent sources and told them th a t Q ueensland is still a low w age S tate. T he circu lar further stated that the G overnm ent, em ployers and th e Indus­ tria l C om m ission use "savage and vicious?' senal provisions. The British Unions re ­ ceiv ed th e circu lar in early D ecem ber and were asked to give it w ide p u b lic ity . A

supplem entary advertising cam p aig n for th e British Press has also been organised by the Q ueensland C ouncil. This m ove outraged the Q ueensland G overnm ent who had previously announ­ ced a jo in t industry-G overnm ent overseas m ission to re c ru it British workers. This four m an mission w ill spend 10 weeks in England, Scotland and Ireland seeking m e ta l and e le c tric a l tradesm en. The Q ueensland P rem ier, Mr. N icklin told Parliam ent: ”1 have co m e across som e pretty scurrilous things in my life , but this reaches th e lowest le v e l o f in ­ famous d efam atio n o f the S tate , its Gov­ ern m en t and its p eo p le, th a t I h av e eveencountered. "

THE UNTOUCHABLES Queensland Police m ade h eadlines last year during a Royal Com mission into fun and gam es at the Brisbane N ational H otel. T he p olice were o fficially ex onerated. However, there has recen tly been strange m ovem ent at the Stations. Sergeant D. Buchanan, one of Brisbane’s leading d e ­ tectiv es and key witness in the N ational scandal, was m ysteriously transferred from C.I.B. headquarter to a uniform ed p o lice branch. The Sydney Morning Herald (21/1/65) reports further that:

J OZ FEBRUARY 1965

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Q U E EN S­

HOUSEWIFE

"Buchanan's m ove follows th e transfer last w eek of the C h ief o f th e C.I.B., In­ spector T. Donovan, to take charge of th e Ipswich district. "Police throughout Brisbane today claim ed th a t dozens of recen t transfers had w eak­ ened p o lice m o rale. "In another p o lice developm ent on Mon­ day, th e Police Com m issioner, Mr. F. Bischof, ordered the w ithdraw al of all p o lice personnel associated with the Pol­ ic e W elfare Club. "T oday it was rev ealed th a t Mr. Bischof had ordered a d ep artm en tal inquiry into the disappearance o f p o lice union funds from the V alley p o lice station. "This followed a report th a t V alley m em ­ bers of the union passed the h a t to m ake up m ore than £100 which had been m isap­ propriated by a p o lic e m a n ."

4


The President of the Queensland Trades and Labour Council is Mr J. Egerton. The following is a recent speech by Mr Aiken, made in the Queensland Parliament, November 20,1964 "It i s n o t s o v e r y lo n g a g o th a t M r . E g e r t o n w a s r u n n in g a r o u n d s h o w in g a b ig b u n d le o f " t e n n e r s " w h ic h h e c l a i m e d c o n t a in e d £ 4 , 0 0 0 . H e s a i d h e w o n th a t £ 4 , 0 0 0 a t th e r a c e s . In m y h o n e s t a n d c o n s i d e r e d o p in io n , h e d id n o t w in th a t m o n e y a t t h e r a c e s . In m y h o n e s t a n d c o n s i d e r e d o p in io n , i t w a s g iv e n t o h im to p a s s on to o th e r t r a d e u n io n o f f i c i a l s a t t h e T r a d e s H a ll in o r d e r t h a t i n d u s t r i a l p e a c e m ig h t b e b o u g h t a t c e r t a i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in B r is b a n e . T h e p r a c t i c e o f h a n d in g o v e r m o n e y t o t r a d e u n io n o f f i c i a l s in o r d e r t h a t th e e m p l o y e e - u s u a l l y a b ig i n d u s t r i a l c o m b in e o r c o n c e r n c a n b u y i n d u s t r i a l p e a c e i s n o t n e w in A u s t r a l i a o r o v e r s e a s . It i s u n f o r t u ­ n a t e l y t r u e in th e t r a d e u n io n m o v e ­ m e n t in Q u e e n s la n d to d a y th a t i n d u s ­ t r i a l p e a c e c a n b e b o u g h t a s lo n g a s th e m o n e y i s p a id to t h e r ig h t p e r s o n a n d d i s t r i b u t e d to th e r i g h t p e o p l e .

E v e n Q u e e n s l a n d 's j u d g e s h a v e a q u a in t w a y a b o u t t h e m . A l e a d in g m e m b e r o f th e l o c a l j u ­ d ic ia r y w a s r e c e n t ly r e v e a le d a s a ta x e v a d e r . H e w a s S ir W i ll i a m P a y n e , p r e s ­ id e n t o f th e Q u e e n s la n d L a n d C o u r t , w h o d ie d tw o y e a r s a g o , l e a v i n g £167, 000. In t h e l a t e s t r e p o r t o f th e T a x a t io n C o m m i s s i o n e r it w a s r e v e a l e d th a t b e t w e e n 1 9 5 1 -5 2 a n d 1 9 6 0 -6 2 h i s i n - 1 c o m e w a s u n d e rsta ted by £ 8 5 9 4 . M r . A i k e n s ( Q u e e n s la n d H a n s a r d , N o v e m b e r 1964) : "I w a s i n t r ig u e d th e o t h e r d a y to h e a r th a t a v e r y p r o m in e n t m e m b e r o f th e L a n d C o u r t , la t e ly d e c e a s e d , le f t an e s t a t e o f £ 1 6 7 , 0 0 0 a n d d id d le d th e T a x a t io n D e p a r t m e n t to th e e x t e n t o f a b o u t £ 8 , 000.

station to a d efin ite Queensland im age." We hope th e statio n 's im ag e is, in fac t, clea n er than both Q ueensland's and Mr. A nsett's.

"I th in k I a m r ig h t in a s s u m i n g a l l th a t m o n e y w a s n o t a c q u i r e d b y th a t m a n p u r e ly and s im p ly a s a r e s u lt o f t h e la w f u l e m o lu m e n t s th a t h e r e c ­ e i v e d a s a m e m b e r o f th e L a n d C o u r t o r o f th e L a n d A d m in is t r a t i o n C o m ­ m is s io n o r w h a t e v e r p o s itio n he h e ld . " A s on so m an y m a tte r s th a t one w o u ld a s s u m e to i n t e r e s t th e l o c a l s t h e B r i s b a n e P r e s s m a in t a in e d r e ­ m a r k a b ly q u ie t a b o u t t h e s e r e v e l a ­ tio n s .

TOWNSVILLE playing 'w h o d u n it? ' After an in v estig ­ ation, the cu lp rit was rev ealed as Reg A nsett. Now Reg has 'dun i t ' again. R ecently, three o f th e original eight Queensland directors o f United T eleca s­ ters suddenly resigned and were replaced by A nsett m en. The n in e-m em b er board now includes five nom inees o f Ansett Transport Indus­ tries, giving Reg co m p lete control. (Although Ansett had originally co m ­ peted w ith United T elecasters in seeking a Q ueensland lic e n c e , he was refused because o f his interests in other S ta te s .) When th e ch airm an of th e board an ­ nounced th e reshuffle, h e stated th at A nsett Transport Industries supported th e policy of "prom oting and operating the

MYSTERY RESIGNATIONS Although Q ueensland's new T elevision station (C hannel 0) is not yet operating it has, m eanw hile, been providing the public with som e rib -sp littin g en te rta in ­ m ent. When 40 per c e n t of the shares o f Uni­ ted T ele casters changed hands on th e first day o f sale last A pril, everyone had fun *

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W h e n th e b ig M t. I s a s t r i k e o c c u r r e d so m e y e a r s a g o , M r. E g e rto n w en t o f f to t h e K a r u m b a g e n t l e m e n ' s h u n tin g l o d g e , o s t e n s i b l y to c a t c h f i s h f o r th e s t a r v i n g s t r i k e r s a t M t. I s a . H e d id n o t c a t c h a n y f i s h b u t h e d id c h a s e a f e w p in k e le p h a n t s . O f c o u r s e , th e K a r u m b a g e n t l e m e n ' s h u n tin g lo d g e is ow n ed and c o n t r o lle d by m illio n a ir e R e g A x i s e t t , w h o I w o u ld s a y , i s a v e r y f i t t in g r e c r e a t i o n a l b u d d y f o r M r . E g ­ e r to n . T o s e e M r . E g e r t o n in th e f u l l f lu s h o f h is p o w er and g lo r y on e d o e s n ot h a v e to g o to th e T r a d e s H a ll; o n e d o e s n o t h a v e to l i s t e n to h im a t th e T r a d e U n io n m a k in g c h a r g e s o f g r a f t a n d c o r r u p t io n a g a i n s t M e m b e r s o f P a r l i a m e n t ; o n e h a s o n ly to g o d ow n to th e V i r g in ia G o lf C lu b o r R o y a l Q u e e n s la n d to s e e h im i n t a r t a n s o c k s , h i s y e l l o w p u l lo v e r a n d p l u s - f o u r s a s ­ s o c i a t i n g w ith th e a s s o r t e d w e a lt h y sn o b s o f B r is b a n e . "

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W in t e r o r s u m m e r , l o v e l y T o w n s ­ v i ll e a lw a y s e n jo y s p e r f e c t w e a t h e r . It i s a t y p i c a l Q u e e n s la n d b o o m to w n . It l i e s d o r m a n t f o r e v e r y t h r e e y e a r s a n d th e n c o m e s to l i f e o n th e fo u r t h , t h e y e a r p r e c e d in g e a c h O l y m p i c G a m e s , w h e n th e A u s t r a l i a n S h a m a t e u r S w im m in g A s s o c i a t i o n m o v e s in . A t su ch t im e s it b e c o m e s a v e r ita b le M e c c a f o r s w i m m e r s o f th e w o u ld - b e , c o u ld -b e and s h o u ld - lik e - t o -g e t - o n t o - o n e - o f - t h e m v a r ie ty . T o w n s v i l l e i s r ig h t ly r e n o w n e d fo r it s b e a u tifu l H a rb o u r and fa m o u s O v ­ e r s e a s T e r m i n a l . A m o n g s t th e V I P 's to u s e t h e T e r m i n a l ' s f a c i l i t i e s in '6 4 w e r e : W i ll i a m W i l l i s , w h o w e n t t h e r e b y m i s t a k e (h e w a s a i m in g f o r S y d n e y ) a n d B e lg ia n z o o l o g i s t S a b b e , w h o m a d e a m i s t a k e in g o in g t h e r e (h e w a s th r o w n in t o T o w n s v i l l e ' s e q u a lly f a m o u s l o c k ­ up fo r p o s s e s s i n g th a t N o r th e r n Q u e e ­ n s la n d , p o a c h e d b ir d .

OZ FEBRUARY 1965 »

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I P rivate exposure h a . become th e talk of Sydney. B«t public exposure h as been all the rage for year*. O n. sol.citor’s opinion i . t »t over

cases o

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exposure in a public place” come before Sydney m agistrates each week. The offences usually occur in public lavatories. F unny. ,sn t .t . We have been ,n and o u t of city Johns for years and never seen even a s u ^ e s tio n of . proposition. Yet should . policeman (plain clothes, n atu rally ) stray .n th en the perverts swarm l i £ b e e sto _‘he h i v e . ^ ^ ^

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beeome8 provocative to the policeman sta n d in * next to him watching it all

out of the corner of his eye. Some lawyers C .im t h . t there .r e c e r t.in public l.v .to r ie s which th e Vice Squad “ P arks .n d G ardens” team guard

so diligently

no-one should risk using them . Such as the one in G reen’s P arks opposite St V incent’s Hospital, most of the lavs in Law P ark and all in C enten.al Park. P e r h a p s diligence can be overdone. In the past y ears, a t least one incognito cop , by m istake, picked up one of his m ates (equally well disguised). I t seems th a t th e lavatories are becoming so clogged with P arks and G ardens men, all giving each o th er th e eye, th a t the m an off the street has trouble fin d in g a v acant space. In its own d ilig en t search, OZ u n earth ed the following docum ents. Read them a t your convenience.

FOR YO UR EYES O NLY Recruitment Division, N.S.W. Police Department. Memo-. To all Suburban Recruiting Officer* The following communication is designed to assist you in finding suitable material for an important sector of the Force. A n official N O T IC E to be displayed in buildings frequented by the public, NOTES for your guidance and a PROTOTYPE of the perfect interview are included.Hope to see you all at the next social.

Yours ever,

R E C R U I T IN G N O T IC E V A C A N C IE S e x i s t in th e N e w S o u th W a l e s P O L I C E F O R C E fo r c e r t a in ty p e s o f m e n N O T N E C E SS A R IL Y w ith p r e v io u s e x p e r ie n c e or I n t e r m e d i a t e C e r t i f i c a t e . F r ie n d ly r e c r u it in g o ffic ­ e r s h a v e b een o r d e re d by o u r C o m m i s s i o n e r to u s e t h e i r o w n J U D G M E N T in c h o o s in g la d s fo r t h e s e p o s­ itio n s . B oys m u st be of P L E A S I N G app earance, L IG H T b e a r d - g r o w t h a n d L IS S O M E b u ild . A P E R S ­ O N A L IT Y m a y b e an a s s e t but is n ot e s s e n tia l. S u ch youn g r e c r u its a r e to e n t e r t h e P A R K S A N D G A R D E N S D IV IS IO N .

(signed) T. H. Osborn (Insp.)

> £ K eep A“n L A W lm

5. A P P L IC A N T S r e q u i r in g A R C H ­ S U P P O R T S c a n n o t b e a c c e p te d a s c a n ­ v a s s n e a k e r s m u s t b e w o rn a t a ll t i m e s . S im ila rly , h e rn ia tr u s s e s h a m p e r th e o f f ic e r s in p e r f o r m a n c e o f d u ty a n d m a y n o t b e w o rn on th e jo b . 6. A P P L IC A N T S m u s t u n d e r ta k e : n o t to a s s o c i a t e w ith w o m e n a s the r i s k o f b e in g b la c k m a i le d is e v e r ___p r e s e n t .

N O T E S to g u id e o f f ic e r s in s e le c tio n o f r e c r u i t s f o r th e D iv is io n :

2. A P P L IC A N T S s h o u ld b e a l e r t to th e v a r i o u s s e c r e t s ig n s th a t h o m o ­ s e x u a ls u s e to id e n tify th e m s e lv e s , e .g . "G ood E v e n in g " , "M y z ip is j a m ­ m e d " , "G o a w a y " , w a s h in g o f h a n d s | a f t e r u s e o f f a c i l i t i e s e tc . 3. A P P L IC A N T S o f u n - A u s t r a li a n o r ig i n m u s t n o t b e a c c e p te d . T hey m a y f a l s e ly i n t e r p r e t th e s e c r e t s ig n a l o f a p e r v e r t a s a p h r a s e o f a fo r e ig n la n g u a g e o r a fo r e ig n p e r v e r t 's a d ­ m i s s i o n o f g u ilt a s a 'd e n ia l . 4 . A P P L IC A N T S m u s t u n d e r s ta n d t h a t P A R K S AND G A R D EN S m e n a r e r e q u i r e d to w e a r u n if o r m e x a c tly a s

[Certificate Examination

[Details

P R O T O T Y P E IN T E R V IE W

( P . S. t o R e c r u ite r s -S e r g e a n t T y r r e ll h a s p r o m ­ i s e d m e a f r e e p lu g f o r t h i s o n h i s t o p - r a t i n g 2G B s h o w . B e p r e p a r e d fo r a r u s h .)

1. A P P L IC A N T S m u s t sh o w a n in t e r e s t i n , an d k n o w le d g e o f, c o m m o n s h r u b s a n d f lo w e r s . ( F o r in s ta n c e , he s h o u ld know th a t a d e lp h in iu m p ro v id e s v e r y l i t t l e c o v e r , th a t e lm b r a n c h e s m a y s n a p u n d e r th e w e ig h t o f a n o f f ic e r s t r e t c h e d f u ll - le n g t h e t c . )

s e t o u t in R e g u la tio n s . S n e a k e rs m u s t b e W H IT E an d W IT H O U T b lu e t r i m S o m e m o r e s e n s iti v e r e c r u i t s m a y o b ­ j e c t to th e r ig i d s ta n d a r d iz a t io n . In th i s c a s e , u s e h u m o u r , e . g . , w hen r e f e r r i n g to t r o u s e r s , o b s e r v e : "A s H e n r y F o r d s a id , 'Y ou c a n h a v e any c o l o u r y o u l i k e -----so long a s i t 's m a u v e '. "

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S it d o w n , so n . So y o u 'd lik e to jo in th e P a r k s a n d G a rd e n s , eh? O f c o u r s e , w e h a v e to be c a r e f u l w ho w e s e le c t f o r t h i s . T h e p r e s e n t lo t a r e v e r y n ic e l a d s , a l l n ic e b o y s , g e t on w e ll to g e t h e r , n e v e r a c r o s s w o rd b e tw e e n th e m . I h a v e to m a k e s u r e y o u 'll f it j in , g e t on w ith th e te a m a s i t w e r e . • R ig h t. { N am e? G r a y . . . an d C h r is ti a n ? Y e s , w e ll w e a l l a r e b u t w h a t's y o u r f i r s t n a m e ? D o r ia n . . . u n u s u a l . . . b u t th e s e r g e a n t m ig h t ta k e to it . P e r s o n a l l y , I th in k y o u w ill f it in , y o u lo o k s u ita b le . H av e I s e e n y o u b e f o r e s o m e w h e r e . . . a t th e tr a in in g c e n tre p e rh a p s ? J u s t f ill o u t th i s f o r m f o r m e , w ill y o u , D o r ia n . H E IG H T : e le g a n tly ta l l B U IL D : s lim , y o u th fu l, a m a z in g ly b e a u tif u l c a lv e s . H A IR : F a i r , c u r l e d in s o ft w a v e s a c r o s s a g e n tly s y m m e t r i c a l face p le a ­ s in g to th e p o in t o f u g lin e s s . EY ES: M is t g r e y , h a z e l fle c k s d is t a n t - s e e i n g . F in e . Now a l i t t l e a b o u t th e w o rk , D o r r y . H av e y o u h e a r d o f 'd e v ia t e s ' N o. 'P e r v e r t s '? N o . T h a t 's a l l f o r th e g o o d , D o r r y , an d I f e e l w e h a v e a g r e a t d e a l in c o m m o n . I th in k w e 'r e g o in g to b e g o o d p a ls f r o m now cfn and I w a n t y o u to f e e l th e s a m e w ay a b o u t ^ ^ / m e . How a b o u t b r in g in g y o u r s a n d ­ w ic h e s u p to m y l i t t l e o ffic e f o r a c h a t o v e r lu n c h , e h ? Y ou h a v e to s e e th e i n s u r a n c e p e o p ­ le , y o u s a y . . . m y , t h a t 's a p ity . A nd w h a t w o u ld a fin e y o u n g m a n lik e y o u b e in s u r in g ? Q u a in t! How m a r v e llo u s ! A p o r t r a i t ..........

Major prizes in Ordinary I Lottery No. 5475, drawn Ptoday, went to: I Abbott, A drian How ard 1A 3 ■4HI 7A 22; A nstice, David W estIb ro o k 1H2 6 8 9 21 22; A rm ■ strong R obert Jam es 1A 2 4A |7 A 22;' A ustin, Terence 1 2 4 5; 1 Starter*; Homeieigb Call J.9 (R. I S e lk rig ) 12, By Error «.! <B. H ill) I 3. Colour Kins 8.1 (D. Lake) 10. I Mils Bronwya 8.1 (C. Clare) 4. J M jf Empire 1.1 (B. Parktnsoni J , ■ C hristopher N apier 1 JA '4 I Bowles, Denis O ordon l 2 3 ( B ra d y , D a v id H u g h 1_2A 3 5 24,

l i t (£6.000) ~

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1877 15428 27604 39085 and VMtor. Homefciali lip Pallynp ^ Jtour jCDfths

| 4094 -1§ $ 5 30097 40748 ] 420<W 826?J0232 40802 Major prizes Were drawn _by Miss Diana Timms. * (visitor from Canada. W inder trailed ' t , F. K. C t n U n , second t> I . A. Stapleton, thtnt by * . Do*-

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New Iackp*Mj.O«ery No. 6A Will-te drawn tomorrow..


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H ow Dr. Evatt Put M e In A Concentration Camp By

P.

This is a shortened version o f an article

originally published in

‘The O bserver’ (1959) as part of th eir series on wartim e recollect­ ions. Like the Observer, we agree that Stephensen “has a case which m ust be answ ered

R.

STEPHENSEN

F

O R three-and-a-half years, from M arch, 1942, until September, 1945, I was held as a political prisoner in Australia, without trial. T his outrage against civil liberties and basic hum an rights was perpetrated by a Labor Government in which the Attorney-General was Hubert Vere Evatt, D octor of Laws. ^ As Minister responsible for the administration of Justice, H . V . Evatt on that occasion inaugurated and m anipulated one of the m ost flagrant miscarriages of justice in Australian history. It will go down into history as such, on any impartial analysis. If the time has com e to review the incident in historical perspective, I don’t mind stating my opinion, which is necessarily biased, since I was the principal victim of the outrage. On the-other hand, as Evatt was the perpetrator of the outrage, his view is also biased. CONTINUED O N PAGE 15

! ! 1 ! H U 1 L L U -L L .

CUSTOMS CHALLENGED

It seems likely th a t th e censorship powers of Customs clerks w ill be challenged soon for th e first tim e in the High

FOLKIOUCEKT

Court o f A ustralia. Dr. John Power, o f th e Governm ent D epartm ent o f the U niversity o f Sydney recen tly returned from Harvard via the U.K. In M anchester he m ailed several paperbacks ad ­ dressed to h im self. On his arrival in Sydney last July, he found th a t Customs had seized "T he Ginger Man" by J. P. D onleavy.

'Ft9-

Dr. Powers has begun p relim inaries toward a High Court action challenging the v alid ity o f this confiscation. We understand th a t the C ouncil for C ivil Liberties has shown in terest in the case but CCL support must be approved by the co m m ittee . This body w ill m e e t som etim e in th e next . ^ 1 . . . . . . . ....i

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The matter to be assessed in historical perspec­ tive is this: During the Attorney-Generalship of H. V . Evatt, I, as editor and part-proprietor of a monthly newspaper, The Publicist, and president of a bona fide political organisation (The AustraliaFirst Movement) was imprisoned for three-and-ahalf years by ministerial edict under the National Security Act and Regulations. On the face of it, this was a gross abuse of freedom of the Press and freedom of assembly. I had committed no offcncc whatever. At any rate, I was never chargcd before any magistrate with any offcncc. N o indictment was filed against me. I had no trial before judge and jury. There was no case for me to answer. I was demonstrably not guilty in any way of any offence in the criminal or civil code. I was not seditious, either in words or deeds. I was simply locked up, and kept locked up for three-and-a-half years, in “preventive deten­ tion," on no demonstrable grounds of military necessity, but merely by ministerial order. The onus was put on me of proving myself innocent of charges of which I was not informed. The instruments of my incarceration were secret denunciations, false accusations made under Parliamentary privilege, spymania, trial by in­ quisitorial conclave in my absence, and the em­ ployment of government agents-provocateur, pimps, paid informers, and professional character-assav sins — all this in an attempt to justify, ex post facto, the governmental suppression of a newspaper and a political organisation which was criticising the government. The pseudo-judicial technique employed was that of the “spy-trials” under the Soviet Commun­ ist system of dictatorship of which H. V. Evatt was then, and still is, an ardent appeaser. But the Australian National Security Act of 1939 was not originated in Russia. It was adopted, almost un­ altered, from a similar Act in Britain. In Ausr tralian history, it was a throwback to the dicta­ torial methods of Governor Darling’s day in New South Wales. In company with twenty other Australians— none of whom was of enemy alien citizenship, birth or ancestry, but all British subjects by birth, and all except one (an Englishman) of Australian birth, I had the entirely unexpected experience— and i am an Australian of the second generation of the Australian-born— of being martyred in mv native land, and in my father’s native land, as crudely as the Tolpuddle Martyrs, the Scottish Martyrs, and the thousands of Irish martyrs of the worst period of the Imperial Convict System in Australia, perhaps more crudely so, for we were not even convicts, as the earlicr-day martyrs were, but merely “detainees.” O f the twenty-one detainees, sixteen were residents of New South Wales and one of Victoria — all, more or less, connected with The Publicist and The Australia-First Movement. The other four, residents of Western Australia, had nothing whatever to do with The Publicist or the AustraliaFirst Movement. They were induced by a govern­ ment agent-provocateur to take some part in the

formation of a bogus “Australia-First” Movement, of which we, in Sydney, knew nothing. That is the clue to the whole silly or deplorable or sinister business. Sixteen men in Sydney, and later one in Melbourne, were arrested and detained because of the activities of a govern­ ment agent in W estern Australia. T he seventeen arrested in the Eastern States were merely kept detained, and never put on trial. T he four in W estern Australia were tried. T w o of them were found guilty of an ofTciicc against the National Security Act, and v/cre given short terms of imprisonment, which sufficiently indicated that '.heir culpability, as victims of a government agent, was not very serious. But then cam e the clim ax of ab ­ surdity. T he two who were found "Not Guilty” at the trial in W estern Australia were nevertheless in to n e d for the duration of the war. T h e two who were found “G uilty,” after serv­ ing their sentences on a, prison farm, were also interned for the duration of the war. T h e seventeen ih the Eastern States, including myself, who were never brought to trial a t all, were kept interned for various periods. Fourteen of them were released after six months’ detention, two after fifteen months, and I was held for three and a half years. I am not authorised to speak here on behalf of the other twenty in this martyrdom; but it should be evident that mine was the extrem e case. M y view, then, is th at the whole incident must stand in history as the blackest smudge on H . V. E vatt’s juridical and political record. The case began with questions asked in the Federal Parliam ent by M ax Falstein, M .H .R., and in the New South Wales Parliam ent by A braham Landa, M.L.A., dem anding the suppression of the Australia-First M ovement as an allegedly “anti-Semitic” or “ Fascist” or “Nazi” organisation. T his was sup­ ported by a resolution carried by the then Communist-controlled Sydney Trades and Labour Council, dem and­ ing my internm ent. Evatt answered Falstein’s question (November, 1941) promising an inves­ tigation. In the sequel a submission was made, in January, 1941, to the G.O.C. Eastern C om m and (G eneral Fewtrell) for my internm ent. T he G.O.C. refused to sign this submission. It was after that th at the agentprovocateur wus put to work in West­ ern Australia, to organise a bogus Aus­ tralia-First M ovement there, with fan­ tastic conspiratorial aims. On 5th M arch, 1942, Evatt sent an order to Police C hief M ackay, in Syd­ ney, to prohibit a meeting of the Aus­ tralia-First M ovement which we had called to press for “an inquiry into ministerial responsibility for the in­ adequate defence of R abaul,” and for “the recall of the A .I.F. from the Middle East to defend Australia First.” On 9th M arch, a telegram was sent from Perth by Lieutenant-Colonel Moseley (D eputy-D irector of Security, WA.) to all C om m ands (including Eastern C om m and, w ith H .Q . a t Syd­ ney) announcing the discovery in W.A.

* Between 195052, a bored weatherman, stationed north of Hudson Bay, left a monument that neither government nor tim e can eradicate. Many white men have felt com­ pelled to pile stone on stone to leave some mark in the arctic w astes, but he was the first to harness tech­ nology to this end. U sing a bulldozer abandoned by the Air Force, he spent two years and great effort pushing boulders into a single word. It can be seen from 10,000 feet, silhouetted against the 3now. It’s the first evidence of human life to be

of the “ plot” of the (bogus) A ustra­ lia-First M ovement. T h e sixteen members or associates of the authentic “A ustralia-First” M ovement in Sydney were arrested on the morning of IOth M arch. T h at same day II. V. Evatt had left Aus­ tralia to go to the U.S.A., where he rem ained for six months. T h a t was how he attem pted to cover his tracks, and to put responsibility for the coup on the A cting A ttorney-G eneral (John Beasley), who was not a lawyer, and stated in Parliam ent that he “ knew nothing” of the case. W hen Evatt returned from America, in Septem ber, 1942, he “ reviewed” the cases at a S tar C ham ber C ourt held in the Senate C ham ber, which recom­ mended that thirteen of the sixteen de­ tainees of Sydney should be released, and the other three (including myself) kept in—as scapegoats. N one of those most concerned was invited to this Siar C ham l)cr hearing. We w ere tried in our absence; but Evatt read in Parliament extracts from letters purporting to have been sent to or from the three found culpable. Some of these letters had been w ritten during the 1914-18 war! Later, Evatt, in response to parlia­ m entary uneasiness, appointed a C om ­ missioner under the N ational Security Act to investigate the internments. T his was not a Royal Commission. It was not subject to the rules of evidence. Soon after the Commissioner began tak­ ing evidence, Evatt gave him another appointm ent, i.e., to investigate tele­ phone tapping. T his delayed the hear­ ing for many months. W hen appointing the Commissioner, Evatt made an unprivileged Press state­ m ent that seriously prejudiced the inr quiry. T h e Commissioner’s findings, as regards the sixteen men of Sydney, were that eight of them (including myself) Had been “justifiably detained” and eight “unjustifiably detained.” In Par­ liam ent, E vatt falseiy stated that the case had been investigated by “a Royal Commission.’’ W ithin the scope of this present short article, I nred not enter further into the facts. When my application in H abeas Corpus was rejected, I had no further recourse in law. As for me, I have nothing to apolo­ gise for, or to retract. M y writings in T h e Publicist for 5? years arc on record. T h a t was a venture in in­ dependent journalism , a step forward from colonialism into Australian N ationalism —the idea that something could be originated here. M artyrdom in itself proves nothing. I was persecuted, but I don’t yowl about it. Not the present generation, but their fathers, were the “ beat” gener­ ation— hoodwinked into a aw ar that des­ troyed the British Em pire, spread Com ­ munist dictatorship over half Europe and half Asia, and weakened the pres­ tige of the white race. They were beat by men of the E vatt ilk, and I h a d no part in that.

observed when flying south on the Thule route— Canada’s greeting to travellers aboard KLM F light 571. Government officials exchanged memos full of circumlo­ cutions (no Latin equivalent exists) but failed to word an appropriation bill, for the destruction of this cairn, that wouldn’t alert the press and embarrass both Par­ liament & Party. It stands today, a monument to human spirit. If life exists on other planets, this may be the first message received from us.


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“Who’s Afraid of Peter the Wolf? n e v e r to ld y a d id I? (S IP) I m e a n it c l e a n s lip p e d m e r o tt e n m in d (S IP S IP) I m e a n . . . . s tr e w th . . . . a s h e il a 'd w a n n a b e o r f h e r lo g . (S IP S IP S IP) Y ou s e e N ev . . . I 'm . . .

A p la y a b o u t P e o p le F o r P e o p le A CT ONE: S c e n e : T h e S ittin g R o o m o f a P a d ­ d in g to n H o m e . C y n th ia a n d N e v ille a r e s itt in g . If it w e r e th e S ta n d in g ro o m o f a P a d ­ d in g to n H o m e C y n th ia a n d N e v ille w o u ld b e S ta n d in g . I t 's T h a t s o r t o f P la y . C Y N T H IA : P a r t i e s p a r t i e s p a r t i e s ..........n o th in g b u t b e a s t ly p a r t i e s . I d o n 't k now w hy I e v e r c a m e h e r e to liv e in b e a s t ly P a d d in g to n ! N E V IL L E : C y n th ia ! Y ou s h o c k m e to th e v e r y c o rp s. D o n 't e v e r l e t m e h e a r you s a y a th in g lik e th a t a g a in . E v e r ! C Y N T H IA : (c o n tin u e s d rin k in g R o t h m a n s D ry M a r ti n i . . . th e e x t r a le n g th fo r f in e r f la v o u r . S he s u d d e n ly s t a r t s u p , th e n f a l ls to h e r k n e e s a t N e v il le 's f e e t. N e v ille i s a l l e a r s . ) N e v ille . (SOB) N e v ille I . . . (SOB SOB) N e v ille I h a v e . . . (SOB SOB SOB) I h a v e s o m e th in g I m u s t t e l l y o u . (SOB) I ' m ................. (C y n th ia b r e a k s dow n. N e v ille s ta n d s u p . H e is d o w n c a s t b u t d e t e r m i n e d to r e m a in u p r i g h t . ) N E V IL L E : C y n th ia . . . . C y n th ia - do you m e a n ? Y ou c a n 't m e a n ? C Y N T H IA : Y e s N e v ille . I t 's t r u e . Y e s y e s y e s (C U R TA IN A C T O N E)

NEV: (w h ip s b a c k to th e c o u c h . T r i p s o v e r A R o th m a n 's F i l t e r T r i p . . . th e e x t r a le n g th f o r f in e r T r ip p in g . . . a n d flip s h is lid .) W hat in th e B lu e B la z e s a r e y o u on a b o u t? A r e y a b y a n y s tr a n g e q u ir k tr y in g to g iv e m e th e d r u m th a t y a . . . (N e v 's lip s c a n s c a r c e l y f r a m e th e w o r d s . . . b u t t h a t 's a n o t h e r s to ry ) THEA: Y e s N ev . . . Y e s y e s y e s y e s . . .

I am .

(C U R TA IN A C T TW O) ACT THREE: N e v ille a n d C y n th ia a r e d i s c o v e r e d in th e D ra w in g R o o m o f t h e i r n ew M a r r a c k v i lle H o m e . They a r e S m o k in g . (N o n - c o n f o r m is ts ! ) C Y N T H IA : O h N e v ille . I do so lo v e i t h e r e . I t 's s o q u a in t a n d u n u s u a l. A ll th e s e d is h y l i t t l e d o u b le - f r o n te d w e a th e r b o a r d v i l l a s . I 'm th a t t h r i l l e d th e y 'v e b e ­ c o m e a l l th e r a g e . N E V IL L E : (s ip p in g f r o m a C a n o f D. A . ) T r e m ­ e n d o u s ly s a tis f y in g a r e a . D o yo u know th e y w e r e b u ild in g h e r e a s la te a s 1964? ( T h e r e is a k n o c k a t th e d o o r . S o m e ­ o n e h a s ra p p e d t h e i r k n u c k le s a g a in s t i t . N e v ille s t a r t s . C y n th ia s t a r t s to th e d o o r . ) C Y N TH IA : (o p e n in g th e d o o r s o t h a t w e c a n s e e w h o 's th e r e ) T h e a a n d N ev . W h a t an u n p le a s a n t s u r p r i s e . H ow v ile to s e e y o u . I s u p p o s e I 'l l h a v e to a s k y o u in ?

A C T TW O : T h e L iv in g R o o m o f a M a r r a c k v i lle H om e. T h e a a n d N ev a r e L iv in g . A ny r e s e m b la n c e to p e r s o n s d e a d is U n f o r tu n a te . THEA: K n it k n it k n it . . . n o th in g b u t r o tt e n k n ittin g . I d o n 't s e e w hy w e c a n 't go a n d liv e in P a d d in g to n . O v e r t h e r e i t 's p a r t i e s p a r t i e s a l l th e w a y a n d n o t a d r o p to d r in k . NEV: B e lt u p T h e a . Y a dunno w h a t y o u 'r e o n a b o u t. T h e y d r in k in P a d d o s a m e a s w e d r in k h e r e i n M a r r a c k v i lle . O n ly f o r d i f f e r e n t r e a s o n s . THEA: (c o n tin u e s k n ittin g R o th m a n 's W ool . . th e e x t r a le n g th f o r f in e r c a r d i e s . S he s u d d e n ly b e l c h e s . ) C r ip e s N ev . . . I

THEA: N o t a t a l l. W e j u s t th o u g h t y o u 'd lik e to h a v e th i s . W e fo u n d it in th e a ttic o f o u r new o ld P a d d in g to n H o m e th a t w e b o u g h t f r o m y o u f o r tw ic e i t s a c ­ tu a l v a lu e . N E V IL L E : W h a t i s i t ? Y ou d o n 't m e a n i t 's a n . . . C o u ld it b e o u r . . . CY N T H IA : N e v ille . I t i s .

Sure, he’s warm But is he elegant? Tasteful? Quietly distinctive?

I t 's c o m e A t L a s t.

BOTH: I t 's O u r B aby! C U R T A IN T H E EN D F IN IS N O T A B E N E : DO N O T P L A Y N A T ­ IO N A L A N T H E M .

Floor Sanding & Polishing

H otfoot to the T o ggery for o u r gear w inter collection. C oolest w oollies, h airiest sh etlan d s, siz z lin g su e d e s-a ll w arm from the draw ing board. C atch on to our range and be ready for the blizzards. A nd if y o u 're going o u tsid e and may be som e tim e th en grab a sled and m ake it a cro ss the crevasse to th e T oggery at Double Bay. Y ou ’11 really w arm to th e wear. Let us be the ones to w atch y o u r eyes light up at

fllajje EUassPi OZ FEBRUARY 1965

Page 18

3 3 6 new sou th h ead road, d o u b le bay — 3 6 - 4 4 1 8


Some Valentines (Feb 14) To Ray

NEW GUINEA A lady we know was elected, By fierce Kukukuku selected; They all came to greet her, Decided to eat her,

To Jackie

from Elizabeth For you this Valentine I ’ve penned, As thru court corridors I wend They say our love was just a flash And that it only came to Ash! But my heart knows and Heaven senses That I ’m your own emanuensis.

from Jack Rubies are red Revenge is sweet Went o ff my head Gave Oswald the heat Critics are rife (Prob'ly get life) Juries are pink Warren’s a fin k Of you I think In Dallas clink.

To S i r A tec from Niki To o n e w h o ’s toppled, f r o m a n o t h e r : A b i l l e t - d o u x f r o m y o u r B i g Brother. I trust, c o m r a d e , y o u r e x i l e ’s c h e e r i e r

And soon had that lady dissected RUSSIA Said Suslov to Khrush “I accuse You o f soft ideological views, Capitalist thinking A nd fa r too much drinking, A nd hogging the overseas news’

G ra n t N ic h o l

To darlings Hilton, Wilding and Fisher from Liz I loved you, then, I loved you not. But Do not think that I ’ve forgot Your passion in our marriage cot (s)

T h a n these sunless salt wastes o f S i b e r i a W h e r e - i f I see a f l o w e r b l o o m M y h e a r t doth ache fo r Home, sweet Hom e. To S i r R o b e r t from Arthur I wi ll love y o u till I die, B u t w h y h a s li fe p a s s e d m e b y ?

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OZ magazine, Sydney, no.17